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 tdol. 34 I jpo. 11 3$sue. 38*5 o o q o o o 0
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FEB 2017
COVER:    PALE   RED   BY   KONSTANTIN   PRODANOVIC
FUN WRITERS WANTED
EDITOR'S NOTE
jfeature*
07
08
16
- GRANVILLE   ISLAND  2040
What happens when ECUAD leaves?
- OVERDOSE  CRISIS
Looking to the streets.
- THE  COURTNEYS
New moves.
iscorder interviewed Hunter S. Thompson for the July 1986 issue. On
journalism, he had this to say:
Well, right now, the trouble with journalism now is that it's not fun. If this sounds frivolous, think whatever you want. But you don't get into journalism for money; most likely
you'll just pay your rent; very few people, even the best editors and writers do more. And
when I say fun I'm talking about looking at Richard Nixon in November 0/1972 and saying
"that swine, that bastard, how could any evil man like that become president." I remember watching television and thinking that's the crookedest son of a bitch I've ever seen in
my life. What does this mean for me? And I remember thinking, ah ha, he is so crooked we
can get him. And we did get him. He was right. He claimed the liberals and the maniacs
and the people with personal grudges came after him and got him. He was right. It had to
be done. And that's fun.
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17 -  PALE RED
Inside  Soft Opening
18 -  NOTHINGNESS
Make  it good.
19 -   CHAPEL  SOUND
#wutdoing et als.
Column* + spore
04  -  Hot  Head
04 -  Filmstripped:
Canada On Screen
05 -  Shelf Life:
Pity  City Publishing
09 -  Discorder  Revisited:
Paul Leahy
10 -  Real  Live  Action
12 -  Shindig Photo Essay
13 -  Calendar
14 -  Under Review
20 -  On The  Air:
Unceded Airwaves
21 - Program Guide
23  -  Charts
Publisher: Student Radio Society of UBC // CiTR Station Manager: Hugo Noriega // Advertising Coordinator:
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Moe, Sydney Thorne, Jasper D. Wrinch
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FONDATION
SOCAN
FOUNDATION
We have published 344 issues since, and yet, HST's words have never been
more relevant.
I can't sugarcoat an Editor's Note this month. I'm not going to pretend that
I'm not sick by the hateful administration leading the United States, and that I'm
not scared at how it has been stirring similar undercurrents of racism, sexism
and prejudice that already exist in Canada. I envy the editors that can overlook
disturbing headlines to stroke pop icons in their pages without some sense of obligation to write about more.
Discorder turns 34 this month. Although our dominant brand has been alternative music, we have published — quite literally — hundreds of articles on social
and political issues that impact our community. Over the next year, we're going
to continue expanding beyond arts coverage. We'll still interview your favourite
new punk band, but we're going to publish more articles about other stuff, too.
We recognize that some headlines have understated ripples in our underground
arts community, and those deserve to be talked about more.
If this speaks to you, email editor.discorder@citr.ca about contributing to
Discorder.
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EDITOR'S NOTE HOT HEAD
Hot Head is Discorder's feedback column, encouraging any comments on the magazine or the community we serve. All submissions are welcome and will be considered for print unless
they contain hateful language. To submit to Hot Head, email comments to editor.discorder@citr.ca clearly indicating whether or not the submission is anonymous. Physical submissions can
be left for Discorder Editor-in-Chief Brit Bachmann at the CiTR Station in the UBC Nest. To submit to Hot Head is to consent to being published in the magazine and online at discorder.ca
REPORTED AS SPAM
This is a call out to "bands" whose sponsored ads I report as spam every time they show up in my feed. Specifically ones that have every social media platform on lockdown, 20 photo-
shoots under their belt, 4 or 5 signature sexy matching outfits before they have any music for me to listen to. You are forcing me to judge you on what you present primarily: your outfits
and your aggressive social media campaign. I dare not say any of this to my peers in the music scene because a) I will be seen as not "sex-positive" or a bad feminist b) hordes of white
knights will rush to the defense of the helpless "Susans" who are *nice* and need your blind support. I'm sorry but a) I am not judging anyone on their sexual liberation, but I refuse to
conflate self-commodification with feminism. I am maybe also sick of having being a female musician — something I hold sacred and comes with great social and emotional barriers for
most — be represented by pale skinny bodies under the guise of sex-positivity, and having that be the fastest way to get recognition and praise in my community [read: white supremacy,
auty privilege] and b) I refuse to patronize anyone because they are female. I actually hold them to a higher standard. I expect better. I would love to criticize you on the merits of your
— Ipalnuc
DA OF MIDDLE AMEn,u«
he New York Times reported that the crowd that gathered for the Women's March on Washington was three times larger than the group that turned out for Trump's inauguration.
Though it is impossible to gauge exact numbers, it's visibly clear that both the Women's March and Obama's inauguration in 2009 drew many more people than the ceremony at the White
House on January 20th. For a lot of us, these turnouts were heartening: seeing groups of people standing against oppression outnumber those who support this new harbinger of lethal
inequality felt like a light in the storm. But these numbers reflect something integral about those who voted for Trump last year, which is that these people are mostly working class folks
living in the midwestern and southern states who sure as hell aren't going to be able to take a weekend off work, buy a plane ticket, or traverse the country because, y'all, they can't afford
it. Furthermore, those who voted for Trump are statistically older and living in rural areas, which means their mobility is likely limited. Going out to protest, or to show support for any kind
of cause, is a privilege for those who can afford it and who are physically able to do so. We need to consider the swaths of land between the coasts, the small communities that may only
get one television channel. Class is at the forefront of the current political divide: to those living in dwindling rural communities, nothing is more pressing than economic stability as they
watch jobs move into the city, then out of the country, destroying their livelihoods. Part of Trump's appeal, unfortunately, is that he speaks to the people for whom issues of social justice
come second to putting bread on the table and protecting the resources that they spend most of their lives cultivating. —A Disenfranchised Farmer's Daughter
IN AN ALTERNATE REALITY WHERE BOWIE IS DEAD AND THE US PRESIDENT IS WAGING A WAR AGAINST VAGINAS...
...creative be music fund gave universal $56,035 of tax payer money so that dear rouge could tickle synthesizers into an album [handclapping emoji] well done creative be, well fucking
done. —sad alice
FILMSTRIPPED
CANADA ON SCREEN AT THE CINEMATHEQUI
words by Leigh Empress // illustration by Henrietta Lau
ID
Jn keeping with avant-
garde roots, Vancouver's
Cinematheque is host to
an ambitious nation-wide project this year: Canada On Screen. It
aims at familiarizing Canadians
with the moving images "that
have made a major contribution
to the practice of cinema, and to
the practice of Canadians speaking to themselves," explains
Executive and Artistic Director,
Jim Sinclair.
The Cinematheque, along with
TIFF, Library & Archives Canada
and Cinematheque quebecoise
have assembled a list of 150
quintessential Canadian films,
most of which will be screened
for free in 2017 as part of Canada
150 celebrations.
In talking to Sinclair, I learn
that the process of selecting
a mere 150 works was agonized over by committees of
film critics, academics, and industry professionals. There are
nine categories of works selected, from familiar genres like
Feature Film and Documentary,
to Commercials and Music Videos.
The number of works in each
category varies based on the
significance of Canadian achievement in each category. Through
the process, Sinclair assures that
diversity was a consideration:
"When we were tweaking
these lists, it was very important to make sure the regions were
represented, that women were
represented, that filmmakers of
diverse ethnic backgrounds
including First Nations filmmakers — were represented."
Canada 150, the impetus and
funding backbone of Canada On
Screen and other ambitious proj -
ects across the country, is the
focus of some contention. Canada
150 celebrates the 150th anniversary of Confederation. Critics
have argued that Canada 150, in
fact, glorifies 150 years of colonization, and that it undermines reconciliation efforts with
Indigenous peoples.
This controversy is one that
Sinclair does not take lightly.
While the topics of colonization
and Indigenous perspectives are
noticeably subdued in the selection of works for Canada On
Screen, The Cinematheque will
be adjusting their bi-monthly
program to include a statement
that acknowledges Vancouver
screenings are taking place on
the ancestral and unceded land of
Coast Salish peoples.
The organizers of Canada On
Screen, and Sinclair in particular,
strive for Canada On Screen to become a "living project." The intention is to add to the list, treating this year's screenings and
outreach as the launch of a larger
initiative to preserve and disseminate influential older works.
"This project is not only about
naming these films, but in many
cases restoring and digitizing
them," explains Sinclair. "By
digitizing them, they are made
more accessible to Canadians ...
and more accessible to [cinemas] because they don't have
to ship 35 millimeter film cans
across Canada."
All Canada On Screen screenings are free to the public. As
a companion, there will be an
online catalogue featuring essays on each of the 150 works.
Sinclair and The Cinematheque's
Operations and Programming
Associate Shaun Inouye have
each contributed five essays to
the catalogue.
hen asked how many
of the films The
Cinematheque will
screen in 2017, Sinclair is opti
mistic: "We're trying to screen
as many of the 150 works as is
practical for us to screen in the
cinema. We can't screen 19 sea
sons of The Beachcombers ... but
we are doing [all] Anne of Green
Gables because it's only five or six
hours long ... We will try to keep
it interesting.
At the moment, The
Cinematheque is hosting 2-3
screenings of Canada On Screen
each month, each one including
at least two works off the list.
They intend to
program a full
month of Canada On Screen in July.
"It can be difficult to get
Canadians out to [watch] Canadian
film," laments Sinclair. "It is always challenging to get bums in
seats to see Canadian films."
If January's attendance for
Canada On Screen is any indication, getting bums in seats won't
be a problem.
Pick up a copy of The
Cinematheque's bi-monthly program at most locations where
Discorders are also distributed, or
check thecinematheque.ca for a full
program schedule. To see a complete
list 0/Canada On Screen selections,
visit tiff.net/canadaonscreen.
HOT HEAD / FILMSTRIPPED: CANADA ON SCREEN SHELF LIFE
PITY CITY PUBLISHING
words by Brit Bachmann // images courtesy of Pat Valade
"U
Iou can spend five bucks
and, instead of buying
a coffee one day, have
a piece of art that somebody made
with some intention," says Pat
Valade, speaking to the bleeding
heart of his new zine project, Pity
City Publishing.
In an age when newspapers are
migrating content to web and / or
cutting print altogether, there is a
renewed interest in independent
publishing, due in large part to the
co-opting of zines by artists. As
Pat points out, "anyone can make
a zine. You just need paper and a
stapler." Made on the cheap, zines
can be one of the most affordable
ways of disseminating art.
And that's Pity City's intention — to provide artists with
the means of getting their work
seen. A photographer himself,
Pat understands the obstacles: "I
come from a contemporary art
background, having had a fine
art education at university where
everything is focused on the gallery and the fine finished product. Everything is big. I'm just
kind of sick of that because it's
pretty inaccessible, especially to
emerging artists in Vancouver, to
do that kind of art, on that kind
of scale."
Two weeks into Pity City, and Pat
already has a list of artists he will
be collaborating with over the next
several months. Some names include Aya Garcia, Scotty Alva, Paul
Rarick, Teresa Holly, and Brayden
Naka. Pat also commissioned local
illustrator Marena Skinner to design the Pity City logo.
hen asked about his
role, Pat prefers the
term facilitator to curator. Every zine is unique in that
Pat's involvement in the publishing process is left up to the artist.
Sometimes Pat will help with layout and composition, other times
he's just the wheels. In following
with a decidedly relaxed approach
to publishing, there are no deadlines at Pity City. Except, perhaps, for his own work.
Pity City is a platform for Pat's
personal projects as well. Zines
and film photography share a certain fallibility that attracts him: "I
just like things that are not perfect ... I like the opportunity for
errors, it's more interesting."
That being said, Pat swears
he's not a film snob, especially
not with the artists publishing through Pity City. "I think
you should use what you have,
whether it's a phone, or a digital
camera, or a homemade camera,
or the best film camera ever — I
don't fucking care," says Pat. "It
took me a couple years to mature
out of the 'everyone should use
film' thing."
fllthough Pity City is printing simply — anywhere
that offers photocopying
services — Pat maintains that
each book is made "with integrity." At the same time, it is just
toner on paper. "I kind of like
the disposability of it," explains
Pat. "There is a finite time you're
I J I
I     I
I
>
WEWANTTaHEAR
I
Its quick,
painless,
and you
could
win
some sweet
Discorder
merch
VISIT:
http://bit.ly/2fUGy8M
-rtl
going to have [a zine] before it
doesn't look the same ... You can
spill a coffee on it, and it's not a
big deal."
explains Pat. "There is a stigma
in Vancouver that you can't really
do anything. And it's true a lot
of the time because everything is
really expensive."
With so many plans for Pity
City, on top of a full-time job and
his own art practice, it's hard to
imagine how Pat has time for it
all. When asked, he responds, "I
think sleeping is a waste of time,
and I get heavy anxiety if I'm not
doing things. [Pity City] is a good
exercise for my mental stability. I don't like idle time ... and
as a 25-year-old bachelor, I have
more free time than most."
Let's hope he stays single, for
Pity's sake.
While Pity City relies on photocopying businesses for the moment, there are plans to create an
official headquarters in March.
It will include a main studio,
darkroom, and exhibition / venue
space for the occasional gathering. It is through establishing
a studio that Pity City will truly
become a collective, encouraging
community in a city that has recently lost so many of its favourite hang-outs.
Unsurprisingly, the name, Pity
City is "a slight joke towards
some people's attitudes about
art and culture in this city,"
Follow Pity City on Instagram
@pity city publishing, and visit
pitycitypublishing.bigcartel.com for
current inventory.
SHELF LIFE: PITY CITY V
DO ONE THING REALLY, REALLY WELL. The smell of fish fills the
air of the Public Market,
which buzzes with the en
ergy of eager shoppers. Espresso
machines steam and churn, stall
owners chat with customers and
hand out samples. It's
easy to forget that just
outside, the fate of
the market and
community surrounding it is in
question.
Granville Island
is a cultural institution in Vancouver.
It is a hub for creativity and innovation.
But right now, its direction is
uncertain, with one of its largest tenants preparing to leave:
Emily Carr University of Art +
Design is moving to the False
Creek Flats next year, leaving two of Granville Island's
largest buildings unoccupied. ECUAD has been part
of Granville Island since the
beginning of its transition to
an arts centre in the late '70s
and early l8os. The managers
of GI, Canadian Mortgage and
Housing Corporation (CMHC)
have embarked on a process
called Granville Island 2040 to
work with the community in
proposing redevelopment, in
large part as a response to the
departure of ECUAD. GI 2040
aims to address the issues that
currently limit its possibilities.
I met up with Sebastian
Lippa, Project Manager of
Planning and Development on
Granville Island to find out
what these issues are, and how
the CMHC plans to address the
vacant ECUAD buildings. But from
the sounds of it, there is less of a
plan, and more of a vision.
"We don't know exactly who
and what types of things would
go in there, but [we want to keep
it] in that realm of arts and innovation," said Lippa. He described
Emily Carr's North Building as an
"opportunity to provide a lot of
space for people working in that
area [of arts and innovation],"
something the CMHC has not
seen sustained.
The last 30 years have established Granville Island in the
hearts of all Vancouverites,
and Lippa stresses that
the 2040 committee is determined to
respect that. 'The
community,' as
Lippa described it,
consists of anyone
who wishes to comment on the future
of the Island, whether
they are part of the arts
affordable places to breathe fresh
life into the GI arts scene.
"We'll be looking to work with
the community and organizations
within the community to help us
really shape the design and the actual uses in those buildings," said
Lippa. "The process will involve an
open call to the community, and
we'll be looking for groups and individuals who are interested in being part of this arts and innovation
hub, to help us meet the objective
around providing those types of
spaces for people."
The types of spaces he is
talking about will be varied. In
the North Building, for instance,
He believes that public consultation is required to build on
the success of Granville Island's
past, while making it relevant to
a new generation of tenants.
A younger demographic is a
focus for the 2040 redevelopment plan. With ECUAD leaving, the student population will
also be gone. This concerns the
CMHC. Part of their aim is to
encourage the "dirty arts" on
the island through new food and
beverage options, and by keeping affordability for emerging
creatives. They plan to reach out
to the strong art scene of East
Vancouver in order to tap into
some of that emerging talent,
and bring it to Granville Island.
One example of CMHC's outreach to the emerging arts is its
recruitment of the collective, Red
Gate Arts Society. They are influ-
.-";>
We1 re not going to just
ild it and none thev cod
build it and nope they come
scene in the city or not.
GI 2040 seeks to preserve the
creative identity of Granville
Island, but how that will unfold is still vague. So far, the
CMHC plans to keep ECUAD's
South Building as an arts education facility, and transform the
North Building into artist studios.
These studio spaces will hopefully
be filled with creative innovators, with the aim of providing
the CMHC will develop multiple
types of artist spaces that reflect the individual needs of each
group. This will be done through
shared workshop and gallery
spaces, studio spaces for individual artists, and larger spaces for
live performance. "We're not going to just 'build it and hope they
come,'" Lippa insists, stating
that they want to have the community dictate what is needed.
ential in the East Vancouver and
Hastings communities, and will be
bringing the younger, "dirty arts"
culture that the CMHC is after to
GI. They also bring with them the
hope of developing new arts education programs.
"We are very interested in
expanding our offerings across
the spectrum of education, from
the formal, including public and
post-secondary, to private, to
drop-in work shops. Red Gate
falls into that category. We're
all quite excited to see how they
will use their space," said Lippa.
Though Red Gate has taken over
the Revue Stage, a venue not
within ECUAD, the CMHC hopes
to attract organizations with similar ethos to the vacated ECUAD
buildings, to continue developing
the tradition of arts education on
Granville Island.
Bed Gate Arts Society
opened their new location on Granville Island
January 14. According to Red Gate
co-director Ana Rose Carrico,
they were approached with this
unique opportunity last year:
"Around September [the 2040
committee] offered us this space
quite unexpectedly." And Red
Gate couldn't say no.
Carrico says that the CMHC
told Red Gate that they wanted to
increase the nightlife on GI. The
2040 committee wanted more
grit. And Red Gate's response
was, well, "if you want it to be
louder and messier, then we're
your people."
"Having this place does fit our
mandate," explained Carrico, stating her excitement at the opportunity. She thinks that the redistribution of the ECUAD buildings
will be a very interesting experiment, and is curious to see what
other new artists and creatives
will bring to Granville Island.
The Red Gate takeover of the
Revue Stage is not a permanent
placement, as the space they now
occupy will eventually become an
expansion to the Public Market,
if all goes to plan. But they hope
to remain on GI if the new Revue
Stage venue is successful.
Granville Island's newest
tenant is one step toward
w the 2040 redevelopment
plan, but there are still many hurdles to overcome. The lack of access on public transit is an issue,
as are the rising rent costs in the
city. The biggest hurdle will be to
keep the visions of the community at the forefront of the operation. After all, Granville Island is
a place to explore art and innovation, both of which need strong
communities in order to survive.
If you are a creative interested in
the spaces that will be available at
the ECUAD buildings, email Sebastian
Lippa at slippa@cmhc-schl.gc.ca for
further information, or to join the
info mailing list.
GI2040 WHY WE NEED THE OPIOID AWARENESS DAY OF ACTION
words by Oona Krieg //illustrations by Danielle Magee
Jt is with a heavy heart I write about the opioid crisis. In 2016, British Columbians lost 914 people
to accidental death due to opioid overdose. Take a
moment to visualize what 914 people look like. 914 accidents. How can I translate the number into human cost?
How do I illustrate the vacancy left by the bodies no longer
breathing? The friends, families and communities grappling with these losses?
For those of you not 'in the know,' I will recap the opioid crisis this past year. In April 2016, a medical emergency was declared in B.C. due to the accelerated incidences of preventable, accidental deaths from overdose.
This issue isn't limited to our province. Across North
America, we have an unprecedented crisis as the illicit
drug trade is flooded with fentanyl. In September 2016,
fentanyl was being found in 67 percent of overdoses in
British Columbia. Shockingly, on December 2, 2016, the
Vancouver Police Department stated that 100 percent of
drugs they collected from the Downtown Eastside (DTES)
had tested positive for fentanyl and another drug, carfen-
tanil. These tests include samples of stimulants, as well as
substances sold as opioids.
Drug users, community groups, medical and health
professionals, and emergency care providers are scrambling to limit the impact of the arrival of fentanyl and
carfentanil. Fentanyl is already 50-100 times more toxic
than other opioids. Carfentanil, an elephant tranquilizer,
is 10,000 times more toxic than morphine, 100 times more
potent than fentanyl.
In Vancouver, agencies like Vancouver Area Network of
Drug Users (VANDU), Portland Hotel Society (PHS), and
Crosstown Clinic and Drug Users Resource Center (DURC)
have worked 20+ years to humanize substance users.
Community-based action groups and agencies have been
trying to address the stigma of addiction. If it weren't for
the hard-won community engagement already in place in
Vancouver, the fentanyl crisis would have a much greater
toll across British Columbia.
At the Emergency Opioid Summit in Ottawa from
November 17-18, 2016, politicians attempted to brush
up on the drug policy stances of their individual parties. According to many service providers, the results of
the two-day conference completely missed the mark.
Across Canada, 94 percent of drug strategy funding is
spent on police enforcement. And enforcement seems to
be the government's only long-term plan to cope with the
overdose deaths in British Columbia so far, which at the
time of the summit was already 730 people. 128 British
Columbians, four people per day, died in November.
Disproportionately, most of those deaths were community
members of the DTES. It seems shortsighted that no one
from their community was invited to present at or witness
the Emergency Opioid Summit in person.
To help illustrate the intensity of the situation in
Vancouver, frontline staff at shelters, housing projects and
Insite reported reversing 50+ opioid overdoses in a span
of time shorter than the duration of the Emergency Opioid
Summit. On Sunday, November 20, frontline staff, volunteers, and peers reported over 90 overdoses in one day.
The community has reacted by creating unsanctioned,
peer-supervised consumption tents in the back alleys of
the DTES. Although the VPD have encouraged substance
users to access harm reduction services, the police have
also told consumption pop-ups they are in violation of fire
lane codes. In November, the VPD were threatening to tear
them down. Vancouver Coastal Health had admonished the
pop-ups as illegal, and refused to provide support to the
volunteers running them.
On December 12, the leash technically came off. The
Federal government tabled Bill C-37, essentially giving
91+  lo-reJLO-™*
permission for Health Authorities to act without reprisal.
Vancouver Coastal Health set up an emergency tent on a
freshly paved lot just off Hastings Street. All Community
VCH staff are able to administer naloxone, a drug that
counters the effects of opioid overdose, after receiving
training to do so. There were also plans for three new
consumption sites before January (have yet to come to
fruition). The unsanctioned pop ups are no longer
being disavowed and threatened. Even Mayor
Gregor Robertson lobbied for and won a
tax increase to help with the crisis.
Everyone I spoke to who has been
working in the DTES is grateful for
the reprieve and support. Very few of
them are willing to criticize the progress, but as an observer of this crisis,
I see it is too late for so many. While
people argue over who is most deserving of funds being redirected to the opioid crisis, the toll on the community and
those who live in it is demoralizing. Grief and
loss are tangible, and permeate the DTES streets.
Jn 2016, we saw a 79 percent jump in overdose
deaths from the year before, and 227 percent from
2014. The introduction of naloxone, naloxone
training, and education has made a huge difference for
DTES community members and their allies. VANDU has
recruited volunteers to patrol alleys day and night; PHS
formed bike teams for laneway response; DURC, which
was strangely shut down amid this crisis, is now functioning again as a rapid overdose response site. Overall,
the DTES is seeing a reduction in accidental overdose
overall due to their own unsupported mobilization. In
December, we saw an increase in deaths across B.C., but
a reduction of the saturation centered in the DTES. Of the
142 overdose deaths in the province in December,  51 were
in the DTES and 91 across the rest of British Columbia.
As of January 2017, B.C. Chief Medical Officer Dr.
Perry Kendall and VCH's Chief Medical Officer Patricia
Daly have called on the availability of prescription heroin and hydromorphone, in the hopes that access to prescribed substances will discourage the use of fentanyl and
carfentanil-laced street drugs. Despite the request, B.C.
Health Minister Terry Lake says there is not enough public
support for prescribed injectable drugs, and doesn't want
to move "too quickly" to expand the small Vancouver
clinic, Crosstown, which currently prescribes morphine
and clinical heroin.
The amount of public support for what is archaically considered a moral choice shouldn't be considered; best practice
and evidence-based research is what the Health Minister
should be using to move forward. Once again, political stalling continues to cost people their lives. In an interview with
CBC's On The Coast, Federal Health Minister Jane Philpott
said B.C. must reach "the absolute end of what it can do"
before a federal health emergency will be declared over the
overdose crisis — and as it stands, the province is not using
all its powers. While the blame gets tossed between public,
federal and provincial interests, people are continuing to die
from preventable, accidental overdoses.
Arguably, grassroots initiatives have been the only
practical and effective action towards saving and raising
the quality of life in the DTES. However, there are limits to what can be done. Access to services and a spectrum
of care are critical, but not always available. Community
education, multi-directional approaches, and long-term
treatment plans could help break the moral codification
that currently clouds the eyes of the public, and could
really act as models for new policy. However, the words
addiction, addict, using, users, recovery are still dirty. The
general public needs a better understanding of the complexity of these terms. While the experts on substance use,
the drug users themselves,have clearly stated that to turn
this terminal situation around, they need access to pharmaceutical grade opiates, treatment plans based on personal goals, stable housing and naloxone training for all
community members, public perceptions stand in the way.
The stigmatization of addiction, addicts, users, the
DTES, and mental health prevents the general
public and B.C.'s Health Authority from
responding to this crisis in a humane,
timely and cohesive manner.
Jordan Westfall is the president of
the Canadian Association of People Who
Use Drugs, or CAPUD, which advocates
for the inclusion of drug users in policy making at all levels of government.
He is part of the consciousness raising
and active resistance, Opioid Awareness
Day of Action on February 21, which will
see demonstrations in Victoria, Vancouver,
Edmonton, Toronto, Montreal and Halifax.
CAPUD's mandate is to demand drug decriminalization
in the short term, and full legalization and regulation of
illicit drugs in the long term. In line with CAPUD's dictum, Jordan asserts, "We're in an emergency, and there's
absolutely no way that arresting and charging people with
drug possession will help reduce this crisis. As an immediate response, our government should decriminalize drug
possession and focus on turning people to medical centres to get their drugs tested. Anyone who does get their
drugs tested is a good Samaritan for interrupting a chain
of events that could have ended someone's life. In British
Columbia, we are demanding rapid expansion of injectable
opioid treatments, including a significant expansion of
Crosstown clinic's capacity in the Downtown Eastside."
Associations like CAPUD exist to break established
narratives about people who use drugs. Referring to the
efforts to decriminalize drug possession and promote accessibility to pharmaceutical opioids, Jordan states, "the
[accepted] narrative [is] that we can't make decisions for
ourselves. We know exactly what will end this epidemic,
and our government refuses to acknowledge it." VANDU,
OPIOID CRISIS for example, has organized themselves and are determined
to save the lives of the people in their neighborhood.
Jordan, who works closely with VANDU, affirms "they
never let the public forget about how many people were
dying. They've used days of action in the past to show the public
how devastating the war on drugs
is and to create positive change
for health and human rights."
Jordan infers that Vancouver's
Opioid Awareness Day of Action
is special because we will see a
coalition of impacted parties, that
it will be a platform for sharing
the efforts and stories of people
who use drugs, frontline workers,
and families. This peer-led coalition will take to the streets in the
heart of downtown Vancouver to
demand an end to this overdose
epidemic, and the decriminalization of people who use drugs. Part
of this action will be memorializing the lives lost as a result of the war on drugs. Jordan stresses, "Every day they
wait to repeal legislation that could save people's lives,
every day they exclude us from decisions that determine
our life or death, and every day people die and continue to
die criminalized. Our government is complicit. Our day of
action is about disrupting the narrative that our government has this epidemic under control."
Summarizing Vancouver poet-warrior Bud Osborn's
protests in Raise Shit, when waging war on drugs, it becomes a war on addicts. Meaning, society loses sight of
an individual's life in the virulent turmoil of trying to sort
out a moral codification around addiction and who's at
fault. This code built on social class, identity and location
are outdated and deadly.
Ironically, I researched this article with the help of
hydromorphone. I broke my collarbone on New Year's
Eve and had a subsequent surgery 11 days later. I was
prescribed morphine for the first week, and I am so glad
that I could take my pain medication without the fear of
dying because of it. Since my accident, four people — two
I know interpersonally — have died. They didn't regularly
use opiates. So many people I know
died last year; I stopped counting
in October of 2016.
Being situated close to this crisis
because of my work with Mental
Health & Addictions, volunteering
in the DTES, my partner also working in the DTES, and my Vancouver
community, it is mind boggling to
see the lack government response
and accountability, the insincerity
of broken promises, the blame being shifted around, and service stall
after service stall.
I encourage all who have been
impacted by the opioid epidemic
to get involved in the Opioid
Awareness Day of Action February
21. Bring more of the public in, form complicated coalitions, bridge disparate communities to form a spectrum
of care, use evidence-based responses, take capital 'A' —
Action. First and most importantly, as a community, we
need to take the stigma out of the equation collectively. It
is the stigma of substance use that is preventing us from
being able to act effectively against to the opioid epidemic.
The public can get involved in the Opioid Awareness Day of
Action by getting in touch with representatives in each participating city: contact info is posted on capud.ca. You can also follow @CAPUD20i6 on Twitter and Facebook
@lifewontwaitfeb2i for updates.
Sources:
Boyd, S., D MacPherson, B. Osborn. Raise Skit: Social. Action Sailing Lives. Fernwood
Puh Canada. 2009.
"Carfentanil Linked To Vancouver Man's Death" November 29 2016. http://mediare-
kases.vpd.ca/2016/ll/29/mrfmtanil-linked-to-vancower-mans-death/
"Fentanyl-Detected Illicit Drug Overdose Deaths January 1, 2012 to October 21,
2016."British Columbia Coroner's Service. December 7 2016. http://www2.gov.bcca/
assets/gov/public-sqfety-and-emergmcy-services/deam-investigation/statistical/fmtanyl-de-
kckd-overdose.pdf
"How the Province is Responding." British Columbia Government (Website), http://
www2.gov. be ca/gov/content/overdose/how-the-province-is-respondmg
"Illicit Drug Overdose Deaths in BC January 1, 2007 - December 31, 2016." British
Columbia Coroner's Service. Date Unknown, http://www2.gov.bc.ca/assets/gov/pubhc-safe-
y-and-emergmy-sewices/deam-mvestigation/statistical/illicit-drug.pdf
'Joint task force mobilized to scale up overdose response." British Columbia Government
(Website). July 27 2016 https://news.gov.bcca/rekases/2016PREM0082-001361
Know Your Source? (Website), https://knowyoursource.ca
McElroy, Justin. "Ayear of overdoses: 7 charts that show the drug crisis." CBC News.
Last modified January 18 2017. http://www.cbc.ca/mws/canada/briUsh-columbia/a-
year-of-overdoses-7-charts-that-shw-me-scope-of-b-c-s-drug-crisis-l.3910246
"Provincial health officer declares public health emergency." British Columbia Government
(Website). April 14 2016 https://news.gov.bc.ca/rekases/2016HLTH0026-000568
Shaw, Rob. "Givefree clean drugs to addicted users says top B. C. health officials. " Vancouver Sun. January 20 2017. http://vancouversun.com/news/
local-news/b-c-should-give-clean-drugs-to-users-say-top-health-officials
Shaw, Rob, Nick Eagland. "Health Minister concerned ckan drug proposal lacks public
support." Vancouver Sun. January 20 2017. http://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/
health-minister-concerned-clean-drug-proposal-lacks-publk-support
Various, 'Joint Statement of Action to Address the Opioid Crisis." Last modified
November 29 2016. https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/substance-abuse/
opioid-conference/joint-statement-action-address-opioid-crisis.html
"VPD Chief Palmer Joined By Mayor And Vancouver Fire Chief To Discuss Fentanyl."
(Video) December 162016. http://mediarekases.vpdca/2016/12/16/17403/
DISCORDER REVISITED
PAUL LEAHY
words by Erica Leiren // illustration by Michael Shantz
le best song to dance to in
Junior High was Sweet's
^^'Fox On the Run." Ricky
van Rikxoort and I were the two
shortest kids in our grade, and
we both loved to dance. He was a
rarity in that he was a grade nine
guy who would dance — not just
so that he could smarmily pick
up girls, but for the joy of it. So
at dances, there'd be Ricky on the
gym floor surrounded by 10 girls
at a time, and all the other guys
lined up against the wall watching.
Sweet had a string of great songs,
like "The Ballroom Blitz" and
"Little Willy." That was another
one of our favourites, but more of
a roller skating than dancing song
— perfect for Saturdays at the
Stardust Roller Rink.
I never thought I'd hear music
like that again. So when Gord and
I wedged ourselves into the tiny
front room of Dental Lab just before Valentine's Day 2012, what
happened next seemed miraculous and unbelievable. Paul Leahy
strutted on stage with his new
band, Hello Polly, and commenced
to re-vivify the Glam Era right
in front of our eyes... but with
All!New!Original!Songs! Wow.
It was all there. The big, beautiful guitar sound up front; Paul
playing with attitude, effortless
style and swagger just on the
edge of bombast; this fabulous,
acrobatic voice leaping octaves
with panache; witty poetry skipping through the songs like a
rock glinting across the top of a
sunlit lake on a perfect throw.
As true talent will, Paul made it
look easy. He stood there projecting bright white energy off the
stage as though it were flying from
his fingers and his entire person
in invisible rays. The concert was
such an amazing surprise that the
audience could only dance and
marvel at what scarcely seemed
possible. Glam. The Return of Real
Glam. Played by a master surrounded by his acolytes.
Hello Polly, which at that time
was Paul with Pointed Sticks
members Ian Tiles (drums), Tony
Bardach (bass) and Gord Nicholl
(keyboards) were stupendous,
and instantly became my favourite band. They remain so today in
their new incarnation as, simply,
Polly. Every song on All Messed
Up (2012) is a hit, with "Jet Jet &
the Golden Feather," "It's a Glam
Glitter World" and "Put A Little
English On It" topping my playlist.
How did it all happen? Paul
first played guitar in The Toys,
whose song "Hello" (1978) features incredible lead vocals by
Rex Jackson-Coombs. After The
Toys, Paul was in the legendary
No Fun with David M and Pico.
They became CiTR darlings in the
'80s with their subversive Surrey
provenance and the tune, "Be
Like Us."
Paul bridged the millennium (1998-2006) with The
Transvestimentals, whose enchanting, otherworldly "Cosmic
Planet Rock" called upon the talents of Nicole and Valeria — who
in addition to being musicians,
were both candy-makers at Lee's
Chocolates on 10th Avenue until
it closed.
Next, Paul collaborated
with producer / musician Marc L'Esperance in
Pleasure Suit, a project that proved to be an
ideal incubator for Paul's
return to his ultra-Glam
roots in (Hello) Polly.
e were a few friends
visiting Paul at the
hospital last month.
Gord and I entered, tentatively,
bouquet in hand, not wanting
to disturb. Paul was seated with
his guitar, jamming with Marc
on "Filthy Chair," practicing for
the then-upcoming Super Duper
Show at the Rickshaw Theatre.
Paul rose and gestured for us
come in. Hugs all around and
then he found his notebook and
wrote: "Hang out." Offered cups
of tea, we felt welcomed and sat
down to join the circle. Paul's
wife Kimiko looked through his
lyric notebook for a line they
were trying to remember as Marc
leaned in close to watch the
movement of Paul's nimble fingers on the fretboard. And then
they were playing together, even
managing to sing a few lines. A
verse. A chorus. Another verse.
There was magic in the room and
we all felt it. Sublime.
Paul Leahy passed away January 16,
the night before his tribute concert at
the Rickshaw Theatre. We send out love
and condolences to his family, friends
andfans.
OPIOID CRISIS/ DISCORDER REVISTED: PAUL LEAHY Heal tine
Action
JANUARY 2017
SHINDIG 33 SEMI-FINAL #1 DEVOURS/
MARK MILLS /PRISON HAIR
JANUARY 10 / PAT'S PUB
hether by design or coincidence, there was a distinct synthiness
<4|%P to the acts playing the first round of Shindig 33's semi-finals. The
still-futuristic (even in 2017!) sheen of keyboards and electronic beats were
a stark contrast with the jazz age ambience of Pat's Pub, all brick and smatterings of neon on the walls, with brass street lamps bookending the venue's
dance floor.
The first two acts of the night made absolutely sure that said dance floor
was being used. Devours — a.k.a. Jeff Cancade — started the night with
his brand of smart, sexy dance-pop: a little bit Depeche Mode, a little bit PC
Music, with nods to the classical, the choral, and the saccharine here and
there.
Playing a set largely composed of tracks off Late Bloomer, Devours
mostly didn't disappoint, save for the vocals, whose lushness on the album
didn't translate to the live setting at Pat's. Once the title track began, though,
Devours' set vindicated itself in the audience's eyes, setting the stage for kindred spirit Mark Mills to follow up with even more singing and dancing.
Mills' set was wholly oriented toward his vocals; his entire performance
set to backup tracks on his iPhone. It was the night's biggest hit, no doubt
owing to Mills' powerful voice, dance moves and general air of enthusiasm —
he once quipped that he wanted to "win this band contest" in the middle of a
particularly throbbing song. The audience expressed their appreciation with
near-constant dancing. Deep into Mills' set, I was getting down and mouthing the lyrics as if I had put his album on repeat for the past week alongside
Devours' (for research purposes, of course).
It was the final moments of Mills' set, however, that he secured his place
as star of the night. First, Mills covered Drake's "Back to Back" in what was
almost certainly a deliberate touch of playfulness in song choice, given his
surname — "Back to Back" is a diss track targeted at a certain Meek Mill.
He then closed off his set with "Bank Account," a sassy, funky number
of his which he dedicated (in a way) to a past audience member who had
drunkenly pawed at him, only to stick her fingers directly into his "butthole."
But Mills also had something important to say, aside from the (admittedly)
funny story: the importance of enthusiastic consent, highlighted in the song's
refrain: "It's my bank account / Only I can take that money out."
With that many points to his credit, it was no wonder that Mills won the
semi-final round that night. Though the contest had indeed been decided
after Mills' set, the last act — ambient post-rockers Prison Hair — was every
bit as strong in its own way.
"We'll continue the fun in a slower way... we're going to go on a trip
together," the band's frontman said as they started their set, after a Jokes for
Beer segment that was curiously devoid of jokes, save for someone's twist
on the classic "Frayed Knot" joke. Instead, there was a steady stream of facts
of varying funness and an untaken offer to discuss New Year's resolutions.
As I left Pat's Pub, what little I could hear of Prison Hair seemed a fitting
soundtrack as I headed out into the night, homeward bound.
—Chris Yee
FRIDAY THE 13TH W/ WARBABY /
WISHKICKER / FRANK LOVE / MESS
JANUARY 13 / RICKSHAW
.    riday the 13th at the Rickshaw Theater: Four local punk bands back-
dropped by compilations of kills from the 1980 film, Friday the 13th,
featuring none other than the beloved iconic killer, Jason. Naturally, when
they walked out on stage and began to play, Mess was fronted by the hockey-masked killer swinging his knife through the air, until he revealed himself,
took off his shirt, and started singing hardcore punk at full octane. As far as
putting on a show, Mess know how to have fun amidst mass murder, and
thus, a giant $40 bag full of popcorn was unleashed upon the audience spilling popcorn all over the pit while the audience's real popcorn bowls were
filled and immediately thrown across the room. And balloons too — they
bounced and popped among the crowd. Mess' show held true to their band
name, and it was damn fun to watch.
When Frank Love hit the stage, popcorn was still everywhere — during
the set, the audience threw their popcorn and popcorn bowls at Frank Love's
bassist. "I have a deathly popcorn allergy," he pleaded. The songs sounded
like a mix of early '90s independent punk, with slow-to-fast 4-chord structures, guitar chorus effects, and bass fuzz behind the vocalist's bark: "You
want to be appreciated? / Appreciate this!"
Wishkicker took the stage to play what would be bassist Megan
Magdalena's last show with the band. Having caught them before a few
months ago, they have improved greatly. Wishkicker's first release, For
Que, Y? caught some attention as some of the songs were featured in BBC
America TV series Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency, and during an
episode, actor Elijah Wood comments, "This band sucks," whilst none other
than Wishkicker play in the background. Contrary to their TV performance,
Wishkicker played a great set. Rhythm guitarist and vocalist Kyle Schick
donned a Strokes t-shirt given to him by Warbaby's drummer, Kirby. While
the entirety of the first Friday the 13th was projected behind them, the band
members yelled in unison, "This is the perfect song for the shower scene!"
Schick commented on the lack of audience commitment in the pit, saying,
"Sarcastic moshing is the best kind of moshing." During their last song, his
guitar strap unhinged from his guitar, and he threw his shiny (probably new)
red Jaguar aside and grabbed the mic stand, swinging it through the air as
he stepped out onto his monitor.
Once the set wrapped up, the venue shifted a bit of equipment. Before
the last act started, Warbaby premiered their terrifyingly hilarious new music
video for their latest single "Coma Kid." Warbaby have an affinity for being
both terrifying and hilarious, with their attribution of the slogan, "Don't Happy
Be Worry," and with witty lyrics, poppy melodies, and heavy — and I mean
heavy— guitar parts. Somehow they managed to play even faster than
their recordings, which I noticed during my personal favorite, "Eternal Life
Insurance." And I can't think of a more fitting way to end their encore with a
perfect, Warbaby-true rendition of the Friends theme song. —Aidan Danaher
CATELE BON /TIM PRESLEY
JANUARY 16 / FOX CABARET
aving cycled through years of mutual adoration and reciprocal influence by way of various collaborative projects, forever emblematized by
their DRINKS team-up, Cate Le Bon and Tim Presley set out on another of
their many tours, a legacy that started back in Presley's earlier White Fence
days.
Le Bon and Presley welcomed a sold-out show at the Fox Cabaret, the
venue thick with endless, gin-tinted
enthusiasm being blurted out by equally stoked fans from all corners of the
echo chamber.
Dressed all in white, with chalky
face paint to match, Presley's band
filtered onto a gear-covered stage. Le
Bon was tucked modestly away with
a bass guitar, forfeiting the spotlight
entirely to Presley as he drifted into a
reckless and unselfconscious set, a
run-through of his latest album — the
first under his own name — The Wink.
Due to the combination of Presley's
charmingly reclusive and unmistakably genuine (non)gestures coupled
with the theatrical, and somehow somber, influence of the band members'
bizarre and captivating all-white presence, Presley's band leveraged a hazy
and absurdist performance that felt a
bit like astral intervention. Still, Presley's dedication to crisp songwriting and
persistently sublime — if at times abstract — lyricism rooted the performance
to a deeper and more profound relevance, his lyrics being, no doubt, a large
part of what so heavily captivates Presley fans.
Rebounding from one instrument to another, his bandmates seamlessly shifted roles throughout the show, at times double-teaming keyboards or
drums. Regardless, they needed no cues from Presley himself, who was
immersed in his own realm, pulling his eyes closed and guitar close, orienting his attention to the smooth enunciations of his lyrics and wafting vocals.
By the time Presley's band moved into "ER," no one's gaze left the stage,
a transfixion induced by the choppy and asymmetrical rhythmic configurations that shape so much of
the album's mood and melody. The performance
dipped in and out of electronically-imbued spontaneity when least expected and Presley's mild,
on-stage composure, throughout the eccentric and
erratically-charged set, doubtlessly did justice to the
album's immaculate production.
After a quick break, the band returned and
reconfigured on stage, this time dressed in all black
(the drummer seeming particularly relieved at the
chance to wash off his sweat-and-paint-covered
face). Central now, and with a palpably renewed
sense of commitment, Le Bon strummed into "Crab
Day," from her most recent, likewise-titled album
released last year by Drag City.
When Le Bon wasn't holding the audience spellbound with her cosmic glance that seemed to further reverberate her bright vocals, she thrashed back and forth relentlessly,
her feathery hair billowing around her face, her bandmates fully immersed
in an attempt to keep up. Widely recognized as a tremendously talented guitar player, it's no wonder that, in interviews, Presley has previously cited Le
Bon as his favourite, and an unprecedentedly creative, guitarist. Le Bon's
staggering stage presence marks her as nothing short of a goddess, and her
charmingly buoyant Welsh accent left the crowd totally endeared, with fans
beaming in admiration at her sporadic banter.
While the majority of her set was comprised of Crab Day tracks, Le Bon
pulled a few songs from her much-adored 2013 release, Mug Museum, with
small voices in the crowd singing along in nostalgia. Just as the set flickered out and the stage cleared, Le Bon strode back out with her band and
Tim Presley who (the only one who'd not bothered to wash off his face paint,
which had now hilariously smeared across his demure and easy smile) drifted on stage for an encore of "Are You With Me Now?," the crowd melting in
the afterglow. — Ivanna Besenovsky
SHINDIG SEMI-FINALS NIGHT #2
CAROUSEL SCENE /JERK IN THE CAN/
PAVEL
JANUARY 17 / PAT'S PUB
'1
wanted to crawl into a hole. With warm beer and brick walls, Pat's Pub
fulfilled these desires. As a result of these stupefying influences, the
audience of Shindig 33's Semi-Finals appeared restful, content to sit. While
the crowd was subdued, the bands were not. Each performance displayed a
certain type of synth based intensity.
Carousel Scene exemplified this ferocity. Taking the stage with an electric
drum kit, two synths, a guitar and a vocalist, the band laid down a hazy mix
REAL LIVE ACTION of synth pop and R&B. At first, they were restrained. Meek, they looked down
at their feet; occasionally, the singer sat down — her attitude and voice were
smoky and complimented the surroundings. In between songs, banter was
absent. The audience seemed a distant consideration. But things thawed.
Hidden energy exposed itself. As they delved deeper into funky territory,
movement appeared.
During a song, which I believe was called "Red Lipstick," the singer shook
her legs like a young Elvis Presley, as the band behind her oscillated. This
momentum built. At a climax of pounding drums and synthetic bass, the
singer ripped off her jean jacket, as the band began to wallop around. It was
not a preformative energy, but rather, one born out of musical joy. For these
reasons, it was clear why Carousel Scene came away victorious.
Building upon this energy, Jerk in the Can were up next. Taking the stage,
their sound check seemed to run long — setting up synths, with all those
knobs and cables, and the requisite fiddling, is a lot of work. When everything was established, the two members donned matching tee shirts, with
their band name scribbled in red lettering like some ominous prescription. To
signify the start of their set, they also put on balaclavas.
Now obscured, the lead singer yelled into the microphone, but this utterance was indistinguishable amongst a swell of distortion. An electric drum
throbbed, deep and pounding. He yelled again. The two sounds became
intertwined in a wall of dissonance. Soon synths chimed, bright and cutting,
in contrast to the surrounding din. It sounded like Mr. Bungle failing to upload
to the internet, all static and disconnected. And as they swayed slightly, bobbing along, their passion was enjoyable and infectious.
Closing the night was Pavel. In contrast to the past performers, his setup
was startlingly minimal. He appeared a lone figure, with a dirty baseball cap
and a baggy tee shirt. And as his backing track of washed out synth began
to wallow, he moved about the stage like a caged animal yelping and gesticulating. As I exited the pub, the final moments of his set bled out onto the
street. On a sodden East Hastings, his voice felt oddly fitting: a lone figure
lost amongst something large. —Maximilian Anderson-Baier
WINTER WASTE W/ MANEATER / CO-OP
/DEVOURS/HAZY/MIREPOIX
JANUARY 20 / PAT'S PUB
I s I approached the dingy exterior of Pat's Pub and Brewery, I had
I no idea what to expect from Winter Waste, Music Waste's off-season fundraiser. My friend and I took a seat at a table in the corner next to a
Flaming 7's lottery ticket dispenser and watched as the pub leisurely began
to fill with a myriad of bourgeois student hipster imports. With a pitcher of
cider and tray of fries in hand, we were ready to go.
hazy began her performance by reading intriguing excerpts from an essay
about women in rock and their lack of representation in the industry. She
slipped into a dreamy, neo-psychedelic cloud of distorted sound echoing with
a fusion of feedback and obscured vocals. Cascading lyrics enhanced the
vibration-filled atmosphere. The subsonic in the floor reverberated beneath
my feet as I, too, was immersed in the shoegaze-y fog. Jangly, haunting guitar with chilling, minor chords, and thrashy cymbals exuded an unsettling
aura. It was slightly difficult to distinguish or appreciate the complexity of the
many sounds within hazy's music due to how overly loud it was. Regardless,
the overall vibe sent me into universe-reflection-mode.
Following hazy, Mirepoix's strong rock intra left little uncertainty about
their ample experience and chemistry as a group, with the exceptional skills
of their impressive drummer, guitarist, and bass player. The alternative, folky
voice of the singer contrasted with the rest of the music, in what would have
otherwise been a very classic rock set. Nonetheless, Mirepoix had a enjoyable sound that was harmonious, but in a stompy, in-your-face kind of way
which made it fun to dance to.
Next was Co-op, a trio of lo-fi rockers, whose sound after their mellow yet
simultaneously heavy performance produced the aural equivalent of a drawn
out back scratch in the throes of passion. At times the gig felt a bit too reminiscent of a Nirvana cover band, but this shortcoming was quickly remedied
by expert drumming that provided the heartbeat necessary to sell this '90s
band. Co-op created a tempo that people of all ages could appreciate, allowing older members of the crowd to dive into sweet nostalgia and forming a
beat with which the younger folks could jive.
When Devours walked on stage, following Co-op, I could not help but
wonder if there was any way his performance could live up to the high standard of radness that his sparkly, painted-on eyebrows had set. I could not
have been more wrong. Immediately, his off-kilter electronic beats transformed me into the dancing queen I have always aspired to be. Devours'
angsty lyrics — "I was in love, and now I'm watching you burn" — were
off-puttingly relatable and I liked it.
Maneater finished off the night with some grungy synth pop reminiscent
of an awkward high school band playing punk rock in their parent's garage,
in the best way possible. Their dreamy melodies were kept up tempo with
a swift beat in the background — each song held a steady rhythm to which
the crowd joyfully bobbed around. I continued to bounce with happiness as
I sauntered out of the pub, reflecting on the evening I had just had at 2017's
Winter Waste, a complete success in my opinion. —Inca Gunter
QUIET CITY #31W/ BRANDON NICKELL
/ KEVIN DRUMM / CAMERON SHAFII /
CHRISTIAN CARRIERE / RUSALKA
JANUARY 20 / RED GATE REVUE STAGE
Jt was anything but quiet. Arriving early to the Revue Stage on Granville
Island for the 31 st instalment of Quiet City — one of the first shows
at Red Gate Arts Society's newest venture — everything pointed towards
a relaxed, introspective, and moderately low-volumed evening. The venue
was dimly lit, with soft red and green lights on stage; the rows of velvet lined
Cameron Shafii played next. Before I had time to remove my earplugs for
a brief respite from my muffled world, the San Francisco-based experimental
producer began. Again, a similar wave of near-subsonic frequencies enveloped the theatre. This time, instead of Carriere and Rusalka's slow and subtle sonic manipulation, Shafii punctuated his drone with sporadic electronic
glitches and bursts of feedback. Sounding like the internet collapsing in on
itself, Shafii's generative set was by far the most diverse — and lively — performance of the evening.
# Following a brief intermission, the prolific and experimental Kevin Drumm
• took to the stage. Aware only of his earlier music on prepared guitar, I was
surprised to see the Chicago musician step behind a laptop and a table of
knobs and cables to perform an electroacoustic set. Again, it was low and
_ it was loud. Feeling my eyeballs vibrate under the barrage, I was reminded of the first two sets of the evening. Drumm's bass shook the theatre, as
he gradually altered the sound, letting only the deepest of listeners in on the
subtle sonic shifts.
Brandon Nickell closed the night, and to be quite honest, a fifth act was a
stretch. As rewarding and intricate the music had been, I found myself weary
from relentless bass. After four sets and over two hours of visceral low-frequency vibration, I couldn't physically take any more. So when Nickell's set
began and the bass swelled, I had to leave early.
Stepping out of the theatre into the deserted Granville Island street, I
removed my earplugs. The incessant hiss of the city's ambience flooded my
ears, and finally, it was quiet. —Lucas Lund
weeks in advance to Jasper D. Wrinch, Real Live
Action Editor at rla.discorder@citr.ca.
seats were comfortable and spacious;
relaxed conversation from the handful
of overly punctual audience members
floated by on the warm air.
As the seats began to fill up around
me, the curator, host and mastermind
behind the Quiet City concert series,
Constantine Katsiris, stepped onstage to
announce that complimentary earplugs
were available at the bar. Confused, I
decided to be safe and grab a pair just
before the music began.
Rusalka, the electronic noise project of Vancouver's Kate Rissiek, started
the night. Kneeling in absolute darkness near the front of the stage behind
a theremin and a profusion of electronics and effects pedals, Rissiek slowly
unleashed an aggressive wave of deep,
rumbling bass. Quickly slipping the complimentary earplugs in, I sat back and let
the ever morphing drone wash over me,
shaking me to the core.
After Rusalka's set, my body still
tingling from the intense vibrations it
had just withstood, Montreal sound
artist Christian Carriere stepped on
stage. Performing with a no-input mixer,
Carriere seemed to be performing on
a similar wavelength as Rusalka. The
unrelenting wash of bone-rattling bass
was more physical than auditory. As
the torrent continued, the timbre transformed. Compared to the harsh, almost
violent atmosphere of Rusalka's set,
Camera's sound seemed almost meditative. Massaged by the bass, I found
the auditory experience become almost
secondary to the introspective atmosphere the sounds created.
Red Gate Revue Stage
Grand Opening
Lt. Frank Dickens
Holzkopf
Hazy
Aileen Bryant
+ tba
with DJs
Daniel R
Usd.
installation by
Olga Abeleva
Saturday
Feb IS lO I 7
1601 Johnston St. (Granville Island)
REAL LIVE ACTION  £ I  |
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JANUARY 2017
EMMA CITRINE
EMMA CITRINE
Sad Surprise
(Self-Released)
10/02/2017
SAD SURPRISE
fmma Citrine is good at being sad. I feel I can say that because many
people have said the same thing about me. While it's not what I'd
like to be known for, it's comforting to know I have a talent for expressing
the emotion that takes up much of my time, and I hope Emma finds comfort in this ability as well. There is an experienced melancholy in her voice
that brought weight to Allow To Remain, the 2015 EP from Leave, her duo
with David Cowling. Emma's latest release, Sad Surprise, will not disappoint
those who love her unbridled sadness. Woven throughout the EP is the bitter
sensation of lost love, the kind that settles at the bottom of your stomach and
hurts every time you laugh.
But just as Emma promises sadness, she also promises surprise. I'm
cynical when it comes to promises, but Sad Surprise delivers. As I listened to
the EP's first single, "A Screaming (comes across the sky)," the unexpected
melodies and chord structures startled me. I know this comment is a little on
the nose, but I swear it's the truth. The song starts off as a simple folk ballad,
but as it unfolds, it reveals lush harmonies and complex melodies. Amongst
swelling ambience, the tune heads one way and then swerves another. At
times, Emma reminds me of local dream-pop group The Belle Game and
everyone's favourite main stage festival act, Beach House.
This surprising ability to shift genres runs throughout the whole
EP. Citrine keeps us transfixed by effortless hopping from one sound to
another. Sad Surprise begins energetically with "Poor Boy," a crunchy rockabilly tune with a double-time feel. This vigor continues on the second track,
"Make War," a song which mixes angry rock vocals that border on rap with
surprisingly angelic backing harmonies. In contrast, the track "Ledges" is
sweet and soft, and shines a spotlight on her strong vocal talent. She ends
the album with "Give Them Love," a reminder that under all of the anger and
bitterness, Emma Citrine is still the queen of being sad. A title that is not
meant as a premonition of a life of supreme sadness, but instead a trophy for
having the courage to feel her feelings deeply, and share them with those of
us who need to be reminded that we are not alone. —Sarah Jickling
LOCAL CREATURE AND
ALIEN BOY
The Viper Sessions
(Self-Released)
19/01/17
shit, clearly she'd be laughing.
And the rhythm keeps on flowing like the blood rooted in your
breast.
And this is good and this is right and this is all ye need to know.
—Matt Turner
HaL/- Light
Pye
Audio
PYE CORNER AUDIO (AND
VARIOUS ARTISTS)
Half-Light
(More Than Human Records)
06/01/2017
4 I
Prowler  Semixed
alt-Light is an electronic instrumental album full of remixes that play off
of Pye Corner Audio's 2015 LP Prowler. It is composed of two original
songs, and four different remixes by artists such as Clesse, Silent Servant,
Cloudface and Not Waving. Though the album features only a handful of
songs, each track compensates with length and density. A simple structure
is followed throughout the release. Often, songs begin with a simple beat
• or melody. Gradually, new elements are stacked on top of one another. And
finally, things collapse into an intense and busy climax. However, just as the
song reaches a fever pitch, the chaos gives way to a peaceful denouement.
These patient peaks and valleys give your pores time to soak in the music,
until it courses through your veins and makes you move. As a result, Half-
Light comes across as as mature and well-rounded release.
Though drawing from the same source material, the songs on Half-Light
cannot be called monotonous. It is a diverse release that switches tones
0 throughout. The first three songs are light and airy. "Corrupt Data," one
• of the originals, is backed by a funky percussion, and "Decade Counter"
(remixed by Cloudface) sounds like chill trance music. While Clesse's "She
Hunts at Night" sounds a bit more devious, it's still comparatively light, with a
minimalist beat throughout the song.
In comparison, the last three songs can only be described as metallic and
dark. "Morning" sounds nothing like what typically comes to mind when one
thinks 'morning'- refreshed and re-energized. Instead, it sounds ominous
and suspicious, fading out with threatening electronic staccatos. "Octal Run,"
the other original song on the album, is full of distorted dissonant, which,
although strange, makes for a unique listening experience. But "Prowler," the
second-to-last track, is by far the album's best. It begins menacingly: metallic
drums pound suggesting something bad to come. A trombone interrupts the
flow like a beast that swallows the listener whole. Suddenly, a grittier beat is
introduced revealing the track as sinister and amorphous. The song starts
glitching near the end before fading into frantic static - almost as if the music
• is running away. Then it cuts off.
It's not hard to feel the personality, imagery and story in these tracks. Just
let the beats sweep over you. Get lost in the curated world of Pye Corner
Audio, and let the undulating electronic waves melt into your skin.
—Jessica Lin
MI'ENS
Challenger
(Kingfisher Bluez)
06/01/2017
more diversity between tracks. Maybe on a longer release the band would
have extended further into their musical knowledge to create even more wild
and crazy sounds. This album, however, leaves you yearning for just a little
bit more. Guitar chords or riffs are looped at the beginning of almost every
song. While this looping acts as a backdrop for stunning guitar work, the
continuation of a single riff (for minutes at a time) ultimately limits the songs
to just a few different melodies. The end result: undynamic song structure.
At points, songs virtually blend into one another.
Nevertheless, the instrumentation remains undeniably impressive. For
any average guitar player, listening to Challenger will conjure up a feeling of
ineptitude: as good as you may think you are, there will always be someone
better. And, chances are, they're in a math rock band. —Aidan Danaher
GESTURE, SWIM TEAM,
PUZZLEHEAD,
BLOTCHOUTS
c7bJVGBt(r"ee^-r
^i5ioor^.i™   Pt5w.,T &..TER *iid£-
Angelo (Covers His Body With Peanut Butter)
(Self-Released)
23/12/2016
i^_(fe vMYViout-    BQlJHcw^ Www.
ft?
1 nto the shadows we go.
^P Into the smoke of a burnt and blasted tree.
This album deserves no name.
The music bears every name and none. And all the curses in
between. Curses, loud and deep-mouth honoured, breathing from a
time out of place.
All the honey is stolen from the bee, like a saviour bleeding on a
tree. It has the voice of dark money and empathy.
The violin says it best: take my heart and damn the rest.
Have you ever lost a limb?
This is the soundtrack to your personal violence.
It gives the word "tonight" a new and fine imperative. This music
says everything now, tonight, and never again.
The six string points prick against the stars and come settling down
again; the beat beats on, blue, like an epileptic vein; strings raise a
tender road, stripped down under tired eyes.
If you are hounded by easy devils and easy vices, this is the cure.
Yet don't forget that slippery doom—it is part of you, it never left, it
is your virtue.
Macbeth would have cried over this album, but Lady Macbeth, well,
math Rock duo Mi'ens certainly make an impression with their latest release, Challenger. True to this sub-genre of indie rock,
Mi'ens' drummer Evan and guitarist Kim utilize unconventional song structures, unusual time signatures, and melodic dissonance in order to showcase musical ability. At times, it is easy to hear the influence of their Math
Rock forefathers. Spiderland by Slint, Mirrored by Battles, American Don
by Don Caballero and American Football's self-titled album have all clearly left a mark on Mi'ens. An immense amount of music theory knowledge,
talent and accuracy is a prerequisite for math rock, and Mi'ens do not falter.
"Challenger," the eponymous track of the album is a composition in which
guitars juxtapose themselves, woven between each other in counterpoint.
The melody of this track is as jagged as it is repetitive, but catchy nonetheless. "Ja Baar," the third track off the album, contains a seriously impressive
guitar melody that sounds as if it spans the entirety of the guitar neck.
While the band's musicality is tantamount to many of the other great
bands in the genre, their style is noticeably similar to more-recent, lesser-known math rock groups like Hella and Tera Melos. But Challenger has
its limitations. Clocking in at a brief 20 minutes, the listener is made to desire
] ngelo (Covers His Body With Peanut Butter) is a diverse compilation album that covers four bands, ranging in genre from post-punk to
indie rock. With its cycling tempos and varying intensities, it's hard to make
an all-round statement about the composition of this album. What holds
true, however, is its fascinating exploration into redefining brilliant music from
the past. During the course of this musical expedition, we see the transcendence of decades, genre and gender to bring together one work of low-fi
psych punk art. Each Vancouver based band brings something unique to
their covers. Though at first Angelo (Covers His Body With Peanut Butter)
may feel like it flows in unpredictable ways, it never passes a certain threshold, allowing for listening in a laid back environment.
The album begins with four slow, feisty tracks by Gesture, covering Cardiff's Young Marble Giants, a post-punk band from the late 70s.
Presenting a strong start with distorted vocals and the added punch of a low
repetitive drum beat, Gesture sounds like a low-fi psych merging of Daniel
Johnston and Lou Reed.
These sensationally hokey, yet well fitted, charming tracks transition into
Swim Team. Covering Glasgow indie-rock band, Life Without Buildings,
Swim Team presents a chatty and calming set of tracks. Initially, I was slight-
ly confused as to why Swim Team is stitched into a rather jarring album, but
A once listened through, their melodic tunes soothe the album's midlife.
At this point, if you've drifted into a peaceful daze, Puzzlehead will instantaneously pull you right out of it with powerful distortion. Though the contrast
is undeniable, the shift in intensity isn't uncomfortable, as Puzzlehead's cov-
er of Australian post-punk artist Rowland S. Howard, is transiently laid back
# in its own right.
• Angelo's darkest and loudest tracks are Blotchouts' covers of 1980's
German / English new wave punk artist Petticoats. Ending on an oomph, and
cycling through a variety of other experiences, the album reads as a saga
rather than a unified work with one sound.
If taken for what it could be, Angelo (Covers His Body With Peanut Butter)
might lead one to question if these four groups fit quite right with one another. But that's part of the joy it offers, the total trip it takes you on — throwing
you for a loop at any chance it gets. Its tracks are played out in such an order
that make listening to it from start to finish an eclectic journey.
—Emily Valente
THE EVAPORATORS
Ogopogo Punk
(Mint Records)
15/12/2016
myths spread like contagion. On a cramped roadtrip to the
Okanagan, thoughts of an enlarged lake monster hop from head
to head with the ease of a common cold. Until, finally, everyone is consumed
by a single image: the Ogopogo.
This type of infectious energy vibrates throughout the aptly named
Ogopogo Punk, The Evaporators' follow-up to 2012's Susy Doing Nothing.
Helmed by Nardwuar and John Collins, and accompanied by Nick Thomas,
Stephen Hamm and Shawn Mrazek, The Evaporators propel themselves
forward with an irreverent glee. Unified by a disgust of the self-serious,
each song on Ogopogo Punk is refined and minimal. Indulgence is whol-
UNDER REVIEW ly absent. There are no ballads about lost love. Songs about pain have no
place. Instead, focus is on commonality. Like the Ogopogo, The Evaporators
appeal to all.
This ability to attract is born out of an awareness of genre. With tracks
like the organ driven "Eat to Win" and the breakneck "I Can't Be Shaved,"
The Evaporators dig into their roots. After all, garage rock is about vigor. As
long as it's fast and filled with vinegar, lyrical content is meaningless. For
instance, on "Double Decker Bus," the opening track of the Count Five's
1966 album Psychotic Reactions, the howling lead vocals of Kenn Ellner is
pure poetry. This accomplishment seems impossible. Especially considering it is a song about a bus. But, somehow, amongst the swirling fuzz guitar,
Ellner encapsulates an uncontaminated energy. And, like their Count Five
predecessors, The Evaporators manage to generate genuine feeling when
Nardwuar yelps, "Take away that blade, I can't be shaved."
By energizing the mundane, Ogopogo Punk drags the listener into a
world of infectious fun. Songs about shaving and smoked meats jangle about
until smiling is inevitable. But while most acts would impale themselves upon
such unadulterated silliness, The Evaporators maintain by merit of taut song-
writing. "Chuckanut," for instance, pits Nardwuar's yowling recount of a road
trip against a beautiful mish-mash of saxophone and beach oriented guitar.
Less than two minutes long, it is lean but not necessarily rushed. Midway
through, for example, a guitar solo plods along comfortably. But this does not
derail the song. Quickly, the chorus resumes.
The Evaporators penetrate your ears. They set up shop. And as you walk
down the street whistling their tune, it lodges in the head of a passerby.
—Maximilian Anderson-Baier
DEBRA-JEAN CREELMAN
Railtown Sessions Vol. 4
(Light Organ Records)
11/11/2016
^ in the back of my mother's car as she popped in yet another Springsteen
tape. While the subtle indie flourishes of the songs bring Wallace's sound
into the current decade, it's obvious that Something Wicked channels the
ghosts of folk heroes that, for better or for worse, haunt the American country scene.
Country music always seems to be looking back. Perhaps this is more
• than just a lyrical troupe; maybe it is this idealization of the past that steers
newcomers down the same beaten path again and again. So is this where
my ability to relate ends? My exposure to country and folk has always been
second hand and I may lack the romantic taste needed to enjoy it. Has
Wallace then succeeded in creating yet another collection of songs dressed
for the neon jukeboxes of North American backwaters? Is this ultimately the
resting place of all good independent country music? Maybe what I deem
as a problem is the true success of folk and country — music so immersed
in it's own context that forgoing form would mean abandoning the genre al
together.
But, for a moment, Wallace does show us an ability to escape the
restraints of the genre. The closing track, "Work of Status," offers a song
almost entirely stripped of its country flavour, providing a simple yet effective
pop-rock tune that shines amongst the dirt dusted barnyard rompers that
come before it. This song is more evidently the odd star of the album when
compared to "Stronghold," a sing-along track with an almost painfully obvi-
• ous hook sure to rouse the patrons of highway bars across Canada.
Skye Wallace is a competent musician and a gifted singer who is almost
effortlessly melodic. If you're into foot tapping anthems to kick up the dust,
then you'll probably find what you're looking for in Something Wicked. So,
crack open a cold one and enjoy the ride. But if country and folk has never quite been your bag, then it's unlikely this album will do anything to sway
your opinion. These songs will be nothing more special than the music that
seeps from The Bourbon as you pass by. —R. Hester
CHELSEA GRIMM
Busshead
(Owake Records)
16/09/2016
I hen listening to Debra-Jean Creelman's four-song contribution
<4|%P to the Railtown Sessions EP series, the phrase "standard for the
genre" comes to mind. The EP is a fair representation of alt-country singer-songwriters in Canada. Fitting, given Creelman's work as co-founder of
Mother Mother, and frequent collaboration with Vancouver mainstay Frazey
Ford. Despite these past successes, Creelman's second solo EP fails to distinguish itself as inventive in a highly saturated genre.
She opens with "Maybe They Were Right," a sulky track with muddled
lyrics at the front of the mix, which adds to the song's general tone of confusion and mournful longing. Unfortunately the verse hits much harder than
the chorus, which leaves the listener wondering: why has the rhythm section
abandoned us? This track is followed up by "Midnight Sun," a song full of
sweet backing vocals and sparse guitar, heavily reminiscent of Frazey Ford's
2014 release Indian Ocean. Unlike the tight pop of Ford, however, "Midnight
Sun" meanders for two minutes too long. Weakest by far was "Up In Smoke."
There are nice moments of harmony and syrupy guitar on "In the Dark" to finish out the set of four song set, but the breakdown was underwhelming, and
again, far too long.
Yet, this release still has merit. Creelman's vocals shine throughout the
EP. On "Midnight Sun" her crisp belting carries the verse. Similarly, on "In the
Dark" her voice leads moments of cleanly refined harmony. But unfortunately, her strength as a singer and the spotless production fail to hide derivative
lyrics and wobbly songwriting. — Madeline Taylor
SKYE WALLACE
Something Wicked
(Self-Released)
29/10/2016
fomething Wicked is a decent listen. To even the most untrained ear,
the attraction of Skye Wallace's music is obvious. Between her incredible range and her ability to write a catchy hook, her strengths shine through
on these nine recordings. After just one listen, ear worms have been planted
and the melodies of the album start to rattle around your head. By the second spin, you will already be familiar with the majority of the album. So in
that it succeeds; it is simple and effective. But Wallace's take on folk pop is,
unfortunately, not unheard of or even that uncommon. Every song summons
thoughts glazed by the sepia lenses of nostalgia: wayward feelings of sitting
Breadth of emotion is tough for any musician trying to construct a
release, especially when confined to a five track EP. For many musicians, it is easiest to cough up something monotonous, either an album that is
wholly sad, dancy, or whatever. But if anyone can workaround this pitfall, it's
Alberta native Branton Olfert — a.k.a. Chelsea Grimm — with his new instrumental electronic release: Busshead.
With only three prior singles on Soundcloud and a live debut in August
2015, Chelsea Grimm is about as fresh on the Vancouver music scene as any-
« one can be. Forgiving ears are entirely unnecessary for this polished release,
as Olfert already seems a seasoned veteran.
The album begins with "From Above," an initially steady melody with plucky,
Nicolas Jaar-esque synthesizers and an aggressive, 2-step-garage hihat that
punctuates the introduction — giving the listener the delightful indication of an
« incoming dancefloor swell. The initial riff, disintegrating into the background,
is then overtaken and carried along by a spacious and off-kilter woody percussion reminiscent of Burial's seminal record Untrue. This moment is underscored by a viscous bassline that will make any sub owner rejoice in their
investment.
The next track, "Beillustrious," seems to mirror the thematic versatility of
the album, as it flipflops from delicate ambience and shimmering arpeggiated
synths to a gritty yet subdued industrial house beat (that calls to mind James
Blake's "Voyeur").
The final two songs on the album provide a unique edge to Busshead in that
they incorporate and emphasize the use of electric guitar and jazz-sourced
drum breaks. Not only do these elements broaden the emotional breadth of
the album, but they also serve to add a human component to it. In comparison to the start of the EP, the second half of this release challenges the listener and demands further consideration. And it is this call for consideration that
allows Busshead to stand out amongst its peers. Neither a UK-garage-inspired
dance project nor an overly abstract release, this album is something born in
the middle. The deliberate ambiguity of this record etches out a new process
of feeling for the listener. We are faced with a piece of art that makes us want
to move as much as it makes us want to sit still. And in determining how to
consume Busshead, we learn that it may just be possible to do both of these
things, to feel more than just unvarying elation or monotonous sadness.
—Mat Wilkins
io suDmiT music Tor review consiaerauon in uiscoraer iviagazmeana online,
please send a physical copy to the station addressed to Maximilian Anderson-Baier, Under Review Editor at CiTR 101.9FM, LL500 6133 University
Blvd., Vancouver BC, V6T1Z1. Though our contributors prioritize physical
copies, you may email download codes to underreview.discorder@citr.ca. We
prioritize albums sent prior to their official release dates.
THIM
1660 EAST BROADWAY
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For complete calendar info see www.riotheatre.ca m
e don't make
music with
any goal
about what it is supposed to
sound like, except that we want
to communicate an atmosphere
that is felt in the moment that
we are jamming together," explains Sydney Koke (a.k.a Crazy
Courtney), bassist / vocalist of
The Courtneys. "Sometimes
we will try to write a song that
sounds like another song or
band because it will push us a
bit in a certain direction, and
that can be really fun. However,
the songs always come out
sounding like The Courtneys."
The Courtneys are back. It's
been four years since the 2013
release of their first self-titled
album on Hockey Dad Records,
and the band has been exceptionally busy since then. Between
releasing singles, creating music videos, extensive touring
and several side projects, The
Courtneys have been diligently
working towards their sophomore album, The Courtneys II.
Thcflatoria
The    " *
words bit fa/anas-Wne. Hbss// i||i/ctmions i>ij 0\b3 AWeVa //
photo c-ovrfe^.ui of -the- band and ^ara W(t|i&
■*r
4
J?  4
4
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le mptejtespeci tp ojatjcteatiue cbemtstta,
[friimiiiairijiimimaiifrii
Demons
lesonos.
When asked how the band
is feeling about the upcoming   1
release, Koke exclaims, "We
are really excited! When mak-  '
ing this album we had a really
specific vision, and we tried
a lot of things to make sure
that the songs came out the
way we wanted. It's been a lot
of work and a lot of time, so
we are excited to share it and
see what people think!"
What's intriguing about
this album is how, in a lot of
ways, it sounds like a time-
warp to that classic, "sundrenched," sugary sweet pop
music that they are best known
for. But this time, the music is
more personal.
"It actually didn't occur to
me at all that this album, lyrically, was more personal or
emotional until Sydney mentioned it while we were recording," says Jen Payne (a.k.a.
Cute Courtney) and lead vocalist / drummer. "It definitely
wasn't a conscious effort, and I
haven't changed my process of
writing lyrics."
It may be because of the
length of time this album took
to complete, but each song
in this new album feels like
a more intimate depiction of
Payne's journey over the past
four years. "These albums are
representative of two different periods of my life, with the
latter being written during a
more... tumultuous time," explains Payne.
THE COURTNEYS
The first single released off
the new album, "Silver Velvet,"
has Payne chanting: "And
nothing you say, and nothing you do, could stop me from
thinking about you." This particular song seems like an ode
to a faraway lover.
The Courtneys have been
having their own time
apart from one another.
In fact, only Payne currently
reside in Vancouver. Courtney
Loove (a.k.a. Classic Courtney)
is currently living in California,
and Koke is in France.
"Although we all live in different places, we communicate very consistently. We don't
have a manager, so we have to
organize a lot of things on our
own and make a lot of important
decisions collectively," shares
Koke, when asked if the distance
between one another poses any
difficulties. "Even though I live
in France now, this band is a
major part of my life."
With Koke in France, "working on [her] solo music and art,
and playing music with new
friends," Loove has also found
herself immersed in a new
community. "The opportunity to sink into a new culture
/ new scene is always exciting for artistic and personal
growth, and perhaps even necessary," says Loove, reflecting
on leaving home.
Looking back at when The
Courtneys first album came
out, it coincided with a particular genre resurgence. Slacker
rock / pop was blowing up — no
thanks to Mac Demarco and a
stream of musicians channeling
the laidback sound of artists like
Pavement and Dinosaur Jr. The
Courtneys may have even helped
instigate this new-slacker
movement. That being said, they
don't necessarily feel like they
fit into that style.
"How our band fits in a certain genre is something I think
about a lot," admits Koke.
"Although there are lots of
'beachy slacker' bands around,
I'm not so familiar with this
genre in its contemporary manifestation." And to be fair, to
lump The Courtneys into a brief
musical fad seems to undermine
the work they have put into cu-
rating what is now their distinct
sound. "Any alignment with a
trend would be a coincidence
as we don't really pay much
attention to trends," Loove
adds. "We described ourselves
as 'slacker pop' on our first record, but for our new record we
have coined the term 'artisanal
grunge' That's right, you heard
it here first!"
I   hat to expect from
I   The Courtneys II is a
more polished, and
purposeful record. "We were
much more deliberate about
the songwriting process, and
trashed a lot of songs that just
didn't seem interesting," says
Koke. "I think we gave more
respect to our creative chemistry, by pushing ourselves
harder to find the best versions
of the songs." They recorded
their entire album live off the
floor, which they had done on
their previous album, but it
seems safe to say that the three
of them have refined their
skills as a band. "I'm really
proud that our recordings are
just a real take, and not more
manufactured," remarks Loove.
The Courtneys II is an excellent
follow up to their first album,
and a true testament to creating timeless music that stands
alone among music trends.
'it
The Courtneys II comes out
February 11 on Flying Nun Records.
The Courtneys will be playing
hometown shows at The Biltmore
March 14 and The Cobalt April
11. You can check out a video for
"Silver Velvet" at
youtube.com/FlyingNunRecords.
smu/s
-THURSDAY FEBRUARY 2-
HOMESPUN DISCOS PRESENTS:
RAMBLING DERELICTS
THE KEVINS / STOLEN FACES
-THURSDAY FEBRUARY 9-
POSHLOSTEP RELEASE WITH
HEART BEACH / TULIP / DEVOURS
-SUNDAY FEBRUARY 12-
OF ARTISTRY / THIS GUN FOR HIRE
FEAR THY NAME / OF MODERN ARCHITECTURE
-MONDAY FEBRUARY 13-
PHRENEUTH (DK) / DEATH WINDS / NECROT
CEREMONIAL BLOODBATH
-THURSDAY FEBRUARY 16-
ECHUTA / RUSALKA / MASKARA / MI'ENS
 -FRIDAY FEBRUARY 17-	
UNIFORM (NYC/SACRED BONES) + GUESTS
-SATURDAY FEBRUARY 18-
THE BLOOD RIVER BAND / ACREAGE
GORDON SMITH + THE WILD ONES
THE ROCK BAND CALLED TIME
 -TUESDAY FEBRUARY 21-	
ART ROCK: DEATH DRIVE/PUZZLEHEAD/SAUCE
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THIS PATCH OF SKY / RISHLOO / GUILT TRAP
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ISSAC ROTHER + THE PHANTOMS (LA)
ZMA/C6 7WR7SSS +MOR&
 -FRIDAY FEBRUARY 3-	
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90S ALT/BRITP0P/90S CHEESY POP HITS
DJNIKKI NEWER + GUESTS
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CULT 80S HITS/GOTH/MINIMAL WAVE
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PUNK / NEW WAVE / POST-PUNK NIGHTS (NEW!)
WITH DJ JEFF RPM + GUESTS
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ST. VALENTINE'S STOMP
NORTHERN SOUL / RNB / SIXTIES
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N0 HEART (NEW!)
RAP /HIP HOP /DARK WAVE
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THEANTI-VDAY DANCE
DJ SKINNY + GUESTS
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RENT CHEQUE (EVERY LAST FRIDAY OF
MONTH)
AMATEUR STRIP NIGHT
 -SUNDAY FEBRUARY 26-	
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PSYCH/MOTOWN/BRITISH ROCK/FRENCH YE-YE
-WEDNESDAY NIGHTS-
KARAOKE (WEEKLY) UtC-Y-dLi,   by   aUO^O/  JbuijXtti.'r
j-JkcXx^i,   try  K^x^bCavit^- &Y^«Co^\.C
\,04jHXs
J heard about Pale Red for
the first time last year.
They had just played
Shindig and everyone I met was
raving about over them. This happened just around the time I was
getting into the CiTR and Discorder
community, and even though
human organizations can look like,
how people can figure out ways to
express themselves without steam-
rolling others."
Until the release of Soft Opening
this month, their only recordings
were EPs made on their phones.
In reality, the album has been recorded for over a year. Myles and
j&otiflS are rarelp static because toe
are people, so also rarelp static/'
this is based on almost nothing,
I developed a sense of nostalgia
for Pale Red. We have been ships
passing in the night for almost
a year now — I always plan on
going to their shows but never
make it, or arrive right after their
set, and this streak persists even
for this article. All the communication seemed to happen just
an hour too late or a hangover
too soon. We end up exchanging
questions and answers via email,
which isn't perfect, but it allows
Portia, Myles, and Charlotte to respond individually. Through their
responses, I see their personalities
and similarities.
Pale Red is a local art-pop trio
made up of Portia Boehm, Myles
Black, and Charlotte Coleman. They
had known each other since high
school and have played together in
various combinations before establishing Pale Red in 2014. The
longevity of their bond is uplifting. Charlotte describes their first
full-length album, Soft Opening
"as a culmination of that history."
Myles gushes, "Pale Red is my favourite thing, it's such a beautiful
artistic relationship. Sometimes I
even think of it as a model of what
Portia chalk the delayed release
up to the project refusing to be
rushed. Portia explains, "Things
just take as long as they take. We
really didn't have a desire to hold
on to it, so much as life got in
the way of the process of mixing,
mastering, duplicating at pretty
much every turn." The value of
this extended production period
was not lost on them. Being able
to revisit and reevaluate the material allowed for more thoughtful
and satisfying songs. This is not
the band's usual approach. Their
previous EPs were released almost immediately on Bandcamp.
I am reminded of an episode
of the Revisionist History podcast
where Malcolm Gladwell categorizes artists as Picassos or
Cezannes, the difference being
whether they produce completed works or projects that
are always being worked on and
perfected. Judging by Pale Red's
earlier, Picasso-esque releases,
this intentional and simmering
Cezanne — Soft Opening promises to be distinct. Charlotte
describes the album as "for the
most part, real fun and sloppy,
but also not sloppy."
This sloppiness, and lack
thereof, played a big role in motivating Soft Opening. All three
members cite higher quality recording as a major goal for the album. Myles explains the contrast
between the professionalism of the
process and the informality of the
recording: "I wanted to make an
album that really sounds like us
playing an intimate, live set. Close
to the mic, high energy, rough
around the edges. Rehearsed, but
with room to play and improvise." An imperfect combination of
Picasso and Cezanne.
Pale Red's last Bandcamp release, un-titledee-pee, hinted
at an imminent "no nonsense"
album. Upon reflection, Portia,
Myles, and Charlotte all disagree
with that goal. Portia laughs it off
saying, "less nonsense, maybe,
but I don't know that you can
completely eradicate it from anything I am involved with." What
Charlotte describes as "minimal
nonsense" is reflected in the Soft
Opening's creative process. For
Myles, songwriting "focuses attention on enduring emotional
concepts and in a way counteracts
anxiety." Myles wrote most of
what he calls the album's "core
songs," which Charlotte and
Portia then wrote onto, which
developed the Pale Red style.
"Songs are rarely static because
we are people," explains Portia,
"so also rarely static." While
this has been Pale Red's process
for years, Soft Opening is unique
in its deliberateness. The songs
were allowed to morph and evolve
through additional practice and
live performances. Despite the
more professional set up — recording in their friend Evan
Matthiessen's home studio as
opposed to their tiny home jam
room — it was "really casual and
fun," and still let some nonsense
seep into the Soft Opening.
I  hen asked about their
I   band name, Myles
explains, "colours
are abstract and emotional, very
open conceptually. We all wanted
a name that was very open to interpretation." Portia elaborates,
"Pale Red — to my mind — is
sort of an imaginary colour, an
oxymoron almost? I like the un-
representability of that," speaking to an intangible materiality
present in a lot of the music.
That's what makes it seem
kind of fitting that we never actually meet in person. I am able
to sustain this game of engaging
with a band that I've never really experienced. It feels like any
more intimate interaction would
be the end of an era. Soft Opening
as an album is the beginning of a
new era for Pale Red, and maybe
the beginning of a mostly polished but still messy era for me
and the band.
To hear Pale Red, visit
paleredband.bandcamp.com for previous releases, and keep an eye out
for the Soft Opening release party
February 17 at Ged Rate.
CiTR and Discorder Magazine present
March 9-March 17
COMING
SOON!
FUNDRIVE
FINALE!
Friday, March 17
Polish Community
Center A CONVERSATION WITH INSTRUMENTS
words by Aidan Danaher// illustrations by Hayley Dawn Muir//photos by Jill Willcott
"Existence precedes essence."
-Jean-Paul Sartre, Being and Nothingness (1943)
nothingness, Vancouver
shoegazers, unintentionally mirror this
existentialism into their music
on their debut album, Being, even
using the same font as the first
edition cover of Sartre's book as
a little philosophical easter-egg.
It "started out as a joke, then became reality (pun non-intended),"
says bandleader, Bill Young. The
namesake proves that as a band,
the members of Nothingness are
well-read, highly proficient, precise and pay due attention to what
matters the most in their music: the sound, or as bassist and
multi-instrumentalist Caton Diab
says, "sonic interest."
Nothingness spend much of
their focus on inventing, manifesting, discovering, harnessing and then mastering certain
aspects of sound that is found
electronic and guitar music, but to
redefine and push against the barrier between the two. Diab puts it,
"We just do it so that something
falls out of a bunch of different
undisciplined points and then creates a certain sound that you have
to struggle to find (creatively)."
0
lacking in most music. To give
you an idea of the band's collective "sonic interest," I uncovered
that each of the members have
vastly different musical projects
outside of Nothingness that, on
special occasions, finds ways into
Nothingness' collective musi-
cality. The band is comprised of
songwriter Young, bassist Diab,
drummer Justin Devries, and guitarist Paul Stewart.
Young obtained a degree in
electro-acoustic composition at
Simon Fraser University. Young
uses electro-acoustic soundscap-
ing techniques in and between
songs on Being; Devries recently
returned from Bali after
spending this past fall
studying Gamelan drumming. ("Really ,,
wild music" from
his ventures there
are available under the name,
Insiturec); Diab's
solo project, C
Diab, features
him playing the
acoustic guitar as if it were
a cello, which is
even demonstrated in
Nothingness's song "Sun
of Mine;" And finally,
Stewart and Devries together are one-half of
another local shoegaze band,
Summering. (There is talk of
a future collaboration between
both bands, under either moniker
Smothering or Sumthingness.)
n playing together, Diab
says bluntly, "With this
band, it's like going to the
playground, like having a really
fun, good time, or like going on
a jog ... When I'm in the process
of creating at home, it's a much
more personal, deeper expression
of the self, I suppose. [Whereas]
this is fun! Like getting together
with friends and having a great
time — having a conversation
with instruments."
Expect their live show to be
much different than the recordings on Being. For one thing,
Stewart's guitar was not featured
on the album, yet he seems very
comfortable about performing
the material and adding something more to it. Diab explains
the process of reworking recorded
material in person: "[When playing live] we're actually trying
to distill everything down to its
elements. It can be so much better if what's being done is being
done minimally and efficiently.
Each little thing makes an impact, instead of having to create
big things to create some sort of
sonic interest... Try and actually
be a band and just do the things
that our hands know to do and
make it work correctly."
On the matter of creating music in and around Vancouver, the
band assures me of the impor-
3V       tance to persevere in the
t&mfe tfjat anp mustcal  b& ag** the <%».
attitude towards artists
and continued gentrifi-
cation. Diab pleads, "You
interest in electronic music.
"The spectacle of electronic
music is undeniable," Young
explains. "I think that, unfortunately, a lot of guitar-centric
music is really not about much
other than the privilege of the
people playing it, and that frus-
stple or genre it soma to lose
relevance if tt starts to become
more about nostaifltc tropes $anaregoingtobeover
about reintoentiotv'
n
s a band, the members of
Nothingness carve themselves a nice little niche of
ambient "rock music with weird
edges," as Devries remarks. In
somewhat revolutionary form,
they think outside the box to find
their sound through uniquity. It
helps that all of the bandmates
have similar tastes, such as their
trates me. Like, lots of songs
about not much at all, and maybe
there's like a good group of clever
lyrics, [but] there is a kind of
shallowness to them. "I think
that any musical style or genre is
going to lose relevance if it starts
to become more about nostalgic
tropes than about reinvention."
Devries reiterates the sentiment: "If rock music is not as big
as bass music, and [rock] isn't
relevant, then it's the fault of
rock music."
At the same time, they don't
necessarily wish to homogenize
coming a lot of, not only
personal problems, [but]
adversity from having
to create this thing from
the bottom of your heart
and expose it to people in
the first place, and then there's
nobody to compare it to, because
most of them are being destroyed
by the city, because they are hostile to the people who live there.
Do everything you can against
them." Young agrees, "Destroy
the oligarchs!"
After sitting on Being/or nearly 2
years, the band finally released it on Big
Smoke January 20, and will be playing
the album release show at Hidden City
Records February 10. Bill Young is also
participating solo in a showcase at the
Western FrontMarch 9.
NOTHINGNESS #£>©
more trratrF^nusic
words by Courtney Heffernan // illustration by Mel Zee//photo by Evan Buggle
The first thing to note
about Chapel Sound is
that sound does not solely
refer to music. Founder Sean Oh
says, "When I was saying Chapel
Sound, 'sound' was not the music. It was something that is
around. Wherever you are, there
is no place [without] sound. It
is a ubiquitous dimension ... A
lot of people misinterpret that
[Chapel Sound] is a musical
group." Instead, Nancy Lee adds,
"It's a frequency, it's a vibe, it's
an energy."
To call Chapel Sound a vibe or
an energy is an effective summation of the mindset at work
within the collective. More
concretely, Chapel Sound is a
multi-disciplinary art collective
with as many as forty contributors. At their regular meeting
space I meet with four of them:
Oh and Lee, along with Laine
Butler and Eli Muro. They are
all fully immersed in the visual, sonic and curatorial aspects of the collective, which is
to say they each use many verbs
to describe their roles within
Chapel Sound. Lee says that
since Chapel Sound's outset, "We
didn't want to have music only.
We wanted to have the disciplines interact... Everyone is
quite interdisciplinary."
X
he members of Chapel
Sound are known for
throwing parties at
alternative spaces throughout
Vancouver. While the parties are
often remembered for the DJ sets,
Chapel Sound is as much about
curating the vibe of a space and
creating an immersive experience as they are about playing
music. Chapel Sound first gained
attention in September 2012 when
Oh live-streamed a party he
hosted in his living room, complete with visual projections and
a live painting installation. The
first event was an "index of what
we're interested in," says Oh.
The subsequent parties offered a
platform for artists to experiment
with different mediums and to
bring their artistic practices to the
table. Butler performed his first
live DJ set during a broadcasted
party. He adds, "Chapel is kind of
why I became a VJ... There was
a need for it." Similarly, Lee says
that her new media practice developed as she created installations
and immersive spaces for Chapel
Sound events.
Lee says that the aim from the
start was to offer "an alternative
space so we could get together and
jam and be weird and be comfortable being weird." Muro says of
the early parties, "It was a strange
sort of vibe but it worked." They
moved the parties to a larger underground space to increase the
reach of the events so more people could contribute. Through
their events, Chapel Sound offered
a platform for DJs and producers who aren't being booked for
mainstream venues, often because
their styles differ from mainstream electronic music.
Chapel Sound started hosting
events in the first place because Oh "like[s] to [bring]
people together." He has aimed
to bring artists together since
he arrived in Vancouver. He is
happy to encourage the talents
of local artists in what he refers
to as a "dad-type" of role within
the scene. Butler adds that with
Chapel Sound, "It [is] all about
being inclusive."
Inclusivity continues to be a
focus for Chapel Sound, whether
it means embracing a range of
genres or ensuring that hosted
events showcase the diversity
of the collective's members. Lee
says, "Chapel Sound is a very
racially diverse electronic music collective." Muro continues,
"I know that some other collectives have been criticized for
being predominantly white men.
I think we can be kind of proud
that we're not that." All members agree that there isn't a single sound that defines Chapel
Sound. "People come from lots of
different backgrounds, so that affects people's styles," says Muro.
Chapel Sound's two compilation
albums effectively represent the
range of styles in which its members work.
What connects the members'
work is a common vibe. Oh attributes the vibe to the Vancouver
music scene and to the impact
of the city's geography and climate. Muro agrees: "Any city's
musical sound [is] influenced
by the environment." So too is
a music scene influenced by its
city's history. In Vancouver, this
includes a history of colonialism
and of economic division. Chapel
Sound aims to initiate conversations around these topics. Chapel
Sound does more than offer a
platform for artistic experimentation; it offers a platform for
critical engagement.
Jn May 2016, the collective
hosted its inaugural Chapel
Sound Festival. In addition
to parties, the festival included
workshops and panels, notably a panel discussion on women
in electronic music and creative
technology. The women on the
panel shared their experiences of
discrimination in the music industry and their differing experiences based on sexual orientation, race and class. The audience
was made up of more men than
women, many of whom asked
questions. Muro says, "We created
a space that allowed for that kind
of transferring of understanding."
Now that Chapel Sound is in its
fifth year and has gained acclaim
beyond Vancouver, its members
are able to take on new endeavours, develop their artistic practices and initiate conversation.
With future events, they intend to
push the conversational aspect.
By offering a forum for discussion
Lee says, "We can actually reflect
critically on our positionality in
society: to [become] more self-
aware and conscious of who we
are and why we make art, why
we make music, why we have
to go through this process to do
things in Vancouver and reflect
on, maybe, class divide, housing issues." On a closing note,
Lee emphasizes that the doors
are open to anyone who wants to
contribute to Chapel Sound. As
for future goals Oh says, "I still
dream about this perfect 360 experience where all of your senses
are stimulated."
You can learn more about Chapel
Sound at chapelsound.org, or visit
soundcloud.com/chapelsound to hear
past projects and compilations.
CHAPEL SOUND ON THE AIR
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
words by Marina Guessous and Danielle Thomas
illustration by Alicia Lawrence
photo by Christine Phang
Jn this contemporary context,
Indigenous people face the
slow song of ongoing colonization, as well as residual in-
tergenerational trauma, and the
relentless journey to recovery
and reconciliation. Through
the embers and ashes of
adversity, we find beautiful minds, kind yet powerful bodies, and resilient souls;
human beings who have given
back to the world in the form of
song, dance, artwork, storytelling,
and a wide range of brave contribu
tions and talented displays.
Unceded Airwaves is a weekly radio pro
gram by CiTR ioi.9FM's Indigenous Collective.
Our loose mandate is to discuss Indigenous issues, current events and entertainment with our weekly air-
time. Indigenous issues have been that of a silent struggle for over four hundred years. Unceded Airwaves aims to
be an accessible resource, providing an opportunity for
Indigenous voices to be heard, and for that silence to be
broken.
fmsm
oral teachings which are utilized today. Our
collective at CiTR was conceived in the
year of 2015, and this is why Unceded
Airwaves is so important: we have
created two seasons worth of
feather decorated deliverance.
The necessity for centering
Indigenous voices is evident
through the layout of our past
shows. Last October, on the
topic of cultural appropriation
during Halloween, the show invited its first Indigenous student
panel of the season to speak of the
issue. On the issue of the impact of
the Nathan E. Stewart diesel spill for
the Heiltsuk livelihood, the show interviewed Jess Housty, a Heiltsuk citizen, community organizer and elected politician chairing
the lands portfolio and co-chairing the youth portfolio for
the Heiltsuk Nation (S2E2). These important programs
would not be made possible without the collaboration of
our Indigenous Collective members.
In addition to interviews, we broadcast a diverse array of Indigenous artists with a fresh playlist every week.
Some of our favourites include Dani and Lizzy, DJ Shub,
We feature diverse narratives: from the personal experience of Robert Nahanee of the Squamish Nation talking
about National Aboriginal Veterans Day (S2E5) to the funny
story of how Blake Desjarlais tried to feed Santa's reindeer
on the Fishing Lake Metis Settlement (S2E9). On February
20, the Indigenous Collective is planning an Indigenous
Futurisms episode, where we will critique the film Rogue
One: A Star Wars Story from a decolonizing perspective.
I   e reaffirm our intention every week: that this
program is committed to centering the voices
of Indigenous people by creating narratives
that empower our stories. These shows are student led,
with indigenous voices at the centre of discussion. Due
to assimilative practices, Indigenous tribes and nations
have not always been afforded the ability to harvest, trade,
exercise traditions or languages. Access to media, including print, radio, and television, have played a significant role in the preservation and revitalization of many
Mob Bounce, JB The First Lady, Blue Moon Marquee,
Mourning Coup, Cris Derkson, David Morin, Saltwater
Hank (and the list goes on). (Send us your favourite
Indigenous artists using the hashtag #UncededMusic and
we'll do our best to get it on the air.)
We're always looking to hear from our listeners about
what you're up to, so share your knowledge. Send us the
events you're attending or promoting, and we'll help get
the word out.
You can reach Unceded Airwaves on social media, through
Twitter and Facebook at @uncededairwaves. We also podcast
our show on citr.ca/radio/unceded-airwaves, or tune in live on
101.9FM Mondays u-i2pm.
CHECK OUTCmiOMRWeMWifS^/WSHffllWf®
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ON THE AIR: UNCEDED AIRWAVES CtXH 101.95m PBOGHpm 6UJD£
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6 AM
7 AM
8AM
9AM
10 AM
11AM
12 PM
1PM
2 PM
3 PM
4 PM
CITR GHOST MIX
AURAL TENTACLES
CITR GHOST MIX
PACIFIC PICKIN'
CITR GHOST MIX
CITR GHOST MIX
OFF THE BEAT AND
PATH
CITR GHOST MIX
BEPI CRESPAN
PRESENTS
CANADALAND
(SYNDICATED)
CITED!
QUEER FM VANCOUVER:
RELOADED
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
BREAKFAST WITH THE
BROWNS
THE COMMUNITY
LIVING SHOW
WIZE MEN
CLASSICAL CHAOS
FEM
CONCEPT
THE SATURDAY EDGE
STUDENT
FILL-IN
A FACE FOR RADIO
MIXTAPES WITH MC
& MAC
POP DRONES
SHOOKSHOOKTA
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
THE REEL WHIRLED
STUDENT FILL-IN
SYNCHRONICITY
THE SHAKESPEARE
SHOW
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
DAVE RADIO WITH
RADIO DAVE
GENERATION
ANNIHILATION
STUDENT
FILL-IN
PARTS UNKNOWN
PERMANENT
RAIN
STUDENT FILL-IN
K-POP CAFE
FRESH SLICE
FHE ROCKERS SHOW
POWER CHORD
PARTICLES & WAVES
MUZAK FOR THE
OBSERVANT
ALL ACCESS PASS
RADIO ZERO
ASTROTALK
THE BURROW
RADIO FREE THINKER
KEW IT UP
THUNDERBIRD EYE
CODE BLUE
LA FIESTA
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
LITTLE BIT OF SOUL
TEXTBOOK
VIBES AND STUFF
SIMORGH
BLOOD
ON THE
SADDLE
6 AM
7AM
8 AM
9AM
10 AM
11AM
12 PM
1PM
2 PM
3 PM
4 PM
5 PM
THE LEO RAMIREZ
SHOW
DISCORDER RADIO
ARTS REPORT
BABE WAVES
NEWS 101
MANTRA
CHTHONIC BOOM!
5 PM
6 PM
UBC ARTS
ON AIR
STUDENT
FILL IN
STUDENT FILL-IN
FLEX YOUR HEAD
7 PM
INNER
SPACE
EXPLODING HEAD
MOVIES
SAMS
QUANTCH'S
HIDEAWAY
ARE YOU
AWARE
STUDENT
FILL-IN
8 PM
INSIDE OUT
MIX CASETTE
SOUL
SANDWICH
SEAN HARBOTTLE'S
HIPPITY HOPPITY
BRIGADE
NASHA VOLNA
NOW WE'RE TALKING
6 PM
EL SONIDO
QUESTION EVERYTHING
NIGHTDRIVE95
MORE THAN HUMAN
7 PM
RIP
RADIC
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
SOCA
STORM
RHYTHMS
INDIA
TECHNO
PROGRE
SSIVO
8 PM
9 PM
WHITE NOISE
SKALDS HALL
9 PM
CRIMES & TREASONS
LIVE FROM
THUNDERBIRD RADIO
HELL
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
TRANCENDANCE
10 PM
THE JAZZ SHOW
THE HEADQUARTERS
CANADA POST ROCK
10 PM
11PM
STRANDED: CAN/AUS
MUSIC SHOW
THUNDERBIRD LOCKER
ROOM
COPY   /   PASTE
11PM
THE MEDICINE SHOW
12 AM
SCREEN GIRLS
RANDOPHONIC
1AM
CITR GHOST MIX
SPICY BOYS
AURAL TENTACLES
CITR GHOST MIX
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
CITR GHOST MIX
2AM
CITR GHOST MIX
LATE
NIGHT
THE  ABSOLUTE  VALUE
OF   INSOMNIA
12 AM
1AM
2AM
LATE
NIGHT
"DISCORDER RECOMMENDS LISTENING TO CiTR EVERYDAY" ■ MONDAY
TRANDENDANCE GHOST MIX
12AM-7AM, ELECTRONIC/DANCE
Up all night? We've got
you, come dance.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
8AM-10AM, ECLECTIC
Your favourite Brownsters,
James and Peter, offer
a savoury blend of the
familiar and exotic in a
blend of aural delights
Contact: breakfastwiththe-
browns@hotmail.com
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
11AM-12PM, TALK/CULTURAL
COMMENTARY
Unceded Airwaves is in its
second season! The team
of Indigenous and non-
Indigenous peeps produce the
show weekly. We talk about
Indigenous issues, current
events, and entertainment
centering Native voices through
interviews and the arts. Come
make Indigenous radio with us!
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Follow us @uncededairwaves &
facebook.com/uncededairwaves/
SYNCHRONICITY
12PM-1PM, TALK/SPIRITUALITY
Join host Marie B and
spirituality, health and
feeling good. Tune in and
tap into good vibrations that
help you remember why
you're here: to have fun!
Contact: spiritualshow@gmail.com
PARTS UNKNOWN
1PM-3PM, rock/pop/indie
Host Chrissariffic takes you on
an indie pop journey not unlike
a marshmallow sandwich:
soft and sweet and best
enjoyed when poked with a
stick and held close to a fire.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE BURROW
3PM-4PM, rock/pop/indie
Hosted by CiTR's music
department manager Andy
Resto, the Burrow is Noise
Rock, Alternative, Post-Rock,
with a nice blend of old
classics' and new releases.
Interviews & Live performances.
Contact: music@citr.ca
LITTLE BIT OF SOUL
4PM-5PM,JAZZ
Host Jade spins old recordings
of jazz, swing, big band,
blues, oldies and motown.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
5PM-6PM, INTERNATIONAL
Veteran host Leo brings
you talk, interviews, and
only the best mix of Latin
American music.
Contact: leoramirez@canada.com
UBC ARTS ON AIR
ALTERNATING MON. 6:30-7PM, TALK/
ACADEMIA
Provocative interviews expert
commentary and the latest
updates from Faculty of Arts
make for engaging segments
with UBC's top writers,
philosophers, researchers,
singers, and actors in the
Humanities & Social Sciences,
Creative & Performing Arts.
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
7PM-8PM, EXPERIMENTAL
Join Gak as he explores
music from the movies,
tunes from television, along
with atmospheric pieces,
cutting edge new tracks,
and strange goodies for
soundtracks to be. All in the
name of ironclad whimsy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE JAZZ SHOW
9PM-12AM, JAZZ
On air since 1984, jazz
musician Gavin Walker takes
listeners from the past to the
future of jazz. With featured
albums and artists, Walker's
extensive knowledge and
hands-on experience as a
jazz player will have you
back again next week.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ TUESDAY
THE SCREEN GIRLS
12AM-1AM, HIP HOP/R&B/SOUL
The Screen Girls merge music
and art with discussions of
trends and pop culture, and
interviews with artists in
contemporary art, fashion and
music. We play a variety of
music, focusing on promoting
Canadian hip hop and R&B.
Contact: info@thescreengirls.com
PACIFIC PICKIN'
6AM-8AM, ROOTS/FOLK/BLUES
Bluegrass, old-time music, and
its derivatives with Arthur and
the lovely Andrea Berman.
Contact: pacificpickin@yahoo.com
QUEER FM
8am-io:30am, talk/politics
Dedicated to the LGBTQ+
communities of Vancouver,
Queer FM features music,
current events, human interest
stories, and interviews.
Contact: queerfmvancouver@
gmail.com
FEMCONCEPT
A show comprised entirely
of Femcon* music and
discussions of women's
rights and social justice
issues. Featuring all genres
of music, with an emphasis
on local and Canadian artists
and events in Vancouver.
•"Femcon" is defined as
music with someone who
self-identifies as female in 2/4
categories: music composition,
lyric composition, performance,
or recording engineering.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE PERMANENT RAIN RADIO
1PM-2PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Join co-hosts Chloe and
Natalie lighthearted twin talk
and rad tunes from a variety
of artists. For more info, go to
thepermanentrainpress.com
Contact: theprpress@hotmail.com
PARTICLES & WAVES
2PM-3PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Like the quantum theory it
is named for, Particles and
Waves defies definition. Join
Mia for local indie, sci-fi prog
rock, classic soul, obscure
soundtracks, Toto's deep
cuts, and much more.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
RADIO FREE THINKER
3PM-4PM, talk/criticism
Promoting skepticism,critical
thinking and science, we
examine popular thought and
extraordinary claims, and
submit them to critical analysis.
Contact: info@radiofreethinker.
com
TEXTBOOK
4PM-5PM, TALK/STORYTELLING
Textbook (FKA The Student
Special Hour) is a show
about students by students
hosted by Josh Gabert-Doyon,
CiTR's student programming
coordinator. There are three
segments: Feature interview,
student storytelling, & "Tell
Me About Your Paper".
Contact: outreach@citr.ca
DISCORDER RADIO
5PM-6PM, ECLECTIC, TALK
Produced by the Discorder
On Air collective, this show
covers content in the magazine
and beyond. Coordinated by
Claire Bailey, Matt Meuse,
and Jordan Wade. Get in
touch to get involved!
Contact: discorder.radio@citr.ca
FLEX YOUR HEAD
6PM-8PM, loud/punk/metal
Punk rock and hardcore since
1989. Bands and guests
from around the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
INSIDE OUT
8PM-9PM, dance/electronic
Tune in weekly for dance music!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CRIMES & TREASONS
9PM-11PM, HIP HOP
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill
$h*t. Hosted by Jamal Steeles,
Homeboy Jules, Relly Rels,
LuckyRich, horsepowar & Issa.
Contact: dj@crimesandtreasons.
com
www.crimesandtreasons.com
STRANDED: CAN/AUS MUSIC
SHOW
11PM-12AM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Join your host Matthew for a
weekly mix of exciting sounds
past and present, from his
Australian homeland. Journey
with him as he features fresh
tunes and explores alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ WEDNESDAY
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
8AM-10AM, ECLECTIC
Live from the Jungle Room,
join radio host Jack Velvet
for music, sound bytes,
information, and insanity.
Contact: dj@jackvelvet.net
POP DRONES
10AM-12PM, ECLECTIC
Unearthing the depths of
contemporary and cassette
vinyl underground. Ranging
from DIY bedroom pop and
garage rock all the way to harsh
noise, and of course, drone.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
12PM-1PM, ECLECTIC
Dan Shakespeare is here
with music for your ears.
Kick back with gems from
the past, present, and future.
Genre need not apply.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
MUZAK FOR THE OBSERVANT
2PM-3PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
The CiTR Music department
program, highlighting the
newest/freshest cuts from the
station's bowels. Featuring live
interviews and performances
from local artists.
KEWITUP
3PM-4PM, experimental/ talk
Radio essays and travesties:
Sonic Cate(s)chism / half-baked
philosophy and criticism.
Experimental, Electronica,
Post-Punk, Industrial,
Noise : ad-nauseum
Contact: programming@citr.ca
VIBES AND STUFF
4PM-5PM, HIP HOP/ R&B/ SOUL
Feeling nostalgic? Vibes and
Stuff has you covered bringing
you some of the best 90s to
contemporary hip-hop artists
all in one segment. DJ Bmatt
& Dak Genius will have you
reminiscing about the good
ol' times with Vibes and Stuff
every week! skrt skrt.
Contact: vibesandstuffhiphop@
gmail.com
ARTS REPORT
5PM-6PM, TALK/ ARTS & CULTURE
The one and only student run
arts and culture radio show in
Vancouver, Arts Report brings
you the latest in local arts!
Your show hosts Ashley and
Christine provide a weekly
dose of reviews, interviews,
and special segments.
Contact: arts@citr.ca
INNER SPACE
6:30PM-8pm, electronic/dance
Dedicated to underground
electronic music, both
experimental and dance-
oriented. Live DJ sets and
guests throughout.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SAMSQUANTCH'S HIDEAWAY
6:30PM-8pm, rock/pop/indie
If you're into 90's nostalgia,
Anita B's the DJ you for.
Don't miss her spins,
every Wednesday.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
MIX CASSETTE
8PM-9PM, HIP HOP/R&B/SOUL
A panopoly of songs, including
the freshest riddims and
sweetest tunes, hanging
together, in a throwback suite.
Which hearkens back to the
days where we made mix
cassettes for each other(cds
too), and relished in the
merging of our favourite albums.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
WHITE NOISE
9PM-10PM, talk/sketch comedy
Join Richard Blackmore for half
an hour of weird and wonderful
sketch comedy, as he delves
into the most eccentric corners
of radio. Then stay tuned for
the after show featuring Simon
and Connor who make sense
of it all, with the occasional
interjection of quality music.
Contact: whitenoiseUBC@
gmail.com
THE HEADQUARTERS
10PM-11PM, HIP HOP/ R&B/ SOUL
The Headquarters for
Vancouver's undercover
scene. Hang with Young
Emma, she knows what's up.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THUNDERBIRD LOCKER ROOM
11PM-12AM, TALK/SPORTS
Chase takes you into the
locker rooms of UBC for talk
with varsity athletes, coaches,
and UBC staff on everything
but sports. The Thunderbird
Locker Room gives you a
backroom perspective.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ THURSDAY
SPICY BOYS
12AM-1AM, PUNK/HARDCORE/METAL
Playing music and stuff.
You can listen.
Or don't.
It's up to you.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
OFF THE BEAT AND PATH
7AM-8AM, TALK
Host Issa Arian introduces you
to topics through his unique
lens. From news, to pop culture,
and sports, Issa has the goods.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CANADALAND (SYNDICATED)
8AM-9AM, talk/politics
Podcast hosted by Jesse
Brown that focuses on media
criticism as well as news,
politics, and investigative
reporting. Their website also
has text essays and articles.
Contact: jesse@canadaland-
show.com
THE COMMUNITY LIVING SHOW
9AM-10AM, talk/accessibility
This show is produced
by and for the disabled
community. We showcase
BC Self Advocates and
feature interviews with people
with special needs. Hosted
by Kelly Raeburn, Michael
Rubbin Clogs and friends.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
A FACE FOR RADIO
10AM-11AM, ECLECTIC
A show about music with
interludes about nothing. From
punk, to indie rock, and beyond.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
11AM-12PM, PUNK
Hello hello hello! I interview
bands and play new,
international, and local punk
rock music. Broadcasted in
by Russian Tim in Broken
English. Great Success!
Contact: rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com.
'ocke1fromrussiacitr@gmail.com,
@tima_tzar,
facebook.com/RocketFromRussia
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
12PM-1PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by
Duncan, sponsored by donuts.
Contact: duncansdonuts.word-
press.com
K-CAFE
1PM-2PM, K-POP
Jayden gives listeners
an introduction music &
entertainment in Asian
Cultures, especially, Korean,
Japanese, Chinese. Tune in for
K-POP, Hip Hop, Indie, R&B,
Korean Wave (aka K-Wave or
Hallyu), News about Korean
Entertainment Industry, and
Korean Society in Vancouver.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ALL ACCESS PASS
2PM-3PM, TALK/ACCESSIBILITY
The Accessibility Collective
radio show! They talk equity,
inclusion, and accessibility
for people with diverse
abilities, on and off campus.
Tune in for interviews, music,
news, events, & dialogue.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ASTROTALK
3-3:30PM, talk/science
Space is an interesting place.
Marco slices up the night sky
with a new topic every week.
Death Starts, Black Holes, Big
Bang, Red Giants, the Milky
Way, G-Bands, Pulsars, Super
Stars and the Solar System.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THUNDERBIRD EYE
3:30-4PM, talk/sports
Your weekly roundup of
UBC Thunderbird sports
action from on campus and
off with your hosts Jason
Wang and Timothy Winter.
Contact: sports@citr.ca
SIMORGH
4PM-5PM, TALK/STORYTELLING
Simorgh Radio is devoted
to education and literacy for
Persian speaking communities.
Simorgh the mythological
multiplicity of tale-figures, lands-
in as your mythological narrator
in the storyland; the contingent
space of beings, connecting
Persian peoples within and
to Indigenous peoples.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BABE WAVES
5PM-6PM, TALK/CULTURAL CRITICISM
Babe Waves is CiTR's Gender
Empowerment Collective show.
Jazzed women-identifying and
non-binary folks sit around
and talk music, art, politics,
current events and much more.
Tune in, follow us on social
media, and get involved!
Contact: programming@citr.ca:
facebook.com/citrbabewaves
ARE YOU AWARE
ALTERNATING THURS, 6PM-7:30,
ECLECTIC
Celebrating the message
behind the music. Profiling
music and musicians that
take the route of positive
action over apathy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
ELSONIDO
ALTERNATING THURS, 6PM-8PM,
LATIN AMERICAN
Daniel brings you the
finest sounds, all the
way for Colombia.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SOUL SANDWICH
8PM-9PM, HIP HOP/R&B/SOUL
A myriad of your favourite
genres all cooked into one
show. From Hip Hop to Indie
rock to African jams, Rohit
and Ola will play it all, in a
big soulful sandwich. This
perfect layering of yummy
goodness will blow your mind.
AND, it beats Subway.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
R.I.P. RADIO
alternating thurs, 8pm-9pm,
talk/hip hop/r&b/soul
R.I.P. Radio brings deceased
artists back into the spotlight
and to reveal the world of
budding artists standing
on the shoulders of these
musical giants. Each episode
is a half-hour journey back
from the musical grave.You'll
want to stay alive for it.
Contact: Instagram, @rip.radio
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
9PM-11PM, rock/pop/indie
Thunderbird Radio Hell
features live band(s) every
week performing in the comfort
of the CiTR lounge. Most are
from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country
and around the world are nice
enough to drop by to say hi.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
COPY/PASTE
11PM-12AM, ELECTRONIC
If it makes you move your
feet (or nod your head), it'll
be heard on copy/paste. Vibe
out with what's heating up
underground clubs around
town and worldwide. A brand
new DJ mix every week by
Autonomy & guest DJs.
Contact: music@actsofautono-
my.com
■ FRIDAY
AURAL TENTACLES
12AM-6AM, EXPERIMENTAL
It could be global, trance,
spoken word,rock, the
unusual and the weird.
Hosted by DJ Pierre.
Contact: auraltentacles@hotmail.
com
CITED
8AM-9AM, talk/academia
This is a radio program about
how our world is being shaped
by the ideas of the ivory tower.
Sometimes, in troubling ways.
Formerly "The Terry Project on
CiTR." Join multi award winning
producers Sam Fenn & Gordon
Katie every Friday morning.
Contact: facebook.com/citedpod-
cast, Twitter | @citedpodcast
WIZE MEN
9AM-10AM, rock/pop/indie
Watch and wonder as Austin
begins to unravel the intricate
world of environmental
science right in front of your
earz. Austin's taste in music
has been praised among the
deities as the finest and most
refined in all the land. So trust
in Austin as you surrender your
ears every Friday morning.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
MIXTAPES WITH MC AND MAC
10AM-11AM, rock/pop/indie
Whether in tape, cd, or playlist
form, we all love a good
collection of songs. Join us
every Friday morning at 10
for a live mixtape with musical
commentary. Who knows
what musical curiosities you
will hear from Matt McArthur
and Drew MacDonald!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE REEL WHIRLED
11AM-12PM, TALK/ FILM
The Reel Whirled is an
adventure through the world of
film. Whether it's contemporary,
classic, local, or global, we
talk about film with passion,
mastery, and a lil dash of
silly. Featuring music from
our cinematic themes, Dora
and Dama will bring your
Friday mornings into focus.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
DAVE RADIO WITH RADIO DAVE
12PM-1PM, TALK/THEATRE
Your noon-hour guide to
what's happening in Music
and Theatre in Vancouver.
Lots of tunes and talk.
Contact: daveradiopodcast@
FRESH SLICE
1PM-2PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Tunes are hot and fresh.
Talk is cheesey. Pop,
rock, DIY, pop-punk.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
RADIO ZERO
2PM-3:30PM
An international mix of super-
fresh weekend party jams
from New Wave to foreign
electro, baile, Bollywood,
and whatever else.
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
www.radiozero.com
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
3:30PM-5PM, MUSIC/INTERVIEWS
Join Nardwuar, the Human
Serviette for an hour and a half
of Manhattan Clam Chowder
flavoured entertainment. Doot
doola doot doo... doot doo!
Contact: http://nardwuar.com/rad/
contact/
NEWS 101
5PM-6PM, talk/news
Vancouver's only live, volunteer-
produced, student and
community newscast. Fridays
tune in to hear an independent
perspective of what's going on
in the world. News 101 covers
current affairs ranging from
the local to the international.
SEAN HARBOTTLE'S HIPPITY
HOPPITY BRIGADE
6PM-7PM, HIP HOP/ R&B/ SOUL
Do you love dope beats and
flaming hot bars? Yes? Would
you still love them if you had
an earnest but ultimately
annoyingly British dude spinning
the decks? Still yes? If so, join
Sean Harbottle for a marriage
of old classics, new classics,
and everything in between.
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Twitter | @TheHarbottle
QUESTION EVERYTHING
7pm-7:30pm, talk/interviews
Question Everything focuses
on providing inspiration and
advice to young leaders who
are in the early phases of their
careers. Each week, we bring
you inspiration and insights
from creative minds and
experts in entrepreneurs hip,
publishing, and design.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
7:30pm-9pm, r&b/soul/inter-
national
African Rhythms has been on
the air for over twenty three
years. Your Host, David Love
Jones, plays a heavyweight
selection of classics from the
past, present, and future. This
includes jazz, soul, hip-hop,
Afro-Latin, funk, and eclectic
Brazilian rhythms. There are
also interviews with local and
international artists. Truly, a
radio show with international
flavor.Genre: Dance
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SKALD'S HALL
9PM-10PM, talk/radio drama
Skalds Hall focuses on
entertainment through the art of
Radio Drama. Story readings,
poetry recitals, drama scenes,
storytellers, join host Brian
MacDonald. Have an interest in
performing? Guest artists are
always welcome, contact us!
Contact: Twitter | @Skalds_Hall
CANADA POST ROCK
10PM-11PM, ROCK/POP/lNDIE
Formerly on CKXU, Canada
Post-Rock remains committed
to the best in post-rock,
drone, ambient, experimental,
noise and basically anything
your host Pbone can put
the word "post" in front of.
Stay up, tune in, zone out.
Contact: programming@citr.ca,
Twitter | @pbone
THE MEDICINE SHOW
11PM-12:30AM, eclectic/live
interviews
Broadcasting Healing Energy
with LIVE Music and laughter!
A variety show, featuring
LIVE music, industry guests
and insight. The material
presented is therapeutic
relief from our difficult world.
We encourage and promote
independent original, local
live music, art, compassion
and community building.
Contact: vancouvermedicine-
■gmaiLcom
scene, which progresses
to Industrial, Noise and
Alternative No Beat into the
early morning. We play TZM
broadcasts, starting at 6am.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE SATURDAY EDGE
8AM-12PM, ROOTS/BLUES/FOLK
Now in its 31st year on CiTR,
The Saturday Edge is my
personal guide to world &
roots music, with African,
Latin and European music
in the first half, followed by
Celtic, Blues, Songwriters,
Cajun and whatever else fits!
Contact: steveedge3@mac.com
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
12PM-1PM, PUNK/HARDCORE/METAL
On the air since 2002,
playing old and new punk
on the non commercial
side of the spectrum.
Contact: crashnburnradio@
yahoo.ca
POWER CHORD
1PM-3PM, loud/metal
Vancouver's longest running
metal show. If you're into music
that's on the heavier/darker
side of the spectrum, then you'll
like it. Sonic assault provided
by Geoff, Marcia, and Andy.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CODE BLUE
3PM-5PM, roots/folk/blues
From backwoods delta low-
down slide to urban harp honks,
blues, and blues roots with your
hosts Jim, Andy, and Paul.
Contact: codeblue@paulnorton.ca
MANTRA RADIO
5PM-6PM, electronic/mantra/
NU-GAIA
Mantra showcases the many
faces of sacred sound -
traditional, contemporary,
and futuristic. The show
features an eclectic array of
electronic and acoustic beats,
music, chants, and poetry
from the diverse peoples
and places of planet earth.
Contact: mantraradioshow@
gmail.com
NASHA VOLNA
6PM-7PM, talk/russian
Informative and entertaining
program in Russian.
Contact: nashavolna@shaw.ca
NIGHTDRIVE95
7PM-8PM, experimental/ambient/
chillwave
Plug NIGHTDRIVE95 directly
into your synapses to receive
your weekly dose of dreamy,
ethereal, vaporwave tones fresh
from the web. Ideal music for
driving down the Pacific Coast
Highway in your Geo Tracker,
sipping a Crystal Pepsi by the
pool, or shopping for bootleg
Sega Saturn games at a Hong
Kong night market. Experience
yesterday's tomorrow, today!
Contact: nightdrive95@gmail.com
SOCA STORM
8PM-9PM, international/soca
DJ SOCA Conductor delivers
the latest SOCA Music from
the Caribbean. This show is
the first of its kind here on
CiTR and is the perfect music
to get you in the mood to go
out partying! Its Saturday,
watch out STORM COMING!!!!
PapayoM #SOCASTORM
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
9PM-11PM, electronic/retro/
TECHNO
Every show is full of electro
bleeps, retrowave, computer
generated, synthetically
manipulated aural rhythms.
If you like everything from
electro / techno / trance /
8bit music / and retro '80s
this is the show for you!
Contact: programming@citr.ca
RANDOPHONIC
11PM-1AM, EXPERIMENTAL
Randophonic has no concept of
genre, style, political boundaries
or even space-time relevance.
Lately we've fixed our focus
on a series, The Solid Time of
Change, 661 Greatest Records
of the Prog. Rock Era - 1965-
79) We're not afraid of noise.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ SUNDAY
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF
INSOMNIA
1AM-3AM, experimental/generative
4 solid hours of fresh generative
music c/o the Absolute Value
of Noise and its world famous
Generator. Ideal for enhancing
your dreams or, if sleep is not
on your agenda, your reveries.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS
7AM-9AM, experimental/difficult
Difficult music, harsh
electronics, spoken word,
cut-up/collage and general
CRESPAN© weirdness.
Contact: Twitter I @BEPICRE-
SPAN
CLASSICAL CHAOS
9AM-10AM, CLASSICAL
From the Ancient World to
the 21 st century, join host
Marguerite in exploring and
celebrating classical music
from around the world.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
SHOOKSHOOKTA
10AM-12PM, INTERNATIONAL/
AMHARIC/ ETHIOPIAN
2 hour Ethiopian program
on Sundays. Targeting
Ethiopian people and
aiming to encouraging
education and personal
development in Canada.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
THE ROCKER'S SHOW
12PM-3PM, REGGAE
All reggae, all the time. Playing
the best in roots rock reggae,
Dub, Ska, Dancehall with
news views & interviews.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
Real cows hit-caught-in-
yer-boots country.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
LA FIESTA
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue,
Latin House, and Reggaeton
with your host Gspot DJ.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
CHTHONIC BOOM
5PM-6PM, rock/pop/indie
A show dedicated to playing
psychedelic music from
parts of the spectrum (rock,
pop, electronic), as well as
garage and noise rock.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
NOW WE'RE TALKING
6PM-7PM, talk/comedy/interviews
Now We're Talking features
weekly conversation with Jeff
Bryant and Keith Kennedy.
You'll see.
Contact: nwtpod@gmail.com ,
Twitter | @nwtpodcast
MORE THAN HUMAN
7PM-8PM, ELECTRONIC
Strange and wonderful
electronic sounds from the
past, present and future:
house, ambient, vintage
electronics, library music, new
age, hauntology, fauxtracks..
Music from parallel worlds,
with inane interjections and
the occasional sacrifice.
Contact: fantasticcat@mac.com,
Twitter | @fcat
RHYTHMS INDIA
8PM-9PM, international/bhajans
/qawwalis/sufi
Presenting several genres of
rich Indian music in different
languages, poetry and guest
interviews. Dance, Folk,
Qawwalis, Traditional, Bhajans,
Sufi, Rock & Pop. Also, semi-
classical and classical Carnatic
& Hindustani music and old
Bollywood numbers from the
1950s to 1990s and beyond.
Contact: rhythmsindia8@gmail.
com
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
8PM-9PM, ELECTRONIC/DEEP HOUSE
A mix of the latest house
music, tech-house, prog-house
and techno + DJ / Producer
interviews and guest mixes.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
TRANCENDANCE
9PM-11PM, electronic/trance
Trancendance has been
broadcasting from Vancouver,
BC since 2001. We favour
Psytrance, Hard Trance and
Epic Trance, but also play
Acid Trance, Deep Trance,
Hard Dance and even some
Breakbeat. We also love a
good Classic Trance Anthem,
especially if it's remixed.
Contact: djsmileymike@trancen-
dance.net
THE AFTN SOCCER SHOW
11PM-12AM, TALK/SOCCER
Est. 2013, the show features
roundtable chat about the
week's big talking points,
interviews with the headline
makers from the local and
national game, a humorous
take on the latest happenings
with the Vancouver Whitecaps,
MLS, and the world of football.
Contact: programming@citr.ca
■ ISLAND OF
LOST TOYS
STUDENT FILL IN
ECLECTIC
A place for experimentation
& learning!
MOON GROK
EXPERIMENTAL
A morning mix to ease you from
the moonlight. Moon Grok pops
up early morning when you
least expect it, and need it most.
CITR GHOST MIX
anything/everything
Late night, the on air studio
is empty. Spirits move from
our playlist to your ear holes.
We hope they're kind, but
we make no guarantees.
■ SATURDAY
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
12:30am-6am, electronic/ambient
The Late Night Show features
music from the underground
Jungle and Drum and Bass CiTR 101.9FM JANUARY MONTHLY CHARTS
DISCORDER (COVERS ITS CHARTS WITH PEANUT BUTTER)
I-
L
f
®
JL
9
artist
The Evaporators**
Loscil*+
Album
Ogopogo Punk
Monument Builders
ftabd
Mint
Swim Team*+ Out Of The Flood
Twin Rains*+ Automatic Hand
New Fries* More
Brasstronaut*
Moth Mouth*-
Mi'ens*+
Psychic Pollution*
S/T
Mirror Universe
Challenger
—t"
Phern*
Steve Adamyk Band*
Shhh*
©
Avec le Soleil Sortant de
sa bouche*
n
Monomyth*
©
Skye Wallace**
ms
Daniel Terrence
Robertson**
©
A Tribe Called Quest
us
Various*
119
badbadnotgood*
mSNSSNSSNSSNSSN^
Tim The Mute*+
M
Tanya Tagaq*
Al Existential Intelligence   \
Pause Clope/Cool Coma
Graceland
Be Quite!
Pas Pire Pop
Happy Pop Family
Something Wicked
Death
We Got It from Here... Thank
You 4 Your Service
Quarter Life Crisis
IV
Take My Life...Please!
Retribution
Kranky
Self-Released
Self-Released
Telephone Explosion
Unfamiliar
Self-Released
Kingfisher Bluez
Eat Glass
Fixture
Dirt Nap Records
-1
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Tasseomancy*
Arts & Crafts
Kingfisher Bluez
Six Shooter
Hand Drawn Dracula
Agony Klub
Self-Released
Idee Fixe
Dare To Care
Transistor 66
u-   C
u  ra
IS
I 1d
LIVE AT THE WISE HALL
FEBRUARY EVENTS SCHEDULE 2017
THUR
FEB 2
FEB 5
ill?
FEB 20
THUR
FEB 23
FffKiBi/K FtWIt/EK
with ROBERTS HALL and DANA SIPOS
OLD TIME DANCE PARTY
MONTHLY SQUARE DANCE
CLOTHING SWAP
1:00PM-3:00PM
Petunia and the Vipers
IN THE WISE LOUNGE
EhEGmtG SQM
ELECTRIC STARDUST TOUR m «g
REAL PONCHOS
ALBUM RELEASE SHOW W/SPECIAL GUEST JAMES GREEN
BEN ROGERS & THE BL00DRED YONDER
"THE HIGHWAY OF TEARS" SINGLE RELEASE
Petunia and the Vipers
IN THE WISE LOUNGE
FLANET PINKISH «. ORCHARD PINKISH
EVERY THIRD WEDNESDAY IN THE LOUNGE • THIS MONTH: THE RETURN OF CHOPPER!
BROKEN EARTH VANCOUVER PRESENTS
a FUNDRAISER for HAITI
THE El G SOUND VANCOUVER
A CELEBRATION OF THE GLORY DAYS OF CLASSIC SOUL AND THE MOTOWN SOUND
Petunia and the Vipers
IN THE WISE LOUNGE
FEBRUARY VISUAL ARTIST SHOWCASE featuring
CR AVCry in the wise lounge
JOHNNY 2 FINGERS
vim THE CUT LOSSES » THE PSYCHIC ALLIANCE
EAST VAN MARPIGRAS
SCREAMING CHICKENS THEATRICAL SOCIETY
Tagoo Revue
Petunia and the Vipers
IN THE WISE LOUNGE
1882 ADANAC STREET (AT VICTORIA DRIVE)
WWW.WISEHALL.CA   (604) 254-5858 Feb 1
BLACK UPS
Rickshaw Theatre
Feb 7
CHERRY 6LAZERR
The Coablt
Feb  8
RUN THE JEWELS
Vogue Theatre
Feb  17
THUNDERCAT
Rickshaw Theatre
Feb  11
WHITE LIES
Rickshaw Theatre
Feb  21
LOS CAMPESINOS!
Imperial
Feb  25
THE RURAL ALBERTA ADVANTAGE
Fox Cabaret
Feb  26
KEVIN ABSTRACT
The  Biltmore
Mar  12
THE WOOD BROTHERS
Feb  22
CLIPPING.
The  Biltmore
Feb  23
HIPPO CAMPUS
The Cobalt
Feb 26 DESERT DAZE CARAVAN TOUR
TEMPLES, NIGHT BEATS, DEAP VALLY & JJUUJJUU
Rickshaw Theatre
Feb  28
THE RADIO DEPT.
The  Biltmore

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