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  254 EAST HASTINGS STREET 604.681.8915
J THE TRAGIC TRIBUTE
\ (9 BANDS PLAYING 30 TRAGICALLY
HIP SONGS) PROCEEDS TO THE
GORD DOWNIE FUND FOR
BRAIN CANCER RESEARCH
I MAJAHMANSERS
SHAPRECE
MU
I STICK TO YOUR GUNS
i STRAY FROM THE PATH,
I EXPIRE, KNOCKED LOOSE
I ART D'ECCO 'DAY FEVERS'
RECORD RELEASE
SHITLORD FUCKERMAN,
I DIRTY SPELLS & ELIZABETH
I+D0PE +
SAINTS OF DEATH, THE
SCHOENBERG AUTOMATON,
I CELESTIAL RUIN	
TRAILERHAWK&WEST
OF MEMPHIS
LAWLESS
I PETUNIA AND THE VIPERS
THE CROW QUILL NIGHT
OWLS
PREOCCUPATIONS
WITH GUESTS
DAVID LIEDE HART
(ADULT SWIM/TIM & ERIC)
BABOON TORTURE DIVISION,
VICTOR BARKAR, NO CARE.
HOSTED BY MC DAVE FLAIL
REBELS SINGzATRIBUTE
TO TODD SERIOUS
THE REBEL SPELL ALBUM
RELEASE
EARLY SHOW: 7PM
COMEDY SHOCKER-
DECALOGUE OF DEATH
SEAN PROUDLOVE, MARK
HUGHES, KYLE JONES, MARK
NESBITT, SAM TONNING, MARK
0'KEEFFE,OLUEMAUGHAN
BOTH SHOWS SOLD OUT!  1
PROZZAK
CHRISTA RELLE
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io mint
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LL500-6133 University
VancouTOBB TpB££ of COttlUltS
SEPTEMBER 2016
COVER:
JFeature*
06 - Destroy Vancouver XVIII
VIVO's sound series concludes September 8
07 - Art d'Ecco
Day Fevers and the transformative power of a new hairstyle
08- Wishkicker
(Trying to come up with a Wishbone pun, but can't think of one. Sigh.)
16 - Graftician
Architecture and finding time for Wander/Weave
17 - Hick
Moving on and meeting people
Column* + spore
05
09
10
12
14
19
20
21
23
ADVERTISE: Adspai
booked by calling (604) 822-4342 or ei
advertislng@cttr.ca. Rates available up
Generation Gap:
The Mainstream between lie
and The Fall
Discorder Revisited:
Zippy and The Debs riot
Real Live Action
At»+      "DT*r» iarf¥      4.     f al anHar      DISTRIBUTE: To distribute D&coreferin your busl-
Afl  Jrioject   +  o a j. enaar   ness_^mtmmv9tibM,Weare^i^,
by   Juli   Majer for new friends.
Under Review
Venews:
Must-Visit Music venues,
music shops, and art galleries in Vancouver!
On The Air:
copy/paste
Program Guide
Charts
Publisher: Student Radio Society of UBC // CiTR Station Manager: Hugo Noriega // Advertising Coordinator:
Katayoon Yousefbigloo // Discorder Student Liason: Claire Bailey // Editor-in-Chief: Brit Bachmann // Under
Review Editor: Jonathan Kew // Real Live Action Editor: Jasper D. Wrinch // Art Director: Ricky Castanedo-
Laredo // Production Assistant: Jules Galbraith // Web Content Coordinator: Katrina Wong // Accounts
Manager: Eleanor Wearing // Charts: Andy Resto // Discorder Radio Producers: Claire Bailey, Matt Meuse,
Jordan Wade // Online Communications Coordinator: Keagan Perlette // Writers: Maximilian Anderson-Baier,
Josh Gabert-Doyon, Bridget Gallagrjer, Daniel Geddes, Blake Haarstad, Courtney Heffeman, Evangeline Hogg,
Jonathan Kew, Kat Kott, Erica Leiren, Alex Lenz, Charmaine Li, Lucas Lund, Missy Martin, Sam Mohseni, Keagan
Perlette, Christine Powell, Elijah Teed, Sachin Turakhia, Jasper D. Wrinch // Photographers & Illustrators: Olga
Abeleva, Sara Baar, Evan Buggle.Bev Davies|giona Dunnett, D|ffa|Keartey, Lucas Lund, Sharon Ko, Zad Kokar,
> Mis|^1artin, Nolan Sage, Manny Sangha, Emma Porter, Karl Ventura, Declan Wileman-Hopkins, Daniel Witnicki
// Proofreaders: Brit Bachmann, Ricky Castanedo-Laredo, Erica Leiren, Jonathan Kew, Andy Resto, Jasper D.
Wrinch, Chris Yee, Katayoon Yousefbigloo
itder 2015 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published almost monthly by CiTR, located on
ie< level of the UBC Nest, situated on the traditional unceded territory of the haiiqamiham speaking Musqueam peoples. CiTR can be heard at 101.9 FM, online at cilr.ca, as
i through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487, CiTR's office at (604) 8221242, email CiTR at
stationmanager@citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write LL500 - 6133 University Blvd. V6T1Z1, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
STRANGE
FASCINATION
EDITOR'S NOTE
^p or me, what makes change so unsettling is not having to adapt to the new
^^ or mourn for what's gone, but the way time itself suddenly feels more real
^P when things change. Normally time is an abstract concept that we as humans
attempt to interpret through clocks or moon cycles, but time doesn't actually have
shape or substance... Unless something changes, and then two separate timelines
are created in our minds: the before-change, and the after-change. These periods
of time are no longer abstract concepts, rather, they become pockets of memories
or ambitions — memories to reminisce over, or ambitions to look forward to.
September is a time of change. Either you're a student or faculty returning to
studies, or you're outside a seasonal institution and feeling the actual change of
season — crisper air, and all that. And maybe you've been reading Discorder for a
couple years and you've realized that we have changed, too:
The new format you are holding in your hands or admiring online is the result
of spirited masthead discussions around the nature of independent publishing and
distinguished design, and lovingly produced by our Art Director, Ricky Castanedo.
This reformat is not a rebrand; it's more like a really good dye job. Discorder has
changed its style many times since 1983, but our content and overall aesthetic
stays the same: passionately and provocatively representative of the local DIY arts
community.
There is also new staff! The Station Manager of CiTR and Discorder's new publisher is Hugo Noriega, whose creative projects have been featured. (Hugo is actu- ■
ally close to acquiring the most mentions in Discorder, second only to D.O.A.,
and tailed closely by War Baby.) We also want to welcome CiTR's new Program
Manager, former Spoken Word Coordinator Madeline Taylor. Finally, shout out
to the new Student Executive for the 2016 / 17 year led by Shea McConkey and
Christine Powell, and our new Discorder Student Liaison Claire Bailey.
Change is an inadvertent theme in this issue: Art d'Ecco discusses the cosmetic
change that brought him closer to his creativity; Wishkicker becomes a 5-piece
for the release of Wider Vision; Andrea Lukic grows Hick's presence on stage, but
not in the studio; Erica Leiren's Discorder Revisited is inspired by the sighting
of an old bandmate; and Destroy Vancouver concludes with a series finale on
September 8. Everything changes.
SUBSCRIBE: Send in a cheque for $20 to LL500
- 6133 University Blvd. V6T 1Z1, Vancouver, BC with
your address, and we will mail each issue of Discorder
right to your doorstep for a year.
DONATE: We are part of CiTR, a registered non-profit, and accept donations so we can provide you with the
content you love. To donate visit w«
PS. New to town or just wanting to crawl out of your shell? Flip to page 19 for a
list of local venues and galleries, and page 13 for upcoming events. And see you at
Sweet Pup Studios September 16 for The Micro Mac-rodeo in the Sky!
PPS. Thank you Web exPress for the really good dye job.
CiTR
DISCORDER
101.9FM j CITR.CA
/ DISCORDER.CA
WE HAVE AWESOME VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES!
AT CiTRioi.9FM, UBC's Community
radio station, you can be trained and
participate in:
+ Sports broadcasting + Independent news
journalism + The music industry + Arts
journalism + On-air show hosting + live sound
and live audio broadcasting + Digitization and
archiving + Production for radio + Promotions
and outreach
You can also volunteer for Discorder,
CiTR's own magazine:
+ Contribute live show and album reviews +
Write about Vancouver's thriving music scene
+ Contribute art, illustrations, photography +
much more!
And if that wasn't enough for you, CiTR offers work-study opportunities and
practicum placements for students (at UBC and beyond) interested in a
multitude of fields
EDITOR'S NOTE j 11
a
PRENUP7"
Twee/pop/punk from Josiah & Sara of
Grown-U ps. Co-release with Kingfisher Suez
EMPTY HEADS ugly 7"
Featuring members of Unfun, PMMA,
and Sabertooth.
uHfun
UNFUN waterboanding LP
The final Unfun recordings. One time
pressing on blue vinyl.
order at debtoffensiverecs.com
Joseph Staples
Garden of
Paradise
Sep 9 - Oct 22
Opening reception
Sept 9,7 -10 pm
SWARM
After party
Fundraiser
w/Zen Finger
& hazy Sept 9
10 pm-1 am $5
UNIT/PITTJ
Chinatown!
Tue - Sat noon to 5 pm I
mesmsm
CITR
MSCORDER
GET  INVOLVED AT CiTR
Come to our open house!
Friday September 9 from llam-5pm rm LL 500 in the AMS Nest.
We will be a having a cd/vinyl garage sale the inside station from llam-2pm Sept
6-9 + will be doing membership sign-ups. Come out and say hi!
STOP .IN FOR A STATION TOUR weekdays at noon. Email volun-
teer@citr.ca or visit www.citr.ca to book a tour.
CiTR and.AMS Events Present
Live at Lunch, bringing Vancouver bands to UBC
12-1PM from Sept 6-9 12-14
Bands will include: Ashley Shadow, Devours, hazy, Marin Fetenaude and more!
We Live Broadcast every performance! So come out and talk on the radio
Upcoming
Live Broadcasts
Come say hi!
September 2
Graduate Student Society
Orientation
SHINDIG!        Workshops
CiTR s 13:week battle of Join CiTR! You git
the bands is starting once access to our weekly
again this October! broadcast training and
You can still submit until    our workshops!
September 10,. 2016! For
more info, visit
www.citr.ca/shindig
Writing for Discorder   SgSSiwBkH*
Every Tuesday in September from 8pm-5pm to learn   p^TJ7 bquare mock
the ins and quia of writing for Discorder Magazine
with Editor Brit Bachmann
September 6-14
Live at Lunch UBC
Become a DJ
Sign up for our free digital mixing and beatmatching    IfPteF11^-26 ™     ,   &
program, DJ.101.9. Classes start in Oct. Email Highline Live Broadcast
volunteer@citr.ca for more information
101.9PM | CITR.CA
/ DISCORDER.CA
RMS
F RST
WEEK
THERE'S NOTHING LIKE YOUR FIRST WEEK.
SUBMITTO
SHINDIG
2016
1 - A MNIUUU OF 3 SONGS OF ORIGINAL
NATERIAL ROUGH DEMOS ARE A-OKAYI
WEIL GET THE IDEA.
2 - CONTACT INFO! PHONE # + E-MAIL
Featuring dsly everts inducing a massive stages pair*
party, a scenic shopping trip, comedy show, and a hugs
oubdoor concert, AMS Ftsfcweek is the official
sbart-c^the-yearcetebrattonabUBC
SHINDIG.SUBMISSIONS@GUAIL.COU
OR. IF YOUDE OLD SCHOOL PUT
EVERYTHING IN AN ENVELOPE AND EITHER
SEND IT OR DROP IT OFF AT:
LL500-6133 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD.
VANCOUVER BC.V6T1Z1
' SUBMISSIONS DEADLINE IS SEPTEMBER 101
BY STUDENTS FOR STUDENTS GENERATION GAP
THE MAINSTREAM BETWEEN LIE
AND THE FALL
words by Daniel Geddes // illustration by Olga AbeleYa
])Ms^~^
Mjfeg&S
op
r^^^w'^^<\^Af/r
Hecently people have
been telling me that pop
music is in a pretty good
place right now. They say that the
songs are good or that the produc
tion is amazing — and every now
and then when I hear music on the
radio while I'm driving, I grudgingly have to agree. Additionally,
some of these confections even
have clever subversive messages,
the kind that tell us that our collective consciousness may actually
be evolving for the better. That
can be very encouraging. And yet I
still feel frustrated as a music fan,
and I think I always will. Part of
what I like about music and art is
actually disliking the stuff I don't
like and defining it against what
I do. And what I can't seem to let
go of is that, even when popular
music contains messages, production values or melodies that I
find appealing, it still just isn't as
open to directly confrontational or
radical messages as less popular
music. You still have to go to the
underground to hear something
that is free to speak openly about
the world.
Listening to he's new album
Truth Or Consequences reminds me
of why I consider pop music to
be slightly inferior in terms of its
capacity to feel urgent and real.
The album isn't even particularly
inaccessible: it's fun to listen to.
As somebody who has seen the
band many times over the years,
I feel confident in saying that
Jordan Koop's production suits
these songs perfectly, and that the
music is full of a powerful musi-
cality with its pulsing rhythms
and glowing, nuclear melodies. It
just feels subterranean and vital,
and gives you the sensation that
perhaps you are being confronted
with both the truth AND the consequences. To me, being able to
grab hold of a bit of truth, even if
it's a dark or ugly one, is a good
feeling. I won't go into any lyrical
analysis here. I'm talking more
about a feeling that what you are
hearing hasn't been calculated for
mass appeal, but rather speaks to
you in a more specific, personal
way should you be open to it.
he atmosphere of lie's
record reminds me of one
of my favourite albums,
and one that I definitely consider
to be a triumph of rawness and
truth-telling over smooth professionalism. The Fall's second
album, Dragnet is a much more
sonically eccentric record, but
that sense of absolute commitment to the genuine realization of
the music is similar. Recorded in
1978, when making a record like
this would have been much harder
on a practical level, it sounds like
it exists against the odds. In a
way,, the recording quality of the
record actually kind of sounds like
the forces of mainstream music
attempting to snuff it out in real
time. And yet, Mark E. Smith's
insistent, incisive jabbering persists through the tape hiss. Just
as lie does, the band plays with an
awe-inspiring energy and originality, not knowing whether there
is an audience, but knowing that
these things need to be said and
done.
In 2016, it sometimes appears
that the underground has succumbed to the same rat-race
mentality that marred the mainstream music industry in the first
place. New musicians grasp at the
blog posts, 'likes,' and instant
appreciation that appear just out
of reach. But there is still a portion of the underground that is
going about the business of saying
and doing the things that need to
be done against the odds, and to
me this is still the truly important
and enjoyable work, and the reason that, although I do find myself
occasionally tapping on the steering wheel, I will always gravitate
back towards the things that I
have to seek out.
J DESTROY
VANCOUA
XVIII
SERIES FINALE
words by Jonathan Kew //
illustration by Sharon Ko //
photo by Manny Sangha
names and gestures reverberate throughout my interview
with Elisa Ferrari and John Brennan, co-curators of Destroy
Vancouver. These are the names of Vancouver's artists and
sonic neighbours, the gestures they send into the world. But our conversation also returns to the name of that ostensibly punk prerogative
itself — Destroy Vancouver — and its productive gesturing at a network
of artistic production. The experimental music series, which now in its
fifth and final year, concludes with volume XVIII this September 8 at VIVO
Media Arts. If there is a trace that Destroy Vancouver draws out with the
myriad of local and international artists, the present seems like a time for
reflection.
First, a brief history. Years ago Brennan, who worked as Technical
Coordinator at VIVO, was using the performance space for Destroy Vancouver.
The series' conception was to provide a space for eclectic experimental music,
with a focus on improvisation and deconstructed stage / audience bmaries.
Brefmwliys, <fI've always been ihte^ScTlfp^rc^rffifirg^6®fe1^^ge^Bf^
in the field of experimental improvisation, all within one event. The set
lengths are usually short, between 15-25 minutes with break periods to allow
people to mingle and get beverages." Ferrari adds, "It was very much about
going into all these different genres without creating a hierarchy." Destroy
Vancouver would eventually go on to partner with VTVO, increasing the series'
funding. Ferrari/began co-curating Destroy Vancouver in 2015.
%f*
BRENNAN: In the spring of 2015
we applied for funding through
the Canada Council for the Arts.
We programmed the whole year
in advance, and the application
was successful. But it was January
2016 when we felt this would be
the last year. Four years is a good
amount of time for a series to run.
FERRARI: There is another reason. I think it's important to think
about how this project started —
the name "Destroy Vancouver"
was about "protesting" what was
happening in the city, the closing
down of spaces where you could
really experiment with noise or
other genres. Since 2012, the series
has gone from being very independent to more institutional. At
fbme point"tMs' year, we! felt as
if the name "Destroy Vancouver"
had run its course.
Back to the trace. What
does Destroy Vancouver
gesture towards? With
its dedication to eclecticism
and local partnerships, Destroy
Vancouver has been a lightning rod of political dynamics
bound to Vancouver. As Ferrari
notes, instead of taking 'Destroy
Vancouver' at face value, "we
were thinking in terms of building relationships. Not building condos, but the relationship
between different organizations
in the city, local and international artists and the individuals
who attend these events."
Destroy Vancouver, which links
international artists to hometown
favourites, is also contingent on a
rich network of allied Vancouver
artists. Brennan and Ferrari
are quick to cite their partners
and supporters in Vancouver:
JP Doucet and Shaun Watt (Big
Joy), Constantine Katsiris (Quiet
City), Alexandra Spence and
Rebecca Bruton (Tidal-Signal),
Brady Cranfield and Josh Rose
(Selectors' Records), KC Wei
(art rock?), and Rainbow Robert
(Coastal Jazz and Blues Society).
Giorgio Magnanensi of Vancouver
New Music is cited as a particular
supporter, who has done much to
make Destroy Vancouver's successes possible.
BRENNAN: The freedom of
experimentation is a part of what
I've found [in Vancouver]. I feel
that people aren't afraid to just
try. Even artists that focus on a
specific genre and are very good
at it, are not afraid to move outside of their comfort zones. You
might have harsh sound artists
who also experiment with techno
or weird punk music.
FERRARI: And I also think that
in Vancouver it is fairly easy to
start a new experimental sound
project and have the right support to present it: there are many
entry points, with series like
Quiet City, Big Joy or art rock?,
and places like Selectors' Records.
■^^K Destroy Vancouver has
■done anything, it has
^Ppointed towards these various intersections and meetings
of artists, and at an undercurrent network of collaboration
and experimentation which girds
against an antagonistic municipal presence. That is the impro-
visational quality and charge of
possibility in Destroy Vancouver.
The final edition references this
charge, with Barcelona-based
techno artist Adriana Lopez,
German artist Christina Kubisch,
Dan Leonard's Friends + War,
Emily Thacker, KC Wei's hazy,
Austrian drummer Katharina
Ernst, minimalviolence. It'll be
a series of roiling dynamics. To
quote Brennan, "One of our favourite techno producers, Adriana
Lopez will perform a 1.5-2-hour
techno set at the end of the evening. We're hoping this will set
the atmosphere for yet a different
embodied listening experience."
Improvisation and possibility
have marked Destroy Vancouver's
run — Brennan and Ferrari hope
it will mark its conclusion. In the
evening of September 7, Christina
Kubisch will host an artist talk.
On September 9 she will lead
three Electrical Walks. The
Electrical Walks, beginning at the
end of the 1970s, allow individuals to use special headphones
designed by Kubisch to amplify
the acoustics of electromagnetic
fields. As such, they allow participants to wander throughout a
city, discovering the ubiquity and
heterogeneity of electromagnetic
frequency. The city becomes a
generative machine, with the
user its conductor.
The trace may be non-visible,
hut Vancouver is a city with many
currents. Destroy Vancouver has
been an invitation to exciting
moments of reinterpretation and
revelation. Ending the series with
Kubisch's upcoming Electrical
Walks is an ending in the spirit
of exploration with an open and
extended hand.
BRENNAN: [Kubisch] will
extend Thursday evening even
further, especially the Electrical
Walks which are definitely rooted
in the spirit of Destroy Vancouver
and Vancouver itself.
The series' closure also
makes it possible for Ferrari and
Brennan to re engage with their
own projects. Ferrari, who sees
her practice "as an artist and
curator and researcher as something that shifts and is interrelated," will continue focusing on
projects that "manifest through
installation, performance, sound,
and photography." Her focus
is "archival fragments, of text,
image and videography, considering the act and implications
of retrieval." Brennan will be
working on a sound sculpture /
installation that examines the
relationship between improvisation and a musical instrument's
sonic memory of musical instruments, in this case a drum kit
and involves acclaimed drummers from across the world.
FERRARI: We also DJ together.
BRENNAN: We also DJ together!
The name of their DJ project —
still undecided.
1
' Destroy^ vaffcouver XVIitl/vtlrtake
place Thursday, September 8 at VIVO
Media Arts Centre, featuring performances by Adriana Lopez, Christina
Kubisch, Friends + War, Emily
Thacker, hazy, Katharina Ernst,
and minimalviolence. Tickets $18 in
advance, or $20 at the door. There
will also be artist talks and sound
walks in the days before and after
the event — visit vivomediaarts.com
or VWO's social media for more information. Destroy Vancouver XVIII is
also part of SWARM17, a two-day
festival celebrating artist-run culture. Details at paarc.ca/swarmi7.
I DESTROY VANCOUVER XVIII /i*S
StastratTon by Daniel Witnicki
photo by Jaqueline Manoukian
he day that I was born,
the number one song
charts   was
David Bowie's 'Let's Dance.' That
throughout our afternoon in Dude Chillin'
Park, but he has
also stylized his new
persona in avant-
garde fashion, akin
to Bowie circa Hunky
Dory. However, Art's
new album Day Fevers
is a miasma of genres,
combining everything
from spaghetti western to Motown
to glam rock. The essence of Day
Fevers is rock with a modern,
inclusive twist. While Art has been
playing in Vancouver bands for the
past decade, this new album is his
first solo project.
it was only a couple of
months ago when Art
found himself in a wig
store in Victoria that he
decided to change his
appearance.
"It wasn't cheap, but
I thought, I'll get a lot of
miles on it. Just to fuck
with people and get a
reaction. People said, 'You
played that show differently tonight.' I probably
played differently because
I felt larger than life. It
felt badass, it felt more
real and raw and more
creative. The look — it's
a cape and I'm a super-
"IF PEOPLE CALL MY LOOK GAY, THEN IT IS.
THAT'S FUCKING FINE BY ME. THE POINT IS
THAT GENDER EQUALITY ISWHATS MISSING
IN A LOT OF THE ROCK 'N' ROLL THAT I'M
TRYING TO BRING INTO MY SQUND."
was a weird star chart; kind of an
indicator of my musical tastes."
This is a fact that Art d'Ecco is
staunchly proud of. Bowie's influence is overt, to say the least, in
Art d'Ecco's outward and inward
identity. Not only did Art mention
Bowie's name on a routine basis
The name "Art d'Ecco" is
somewhat of an inside joke with
his good friend, actor Jared Keeso.
There was a wall in Keeso's old
apartment dedicated to scribbling
down hypothetical DJ names. Art's
was, naturally, Art d'Ecco, and the
name has stuck. As for the look,
hero. It's all meant for
art, and to be expressive,
this concept of gender
fluidity."
Day Fevers   is   Art's
answer to the question:
is rock 'n' roll dead? In
Art's  view,   perhaps  it
is.  In order to save
- rock, what the genre
needs is revitalization.
Namely, by seeking to expand the
traditional patriarchal notion of
rock 'n' roll.
"If people call my look gay,
then it is. That's fucking fine
by me. The point is that gender
equality is what's missing in a
lot of the rock 'n' roll that I'm
trying to bring into my sound.
I could just as easily rock a
leather jacket and Doc Martens
and have stubble on my face,
but that's boring. Being in
touch with the feminine side
and being more androgynous is
a direct rip from my idols, and
it also makes the music sexier." ;
Brt's male idols include
Bowie, of course, but
also Lou Reed, Iggy Pop
and Bradford Cox, all of whom
have embraced drag at different
stages in their careers. Of course,
Art also cited many women who
have greatly influenced him,
including Grimes, Karen 0 and
St.Vincent. All of these talents
have had a huge impact on Art,
and his androgynous identity is an ode to their combined
influence.
The album cover for Day
Fevers is a contrast to Art's new
identity, as the photo shoot
for the cover took place before
the transformation of his look.
However, the album cover does
symbolize a transition — one from
urban to rural. Art's urban exodus
to the Gulf Islands was lonely but
inspiring, leading him to write the
tracks for Day Fevers in his grandmother's empty house. Art channeled his isolation into creativity,
fueled off of his new environment
and treating the process of writing
the album as "musical therapy."
Living on the Gulf Islands also
provided Art with a fresh audience. Namely, this meant debuting his glam rock demos at hippie
drum circles, "where no one wears
shoes and everyone's drinking
kombucha. It was straight out of
a Portlandia sketch."
Day Fevers is an album that encompasses a breadth of genres and emotions. In doing so, the album does
not necessarily have a distinctly
unifying sound. Rather, Art's vision
was for the album to play out like
an iPod shuffle playlist. Art wanted
to build around the instantaneity of
music in the modern age, in order
to design an album that embodies
different characters across songs.
"Musically, we're so spoiled now..
We can listen to whatever we want
whenever we want. People might
not buy this album, and if they
do they might just stream the one
song they like. But if they bought
the 12-inch record, I want to take
them on a little bit of a journey. Not
just lyrically or thematically, but
sonically I want it to sound drastically different."
Art really does personify his inclusive Art d'Ecco identity. He is incredibly friendly and looks you in the
eyes when you speak. As we were
walking around Mount Pleasant
hunting for photo shoot locations, a
young girl asked Art if he was wearing a costume. Without hesitation he
replied, "No, are you?" In this sense,
Art truly is Art d'Ecco, confirming
that identity can be porous.
The release party for Day Fevers is
September mat the Rickshaw Theatre,
featuring performances by_Art d'Ecco,
shitlord fuckerman, Dirty Spells and
Elizabeth, and D) sets by ACTORS. The
first 50 people with valid Student ID
get free admission. Otherwise, $10 in
advance or $12 at the door. 19+
ART D'ECCO Jf you've seen the name
wishkicker pop up on
seemingly every poster,
handbill and event page in the last
little while, you're not alone. With
the exception of August (when
they stopped performing to record
their second EP in five months),
the band has been playing nonstop. It's not because of longstanding connections, or by any
stroke of dumb luck — they just
work really hard, and aren't afraid
to show it.
Kyle Schick started the project as an outlet for songs he had
been writing that didn't quite gel
with his previous band, MALK,
morphing into Wishkicker proper
with the recruitment of his partner Megan Magdalena on bass,
and Alex Smith on drums. The
trio released their first EP, Por
Que, Y? in the spring — a wicked
15 minutes of power pop that was
largely the brainchild of Schick's
independent writing and composing. In the months that followed,
however, Wishkicker did a lot of
growing up. By turning over guitar
duties to Kaeden Teindl and Felix
Fung, the band turned into a five-
piece, which helped make their
second EP (the aptly titled Wider
Vision) a serious step forward.
As Schick puts it: "I think this
EP is the first step onto the road of
what the band is going to go on to
UISHKICKEB
ful skinny dipping in your neighbour's pool.
Returning to Little Red Sounds,
where their first EP was recorded,
has also been a boon for the band.
With Fung once again heading production, it has made the
process of crafting Wider Vision
aspect of Wishkicker's evolution
has been the freeing up of Schick's
hands. Even though Teindl has
played guitar for the group since
their second live show, it's only
now with the release of Wider
Vision and the addition of Fung
playing rhythm that Wishkicker
site. I want to see some flash and
some excitement — something I
haven't seen in awhile, or something new."
That idea of having a face and
a focal point is something the
group sees as a lost art, a missing
connection amidst a sea of acts
"I'M REALLY TIRED OF SEEING FOUR DUDES ON STAGE WHO LOOK
LIKE PEOPLE I WOULD BE AT WORK WITH AT THE CONSTRUCTION
SITE. I WANT TO SEE SOME FLASH AND SOME EXCITEMENT -
SOMETHING I HAVEN'T SEEN IN AWHILE, OR SOMETHING NEW."
be. I feel like the first record was
really me, and my songs, and my
friends playing on it, whereas this
feels more like a band."
The changes have done a lot
for Wishkicker creatively, with
Wider Vision being more collaborative than the band's previous
work. The difference is audible,
too. Where Por Que, Y? feels appropriate at a beach side hangout,
Wider Vision was made for unlaw-
!HS WISHKICKER
both a comfortable and kinetic
experience.
"When you're playing in the
room and Felix is guiding to
you towards the best possible
take of a song, it really does feel
like there's a genuine reaction
between the band and what he's
doing," says Schick with enthusiasm. "It's really cool. It's a really
fun way to work."
Perhaps  the  most important
has been able to solidify a true
frontperson in Schick.
"Now thatl'm just singing I can
really focus on putting a face to
the music and having something
for people to grab onto, rather
than a bunch of guys with their
hair in their faces looking at their
guitars," he explains. "I'm really
tired of seeing four dudes on stage
who look like people I would be
at work with at the construction
who choose to hide behind mops
of unkempt hair and fuzzy guitar tones. Wishkicker's playfulness and buoyant stage presence
help to separate them from a lot
of other local talent, and those
aspects are ones they're very
much committed to.
"Where are the personalities?" Fung posits. "Even if it's
made up... that's what we use to
interact with each other. When I
become this [personality] ... then
I can make those interactions a lot
more exciting, for myself and the
person in front of me."
^t's an interesting juxta-
■ position, as Wishkicker
<^pr appear so loose and lively
on stage, they are serious about
their music and their devotion
as a band. As Schick, Fung and
Magdalena all confess, taking
things seriously is the only way
making music becomes a cathartic
experience.
"There's a lot of work that goes
into it, but every minute is a fucking joy," Fung elaborates. "It's
such a privilege that we get to do
these things. I want every fucking
rock 'n' roll experience that I can
get — I've read about it my whole
life, I've watched it on YouTube,
I've seen documentaries, and
every single one of those people I
see I think 'Why not me?'"
Luckily for Fung, Wishkicker's
work ethic is clearly earning them
the rock 'n' roll experiences he
covets. From opening for Parquet
Courts at the Vogue last month,
to an EP release show at The Fox
early this month, the band is
building momentum — and they
don't intend to slow down anytime soon.
"We will be going somewhere
in 2017 for sure," says Magdalena.
"Either the U.S., or the U.K., or
Mexico — or all of them. Something
will happen ... We all have the bug;
we want to get out of here and see
other places."
Future plans aside, Wishkicker
is openly enthusiastic about the
reception and recognition they've
managed to accrue in the span
of only a few months. As Schick
divulges, this is the first project
in his musical career where he's
comfortable feeling proud about
the product.
"Just to know there's other
people that at least say they
like [Wishkicker], or come to
our shows or buy our tapes, it's
just really validating," he concludes. "It's exciting, and I just
can't thank anybody who likes it
enough for liking it."
If you need some more Wishkicker
in your life, you're in luck. Checkthem
out at The Fox on September 3, or
the Biltmore on September 17. Don't
like leaving the house? Their new EP,
Wider Vision, will be available for
download on their Bandcamp in early
September. DISCORDER
REVISITED
ZIPPY AND THE DEBS RIOT
words by Erica Leiren // illustrations by Deelan Wileman-Hopkins
photo courtesy of Be-r DaTies
s|flo|  hile watching PiH Squad at Khatsahlano in July, I
I saw Zippy Pinhead. He was at the front, like he
-*£iP*tr   always was when not on the stage, looking
like he was still 23. Distracted, I heeled to the opposite
side of the stage and missed my chance to say hi.
But seeing Zippy, handsome-as-ever and tastefully tattooed in all his present glory, took me
right back to the time he drummed with us
in 1983...
"Hey! The bullets are missing from my
gun clip!" the VPD officer cried out over the
heaving, dancing audience. "ATTENTION PLEASE.
THIS DANCE IS NOW OVER. Please leave immediately through the rear doors. Exit in a calm and orderly
manner."
The party atmosphere, mistaken for a riot, evaporated
quickly as the packed crowd ebbed through the
exits onto the Hellenic Centre courtyard. A breeze
zephyred fitfully, turning up the corners of the
posters pasted to the windows:
Tonight All Ages
THE DEBUTANTES!
Tickets $6
In ten minutes, the place was totally empty.
* * * * *
Zippy lived in the house next to Mary and Buck from
the Modernettes, and travelled up and down the West Coast
as far as California, kind of like Vancouver's own punk
rock David Lee Roth. His full time gig at the time was in
the Vancouver supergroup, Los Popularos. We were also
impressed to hear that he was the son of the Police Chief in
Prince George, or so the story went.
Zippy charmed us thoroughly at our practices before the
Hellenic Centre gig, with drumstick tricks and goofy faces.
He was so nice to all of us, and just a lot of fun to be around.
I guess he didn't mind being in a band with five pretty girls
either.
* * * * *
The Hellenic Centre gig was on a Friday night, with
sound check after classes. I arrived before the show
as Gord Badanic, Steve Quinn and our celebrity-guest-drummer, Zippy, were setting up the gear. Gord
was helping Zippy with his drums near the back of the
stage, but he strolled over to meet me when I arrived.
"Here, talk into this," Gord said, moving a mic
in front of me:
" "One two three, testing, testing — Hey, I
see Sheilagh."Sheilagh Badanic climbed up
onto the stage to join us. Zippy winked and
smiled at us both. His smile was irresistible.
"All ready to go," called out Gord, and Zippy
counted us in, clicking His drum sticks together:
"One, two, three..."
We played the song and ran though a couple more to
make sure all the levels were good. Gord and Steve cracked
jokes and showed off. The comic interplay was even better
than usual with Zippy's zany sense of humour to play off.
He kept cracking jokes and winking at us. Cute. Yes, this was
going to be fun...
Looking back, it seems pretty obvious that the promoters advertising the dance as a "city-wide grad party" was an
invitation to a riot. Five songs into our set, multiple fights
broke out in the audience, an outright melee erupted and the
police arrived to shut it down. The gig ended differently than
we had expected, what with the riot, but what an adventure,
and Zippy played with us!
* * * * *
'^TW^M e probably set a land speed record. In under seven
■ minutes, our equipment, including drumkit, was
•^g?*»8r   broken down, and we were ready to leave.
I looked over at Roxanne Heichert to see how she was taking the sudden upheaval. This evening had been her first performance as our new lead singer.
"Fuck!" was all she said before stalking off the stage without another word to any of us.
* * * * *
pppy was an Immortal in our pantheon of rock
is. He was in The Dils with Chip and Tony
FKinman, whose song, "Sound of the Rain" is
like a Vancouver lullabye. Blonde and great-looking with a sexy, gravelly voice and a smile that
seemed to take up half his face, Zippy's eyes crinkled right up until you could hardly see them when
he smiled.
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land the Barefoot Wine B Bubbly Stage
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j EVERY NIGHT OF THE FESTIVAL
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AT OCEAN ART WORKS
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SMjuSME- Heal Clue
fiction
WHITNEY / MICHAEL RAULT
AUGUST 1 / COBALT
Cruising down Main Street with an old friend on a summer night
was perhaps the most fitting way to arrive at Whitney's August 1
concert. After all, Whitney is composed of childhood friends whose
debut album embodies the spirit of whimsical summer nights.
Unsurprisingly, the show sold out at the last minute, leaving the
Cobalt packed and steamy.
Michael Rault, an Edmontonian, kicked off the show with a powerful rock set. It was evident that Rault and his thoroughly mustachioed band cared deeply about the quality of their show — they
took their time doing their soundcheck, ensuring that each instrument possessed the right finesse. Donning a rainbow gradient t-shirt
with shaggy dark hair falling over his face, Rault looked like a grun-
gier version of Anthony Kiedis.
Musically speaking, Rault was strong but somewhat forgettable. His song-style was greatly reminiscent of 1970s classic rock,
with heavy guitar and lots of instrumental interludes. In combination
with the retro ambience of the venue, it really felt as if it could have
been 1978, despite Rault's failure to exude a distinct musical imprint.
Having said that, Rault and his band put on a solid live performance.
He and his guitarist fed off of each other's energies, and towards the
end of his set, Rault invited Whitney's piano player onstage, which
served to increase the audience's excitement for the main act.
Julien Ehrlich, lead singer of Whitney, is also the drummer, so the
drum kit was placed front and centre. The Cobalt's small stage made
for a crowded performance, since the band is composed of six relatively tall young men with a variety of instruments. Huddled onstage,
they had to fit themselves awkwardly together to accommodate for
the lack of space.
Whitney opened with "Dave's Song," an ode to Ehrlich's grandfather, whose name is tattooed onto the singer. Hearing the song live
had me wanting to hang out with my own grandpa and get his name
as a tattoo, but I responsibly resisted the impulse.
The band charismatically interacted with the audience, kindly
asking for drinks throughout their set. Fulfilling their request, a round
of tequila shots arrived onstage, accompanied by a handwritten sign
from the audience that read Tequila Shots, From Chris." In a full-circle kind of way, Whitney invited Rault back onstage to play their
album's instrumental, "Red Moon." Rault was back to shredding the
guitar and Whitney was back to cheekily drinking cheap pinot grigio
between songs.
The band really shone when they played their hit "No Woman"
to close the night. Towards the end of the song, they took a pause
to embrace the audience's energetic love before continuing on to
finish the song. The control they had over their instruments was on
point, leaving the audience mesmerized by the performance — if my
Grandpa's reading this, I'm still considering that tattoo. — Alex Lenz
PURE/NATHAN SHUBERT
AUGUST 5 / MERGE
On the evening of August 5, I cycled North on Clarke Drive
and found myself at the nexus of urban development and the
Vancouver dockyards looking for Merge, a venue to which I had never been. Nestled discreetly beneath the overpass to the harbourage
and windy corridor of Powell Street, this interdisciplinary artist-run
venue is tucked away on the second floor of a nondescript building.
After locking my bike to a rather precarious railing, I walked up the
stairs into a warm apartment-like room with the soft light of red paper
lanterns blooming down from the ceiling onto the red drapes that
lined the back wall of the stage — a welcome foil to the cold phosphorous lights of the seaport just across the train tracks.
About two dozen people lounged about the room on homely
couches and tables casually chatting. The evening's performers
were Nathan Shubert and Pitre, who sat amongst friends kindly nodr
ding to entering guests.
At 9:30pm, without introduction, Nathan Shubert sat at the upright
piano and drifted into a delicate collection of minimal, classically
tinged piano pieces. Shubert's fleet-fingered playing danced along
the keyboard with such grace it took me a while to notice the green •
felt draped across the strings, dampening the sound. This rendered
the, notes whisper quiet and highlighted the mechanical sounds of m
the instrument.
The rooftop door was left open and the industrial thrum of the
shipping yards leaked into the room. Rather than distract from •
Shubert's playing, the din from outside blended with the cyclical
music, heightening its effect as it wandered through the urban spac- ^
es and sounds. Pieces like "Foals" and "Crest" lulled along with their •
temporal and harmonic consistency but Shubert was still able to ere- •
ate powerful tension with a well placed pause. It seemed like these •
songs had always been playing somewhere and had just then sur-
faced into earshot. #
In a similarly peaceful fashion, Pitre followed shortly accompa- #
nied by a clarinet and violin. In contrast to Shubert's phonomet- •
ric repetition, Pitre's dirge-like songs swelled as her voice carried •
sedate melodies with remarkable precision at a low register. Her
voice was punctuated by the melodic lines of the clarinet and violin, 9
which although adding depth to the timbre never seemed to take #
away from the impression that Pitre was the only one on stage.        •
While Pitre's playing invoked a sense of quietude, her music •
nonetheless emitted somber emotional pain like the red lamps glowing above her. Her lyrics flowed thematically through the restless ^
isolation of insomnia, the absence of direction, and loneliness. If I «
hadn't heard a faint train whistle blow from the tracks outside, I prob- •
ably would have heard it in my head.
When the show ended and I left the humid red of Merge, I found
myself once again in the blue-grey dust of Powell Street beneath the q
overpass. The contrast was jarring at first, but then the music I had *
just heard faded back into my head and I breathed a sigh of relief •
that my bike hadn't been stolen. — Blake Haarstad
•
ARTSWELLS:GABRIELPALATCHITRIO/ *
JASPER SLOAN YIP / DOUG KOYAMA / ?
ANDREW JUDAH / BLOCKTREAT
from that northern town. Palatchi, the Argentinian-born composer and pianist, led the trio — filled out by Jose "Chema" Gonzalez
on drums and Kerry Galloway on bass — through a flurry of world
music. While it was easy to be hypnotized by their grooves, all three
of them possessed an uncanny skill for their respective instruments.
The next evening, on the same stage, Vancouver-based alt-folk-
er Jasper Sloan Yip, backed by a sextet of some of the city's best,
offered the festival a sample of his upcoming third album Posf
Meridiem. The album's first three songs all flowed together in an
unbroken torrent of lush strings, intricate drumming, and Sloan Yip's
signature soft and stellar voice.
It would a travesty not to pay homage to Doug Koyama, considering his benevolent and boisterous personality is a defining feature
of nearly all music festivals in Northern B.C.. On Sunday morning,
I was treated not only to one of his world famous hugs, but also a
mesmerizing set of improvised a capella that highlighted both the
low end of his nearly subsonic vocal range and his knack for distilling
music to its bare bones.
Later Sunday, in the basement of the community hall, I caught
a few songs from Kelowna's Andrew Judah. Performing alongside
drummer Zac Gauthier, Judah filled the cramped space with robust
and challenging indie-prog music. Encircling simple vocal melodies
with bursts of heavily effected guitar and vigorous rhythms, the duo
never settled with any instrumentation short of unpredictable.
Several hours later, in the wee hours of Monday morning, I went
back to the Sunset Theatre to see Blocktreat. Despite manning
the venue's soundboard for the majority of the weekend, Brandon
Hoffman moved to the stage to showcase his distinct brand of exper-
imentar electronic music. Joined by two live drummers — Brent
Morton and Graham Serl — as well as projection artist David Jacob
Harder, Blocktreat churned the crowd into a lively dance party.
Though I'm utterly unsatisfied with the amount I've left out in this
review, I have to stop. All I can say to sum up the weekend is this:
There was a certain spirit to the festival, a resounding reverence to
the art and the atmosphere that compelled every person in attendance — spectator, volunteer and artist alike — to make ArtsWells
the best it could possibly be. — Lucas Lund
JULY 30-AUGUST 2 / WELLS, B.C.
Ten hours north of Vancouver, situated along a stretch of thickly • JULItll Dnivt h
forested highway that leads to British Columbia's historic town • AUGUST 9 / COBALT
of Barkerville, sits Wells. With a population of 200, Wells is a quiet *
and isolated Cariboo town for fifty-one weeks of the year. I arrived on     ^F he crowd at the Cobalt fell silent the moment Julien Baker
the fifty-second week. It was ArtsWells. «   ^ stepped on stage. Unintroduced and unaccompanied, she kept
Every inch of the town was populated with the tents of artists and • her face turned to her guitar and began to play in the silent room,
spectators alike, moving in and making Wells their home for those •     That silence remained unbroken through the minimalism of
few days of relentless artistic energy and encouragement. A com- * "Blacktop," the opening track on 2015's Sprained Ankle and the
fortable frenzy settled over the town. With over one hundred musical #
acts performing across twelve stages over four days, it was entirely •
impossible to see it all — I didn't even come close. Lighting my way •
from venue to venue, the program guide forced me to make calcu- •
lated choices between the acts I wanted to see and acts I could not
afford to miss. Even still, I have neither the print space nor time to #
properly address all the incredible music I saw, so I'll only mention •
a few. •
Stepping over the threshold of the Sunset Theatre on Friday night •
was like stepping into a different country. From the stray twanging of
banjos outside the venue to the steamy and pulsating latin jazz with- #
in, the music of the Gabriel Palatchi Trio transported me far away »
show. Baker gave quiet thanks for the applause before diving into
the notes of her album's title track. When applause erupted from the
otherwise soundless audience, Baker said,' "You're so quiet!" With
talent so worthy of revere and a body of/work so, solemn, I had felt
like we needed Baker's permission before we/obu|d have fun at the
show. With permission granted, the atmosphere became warm with
Baker's gracious interactions with the audience.
Between songs, Baker quipped, "I came all the way here just to make
you sad." While the audience laughed, she added, "But sad songs make
me feel better," — a phrase printed on her t-shirt. At that, she began
"Everybody Does," the most upbeat track on Sprained Ankle, despite its
devastating lyrics; it is the epitome of a sad song that makes you feel better.
1
\ REAL LIVE ACTION Next, she played her cover of Elliot Smith's "Ballad of Big Nothing"
that was released in April 2016, followed by a few tracks of new
material. Baker's new material was in keeping with the emotion and
sound of the final tracks she recorded for Sprained Ankle, "Brittle
Boned" and "Vessels." The songs' minimal acoustics mounted to
ardent final choruses.
The sparseness of Baker's songs made the richness of her
vocals all the more powerful. I was astounded at the range of sounds
Baker created with a single guitar and a few sparse effects, from the
acoustic sounds of "Sprained Ankle" to the crescendo of chords on
"Rejoice." A person yipped in appreciation as Baker reached the
height of "Rejoice." I wouldn't have dared to disrupt the moment but
I shared his appreciation of her vocal power; that moment was one
of the most poignant of the show.
For all the immense loneliness her songs express, Baker was
inviting and funny. Her onstage demeanor and confessional lyrics
fostered a feeling of intimacy with the audience. She closed with
"Something," as the people around me whispered that the song was
their favourite on the album. Baker left the stage to chant of "JB!
JB!," returning a few moments later with grateful laughter at the football-like chant. She played "Go Home," her album's closing track, as
a fitting finale to her show.
To call the show cathartic would be to underplay the beauty and
emotion of Baker's music. While I experienced the lightness of
catharsis achieved as I walked out of the Cobalt, to have shared in
the emotions Baker expressed so sincerely was even more significant. — Courtney Heffernan
RAILTOWN SESSION: ROB BUTTERFIELD
AUGUST 12 / LIGHT ORGAN STUDIOS
The street was deserted as I walked up to a plain, two-storey
office building in Railtown. A sheet of paper was taped to the
door with, "Rob Butterfield: Go around back" scrawled in Sharpie.
Around back, I pulled open a heavy, unmarked door and went inside.
The room was sparsely decorated with acoustic baffling, save the
carpeted, homely and exquisitely lit stage set up in one corner. The
rest of the space was populated by groups of amicably conversing,
well-dressed young people, sipping slowly at their complimentary
beers. I had found the right place.
I was there for the second installment of Light Organ Records'
Railtown Sessions, a four-part live-streamed concert series featuring some of B.C.'s most talented folk and roots artists.
After a brief introduction by Light Organ's Andy Bishop, mastermind behind the Railtown Sessions, Rob Butterfield and his band
— bassist Colin Cowan, keyboardist Chris Kelly, and singers Debra-
Jean Creelman and Jenn Bojm — emerged from the crowd, and
settled into their places on stage. They plunged into the first song,
"Good People."
Butterfield's twangy and intricate guitar parts seemed effortless,
as he sang in harmony with Creelman and Bojm. Despite playing
on an electric bass, Cowan's bass lines resounded with the depth
of a double bass. And Kelly's keyboard turned into a B-3 organ as
he added soulful fills throughout the arrangement. The song, with its
blend of country, bluegrass and rock, would have easily fit in on The
Band's 1968 Music From Big Pink.
As the song finished, the crowd kept quiet, unsure about the
applause protocol during a recorded performance. At Butterfield's
tentative "thank you," the room's tentative claps rose. "This next
song's abo — am I supposed to talk for this?" asked Butterfield. "I've
never done one of these live-streaming things before."
Deciding to go on talking, Butterfield continued to question the ^
logistics of the session's format. "How do we know if the people 0
watching the stream are enjoying this?" Butterfield asked, before •
arriving at the answer himself: "Oh, the tweets."
As they drifted through the rest of their rootsy set, the crowd *
gradually sunk to the ground. Squatting on haunches, sitting cross-
legged, or even lying on the studio floor, the music influenced every #
person in attendance to find a little extra comfort.
Just as the audience had settled in, Butterfield announced that •
the session was over. After only five songs, the house lights came *
up, and like a nap cut short, I squinted against the sudden bright-
ness to watch the band begin to tear down. — Lucas Lund »
HOCKEY DAD / MUUY BIIEN / KIM GRAY
AUGUST 16 / COBALT
August is a weird month for live music: half of the people you
know are leaving for vacation (does everyone but me have a
cabin on Hornby Island?), and the other half are too burnt out from
the onslaught of festivals and shows in July to bother coming out to
the Cobalt on a Tuesday. Those who did show up, however, were
wise to do so, as the trio of performances from Kim Gray, Muuy
Biien, and Hockey Dad were worth the late summer excursion.
Local shoegazers Kim Gray opened up the night to a modest
crowd of dudes in five panel hats and oversized tees. Between the
hazy vocals and the reverb-soaked guitar, it's hard not to picture Kim
Gray as a bootleg version of King Tuff. Nonetheless, with the exception of a false start at the end of their set, the band pulled off a very
fluid performance.
"Frank Sinatra" had the audience politely swaying back and forth,
and "Why is Red?" even garnered a little dancing. The set would
have benefitted from some more interaction with the audience,
though. A little stage banter might have helped liven up the dreamy
atmosphere Kim Gray had created by the time they'd hopped off
stage.
It wasn't until Georgia natives Muuy Biien plugged in that the
burgeoning Cobalt crowd genuinely snapped to attention. After an
immediate demand for all the lights off from frontman Joshua Evans
(most likely so we could better see his glow-in-the-dark t-shirt), the
group wasted no time in completely turning the night on its head.
Muuy Biien's undeniable energy quickly got the venue pulsing, with
one song after another replete with the kind of blues-meets-punk
sound that only comes out of the southern States.
Where Kim Gray was shy and subdued, Evans turned Muuy
Biien's set into a genuine spectacle, peppered with scissor kicks,
pelvic thrusting and convulsions fit for a Hollywood exorcism.
Despite not being able to understand much of what they were saying, Evans and company undoubtedly won the crowd over with their
audacious attitude and jangly guitar riffs — a perfect musical segue
into the final act of the evening.
At this point, the Cobalt had become heavy with sweat, and stepping outside before the top billed Aussie duo took to the stage became
a necessity. Upon re-entry, Hockey Dad wasted no time in establishing their musical motif, with Zach Stephenson's sugar-sweet vocals
contrasted against Billy Fleming's raucous drumming. Despite having been out for less than a week, all of the band's material off of
their newest effort, Boronia, were met with seriously enthused dancing and jumping — a clear indication that the Australian surfers had
found fame across the Pacific. With Fleming's outrageous mop of
bleach blonde hair invoking head-bang envy, and Stephenson's guitar ripping from song to song, Hockey Dad breezed through what the
latter dubbed "the best show of the tour so far." — Elijah Teed
SPACEMELT @ VANCOUVER QUEER FILM
FESTIVAL
AUGUST 17 / TELUS GARDENS
■^% s this the Q&A for the film?"
I asked the woman behind
^r me in line. I honestly didn't
have a clue. As I made my way up the
steps to the Telus Gardens, all I knew
was that I was here to review SpaceMelt,
a self-described "happening" hosted as
part of the Vancouver Queer Film Fest,
and that I should be prepared for a "onetime-only magical, musical, dance, and
visual art experience." Vague.
The mystery continued with masks
being doled out to guests in the lobby, and we were instructed to have
them securely fastened before entering the masquerade. We were also given sheets of assorted stickers not only
meant to decorate our masks, but to be
put anywhere on our bodies, or, after
gaining consent, on somebody else's.
By the time the lights had dimmed and I
had found a seat facing what I assumed
to be the stage, staring somewhat
bemused at the masked faces around
me. I was ready for SpaceMelt, whatever it turned out to be.
Then the Melt began. Using a variety of instruments — from c
inet to trombone, piano to recorder — the SpaceMelt collabc
tors worked to create a dissonant, harrowing soundscape. Addir
sparse guitar, punchy drums, and discordant keys to the mix, t
instrumentals of SpaceMelt constructed haunting, oblique textures '
that fell somewhere between avant-garde jazz and psychedelic rock.
Combined with the talents of renowned guest dancers Jose Guiterez
Xtravaganza and Kevin Stea, who furthered the mood with emotive, kinetic movements, the night conjured up an atmosphere that
evoked collaboration.
So many shows in Vancouver are traditional, in that an artist
will be on stage, play their set for an audience that consumes their
performance, and then call it a night. SpaceMelt played with this
seemingly static framework, blurring the lines between performer
and audience. Everyone — artists and audience alike — wandered
around the room, alternating between idling among the seats, sitting
in the aisles, or grabbing drinks from the bar. Others were given various cardboard cutouts and marked, ripped or destroyed them to the
backdrop of the music. SpaceMelt went beyond mere audience participation, seemingly eradicating the idea that a divide existed at all.
As the performance neared its end, the space was abuzz with
inhabitants chanting, "Melt, Melt, Melt." I'm still not sure if I could
properly convey the experience of SpaceMelt — all I know is that I
left feeling invigorated. — Missy Martin
REAL LIVE ACTION I  Unfttt
HeottiD
COMPLETE WALKTHRU
Complete Walkthru
(1080p)
The digital age is defined by transformative speed. Content
is whirled about. Context is lost. Things are repurposed and
reshaped. Access is universal. In the windswept world of the
Internet, privacy is an antiquated accessory.
Vancouver-based label 1080p embraces and resists this whirling online world. While many contemporary underground electronic
labels such as Moodhut, Going Good and PPU concentrate purely
on physical releases, 1080p shies away from committing to a single
medium. Releasing music both digitally and physically (cassette and
vinyl), 1080p occupies a space both progressive and oddly traditional. They approach the decentralizing forces of the Internet with
an understanding that music can be both public and private, easily
accessible and yet personally exclusive (ie. a possession).
Falling within this 1080p ethos, Brooklyn-based Max Mcferren's
newest outing Complete Walkthru (released under the same name)
straddles a line of public joviality and isolated melancholy. Upon first
listen, each song appears programmed to illicit movement: drums
beat, snares sputter and synthesizers fill the gaps in between. On
tracks like "RN ATM," Mcferren channels the energy of his house
forebears. Reverb laden vocal samples akin to those used by Adonis
and Frankie Knuckles weave in and out of the song while pulsing
synths push along with abandon. These are the inviting sounds of a
communal experience — the build up to a shared moment on some
contorting dance floor.
Yet, underneath this party oriented accessibility lurks something
somber. On tracks like "Performative Grief," for instance, things are
at risk of being washed away. The periodic swell of a few dark notes
blot out the otherwise upbeat jangle. Similarly, on "Come to Chill,"
the climatic drop is sparse, isolated and removed from the song's
proceedings. These moments are closer to the dark electronica
of Demdike Stare, rather than Mcferren's usual woozy house. As
a result of this subtle sonic dissonance, the listener slides into a
torn headspace, one that is celebratory but somehow introspective.
People swirl all around to the pounding of a synthetic drum, but at
any moment things can rupture. The balance can be thrown off. The
song can end or be fully overwhelmed by a chorus of minor notes.
And once again people will sink into isolation. Can one really dance
in the face of such anxiety? Mcferren understands that accessible
public music has merit. Yet, like 1080p, he acknowledges the far
more substantial and lasting connection that comes with something
intimate and personal.— Maximilian Anderson-Baier
words, fans who prefer consistency will definitely enjoy a listen of
JPNSGRLS, take two.
The central theme of Divorce is introduced with the first track,
"Oh My God." Its lines "I was conceived in New York / Two strangers
planted a seed / That was four years before the divorce 11 think it had
an effect on me" have a clarity that sets the tone for the entire album.
From this first track to the anthemic "Holding Back," disillusionment
haunts the record in the form of an angst that appeals to our inner
teenagers, our quarter-life crises, and beyond. JPNSGRLS isn't just
about our insides though. In an interview with Clash, the band points
out that "Bully For You" is "essentially a protest song about the lack
of gender equality in the world."
On the other hand, "A Comprehensive List of Things I Love"
is a unique, rambling track, but its sound is out-of-place from the
album's uniform sound due to its experimentation with female backing vocals. The track's dynamism and fun gives way to one of the
few slower songs, "Circus," which has varying rhythms and reflective lyrics.
"Holding Back" is the most emotional and expressive of the
tracks. It begins pensively with a sense of loneliness before building and exploding into an obsessive frenzy, only to recede to nothing but drum beats. The album then closes with the exciting ender
"19 Pound Baby," establishing JPNSGRLS as as a moshable, party-ready weekend band both in the concert hall and on your stereo.
In summary, Divorce is an intense listen — don't expect to let it give
you a break — that proves the Vancouver rock group isn't running
out of things to deliver with its unique sound.— Charmaine Li
JPNSGRLS
Divorce
(Light Organ)
Bs the album's title suggests, Divorce is a saga about failed i
relationships. Soundwise, it is a continuation of the band's '
2014 album Circulation: bold, memorable rock riffs combined with '
tight, heavy rhythms and unashamedly anxious lyrics. In other (
HEAVEN FOR REAL
Kill Your Memory
(Mint Records)
rfj alifax, Nova Scotia: not the most exciting region of the world.
I I Beautiful yes, but not famed for a lively atmosphere. This is
probably a terrible assumption to make about the region, but I'm not
saying this in a bad way. In fact, I feel that the nature of the region
has had a direct hand in shaping one of this year's best Canadian
releases.
Heaven For Real is led by twins Mark and Scott Grundy, whose
voices and guitars melt together so naturally on Kill Your Memory, it's
hard not to imagine them fine-tuning this unspoken musical understanding for years. The album has an introspective sound, one that
is unified with a natural swing, deep-rooted in jazz. The sound, to
me, seems to be indebted to getting lost in your private musical bubble and not being influenced by ever-changing music trends. Playing
in Halifax's smaller, more condensed scene would remove the urge
to jump on the bandwagon, so to speak, and obviously made it possible for Heaven For Real to produce their simply wonderful debut.
I would describe the album as post-punk at its most tender. Taking
influences from math-rock, but focused on perfecting a song over
countless jam sessions. See the jumping chord progression that
blends effortlessly into walking scales, on the title track, for a prime
example. Or try soaking in the delicate and soothing "Allan," which is
one of the stand out tracks. It blends a spoken vocal over a simple
acoustic guitar line, creating something so relaxing it's therapeutic.
Along with the music, the lyrics are shrouded in mystery and poetic license that makes the album even more of an engrossing listen. The lamenting wallow of "Kill Your Memory" features a beautiful
knife in the back: "Hello high school lover flame / Bad news there's
nothing there / Here's an ancient photograph / You signed it when
you didn't care." Whilst "Oasis Melting" features the metaphor "But
when you stand through me, I'm beside myself," expressing a feeling
of desperation I've never heard expressed so succinctly. Even the
more direct bite of "I'm sick of being sorry / It's always such a boring
thing to be" on "I'm sick," pinpoints a specific sense of dissatisfaction
that relationships are littered with.
None of the words are in your face, the album as a whole is not
like that. But after a few listens they worm their way into your consciousness to leave you intrigued and wanting nothing more than to
find a quiet place to don your headphones, return, and lose yourself
in Kill Your Memory.
In short, Heaven For Real have produced a record that will certainly be one of the best of 2016.— Sachin Turakhia
^
JAYARNER
Jay II
(Mint Records)
Pn ode to self-actualization in a confusing and frightening
world, Jay II is a commemoration for the sensitive ones with a
flare for glam rock. With echoes of Roxy Music and Brian Eno, Arner
delivers a satisfying blend of humorously self-aware lyrics with laid-
back synth grooves. It's a masterful pop creation, and a stellar representation of Arner's ability to channel himself coherently through
his songs.
The album is hook-laden, and drenched in tight guitar lines
mashed up with sunburnt synths, courtesy of Arner's Energy Slime
partner, Jessica Delisle. It's the approachable side of indie rock. The
problems are relatable and the music hits all the right spots, despite
its self-deprecating nature.
Although the album only being around 30 minutes, Arner has
managed to cram it full of uplifting, confessional songs. The opener, "Back to School," is an infectious, chanty song that seems to
describe Arner reassociating himself back into reality. "I'm looking
for a place to stay in the universe," he laments. It's a little amusing,
and this is hardly an uncommon thought. But Arner's honest voice
seems to have us nodding in agreement. Futuristic, Bowie-esque
songs like "Earth to Jay," where Arner sings "Earth to Jay, you're not
the first / One to get your ego hurt," add another level of relatability
to this self-actualizing album.
Jay II is a blissed out version of Jay Arner, its precursor, which
was slower and less jovial. There is a sugary-sweet aspect to Arner's
latest work. He seems more at ease with his previous anxieties, or
at least has accepted that they exist. Despite his reputation of being
a bit shy, he's even gone as far as to include his personal cellphone
number in "Personal Line," a driving, dramatic song that channels
classic guitar sounds with classic rock piano and heavy synths. It's
a bold move. But at least if you're in the midst of an existential crisis,
you can hit him up.— Evangeline Hogg
GLAD RAGS
Sm/7e
(Raincity Records)
ft mile is the furious, guttural snarl of the woman perpetually
4Mr looked at and touched. At times, it is the battle cry of the mal-
, ice that results when one is mistreated in romantic relationships or
> at the day job.
» Smile is Glad Rags' first full-length release and one of the most
' cohesive albums I've heard in awhile. The band has one volume and
' that's loud. The drums are fast, the bass, chugging, the vocals are
, screams. Each song is fast and short. I listened to this album for the
t first time while getting ready to go out dancing and my makeup has
» never been more on fleek.
' The first track "Popsicles," which begins with the bold give-no-
fucks statement: "We're in this bitch" and ends in the lyric "It's okay /
, It's alright / You're gonna die," opens the listener to the world of Glad
i Rags. For those who have experienced misogyny, the album gives
» voice to almost every irritating aspect of patriarchal living, from body
' shaming to assumed incompetence. The lyrics center around the
' everyday violences a misogynistic culture wreaks on women, and
( for Glad Rags, this violence seems to hit the psyche hardest. Tracks
> like "5HTP" (named for the antidepressant amino acid supplement)
I REAL LIVE ACTION and "Anorexia" discuss the mental heaviness that accompanies
social pressures to appear happy, to be nice, to be in control of one's
life and one's body. "Something in the air / Makes her wanna be /
A little less herself" sings Taylor on "Anorexia." The song "Bullshit"
invokes the idea of the "bullshit meter," the intuitive knowledge that
someone is lying, that manipulation is occurring. This gives way to
Glad Rags fighting against the gaslighting-induced feelings of cra-
ziness that lead to self-doubt, and, ultimately, compliance with the
status quo. The band calls bullshit.
It's hard to talk about Smile without acknowledging Glad Rags'
roots as a Hole and Bikini Kill cover band. Koop and Taylor's combined vocal power recalls the projectile volatility of the emerging
Kathleen Hanna and Courtney Love. Crammed with the rage of
generations, their anger just waiting to be unleashed, Glad Rags
approach punk with a modern a feminist sensibility, which is the
acknowledgement of vulnerability and that emotional pain can be
the root of female rage. In "My mind" the lyrics "Gotta slam the bedroom door to my mind" repeat like an anxious mantra, a chant that
wards off thoughts of a beloved who won't say the right things or
provide the necessary care. The subtle revelation is that tough girls
get their hearts broken, too.
As I listened to the album for the second time and applied a final
coat of lipchap before leaving the house, I was reminded of actress
Charlize Theron's advice for how to walk like a queen: "Just think
'murder,' and walk." I would augment this suggestion: just listen to
Smile.— Keagan Perlette        -^^^
PUP
The Dream Is Over
(SideOneDummy Records)
Bfter their debut, self-titled album, PUP pursued the lofty goal
of playing 200 shows in one year. They reached their goal,
and surpassed it by 50+. Spending nights on a cramped tour bus,
driving days on end, and ending up at some shows with an audience of eight people, an album like The Dream Is Over is bound to
be born. The album focuses on failed relationships and trying your
hand at maturity — and the anger, frustration, and exhaustion that
can amount from that.
The first song "If This Tour Doesn't Kill You, I Will" is pretty explicit in the mounting tension felt during touring and being constantly
in such close quarters with the same people. As with many of the
songs on the album, the track, despite dark lyrics, is accompanied
by playful, jovial rhythms. Steve Sladkowski provides unconventional
guitar riffs that both add complexity to the simple, rousing beats and
make the harsh (though often joking) lyrics easier to digest.
The context of the track is very specific, but the feelings are painfully relatable. It'll be instantly familiar to anyone who's ever been in
an intimate — maybe utilitarian, maybe domestic — relationship that
obviously is not working, and the frustration that builds from feeling
trapped, despite tireless effort to make things right.
Many of the tracks also feature attempts at maturity. "DVP" features the lyric of, after making some drunken phone calls to an
unamused recipient, Babcock yelping, "She says I need to grow
up!" The song "Sleep in the Heat" is a ballad detailing how Babcock
"was feeling lonely so he brought [a person] in." It was his attempt at
domestication, and demonstrates how forcing intimacy and maturity like that can be strainful, and even damaging. "You started falling
apart / Six months after you moved in." The second person eventually cracks under the pressures of Babcock's expectations, which
leads to another, subtler theme in the album — death.
Death is featured in 3 songs ("Sleep in The Heat," "The Coast,"
"Pine Point") and it's usually brought up as just another plot point
within the rest of the song, as opposed to being the true focus. "Pine
Point" is a profile of an abandoned town, riddled with metaphors,
and in the beginning, Babcock mentions, "In Pine Point, '86 / My
older brother died when we were kids." The song is sobering, yet
buoyant and rousing. It's about the uncertainty of the future, and,'
how the potential of what could be, with no actual substance or certainty, can seem bleak. Of the song, Babcock says to The FADER,
"When you're a kid, you kind of assume you're going to have your
shit figured out by the time you're 28. And I'm so far from having my
shit figured out."
Pup will be in town November 21, if their tour doesn't kill them.
— Kat Kott
B Place to Live is similar to Dri Hiev's sophomore EP Contravirtual
in that it generates a chaotic, swirling cloud of sound and disorientation. However, A Place to Live has added a post-punk quality to
their noise. The result is emotionally evocative and highly experimental.
One of my favourite elements of Dri Hiev's sound is Crough's
screeching vocals. On this release, however, his vocals evoke emotion through dissonant tone and melody rather than harshness. This
change generates a refined type of cloudy angst reminiscent of Joy
Division.
Dri Hiev does have a tendency to overpower the vocals with
drums and samples. While I can respect this as an artistic choice, it
makes listening to the music exhausting at times.
Where A Place to Live excels is in the composition. Individual
tracks have interesting changes in melody and pace. Pacing is a
huge part of listenability on heavily chaotic albums and Dri Hiev
have a great grasp of this. For example, the first two tracks come in
heavy on noise and chaos but the third track comes in softer. This
change in momentum gives listeners a chance to regain their footing
after all the intensity.
Overall, A Place to Live shows that Dri Hiev is not afraid to explore
new sounds and directions. Their passion for exploration will continue to drive them closer to unique sound. In the future I hope to see
more experimentation with sampling and synths. I will be keeping an
eye on Dri Hiev's journey through genre and advise you to do the
same.— Bridget Gallagher
SECRET PYRAMID
Distant Works II
(Self-Released)
Secret Pyramid has a minimalist approach to ambient music.
Their minimalism is also progressive. The nTusic sounds like
a narrative that can be different based on the listener's experience
with the music. For that reason, Secret Pyramid's Distant Works II is
a unique ambient record that evolves with each listen according to
different situations and times of the year. At only 31 minutes across
seven cohesive tracks, Secret Pyramid creates music that is equally
warm and eerie, a mix that not many recent ambient records have
managed to achieve.
Other than three interludes consisting of field recordings from the
Pacific Northwest, there are four full songs ranging from four to nine
minutes. Secret Pyramid takes their time and carefully introduces
the elements of each track, as if each element is a character with
their role, until they all come together in the end to close the narrative and fade into the next song. For instance, in the record's 8-min-
ute centerpiece, "IV," we first hear a distant, slow synth melody thai
gradually becomes more prominent. Then we notice the equally distant strings are gradually added to the synth melody while the original drone section from the end of the previous track still remains.
What further emphasizes Secret Pyramid's music sound like a
narrative, is their ability to create expectations for the listener. We
keep guessing and anticipating the next element. Again, this can
be noticed in "IV," where the drone becomes more layered halfway
through and we notice the sound of the synth and the strings becoming distorted, as opposed to their clean sound in the beginning. A
similar sense of narrative can also be heard in "V," a more subtle
and haunting track, which begins with a recording of winds. This is
seamlessly joined by a distant synth line that becomes prominent for
few moments, while the field recording fades out as a distorted piano melody fades in and remains the only sound for moments. Then
an equally distorted synth line appears that occasionally reflects the
piano melody, as if it is creating a dialog, before fading out to another
field-recording that leads to the next track.
This sense of narrative in each track is what makes Secret
Pyramid's music unique. Distant Works II is a cohesive album that
only gets better and more valuable depending on where and when
it's listened to. It is haunting music that is equally warm as it is
cold.— Sam Mohseni
RAMZI
ForHaku
(RVNG Intl.)
Hamzi's music deserves deep listening — it's intricately layered, serene/disorienting, and highly detailed. As per last
month's feature on the genre in Fact Magazine (which included, as
it were, a Ramzi track in it's accompanying playlist), Ramzi invites
a reappraisal of new age music as a complex and potentially subversive genre.
On For Haku, the latest release from Ramzi, a.k.a. Phoebe'
Guillemot, the acupuncture clinic's background noise drifts towards
horror and anxiety. There are murmurs from the Upsidedown. It's a
specific kind of technological horror — fragmentary, and automated, with porous borders. There's a disturbing immediacy to noise,
even more so than the computationally rendered images which we
so readily associate with the digital turn. That said, while ForHaku's
sonic palate may be full of groaning and distortion, there's still
enough mugginess and groove here to smoke a joint to. "Haku" feels
like walking into a music shop possessed by spirits, although the listener receives little more than a snippet of what lurks inside. "Houti
Beni" is a smooth, jazzy track, exquisitely textured — an organic
structure, like an overgrown vine, with melody growing slowly outwards, 8 bit electronic tones reaching out towards the sun.
The statement released with this album stressed its narrativity.
It makes the most sense to think of For Haku as an internal journey. The a narrative probes moods and memories, digging into
the crates of the subconscious. In interviews, Guillemot has talked
about the persona of Ramzi as a double in itself — already doubled, always involved in exploration and discovery, both male and
female, fighting and fucking, truthful and contrived — with a dial
turning between them, as if tuning for a radio channel. For Haku's
new age horror is personal and intense, but also oddly liberating.
— Josh Gabert-Doyon
UNDER REVIEW I I was thinking, like, high-school-
Roxanne would be pretty impressed
with adult-Roxanne."
Graftician's eponymous debut
was released two summers ago,
a collection of songs that she
produced entirely on her own.
Nesbitt's technical skill is evident
in her masterfully produced tracks,
though Graftician is anything but:
Jt's nighttime on a road leading out of the University
Endowment Lands, the forest leans over the road and Roxanne
Nesbitt is riding her bike through
the shadows cast by foliage caught
in intermittent streetlights. She's
singing softly as the wind catches
her dark hair.
This is how I imagine Nesbitt
writing songs for Wander / Weave,
the second album she produced
for her experimental music project, Graftician. Nesbitt began
writing Wander / Weave as
she completed a master's
thesis in architecture at
UBC.   With   intentions
of focusing solely on<
design   entering   into
the  architecture program, Nesbitt says, "
found that I  couldn't
quit [music], and I was
writing songs on the back
of my drawings and singing
in the bathroom and on my
bike ride home."
I meet Nesbitt in a candlelit
bar on Commercial Drive, and it's
hard not to be intimidated by the
musician's talent and wide-ranging accomplishments. On top of
her impressive architecture thesis (which Nesbitt later tells me
she will begin to build during a
residency in Berlin next
ritri^t;   / FEEL LIKE SOME PEOPLE ARE MADE TO MAKE THINGS. AND
** ■»■-**-•» IF YOU DONT, THEN YOU GET ARTISTICALLY CONSTIPATED.
an artist residency at the
lauded Banff Center, and
is already a notable performance
and multimedia artist. When I
sit down with her, I realize she's
really silly, and really committed
to her work.
"I shot a music video at New
Brighton pool recently," she tells
me. "I was at home editing it and
WM GRAFTICIAN
classical. Nesbitt's music is ambient, with elements of musique
concrete featuring samples she
records from her environment,
infused with Nesbitt's jazzy vocals
and   spoken-word-poetry-esque
lyricism. Graftician pushes aural
boundaries, the beats leading the
mind through a maze of unexpected sounds.
"In music school you learn that
you can do whatever you want,"
Nesbitt says, laughing. "My hierarchy is kind of like: sound and
texture, then emotional
reactions to the sound, and
then lyrics. I don't care that
much about [stuff like] harmony! I was thinking that I should
just sit down with all of my favourite songs and kind of pull them
apart and ask what they're made
of instead of just doing whatever I
want all the time."
Graftician's second album,
Wander / Weave, released in July,
features guitar by Craig Aalders
and percussion by Ben Brown. "I
wanted it to be more collaborative as a way for it to be less of
me being obsessed in my bedroom
by myself, and more of a social
[thing]. And in a way, that didn't
work. [Wander/Weave] took longer
than I wanted it to [because] I had
to consider other people's schedules, and then I started working on
a movie. I ended up taking more
ownership of it in the end."
gPll^ ander / Weave is
I Graftician with expe-
^Sf^p' rience. Nesbitt's clear
vision for her sound becomes more
precise and her skills sharpen in
this second album. "It's a response
to the cleanliness of architecture,"
she says of writing the music
while studying. "[A response to]
how restrictive and logical I kind
of had to be in school. I just realized that [Graftician] had to be
about design and music. It made
everything more difficult, but
it also made it richer and more
worthwhile."
"I've always been kind of a
weirdo, I guess. I've always made
a lot of stuff," says Nesbitt of her
prolific creative life as an architect, musician, multidisciplinary
artist and filmmaker. "I feel like
some people are made to make
tilings, and if you don't, then
you get artistically constipated.
I didn't feel good when I didn't
make things."
"I've gone through a lot of
phases of making. I made books
for a long time. I made paintings
and collage, but I don't really anymore. But all those investigations
inform videos [for Graftician], I
feel better having them be videos than about them being art
objects." Her drive to continue
to have a creative outlet is what
led Nesbitt away from architecture and into the more flexible
schedule of the film world. "While
I'm waiting at work, I'll work on
a video or something," she says
with a big grin.
Nesbitt has incorporated visuals
into her live performances since
November 2015, and has already
created videos for many of her
songs, including one for "modern
girls" which is a recorded kaleidoscope of lipstick, keys, cigarettes and vitamins. "I always
meant Graftician to be visual and
sonic, but when I started I wasn't
sure how that would happen,"
Nesbitt says.
Making visuals for her music
project was a defense mechanism
for Nesbitt as much as it was a natural progression. "In November
of last year I was procrastinating
applying for architecture jobs,"
she recalls, "I made 10 music videos because I was scared of working 9-to-5 for the rest of my life,
and scared of making condos, and
scared of selling out. I was scared
of being boring and doing something boring."
Going forward, Nesbitt doesn't
plan on slowing her steady drip of
creativity. Having found a kind of
rhythm to her own desire to make
and challenge herself, Nesbitt is
planning the next iterations of
Graftician. "I'm really excited to
make new stuff," says Nesbitt.
"I think for the next album, I'm
gonna challenge myself to try
making images first or try making
them simultaneously. I want to
push my own boundaries and my
own process," she says. "I have
been making music for dancers,
and I've been joking with myself
that I would just hire dancers as
my band, but that they wouldn't
make sounds."
Wander/Weave was released
July 22, 2016. Listen to Graftician
and see Nesbitt's other work at
roxannenesbitt.com/graftician. WORDS BYJASPER-p-WRrN"CH
.   ILLUSTRATIONSB^DANAKEARLEY
PHOTO BY EVAN B^^^S
**~-^^Wthought jt was kind
11 of pretentious to go
•:':J^b^pay name," says
Andrea Lukic, multi-disciplinary
Vancouver artist and musician. "I
don't know, it took the fun away
from performing if I had to just be
the regular me." So she became
Hick.
Sitting down with Discorder,
Lukic discusses %ia«4dyl|a|pc8:
nature of her experimental music
project, and how shej%nanages to
maintain control over Hick despite
extensive cohaboratibn - and a
curse.
',"ril look for sounds that are
otherworldly," explains Lukic. With
Hick, she tries to create sound-
scapes that are eerily close to the
world around us. "There's something off with everything there, but
it still seems like it could be here.
I like music that gives you that
feeling."
A year ago, having slowly tested-
out those otherworldly sounds
in various live settings, Lukic
recorded her first tape, Travelers,
fiin?o"n.efd^Mfert;of on a whim."
^fflS^cpS^oh and technical
assistance from Sam Risser, of
■indus"trial*electrohfc act Sunstroke
Militia, Lukic 'laid* down' what
seemed to her tb be a perfect representation -of jwhat:'.sh£\wante<}£
Hick to be
"I was in the right place at the'
•"iright -time," says Lukic, "and I
really went for it. I pushed myself
vocally, ata|oft%vfo11i absurdity.
I was confident enough to make
sounds thatfelt really humiliating
IpM&Ke, but sounded just right."
Being at ease with her voice
while recording isn't something
Lukic has always enjoyed. She
explains, "It used to takes me a
long time to record vocals. It's a
hard stage to get through." Having
sung and played bass in Nii Sensae,
a Vancouver based grunge-punk
band, Lukic admits that the pressure of recording took its toll
on her well-being.
"I'd   contract   an   illness  -
every time," she says. "I*d go
to the doctor, and they would
tell me it was strep throat.af||^§l|
that it was stress induced. j^l^S
body would not let}ml; record
vocals." So, in a physical sense,
the recording of Travelers was
a feat, which made its loss all
the more impactful. "It got
corrupted in the  transfer,"
explains Lukic. "I don't even
know what that means, but
that's what happened."
Ever since, Hick has been
presented almost exclusively
in the live settmg^irfca mid—
titude of irkSr6atffi^^i(8lb5^
revolving roster of musicians
that join Lukic at Hick performances — including Morgan
Cook of Sister Blanche, Claire
Newton of Cave Girl, Katayoon
Yousefbiglo^ of Tough Customer
and OtK« Jesus, Chandra Melting
Tallow of" Mourning Coup, and
Sam'Risser; among others — the
very nature cdf her project is altered
depending on whoVinvolved. ">
""* FrqriiT^nibient tape-loop based
performances, to 'aggressive full
band shows,*"Hick is practically a
different bi3|l|?at every turn, and
it's that unpredictability that keeps
Lukic so engaged. "When you play
with another person, you can kind
joilii go for a minute, and let them
take the reins," she says. "They
might take it somewhere you're
not expecting — it's just this chain
of chance and consequence that's a
lot more interesting."
EXPEcmem
mm cmmom
mtmmm.*
wmrfAiOT :
ImiTinixmrn
'^g&^M espite Lukic her-
I self being the only
Jsg^P constant element
within Hick,>she admits
that she Jau't maintain
the project Completely by
. 'hersejjjpi just don't think
playing alone is that fun,"
>ij^^^q>lains. "It's miss-
I ing a component of music
that makes music so special. The spontaneity"" isn't
there — there's a disconnect for me." Lukic gives
her last Hick performance
as an example of the way
in which the unexpected
can alter and improve her
experience.
"I played with Sam
[Risser] and he was really
drunk," she relates. "It was
fine, but it definitely didn't
go according to how we
rehearsed it. I didn't know
what was coming next, and
it was so much more interesting to me. I was listening to it just as much as the
audience was."
While she thrives off the
collaborative energy of live
performance, Lukic still
uses her solitary time as
a way to fuel her music. "I
feel'mwisual art and music
are pretty interconnected,"
she* sara. "The thing about
. drav^g-is that it takes so
"mu^Kone time, so much
timellh your own head.
You have to make music
aftjfe'just to release some
tension |
. W§t Lukic, her visual and
ifSfticiU practices come
. jgfer^lhe same creative
Source, despite manifesting
in different artistic products.   "With drawing and
music, it's all channeling the
same information from the same
place, just in a different way," she
says. "For Hick, it's important to
keep certain aspects of my drawing really present in the music —
certain colours that control how
you can receive my message."
And that control is integral for
Lukic to maintain in Hick, despite
the unpredictability of her live
shows. "I thought it would be so
satisfying to control every aspect
of it," explains Lukic on why she
started Hick. "And it is. It's just
not that satisfying to play. I think
the solution is to record by yourself, and find people you connect
with to play with."
After a year of adapting after
the loss of her tape, experimenting with lineup configurations,
and walking the line between
collaboration and solitary^^^p-
ation, Lukic is about to embark on
another venture into the world of
recording. "I thought about recreating the last record, but I don't
see the point," she explains. "It
was a very true and real expression, so it'll always be close. I'm
just approaching it superstitiously
this time. I feel a bit cursed."
Hick performs September 1 with John
Wiese, Rusalka, Mass Marriage and
Fracture at the Remington Gallery. For
more info, visit thehick.bandcamp.com. ANNU
BOOKS
MAGAZINES
ZINES
flj PRINT EPHEMERA
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PERFORMANCES
ARTIST'S PROJECTS
?i®;i®^^iy ST
16.10.16
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THE  DARK
EIGHTIES
EpJgTCE   PAR^NJT|
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$5
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SATURDAY
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FEATURING BANDS
BLACK MARBLE
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RITUAL HOWLS
«•-*. TO i--»  «l~   ■»"|p   --.'..     ft.« ra<  *m r*-.  VCT TO
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-THE ASTO^IA-
$5
SUNDAY
SWT.'l
$5-10
SATURDAY
SEPT.   24 VENEWS SPECIAL
MUST-VISIT MUSIC VENUES, MUSIC SHOPS AND ART GALLERIES IN VANCOUVER
collected by the Discorder Masthead // illustrations by Fiona Dunnett 'I&£jgg0t
Biscorder has compiled a broad list of our favourite Vancouver venues. Within this list there are music venues, art
galleries, music shops, and a couple surprises. We don't give details, for many of these spaces are interchangeable between media, and best experienced rather than described.
You'll notice that we have organized them by area: our designations are a little unconventional, but you'll get the point.
Many of these places are all-ages, but some are 19+. If that is relevant to you, do your research before heading out.
Go forth and explore!
<tet ant) d£a*ter tUancoutoer
Spountf feasant
SDotontofonan&OTfeatdEnD
ASTORIA — 769 East Hastings Street
AUDIOPILE RECORDS — 2016 Commercial Drive
BACKGALLERYPROJECT — 602 East Hastings
Street
BIG JOY BARBER a SALON — 203-2132 East
Hastings Street
CAFE DEUX SOLEILS- 2096 Commercial Drive
FRANKLIN STUDIOS — 1622 Franklin Street
IRIS COLLECTIVE FIELD HOUSE — 3434 Falaise
Avenue
MERGE — Northeast corner of Powell Street and
Clark Drive
REDGATE — 855 East Hastings Street
THE RIO — 1660 East Broadway Street
SPARTACUS BOOKS — 3378 Findlay Street
STORM CROWTAVERN — 1305 Commercial Drive
SUNSETTERRACE — 2028 Clark Drive
VIVO MEDIA ARTS CENTRE — 2625 Kaslo Street
THE WALDORF — 1489 East Hastings Street
THE WISE HALL — 1882 Adanac Street >~&k
CJinatofon attb dDastofon
221A — 221A East Georgia Street
ACCESS GALLERY— 222 East Georgl^^
ALEXANDER GASTOWN — 91 Powell Street"'''
AUDAIN GALLERY — 149 West Hastings Street
BEAT STREET RECORDS — 439 West Hastings
Street
BESTWAYSTUDIOS — 21 East Pender Street
THE BOXCAR — 917 Main Street
CENTRE A— 229 East Georgia Street
CHINA CLOUD — 524 Main Street
CINEWORKSANNEX— 235 Alexander Street
COBALT — 917 Main Street
ELLIS BUILDING — 1240 Main Street
THE EMERALD — 555 Gore Avenue
FORTUNE SOUND CLUB — 147 East Pender Street
GALLERYGACHET — 88 East Cordova Street
GAM GALLERY — 110 East Hastings Street
GOLD SAUCER — 207 West Hastings Street
GROUNDSWELL — 566 Powell Street
LOSTd FOUND — 33 West Hastings Street
IMPERIAL — 319 Main Street
PUB 340 — 340 Cambie Street
PUBLICATION STUDIO — 8 East Pender Street
REMINGTON GALLERY — 108 East Hastings
Street
RICKSHAW THEATRE— 254 East Hastings Street
SELECTORS RECORDS — 8 East Pender Street
SPARE ROOM — 2F-222 East Georgia Street
STUDIO VOSTOK — 246 Keefer Street
SWEET PUP STUDIOS — 19 East Pender Street
UNIT/PITT PROJECTS — 236 East Pender Street
UNTITLEDARTSPACE — 436 Columbia Street
VINYL RECORDS — 321 West Hastings Street
WAAP — 688 East Hastings Street
ANTISOCIAL SKATE SHOP — 2337 Main Street
ANZA CLUB — 3 West 8 Avenue
THEBILTMORECABARET — 2755 Prince Edward
Street
BUDGIES BURRITOS — 44 Kingsway
BURRARD ARTS FOUNDATION — 108 East
Broadway
CATRIONA JEFFRIES GALLERY — 274 East 1
Avenue
CCA SPACE — 5-2414 Main Street
DANDELION RECORDS — 2442 Main Street
DONT ARGUE PIZZA — 3240 Main Street
DYNAMO ARTS ASSOCIATION — 103-30 East 6
Avenue
EQUINOX GALLERY — 525 Great Northern Way
FAS IN FRANK — 2425 Main Street
FIELD CONTEMPORARY — 17 West Broadway
Street
FOX CABARET — 2321 Main Street
GRUNTGALLERY — 350 East 2 Avenue
HOTARTWETCITY— 2206 Main Street
KRANKYCAFE — 228 East 4 Avenue
THE LIDO — 518 East Broadway Street
LUCKYS COMICS — 3972 Main Street
THE MAIN — 4210 Main Street
MONTE CLARK GALLERY — 525 Great Northern
Way
NEPTOON RECORDS — 3561 Main Street
OPEN STUDIOS — 252 East l Avenue
PROJECTION ROOM — 2321 Main Street
(upstairs)
PULP FICTION BOOKS — 2422 Main Street / 1830
Commercial Drive / 2754 West Broadway
REDCATRECORDS — 4332 Main Street
SLICKITYJIMS/SKINNY FAT JACKS — 3475 Main
Street
STYLUS RECORDS— 293 East 2 Avenue (Alleyway)
TOAST COLLECTIVE — 648 Kingsway
VANCOUVER ARTS a LEISURE— 1965 Main Street
WESTERN FRONT — 303 East 8
Avenue
WINDSOR GALLERY — 2-258 East 1
Avenue f^X^s?^';
Wk*t of flj&ount Meaiant
CHARLES H SCOTT GALLERY — 1399
Johnston Street
MALASPINAPRINTMAKERS — 1555 Duranleau
Street
MORRIS AND HELEN BELKIN GALLERY — 1825
Main Mall
MUSEUM OF VANCOUVER — 1100 Chestnut Street
NORM MOVIE THEATRE — Old SUB at UBC
RUFUSGUITARSHOP — 2621 Alma Street
STORM CROW ALEHOUSE — 1619 West Broadway
Street
VANCOUVER THEATRESPORTS — 1502 Duranleau
Street
ZULU RECORDS — 1972 West 4 Avenue
CINEMATHEQUE — 1131 Howe Street
COMMODORE BALLROOM — 868 Granville
Street
CONTEMPORARY ART GALLERY — 555 Nelson
Street
INSTANT COFFEE FIELD HOUSE — Stanley Park
Second Beach
MEDIA CLUB — 695 Cambie Street
OR GALLERY— 555 Hamilton Street
ORPHEUM — 865 Seymour Street
SAKORAS CLASSICAL RECORDS — 432 West
Hastings Street
VANCOUVERARTGALLERY — 750 Hornby Street
VANCITYTHEATRE — 1181 Seymour Street
VENUE — 881 Granville Street
THE VOGUE — 918 Granville Street
jftot ejracflp tn tWancoufcer
BEATMERCHANT RECORD STORE — 160-12240 2
Avenue, Richmond
BURNABY ART GALLERY — 6344 Deer Lake
Avenue, Burnaby
CINEVOLUTION — 7700 Minoru Gate, Richmond
NEW MEDIA GALLERY — 777 Columbia Street,
New Westminster
PRESENTATION HOUSE — 333 Chesterfield
Avenue, North Vancouver
SURREY ART GALLERY — 13750 88 Avenue,
Surrey
J^oit'U )u*t frafte to a*ts around
333 — You'll hear about it
THE BLACK LAB — ask an anarchist
GROUND GALLERY — on abandoned lots, ask
around
JUNIPER ROOM — on Industrial Ave, but attendance is limited
THE MATADOR — Ask a punk
PROJECT SPACE — 2-236 East Pender Street,
but also organizes events in other spaces, like
Vancouver Art / Book Fair at the VAG
New venues are popping up all the time, and others are. ■sbnit-
ting down. This list was created from scratch, laboriously added
to over several weeks in August 2016. If you are&mmie and we
forgot you, we apologize. Email editor.discorder@citr.ca to have
your space added to the web version of this article. ON THE AIR
COPY/PASTE
words by Christine Powell // illustrations by Zad Kokar
// photos by Manny Sangha
fhope that people are listening alone in their rooms and they start
dancing." The host of CiTR's copy/paste, Tim Fernandes, is a DJ by
the name Autonomy. Every Thursday at 11pm, he creates underground
dance mixes with the station's turntables and occasionally vinyl from his own
collection. The mixes incorporate beat matching and blending so that each
song smoothly fades into the next, creating uninterrupted narratives.
Fellow radio host and CiTR Student Executive Co-President Christine
Powell interviewed Autonomy on creating dance mixes and finding
inspiration in the stars —
WHYISTHE SHOW CALLED
COPV/MSTWIVmrHOT
CONTROL/FOR ESC OR
DELETE?
copy/paste is a concept we're
all familiar with. It's the process of duplication and repetition
using a computer. To me, this
is the essence of dance music.
Dance music is all about repetition
because that's how we dance. We
can use computers to create music
that inspires very human emotions
through dance and social interactions. It's taking something very
mechanical and straightforward
and turning it into an emotionally
human thing. So that's why it's
called copy/paste. And when you're
making dance music on a computer, you're going to be using
copy and paste a lot.
HOW IS CREATING MIXES IN
THE STUDIO DIFFERENT FROM
MIXINGAGIG?
When I'm in the studio I'm
completely focused on what I
want to put out. I'm not even
thinking about audience. When
DJing at a gig, you have to be very
responsive to what's happening
on the floor and lead people in
certain directions without pushing them or alienating
them. But in the studio
I have the freedom to
craft an hour-long set
that follows a logic that
I want it to follow rather
than what other people
are expecting, copy/paste
gives me the opportunity to craft experiences
or   narratives   through
music rather than existing to be
the party.
WHAT PROCESS DO YOU USE
TO FIND NEW MUSIC?
In dance music especially, the
concept of a label is important to
defining a sound. So if you follow
specific labels, you can know what
to expect. I play a lot of stuff from
io8op on the show — everyone at
CiTR does. And I really like this
label in Berlin called Utramajic ...
Turbo Recordings is always interesting as well. They're based in
Montreal. 100% Silk — I really
like that label. And they're primarily tape-based, like io8op.
WHAT SORTS OF CHANGES
ARE HAPPENING IN THE DANCE
MUSIC SCENE?
Well across the last few
years the Vancouver house
and techno music scenes
have gotten a lot more popular worldwide. There's definitely a Vancouver dance
music sound which I character as "inspired by trees" or
"arboreal house". It's very
lo-fi, organic house with
relaxed driving beats and
ethereal synths. When I say
inspired by trees I am also
referring to the abundance
of weed in Vancouver, which
creates a very specific sound
palate.
I LISTENED TO THE
OUTERSPACE EPISODE
["BLANK SPACE"]. WHAT
ARE SOME OF YOUR
FAVOURITE SHOWS
YOU'VE CRAFTED?
I really enjoyed the ambient mix I did [July 14]. I made
a version where I cut out all
of the parts where I'm talking
and I call it the "maximum
introspection" mix. I listen to it when I go to bed
sometimes.
I did one [on June 23] called the
"solstice soundtrack" that was
inspired by the summer solstice.
It started light and fun, and then
it moved progressively darker in
tone and by the end it was driving
techno sounds.
WHERE DO YOU FIND
INSPIRATION FOR YOUR
SHOW?
Mostly my life, really. Music is
all about emotional expression.
I'm not that interested in music
that doesn't have emotional character to it. There's a lot of dance
music that doesn't and I'm not
interested in that at all. ["blank
space"] was because I saw the
meteor shower over the weekend
and saw the full moon after that.
And the ambient mix was because
I was having a really rough week
and I needed to cool down and
think about things. If you listen
to the show regularly, you could
probably chart what's going on
in my life based on the music I'm
playing.
i
copy/paste broadcasts on CiTR
101.9FM every Thursday from
upm-nam. You can find show archives
or subscribe to copy/paste as a podcast at
citr.ca/radio/copypaste.
Want to get involved at CiTR or
pitch your own show? Join us for a
station tour every Monday-Friday at
12pm. CiTR is located on the lower
floor of the Nest at UBC.
THipSTIST
GROWING BIA
IN VANCOUVER
\ Hastings Crossings Business Improvement Area Is
home to^ome of tnalnijst exciting new restaurants,
^^^^^'SnikwSttve startups in Vanrcouver
' I Chepyirt what we have to offer at hxbia.com
HASTINGS L
CROSSING\
ON THE AIR cms ioi.9$m pttOGiaflin sum*
DISCORDER RECOMMENDS USTMjMG TO CITR EVERYDAY
■
SJitonDap
CneuDap
WetmwDap
JE&UMDap
JFtrfoap
£>atnrDaj>
: i&urtDap
■
6 AM
crm GHOST MIX
PACIFIC PICKIN'
CITR GHOST MIX
CITR GHOST MIX
CITR dffk)ST MIX"'
CITR GHOST MIX
CTn\6&SfMIX
6 AM
7AM
7AM
8 AM
BREAKFAST WITH
QUEER FM
VANCOUVER:
RELOADED
SUBURBAN
JUNGLE
UBC 100
THE SATURDAY
EDGE
8 AM
SAM
THE COMMUNITY
LIVING SHOW
WIZEMEN
CUSSICAL
CHAOS
9AM
10 AM
POP DRONES
A FACE FOR
RADIO
VANCOUVER,
SHOOKSHOOKTA
10 AM
STUDENT FILL-IN
11 AM
UNCEDED
AIRWAVES
ROCKET FROM
STUDENT FILL-IN
11 AM
MORNING AFTER
SHOW
12 PM
SYNCHRONICS
THE
SHAKESPEARE
DUNCAN'S
DONUTS
DAVE RADIO WITH
RADIO DAVE
GENERATION
ANNIHILATION
THE ROCKERS
SHOW
12 PM
1PM
SHINE
ON
PERMANENT
—SPECIAL
KOKO
FEMCONCEPT
iPM
2 PM
PARTICLES &
WAVES
CANADALAND
(syndicled)
MUZAK FOR THE
OBSERVANT
RADIO ZERO
2PM
3 PM
THE BURROW
RADIO FREE
KEW IT UP
ASTROTALK
CODE BLUE
FIESTA
SSH
3 PM
TOUNDERBIRDEYE
NARDWUAR
PRESENTS
4 PM
LITTLE BIT OF
SOUL
STUDENT FILL-IN
ASIAN WAVE
SIMORGH
4 PM
5PM
THE LEO RAMIREZ
SHOW
RADIO
EL SONIDO LATIN
ROOTS
ALL ACCESS PASS
NEWS1101
MANTRA
CHTHONICBOOM!
S PM
6PM
RADIO PAGEANT
Si
MmONM
ARE
LADY RADIO
NASHAVOLNA
NOW WE'RE
TALKING
6 PM
7PM
EXPLODING HEAD
MOVIES
SPACE
SS
kjwic-
QUESTION
EVERYTHING
N,GHTDR,VE95
MORE THAN
7 PM
THE
SPICE
OFUFE
RHYTHMS
fPi
INSIDE OUT	
MIXCASETTE
NEW
ERA
SOCA
STORM
SET
™
8 PM
gPM
THE JAZZ SHOW
TREASON
WHITE NOISE
LIVE FROM
SKALDS HALL
TRANCENDANCE
9 PM
10 PM
S
RADIO HELL
CANADA POST
ROCK
SANDWICH
10 PM
11PM
STRANDED: CAN/
AUS MUSIC SHOW
COPY/PASTE
THE MEDICINE
11 PM
12 AM
CITR GHOST MIX
RANDOPHONIC
12 AM
1ANT
CITR GHOST MIX
CFTRGHC
ST MIX
AURAL
TENTACLES
§HOW	
1AM
HS
THE ABSOLUTE
VALUE OF
INSOMNIA
2 AM
LATE
NIGHT
LATE
NIGHT
■ CARIBBEAN
SOCA STORM
SAT. 8 PM
DJ SOCA Conductor delivers the latest
SOCA music tracks out of the Caribbean.
This party music will make you Jump out of
your seat. This show Is the first of its kind
here on CITR and is the perfect music to
get you In the mood to go out partying! It's
Saturday, watch out STORM COMING!!!!
■ CLASSICAL
CLASSICAL CHAOS
From the Ancient World to the 21st
century, join host Marguerite in
exploring and celebrating classical
■ CHINESE
ASIAN WAVE
■ DANCE / ELECTRONIC
COPY/PASTE
If It makes you move your feet (or nod
your head), it'll be heard on copy/
paste. Tune in every week for a full
hour DJ mix by Autonomy, running
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
TRANCENDANCE
6:30 PM
Dedicated to underground electronic music,
both experimental and dance-oriented.
Live DJ sets and guests throughout.
INSIDE OUT
sian Wave 101 to listen to
best music from the Chinese
id Korean music industries,
atest news coming from the
two entertainment powerhouses of the
language ar
Asian f
e. The la
■ CINEMATIC
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
the.movies, tunes from television and
any other cinematic source, along with
atmospheric pieces, cutting-edge new
could be used in
Noise, and Alternative No Beat into tr
early morning. Following the music, »
play TZM br
RADIO ZERO
mix of super-fresh week
party jams from New Wave to foreign
electro, balle, Bollywood, and whatever
MIX CASSETTE
A panopoly of songs, Including the fresh
riddlms and sweetest tunes, hanging
together, in a throwback suite. Which
hearkens back to the days when we mac
mix cassettes for each other (cds too), a
relished in the possibilities of merging the
best moments frorrfbur favourite albums
Hosted by DJ Smiley Mike and DJ
Caddyshack, Trancendance has been
broadcasting from Vancouver, B.C. since
2001. We favour Psytrance, Hard Trance
and Epic Trance, but also play Acid Trance,
Deep Trance, and even some Breakbeat.
We also love a good Classic Trance Anthem,
especially If if s remixed. Current influences
Include Sander van Doom, Gareth Emery,
Nick Sentience, Ovnlmoon, Ace Ventura,
Save the Robot, Liquid Soul, and Astrix.
Older influences include Union Jack,
Carl Cox, Christopher Lawrence, Whoop! -
Records, Tidy Trax, Platlpus Records, and
Nukleuz.
Email: djsn
Website: w
■  DRAMA/POETRY
SKALD'S HALL
Skald's Hall entertains with the spoken
word via story readings, poetry recitals, and
drama. Established and upcoming artists
Join host Brian MacDonald. Interested in
performing on air? Contact us on Twitter:
■ECLECTIC
A FACE FOR RADIO
A show about music with interludes
about nothing. From Punk to
Indie Rock and beyond.
ARE YOU AWARE
ALTERNATING THU. 6 PM
Celebrating the message behind the music:
profiling music and musicians that take
the route of positive action over apathy.
AURAL TENTACLES
It could be global, trance, spoken word,
rock, the unusual and the weird, or it could
be something different Hosted by DJ Pierre.
Email: auraltentacles@hotmall.com
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
Your favourite Brownsters, James and Peter,
offer a savoury blend of the familiar and
exotic in a blend of aural delights.
Email: breakfastwiththebrowns@
CHTHONIC BOOM!
SUN. 5 PM
A show dedicated to playing psychedelic
music from parts of the spectrum (rock, pop,
electronic) as well as garage and noise rock.
FEMCONCEPT
electronic and punk, with an emphasis
on local and Canadian artists.
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD RADIO HELL
Featuring live bands every week
performing in the CiTR lounge. Most are
from Vancouver, but sometimes bands
from across the country and around the
world. Upcoming guest include Koban on
July 14 and Inherent Vices on July 28!
THE MEDICINE SHOW
A variety show, featuring musicians, poets,
and entertainment Industry guests whose
material is considered to be therapeutic.
We encourage and promote independent
THE MORNING AFTER SHOW
The Morning After Show every Tuesday at
11:30(am). Playing your favourite songs
for 13 years. The morning after what? The
morning after whatever you did last night.
Eclectic show with live music, local talent
and music you won't hear anywhere else.
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
FRI. 3:30 PM
Join Nardwuar the Human Serviette for
Clam Chowder flavoured entertainment
Doot doola doot doo...doot doo!
EmallMiardwuar@nardwuar.com
RANDOPHONIC
Randophonic has no concept of genre, style,
political boundaries or even space-time
relevance. Though we have been known
to play pretty much anything by anybody
(as long as it's good), we do often fix our
focus on a long running series, the latest of
which (due to premiere in April-2016) Is The
Solid Time of Change (akathe 661 Greatest
Records of the Progressive Rock Era
-1965-79) And we're not afraid of noise.
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
Dan Shakespeare is here with
music for your ear. Kick back with
gems of the previous years.
Anec
lixofth
er underground and
beyond, connected through a different theme
each week. Join your host Shea every
Tuesday for a groovy musical experience!
SOUL SANDWICH
A myriad of your favourite music tastes all
cooked into one show, from Hip Hop to
Indie Rock to African Jams. Ola will play
through a whirlwind of different genres,
perfect layering of yummy goodness
will blow your mind. It beats Subway.
IT SPECIAL HOUR
ut on-campus events
re from the Jungle Room, join ra
■ ETHIOPIAN
SHOOKSHOOKTA
A program targeted to Ethiopian
people that encourages education
and personal development.
■ EXPERIMENTAL
KEW IT UP
WED. 3 PM
Fight-or-flight music. Radio essays
and travesties: Sonic Cateschlsm /
half-baked philosophy and criticism.
Experimental, Electronica, Post-Punk,
ETHAN HUMAN
Plug NIGHTDRIVE95 directly into your
synapses and Immediately receive your
weekly dose of dreamy, ethereal, vaporwave
tones fresh from the web. Ideal music for
driving down the Pacific Coast Highway In
your Geo Tracker, sipping a Crystal Pepsi
by the pool, or shopping for bootleg Sega
Saturn games at a Hong Kong night market.
Experience yesterday's tomorrow, today!
POP DRONES
Unearthing the depths of contemporary
cassette and vinyl underground.
Ranging from DIY bedroom pop and
garage rock all the way to harsh
■ GENERATIVE
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF INSOMNIA
Four solid hours of fresh generative
music c/o the Absolute Value of Noise
and its world famous Generator. Ideal
for enhancing your dreams or, If sleep
is not on your agenda, your reveries.
■ HIP HOP
CRIMES & TREASONS
Hip-Hop & Trill $h*t Hosted by
Jamal Steeles, Homeboy Jules, Relly Rels,
LuckyRich & horsepowar.
Showcases up and coming artists who
are considered "underdogs" in the music
industry. The show will provide a platform
for new artists who are looking to get radio
play. Hip-Hop music from all over the world
along with features of multi-genre artists.
■ INDIAN
RHYTHMS INDIA
Featuring a wide range of music from
India, Including popular music from
the 1930s to the present Ghazals
and Bhajans, Qawwalis, pop and
regional language numbers.
■JAZZ
THE JAZZ SHOW
Sept. 5: Of all the recordings done by
tenor saxophone master Stan Getz, this
one was his favourite. It's features Stan
playing over compositions by composer
Eddie Sauter with a large string section.
The album is called "Focus" and it's a gem.
Sept 12: Tonight begins a regular
September (back to school, back to work
etc.) educational Jazz Feature for two
Mondays. This first is a brief and informal
Jazz History lesson narrated by the
great alto saxophonist/bandleader Julian
"Cannonball" Adderley. "A History of Jazz".
Sept. 19: Part Two of The Jazz Show's
educational Feature Is Maestro Leonard
Bernstein who narrates "What Is Jazz".
Bernstein takes a different approach and
explains what is and what isnt Jazz and
delivers some simple musical theory for
the lay person. Educational and fun tool
Sept 26: A belated Birthday tribute to John
Coltrane (born Sept 23,1926-July 17,1967).
His classic album called "Blue Train" with
a super sextet of players including the
teenage trumpet wonder Lee Morgan and
trombone master Curtis Fuller and drummer
Philly Joe Jones. A Jazz masterpiece.
LITTLE BIT OF SOUL
Old recordings of jazz, s
■ KOREAN
KOKO CHANNEL
This show is in Korean but not for playing
just popular K-POP. We play Korean Indie
pop, K-rock, K-hip hop, and K-ballad. Host
DJ Megan talks about news or daily life of
Korean society In Metro Vancouver. Enjoy
Korean talks and get the information of
Korea through KOKO Channel by Megan!
■ LATIN AMERICAN
EL SONIDO LATIN ROOTS THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
■ LOUD
FLEX YOUR HEAD
Vancouver's longest running metal show. If
you're Into music that*s on the heavier/darker
side of the spectrum, then you'll like It Sonic
assault provided by Geoff, Marcia, and Andy.
SAMSQUANTCH'S HIDEAWAY
All-Canadian music with a focus or
rock/pop.
Email: anltablnder@hotmall.com.
SPICE OF LIFE
Thur. 4 pm
Slmorgh Radio Is devoted to the education
and literacy for the Persian speaking
communities and those interested In
connecting to Persian oral and written
literature. Slmorgh takes you through a
journey of ecological sustalnablllty evolving
within cultural and social literacy. Slmorgh
the mythological multiplicity of tale-figures,
lands-in as your mythological narrator
In the storyland; the contingent space
of beings, connecting Persian peoples
within and to Indigenous peoples.
■ PUNK
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
play new, International and local punk rock
music. Great Success! P.S. Broadcasted In
brokenlsh English. Hosted by Russian Tim.
Website: http://rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com.
Email: rocketfromrussiacitr@gmail.com.
Facebook: https^www.facebook.
com/RocketFromRussia. Twitter:
http-7/twftter.convllmaJzar.
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
On the air since 2002, playing old and new
punk on the non-commercial side of the
spectrum. Hosts: Aaron Brown, Jeff The
FbaT Kraft
Website: generationannlhllation.com.
Facebook: facebook.com/
generationannihilation/
Reggae inna all styles and fashion.
■ ROCK/POP/INDIE
THE BURROW
Noise Rock, Alternative, Post-Rock,
Formerly or
now resides on we west coast out its
still committed to the best in post-rock,
drone, ambient, experimental, noise
and basically anything your host Pbone
can put the word "post" intrant of.
DAVE RADIO WITH RADIO DAVE
D, Canada-Post Rock
DISCORDER RADIO
TUE. 5 PM
Named after CiTR's sister magazine,
Discorder, this show covers content in
the magazine and beyond. Produced by
Sweet treats from the pop underground.
Hosted by Duncan, sponsored by donuts.
http://duncansdonuts.wordpress.com.
MUZAK FOR THE OBSERVANT
A program focusing on the week's highlights
from CiTR's Music Department. Plus: live
In-studlo performances and artist interviews!
PARTICLES AND WAVES
Much like the quantum theory which
Inspired its name, the content of Particles
and Waves defies definition until directly
observed, and can produce unexpected
results-local Indie, sci-fi prog rock, classic
soul, obscure soundtracks, Toto's deep
cuts, and everything in between. Join Mia
every Tuesday at 2pm for a quirky Journey
through music that will delight and Intrigue.
PARTS UNKNOWN
a marshmallow sandwich: so
with a stick and held close to
THE PERMANENT RAIN RA
>p culture-spanning pr
Music-based, pi
co-hosts Chloe and Natalie for ar
llghthearted twin talk and rad turn
variety of artists who have been f
thepermanentrainpress.com
The spice extends life. The spice expands
consciousness. The Spice of Life brings
you a variety of Post-Rock, Shoegaze,
Math Rock and anything that else that
progresses. Join host Ben Lite as he
meanders whimsically through whatever
comes to mind on the walk to CITR.
RADIO PAGEANT
Radio Pageant puts the spotlight onto
Independent and local artists that really
put on a show. Pop, rock, DIY, pop-punk
Join your host Matthew for a weekly mix of
Australian homeland. And Journey with him
as he features fresh tunes and explores the
alternative musical heritage of Canada.
■ ROOTS / FOLK / BLUES
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
From backwoods delta low-down slide
to urban harp honks, blues, and blues
roots with your hosts Jim, Andy, and
Paul. Email: codeblue@paulnorton.ca
PACIFIC PICKIN'
TUE. 6 AM
Bluegrass, old-time music, and its
derivatives with Arthur and the lovely Andn
Berman. Email: pacificplckin@yahoo.com
THE SATURDAY EDGE
SAT. 8 AM
A personal guide to world and roots music-
with African, Latin, and European music
In the first half, followed by Celtic, blues,
songwriters, Cajun, and whatever else fits!
Email: steveedge3@mac.com
■ RUSSIAN
NASHA VOLNA
SAT. 6 PM
News, arts, entertainment and music for th
Russian community, local and abroad.
Website: nashavolna.ca
■ SACRED
MANTRA
i An electlc mix of electronic and acoustic
beats and layers, chants and medicine
song. Exploring the diversity of the
THUNDERBIRD EYE
The Inside edge on the lates
UBC Thunderblrds varsity
■SOUL/R&B
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
FRI. 7:30 PM
Website: www.africanrhythmsradio.com
■ TALK
ALL ACCESS PASS
THU. 5 PM
CfTR Accessibility Collective's new radio
show. We talk about equity, inclusion,
and accessibility for people with diverse
abilities, on campus and beyond. Tune
in every week for Interviews, music,
news, events, and awesome dialogue.
ASTROTALK
Space Is an Interesting place. Marco
slices up the night sky with a new topic
every week. Death Stars, Black Holes,
Big Bangs, Red Giants, the Milky Way,
G-Bands, Syzygy's, Pulsars, Super Stars...
THE COMMUNITY LIVING SHOW
s. The to
outlook on programs and events for the
entire community. We showcase BC Self
Advocates and feature Interviews with
people with special needs. Hosted by Kelly
Reaburn, Michael Rubbln Clogs and Friends
CANADALAND (SYNDICATED)
LADY RADIO
FRI. 6 PM
CITR Women's Collective's new radio
show! Rad women talking about things
they like. Tune in weekly for Interviews,
music, events, commentary, and such.
NEWS 101
FRI. 5 PM
Vancouver's only live, volunteer-produced,
student and community newscast. Tune
in to hear an Independent perspective of
what's going on In the world how ft affects
you. News 101 covers current affairs
ranging from the local to the International.
NOW WE'RE TALKING
Now We're Talking features Interviews
that will capture your Imagination (or
at least prevent you from frantically
changing the frequency on your radio).
QUEER FM VANCOUVER: RELOADED
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and
transexual communities of Vancouver. Lots
of human interest features, background on
queerfmvancouver@gmail.com
RADIO FREE THINKER
Promoting skepticism, critical thinking and
we examine popular extraordinary claims
and subject
them to critical analysis.
SHARING SCIENCE
to all members of the community. We
discuss current research and news about a
different topic each week, providing vastly
different perspectives based on the science
backgrounds of a rotating set of hosts.
SYNCHRONICITY
Join host Marie B and discuss spirituality,
health and feeling good. Tune in and
tap into good vibrations that help you
remember why you're here: to have fun!
UBC 100 DOCUMENTARIES
FRI. 8:00 AM
A series of ten radio documentaries
produced by CiTR using clips from our
collection of archived tape to mark UBC's
100 year legacy. Each documentary
portrays a slice of Vancouver history,
covering challenging topics relevant to
the local community, including the rise of
the UBC football, early hip hop battles In
Vancouver, the fight for trans health care,
accessibility and the media, and the Lady
Godiva ride and rape culture at UBC.
The documentaries use archival content
from CiTR's history audio collection in
addition to interviews with faculty, students,
alumni and community members.
UBC ARTS ON AIR
Ira Nadel, UBC English, offers scintillating
profiles and unusual interviews with
members of UBC Arts world. Tune In for
programs, people and personalities in art
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
Unceded Airwaves is a radio show produced
by CiTR's Indigenous Collective. The
team is comprised of both Indigenous
and non-Indigenous people who are
passionate about radio, alternative media
and Indigenous topics and issues. We
are committed to centering the voices
of Native people and offering alternative
narratives that empower Native people and
their stories. We recognize that media has
often been used as a tool to subordinate
or appropriate native voices and we are
committed to not replicating these dynamics.
VANCOUVER, RIGHT?
Need some comic relief? Join Richard
Blackmore for half an hour of weird and
wonderful radio every week, as he delves
In to the most eccentric corners of radio for
your listening pleasure. Then stay tuned
for the after show featuring a Q and A with
the creator, actors and a guest comic every
Email: whitenoiseUBC@gmail.cc
STUDY AND a
GOJMROADf
EXPERIENCE THE WORLD OF EDUCATION
SEPT 24
iPfe») VANCOUVER
111     CONVENTION CENTRE
/     jjj EXPO • 1 pm - 5 pm
* E SEMINARS • 12 noon - 5 pm
studyandgoabroad.c
1
: »•]:
NNNNW#«*T^
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1
SEPTEMBER
HIGHUGHTS
WWW.RIOTHEATRETICKETS.CA
I
■
■
1
i
■
I
I
I
SEPT
1
PAUL ANTHONY'S TAUNT TIME
BACK 2 SCHOOL
SEASON 9 LAUNCH
SEPT
2
DOUBLE FANTASY: DOUBLE BILL
THE SECRET Of NIMH
1EGEND
Friday Late Night Movie
HGHT CLUB
SEPT
3
STEPHEN KING TRIPLE BILL
See one, or see 'em all!
STAND BY ME
THE DEAD ZONE
PET SEMATARY
SEPT
4
Back To Back Double Feature!
THE RAID
THE RAID 2
SEPT
5
The Gentlemen Hecklers Present
DUNGEONS & DRAGONS
4th Anniversary Show
SEPT
6
CLOSET MONSTER
MADONNA
TRUTH OR DARE
25th Anniversary Screening
SEPT
8
18
THE VANCOUVER
FRINGE FESTIVAL
See www.vonauverlringe.tom for info
SEPT
9
Friday Late Night Movie
PINK FLOYD'S
THE WALL
I
1
SEPT
16
Friday Late Night Movie
RETURN OF THE LIVING
DEAD
I
I
I
■
■
I
I
I
SEPT
20
COCO LOVE ALCORN
WONDERLAND RELEASE TOUR
SEPT
21
THE FICTIONALS COMEDY CO. PRESENTS
Improv Against Humanity
Rush Week Revelry At The Rio
#lAHatRio
SEPT
23
Friday Late Night Movie
SHOWGIRLS
SEPT
23
24
DAN SAVAGE PRESENTS
The HUMP! Film Festival
ON TOUR
SEPT
28
THE CRITICAL HIT SHOW!
An Improvised Comedy Spectacular
#DNDlive
VISIT WWW.RIOTHEATRE.CA FOR A COMPLETE CALENDAR OF EVENTS CiTR 101.9FM JUL/AUG MONTHLY CHARTS
SUBS-CULTURAL ANOMALIES
1
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Agony Klub
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Jay Arner*+
Jay II
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Lion Head
Arts & Crafts
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Slush EP
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Self-Released
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1 S-B"
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Dories*
Outside Observer
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Aupres du poele
Passing Shade
1
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No Sinner*+
III
1
Old Habits Die Hard
Provogue
\ 3!7
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Marissa Nadler
Ii6*+
Strangers
Truth Or Consequences
A Youthful Dream
Sacred Bones
Monofonus Press
Fat Possum
| 5f S
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Yung
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BADBADNOTGOOD*
Death Valley Girls
IV
Glow In The Dark
Arts & Crafts
Burger
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Motherhood*
On A Lawn
Baby Teeth
Self-Released
Monopolized
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Consent
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Old Girl*
99.90%
Objeta
XL Recordings
Gary Cassettes
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Weaves
Absolute Truth
Buzz
Thankless
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Self-Released
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Dominions
Jaz
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Blood Orange
Freetown Sound
Domino
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Light Upon the Lake
Secretly Canadian
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Spray Paint
Feel The Clamps
Goner
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For Evelyn
Dine Alone
: "^,21
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Self-Released
Self-Released
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Advertisement*
Good Dirt
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Self-Released
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Holy Fuck*
Congrats
Last Gang
Self-Released
Light Organ
Self-Released
SB,
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We Found a Lovebird**
Lobby
Divorce
Who Will Read Your Mind
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Delirium Tremens
Dead Oceans
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Helios Rising
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Moods Baby Moods
Polyvinyl
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Palm Springs
Self-Released
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Dead Bird On The Highway
Self-Released
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Betterhaif*
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Vancouver's Community-Driven Concert Calendar j
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Sept 03
THE WHITE PANDA
Imperial
Sept 16
I JOSEPH ARTHUR
The Cobalt
Sept 25
ST. PAUL ©THE BROKEN BONES
Commodore Ballroom
Sept 28
| PREOCCUPATIONS (FKA VIET CONG)
Rickshaw Theatre
Oct 5, Oct 6, Oct 7 & Oct 8
JAPANDROIDS
The Cobalt
it
Sept 05
EXPLOSIONS IN THE SKY
Commodore Ballroom
Sept 20
BEATY HEART
The Cobalt
Sept 06
GADELMALEH
Vogue Theatre
Sept 20
WARPAINT
Imperial
Sept 26
TA-KUOIVE)
Vogue %neatre
Sept 15
BDIB0URELLY
Alexander Gastown I
Sept 21
CHROME SPARKS
The Biltmore
Sept 27
ALLAH-LAS
The Biltmore
Sept 24
NA0
The Biltmore
^l^t 28
NICKWATERH0USE1
The Cobalt
Oct 2 Oct 4
DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS CYMBALS EAT GUITARS |
Rickshaw Theatre I    The Cobalt
Oct 6
KING
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Oct 6
DANNY BROWN
Vogue Theatre
Oct 7
THE JULIE RUIN
Rickshaw Theatre
Oct 10
GR0UPL0VE
Commodore Ballroom
Oct 7
MARLON WILLIAMS & THE YARRA BENDERS |
The Biltmore
Oct 8
BEACH FOSSILS
Rickshaw Theatre
Oct 9
WHITE FANG and NO PARENTS |
The Cobalt
Oct 12
PANTHADU PRINCE LIVE
The Biltmore
Oct 13
COLD WAR KIDS
Commodore Ballroom
Oct 13
TALWILKENFELD
The Biltmore
Oct 13
JAMES BLAKE
The Orpheum Theatre I
Oct 14
THE FELICE BROTHERS
The Cobalt
Oct 15
CHIXDIGGIT
The Cobalt
TM8mM&v^& '&&&*'-'8hpW$^'HfP. TlmbreConcerts. com I

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