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 DlSCOROm
Decembet 2016
[     JantlOty 2017 . iForeiKr ilocal, iFore
*8iol. 33 I $0, io I J$6\XZ, 385    I o OQQOQG
254 EAST HASTINGS STREET  604.681.8915
3 THE BALCONIES, THE
■ LIVING & THE BENTON
IROARK BAND
SAFE INJECTION COMEDY
FUNDRAISER
KATHLEEN MCGEE,
BREn MARTIN, SAN AUNG,
MARK HUGHES & MORE
i Cousin ?1
PRLEYg
Wmlers&
COUSIN HARLEY
THE 24TH STREET WAILERS
DOUSE, RED VIENNA,
BRUTES
LUCITERRA'S WHITE
RAVEN REVUE
ANNUAL WINTER SHOWCASE
KYLE MORTON (oftyphoon)
I ANTHONY D'AMATO,
I OLD SOUL REBEL
TEQUILA MOCKINGBIRD
ORCHESTRA
I THE TAILOR, OMNIKA& MORE
IEATRE.COM
m YTdxittogetyour
music heard across the
country?
CiTR and Discorder are doing a Radio mail-out!
(What does that mean?)
(Okay, great! I'm in!)
music@citr.ca
Package #i: 10 Stati
Package #2:30 Stat
Get us your mus
We mail it alldufin
January 15,2017. TpBa of contents
DEC 16/JAN 17
^mtmsm
IT'S ONLY CASTLES BURNING
EDITOR'S NOTE
Jfcature*
06  - WALLGRIN
Musician/goddess,  Bird/Alien
08 - ADELE BARCLAY
Relationships and writing
09 -  JAYKIN
Hip hop Bonus round
16  -  KIMMORTAL
The spirit of collaboration is Kimmortal
18 -  DAD  THIGHS
Working through The Ghosts That I Fear
19 -   GUIDE:   HOW TO PLAY  SHOWS  IN AMERICA
WITHOUT GOING BROKE FIRST
 if you still want to t
as President.
Column* + spore
04 - Wristband:
Music Waste
05 - Textually Active:
Gone   'till November by Lil Wayne
05  - Homegrown Labels:
Gary Cassettes
10 - Real Lire Action
12 - Art Project
by Jeff Ellom
13 - Calendar
14 - Under Review
20 - On The Air:
Story Story Lie
21
23
to the United States with Trump
CONTRIBUTE: 1
all advertlsing@cltr.ca
SOCAN
Program Guide
Charts
Sydney Thome // Discorder Student' Liaison: Claire Bailey // Editor-in-Chief: Brit Bachmann // Under Review
Editor: Jonathan Kew // Real Live Action Editor: Jasper D. Wrinch // Art Director: Ricky Castanedo-Laredo
// Production Assistant: Jules Galbraith // Web Content Coordinator: Katrina Wong // Accounts Manager:
Shea McConkey // Charts: Andy Resto // Discorder On Air Coordinators: Claire Bailey, Matt Meuse, Jordan
Wade // Online Communications Coordinator: Keagan Perlette // Writers: Maximilian Anderson-Baier, Aidan
Danaher, Dora Dubber, Dusty Exner, Josh Gabert-Doyon, Sophie Gray, Sean Harbottle, Courtney Heffernan, R.
Hester, Evangeline Hogg, Tom Ireland, Dylan Joyce, Cail Judy, Shebli Khoury, KVW, Jack Lamming, Theano
Pavlidou, Christine Powell, Lary Shelmal, Elijah Teed, Sam Tudor, Nora Wright, Tintin Yang, Austin Zeller, Anya
november was the cruelest month of 2016, between the results of the U.S. presidential election validating white supremacy, bigotry and rape culture in North
America, to our own, sad realization in Canada that the Liberal promise of electoral reform by the next federal election is but a pipe dream. And we're going to get more
pipelines! Thanks, Justin Trudeau.
In British Columbia, Premier Christy Clark seems to have fulfilled Lawrence Paul
Yuxweluptun's depiction of her as a snake demon in the painting "Christy Clark and the
Kinder Morgan Go-Go Girls." I have a theory that the farcical politics she demonstrated in
2016 is actually delayed revenge for the cancellation of Om The Bridge on National Aboriginal
Day 2015. (Can I get a "Namaste?")
Speaking of downward dogs, how about the members of the CanLit community that signed
UBC Accountable's Open Letter defending the professional reputation of suspected sexual
predator and former UBC professor, Steven Galloway? R.I.P. my respect for Margaret Atwood.
*Sigh* Must all our heroes die in 2016? (That's a rhetorical question because the answer is
obviously: "Yes, all our heroes must die in 2016.")
I have agonized over the topic of this Editor's Note. I posed it as a question on Twitter,
and at the time voters chose "Resistance + solidarity" as the theme. In light of the approval
of the Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion on unceded Indigenous land, and the hard-won
fight against the Dakota Access Pipeline at Standing Rock, I can't speak to that topic right
now. How can I summarize in 600 words what hasn't happened in 500 years? There are radio programs on CiTR 101.9FM, Unceded Airwaves in particular, that have begun to unpack the
meanings and manifestations of resistance and solidarity. I promise, Discorder Magazine will
pick it up in 2017.*
I am suddenly reminded of a song in the seventh episode of the sixth season of Buffy The
Vampire Slayer, "Once More, with Feeling." Specifically, "Where Do We Go From Here," when
the Scooby Gang realize that they are individually broken, but hurt together. That scene is an
overly dramatic comparison to the dissolution of the 'liberal bubble' (I am referencing a teen
vampire television drama, after all), but I think it's fair. It concludes with a steamy make-
out between the characters Buffy and Spike. I am not suggesting we all start kissing, but
there is some advice to glean:
Find the people that you love, and hold them close.
For the December / January issue, Discorder interviewed artists, writers and community
organizers who have different approaches to expressing love for their communities. Our
cover artist, Kimmortal, advocates for the representation of women of colour in local rap;
Adele Barclay shares her most intimate relationships in her new book of poetry, I/I Were In A
Cage I'd Reach Out For You; Dad Thighs reconnects with the emo scene through their upcoming
album, The Ghosts That I Fear, JayKin reconnects with hip hop through Bonus; Gary Cassettes
is victoria's River Spirit of tape releases; Music Waste 2017 strives for inclusivity under new
leadership; and Story Story Lie brings storytellers and comedians together for all-ages performances and radio segments.
Worried that I hadn't packed enough cultural references into this Editor's Note, I chose
the title from a lyric in Neil Young's "Don't Let It Bring You Down." That song, along with "I
Pity The Country" by Willie Dunn and "Repatterning" by Ora Cogan have been incredible anthems of strength over the last few months. Thank you.
P.S. To those folks who are going to ask me about it, Discorder Magazine is not printing any
self-aggrandizing Best of 2016 lists. We leave that for other rags, but you can visit page 23
for a list of the top 100 albums played on CiTR 101.9 FM.
*P.P.S. On a related note, please take our online Readership Survey. We want to know how
to serve you better, and give you a chance to win stuff at the same time. Information on the
opposite page.
is celebrating the release of two new
books of poetry: GREGORY SCOFIELD'S
ADELE BARCLAY'S
nightwood editions   #READNiGHTWOCD WRISTBAND
MUSIC WASTE
interview by Evangeline Hogg //
illustrations by Fiona Dunnett
'' roaching touchy subjects in
I a tight knit community can
be daunting. That being
said, taking on the responsibility of
having an active role in creating positive changes can be absolutely terrifying. Especially when these changes
will have an effect on something as
sacred as say, a long standing music
festival.
Music Waste has been under scrutiny over the past few years. This
particular festival originated in the
late '90s out of disdain towards Music
West, a corporate rock festival that
bands actually had to pay to partake in. It is the love for Vancouver's
local music community that makes
Music Waste different, organized by
teams of volunteers. However, there
have been whispers of its tendency
to be a little (okay, very) cliquey, and
to have a level of exclusivity towards
band selection. Even so, it has been a
treasure among musicians and music lovers alike. With its cheap tickets
and venues scattered across the city,
it has made for over twenty years of
inspiring and entertaining weekend
festivals.
I had the opportunity tc
and chat with Eleanor Wearing, new
Director and committee member of
Music Waste, about what her team is
planning to do to reinvent this beloved festival for 2011.
Discorder Magazine: well,
first off, what is Music Waste to
Eleanor Wearing: l think
Music Waste represents a really
great sampling of what the city
has to offer, in terms of all types
of art. Because it's been going on
for 23 years, it also represents
this desire that has existed in
Vancouver to consistently present
something against mainstream
culture.
0H; Do you find it interesting
that Music Waste is predominantly run by musicians? Do you
think that offers it a certain kind
of strength?
EW: I think that anytime you
have organizers who are also
lot
1, you just get people who can sympathize with
what musicians in this city are
up against and what they have
to go through- So, I think that i
benefits the festival because
of the organizers are mindful of
keeping it easier for the bands,
and also mindful about wanting
to pay bands as much as possibli
DM: Despite the empathy,
though, there has been criticism
about how Music Waste has been
run in the past. Do you think it's
because of how small Vancouver
is, or maybe because
genres tend to lump
together?
£W: ! t1111^it>s
a combination of
both, to be honest. There should
be lots of things
that are going on....
I think the problem is
not necessarily the
people maybe fee} like they have
to be in competition for things.
If you're paying money to put on
shows and you want to make that
money back, you're going to have
concerns about people coming.
I also think with the second
part about what you said, genres
tend to stick together. One of the
things we've seen with Music
Waste is that it has this dominant
garage and psych-rock tinge to
it. That is not the kind of festival
we want to have happen. Music
Waste should not be one pocket of
Vancouver's music and art community, it should be a [survey] of
all the different things that are
happening.
|}JLf; What do you think some
of problems were with how
Music Waste was being organized in the past?
EW:It>s Deen a few years
since there has been an open call
for organizers. People have
been asking [friends]
if they're interested
in helping organize,
which can be great,
but you wind up
working with people from the same
social circles. We just
recently posted on our
website that we're looking for new organizers. It's
important to keep things fresh.
0|f; It sounds like you want
to make it more inclusive. Would
you say you're planning on supporting different types of cultural representation that haven't
been as represented in the past?
£W; Absolutely ... I think by
opening it up to new organizers
and changing the way we do the
selection process will provide
more intention towards showcasing the wide variety of talents
in Vancouver. We hope that [by
bringing in more organizers], it
will create more of a bridge between different c<
0tf; Any final thoughts regarding how these positives
changes are going to effect Music
Waste?
EW:You can Put on a sreat
event and also be totally mindful of these issues. I think it's
time for us to grow up a little
bit and get more serious and pay
attention. It's going to be more
interesting, and it's going to be
more diverse, and it's going to
inspire people to maybe pick up
an instrument or apply to help
organize.
Learn more about Music Waste
and how to get involved at
musicwaste.ca, or follow them
on social media. And check out
the Winter Waste Fundraiser,
happening Friday, January 20 at
Pat's Pub with Mirepoix, Cindy
Vortex, Maneater, Hazy, Co-op
and Devours. TEXTUALLY ACTIVE
GONE 'TILL NOVEMBER BY LIL WAYNE
review by Maximilian Anderson-Baier // illustrations by
Olivia De Liberto
Boredom and frustration:
two emotions both Lil
Wayne and the reader
experience during the course
of Gone 'Till November. Written
during his 2010 prison sentence
on the infamous Rikers Island
(New York City's main prison
complex), this Lil Wayne memoir aims to detail the pains of
incarceration. Chapters like "Still
Trying to Believe That It's Real"
and "More Frustration" act as a
window into the world of an imprisoned Weezy.
Given Riker's notoriety as a
nasty and abusive place, one
would expect a base level of
reflection or anger from Lil
Wayne. Before reading this
memoir, I held in my mind
a certain image: Lil Wayne
burrowing deep into his soul
as he fills with rage over the
faulty drug and gun laws
that imprisoned him. Hell,
I was even up for some loveable
jailhouse drama a la Orange is the
New Black.
But unfortunately, fame destroys any possibility of reflection, friendship or even rage.
Incarcerated at the peak of his
career, Lil Wayne's time in prison
is dictated by the brightness of
his star; a fact driven home by
a host of high profile visitors
(Diddy, Kanye and Nikki Minaj
to name a few). Though Captain
attests that Lil Wayne "definitely won't be getting the celebrity treatment" (4), he is handled with a delicacy and respect
afforded to none of the other
HOMEGROWN LABELS
GARY CASSETTES
words by Sam Tudor // illustrations by Graham MeFie
fvery summer, the city,
of Victoria hosts
the Eventide Music
Series, an all-ages concert
program that takes place in
the strange Modernist pavilion of Centennial Square.
The series features a number
of local alternative acts perfoi
big every Thursday from June to
September. With funding from
the city, attendance is completely free and open to the public. Speaking to the music, there
is a trend towards the idiosyncratic, the psychedelic and, as the
website states, the "post-angular." At one such show last summer, the evening's lineup, White
Poppy, Sister Blanche, Kye Plant
and Old Girl, was all of those
things. But the performers shared
something else in common: every band on the lineup had released their music through Gary
Cassettes, an independent label
based in Victoria.
Despite the seemingly pervasive influence of Gary Cassettes,
the label keeps an exceptionally low profile — quietly putting out tapes to little fanfare. ,
Tasked with writing about Gary
Cassettes and having a distinct
lack of any sort of information, I began
what amounted to
a scavenger hunt,
and a not unrewarding one at
that.
The list of Gary
Cassettes alumni is
impressive. In addition to
those aforementioned bands, Gary
Cassettes boasts releases from
NXC HXGHXS, Mourning Coup,
and Kristian North, to name a
few. Releases are predominantly
from Victoria, but have come
from as far away as Japan and
Brussels. The list of tape releases
is the last easy thing to discover
about Gary Cassettes. They don't
have a website, they don't submit to blogs, and I learn that they
don't seek publicity in any way.
When I get in touch with Gary
Cassettes, they are happy about
the pitch but politely cite a strict
zero interview policy, instead,
suggesting I might have better
luck asking someone else. They
sign off on the article by providing a list of artists I should try to
contact. So, I do.
Johnny Zithers released
his self-titled album on Gary
Cassettes. "There are other labels
■s. On Weezy's first day,
for instance, two female guards
are suspended for trying to visit
him. Ever the optimist, Wayne
remarks, "Maybe there will be
some groupie in this bitch, after
all" (6). Similarly, the other inmates are eager to please. They
ply Wayne with gifts and praise.
In a desperate attempt to gain his
respect, some inmates even offer
up fake back-stories of gangster glory. Even Riker's top brass
are swayed by Wayne's fame
and wealth. When ants invade
his cell, Wayne complains to the
Captain and is given a new one
(75). And in moments of conflict,
when Wayne finds himself in a
yelling argument on the yard, the
offending party is simply transferred to another prison. Weezy is
never made to feel uncomfortable
or vulnerable. Fame can penetrate
any wall.
^^m   nsulated from true tor-
I   ment, Lil Wayne is left
^P   only with boredom. Days
begin to lengthen. Whole pages
are filled with descriptions of
movies. "We watched Shutter
Island," Wayne comments, "It
was cool!" (75). His only qualms
arise when someone is watching
based in Victoria, but none really capture the Vancouver Island
scene like Gary," says Zithers.
"Victoria is a place where you can
have old men playing techno and
children playing grindcore on the
same bill. Gary started nurturing recordings from these acts
and solidifying them as cassettes.
If you see a weird suitcase filled
with tapes at a show in Victoria,
it's Gary."
This is a common theme
when I talk to artists about Gary
Cassettes — the mysterious label
is repeatedly cited as a unifying
force in an already tight knit and
decidedly strange underground
music scene. "Gary Cassettes
is definitely a positive catalyst for merging people together
in the Victoria music scene,"
says Crystal Dorval, a.k.a. White
Poppy. "It's real and there's no
bullshit. It's 100 per cent about
the music, community and supporting musicians."
Tom Whalen, a.k.a.
Tommy Tone of
Gary Cassettes
alumni New Vaders,
points out another key strength
of the label: "[Gary
Cassettes] are righting the eternally
wrong idea that experimental music belongs to boring sad men," says Whalen.
Mourning Coup, Sister Blanche,!
White Poppy and Old Girl
all feature content wholly
Tyler Perry or if it's raining outside and he is stuck indoors. "I
can't even see the laziest moth-
erf ucka on the planet liking jail"
(81), Wayne bemoans. He is far
from content, but still okay. The
only time he seems beaten and
dejected is in a seven-word chapter entitled "Bad Day," in which
he states on page 83: "No writing, prayer, bible, sleep. Another
one." For a mere moment, things
seem to have taken an interesting
turn. What has devastated Weezy?
Is it another inmate? Maybe a
fight? Or perhaps a degrading
trip to the prison psychologist?
But no, the source of his
misery comes from outside the prison walls.
As Wayne writes in the
following chapter, "I'm       a    h
used to arguing with my    ■   -   j
girl on a daily basis... 1
but finding out that she ™   I
fucked Drake was the absolute worst" (85).
Wayne, however, is
still desperate to take
a lesson away from his
months in monotonous
purgatory. This urge to
reflect probably arises
from feelings of guilt.
How can he possibly
written, recorded and produced
by women. On this note, Dorval
says, "I'm very proud to be affiliated ... I've seen the label go from
just an idea to the well functioning machine that it is now ... it's
very cool to see the progression."
Chandra Melting-Tallow, or
Mourning Coup, has her own
perspective of Gary Cassettes that
is one part music label, one part
angelic conscience: "Let me tell
you the tale about a little label
that lives just over yonder hill.
Gary Cassettes has really good
snacks, Gary Cassettes is basically
family, Gary Cassettes is also a
total workaholic. When I was trying to quit smoking I asked them
for a smoke they looked me dead
in the eye and were like 'You
sure sure about that?' and I said
'Maybe.'"
learn a little
bit more about the label
with each band. It is run
by one person. That
person is sometimes
called Morgan, and
sometimes called
Gary. The label's two
year anniversary is
March 2017. But, (and
with a full awareness of the hackneyed
nature of this forthcoming statement) I
come to realize that
the details might
not be as impera-
I thought. I
leave his adoring fans feeling
so unfulfilled after reading his
memoir? So, just as Aleksandr
Solzhenitsyn in his novel A Day
in the Life of Ivan Denisovich attempts to describe the perseverance of the human soul in a
Stalinist Gulag, Lil Wayne looks
towards the inspiring: "I've always thought I needed things like
being high with my niggas, a
buggati [sic], a dope-ass crib or
some big booty bitches to be creative. But once that was taken
away from me, my creativity was
put to the ultimate test [...] and I
passed like a mothafucka" (157)-
%-
'WJt,
check myself for getting hung
up on particulars, when a pretty
diverse music scene has just
been revealed to me. It makes
a Vancouverite want to hop a
ferry and go check it out. That
could well have been Gary's point
in avoiding an interview. Then
again, maybe they just didn't
want to talk to me.
When your main focus is pocket-sized tapes, traded from hand
to hand on an island, there isn't
much need for grand publicity schemes. However, there are
definite hints of continued production, and possibly even expansion. Zithers notes the development of Gary Cassettes in the
past few years: "Maybe it started
as a sampling of the weird and
welcoming Vancouver Island music scene, but now Gary is set to
be one of Canada's most eclectic cassette labels." With this in
mind, I draw one main conclusion
from my search — it would be
smart to keep listening for Gary
Cassettes, despite how quiet or
evasive the sound might be.
We dare you to find more information about Gary Cassettes.
TEXTUALLY ACTIVE / HOMEGROWN LABELS I ^ifii
SIREN SONGS
by TmSin Yang //photos by Pat Valade
illustration by D. ITIagee
"3 uiant to juxtapose beauty ano bissonance.
BM ^^m  've always had the
■ ambition to take
^P [music] seriously,
I've always wanted to go at it all
out," says Tegan Wahlgren when
I ask her what it was like to take
her fiddle and loop pedal from
a passion project, to recording
a full-length album. A project with earnest beginnings in
2014, Wahlgren has always had
big plans for her music under
the moniker of Wallgrin. Over
the course of the interview, my
discussion with Tegan drifts between the integrity of pop music,
creating a genuine artistic practice, and mythology.
Tegan uses Wallgrin to explore sound, be it screeching or
harsh violin riffs, the more experimental the better. Her new
album, Bird/Alien (to be released
early 2017) plays on unconventional noises with fantastical
lyrics, providing listeners a distinct sonic experience. The album
plays on her own interpretation
of a sci-fi aesthetic, and is heavily based in motifs of mythology. Often beginning experimentally, she starts with melodies,
then layers walls of sound, then
adds lyrics. It builds a portrait of
Wallgrin and the mythological
women whom she channels.
Taking inspiration from musicians like Bjork and Kate Bush,
Wallgrin isn't afraid to wear
her influences on her sleeve.
Especially in her first single from
Bird/Alien, "Ae'aea," Wallgrin
serves up some lively string motifs accompanied by a drum beat
and of course, her ever^urdnjlg.; .
wispy alto. "I want to juxtapose
beauty and dissonance, that's
what my main focus is right
now," says Wallgrin.
Bird/Alien, so it would seem, is
a continuation of the experimental combination of sounds that
began with Wallgrin's self-titled EP from June 2015. This time
around, Wallgrin is drawing on
ruthless harpies, banshees, and
sirens as reference points, paying
homage to these underappreciated beasts. A reclamation of the
"shrill witchy woman," Wallgrin
weaves their personas in her music, as ever-relevant images and
engrossing unsung tales:
"Often people use these words
to discredit women, but what
draws me to most to [these]
mythological figures is their
ruthlessness ... and I want to give
these women back a bit of their
power." It's clear that in order to
make music that encompasses the
nuances of femininity while also
reclaiming the images of merciless, powerful women requires
someone who is in their very essence, a lover and supporter of
impassioned female figures.
"I feel like I'm getting braver,
if I want to have this authentic artistic practice... I need to
say what I want to say," explains Tegan. With this goal in
mind, Wallgrin praises the blunt-
ness of pop music, stating that
non-mainstream music will soon
move towards sincere and di-
rect lyricism. To Tegan, however,
songwriting is just second nature and is a "fluid process." She
expresses an interest in writing
without the need to hide behind
the facade of metaphors she finds
to be a little too "safe," suggesting perhaps there is something
more to be desired considering the ambiguity of most lyrics.
Maybe the approach of just rolling with whatever intense and
sincere emotion felt is the most
underrated quality in pop song-
writing. Tegan explains, "People
appreciate that kind of honesty
and vulnerability ... I want to be
so honest [in my music]."
^^m n mid-November 2016,
I Wallgrin released a music
MkW video for her first single
off Bird/Alien. Under the direction
of Matt Leaf, the video was inspired by the mythology of sirens
filmed through the perspective of
a woman in love with the siren.
Filmed in Lynn Canyon, the video
clashes nature with the imagery of space and otherworldly
experiences.
Speaking to whether or not
Wallgrin will incorporate more
visual content in the future,
Tegan says, "I'd love to do more
music videos, but I want to figure
out other visual, audio-visual immersive ways to express myself
... I don't know what it is yet...
it needs to be something more."
To this end, Wallgrin is looking
to continue making music under
the lens of a fuller, more experimental, all-encompassing artistic
practice.
Releasing Bird/Alien is quite
literally only the beginning for
Wallgrin. A seasoned musician
with experience in classic, traditional, and experimental music,
she is a force to watch out for.
Wallgrin will be releasing Bird/
Alien in early 2017. Listen to other recordings at wallgrin.bandcamp.com,
and follow Wallgrin on social media
for videos and more.
JOIN A RADIO
COLLECTIVE AT (TiTR
101.9FM! Monday December 26th & Tuesday Deceiper 27th
A1IDIOPILE
Records & Accessories     records & cd-s       Records & CD's
2016 Commercial Drive, Vancouver, BC   Ph: 604.253.7453   www.Audiopile.ca impacted by the loss of someone
so adept at using words to convey the complexities of human
experience and relationships.
In many ways, Adele's incredible new poetry book If I Were In
A Cage I'd Reach Out For You communicates similar ideas about
human connection, and the
messiness of all types of love.
"I was in New York on a research trip for my Ph.D, and I
took a poetry workshop with the
poet Brenda Shaughnessy. It was
life changing," says Barclay when
I ask her about
how the book's
beginnings. "I
a handful
of poems, but
words by Nora Wright // photos by Jennifer Van Houten     1 ^^ feeling
Illustrations by Sharon Ko out of steP- ^
my Ph.D took
Adele Barclay!
W«RI$ IN THE »ARK*
Dn my way to meet Adele
Barclay, she texts me to
say she's running late. I
don't think much about her message, too distracted by the news
that a beloved Canadian poet has
just died, and the ongoing political climate in America. So distracted, in fact, that I don't consider that perhaps Adele has been
over. I wanted to write a book but
I didn't really know if it would
happen or if I could, and then I
took this workshop, and [Brenda]
really believed in my writing. It
jolted me."
In addition to spending time
in New York, Adele has also lived
in Montreal, Victoria, Vancouver,
and has spent a great amount of
time moving from place to place.
surroundings." She continues,
"I'm interested and sensitive to
how space shapes our relationships to each other. The poems
[in the book] are to people, but
they are also to people in specific places, or people in different places, and trying to build
that metaphorical bridge, despite
distance."
The connections that Adele has
to those in her life is a compelling
theme within her book, displayed
most prominently by a collection
of six poems titled 'Dear Sara'
which Adele refers to as a sort of
'spine' of the collection. These
poems invoking an incredibly
intimate space, giving readers a
glimpse into Adele's world.
"I like the direct address to a
person," she says, when I ask her
about the personal poems. "A lot
of my work is informed by people
and relationships, and so much
of that is language. You have this
very specific world with people,
out of language, it's very rich and
lush and idiosyncratic. These poems are like letters but they're
also odes to that world I've built
with someone, and the language
and vocabulary and texture of
that relationship. There's some-
"I think poetry can hold those weird paradoxical
affected by the same things.
"That's why I asked if we
could meet later!" Adele proclaims when I bring up the poet.
"I just found out, and I was
like, 'I have to go listen to some
Leonard Cohen music, I'm not
ready to leave the house!'"
As a poet, it's understandable that Adele would be so
And while moving can be physically and emotionally grueling,
Adele has found ways to channel
it into her writing.
When I ask how she feels her
location influences her work,
Adele says, "I think the book is
really obsessed with place, and
how humans are tethered not
only to each other, but to their
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MADELE BARCLAY
thing about writing poetry that
allows me to get at the things
about a relationship that I can't
really express in prose. Things
that are more irresolvable. I think
poetry can hold those weird par-
' adoxical strings, things that don't
fit the normative scripts."
I ask Adele if it was strange or
scary to include these seemingly
intimate poems, and she laughs.
"It was definitely weird,' I was
a little anxious. I thought [the
Sara poems] were these weird
things I was writing for my
friend, but people responded really strongly to them, so I was
like 'Okay well, I guess they like
our love.'"
Biscussing
this public
display of
affection, I'm reminded of the ways
people show affection for one another
over social media.
I find my own impulsive reaction to
this is often negative, wondering why
people feel the need
for a public, rather
than private declaration. Talking with
Adele, I question this
reaction.
"Seeing models of
love and behaviour
that are good is not
a bad thing," she says. "Just because [the poems] are a performance of emotional vulnerability
doesn't degrade that emotional
vulnerability. I think the poems also don't gloss over the
bad, or the messier bits, and that
is something that I'm always
thinking about. How do you also
show the messy, and the low moments, or perform vulnerability?
How do you perform the range of
emotions and not just the good
stuff?"
These are tough questions,
and given the current state of the
world, it's tempting to want to
hide from them. How do we focus on the messier, darker things,
without getting lost within them,
without losing hope? For Adele,
the answer is in poetry, and considering how it can be taken up
as a political act.
"I think of poetry as incredibly magical. There is logic to it,
but there is something irrational to it. I see it as a counter
spell to neoliberalism, [which
is] kind of what got us into this
mess; this neoliberal, patriarchal, white supremacist, mess.
[There are] these systems that
want to quantify and own everyone and everything. Poetry isn't
interested in that. Poetry resists,
it's outside of that scope, because it's not super profitable. It
doesn't try to resolve things, it's
something that is at home with
messiness and paradoxes ... In
this fraught, capitalist society,
relishing in interpersonal relationships, celebrating non-normative relationships and scripts,
I think that is political. I think
of it as radical kinship or radical
kindness. Saying those things out
loud as well, being public about
emotional vulnerability, I think
can be political, right? Or at least
I hope so."
I hope so, too.
If I Were In A Cage I'd Reach
Out For You is out now on Nightwood
Editions. You can purchase a copy at
nightwoodeditions.com, or at your local bookstore. Waiting for J ay Kin
WORDS BY PoRA PUSBER // PHOTOS BY JENNIFER Van HoUTEN
// ILLUSTRATIONS BY FRANCESCA tfELCOURT
^fVVaiting for Jay Kin in a
IBjJ Bean, I didn't know
^^^Pwhat to expect. He had
released his last album, Sneakers
and Video Games, four years ago
before moving to Seoul for a sabbatical from the industry, and only
just started dropping songs for his
upcoming release, Bonus. JayKin
began rapping when he was still
in high school and his last full release, Sneakers and Video Games 2,
was a success, earning him recognition in Japan and South Korea.
However, his new tracks focus on
the beats more than his old work
did. When he was just starting
out, he sounded like the old school
East Coast artists he looks up to,
and the reinvention of his style
since then is a blueprint of the
genre's evolution. When JayKin
started out, he was nicknamed
"The Kid" and later he started
going by "Vancouver's nicest."
But the man I was about to meet
doesn't go by anything right now.
JayKin bought a small coffee
because anything more would
have made him wired. We got
started right away. Bonus is
coming out sometime in late
December or early January 2017,
and it will be JayKin's official re-
introduction to hip hop. He has
been collaborating with artists
from the States and Korea as well
as local features, with a large part
of the album being produced by
Dave Fields.
Speaking to his work ethic,
JayKin also has an EP coming out
a little after he's settled back into
the Vancouver hip hop commu- .
nity. It's a funk-heavy collab EP
with Vancouver producer UTURN
that's lighter and more experimental than the full-length
Bonus, taking his sound in a completely different direction. Day +
Nite will distance JayKin from his
adopted genre, allowing Bonus to
stylistically ease JayKin into his
revival with a fresh, more contemporary sound for JayKin in hip
hop.
JayKin is decidedly classic.
There's a tension between his admiration of Jay Z, Wu-Tang, and-
Nas, and creating music for contemporary consumers. His genre
is less static than it used to be.
JayKin explains, "I'm really trying
to push the bar to make something different, rather than kind
of keeping the sound that I've
always respected and adored. It's
always in my heart, but I think
as an artist you should kind of
push the envelope." JayKin's more
selective about some of the new
music that's coming out. All over
the world, but in Canada especially, artists are replicating the
Drake-made Toronto sound and
JayKin encouraged the community
to use that as a foundation and
create their own style
But Bonus is honest and brutal.
Lyrically, the album explores the
feelings and conditions that led
JayKin to South Korea, the much
needed break from music and
Vancouver. "You know life kind
of hits you," JayKin explains, "I
was just at a really low time in my
life. I was just at a space where
it was really hard to create."
Being in Seoul was inspiring, but
it was hard to put pen to paper.
Watching his friends and peers in
Korea find creative success put the
process of producing this album in
perspective and made its realization clearer.
JayKin visibly slalomed out
of the coffee shop when I
asked him about his faith.
He emphasized religion's role in
keeping him grounded and humble, but also mentioned its significant stylistic capacity. JayKin
doesn't swear in his music,
which, in hip hop, is rare. "I used
to be a bit wild in my early early
stuff, the stuff I used to say is
insane. But my dad took a listen
to it and he said to try to be a bit
more creative and, you know, if
you're angry in a song, find different words. You don't have to
say it like everybody else." JayKin
also chooses his lyrics carefully.
"1995 is MAJOR" is stick-
ered all over JayKin's social media, but that math doesn't make
any sense. JayKin is just over
30-years-old, so the slogan is at
least eight years off, and the year
1995.didn't mark any special release dates. JayKin explained that
it started with a fan from the
United States reaching out while
he was in South Korea. "He asked
if I was still making music and a
lot of people asked me that at the
time but he just kept on messaging me and messaging me. He told
me about the scene." The group
is a collective creative platform
for artists of about ten people
with similar tastes from all over
the States, where JayKin's the
only Canadian. They talk about
everything that falls within their
interests. It was a timely discovery for JayKin: "[1995] really
seemed to fit in with [the themes
of] Sneakers and Video Games; the
anime, the video games, the fashion, everything. So we had a lot of
common ground."
Video games kept coming up
throughout our conversation.
Artists featured on Bonus connected with JayKin through gaming, and the artwork is adapted
from Street Fighter II, although
the album itself has nothing to
do with video games. But JayKin
loves video games. He had a visceral reaction when I asked about
his favourites and the future of
gaming. Like his taste in hip hop,
his favourites are classic arcade
games, but he's excited about
what's been coming out. JayKin's
hoping to get involved in the development of a video game, either
musically or narratively.
J left JayKin at the JJ Bean
over an hour after we began talking.The meeting
had felt more like a conversation than an interview. JayKin
is incredibly talented, which a
cursory listen to his discography
would convince anyone, but what
isn't as obvious from his work is
how genuinely down to earth and
honest he is. Bonus is going to
be a cadaver of JayKin's emotion
and experience for fans to dissect;
it's going to be raw and, at times,
overwhelming.
Visitsoundcloud.com/JayKin to
listen to JayKin's previous releases,
and keep an eye out for Bonus coming
out late December or early January. Heal £i*e
fiction
ANIMAL COLONY VOL.1: GUITAR
NOVEMBER 9 / JAMES BLACK GALLERY
^J haven for burgeoning local experimental artists of all media — wheth-
Hi er it's visual, auditory or Interactive art — the James Black Gallery
Introduced their first edition of the Animal Colony series on November 9. The
improvisational musical exhibition featured five local guitarists from different musical backgrounds: Kyle Goddard, Evancory Taypaywaykejick, Ricky
Castanedo-Laredo, Hieg Khatcherlan, and Miggy Hawes.
Held In the lobby of the JBG, the guitar 'meisters' sat In chairs at the front of
the room, forming a U around the dozens of flashing lights coming from the colorful stompboxes and effects pedals that decorated the floor. With an average
of seven pedals per guitarist (at least), Its safe to assume that there was several
thousands of dollars worth of equipment laid out In front of the audience.
Goddard, Taypaywaykejick and Hawes placed their cube-amps on pillars, Just above their heads, while the crowd sat on the floor, packed tightly
towards the back of the lobby, causing some to overflow Into the hallway.
Once the music began, all In attendance devoted their glossy-eyed focus to
the show. On the wall behind the guitarists, a projector flashed black-and-
white scenes Juxtaposing an array of faces of all variations. Each scene lasted no more than four seconds, skipping from a close-up of a woman In the
passenger seat of a car, to the head of a monster rising up from under the
water In a murky swamp, to the withered face of an older man with dreadlocks looking at the camera In curiosity.
The guitarists' symphony of effects pedals created a roaring ambient
wall of sound. They demonstrated their impressive talent In harmonizing
with each other utilizing feedback manipulation, looping, delays, tremo-
le catalyst
Khatcherlan began to show a bit of leadership, as h
from one aural movement to another. It was very refreshing to see a guitarist
exhibition without the focus on technical guitar proficiency, but to instead to
showcase their knowledge of additional guitar technology. I must also make
note of Castanedo-Laredo and his very unique Sleepdrone pedal with eight
separate effect knobs, used to sustain and alter frequencies amid the rau-
cousness (in a good way).
For at
X JBG as
Morrison — the person responsible for creating Animal Colony — tri
Khatcherian's attention to wrap up the show a few times, to.no avail,
rd Khatcherlan laugh and say, "Sorry, I wasn't lo<
And thus, the literal definition of 'shoegaze' was the best word to describe
it: for the entirety of the show, the guitarists stared down at those bright lights
on the pedals under their feet, constantly reevaluating which combinations
were going to make the coolest sound. If you're looking for a new guitar pedal, definitely ask one of these meisters first. —Aldan Danaher
DAUGHTERS / THE BODY / LOMA PRIETA
NOVEMBER 12 / COBALT
Jf you're someone that has kept their finger even remotely on the pulse
of alternative music, you are as aware as I am that we are currently going through an era of reunions. Cult favourites have come out of hiding
and shaken off whatever cobwebs they've collected In their years of Inactivity to take on the proverbial road once again, maybe even write some new
these reunions successes (at least for the artists), I remain skeptical about
this new trend. The few good ones are near life affirming experiences, but
most fall somewhere between passable and almost laughably disappointing.
So, when I heard Daughters would be reuniting, I wasn't sure how to feel.
One of the most Innovative and dangerous bands in noise / grind / art rock /
whatever-the-fuck-genre-it-is-Daughters-play reuniting after nearly a decade?
For better or for worse, this I had to see.
I got there early. Opening act Loma Prieta is one of my favourite bands
and I was excited to see them play some new songs live. Needless to say
they did not disappoint. Their live show was as incendiary and moving as
ever, flawlessly executing their unique brand of emotionally charged and dissonant post-hardcore with the same energy as their recorded material suggests. Much to my enjoyment, most of their set came from their 2015 mas-
terwork, Self Portrait, sprinkling other gems from their now extensive discog-
raphy throughout. A welcome surprise was in the Inclusion of guest vocalist
Josh Staples on couple of songs, who complimented the quartet's otherwise
abrasive vocals with more melodious flourishes.
Loma Prieta left the stage to grand applause, which was almost surprising considering the room's passiveness towards the performance while
It was happening. As some people withdrew Into the back of the room, a
strange mixture of long hairs, goths, and people sporting baggy hoodies
started to amass at the front of the stage.
After setting up their literal tower of speakers behind them, The Body
was ready to perform. They went right into it, blasting the audience with near
deafening levels of feedback. The crowd welcomed the crushing sound,
banging their heads and slamming their palms against the stage at the beat
of the kick. Their performance was on point, and having never seen them
live, I was Impressed with the mastery they demonstrated over the challenging genre they crafted for themselves. My only point of critique would be that
they could have sacrificed a bit of their loudness for a better mix. Long time
collaborator, Chrissy Wolpert Joined them for this particular stretch of dates
and her performance was hardly audible amidst the chaos which was a
shame. This was In part Intentional, I'm sure, but having her a little higher In
the mix would have made their set exceptional.
The Body took apart their mountain of equipment and the stage was left
generally bare once again save for a pretty standard backline. Daughters
casually took the stage, vocalist Alexis Marshall toting a particularly flattering two-piece suit. I was anxious—would this prove to be another bullshit
reunion, a band half-assedly attempting to reclaim their former stardom?
Daughters quickly dismissed my skepticism, wasting no time with pleasantries and going straight Into fan-favourite The Dead Singer." Marshall climbed
up onto the monitor and met his rabid fanbase at the threshold of the stage
like a messiah addressing his congregation. He met the explosive energy of
the crowd with his own brand of aggressive punk showmanship and ft was
obvious that there was no veneer to his antics. Though this show was taking place at the Cobalt, I felt Instantly transported back to the beer soaked
basements that Daughters had dominated tor the better part of their career.
Sure, there was a stage but Daughters pushed past that often Indomitable
barricade with relative ease, with the better part of the band consistently at
brink and only to be outdone by Marshall constantly dipping head first into
the frenzied hands below.
Daughters tore through a dizzying set of songs ranging from their first
album Canada Songs to their critically acclaimed self-titled, laying waste to
the audience at every opportunity. Between Marshall shoving his mic down
his throat during the break in "Daughters Spelled Wrong" and
tarist Nicholas Andrew Sadler move his hands so fast ft made
if they would disappear leav-
lin. The crowd began to fill in during a cover of Petula Clark's "Downtown."
Her rendition took the Joy out of the song, leaving It with imperative lyrics that
were so hopeful they became desperate. Another stand-out was "Ae'aea,"
which began by Wallgrin repeating a voweled utterance and tapping her
throat to create guttural cuts.
Her live looping alternated between vocals and bursts of violin. Looping
usually makes me uneasy for performers; most other forms of performance
are transient, ephemeral but the heard history of looping ads weight to mistakes — I get similar feelings watching people slacklining. But Wallgrin's exe-
Francesca Belcourt began the next set with "Ballad of November."
Belcourt's approach to loops were less organic, at first using just a synth and
Jlngur
Belcourt threw up a hand and almost recklessly grabbed her guitar. Slow fin-
gerpicking turned Into a tilting, hard strum. Throughout the set, she used her
voice playfully, at one point using a voice modular to create a false baritone.
For her last song, she came into the audience to dance.
Before Jenny Hval's set began, the room smelled like flowers as I made
my way to the front of the venue. Hval came onto the stage in a silk robe.
She had Havard Volden accompanying her on a modular synthesizer, wearing a matching robe. Throughout the performance, she wandered around the
stage, eyes mostly closed, settling in one spot for a while before moving on.
Early on, she reached down to the ground, grabbing a handful of something
and rubbing it between her fingers. Flower pedals I realized, and I saw that
they were spread over the stage. It comforted me to know that I wasn't crazy
— it did smell good.
"Sometimes I change my thoughts, you know when that happens," Hval
thought outloud between songs. "Sometimes I wish that would happen to millions of people." Still with her eyes closed, she performed her next song in a
whisper, holding her IPhone up to the microphone to play voice recordings.
During "That Battle Is Over," which laments the death of feminism and social-
The risks and experimentation of the performances offered hope, or at
least a way to channel our distress. Francesca Belcourt was donating the
proceeds from her merch to Planned Parenthood, and after using her phone
to play the voice recordings, Hval mentioned that her last search had been
a Yelp of Trump Tower in New York. She was waiting t<
d reviews. "Protest in every way possible," si
—Christine Powell
lave thought
they would be selling out the Cobalt and reasserting
and destructive bands In noise rock?
Somewhere in the middle of their set they played a new song, "Long Road,
No Turns," alluding to something larger than a string of reunion shows.
Needless to say I am beyond excited, reunion skepticism be damned.
— R. Hester
JENNY HVAL / FRANCESCA BELCOURT /
WALLGRIN
• DISCORDER HIP-HOP SHOWCASE AND
• FUNDRAISER W/ SOMETHING AUGUST
: / SPOTTY JOSIF / FREEMAN YOUNG /
I R.O.M.I. / MISSY D / SO LOKI / CRIME &
:TREASONS DJ
# NOVEMBER 18 / MEDIA CLUB
NOVEMBER 16 / BILTMORE CABARET
^J week and a day after the election, the a
r of the Biltmore was still
^B heavy. The audience felt raw from the e
motional exhaustion of the
week, which turned into misplaced anger — I i
advertently offended some
one for "dressing like I was from the "90s," and
one person next to me men-
tloned that the feedback through Jenny Hval's
set was "ruining [their] night.
Wallgrin, the first act, played without shoes
on and leaned over her vto-
;s
o Loki's Sam Lucia was silenced. Mid set, his mic cut out complete-
im voiceless on stage. Instead of shrinking back from
f the sea of eyes on him, he jumped forward onto the monitor and literally
# screamed through the rest of "Birthday," supported by the voices of the CiTR
• and Discorder community. This moment seemed to embody the spirit of the
* Discorder Hip Hop Showcase and Fundraiser: Vancouver hip hop was not
Something August kicked off the proceedings, although I'll be honest at
ie beginning I thought I might have walked into the wrong gig. The duo car
\REAL LIVE ACTION onstage in cult-like garb, hoods and all, and settled the congregation In with
clattering chords and bass that brought to mind church organs and U.K. warehouse raves. With no audience Interaction, they let the music do the talking,
marrying hip hop, R&B and goth in an unholy matrimony that worked for some
songs and didn't for others. Ultimately they were uncompromising on sound,
setting the experimental and enthusiastic tone for good things to come.
Spotty Joslf appeared soon after, cutting through the layers of atmo-.
sphere and vibes cultivated by the Crimes & Treasons DJs with no-bullshit
bars and beats. His isolation onstage (with no visible producer) and In the
music might have hurt a lesser artist, but his free and open style and lyrically
dense cuts put his talents at the forefront of the mix.
Freeman Young's voice dripped like honey off his mellow production, and
despite his awkward placing in the middle of the night, he made It his own with
a unique presence and confidence. He moved and rhymed easy, like he had
nothing to prove (something perhaps reflected in his short set) bringing to mind
a hybrid of D'Angelo with the skittish flow of a less aggro Busta Rhymes.
R.O.M.I. reminded me of D.R.A.M. a little, not just because of the deftly
used acronym, but also the happy-trappy style they cultivated performing.
The beats for sure were dark, sometimes sparse, almost never 'happy,' but
the energy the MC's brought to the table was infectious and wholly captivating. The lyrics were thoroughly explicit, but their sound and personalities
were readily digestible. Their angelic voices perfectly Juxtaposed the sordid
tales they spoke of, the loveless situations. They soared over the brooding
Missy D threatened to steal the entire show — her status as penultimate
act didn't stop her from rocking the Media Club for almost forty minutes, without so much as a pause for breath. Too Many Feelings," the single off her
debut album, was the song I screamed back as If I'd known It my whole life,
even though I'd only stumbled across it through Discorder the week before.
She left the stage to rapturous applause — the reaction of a headllner. And
we still had So Loki to go.
They were a revelation. Their music was at once vulnerable and pulverising, melodic and distorted. The only constant was the energy of Sam Lucia
contrasted with the almost calm presence of Natura, grounding Lucia's yelps
and screams and whispers In a soundscape of jittery synths and pounding percussion. During the quieter moments of the set, Lucia seemed to be
speaking In tongues, freestyling sordid somethings to a choir of nervous
laughter from the audience, whose laughter quickly subsided to quiet reverence. I can't even remember leaving the Media Club, the effect was so
In their piece c
n So Loki
VICE
sailed it "Vance
uver's Fragile Hip-Hop
cene." However
seeing th
klneti
: electricity flow through the vei
s of each
srson, performe
produce
andp
ying punter al
ke at the Discord
ar show-
ise, It didnt feel fragile. It
eltrad
Ml. It felt like h
ome.lt felt like it
could nev-
break. In the w
>rds of Freeman
roung: "keep c
n making your own fucking
jcisions... we ne
ed CiTR."
And CITR and Discorder needs them.
—Sean Harbo
HANNAH EPPERSON/HOLY HUM/
OMHOUSE
NOVEMBER 18 / FOX CABARET
^J fter touring parts of Europe, the USA and Canada, Hannah Epperson
■ ■ returned home. The Fox filled up quickly to see the violin extraordinaire play her first Vancouver show in what seems like years.
Toronto's Omhouse kicked the evening off with a set of dreamy, jangly
guitar songs and harmonies reminiscent of Fleet Foxes. For two men playing
electric guitars, their sound was surprisingly fresh. In a genre filled with dreary look allkes, frontman Steven Foster had a unique voice — Rivers Cuomo
mixed with a little bit of the cool side of Rod Stewart. The songwrlting was
ill. Sklrtii
le between pop and prog,
the songs often took breaks after a chorus to walk down a road of colourful chord changes and off-kilter riffs. That being said, this could also be their
kryptonite, as they sometimes fell too far down the progressive rabbit hole
and left the audience behind. Accompanying guitarist Sam Gleason added
lots of flavour to Foster's twelve-string jangle through the use of various crys-
tallizers and delays.The duo would return later In the evening to perform as
Hannah Epperson's band.
Next up was Vancouverite Andrew Lee, better known as Holy Hum. His
set was a gorgeous bombardment of synthesizers, space echoes, deep-electronic percussion and soaring overdriven guitar that evoked post-rock staples Mogwai and Explosions in the Sky. Lee had a stage presence that was
something to be reckoned with, manipulating the tallest rig on one keyboard
stand you have ever seen, then stepping back to shred overtop of what you
justwi
t at work. His songs were clearly experim
id By projections of swirling oceans and v
The venue was completely full by the time Epperson took the stage. Bef
she played the first note, she Implored the audience to ask their neighbours
be quiet, as this was to be quiet music. The crowd was admittedly chatty wt
she began, but after two songs they were silent and entranced.
Hannah Epperson is at this point a seasoned veteran of the stage, am
she carried herself as such, building a strong rapport wit
crowd. Between the beautiful moments of quiet in her music, there w<
id lush st
backed all the while by Gleason's unassuming guitar strums and Foster's
sparse percussion. She took a short break from playing to talk about caterpil-
a metaphor for her return to Vancouver.
After a few more songs both old and new, she thanked the audience for
breaking all the "Vancouver crowd" stereotypes and for being so attentive.
The crowd was just as grateful, crying out a chorus of "We love you Hannahl*
and "Welcome homel" As the night came to a close she played a heartfelt
version of "Farthest Distance" as the audience sang along quietly.
—Lary Shelmal
CJSF 90.1FM 13TH ANNUAL FM PARTY:
/ NON LA / HICK / OTHER JESUS /
MOURNING COUP/SWIM TEAM/MU
NOVEMBER 19 / ASTORIA
CJSF celebrated 13 years on the FM dial at their annual FM Party at the
Astoria. About half an hour Into the celebration, I had a series of anxiety attacks which dampened by ability to be totally observant throughout
the event. The causes of my anxiety were unrelated to the event but, due to
the Incredible lineup — Non La, Hick, Other Jesus, Mourning Coup, Swim
Team, and Mu — there were a lot of people there, many of whom I knew
and which stressed me out even more. I'm not blaming the success of the
event but if it had been worse, I definitely would have felt more comfortable.
Unfortunately, the event really seemed to be a success.
managed to bring their all. I was really taken with the bassist / drummer duo.
They had a full sound, which I found really Impressive, and had a decent
translation of their recorded music for the stage.
Hick, the next act, was the least engaging performer. I thought that was
just because I had to run to the bathroom several times during her set, but
a couple friends confirmed it. Her sound was otherworldly, but she's well
known for collaborating with other local artists and seeing her alone on stage
was underwhelming. Her genre Is difficult to adapt to a live performance and
although the audience around the stage weren't engaged, I heard people
playing pool and arcade games commenting on her set.
Other Jesus was a total change of pace. They debuted Nick Short as their
guitarist—who played with his band Swim Team later on — and the members
danced and shouted their way through a super high energy performance. It
was comforting to see the performers going up genuinely having a great time.
Halfway through the show, CJSF interluded the sets with a raffle with prizes
from Red Cat Records, Mint Records, Alarum Records and Big Smoke. The
volunteers drawing winners were so enthusiastic, ft captivating how much the
organizers genuinely cared about their cause. After the announcement, I sat
facing a comer for forty minutes while everyone around me got drinks and mingled. It felt like a house party in a venue — everyone knew everyone.
Mourning Coup snapped the audience back with a haunting set. Chandra
Melting Tallow screamed into the microphone In ways only she knows how and
ended her performance by reminding the audience that all the proceeds from
her merchandise she was going towards supporting the DAPL protesters.
I was really excited to see Swim Team live — I'd been a fan for a while but
never got to see them perform. I lurked in the back while they banged out really
tight songs that radiated with energy. Dorothy Neufeld and Nick Short swayed to
Murat Ayfer's strong beats, pulling the crowd from side to side with them.
The final set of the night was completely enchanting. Mu floated on stage
in incredible outfits and performed their talented hearts out. Fashion has
always been a big part of Mu's branding and they used it in full effect. A
quick glance was all It took to be drawn towards the stage to be mesmerized
by their ethereal music.
This was the most quintessential^ Vancouver event I've ever been to. My
friend had told me that the lineup was everything that she'd ever wanted in
a show. It was a crystallized combination of the city's traditional punk rock
and experimental electronic, and CJSF got the best Vancouver has to offer. I
didn't really see anything new, but that wasn't the point. CJSF wanted to host
something that reflected Vancouver's independent radio culture — they did a
really great job of that and had fun doing it, even if I didn't.
-Dora Dubber
-
Sill
Rftvl
I • HB • 1
jfilljlll
1660 EAST BROADWAY
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EDITOR'S NOTE The reviews that end with >|c have been e>
cerpted. You can read the full reviews on Discorder.ca.
BRASSTRONAUT
Brasstronaut
(Hybrldlty Music)
11/11/2016
smbers — Bryan Davies, Edo Van Breemen, John Walsh, Brennan
Saul, Tarlq Hussaln and Sam Davidson — reuniting after pursuing solo projects. Brasstronaut brings together distinct sounds to build complex melodies.
The songs are layered, with slow building intros and outros, showcasing the
Individual talents of each artist.
Brasstronaut is released on the local label, Hybridlty, a term that refers
to the work as "confidently kinetic." In fitting with the label description, the
album Is just that. It moves from indie pop-rock to Jazz, from traditional guitar
to trumpets and keyboards. The opening track, "Hawk," embodies this variety, starting off with scattered sounds and coming together to form a cohe-
The fifth track on the album, "Whitney" is like an amped up version of The
only In th
>st way possible. The song builds from
trumpet. After "Whitney," Brasstronaut
:als and guitar In
youth confuses and bravado can mask doubts. Questions about the
future are Intimidating. What are you doing with your life? Is there a
point In continuing? When facing these thoughts, easy escape tantalizes. For
some, eating copious amounts of fast food serves as a relief, but Monomyth
Just wants to get "fucked up, fuck off and be free."
This sentiment is crooned on "Aloha," the opening track of Monomyth's
Happy Pop Family. Nestled amongst a fuzzy guitar twang, it Is a striking
musical moment, one that seems more like a pose than a genuine feeling.
Self-satisfaction of this sort rarely seems genuine, especially when using
loaded words like "free." And these types of lyrically cliche moments fill
Happy Pop Family. On "Re: lease (looking for a place to go)," for Instance, a
Velvet Underground infused Jam is overlaid with the raspy recount of a rental
struggle. A friend fails to pay rent, as he is too "busy getting bell bent." But
what's the point In worrying? "You may as well just "crack a beer when the
[...]
And perhaps tone Is why Monomyth steers clear from reflection. They are
not trying to be grimy. Instead, Happy Pop Family looks constantly towards
the easy and enjoyable. Each song, while selling a "fuck Ft" lifestyle, is filled
with the fluffy and the digestible. It is pop to the core. Nothing is new or
uncomfortable. Instead most of the album plods along a well-worn path.
"Falling in Love" plays like Belle and Sebastian, while the enjoyable and
infectious "High on Sunshine" powers along like a better Sloan song. But
Monomyth occasionally knocks it out of the park. Songs like "Puppet Creek"
and "Cool Blue Hello* standout for both their simplicity and compelling hooks
that burrow into your head. These moments are fun and justify the twelve-
track album. There is a time and a place for this music. But, like fast food
or getting fucked up and fucking off, you are left empty in the end.— Max
Anderson-Baier 1c
DANIEL TERRENCE
ROBERTSON
Death
(Heavy Lark)
Baniel Terrenes Robertson begins a reflective journey through the
confines of his mind, manifesting in Robertson's debut album, Death.
As individual reflection Is truly a solitary act, Robertson composed and
recorded all eight songs alone. Tracks such as "Soundtrack 4 (Mother)' and
"East Cordova (Smile Deth Is Love 21)" capture the essence of solitude. But
dont let the album title fool you, Death is not all gloom. Most of the album Is
packed with bright sounds and, at times, can be even playful.
The opening song "House" sets an atmosphere and tone for the preceding songs that can only be described as 'misty.' "Falsity" and "God I'm
Sony" deviate slightly from the album's blueprint to provide a bit of crunch
to the composition. Robertson's voice appears In most tracks as a welcoming-yet-ghastly host, leading the listener through the album's ambiance [...]
— Austin Zeller*
Tang Clan's i
The
[p hop's tendency to open
Ing the Wu
song uses a sample reminiscent
to the wild screaming near the end of Kanye's "Lost in the World." The third
verse quotes Notorious B.I.G.. The song's title Is a knowing wink, cobbling
together elements of his predecessors and building something new. Jviden is
a rapper from Brampton, Ontario, a far suburb of the mythical 6ix, yet draws
On "Classic," the album's collaboration with K. Forest, Jviden uses the
artist as a surrogate for Sampha, pushing K. Forest's voice to Its limits of
anguish. This song Is the focal point of the album, both in popularity (the
song has more than double the plays of "Typical," on Soundcloud), and In
Its distilling of the album's theme — heartbreak. "Typical" is a song of youthful ignorance and anger from the perspective of a jilted lover. A later song
repurposes a furious voicemail as an Intro, reminiscent of Eminem's infamous Marlah Carey diss. The album ends with "Stay," the hook and verses
serving as counterpoint to one another, the anger and sadness of a failed
Where Jviden falls flat is in his lyricism is with basic rhymes about selling
drugs and cheating on women. It's clear that Jviden has potential: crisp production, and a cohesive sound. He just needs to become a better rapper.
— Jack Lamming
JAYDAG
Sixth Spirit of the Bay
(1080p)
10/28/2016
Jayda G's new EP Sixth Spirit of the Bay fits snugly between Project
Pablo's outstanding / Want to Believe and the cosmic grooves of
LNRDCROY. The 1080p stamp of approval gave me assurance that even if
this wasnt going to be my jam, It would be a trip.
Opening the record Is "Fathom Five," a mix of technicolour keyboards and
drum-loops that provide an invitation into the record. It's like walking in a dark
field while the sun slowly rises. The opening notes tromp stoically into lush
keys that build into a cool wave of turquoise. By minute 2:28, the song fully
captures the "Canadian Riveria" sound (a term coined by house label and
city-m
id Hut).
According to
website, "Sixth Spirit is infused with a sense c
Dased on current experiences, looped back Irrt
field season as a young scientist in Ontario." I
an picture Jadya crafting'this song in the woods, the sun breaking through
> canopy of trees as "Cascabel" weaves through her mind into the green, the
luilding groove of jungle snares and bass loops coming to life. The move-
nent of this song makes it the stand-out track of the EP [...] — Call Judy*
SWIM TEAM
Out of the Hood
(Self-Released)
10/28/2016
^j Itnough labeled as 'punk' on the Swim Team's Bandcamp page,
■ ■ that label is far too constraining for the trio's newest release, Out of
the Flood—and for the band In general. People looking for a straightforward punk record will be disappointed, but for anyone else, there is a whole
lot more going on here. This Is a record to be savoured, one which rewards
relistenlng.
This follow-up to last year's Freedom/Constraint is strong out of the gate.
The opening track, "Sentez" kicks things off with an intense, moody drumbeat and a healthy dose of distorted riffs. Dorothy Neufeld's breathy vocals
kick In, contrasting nicely.
Once thing I notice while listening to the album Is the frequent tempo
changes, both within and between songs. The effect keeps the listener on
their toes and actively paying attention to the music.
By the time you get to the third song, "Correspondent," you could be forgiven for thinking ft was a different record entirely. It is slower, contemplative,
almost hypnotic. That mood, with Its dreamy arpeggios, runs through several
of the tracks especially "Swell."
angrier ones of Freedom/Constraint, Murat Ayfer's ominous drumming and
Nick Short's Jangling guitar provide a common thread. To me, it feels like
growth for the band (who have been compared to art punkers Sonic Youth),
heir sound and are exploring Its potential
fvy Jane's Breaking creates an atmosphere that suspends you by the
thinnest thread In darkness. Then the music and vocals sway you gently but forcibly from side to side. With every surge In Evelyn Jane Mason captivating voice and with every perfectly placed new layer In Jeremiah Klein's .
production, you're sent whirling to new sensations.
The album Incorporates many different sounds: pop, shoegaze, electronic
and ambient are all present, making tor interesting combinations. Evy Jane is
in a well represented field of musicians combining R&B and electronic, and
powerful vocals with lush music. Jessy Lanza, Jessie Ware, the XX, Beach
House, and ABRA all spring to mind.
The songs on Breaking are elaborate, soulful and dramatic. Standout
"Lights" is the clearest example of the excellent harmony between the duo.
The slowly dripping percussion anchors the track, but Just barely. The soaring vocals riding on top of an army of violins drifting in and out with exceptional grace and gravitas, give great grandeur and drama. Another standout is "Give me Love," with a hypnotically repetitive chorus, violin surges
The song pulls you away from
late you and take you somewhere with
[...] — Shebll Khoury *
^| n FOONYAP's "Woolf & Plath," she sings, "A lady ran into the woods
^F / She swallowed darkness / Returned to mud." As the words flow
over the cracks of FOONYAP's lips like golden threads in the course of
Palimpsest, reality brings tenebrous fantasy Into life. It is low tide at the shore
I UNDER REVIEW banting
where FOONYAP weaves the story of I
songs, decoding human behaviour arc
this Is a story where words combine to form uncomfortable truths such
as the pain and struggle included in the process of personal growth ("I am
small / Smaller I grow / When I grow up /1 weep / Weeping I know /1 grow"
In the track "#3") or the Interconnectedness of things ("Nous sommes deux
astres / Dans I'univers / Qui toument autour ce sol ephemera* In "Gabriel
Moody"). In searching for phrases, FOONYAP sinks her fingers into the
sand and unearths ambiguous aspects of the human condition: emotionality,
desire, mortality, adversity, continuity, connection and growth.
FOONYAP combines multiple Influences on Palimpsest her classical music studies, a Catholic upbringing, and traditional Chinese heritage.
Palimpsest is liberated from the conformities of classical origins to produce
a signature sound that alternates between vibrating lullabies and primordial heart-explosions. Her cry in 'Fun Machine" scratches her lungs as she
screams "I should have known / Your silken whir / Your hollow eyes / That
filled with spite," while later her narrator In *#2" confesses, "When I call / No
one comes / When I fall / No one runs" [...] — Theano Pavlidou *
eood news everyone, Dumb
time they're emulating art rock idols, Parquet Courts, In full force. For
Parquet Courts, Is a tune that creates the perfect backdrop for the nightly
cruise to pick up munchies from Mac's with your friends at 3 a.m..
But Mustang Law certainly has moments where It shines. "Esmari" Is
an upbeat, surfy track that's sure to stay In your head tor several days, with
its punchy and infectious melodic riff that sounds like the graveyard behind
Dumb's Beach Church. And you're going to chuckle when you hear the
cheeky, elevator-music remix "Esmidi" that wraps up the album. "Falling
Apart P2* is another gem, with a riff and melody that swings and swerves
throughout the song, not unlike one of Hunter S. Thompson's escapades
through the Mojave Desert.
The songs are consistent, for the most part, except for "Untitled." Here
that feel like berating spoken word sprinkled with feedback. Suddenly, the
track picks up the pace into what actually becomes Parquet Courts' "Light Up
Gold II" verbatim, Just without the catchy chorus. If you hear the two together
for yourself, you'll see what I mean. Still, that wouldn't stop you from putting
them on the same playlist [...] — Aidan Danaher *
"""""",""""     DUOTANG
New Occupation
m
WW hen I heard that Duotang was i
4Af thought was "that two-piece band that I saw on f
I was 13?" Indeed, the drum-and-bass twosome rides again after a 14-year
hiatus. I liked them then, and with the release of New Occupation on Stomp
Records, they've managed to win back fans after pulling a musical Rip Van
The album opens up with 'Nostalgia's A Vi
simple, clean pop-rock. There's only so much
instruments (although some fun synth can be I
and sets the perfect tone;
can do with only two
rd throughout this album)
and this is Duotang's genius. Listeners will find no pretentious prog-rock
breakdowns, no indulgent guitar solos, and no auditory garbage to clutter
up what's at the heart of these tunes — Rod Slaughter's voice and lyrics.
Drummer Sean Allum keeps It simple and steady and the album benefits
from this.
The album's title track, "New Occupation," gives away the band's '90s alt-
rock roots. Steady, marching beats and banged-out guitar chords accented with the occasional bout of horns brings listeners back to the Canadian
music heyday of the late '90s. Over 12 tracks the band manages to keep the
music poppy and high-energy. Slaughter and Allum use every musical tool
available to them as a two-piece to keep each song feeling fresh and different from the one before it [...] — Dusty Exner *
ZOO STRATEGIES
Languager
n
■ ■ Black Parade," the 2007 hit from My Chemical Romance, was our
generation's "Bohemian Rhapsody" — a statement which seems almost
too ridiculous to refute. I've had a lot of trouble getting it out of my mind.
"Welcome to the Black Parade" Is theatrical, over-the-top emotional, universally acclaimed (and despised), anthemic, complete with multiple movements and wild tempo changes — a veritable emo masterpiece.
Zoo strategies newest album Isnt nearly as difficult a proposition to swallow. But the emotional excess packed into Languager makes the MCR /
Queen comparison worth contemplating further. As subdued as It might be,
Languager Is an emo album. The genre may be stigmatized, but Its lasting
resonances as a dramatic, baroque articulation of modem culture suggests
it's hit on something Important. What can emo tell us about the placing of
feeling and affect in our contemporary moment? "Languager" relies heavily
on Instrumental segments — mainly mathy guitar Indulgences, which gives
it a heady veneer. But at its core, this album Is pure feeling, ft may be a
restrained brand of PNW emo, but the feeling still spills over, flowing into the
rain gutter of a suburban semi-detached.
Zoo Strategies' greatest feat is making you feel emotion without making
you feel like you're feeling emotion. "Monster Escape Protocol" (just took at
that name) is a particularly effective example of this: nimble drumming and
thoughtful, polyphonic melodies. "Lethal Weapon" Is a bit more succinct, with
a warmly welcomed blast of homs. "A Single Hat Lost at Sea" Is the downspout of Languagefs gutter. Nautical and sappy, precise and full of flourishes
— It's the final blow of an album that proves emotional outpourings can be
expertly handled. Welcome to the black parade, ya?— Josh Gabert-Doyon
CHEAP HIGH
Subterranean Suburbia
(Dipstick Records)
09/30/2016
i punk and a post-punk band,
truthfully, it is both. Subterranean Suburbia successfully marries the
two genres, cherry-picking from both and emerging more Interesting than a
simple rehash of either.
The Abbotsford rockers' first full-length release rumbles into life with the
eerie "Intro" but hits its stride with Time and Space" (previously released on
the Picture Disc EP). The song is a pulsating piece of post-punk and sets the
tone for the album as a whole. It is driven by ominous, Joy-D'rvlsion-esque
drums and jangling guitars. On top of that, raw, stream-of-consciousness
vocals build to mania as the song hits its midpoint.
Thematically, Subterranean Suburbia digs into both the epic and the mundane with song titles ranging from "Time and Space" to "Cul-De-Sac Crown."
This combination mirrors the individual experience — we are both the centre
of the universe and inconsequential within it. Frustration and confusion run
lyrics and in the way the vocals range from spoken-word to
m [...]
-Tom
because its depth Isn't fully revealed on first listen.
On Co-op, the three-piece post-punk band out of Vancouver plays with
discordant sounds that make for an Intrigulngly incongruent first listen. Evan
Gray's monotone vocals are Indistinct throughout the album, echoing behind
his guitar and Liam Shlveral's bass. For lack of distinct vocal verses and
choruses, the album's progress Is marked by Its Instrumental patterns and
variations.
The band Is at their best when they deviate from the pattern at the core
of their songs. The plodding pace and off-note melody of "Dont Turn the
Page" is disrupted by tighter guitar and accelerated drumming from Stefen
Ursulan. The shift in the song's final minute makes the rhythmic regularity
that surrounds it all the more Interesting. "Golden Hand" Is structurally similar
to "Dont Turn the Page," albeit not so atonal. The song moves between minimalist guitar and bass sequences and darkly melodic choruses, all the while
accompanied by Gray's distant vocals and his bandmates'
tion [...] — Courtney Heffernan *
Too often, Vancouver Is overlooked as a hub tor talented hip hop artists.
Unlike the 6ix, which has enjoyed unprecedented attention thanks to
the success of artists like Drake and The Weeknd, Vancouver Is unquestionably more low-key. Regardless, Vancouver's hip hop prowess cannot be
refuted. And Immerze's third project, Before I Go, delivers bangers.
The EPs eclectic production is its strongest selling point. Eight producers are featured on the project, Including the West Coast's own Eshe Nklru,
The Stunt Man, and Brevner. As a result of the diverse production, the EP
oscillates between smooth sounds, such as In Tropicana," and fast-paced,
bass-heavy tracks like "Black Bond." The only risk of the unpredictable production is that it may alienate fans with niche music preferences. Listeners
who prefer mellow sounds to trap music, or vice versa, may not connect with
the entire project.
The production style is in line with Immerze's vision for Before I Go. As
o in 'Gucci vandrc
is EP to
less blend of Gucci's gritty trap style with Vandross-inspired mi
surprisingly pleasant [...] — Anya Zoledzlowski *
f^tef
CO-OP
■    (Gary Cassettes)
w $ ^iliP   07/26/2016
*y
itjf from cacophony. At Its outset, the dissonance In
"What Is Said" is jarring. However, subsequent iterations
of the refrain reveal a surprising tunefulness amid the
instrumental discord. For all the tonal variation between
the refrain and verses, the song is surprisingly cohesive with greater depth than the cacophony I first heard.
Co-op is a complex and engaging album — all the more
"Vancouver Musicians Directory
Vancouver Band Directory '   .:-
i$prti¥$n,com: Maintained by thousands, because it v^gi
UNDER REVIEW I word** by KVW // photo by Matthew Power //
Illustration by Rachel Wade
ometimes I don't
I realize how hard
I hustle," Kim
Villagante told me. As soul singer
/ rapper Kimmortal, Villagante
has boldly pushed herself outward through her music and
racked up an awe-inspiring
number of accomplishments in
the past two years, including
the release of her debut album
Sincerity and opening for Shad at
the Vancouver Mural Festival last
L
Villagante is like a rough diamond, presently a humble and
esoteric existence, but on her way
to dazzling the world. And unlike
lab diamonds that have been engineered to perfection hi a short
amount of time, Villagante has
taken the time and pains to get
where she is today. Sincerity, released November 28, 2014, was
preceded by five to six years of
writing songs, playing guitar,
and performing at open mics. Her
lyrics, written in private moments of struggle, were made
public by her determination to be
honest and vocal about her truth.
She relayed that her friends have
said she "should have expected"
'^| KIMMORTAL
her growing success, but in her
presence I come to understand
that she's more concerned about
the journey than the destination.
Five years ago, Villagante
joined a hip hop dance
her third year at the University
of British Columbia. Committing
herself to regular practice and the
strive for "perfection and syn-
chronicity," as she put it, somehow veiled her vision: she "felt
like something in [her] was not
seeing fully." However, during
that period she was also performing at open mics, and she fell
deep into that "realm of constant
conversations" where she was
able to step outside her body and.
discuss her poetry and logophilia.
Now she's able to call herself
a singer, rapper, actress, emcee, illustrator, animator, poet
and director. The number of titles in the aforementioned list
might suggest that her potential
could be limited by the ambiguity laced in the phrase "Jack of
all trades," but this Jill not only
has the tools to polish the many
facets of her art and music career,
she has the motivation. "There's
definitely a need for me to represent as a queer woman of colour
in hip hop," Villagante said with
"ronvfcnon."
Villagante was born and raised
in Canada to immigrant parents hailing from the Philippines
(which is a circumstance
we share with various Asian
Canadians, although I was born in 1
Canada and raised in Singapore).
Seven years ago, Villagante took
a trip to her motherland with her
;r, but had not yet realized
the significance of her being a
Filipina. She explained that it was
through the Coast Salish community and her Indigenous friends
that she learned to take "the dive
into exploring [her] culture" because of the relatable experience
of being, in one form or another,
detached from one's homeland.
I admitted to Villagante that I,
too, had not realized the significance of my being half-Korean
. because I grew up in a predominantly Chinese society and so
only recognized my half-Chinese side. It wasn't until K-pop
gained popularity that I began to
acknowledge the fact that I was
half-Korean. This whole other
culture stood behind me, waiting, as hers did. Once she opened
up to learning about her ancient
roots and histories, Villagante's
lyricism and art were not spared
an effect. And now, as Villagante
pointed out, "We're continuing
this legacy even though we're
on the other side of the world. It
plined writing practice, but while
she has a natural ability to bring
her poetry and lyrics into the art
of rap, she's not likely to give up
singing.
Villagante explained that it was
her start as a singer that allowed
her to "go off on tangents" and
achieve more depth with her audience. She observed that often
people don't quite catch what's
being rapped. With song, she's
able to slow the pace of her music
and bring attention to her lyrics.
"[There's] a lot of variation and
range that I can experiment with
when I'm on stage ... It's different with every crowd. I really feel
it out," said Villagante.
Not only does she have to apply her adaptability to the stages
of the music world, Villagante
also has to adapt to the different stages presented to her by her
roles as an emcee and a young
thespian. She explained that her
role as ah emcee entails "hyping
a crowd, gathering people, [and]
"Brushing by Heaven's Shoulder"
she raps,"Queens dead on the
scene / Never forgotten / Forever
Missed" in reference to the ongoing tragedy.
W nother way Villagante
VV represents anti-oppres-
I      sion exists in the form
of a festival. SHE is an "annual
festival celebrating self-identifying women of colour, [mixed
race], Indigenous [women], black
[women], all in music and the
art of words." As its founder,
Villagante explained that the
festival SHE was born when the
music video for her song "She"
ceased production. Like a phoenix
risen from the ashes, SHE created
a central space for the segregated
communities that converged in
Villagante's identity as queer
woman of colour.
An article on The At/antic's
website postulated "that all-
women shows are like affirmative action, neither especially f
good nor bad in themselves but a necessary measure in a still-sexist art world."
I asked Villagante if this belief applied to
her world. After five and a half years of
studying visual arts and art history at the
University of British Columbia, she did
begin to take notice: "After I graduated,
I pursued music more, but all the stages
I hit had a lack of queer women of co-
Purchase a digital copy of Kimmortal's
Sincerity at any donation amount at
kimmortal.bandcamp.com. 100% of the proceeds will go to the Standing Rock Medic &
Healer Council. Kimmortal also has a new
music video for "Jungle," featuring previous
SHE performers Missy Dand Jillthy. Check it
outatyoutube.com/kimmortalmusk.
"3 raallp toasit to feei lifce all mj£»
laper* are in mp music 00 3 can -"
ust be lifee, listen to mp music, - ant>
tliat^ctuailp all of me/'    K
lour, or not even queer folks, or not even «|
women of colour." As She put it, even in -
a "small bubble of any society, any group -
of people, it's never titopie." But SHE will'
return in March 2017 and lay pointed fin-*.
gers, armed to burst bubbles of the sgapyJH
and illusory kinds.
Villagante may noliw as unbreakiK\i
as a diamond but her superhuman pass1o|v
and energy have given her characte$si4rj|
stance of the highest order. That said, 'rtafr
presence is softened by a gentle instiajt   s
that, while powerful In its own rigHJ^x^t^
ercises inclusivity over anythingJ&s&j&k
want to feel encapsulated ii
really want to feel like alLrny lay!
my music so I can just bfelike, 'listelf
my music,' and that'sarctually all of me\
But that's a continuous thing. I want tot
keep making more music that speaks to 1
me and speaks to others, and I want to
feel... family, to build a family with my
music." It's an honest dream, to be sureJ
and if Kimmortal lives up to her name,   I
time is on her side.
m
LIVE AT THE WISE * DECEMBER EVENTS SCHEDULE 2016
ODDFELLOWS MARKET 10AM-4PM
H (WISE PRO WRESTLING) PRESENTS \
CHRISTMAS CHAOS
I PETUNIA & THE VIPERS |
MONDAYS IN THE LOUNGE
I RUBY'S UKES CONCERT |
6:30 T010:30 IN THE HALL
mm
I PETUNIA & THE VIPERS |
MONDAYS IN THE LOUNGE
I TOM H0LLIST0N & FORD PIER I
LIVING MADE EASY
LIVE IN THE WISE LOUNGE
2016 HUNKERDOWN
XMAS SHOWDOWN!
I   VANCOUVER FILM COMMUNITY MUSIC EVENT   |
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THE MYRTLE FAMILY BAND
PETUNIA & THE VIPERS
BIG TOP • BUCK GARDENIA
GEOFF BERNER • AL MADER
PETUNIA & THE VIPERS
MONDAYS IN THE LOUNGE
ODDFELLOWS MARKET
10:00AM-4:00PM
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OPENING NIGHT
TABOO REVUE
BURLESQUE IN THE HALL 8PM
BENEFIT FOR
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HOLIDAY HUSTLE!
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| PETUNIA & THE VIPERS
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NO B.S. NEW YEAR'S EVE
PIZZA PARTY!
THE DEVIL IN THE WOOD SHACK
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RAMB0NE & THE WET REALITY
THEG0DSP0T • DADWEED
TUESDAYS IN THE HALL 7PM (DEC. 6 13 20) THE IMPROMPTU ROCK CHOIR
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WISE HALL
1882 ADANAC STREET
(AT VICTORIA DRIVE)
WWW.WISEHALL.CA
m   -,M
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Sarah Davachi
Dominions
Hello Blue Roses
WZO
Loscil
Sine Studies 2
Nicholas Krgovich
Who Cares?
Out now on
JAZ Records
jazrecords.com Dad
Real Emotional
Contejnt
words by Dylan Joyce //
photo by Pat VtHa.de //
illustrations by Taryu
| t's no secret that the
emo genre holds an un-
for some, but forget about the
eyeliner and all of that — let's
talk content. Dad Thighs are
about community connection,
cathartic songwriting, and way
more joking around than I had
expected. When I showed up to
meet the five members of Dad
Thighs at their Red Gate practice space, guitarist / vocalist
takes a departure from the
twinkly and pop-y tone of our
previous EP, as it deals with
how to cope with death, and
how to be more aware of why
we feel what we feel and how
we act in times of desperation." Felix adds, "Everyone's
done a sad love song, but we
want to take that and look at
different aspects of it."
In the softer moments, Dad
Thighs' sound takes influence
from seminal Midwest emo
songs, the dynamic nature of
the music shines through with
feedback squalls and crunching power chords exhaling into
warm, chiming arpeggios and
harmonics.
Kyle jumps in to talk about
the recording: "I've recorded
with Mike four times now,
and every time we go into the
studio things just come out
better than we anticipated."
With Felix and victoria as the
principal songwriters, lyrics
me how nice it is to hear those feelings.
Felix and frontperson Victoria
were there to greet me. After a
short wait for drummer Devon,
bassist Jill, and guitarist Kyle,
we settled into the couches for
achat.
The group first came together in 2013 as a slot filler for
a showcase of women musicians organized by Victoria at
the now-closed NINES Culture
Club. However, a number of
lineup changes and some tumultuous personal struggles
resulted in a 1.5-year hiatus.
In January 2016, they released
their first EP The Past Three
Years to wrap up that part of
their history, and now they
have a debut album coming out
January 2017.
For the new album, The
Ghosts I Fear, the band have
taken a more mature, nuanced
and self-reflective approach.
Victoria explains, "This release
■£■ DAD THIGHS
bands like American Football,
and when things get loud
they lean more towards the
post-hardcore. We talk back
and forth about the nebulous subject of genre and settle
somewhere between sad punk,
emotive-rock, and as Kyle puts
it, "Dad Thighs, the regular
rock band."
Recorded over three sessions with Michael Kraushaar
at Bully's Studios, the new
album is imbued with the energy of a live set and a palpable sense of urgency. Felix
tells me, "We tried to record
our set as one coherent piece
so each song flows into the
next." The results have interludes of pounding drums and
blaring guitar noise flowing into standout tracks like
the sprawling "Sometimes"
and the heartbreaking "Of
Summer." On these longer
and progressions are brought
to the table and the band gets
together to jam on them. Felix
summarizes, "We, like, make
them sweet."
It occurs to me that lyrics in
certain genres can be relatively
"low stakes," where the songs
don't require the author to
truly reveal anything personal
about themselves. That isn't
the case with Dad Thighs. The
themes of the album can be
heavy, dealing with everything
from coping with death to
emotional self-awareness. "Of
Summer" in particular deals
with the struggles of Victoria's
great grandmother "imprisoned by life's cruel hand." She
explains, "Women rarely have
a say in the matter, specifically
my great grandmother living
through two wars in Indonesia,
raising 11 children and emigrating to Canada."
I ask Victoria what it's like
to perform these songs. "A lot
of people come up to me and
tell me how nice it is to hear
those feelings. One time somebody said it was like a form of
therapy for them, which was
really wild." For Felix, "it's
definitely scary to go up and
perform, especially initially,
and with every new song you
sort of regain that sense of
fear, especially when they're
so personal. You may know
what the song is about, but the
audience might not be able to
connect."
Bad Thighs have played
seven shows since
August 2016, but
you'll have to look for them in
arts spaces and houses. After a
memorial show for their friend
Gary at the Astoria, they've
committed to exclusively playing all-ages shows. "We've
become increasingly aware of
social injustices and the importance of accessibility, so we
decided to play strictly all ages
shows," Victoria explains. Kyle
adds "We're playing the shows
we want to be playing, it's not
like we're missing out on any
gigs." As for the emo scene in
Vancouver, Victoria says, "It's
small but growing. With every
show we notice more people."
Also important to the group,
is playing and promoting Bands
with women, which confronts
an oft-mentioned criticism of '■''
the emo genre - that the content is traditionally androcentric. "We love making music,
obviously, but we think that
the spaces that music occupies
are equally as important," says
Victoria.
In many ways, the genre
of emo represents a rejection of traditional rock V roll
posturing. For Dad Thighs
this seems to be the perfect
vehicle to carry their message, where earnest and candid
emotional expression leads to
genuine community connection. Whether it's something
you rock out to at a show or
something you listen to alone
in your bedroom, their music
is there to help you, and them,
through difficult times.
Dad Thighs' The Ghosts
I Fear full length comes out
on cassette and digitally at
dadthighs.bandcamp.com early
in the new year.
EvaporatorS
THE EVAPORATORS
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mint records So, you're in a band. You've got a good setlist together, your stage banter doesn't suck
too much anymore, and the tote bags you screen printed in your basement actually
turned out okay. What's next? Well, considering you've played the only bar in town
every Thursday for the pastyear, it's probably about timeyou do what every moderately successful Canadian band does — get the hell out of here and head south. But there's a catch: as of
December 20, those of us north of the border looking to tour across the USA are going to have
to cough up a lot more cash to do it. The cost of a work permit is going up by 42% just before
the holidays, jumping from $325 USD to $460 USD per person. That means in order to take your
groundbreaking 12-piece Boy George tribute band on the road, everyone from the musicians,
to the crew, to the inevitably large hair and makeup department will need to spend upwards of
$620 CAN to do it.
If this.sounds exorbitant toyou, that's because it is. While the fee increase may be paltry to
bigger acts, this change could be downright prohibitive for independent and lesser-known musicians looking to accrue a greater fanbase. However, great minds at Discorder and throughout
the local music community have come together to tackle this problem, sharing their experience,
their intellect, and their secrets, to bring you...
HOW TO PLAY SHOWS IN AMERICA
WITHOUT GOING BROKE FIRST |
iiss38iiiiM//iSffi!nsiiaiie 11|
Booking
rvS?
^^or some, booking shows covertly will be
^BPthe easiest part of the process. If you're
4^r the kind of person that finds talking with
other musicians an enriching and rewarding
experience, and not a harrowing process that
makes you feel like never initiating a conversation again, then chances are you'll do well at
this. Do your best to adopt an American band
when they come up to play a show in your
hometown. Help them with booking a show
in Canada, maybe offer them a place to crash
during their stay, and chances are they'll do
the same fgE-you^Obviously this type of networking is most easily done when you already
have a contacts list filled with trendy American
bands, but if your weekend ritual of mindlessly
watching Netflix documentaries while flipping
through your Explore Page has left you with no
one to reach out to, it's time to change your reclusive ways. Force yourself to go out to a show
where unknown acts from the States pepper
the bill, and Start striking up conversations.
With any luck, they or someone they know will
need as much help booking a show as you do,
and you can go from there. Making connections
is key to finding a place to play when you're far
from home, especially if you don't want to go
through the hassle of booking through a venue
(and if you're trying to avoid getting a work
permit in the first place, you probably don't).
Promotion
Better start consulting with your deity
of choice now, because you're going
to need all the help you can get if you
want to promote a clandestine show, without
a legit promoter, nobody is going to put up the
posters you so carefully designed instead of
finishing your paper / spending time with your
family / whatever. Knowing and communicat-
inftwjth other bands is your best bet for getting
afiVppiJ-to notice you, so once you have a show
lined up, try to sandwich your set in between
t-^jjgljpved local acts. With any luck, they may
take pity on you and give your band a shout out
on speial media. This is definitely the grimmest
p^^l^^lro^^^oySlSfti're probably usera
, tcHt ijfcim playing to crowds of nine people at"
home anyway.
EDITOR'S NOTE: Don't let Discorder Magazine, or any
publication in print or online publish your actual name
if you intend to tour to the United States. Adopt a stage
name, and make sure the pseudonym is used consistently
across all your social media and promotion — including
Bandcamp, Soundcloud, Instagram, Twitter, Facebook,
Snapchat, whateverrrr. Border guards have been known
to do a quick Internet search of suspected musicians. If you
have shared your full name with Discorder in the past
and want it removed from the online archive, email editor.
discorder@citr.ca.
3f you've followed steps 1 and 2r r,
chances are you can borrow equipment from whoever is helping you out
in the USA. As to why a group of "alternative types" are all travelling down in a van
together? You're going camping; you're seeing a concert; you're checking out the Space
Needle or some other banal landmark —
take your pick. If you absolutely must bring
your own gear, you can say you're going to
record, but that's liable to its own potential pitfalls. Merch is probably best avoided
unless you're bringing very small quantities.
No one goes "camping" with 100 t-shirts
that all say "Your Shitty Band Name Here"
on them. Also, if you're not crossing the
border near to where your license plate is
registered (British Columbia to Michigan instead of British Columbia to Washington, for
example), have fun with the cavity search.
^^■h brief, playing a show or even going
Hon tour without a license is certainly 5
^Hfeasible, but it's not easy. It involves a
lot of time, preparation, creativity, and yes,
even friend-making. If you can't afford the
ridiculous price for a work permit, we hope
this list brings you some comfort — but
let's be honest, you'll probably just get your
parents to cover it anyway.
Huge thank-you to RMC and Becky for
helping put together this how-to.
GUIDE: HOW TO PLAY SHOWS IN AMERICA WITHOUT GOING BROKE FIRST I ON THE AIR
STORY STORY LIE
interview by Courtney Heffernan // photo by Sara Baar // illustration by Uaia Boakye
7herf&toria\
Bs the host of Story Story Lie, Jo Dworschak has created an interactive storytelling game show and
radio show that reflects her love of storytelling
as much as reflecting her passion for fostering community. Dworschak's commitment to her values is apparent even in her management of the business side of Story
Story Lie. She won't host it at licensed venues to keep the
event open to parents and teenagers wanting to connect
over local performing arts. As it goes into its sixth month,
Dworschak is looking to make Story Story Lie even bigger.
Part of this involves further staking her claim to offer the
best game show prizes in the city, from '70s slow cookers
to '90s fondue makers. But let's get back to the beginning.
PftfffffiMB MAGAZINE How did you come up with the
show's concept?
Jo Dworschak: m tcame3from my son telling me
[about] Two Truths and a Lie. I thought, 'Wow, I wonder
if that was done with stories?' I do quite a bit of storytelling and there are so many stories I hear that seem like
they're lies. Sometimes the truth seems so messed up that
you'd never believe it's real. Those are the kind of stories I
want to get on the show.
For Story Story Lie, I wanted to find a way to [include]
Vancouver's poets, comedians and storytellers, and just
other performing art media and have them all kind of
pushed together, because they don't really interact that
much. I wanted to have a fun show where people in the
audience could interact with the performers.
IMf. Is the show something you had been thinking
about for a while?
JQ. Well, no. The idea of producing a show really terrified me, and I said I would never, ever do it. But I love
being on stage and I've always loved the idea of being a
game show host.
I thought of it first as being a podcast-radio show and
[then] having it become a live show. But I didn't expect
the live show to go as well. Now it is selling out every
time. And it's just amazing.
IMj. How would you say this is an East Van show?
JQ; I think that Commercial Drive has a different feeling from the rest of Vancouver. It feels more community
based. There is a great mix of people. You've got some
business people, you've got some hipsters, you've got —
whatever, everything. I wanted to bring that to the show,
to have that variety. You can come wearing a tutu and blue
lipstick. No one's going to say anything about it. That's
very important to me. Plus, the host is a queer tattooed
chick with short hair!
J)Jf> So how did you get involved with broadcasting in
the first place?
JQj In December of 2015,1 was like, 'Yeah, I think I
want to start a podcast." A half an hour after saying that
I got a message from Carrie Sully, who's on Fruit Salad [on
Vancouver Co-op Radio], asking if I wanted to join.
0|f> Then once you got involved with Co-op, it seemed
a little more natural to go and create a podcast?
J0j Yeah. I gave myself six months to get used to
broadcasting and operating before starting the other show.
[)ff. How does the concept of independent media manifest in Story Story Lie?
JQp The fact that we're new and we manage to get air-
time from CiTR - I'm definitely grateful. That wouldn't
necessarily happen with mass recorded media. They
wouldn't be as willing to take a chance on something like
this. I think that part of it is, to me, fairly East Vancouver.
[That] and having the diversity of voice.
nj£ How do you hope to proceed in the future with
this?
J0t I want to travel the show. So I'd like it to be a bigger monthly show in Vancouver and then also have it pop
up in West Vancouver, Delta, Maple Ridge, Chilliwack and
Kelowna, and start branching out a little more with it.
JJIfL I love that idea.
JQ. Yeah, and have the podcast be bigger and get more
stories. It would be really fun.
JJJ|f- Anything else you want to add?
in. Come see the live show and listen to the podcast!
And if you have a weird story, let me know.
Story Story Lie airs on CiTR 101.9FM every other Monday
from 6-6:3opm, and the next live show is December 10 at Cafi
Deux Soleils. Starting January 2017 Story Story Lie will be every
second Friday of the month at Cafe Deux Soleils. More information atfacebook.com/StoryStoryLie, and to submit your stories
email storystorylie@gmail.com.
GHOUL  OGROEM
PYRAMIDION   PRECIOUS DUDES
SATURDAY DECEMBER 3
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TUESDAY DEC 20+TUESDAY JAN 10
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THE HEADQUARTERS
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill $ht. Hosted by
Jamal Stesles, Homeboy Jules, Relly Rels,
LuckyRlch & horsepowar.
srapeutlc. SEAN HARBOTTLE'S HIPPITY Hi
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
Inanity. Email: dj@jackvelvet.ne
■ ETHIOPIAN
im targeted to Ethiopian
finish off your Saturday night.
Fight-or-flight music. Radio essays
THE SCREEN Gl
;anadlan hip hop and RSB.
Feeling nostalgic?
Swinging Guitar ol Tal Farlc
■ CINEMATIC
D MOVIES
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Plug NIGHTDRJVE95 dlr
with ErSdle Hubba^Wayne Shorter,
10 PROGRESSIVO
1 a blend of aural delights.
m(PST) every Tuesday 1
t
STORY STORY LI
Story Story Lie, II
SYNCHRONICITY
Textbook (FKA The Student Special
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WOO VINTAGE CLOTHING CITR 101.9FM NOVEMBER MONTHLY CHARTS
2016 WAS SHIT BUT AT LEAST WE HAVE GOODMUSIC
TOP 100 OF THE CiTR CHARTS 2016!
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I     3.1        Jenny Hval                   Blood Bitch                   Sacred Bones       |
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9f       CeclleDoo-Klngu*'   ^^^^ ^ ^        Self-Released
1     ©        Lt- Frank Dlckens*+ 1   Sunburned (reissue)    '*               Jaz
jj                Softess*.                  Absolute Truth                   Thankless
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Happy Pop Family
Mustang Law
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9fg Late Spring*.
New Occupation
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Distance You Are Tired
ck Cave & The Bad
£    4HS    •       Artd*Ecco*+        |           Day Fevers
Your Face
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Puberty 2
harts reflect what's been played on the air by CiTR's lovely DJs last month. Records w
in addressed to Andy Resto, Music Director at CiTR 101.9FM, LL500 6133 University Bl
ith the Music Director 1-2 weeks after submitting by emailing, or calling 604.822.873
Dg You Say Party*. VouSayMfy Paper Bag
Dp             Monomyth* Happy Pop Family Mint
gjg Fond 0/Tigers*. UnlnhaUt   ' Offseason
I I    (§)j§)             Holy Fuck* Congrats Last Gang
UUUP              Co-op*. SfT GaryCassett
:e local. To submit music for ait-play on CiTR 101.9FM, please send a physics
pies, feel free to email download codes for consideration to music@citr.ca. Yi IcATE  LE  BON   &  TIM PRESLEY
UPCOMING SHOWS IN VANCOUVER!
Dec 7
LEE FIELDS 8 THE EXPRESSIONS
Imperial
Dec  10
NIGHTMARES ON WAX (OJ SET)
Open Studios
Dec  13
THE ALBUM LEAF
Rickshaw Theatre
Dec  15
ROY WOODS ■ UNLOCKED TOUR
Imperial
Dec 16
IKEITHMAS VII A FOOD BANK FUNDRAGER
Rickshaw Theatre
Jan 12
T.I.
Commodore Ballroom
Jan 16
ICATE LE RON AND TIM PRESLEY
Fox Cabaret
Jan 16
GREAT GOOD FINE OK
Alexander Gastown
Jan 26
DUMBFOUNDEAD
Alexander Gastown
Jan 27
LIZZO
I Alexander Gastown
Feb 7
CHERRY GLAZERR
The Coablt
Feb 1
THE LEMON TWIGS
The Cobalt
«-
Feb 8
RUN THE JEWELS
Vogue Theatre
Feb 22
CLIPPING.
The Biltmore
Feb 2 Feb 4
LYDIA LOVELESS   SERATONES I
The Biltmore  I The Cobalt I
Feb 16
CLOUD NOTHINGS
The Biltmore
Feb 11
WHITE LIES
Rickshaw Theatre
Feb 28
THE RADIO DEPT.
The Biltmore
Feb 23
HIPPO CAMPUS
The Cobalt
Mar 4
MOON DUO
The Cobalt
Mar  12
THE WOOD BROTHERS
Imperial
Tickets  & more shows at
TimbreConcerts. com\
W
Mar 17
M0
Vogue Theatre
Mar 18
JOSEPH
B The Biltmore I
1

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