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 ■Sky;
I   ft   £
reano" Howes
^      Fountain
^Wider Sfnile
iee Young
Wet City
> mmmmmm©
254 East Hastings Street   604.681.8915
UPCOMING SHOWS
THE SADIES & SHADOWY MEN ON A
SHADOWY PLANET
GONDWANA
CAWAMA, SANTA LUCIA LFR
AGGRESSION
1 HELLCHAMBER, KREISE, MEDEVIL
GOING TO NEPAL WITH A CAMERA ON MY
FOREHEAD film screening, after party
WITH DJ KLEO KINNETIC, & FUNDRAISER
YAHELWAV
BELLYDANCE STUDENT SHOWCASE
VOIVOD KING PARROT, CHILD BITE,
THE HALLOWED CATHARSIS, EXPAIN
H
ILL NINO
BOBAFLEX, TERROR UNIVERSAL
LEVITATION FESTIVAL LAUNCH PARTY
RUSSIAN CIRCLES, SUMAC, WAINGRO,
AQUANAUT, SEVEN NINES AND TENS
LEVITATION FESTIVAL
HOLY FUCK, SUUNS, SUMMERING
LEVITATION FESTIVAL dead meadow,
MORGAN DELT, HOLY WAVE, FROTH
PALE DIAN
PASSIVE, THE INTELLIGENCE SERVICE
THE BLACK SEEDS
LOS FURIOS, DJ DUBCONSCIOUS
CALM LIKE A BOMB: A TRIBUTE TO RAGE
AGAINST THE MACHINE the kombucha
MUSHROOM PEOPLE (SYSTEM OF A DOWN TRIBUTE),
FEEL GOOD HITS (QUEENS OF THE STONE AGE TRIBUTE)
SKYE WALLACE & DAVID NEWBERRY
WISHKICKER
Additional show listings, ticket sale info, videos, and more: WWW.RlCKSnAWTnEATKEXOM
THEASTORIA
WEDS;
THURU Jrty/cloaca/
*HEAP APPEAL/ACQUITTED
SAT 11..* H/ ^^BflsoTOPE/OENEX/
TUESt""
FR117 J|
SAT 18,
IGHT
THRS30
++ KARAOKE EVERY MONDAY/NINETIES NIGHT MOST 5UNDAYS++
UveVan.com: Part of a network of concert calendars
completely updated and populated with informal!®
thousands of informed members of our local Indus
Integrated with music profiles from <j
Vancouver Musicians Dire
the CiTR Radio Sponsored
Vancouver Band Directory
and the
Vancouver Music 1
6 Resource Directory
C&mmumty Features
Columns
06 FOUNTAIN
Not just another urinal
17 WIDER SMILE
Our new favourite ideology
21 KEVIN "SIPREANO" HOWES
Voluntary in nature
52 JAYARNER
Jay II is his most squirrely yet
56 HOT ART WET CITY
Feast on it
04
EDITOR'S NOTE
I LEFT YOUR HOUSE THIS MORNING, "BOUT A
QUARTER AFTER 9.
10
DISCORDER REVISITED:
GIRLS TALK
13
WRISTBAND:
PRETTY GOOD NOT BAD
26
VENEWS:
STUDIO VOSTOK
29
REAL LIVE ACTION
36
CALENDAR
38
ART PROJECT:
AIMEE YOUNG
42
UNDER REVIEW
58
HOMEGROWN LABELS:
ARBUTUS RECORDS
61
ON THE AIR:
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
65
PROGRAM GUIDE
71
CHARTS
ADVERTISE: Ad space for upcoming issues can be
booked by calling (604) 822-4342 or emailing
advertising@citr.ca. Rates available upon request.
CONTRIBUTE: To submit words to Discorder, please
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SUBSCRIBE: Send in a cheque for $20 to LL500 -
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email advertising@citr.ca. We are always looking for
new friends.
DONATE: We are part of CiTR, a registered non-profit,
and accept donations so we can provide you with the
content you love. To donate visit www.citr.ca/donate.
vvv
To inform Discorder of an upcoming album release, art
show or significant happening, please email all relevant
details 4-6 weeks in advance to Brit Bachmann, Editor-in-Chief at editor.discorder@citr.ca. You may also
direct comments, complaints and corrections via email,
or visit during office hours at CiTR Tuesdays 4-6pm.
Publisher: Student Radio Society of UBC // CITR Station
Manager: Brenda Grunau // Volunteer Manager: Hugo
Noriega // Advertising Coordinator and Dlstro: Katayoon
Yousefblgloo // Student Llason: Claire Bailey // Editor-in-
Chief: Brit Bachmann // Under Review Editor: Jonathan
Kew // Real Live Action Editor: Jasper D. Wrinch // Art
Director: Ricky Castanedo-Laredo // Production Assistant:
Jules Galbraith // Web Content Coordinator: Katrina Wong
// Accounts Manager: Eleanor Wearing // Charts: Andy
Resto // Discorder Radio Producers: Claire Bailey, Matt Meuse,
Jordan Wade // Writers: Brit Bachmann, Alex de Boer, Slavko
Bucifal, Natalie Dee, Dora Dubber, Courtney Heffernan, Callie
Hitchcock, Evangeline Hogg, Jonathan Kew, KVW, Erica Leiren,
Alexandra Livsey, Missy Martin, Sam Mohsenl, Theano Pavlidou,
Keagan Perlette, Craig Sinclair, Daniel Stone, Elijah Teed,
Harsh Trivedi, Sachin Turakhia, Zak Vescera, Bryce Warnes,
Eleanor Wearing, Jasper D Wrinch // Cover Photo: Jay Arner,
Jessica Delisle, Adam Fink, Adrlenne LaBelle by Nolan Sage //
Photographers & Illustrators: Sara Baar, Sila Egan, Jules
Galbraith, Amelia Garvin, Dana Kearley, KatI Jeson, Brandon
Lai, Alicia Lawrence, Kalena Mackiewlcz, Jaqueline Manouklan,
Emma Potter, Matthew Power, Aaron Read, Alison Sadler, Nolan
Sage, Sofia Samshunahar, Michael Shantz, Craig Sinclair, Ewan
Thompson, Sam Tudor, Pat Valade, Jon Vincent, Eugenia Vltl
// Proofreaders: Brit Bachmann, Ricky Castanedo-Laredo,
Jonathan Kew, Erica Leiren.
FONDATION
SOCAN
FOUNDATION
©Discorder 2015 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published almost monthly
by CiTR, which can be heard at 101.9 FM, online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call
the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487, CiTR's office at (604) 8221242, email CiTR at stationmanager@citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write LL500 - 6133 University
Blvd. V6T1Z1, Vancouver, BC, Canada. I LEFT YOUR HOUSE THIS
MORNING,
'BOUT A QUARTER AFTER 0
Summer is the best season here, when you can drink park sangria on dry grass, and bike
without rain gear, but aren't you still itching to get out of Vancouver? Either you have the money to go visit your friend in Berlin for a couple weeks, or you splurge on a ferry and get your
vacation photos with marine life in the Georgia Straight. Or you're Discorder and you have a
magazine to produce, and you're not going anywhere.
It is with a stir-crazy mindset that we planned the June issue, to feed that travel bug —
Eleanor Wearing interviews Chris Long, one of the organizers of Pretty Good Not Bad in
Victoria June 17-19. Fountain is just back from a reunion tour of France, and we talk to them
about it. Montreal-based Sebastian Cowan shares Arbutus Records' Vancouver origin story.
Also from Montreal, Wider Smile talks ideology leading up to a Vancouver album release at
a masonic temple June 16. Travelling northeast a couple hours and 35 years, Erica Leiren
recounts Heatwave '80 in Quebec City. We also review the albums of Nixxon (Toronto) and
Boreal Network (Seattle), and a live show review of Cate Le Bon (Wales). So I guess you can
call this, the travel issue.
But the title of this note is something different. It is the opening lyrics of "Bobcaygeon" by
the Tragically Hip, a song that references the Christie Pits riot in 1933. In May, the Tragically
Hip released a statement that Gord Downie has terminal brain cancer. For those who love
the Tragically Hip, that was a hard pill. 2016 has already seen the sudden death of so many
artists, but I can't help but see this announcement by the Tragically Hip as something of a
gift. It isn't often that you have a chance to say goodbye to your heros. While I strongly doubt
Gord reads Discorder, I would like to thank him anyway — Thank you for joining every road
trip with my parents. For me, your voice is crystallized in the landscape outside the passenger
window of a car speeding along the Trans-Canada Highway.
A+
BB
—
EDITOR'S NOTE :111 .. i ■ m
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words /?y Jasper D. Wrinch // illustrations by Jules Galbraith //photos courtesy of Fountain
"It was eye-opening to go to France and
see a whole other music community that was
just as exciting — to go all the way across the
world, and find completely kindred spirits,"
explains Evan Jeffery, guitarist, vocalist, and
one quarter of Victoria's Fountain. "I always
thought so locally, but [travelling! totally
changed the way I look at the global music
community."
Having recently returned from a tour in
France, Jeffery, along with his bandmate
Robert Coslett, sit down for a Skype interview with Discorder to discuss how they
maintain musical connections across cities,
countries, and continents.
"The band has been a little slower lately;"
says Jeffery, explaining that half of Fountain
have been living in France since September
2015. Laura Jeffery and Declan Hughes —
Fountain's drummer and bassist, respectively — found themselves teaching English in
the cities of Strasbourg and Angers. "They
had amazing opportunities to go and live
there for a long period of time. It was pretty
hard to turn down," says Coslett. Fractured
for only a few months, the members of Foun-
FOUNTAIN 'O
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tain still stayed involved and active in their
geographically varied music scenes.
"Laura got really involved in the music
scene [in Strasbourg]," explains Jeffery. She
carved out a space for Fountain to expand
abroad by making connections with the like-
minded music-makers in France, and enabling the band to go on tour throughout the
country, from Strasbourg to Brussels, alongside French no wave act Zad Kokar.
Fountain was drawn to something inexplicable and whole-heartedly unique about
Zad Kokar. "[Laura] was like 'I don't know if
people understand Zad Kokar in France, but
they're my favourite band in Strasbourg,' and
seeing them, I totally got what she was saying," relates Jeffery. "They're one of the most
exciting bands I've ever played with. They're
incredible."
Despite parting ways at the end of their
May tour, Fountain and Zad Kokar have not
lost contact. "Actually," says Coslett, "they'll
be coming over to Canada for a couple shows
pretty soon. They'll be playing Sled Island [in
Calgary, Alberta] this year ... Luckily, we get
the chance to play with them again in Kam-
loops on our way to Sled, too."
The two bands will also meet up in Fountain's hometown of Victoria this June for
Pretty Good Not Bad, the city's newest music
festival. "It's being put on by people in Victoria who have done show booking for years
before, so it's pretty exciting to see they've got
a new project on the go," says Coslett. "PGNB
knows a lot of great bands that kind of slips
through the cracks — it's kind of tricky to
get bands over to the island, so it's nice when
there are more festivals like this one to give
them a little incentive." In addition to drawing both domestic and international acts
across the Georgia Straight, Pretty Good Not
Bad is a showcase of talent already within
the city of Victoria, like Fountain.
"It's a cool, really insular scene here," says
Jeffery. "As soon as you get to bigger cities,
you feel more of an energy of competition." It
could be the relative isolation of the city, the
modest population, or even the cost of travel
to get there, but everyone in Victoria "sort of
does their own thing." As Jeffery explains,
"it's not like there are tastemakers, putting
out their feelers all the time in Victoria, and
I think that's cooler in a way. You get people
making the music they want to make."
And with the relative freedom from competition between bands, "you end up having
really eclectic bills, because there are only so
many bands." Jeffery continues, "It's more
exciting to have shows like that, rather than
all the top four punk bands all playing together, all sounding the same." The diversity
of talent is one of the main aspects of Victoria that keeps Fountain so satisfied in their
hometown.
Despite thriving on the island, Fountain
still makes their way to Vancouver from time
to time, but they come with a distinctly outsider's perspective. "I think Vancouver's really cool too, but it's just a totally different
energy," explains Jeffery. "I still feel like a
stranger every time I go, but that's kind of
exciting, you know? It's always different venues, and it seems like there are a lot of bands
that are always changing."
"It's definitely pretty relaxed here," says
Coslett, "whereas when you go to Vancouver,
N«#
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FOUNTAIN
°a°o, I don't know if it's just being confronted with
the realities of the city that brings out a lot of
anxiety and tension in the music. But yeah,
I like it"
Of course Fountain's music isn't fulry devoid ofanxiety or tension, despite their island
home. Owing to their sharp and wonderfully
distorted guitar tones, quick-paced drumming, and at times chant-like vocal delivery,
Fountain have sounded far from cheery and
relaxed on their releases so far. "I guess the
first tape we did [2014's Fountain} was more
post-punk Listening to it now it sounds a lot
more scrappy," explains Jeffery. "But as we've
gone on, [the sound has] kind of opened up.
Alter you're a band for a bit, you're trying to
go altera feeling more than a sound, Just trying to make it more eclectic,"
Starting work on their next project even
in the midst of the band's inter-continental
separation, they're trying to develop Fountain's sound into something that's still exciting for them. "So for, the songs are going in
a bit of a different direction," says Coslett. "I
think they still fit in with the sound and feel
of Fountain, but itTl be a fresher document of
where we're at now,*
Working within, and taking inspiration
from the music semes in Victoria, Vancouver,
and now Strasbourg, Fountain are gathering
the raw material* together fer a trufy global record, As Jeffery says, traveling abroad
"makes me think more about broadening the
horizons of the band. Especially in France,
there's this cra«y DIT punk community that
we tapped into, and hopeftdry we can get
some of that on the record.
ft
Visit fountain,bandcamp,com for more
musk, and stay tuned for new Fountain re*
learns, FUp to page 13 to read more about Fret*
ty Good Not Bad from June 17*19 in Victoria,
FOUNTAIN SLICES & PIES
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}wke(W
Cfooct/Hmcv
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mint records     Canada FAgm
www.mintrecs.com   II ¥ © mintrecords DISCORDER REVISITED
GIRLS TALK
words by Erica Leiren
illustrations by Sofia Shamsunahar
The thing to remember is that at the time,
there were only two kinds of beer: Labatt's
Blue and Molson Canadian, both in cans. As
university students without any money, beer
was the cheapest alcohol, but try as I might,
I just couldn't learn to like it, so my friends
and I ended up drinking water and dancing
instead.
That year I spent in Quebec City was preceded by a huge concert we'd been hearing about
in Vancouver all summer: Heatwave '80. It was
supposed to be headlined by The Clash, but
there were lots of other great acts on the bill.
I bought tickets on Granville Street, and
packed my new wave shirts and pants from
Foofaraw, a local shop with clothes that were
very striking, to the extent that when worn
on the street you would get a lot of double-
takes.
I'd convinced Colleen and Marianne to
come along for a school-year-long adventure to study French at Laval University in
Quebec City, and we met up at Marianne's
folks' in Burlington, where I soon found out
that the two of them weren't at all interested in the weird kind of music I liked, nor in
going to the concert. Luckily, Terry, a game-
for-anything Vancouver friend showed up in
Burlington ready to brave the bus ride there,
and sleeping out in a field to see the concert.
The two of us hit the road with sleeping bags
and food packed by Marianne's Mum, and I
sold my extra concert tickets on the bus on
the way to the show.
The venue was a massive stage set up in
fields surrounding the Mosport speedway,
and the concert was amazing. Opening act
Toronto punk band, Teenage Head sucked,
5ofS0fc°*>V£S
but everything else was unbelievable (except
for The Clash cancelling, which also sucked).
The Pretenders still had their original line
up, and it was one hit after another from all
the bands, which included Talking Heads,
Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, and Elvis
Costello. Tom Tom Club stole the show, but
every band was in their prime and playing
fabulous sets, excited by the beautiful summer day and the huge crowd of kids cheering
from the grass fields that were banked like an
amphitheatre for perfect viewing. The B-52s
were my favourites for their girl-group harmonies, crazy style and danceability. I also
loved Rockpile, who were not punk, new wave
or art bands like the others, but an un-catego-
rizable talent whose playing and songs I loved.
DISCORDER REVISITED v^i £ ? h
Once we got to Quebec City to start school,
I found a group of friends who liked the same
kind of music I did — we found each other
when I used the tapes I had made of my records from home to give an oral presentation
in class on Vancouver bands. I proudly played
songs from bands I liked, like Pointed Sticks,
Maurice & the Cliches, Young Canadians and
others. Vancouver was exotic, remote and
glamorous and everyone enjoyed the presentation (en Frangais).
Dancing and music brought us together
in many ways; I met Senegalese students on
the dance floor who were charming, beautiful and loved to dance as much as I did. My
roommates and I visited L'Apres Onze in
Quebec City's vieux quartier and paid the
$1 entry fee to dance all night, pester the DJ
and drink only water since we hadn't been
able to develop a taste for beer. We saved a lot
of money that way.
Live music in the small clubs in Quebec
City was mostly Les Blues, but one night,
from far away Belgium, came something different — Plastic Bertrand...
DISCORDER REVISITED
™ -♦^sraaft-
Mrnusic
"inogazine.
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WITH
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PRETTY GOOD NOT BAD
FESTIVAL
words by Eleanor Wearing
illustrations by Eugenia Viti
Picture yourself in an indoor climbing
gym. A fancy, state of the art one, with walls
forming angles you didn't think possible for
the human body to manoeuvre. Now imagine the space is dark, and instead of people
dangling off the walls, there are projections,
and the ambient sonics of Michael Red, a.k.a.
Souns, are bouncing throughout the space.
If this sounds strange, it should — it was
planned that way. And if it sound enticing,
you should probably make arrangements to
head to Victoria on June 18 for the festival
this show is part of— the first annual Pretty
Good Not Bad Festival.
"Victoria has a very robust local communis
ty of experimental and weird music going on,
and a cool visual arts scene and multimedia
scene as well," says Chris Long, one of the
festival organizers. "And while Victoria has
a pretty robust ecosystem of events, not a lot
of them are really tailoring to that [community]."
This gap in programming is what led
Long and the rest of the PGNB organizing
team to imagine new possibilities for shows
in Victoria. The small but talented team consists of Long, Phoenix Bain, Dan Godlovitch,
Toni Hall, arid Alyssa Hrenyk, all of whom
WRISTBAND have strong backgrounds in the local music
community. Following a restructuring of the
non-profit society Animal Productions (previously run by Bain and CFUV Music Director Ali Lopez) into the Pretty Good Society
in December 2015, the team dove headfirst
into programming their brand new festival
— which Long says has been one of the best
parts so far.
"There's a stereotypical Vancouver Island
programming stream, that is very, very common, very familiar, and totally fine, it totally represents the interests of a lot of people.
But Pretty Good Not Bad is really trying to
dig several layers below that, and showcase
not only the local but international talent as
well, that is a little bit weirder, and a little bit
more experimental."
And dig below it they have. There is the
aforementioned show at the Crag X climbing gym, where attendees are encouraged
to bring pillows and lie on the floor to take
everything in. There is the "Ambient Picnic"
— an afternoon of free ambient music in the
heart of downtown Victoria, where artists
from all over the province will s^wath Centen
nial Square with experimental sounds. There
are three nights of free noise music shows,
programmed by the Cavity Curiosity Shop.
And beyond music, there will be smaller but
compelling visual arts and dance components
to the festival as well.
"Visual art, along with dance, is one thing
that we want to see grow as the festival
moves forward, and integrate that in a more
meaningful way so it's a little more embedded," says Long. "Music will always be the
anchor, because we have such a strong musical background ... but as the organization
and event grows, we will definitely be bolstering different parts of the programming."
One of the mission statements of the Pretty Good Society is to "reframe our collective
concept of 'a performance,'" an idea that the
organizers are excited about, as it marks a
significant shift away from the framework
they have used to put on shows in the past.
"Bigger festivals are all interested in selling tickets, and while we obviously want to
sell tickets to our shows, our programming is
the most important thing," says Long, when
I ask him about how the festival seeks to
h-
WRISTBAND i;;!:;;:-;:^
bring its mission statement to fruition. "We
all have to be comfortable with a show that
isn't packed. Because we all come from that
background where you promote the shit out
of your shows and do whatever you can to sell
it out, and the reality in a market like Victoria is, some people just aren't interested in
modern dance and electronic music, bu that's
totally okay — it's still valid to make space
for it."
When I ask Long what he is most excited for, he looks as if I'm asking him to pick
his favourite child. He ultimately settles on
the Laurel Halo show on at the Alix Goolden
Hall on June 17, which will also feature projections by local artist Corey Arnold, a.k.a.
Comp_zit, on a massive 30-foot screen. The
show marks Halo's Western Canada debut,
and as the festival opener, it looks like it may
also mark the beginning of a new chapter in
the musical landscape of Victoria.
*
Pretty Good Not Bad Festival runs from
June 17 - 19 in downtown Victoria. You
should check out the full schedule at
prettygoodnotbad.ca because in our opinions, it's pretty good.
WRISTBAND
j LEVITATION
VANCOUVER
NE 16-19, 2016 • MALKIN BOWL + NtGHT SHOWS
FLYIHG LOTUS • TYCHO
THE GROWLERS • of MONTREAL
THEE OH SEES • FfM/W * ALLAH-LAS
THUNDERCAT • ffOilT fUCff • iMVfffIINVG
JfiWDS • RUSSIAN CIRCLES • Df/ID MEADOW
COM TRUISE^ SHABAZZ PALACES • SIWJVS
OffJUWGLAZERR • SUMAC^THEFLATLINERS
NOTHING • MORGAN DELT • HOI? IVflVf • B00GARIN5
DEAD GHOSTS • PAT LOK (LIVE) • HERON OBLIVION • SACRI MONTI
TOGETHER PANGEA • FffOrH • WffOJVG • CULTURE ABUSE • BLACK MASTIFF
DAD A PLAN • LOUISE BURNS ' YOUTH DECAY • AOUANAUT > WAINCRO ' SUMMERING
ERIC CAMPBELL & THE DIRT * ffVfJV NINES AND F£«5 * Tiff RADIATION FLOWERS • BETRAYERS \
THE ORANGE KYTE • DID rOVDIf • SHAUNIC ' NINA MENDOZA • MAD ALCHEMY LIGHT SHOW I
:OOD 7RUCXS • 8/KE VALE
:RCM ZONE • S.PEC/A£
.*   -*T  WIDER SMILE
OPEN UP
words by Callie Hitchcock //photos by Jon Vincent // illustrations by Aaron Read
Welcome to Wider Smile. Dave Biddle
on saxophone and keys, Andrew Woods oh
guitar and vocals, and a styrofoam mannequin with a wig called Andrew comprise
Wider Smile. One of those is an honorary member but who's into labels? Biddle
and Woods met in 2012 when both of them
were shopping for producers in New York.
DB: "There were a lot of prophecies in the
Mayan calendar for 2012. None of them mentioned that two young men would become best
friends. Two young entrepreneurs with bright
hearts and cold eyes would single each other
out amongst 20-million other entrepreneurs in
the big bright beautiful apple."
AW: "New York, where record mogul David
Musial is based."
DB: "It's a dazzling center of the inter-human
community."
AW: "If you live there it's important to
not pay attention to the rest of the world."
This is how most of the conversations flow
with Biddle and Woods. Their rapport is upbeat and infectious. Talking to them, jokes
flying, the world takes on a more relaxed
glow.
From Woods and Biddle's side of production, the music goes untouched by software.
"We don't use computers, it's not part of our
process," says Woods. "We recorded our first
EP on a cassette and^sed a Tascam Portas-
tudio for our second." Hardware only, folks.
The executive producer Chance Corp™,
arguably the actual third member / branch
of the band, takes all the music they send to
the company and produces the songs in their
final form. Woods tells me with an ominous
lilt: "Chance is the only dictator in the band."
After Wider Smile first signed the contract to make music together, they met up at
a studio in Montreal and "just started making noises," explains Biddle. "At the time you
were a professional musician and I had zero
experience with music."
"I should have asked Dave about his musical experience. He hadn't even bought his
first saxophone yet," says Woods. "[It was]
less jazz more jass. We were not syncing up in
the way that two professional musicians typically do. I did eventually meet [Dave] in the
middle and I think that's how we invented
our signature Wider Smile sound, by chance.
All our songs are written by Chance Corp™.
I could tell he was a talented individual, and
I could tell that he had a lot of passion. I persevered through some of those more hectic
moments. I thought maybe there's some genius behind all of these clumsy notes."
"Chance Corp™ did a fabulous job converting those mashes of sound into really streamlined, digested sounds," Biddle agrees. "They
translate it into something that's usable."
After the formation of their creative relationship with Chance Corp™, they are on to
their next album, User Illusion — a self-help
cassette on one side and the other side features what Wider Smile describes as "ballads
of self destruction."
Biddle settling into the main Wider Smile
WIDER SMILE  "AND IF YOU COMPLAIN ABOUT THE WEATHER THEN
YOU ARE JUST CONFUSED ABOUT WHAT YOU'RE EVEN
COMPLAINING ABOUT."
philosophy starts to speak very rhythmically
and calmly, laying out a dense web of patterning. "Being greedy and rich is the ideal
that we call success but people don't realize
that that's random. So not being greedy and
rich but thinking that you could work your
way to get there, is causing a lot of people
anxiety and stress." Biddle and Woods hope
to reveal and relieve this stress through this
tape. "The whole tape negates itself. The
times when you feel like what you're saying
is in complete contradiction with how you live
then you have an emotional breakdown and
an identity crisis."
"Partly we feel like we are learning, but
the other part is frustration," says Woods.
Biddle continues: "To accept advice people
want an unblemished persona. The other side
is to admit your own hypocrisy. That contradiction creates a collapse of logic. And then
from that collapse, a client or listener gains
a certain kind of stark clarity from the chaos
of the collapse when you think you have this
one ideological framework to work with. And
then all of a sudden, from the same source
you are presented with an opposing ideological framework.
Essentially, Wider Smile breaks down
the binary of didactic instruction as correct,
while feeling or doing the opposite of what is
instructed as wrong. Wider Smile presents
both of these phenomenon as essential to
achieving a third phenomenon:
"From that collapse you are left with no
ideological framework which leads you with a
clear mind to perceive the world anew, and you
can realize nothing is fixed and everything is
just the weather. And if you complain about the
weather then you are just confused about what
you're even complaining about," says Biddle.
Their show featuring this ideology in musical form will be held at a masonic temple in
Vancouver June 16.
"Architecture and the spaces that we inhabit dictate our mental states. For example,
condos are constructed with an underlying
philosophy that dictates subtle things, and
they seep into you subconsciously, but they
determine how you act when you're inside of
these spaces. They were built in such a way
to keep their inhabitants from leaving. They
suppress spontaneity," Biddle warns.
"The underlying philosophy in a masonic
temple is an acceptance of things as they are,
and putting aside illusory concepts like free
will and individual agency. So you perceive
with an open mind and a clear heart. You
submit to the spiritual presence or message."
Wider Smile is in the business of an "altering state of consciousness." Transcendence
you can count on.
A
Visit widersmile.bandcamp.com for past recordings, or track them atfacebook.com/widersmile.
WIDER SMILE KEVIN "SIPREANO" HOWES
BECOMING VOLUNTARY
words by Brit Bachmann //photos by Matthew Power //illustration by Amelia Garvin
Where to start?
I pick up Kevin "Sipreano" Howes in
Mount Pleasant to drive to Third Beach. His
choice of location. We talk about defunct venues and media arts. Then the conversation
breaks for a moment while stopped in traffic, and it suddenly occurs to me that we are
getting farther and farther away from the
huge collection of vinyl records that seem to
define Howes' public image. Is this distance
purely physical, or is it psychic as well? How
essential is his association with vinyl? I decide not to bring it up. Once at Third Beach,
the backtrack of our interview is a percussion
of waves and crow calls, and that's all the
rhythm we need.
"The most meaningful music to me is
something where the vibrations are a lot
stronger ... It is a holy experience being able
to connect with music, and connect with art,
and connect with nature," shares Howes. As
if addressing my initial thoughts, he adds,
"I want to keep digging, as deep as I can,
to learn more about the roots of it all ... It's
mostly about the music, not really about the
format, though vinyl is what I work with."
The music that Howes appreciates is from
the initial vinyl era between the 1950-90s.
Howes began DJing as Sipreano in the
mid '90s* merging interests in reggae, r&b,
hip hop, jazz, jungle, folk and psych to host
open genre parties at venues long-gone. Most
notable among these regular nights was "The
Soulcial" at the Chameleon Urban Lounge
with Neil Frost, a.k.a. Kamandi. "I feel like
open format was something that came out
SIPREANO  later with the internet," explains Howes. "Everyone was in their camps before — the metal heads, and this and that — but [Kamandi
and I] always appreciated stuff that resonated with us regardless of the background, or
whether it had commercial success."
Throughout the '90s and early '00s, what
started as an interest in open genre music
and record collecting grew into an obsession
with sound heritage and archiving. Howes
expanded upon his appreciation for the music, and began researching historical context
and social significance. With the guidance of
mentors and collaborators he met while travelling the United States, Japan and the U.K.,
Howes leveraged his knowledge to present
eclectic live performances locally and internationally, record mixes for companies and
art collectives, and bring research to music
projects. In 2003, Howes met Light In The
Attic Records co-owner Matt Sullivan, and
began working with the label as a consultant,
researcher, and liner notes contributor. Their
collaboration resulted in the influential Jamaica to Toronto: Soul Funk & Reggae 1967-
1974 released in 2006, and more recently,
Native North America Compilation (Vol. 1):
Aboriginal Folk, Rock, and Country 1966-
1985 released in 2014.
Howes estimates that he has given close
to 65 interviews about Native North America. I try to avoid discussing it, but it's impossible; Native North America is Howes' most
high-profile project to date, earning him and
his collaborators a Grammy nomination and
international praise. In addition to three
records, the box-set compilation includes a
booklet of interviews with the featured artists, none of whom found commercial success
among their contemporaries. Though the music is 20-40 years old, the themes expressed
ring true today — hard feelings over the loss
of nature to industry, and the loss of family
to government. In an era of accelerated environmental destruction and the first attempts
at reconciliation, Native North America is a
timely project. Yet, there is a lightness and
beauty to the music —
"Native North America raises a lot of issues, a lot of concerns, but it is also love.
And hope. And caring. And compassion. And
humanity," says Howes. "It covers the gamut
of human expression, and specifically indigenous expression. It's easy to latch onto the
bigger themes, but there are love songs, too."
Howes wrote the introduction to Native
North America, signing it with his full name
and the title, Voluntary In Nature. When I
ask about the meaning of this term, Howes
describes fy as his "cultural umbrella." It is
a phrase borrowed from Jerry Garcia — In
1970, Grateful Dead performed a free outdoor concert in Toronto after protests that
their scheduled festival appearance was
too expensive. Garcia described the efforts
of the organizers, performers, and staff as
being "voluntary in nature." It wasn't just
about the money. This concept resonated
with Howes, inspiring the name of a sound-
scape mix for Sandinista Clothing & Apparel
in 2006, and later, Howes personal blog at
voluntaryinnature.blogspot.com in 2010 that
is still updated today.
On the topic of blogging and web presence,
Howes says that he likes to keep it "pop and
in-the-moment." He continues, "Everyone
in the digital age collects information about
themselves, whether it's photos or Word
Documents or Excel spreadsheets, or any
number of ways you can save imagery, data,
thoughts. Some people share it, some people
keep it personal the way you would a photo
album back in the day." I ask Howes if he considers his blog posts as contributing to an archive of sorts, and somehow our conversation
shifts to a question of physical versus digital,
and consumerism —
"I question the physical product today, in
the modern age, when we're surrounded by
so much waste. In a digital world we don't
need to create all that waste" laments Howes.
"I'm evolving in my career so that I would like
to put out some records and work on archival
projects of my own, but I only want to put out
SIPREANO
MEEH something that I feel merits the waste, merits the materials that they would be printed
on."
Touching on the craze for vinyl as nostalgic gimmick, Howes continues: "The reissue
market today is so over-saturated. People are
putting out everything, thinking, 'Oh, it's
from the past, it must be good.' I don't think
that everything from the past is worthy of reappraisal. In fact, I think a lot of things are
best left to the past."
Our dialogue is interrupted suddenly
when we spot a crane on the beach. The focus
of the interview shifts back to our immediate
environment. Howes attributes his appreciation of Third Beach to Chris Frey (Radio
Berlin, Destroyer) and Steven Balbgh (Pink
Mountaintops, Anemones) in the mid '90s:
"They encouraged me to come down to the
beach, even on grey days, to come down here
and have a beer, smoke a little grass, and
go swimming." But Howes' friendships with
Frey and Balogh had an impact that extended beyond physical activity —
"Their influence to reconnect with nature and the ocean was really important. I
was making music at the time, a lot of sample-based collage music. I was connecting
with all these things, and going back to na
ture and friends. It was voluntary, really. I
was surrendering to it and reconnecting to it.
When I came to these places, I would really
start listening to the environmental sounds,
listening to these rhythms. It was so affecting. I would go to the woods and take walks.
I was listening to a lot of folk, French Canadian and psych music, too," explains Howes.
"Voluntary In Nature is a reflection of my
reconnection with nature and how I'd like
to approach the business which I find myself
working in."
In everything he does, Howes is a collaborator. In partnering with other researchers,
musicians Or like-minded labels, or seeking
out natural rhythms, Howes establishes himself as curator and archivist. Howes knows
what people want, even before they do.
Through sound and setting, he creates the
perfect mood.
Read more about Howes' past and upcoming
projects at voluntaryinnature.blogspot.com, or listen to some mixes at soundcloud.com I sipreano. And
keep an eye out for his next DJ night at The Lido.
mmm N^S^sSS>^
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STUDIO VOSTOK
words by Elijah Teed //photos by Jaqueline Manoukian
illustrations by Alison Sadler
After three years in business, hundreds of
shows, and a hard-earned reputation, Mitch
Ray and Taya Fraser have undertaken their
next great endeavour: a venue of their very
own. For the duo behind Art Signified, Studio Vostok is not only the culmination of
endless blood, sweat, and beers, but a haven
for the community they've helped to foster.
At the time of this interview the Chinatown
art space is still early in its infancy, but has
already produced an outpouring of support.
Friends and cohorts have come by every
night to assist with converting the former
meat shop into Studio Vostok, staying until
the wee hours of the morning to scrub floors,
paint walls, and whatever else Ray and Fraser need — all free of charge.
"There's people that help us out that Ta-
ya's known for way longer than three years
and I've known for way longer than three
years," Ray says. "It's just kind of cool that
we've all come up together, and we now have
a home base."
With huge windows facing out onto Keefer
Street, Vostok is widely visible to the public eye, and the work hasn't gone unnoticed.
Pop-ins from neighbouring business owners,
parking attendants, and the community at
large are frequent, but Ray and Fraser are
more than happy to oblige their questions
and curiosities.
"We're very much the new kids on the
block in a decades-old neighbourhood. We're
conscious of that, and we need other people to
be conscious of that, too," Ray acknowledges.
"The stuff that buries venues is people who
can't figure their shit out. If everyone makes
little sacrifices we have a home for a long
time that we can share with a lot of people."
It's a philosophy very much in line with
what Art Signified has always branded itself
as: a truly by-artists, for-artists organization.
VENEWS Studio Vostok looks to be an extension of that
same credo, and with the benefit of complete
control over their space, Ray and Fraser are
free to experiment with the venue as they see
fit. Their ideas are outweighed only by their passion, though the two have a seemingly limitless
'The goal is we want something to be going
here every single day and every single night,"
Ray says. "Whether its jams
down on couches and collabo
an outlet for creativity."
"As we get more establish
bourhood and people know us
or people sitting
ating on ideas, or
ittle more, we'll
probably try and bend the rules as much as we
can, and see what we can get away with," adds
While there's no denying theirs are audacious
goals to undertake, there's also no question that
Rav and Fraser are the two most likely to accom-
9mm
plish it. The pair have achieved a preposterous
amount in the past three years under the banner
of Art Signified, not to mention their respective
work as promoters and musicians before they
joined forces. With Studio Vostok, they're itch-
to try and undertake the kinds of projects
uld be impossible without their own lab
K3 and experiment. Their ultimate aim?
s — all of them.
venue you have to pay your sound fee,
[lee or whatever, and you get the door
I the bar, none of anything," Fraser ex-
>o our idea, once we can afford it, is to
y single show free, and pay the bands
»r. If we set that standard maybe ev-
e city will see tf
^s differently,
any veitue th
isiness plan," admits Ray.   But a free
i
a very community-minded sprit can
at the bar into $6000. We think it
VENEWS stop booking elsewhere in the city. As Fraser
explains, her and Ray love getting to put on
great shows and drawing crowds at the venues where they've built up their community.
Rather, the Studio serves as a testing ground,
a blank canvas open to any harebrained idea
or clever creation.
As Ray puts it: "If someone presents an
idea to us, we're never going to say 'No, you
can't do that here,' because it drove us crazy
when we'd go to venues and say we have this
idea for an event and they'd tell us it's not
doable. So our approach is 'Let's see how we
can make that happen ...' We're going to do
shows here that are the insane ideas that we
can't do anywhere else."
Years of experience have led the Art Signified duo to a mutual dream of creating a hub
for arts and culture in the city that simply
can't be ignored. Even though Studio Vostok
is still in its earliest stages, Ray and Fraser
are more than hopeful for the future — and
they've got a whole community ready to support them.
ft
Don't miss the chance to come to Studio
Vostok's grand opening on June 4. Live performances from WTCHDR, Eric Campbell
& The Dirt, Tempest, PASSIVE, and more
throughout the day. Keep your eyes peeled and
your ears open.
VENEWS Heal tine
fiction
MAY 2016
VANCOUVER NOISE FEST VI
MAY 7 / RED GATE
On May 7,1 was to have my first experience
with "unlistenable" sounds in a musical context,
and for seven hours, no less. While at first I
was intimidated by Vancouver Noise Fest VI, I
was comforted by the artist talk given by Scott
Reber in the front room of the Red Gate, Reber
being the man behind noise project Work /
Death. He explained the links between noise
and its artistic ancestors — including musique
concrete, and Dadaism — over a backdrop of
various field recordings. What struck me most
about Reber's talk was his ruminations on the
narrative that noise music can create — how
ambient sounds and field recordings allow one
to share someone else's lived experience. With
this narrative in mind, I plunged headlong into
the noise. *
Local act Maskara began the show with desperate vocal drones delivered from behind a
pink veil wrapped around his head, under hollow lights that grew dimmer as the night drew
on. This was followed by Vancouverites The
Flood, FCRSAC, and Hectocotyli, all providing
a compliment of huge synths and relentless,
oscillating percussion through various rickety
setups. Next, Seattle's Ox Hunger screamed
wretchedly through the clang of industrial machinery, preceding Crotch, who hunted
down phone users in the crowd with a makeshift theremin, and punctuated putrid spoken
word with massive, blood-curdling blasts of
sound.
JS Aurelius delivered an intellectually fascinating set, applying computer algorithms to
vibrations received from a sheet of glass, leaving it shattered by the end of the piece. Then,
the animal aggression of Seattle's Anteinferno
was contrasted by cerebral and measured sets
from Vancouver's Mass Marriage and Nervous
Operator. Next, violent object manipulations by
local duo Molena, and the rhythmic industrial sounds of Sunstroke Militia bookended the
pummelling, yet pretty compositions of Ritter
Leinahtan, which were built around a pitched-
down vocal sample that repeated throughout the piece: "The garbage of my life fills up
/ Every dirty, stinking sin falls into my foul and
bitter cup."
The crowd began to pack in as John
Brennan served up a visceral and exciting
offering of spasmodic jazz drumming, winding
around huge blasts of noise, hooked up to an
antique TV set that glowed with ominous, faded colours. Griefer from Victoria attacked his
invented instruments over a set of oddly funky
loops and samples, interspersed with aggressive, didactic shouts. This was followed by
an undeniably beautiful piece by Portland's
Gordon Ashworth, mixing field recordings and
acoustic samples into a satisfying melange.
Worker started his set proclaiming, "I hate
all of you!" before intently spraying the crowd
with sparks from his angle grinder, which
also provided sound for his music. Vancouver
noise veterans Sam McKinlay (The Rita) and
Gabriel Saloman (Sade Sade / Yellow Swans
/ Chambers) were up next, combining incomprehensible and kinetic guitar shredding with
careful synth work for an overwhelmingly dissonant sound.
It had become apparent to me that these
artists were telling stories; some of pain, labour,
REAL LIVE ACTION malaise, exploitation, and perhaps some kind
of hopefulness. Some clearly acknowledged a
narrative, while others prefered chaos. But this
idea of noise music creating a narrative was no
more apparent to me than in the set by Work /
Death, from Providence, Rhode Island. He took
the crowd on an urban journey, through train
tunnels and warehouses, factories and highways, while pieces of metal bounced around
hypnotically in the speaker cones he had set
up on his desk.
Reber very clearly had an emotional connection to his music, with the ambient swells of
noise from his gear evoking a visible response
from him. It was also clear to me by the end of
the night that the sounds that had been created were not "unlistenable" at all, but could in
fact be used to achieve something of emotional depth, coherence and power. After seven
hours of noise, I was reminded of a quote from
Reber's opening lecture by American composer Robert Erickson on the nature of noise and
the "disposable" sounds in our environment: "I
strongly resist the idea that it's garbage ... the
more one listens, the more one finds that it's all
jewels.". — Daniel Stone
THE PACK A.D. / DEAD SOFT
/GLAD RAGS
MAY 12/THE COBALT
i Promoting their upcoming album Positive
Thinking, The Pack A.D. took to The Cobalt
May 12 and 13 to play back to back hometown
shows. Combined with the opening bands on
the bill, Glad Rags and Dead Soft, the first night
played out like a mixtape found in a teenager's
bedroom of perfect punk anthems.
In true Riot Grrrl fashion, Glad Rags, kicked
off the night with a show full of politically
charged lyricism and unapologetically loud guitars. With a delivery that was reminiscent of
early Sleater-Kinney, Selina Koop and Sarah
Jane Taylor's call-and-response vocals twisted and convulsed throughout their set. Making
their way through nine tunes at a blistering
pace, Glad Rags powered through their performance, even if at times they were sonical-
ly repetitive. Even so, the scathing chant of "I
don't wear a skirt / so you can control me" in
"Meat Legs," along with the undeniably catchy
chorus of "Popsicles" were enough to win over
an engaged, if modest, crowd.
Next up, Dead Soft took to the stage with
a selection of newer tunes, and proved they
hadn't lost their ability to construct fuzzed out,
grunge tinged soundscapes. Even though
much of the material performed was new, it
didn't stop The Cobalt from jamming out alongside the band. Throughout their set, Nathaniel
Epp's vocals stretched between soaring well
above the crowd to dropping low into a gnarled
out growl, adding another layer of punk sensibility to Keeley Rochon's girthy bass and
Graeme McDonald's kinetic drumming. The trio
didn't forgo a few older fan favourites, including
the infectious "Phase," as well as the heavier,
frantic drawl of "Never Forever." By the end of
Dead Soft's show, the floor of The Cobalt had
grown dense with people eagerly awaiting The
Pack A.D.
Only comprised of a guitar and drums, The
Pack A.D. were still unquestionably the fullest sounding band of the night, easily droning
out the pre-show music that continued to play
three-songs deep into their set. T+iough the
first few tunes were tinged with feedback, the
Pack found their groove before launching into
"Cellophane." It was here where Becky Black,
with her wailing vocals, chugging guitar, and
undeniable swagger, alongside Maya Miller's
pounding drums that refused to take a backseat, made it abundantly clear we were in for
a treat.
Though much of the material performed
was coming off of their upcoming LP, Positive
Thinking, the crowd had no issue moshing to
the new tunes, even with a few brave, if comical, attempts at stage diving. Standout songs
of the night included the driving guitar behind
"B.C. Is On Fire," and the bluesy, smoky rendition of "Creepin' Jenny." Though the band is
known for turning the dial up to eleven while
REAL LIVE ACTION performing, the duo proved that quiet can be
just as intense in the distorted murmurs found
in the tune "Loser."
As the clock ticked on and the crowd had
just begun to thin out, Miller hinted at an
encore, imploring the crowd to "just make a lot
of noise and pretend we're not here." Judging
by the yelps of adoration that followed, The
Pack A.D.'s first of two hometown shows was a
raging success. — Missy Martin
CATELE BON/MEGA DOG
MAY 12 / BILTMORE CABARET
Arriving at the Biltmore into an already-crowded room, the sound of simultaneous conversations washed over me. It was clear that Cate Le
Bon, Welsh singer-songwriter and the night's
headliner, had a strong following in the city.
As I moved further into the venue towards the
stage, I realized that Mega Bog, the opening
band from Seattle, had already begun.
Moving through the talkative crowd, it was
only within 10 feet of the stage that I could
hear the music clearly. A strange ensemble of
a singer / guitarist, keyboard player, bassist,
and clarinetist occupied the stage, performing
pared-down, pastoral soundscapes. While I
was taken by their intricate and unique sound,
I was in the minority. Mega Bog finished their
quick set to applause from the few listening to
them, and the stage crew began to rearrange
for the main act.
Accompanied by her three-piece band, all
donning Le Bon's eye makeup from the cover
of her latest release Crab Day, Cate Le Bon
arrived on stage to audience applause. As the
crowd pushed forward and packed tighter, Le
Bon offered a direct and simple "Hello" as introduction, before diving directly into the music.
While her music has been attributed to a
plethora of musical genres — from neo-psy-
chedelic-art-pop to simply folk — the only word
that came to my mind to describe her music
was janky. I don't know if this is a real word,
but in my mind, it captures everything there is
to love about Cate Le Bon's sound. It's all over
the place, it's scrappy, it sounds thrown together, but it's actually carefully constructed to be
that way.
After the first flurry of songs, Le Bon stopped
to more fully greet the eager crowd. "Thanks
for being here," she said as the backing band
REAL LIVE ACTION began trading instruments. "We drove 27 hours
straight to be with you. I think this might be the
best crowd yet. I also think I might be delirious."
With all the guitars and basses in the new
configuration, they played "Wonderful," one of
Crab Day's first singles. It was during this song
that janky appeared in my head. The drums
spasmodically counted out a quick tempo,
the bass line jumped all around, the two guitars traded off jerky bursts of dissonant chords,
and Le Bon's voice twirled above it all. Darting
through its verses, "Wonderful" decayed into
a (dare I say) wonderful pile-up of noise in its
chorus, in which every part seemed to move at
a different tempo. The harmonies slid away into
discordant mash-ups of notes, and Le Bon's
voice wailed out over the chaos a simple declaration: "Wonderful, wonderful, wonderful!"
—■ Jasper D. Wrinch
PLAZAS/PRISON HAIR/
PAVEL/GRAN AM
MAY 13 / TOAST COLLECTIVE
After consuming a full bottle of Les Fleurs
du Mai Rose" to myself, I, accompanied by
two stone-cold sober friends, strode unevenly
through the shadowy alley just off of Kingsway
to the Toast Collective's back entrance. I found
myself pulled inexorably through the doorway
and into the show space as if I were being
beamed up into the belly of a space ship.
Amanda Anderson's dark head was bent
over her control panel and she was surrounded
by stars, some visual magic that I had a hard
time separating from the music as the night
went on. She was part way through her debut
set as Gran Am, and I was mesmerized. I can't
help but compare her sound to Ridley Scott's
iconic Alien. Like the movie's visual and aural
atmosphere, the soundscape was both terrifying and intoxicating. It sounded as if we were
moving through the organs of the Nostromo:
fans clanked and whirred, ducts crashed, with
insidious alien blood leaking through the hull
and the cold scream of space assaulting our
eardrums. The sheer sublimity of sound sent
shudders through my soft, tipsy body and when
the music subsided, I felt as if I'd just come out
the other side of hyper drive, in a different solar
system entirely.
The memory of Gran Am slid away into
the next act: Pavel. Again, a single occupancy set up, this time with Alex Cooper, instead
of Anderson, manning the electronics while
half whispering vocals into a microphone that
he held to his lips. I couldn't quite make out
his lyrics, but there was a moodiness to them.
Coupled with his bowed head, it reminded me
of the emo acts of my early adolescence.
I closed my eyes and let myself dance, a tormented jolt, my limbs missing beats, following
the wrong sonic rabbit. The sounds I made note
of, those that set Pavel apart from other dan-
cy electronic acts I've heard, were the expertly used cowbell and that sound cop cars make
before they go full siren.
I'm not sure how cognizant I was of the
third act, Prison Hair. At this point in the night
I entered a dream state. Looking back, there
is no doubt that Prison Hair's ambient echo
chamber music facilitated this degraded lucidity. I floated on synth and reverberating guitar
— it was like a noisy lullaby. The three-piece
kept making eye contact with one another, like
they were weaving something ethereal and had
to keep passing the shuttle to one another. No
one dropped a stitch.
Full disclosure: I went for Plazas. Savana
Salloum's performance was intense and
reminded me of both Lorde and Grimes. She
looked out into the audience with a single-eyed
stare, half her face obscured by a lock of black
hair. Inside Plazas' bedroom electro-pop, there
is something a little disco, a little Cindy Lauper,
a little techno — all of this washed with shrouded vocals, sometimes reaching an eerily low
register.
When the set was over I clumsily introduced
myself like a drunk girl in a bathroom. That was
beautiful, you are beautiful. I tumbled back out
onto the street, ravenous and exhausted. The
REAL LIVE ACTION show had taken all of my energy and it was time
to climb back into my sleep pod. — Keagan
Perlette
BODIES/CROATIA
/ SUPERFASHION
MAY 13 / LUCKY BAR (VICTORIA)
Hitting a golden mark for HOLY SMOKES, a
young but accelerating music-promotion project
based in Victoria, Lucky Bar saw the introduction of a new band, Superfashion, the release
of a new single by Croatia, and the long-awaited debut of Bodies' self-titled album.
Superfashion made a strong first impression, as evinced in the bobbing and swaying of
keen listeners and the ensuing howls of support. Their instruments burst with repressed
energy and guitar notes pierced through the
resounding mushroom clouds. Hoarse, heavy
vocals were neutralized by DllV-like riffs, challenging the audience's flexibility and winning their approval. The triumviral setup soon
cleared the stage for Croatia, but not before
deftly dropping the mic for their budding fans.
I was caught off guard with the expectant
crowd Croatia had amassed. The scuffed floor
disappeared under a wave of friends saturating the air with shouts and hollers. The band's
synth-heavy electronica coupled with Tashiina
Buswa's half-whispered, half-moaned croons
diffused an enigmatic atmosphere which grew
as Buswa's eyes intensely searched the crowd.
She occasionally ducked out and sang into the
dark corner where the brick wall and back door
met, highlighting Steve Mitchell on the synthesizer, Matt Dell on guitar and Ben Erikson on
drums.
After a stimulating cover of M0's "Fire
Rides," Croatia sped up the tempo with their
new release, "Backseat." However, they best
engaged the audience with their plutonic vibe
— Buswa perched on the edge of the stage,
making telepathic connections with those
who dared to hold her gaze, or writhing in the
tunes released by her band mates. Croatia
was indeed an all-consuming force of music
and movement. And yet the end of their set —
perhaps seen as a herald for Bodies — only
restored the energy lost throughout the night.
Comprised of Jacob Bentley, Calvin
Paterson, Paul Shenton and Tyler Paterson, the
math pop / bedroom rock band was drawing in
all the love with their acute notes and heart-tugging lyrics. Especially laid out in the song
"Weak," Bodies is more of a personal enterprise for Tyler Paterson. About "the dawn after
a breakup," the album is basically the result of ,
sucking the poison out of a relationship gone
awry and ensuing disillusionment. "It's been a
bit of a therapeutic thing for me," Tyler Paterson
reflected.
Still, the album is a product of the 4-piece
band and a token of the house (and bedroom)
they recorded in before they got kicked out.
(The video for "Weak," released late April, also
directed Calvin Paterson out from behind the
REAL IVE ACTION drum kit — it was his "time to shine for real.")
"Thumbwar Armistice," led by Paul's earthy
voice, rang in familiar pulsating melodies,
while "Lips" — apparently inspired by Chris
Brown's "Wet The Bed" — had the crowd dissolve in Bodies' talent for angular riffs. Cued
by Calvin Paterson's brief drum solo, Bodies
completed their high-energy set with covers of
The Strokes' "Last Nite" and Tom Petty & The
Heartbreakers' "American Girl." But the majority
of the band had barely left the stage when calls
for an encore broke out. Much obliged, Bodies
capped the night off with "Mylove," a track incidentally omitted from the final album. By doing
so, they sewed their hearts right back on their
sleeves, unleashing an echo of the last line of
"Weak": Tyler Paterson singing, "Maybe I'm
relieved." — KVW
BLACK MOUNTAIN/ASHLEY
SHADOW
MAY 21 / COMMODORE
The first time I saw Black Mountain was in
their infancy. In a crowded bar in Calgary, with
Blood Meridian and Pink Mountaintops opening, it was an incestuous affair with all three
bands swapping members. It was a dizzying
night of gritty, sweaty, raw music. And it was
fantastic.
A dozen or so years later at the Commodore
Ballroom the question is: does Black Mountain
still have "it?" One thing they are still doing is
keeping the opening band in the family. Ashley
Shadow, sister of Black Mountain's Amanda
Webber/opened with a solid set and her genetic connection to Amanda was evident in the
timbre of her voice. The sound was pleasantly familiar, and while Ashley Shadow's music
lacked the monumentality of Black Mountain,
it had a maturity to it informed by years in the
industry, working with the likes of Will Oldham
and Pink Mountaintops. It's a shame it has
taken this long to get the first solo effort from
Shadow since musical talent' obviously runs
deep in the family.
And then came Black Mountain, playing to a
friendly crowd of loyal fans that, based on age,
were probably all at the same or similar show I
was at a decade ago. Recently releasing their
fourth album, aptly titled IV, Black Mountain
had some new material to present and appropriately played the first song off the new album,
"Mothers of the Sun," as the first of the show.
A subtle but heavy track, not dissimilar to the
theme to Jaws, it was threatening without being
overt about it. Nevertheless, it was a song that
promised to build to something big. It was the
perfect way to open the show.
They followed it up with "Florian Saucer
Attack," not coincidentally the second track on
the new album. It was a perfect segue for both
the show and the album. They broke from the
new record's track listing with the third song,
REAL LIVE ACTION "Stormy High" off of 2008's album In The
Future, but it became clear as the show progressed that Black Mountain wasn't going to
rely on the old standards of their first album.
They were there to play new and representative material.
Black Mountain sounds big. That's a testament to their skill as musicians and performers. They make every note, every lyric, count
for something, and they brought this to the
Commodore stage.
But, if I'm allowed to be critical of Vancouver's
darlings, the show was just too loud. It didn't
start off that way, but as the show progressed
it got louder and louder to the point where it
sounded washed out, which was detrimental to
the richness of their music. Louder isn't always
better, especially in the case of Black Mountain.
In talking to a number of people afterwards, the
sentiment was mostly the same: "It was great,
but the sound sucked." It's a shame, really,
because Black Mountain played with passion
and energy, and their new music is as good
as or better than their old stuff. Still, I'll (hopefully) go see them again in another decade
or so, and invest in some better earplugs.
— Craig Sinclair
Iff
To have a live show considered for review in Discorder
Magazine and online, please email event details 4-6
weeks in advance to Jasper D. Wrinch, Real Live
Action Editor at rla.discorder@citr.ca.
REAL LIVE ACTION SUN.
MON.
TUES.
Illustrations by Emma Potter
^r
*
M
WED.
1
Only A Visitor, Iceberg Ferg,
Rabbit Fighter
® Biltmore Cabaret
Wreckless Eric, Tranzmitors, Sore^
Points ® Astoria
Discharge, Toxic Holocaust, Mass I
Grave, Old Derelicts, World View |
® Rickshaw Theatre
Music Waste © What's Up? Hot
Dog!, Wise Hall
Never Young, Lie © Red G8
Man The Wolf, A Shadow Of
Jaguar, Jericho © Astoria
Dr. Sketchy s Artist On Artist
© The Emerajo'
At The Drive-ln, Le Butcherettes
© Commodore Ballroom
Kevin Morby, Jaye Bartell
® Media Club
8
New Additions #11: Fresh
Feminism (screening)
©VIVO Media Arts
12
® Vane
Have a gh>
© Redg
13
Voivod, King Parrot, Child Bite,
The Hallowed Catharsis, Expain
© Rickshaw Theatre
14
art rock? © Astoria (Discorder back
issue sale)
15
Sexual Assault on Trial:
Ghomeshi, survivors, media
& the law
© Robert H. Lee Alumni
Centre
19
Fathers Day Fundraiser:
Dadweed, Dad Thighs,
lllacuda, Tim The Mute
® Lana Lou's
Pale Dian, Passive, The
Intelligence Service
0 Rickshaw Theatre
20
Darto, Fountain, Tough
Customer, Hick © Red G8
Jessy Lanza w/ DJ TAYE
© Alexander Gastown
22
Shotgun Jimmie © The Lido
Dil Brito, Freddie Esther,
Family Columbaria
© The Caverns
26
Skye Wallace & David
Newberry, Wishkicker
© Rickshaw Theatre
Chastity, Bent Knee, Big Evil
© Franklin Studios
You Won't, Bombadill, Jocelyn
Mackenzie © Cobalt THUR.
Music Waste
© Fortune Sound, The
Lido (For the full schedule
go check out Pg. 50)
Naomi Punk, TransFX, Crazy Bugs,
Gretchen Snakes ® Antisocial
One Take Super 8 ® Western Front
FRI.
Music Waste m Selectors' Records,
The Toast Collective, Pat's Pub,
The Hindenburg, The Astoria, The
Lido, Red Gate
Eat Yo Self Opening Reception
® Hot Art Wet City
The Sadies, Shadowy Men on a Shadowy
Planet ® Rickshaw Theatre
Rae Spoon, LAL, ESL ® Wise Hall
Greys, NEEDS, Casual Luxury ® Cobalt
Ch'tite f ille ©Slickity Jim's
SAT.
Music Waste © Red Cat Records, Neptoon
Records, Guys and Dolls Billiards, The
Toast Collective, SBC, The Lido, The
Hindenburg, Redbell Pepper
Islands, Honus Honus © Biltmore Cabaret
Quiet City #27 w/ Eschatons, Pulse Emitter, Sisters of Seance, X41 © Red Gate
Fader, Crooked Mouth, C. Diab, DJ Pop
Drones © Selector's Records (Accepts
Music Waste Passes)
Miens, Curse League, Lambsbreath
© The Heatley
Gang Signs, Mu, Left Fall e Fortune
Sound
Have a Good Laugh ® The Astoria,
Franklin Studios
10
Taiwanese Film Festival & Vancity Theatre
Have a Good Laugh <B Redbell Pepper, Ask Around,
Franklin Studios
Black: The Black Metal Art and Photography Exhibition
© Evergreen Cannabis Society
SUSPIRA, Late Night Movie 0 Rio Theatre
Book Launch + Reading: Juliane Okot Bitek, Cecily
Nicholson, Jordan Abel® Selector's Records
BA Johnston, What's Wrong Tohei?, Low Levels
® Pat's Pub
The Jins, Dodgers, No, Boy ® Askaround
Taiwanese Film Festival © Vancity Theatre
Have a Good Laugh ® 333, The Astoria,
Redbell Pepper
Music Melt ® Franklin Studios
Frog Eyes, Strength of Materials
® The Emerald
Petunia ® Skinny Fat Jack's
16
Levitation Festival ® Rickshaw
Theatre, Cobalt
Wider Smile ® Masonic Temple
Levitation Festival ® Malkin Bowl, Rickshaw
Theatre, Imperial, Cobalt
Pretty Good Not Bad Festival Opening: Laurel
Halo, Loscil ® Alix Goolden Performance Hall
(Victoria)
Foolish: Flipout, Shy Daughter, Cam Crillz, DJ
Seko, Wobangs, Sailc  "
@, Biltmore Cabaret
18
Levitation Festival ® Malkin Bowl,
Rickshaw Theatre, Imperial, Cobalt
Great Grandview Garage Sale
® Grand view-Wood land
S53^>--ak
%
■
The Burning Hearts Soul Club ® Astoria
Marina and the Specks,® Slickity Jim's
iTheijuries, The Prettys, Fashionism, Pill
SquacTVSBC
n"^
AJ Suede, Vials, Hermit* ACdatyoung-
nigga, Lil Halo ® Franklin Studios
.
24
25
UPPERS/DOWNERS Festw/ Hot Lunch
Program, Solitaire, Slippery Jibberish,
Noscar, Eshe Nkiru, FVDE, Ricfylan, BBNO$,
hMasherman ® ASK A HOST
A
Sam Binga(Bristol, UK), Taal Mala, Greazus,
Levrige ® Vancouver Art & Leisure
Chicken Like Birds ® "''
Destroy Vancouver: Chris Corsano, Erin Sexton, Evan Parker, Scant Intone® Ironworks
UPPERS/DOWNERS Fest w/ Kantaro, Dean-
ius, Jaya,*Neon Annex, Dyzphoria, Shelby, DJ
Bloody Sunday, Vials, Wobangs
®ASK^HOST KNOWING & NOT KNOWING
A Discorder Art Project
By Aimee Young
heyaimee.com    !    theyaimee^    Unbet
JUNE 2016
ELKA
Chants
(1080p)
Sometimes it's what you don't do that ends up
being important. In the case of Elan Benroch's debut
.under the moniker Elka, the decision to resist adding
and dropping musical elements at a hyperactive pace
is refreshing. Chants ranges from classic house to
'80s inspired nu-disco and makes good use of Elka's
apparent love of retro sounds and tape echoes, while
staying disciplined with a minimal design ethos.
The majority of the tracks on Chants begin how
they end; the compositions quickly introduce elements
that remain relevant throughout the tracks. This is a
very patient exercise in musical sequencing because
it is all too easy to hit the panic button and change
the entire flow of a piece. With Chants, the listener is
allowed to loiter blissfully with the established beats
, and basslines. The minimal changes that occur awash
the soundscape with subtle variations, likening to to a
slow incoming tide complete with sand, grit and everything else. "Closer" is perhaps the most hypnotic subtle change-up in the mix. The initial beat is a purposeful flurry of electronic percussion that messes with the
timing in your head the more you listen to it. When
the slightly crusty snare finally drops at the 3 minute
mark, there is this fantastic realignment with the primal
rhythm of the piece, giving off the imagined impression that the beat has somehow previously jumped off
of it's own time signature. Meanwhile, the harmonics
deviate little from their opening presentation, maintaining a comfortable vibe with the whole affair.
While the concept of slowly manipulating only
a few musical phrases seems to work well for most
tracks, "Fairbeat" in particular sounds unfinished, as
Elka plays with some cool drum sequences that never really go anywhere. It sort of feels like the moment
when you find that old analog drum machine at a swap
meet and fiddle with it for the first time. Still, the track
is highly danceable and the beat is ultra cool — an
aesthetic it shares with the rest of its cousins on the
album.
Chants is a gratifying electronica record with big
retro bass lines, sweeping synths, and gritty beats, all
woven together with a less-is-more ideology. It's destined to be placed on repeat at a house party, or if
you are lucky enough to get the cassette, Chants will
happily drain the batteries off your walkman.— Slavko
Bucifal
USD.
Kola Dubs
(Isla)
Vancouver ambient electronic artist Spencer Davis
has moved away from his Nervous Operator pseudonym to record under a new name. Usd.'s genre
is self-described as industrial dub techno, though
Exclaiml's take, "damaged dub techno," is just as apt.
Kola Dubs is the first EP released as Usd. On it,
Usd. melds electronic melody with disconcerting dis-
Mm
UNDER REVIEW sonance. The songs are composed of layers of juxtaposing sound, with tonal shifts throughout the tracks
as each layer comes into prominence... — Courtney
Heffeman *Find the full the review on discorder.ca
SUPERMOON
Playland
(Mint Records)
In 2014, Supermoon were riding a wave of adulation as they played live shows — similiar to the anticipation surrounding their namesake phenomenon.
This excitement grew and culminated in 2015 with
their stellar EP, Comet Lovejoy, just before the super-
moon coincided with a total lunar eclipse.
Come 2016,the supermoon eclipse has dropped
out of public consciousness. But the challenge is for
Supermoon to carry on strong. Playland, Supermoon's
new double 7", is another bold statement for the band,
and an excellent record, ensuring the Vancouver four-
piece won't face a similar fate as their namesake
curiosity.
The record opens with two of Supermoon's more
mellow melodies. "Night Division" has almost sinister undertones, bemoaning unrequited love: "And I
saw myself divide / As I watched you just walk by."
"Witching Hour" opens with the verse "I guess that I
messaged you first / But I can't really recall /1 don't
like eating alone / But I kind of like sleeping alone."
Supermoon's lyrics are a highlight throughout, levelling each former egotistical relation, one breathy verse
at a time.
The darker tone that defines these two opening
tracks continues throughout Playland, setting it apart
from their wistful debut tape. The band have grown
into their craft. Adding in Tom Prilesky's excellent
production, Supermoon now sound fine-tuned. They
appear fearless in their songwriting approach, translating raw emotions rather than sticking to an indie-
pop recipe. Playland gives off a confidence that is
instantly likable.
There is a brighter guitar line on "If You Say So,"
but the refrain, "You were right / You were right / You
were always right" has the same lyrical bite. The song
culminates with a verse that sums up many people's
hidden battles: "I could have looked the other way /1
could have just walked home / But I didn't." It articulates the voice inside that debates whether it's worth
sharing one's true feelings.
The second 7" is no less impressive. "Stories We
Tell Ourselves About Ourselves" displays the band's
musicianship, where the guitars of Allie Lynch and
Katie Gravestock combine to create a bona fide
dancefloor filler. However, this musicianship almost
plays second-fiddle, as the lyricism is stand-out good.
With each listen you will discover a new favourite couplet. A verse that shines through features on "Unsaid":
"I'll write you a letter / But I'm not a sender / Some
things are better left unsaid."
As a whole record, Playland is a brilliant listen.
Supermoon have crafted a distinctive sound that is
hard not to fall in love with. I'd do anything to be part of
the gang.— Sachin Turakhia
PLANTS AND ANIMALS
Waltzed in from the Rumbling
(Secret City)
Montreal trio, Plants and Animals excel in crafting songs that are complex yet never overproduced
or overwhelming, and mellow songs that are dreamy
yet never boring. Their music is interesting while being
easy to digest. And altogether, Waltzed in from the
Rumbling is an enjoyable and cohesive mix of upbeat
UNDER REVIEW and mellow indie rock songs.
The opening track, "We Were One" is a perfect
example of how the band creates a sense of space
that evolves throughout a song's duration. "No Worries
Gonna Find Us" is an upbeat track, representative of
the album's lighter side, with playful guitar melodies
that give the song a sense of movement. The drum
beat makes the song danceable, fitting Spicer's optimistic lyrics as he repeats the titular refrain "No worries gonna find us."
"So Many Nights" highlights the mellow side of
the album. With a slower tempo, the band makes the
song more detailed as it progresses, adding smooth
backup vocals, distorted flute, gospel-influenced
synth; achieving the sense of space that makes all the
songs of the album dynamic and enjoyable... — Sam
Mohseni *Find the full the review on discorder.ca
SILVER POOLS
Memoirs of an Oblong Sphere
(Self-Released)
Unlocked memories, unlocked desires act like
thousand sharp arrows shot from rusted bows in
strange angles — the sky is bleeding again.don't you
see? A tiny drop of celestial blood lands on the fresh
skin of Silver Pools' debut album. Do not be afraid. The
ambient, dream-pop entity, led by the Toronto-based
mandolinist, Todd Macdonald, bathes its fingers in the
liquid stain and stirs it — a few peels of sunset light it
finds and thin fibers of clouds which it pulls along the
album's paper surface drawing Memoirs of an Oblong
Sphere.
The opening song, "Spesku Strings," has the texture of a '30s movie soundtrack. Todd Macdonald's
prolific sampling techniques and brilliant exploitation
of the Roland SP 404 create a retro micro-biosphere
where the full, mellow, blurry melodies of an old gramophone, sounds of slippery guitar strings, and a wooden loop like the wind-up of an antique music box are
kept alive.
These calm winds of computerized nostalgia provide a smooth transition to the next song "Carbon
Cadence," and to a modern-romantic, post-impressionistic mood which remains until the end of the
album. A low-key but uplifting symphony of magical
beats, electronic signals, subtle trip-hop tones and
elastic sonic layers that expand and contract underwater. Chill-out vocals coming from an ocean cave, a
simple but addictive bassline, and the delicate mandolin complete its, distinctive, avant-garde sonic-scape.
Silver Pools keep up this abstract and unconventional approach until the fifth song "Falling Embers."
Bringing forth the mandolin, intensifying the colours
of frequencies which resemble dolphin or whale whistles, Silver Pools produce musical compositions which
evoke an atmospheric quality. It is a captivating series
of relaxation and contemplation... — Theano Pavlidou
*Find the full the review on discorder.ca
VRIT11Y k.
WHITNEY K
Goodnight
(Maple Death Records)
With just seven songs, Whitney K makes us feel
like we've lived a full day, but without the "same shit,
different day" attitude. Goodnight, Konner Whitney's
third album as Whitney K, is uplifting and sad, and
other times romantic! The album recognizes the
uncertainties of life in a manner that is comforting and
undoubtedly pleasing to the ear. I'm tempted to say it's
an album for everyone.
Genre wise, Goodnight falls in the bluesy, outsider folk realm. There's an element of organized chaos
U
UNDER REVIEW to the album, achieved through disjointed sounds; low
vocals paralleled with sharp instrumentals. The lack
of smooth cohesion is reminiscent of old-timey country blues, clad with the proverbial twang. With deep
and at times eerie leading vocals, I can't help but be
reminded of Timber Timbre. A resounding voice is not
easily forgotten — and that's a good thing.
The opening track "Swans" is a multi-faceted
composition. For imaginative ears, it may feel like a
bird taking flight. One could start the day easily with
this hopeful tune, accompanied by an array of string
instruments and folky background vocals. The music
is extremely relatable, bringing listeners on a human
path. Lines like "But the last welfare cheque won't
come in time for the rent / That's alright, my sugar pie"
resonate.
The title track, "Goodnight," ends things with a
wonderful completeness; the end of long, satisfying
day. I could imagine swaying to this song as the sun
sets (or begins to rise — depending what a good night
means to you).— Alexandra Livsey
SIGHTLINES
"North"
(Alarum / Big Smoke)
There is something to be said about the simple
satisfaction of a good garage-rock album. Sightlines
have been delivering upbeat, unhinged lo-fi goodness
for the past few years, but oddly enough, have managed to put out every form of tangible music except a
full-length album — until now. From 7 inches to floppy
discs, they've experimented with it all. Now, with their
first LP, "North," they've gone ahead and stacked it full
of pop-punk excellence.
"North" feels highly personal, despite its upbeat
energy and enlivening tempo. Its pleasant quirkiness
is attached to tales of nights spent gagging over hospital food, and even touches on rape-culture. That
whole, "a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go
down" comes to mind when an artist combines politics
with catchy melodies.
"The Idea of North," the opening track grinds out
quickly and sets the pace nicely for what's to come.
It's a classic pairing of distorted guitars layered sweetly with vulnerable lyrics. Speaking with Eric Axen
(vocalist / guitarist), he explains the album's title as
influenced by his upbringing in Northern B.C.. "The
Idea of North" is less about the North as a physical
space, but emotional ties to an old home.
Little-minute moments of Vancouver life are scattered throughout the album. It's a nice touch to please
local music fans. "Commiseration" begins with the
drawl of the skytrain lady's voice flatly announcing
the approaching platform, and one can't help but
smirk at the reference to a lot of our daily routines...
— Evangeline Hogg *Fmd the full the review on
discorder.ca
NIXXON
No Good Reason
(Spinnup)
No Good Reason, with its monotonous sound, features heavily autotuned, feathery vocals over pop-y
beats and is a deviation from Nixxon's previous style
which favored a starker sound and more structure variation within the songs. This transition is an imitation
of the style popularized by other Toronto artists and
Nixxon achieves it in a thinly veiled formulaic effort.
The first song on the EP, "Reason," was entirely
freestyled, but it doesn't seem it. Nixxon explains his
return to the industry and concludes that it is for "No
good reason," setting the thematic tone for the EP.
UNDER REVIEW The track is methodical, maintaining the same tempo
throughout. But it's never boring. The wordplay and
fluid transitions between verses and refrains impress
Nixxon's technical control, and create a narrative of
his current reality. But this does not compensate for
the lack of evolution on this EP. Each track is interchangeable and fails to develop Nixxon's message
beyond its establishment.
Nixxon's technical skill is overshadowed by his
archaic themes. He has described this release as an
anthem for people chasing their dreams while living
paycheque to paycheque, but the lyrics don't reflect
this. Every song is only skin deep, highlighting sexual conquests and economic gain. The hypermasculine
content is juxtaposed with the airbrushed production
style, leaving the listener confused... — Dora Dubber
*Find the full the review on discorder.ca
RED DONS
The Dead Hand of Tradition
(Deranged Records)
Released in Europe through Taken By Surprise
Records in August, 2015, The Dead Hand of Tradition
has been made available to North American audiences, courtesy of B.C.'s Deranged Records. Red Dons
compile themes and experiences of the continental
distance between band members, backed by melodic
punk. The new album breaks through the stifling canopy that has been weighing down much punk music in
recent times. And breaking through is what Red Dons
have been doing throughout their career of periodic
7-inch releases.
The Dead Hand of Tradition is a driven start-stop
ride, without much of the stop. Where the guitars go
silent at a moment, the bass rolls on. "Together Apart"
transitions back and forth between a four chord cho
rus line and a dance rhythm that draws a parallel to
the Arctic Monkey's "I Bet You Look Good On The
Dancefloor" days. The album matures into this trend
for a few more tracks until it steers into the heavy,
bass driven "Weakness." The title track follows as
another non-stop ride up to the break after the second
chorus, which breaths in a collection of noise for half
a minute, and bursts back into anthemic vocals over
the ceaseless rhythm... — Harsh Trivedi *Find the full
the review on discorder.ca
AJ CORNELL & TIM DARCY
Too Significant To Ignore
(NNA Tapes)
Released in mid-March, Too Significant To Ignore is
the collaboration between Montreal sound artist Andrea-
Jane Cornell, who creates churning soundscapes, and
Ought-frontman Tim Darcy, known for freewheeling and
surreal poetics. In its most simplistic terms, the record is
spoken word over electronic drones. But the connection
between Cornell's sounds and Darcy's voice transforms
both elements into a cohesive and atmospheric entity,
unsettling to its core. Separate from one another, the
sound and the voice would fall flat.
Cornell's anxious and ominous synth-swells, her
waves of noise, the crackling and popping of electronic
sounds form a backdrop, a tone, a mood, yet possess
nothing the listener can grasp. Any handhold melts away
with another sweep of dissonance. Darcy's nasal, repetitive, and sharp voice is a gentle attack on the ear above
the dark blur of noise. It's both urgent and preoccupied
with the supremely mundane, notably in his opening
lines of "The Space Between Everything": "It isn't worth
it anymore / But it is."
Together, Cornell and Darcy merge their two disparate sonic elements to create an experience entirely
UNDER REVIEW new, and entirely unnerving. It's easy to lose focus of
Darcy's words, as the sound of his voice can be heard
as an instrument in itself, playing intricate and cyclical
melodies over Cornell's steady, unwavering synth tones.
Occasionally, but very seldom, their paths sync together,
meeting in a strange harmony — Darcy extends a vowel
sound as Cornell pushes a sonic wave to its peak, and
together they create an unsettling euphony before diving back into labyrinthine soundscapes... — Jasper D.
Wrinch *Find the full the review on discorder.ca
HUMANS
Water Water EP
(Mom + Pop / Haven Sounds)
Since their 2009 debut, the duo of Peter Ricq and
Robbie Slade, a.k.a. Humans, has delivered electron-
ica that is as meaningful as it is danceable. On their
new EP Water Water, Humans seldom speak. When
they do, their voices ring out from a static-saturated
otherside, rippling across a sea of drum patterns and
trickles of synth that make the 15 minutes of Water
Water pass in an instant of refreshing electronic bliss.
But Water Water is sometimes a bit too smooth for its
own good. Even as an EP, Water Water is less of of
a musical main course and more of an ambient hors
d'oeuvre, and we're left hungry for more of what we
know Humans can put on the table.
The EP opens with a 9-minute sprawling title track.
Despite the length, it's a surprisingly regular chunk of
sound. The song opens with a clapping, steady drum
pattern that is only interrupted by the wobbling of a
baseline and an ethereal sing-song chant. There's a
lot to be said for the simplistic perfection, musically
and lyrically, of a track like "Water Water"—- but there's
not much to be said for why the track sprawls on for
a whopping 9 minutes. After the first set of bass-
heavy trembles and a few minutes of that undying
drum pattern, we're ready to move on. If anything,
the radio edit, attached to the end of the EP, better
shows Humans' gift for delivering both quality and
concision... — Zak Vescera *Find the full the review
on discorder.ca
%%4 "m'
BOREAL NETWORK
Itasca Road Trip
(More Than Human)
The music of Road Trip floats in a vague space:
often peppy and insistent, the feel is offset by a subtle ambience, and accompanied by lo-fi, shuffling drum
beats. This ambiguity can be felt clearly on a track like
"Badlands." The song features a mischievous synth
riff that, while undeniably digital, seems to contain a
distant memory of an outro segment from some '60s
southern rock ballad. It's accompanied only by cyclical
drums fading in and out, and the inconsequential, easy
chatter of a group of friends, that can't really be understood clearly no matter how one tries.
This combination of pop pastiche with a somewhat
detached perspective gives the album a close kinship
with many vaporwave artists, such as ECO VIRTUAL,
Macintosh Plus, and ESPRIT. These links are further
emphasised in Johnson's incorporation of interludes
and muzak into the album, with the short song "The
Couch" making me feel like I'm watching the weather
channel or the 10 o'clock news on a tiny '80s CRT television set. Unlike these producers however, Johnson
seems to be turning these textures and all-too-familiar
sounds away from the ironic cynicism of vaporwave,
and towards something more bright and optimistic.
Itasca Road Trip works very well as a piece of ambient music. But for the attentive listener it might outstay
its welcome — Johnson's palette of sounds doesn't
UNDER REVIEW vary massively throughout the album. While this might
be wearisome at times, this coherence serves to reinforce the industrial-cum-pastoral mood of the music,
and creates the perfect soundtrack to a drive through
the prairies under purple skies, watching oil derricks
and fspwer plants crest the horizon and fade away into
the distance. — Daniel Stone * Find the full the review
on discorder.ca
T«c-Miwto!*
THE BALLAD OF
OPPENHEIMER PARK
Directed by Juan Manuel Sepulveda
Sung of a park and its denizens — The Ballad of
Oppenheimer Park can be heard in two key scales at
once. The first scale tells the story of derelicts, not
unlike Steinbeck's cast in Cannery Row. Far from the
Palace Flophouse, Ballad's park-goers are indigenous residents of Vancouver's Downtown Eastside.
Bear, Harley and their crew of friends, hang out and
sometimes sleep in Oppenheimer Park. Similar to
Mack and his boys in Cannery Row, they remain resilient to hardship through moments of generosity and
friendship.
Heard in another key, Ballad is an ethical conversation about the film and its filmmaker. Director and
SFU Film School graduate Juan Manuel Sepulveda
is considered a settler in Canada, meaning he is
not an indigenous person. As a settler, his depiction
of indigenous people in Oppenheimer Park — particularly those who face chronic mental health and
substance abuse issues •— is controversial. As a
Western-themed documentary, Sepulveda's settler
status adds the first layer of colonialism to the film;
one that operates outside the screen, adding threat to
the Oppenheimer Park "frontier."
As Sepulveda observes a variety of amiable and
antagonistic moments between members of the
Oppenheimer Park community, he experiments with
the documentary genre. Using props, character placement and landscape, Sepulveda fashions his film as a
Western. Ballad's opening scene shows a stagecoach
burning in the middle of Oppenheimer Park. Flames
peel back its canvas covering as the stagecoach sits
ominous. This is the first of many props the audience may assume are inserted in the film by its filmmaker. These insertions become creative infusions
in the unfolding relationships between the people of
Oppenheimer Park: they are filmed wearing cowboy
hats, playing cards and carrying a coffin solemnly into
the park. Props place the film's characters in a stylized setting.
Challenging the Western paradigm of "cowboys
and Indians," Ballad's indigenous park-goers play both
roles. Riding through the park on a stagecoach —presumably the same stagecoach that is burned in the
opening shot — some chant, drum and dance. They
are the park's cowboys. Cowboys who fight for their
honor and the Oppenheimer F|ark frontier, but remain
simultaneously as indigenous people living within
Canadian colonialism.
Two lifesize cutouts of indigenous people dressed
in traditional clothing appear midway through the film.
One is a chief in headdress, one a warrior holding a
gun. The cutouts are addressed briefly by an indigenous man named Bear, but are generally ignored by
people in the park, as if invisible. In one scene Bear
and a woman sit on two separate benches with the
warrior cutout between them. More than a reminder
of the past, this cutout is a symbol of how identity is
assigned and assumed. The presence of this familiar
image of an "Indian warrior" challenges the audience
to accept their indigenous cowboys also as "Indians."
The film's placement of characters and cinematic style builds on this theme of dualism. A number of
shots show characters with visible faces and others
with shadowed faces or heads turned away from the
camera. This is, in part, due to the documentary's single camera limitation, but this also functions to mystify individuals. The contrast of visible and unseen faces suggests that there are agents of good and evil at
mm
UNDER REVIEW work. It also symbolizes the presence of "dark forces"
inching mysteriously into the park frontier.
Long shots of the park at sunrise and sunset establish Oppenheimer as a desolate and fiat landscape:
another homage to the Western genre Sepulveda
consistently draws from. Where he deviates from this
genre, is in the park's unusual designation as "frontier." Like a traditional Western frontier, it is a place
of freedom, a place where mainstream colonial law
and order is rejected, but, as the first words heard
in the film assert: "You're standing on stolen native
land." Once an indigenous cemetery, Oppenheimer
Park now belongs to the Government of Canada.
Defending Oppenheimer park as a "frontier" means
allowing Ballad's indigenous cowboys to redefine the
standard Western notion of a "frontier" as something
more nuanced.
In the film's final scene, the camera takes us away
from the park for the first time. It follows a person walking through some bush. The metallic sizzle of hot train
tracks is audible. As the man exits the frame (possibly
to catch a train), out-of-focus trees are all that remain
in view. It is a blurry image. As Sepulveda's controversial role in the making of Ballad enhances the film's
trope of colonial threat — threat to honor, threat to
freedom and threat to this newly imagined "frontier"
— the audience is left with a ballad sung in two key
tones, complex, but clear.— Alex de Boer
If!
To submit music for review consideration in Discorder
Magazine and online, please send a physical copy to
the station addressed to Jon Kew, Under Review Editor
at CiTR 101.9FM, LL500 6133 University Blvd., Vancouver BC, V6T1Z1. Though our contributors prioritize
physical copies, you may email download codes to
underreview.discorder@citr.ca. We prioritize albums
sent prior to their official release dates.
I • §**J: IIMII
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^■*****l * M *T***^m*\m*****\ ***«V**T^B
■ *B*l*h*^/^*i*l*k**i:*7B
1660 EAST BROADWAY
H      JUNE       U
M     HIGHLIGHTS     U
WWW.RIOTHEATRETICKETS.CA          1
J JUNE
I2
PAUL ANTHONY'S
TALENT TIME        H
Summer Trip 2!            Hmm
J JUNE
I3
HELD OVER!!!                     U       fj
Geekenders Theatrical Co. Presents    1
THE FORCE IS SHAKIN':       ^^J
A SCI-FI BURLESQUE ADVENTURE B|
Also on Saturday, June 4
GOOD BURGER          IPI
Friday Late Night Movie        &SHH
X JUNE
I4
MAMORU HOSODA'S           MM
THE BOY AND THE BEAST     W^%
J JUNE
\5
EAST VAN
SHORT FILM SHOWCASE     |
THE LOBSTER              ILJ
Bill JUNE
P|7
A LEGACY OF WHINING   1
TOM HIDDLESTON, JEREMY IRONS,
SIENNA MILLER & LUKE EVANS
HIGH-RISE            WKm
BV|jum
H8
HIGH-RISE             KJ
THE GENTLEMEN HECKLERS PRESENT       ^
NICOLAS CAGE IN
THE WICKER MAN
So.Many.Beei
J JUNE
I10
DARIOARGENTO'S             |^J
SUSPIRIA                WW
Frjday Late Night Movie         msEwi
J JUNE
111
CINEMA PARADISO
THE ROCKY HORROR
picture show        mimm
J JUNE
I14
Michelangelo Antonioni Double Bill!   |^^|
L'AWENTURA
BLOW-UP                BTfcl
WHII JUN.E
Ml5
The Actionals Comedy Co. Presents    |^^^
IMPROV AGAINST HUMANITY W^Jt
#IAHATRIO                 RHB9
PJjUNE
Ml9
1 BURLESQUE DOCUMENTARY
TEMPEST STORM
TEMPEST STORM & FILMMAKERS             H
/N ATTENDANCE JUNE 19-20!                M^^fl
SEE WWW.RI0IHEATRf.COM FOR ADDITIONAL DATES    fH. M
Vjum
M21
Russell Crowe & Ryan Gosling in         W^^m
THE NICE GUYS          ■
SEE WWW.RI0THfATRE.COM FOR ADDITIONAL DATES    ^^^|
H29
THE CRITICAL HIT SHOW  I
A #DNDLive Comedy Adventure
PHI JUNE
M30
PRINCE DOUBLE BILL   §M§
♦     UNDER THE CHERRY MOON M
jLjfjl JULY
J   1
MARTIN SCORSESE'S
THE LAST WALTZ
THE TALKING HEADS
STOP MAKING SENSE
U|     CHECK WWW.RIOTHEATRE.CA    farff
1   FOR OUR COMPLETE CALENDAR OF EVENTS |
UNDER REVIEW HOCKEY DAD
RECORDS STAGE
9:30 PM - Gum Country
10:30 PM- Fuzzy P
11:30 PM-Kim Gray
12:30 AM-Dada Plan
JUNE 2
FORTUNE SOUND CLUB
ART WASTE STAGE
Art Waste
7 PM - "Strange Magic" Group Show
Music Waste
10:00 PM-Booker T On Acid
11:00 PM-Jo Passed    ■
12:00 AM-Rec Centre
LIVESTOCK ROOM
9:00 PM- Brutes
10:00 PM - Shitlord Fuckerman
11:00 PM-Plazas
12:00 AM-So .LoW
JUNE 3
RED GATE
Art Waste
9 PM - Light Show
Music Waste
11:45 PM-Pavel
12:30 AM-ATSEA
1:15 AM-Late Spring
2:00 AM-TV Ugly
HINDENBURG
10:30 PM-School Girl
11:15 PM-Non La
12:00AM-Doppelganger
12:45 AM-Glad Rags
1:30 AM-Did You Die
THE LIDO
10:30 PM - The Grange Kyte
11:15 PM- Black Magique
12:00 AM- Les Chaussettes
TOAST COLLECTIVE
9:45 PM - Maskara
10:30 PM-Mourning Coup
11:15PM-Supermoon
12:00 AM- Adrian Teacher and
the Subs
PAT'S PUB
9:45 PM - Softess
10:30 PM-Teeth Dreams
11:15PM-Spring Breaks
12:00 AM -Mary
NO WAY CAFE
Art Waste
7 PM - Group Print Show
Presented by Deetch Prints
ASTORIA
10:30 PM-Skyote
11:15PM-Sleuth
12:00 AM-Wire Spire
12:45 AM-Mark Mills
1:30 AM-Devours
SELECTORS'
RECORDS
8:30 PM - Same Same
9:15 PM-Dream Cars
10:00 PM-R23X RED CAT RECORDS
(ALLAGES-FREE)
3:15 PM-Future Star
4:00 PM - Mirepoix
4:45 PM - Shame Spiral
NEPTOON RECORDS
(ALLAGES-FREE)
3:45 PM - Tender Hearts
4:30 PM - Puritans
5:15 PM-Red Circle
GUYS & DOLLS
8:30 PM - Tesstopia
9:15 PM-Total Ed
10:00 PM-Little Sprout
10:45 PM-Tuna Melt
REDBELL PEPPER
11:30 PM-Aquarius
12:15AM-Maneater
1:00 AM-Milk
1:45 AM-Pale Red
SBC
9:45 PM - Gun Control
10:30 PM-Durban Poison
11:15 PM-Dumb
12:00 AM-Mosfett
THE LIDO
10:30 PM-Meteoric
11:15 PM-Sexy Merlin
12:00 AM-Skim Milk
TOAST
COLLECTIVE
9:45 PM - Gesture
10:30PM-Hazy  .
11:15 PM-Ace Martens
12:00 AM-Ruby Karinto
"f MSS jujiHATI P5Y
Go Your Own Waste
8:45 PM - Lambsbreath
9:45 PM - Mi'ens
10:45 PM-Curse Leage
LUCKY'S COMICS
Art Waste
4-7PM ~ Zine Fair
JUNE 4
SELECTORS'
RECORDS
Go Your Own Waste
8:00PM-C.Diab
9:00 PM - Crooked Mouth
10:00 PM-Fader
THE WISE HALL
Art Waste
7:45 PM - Zine Fair
Music Waste
7:45 PM - Jock Tears
8:30 PM - Stefana Fratila
9:15 PM-Kiso Island
10:00 PM-Poor Baby
10:45 PM-Swim Team
11:30 PM- Jay Arner
JUNE 5
WHATS UP? HOT DOG!
(ALLAGES)
8:00 PM - Cindy Vortex
8:45 PM - Echuta
9:30 PM - View Master
All Shows $5 - Festival Pass - $15
—» www.musicwaste.ca <— JAYARNER
SURVEILLING SQUIRRELS FROM THE KEYBOARD
words by Keagan Perlette //photos by Nolan Sage // illustrations by Kalena Mackiewicz
It's early afternoon when I arrive at the
little apartment Arner shares with his partner and Energy Slime bandmate Jessica Del-
isle. We've all just woken up, and Arner and
Delisle offer me coffee as soon as I cross the
threshold. Arner calls coffee "bean juice," a
joke I already know because I've been prowling his Twitter account, which literally had
me laughing until I cried. The musicians
are putting peanuts on the patio railing for
the Stellar's jays flitting their plump bodies
from fence post to fence post. Across from the
record player spinning something dance-y,
there is an upright piano garnished with a
baby blue synthesizer, the only type of instrument Arner covets the way some musicians do
guitars. "Each one is its own precious thing,"
he jokes. And if Arner is full of one thing, it's
jokes. Clearly an animal lover, Arner keeps
watch over the local squirrels from his seat at
the computer where he works on his music,
coining such activity "squirrelveillance."
But I haven't invaded the couple's personal
space just to make light of their relationship
to urban wildlife, Arner is about to release
his second solo album, aptly called Jay II,
on Mint Records. Three years, two tours and
another band — Energy Slime — separate
JAYARNER 77 SEEMS LIKE WE'RE REALLY RAMPING
UP TO THE APOCALYPSE."
this record from his debut, Jay Arner. The
nine-track album is the product of on and off
songwriting, and a long stint of international
travel touring Jay Arner and, later, Energy
Slime's New Dimensional.
The musician and producer has been living in what he calls "music world" since he
was a teenager. It has officially been twenty
years since Arner began his own record label with a couple of high school friends called
Probably Records. Even though Arner later
studied at the University of British Columbia
and went on to work a carpentry job, his at
tention was always firmly focused on making
music.
"I didn't really have the guts to admit that
I didn't want a normal job and I just wanted
to do music," he says, "but I regret nothing
because I wouldn't be where I am now. I've always had jobs where you don't have to think
too much so I'd just write songs in my head,
and I would write songs down on pieces of
scrap wood."
Delisle giggles and shows me a piece of
scrap paper stacked under the computer keyboard. Arner doesn't read music, so he jots
JAYARNER down a notation that is incomprehensible to
me but is clear as day to Arner who tells me
it is the guitar part for the track "Personal
Line." The quickly jotted notes are part and
parcel with Arner's quick creative process.
"Sometimes I say 1 feel like a song's coming* and I haven't played it on any instruments or anything. I feel like a song's coming, and then I'll write it down and I write
a lot in the middle of the night. I don't even
feel like I wrote it, I just feel like it came to
me and I have to record it that way." Arner
is pretty staunch about staying true to this
original impulse, and it's one of the reasons
he likes working on this project solo. On the
recording, Arner plays all of the instruments,
save a couple of tracks on which Delisle sings
and plays keyboard. His live band consists
of himself, Delisle, Adrienne LaBelle, and
Adam Fink.
Jay II is sonically consistent with Jay
Arner: synth heavy with catchy drums and
groovy bass fills. However, Jay II is dreamier, more liquid, a little bit closer to the
soundtrack to a vintage alien flick. What
shines in the album (even brighter than the
ever-present laser noises) are the self-aware
lyrics.
"It was kind of a reaction to touring so
much," says Arner. "I hadn't left North America [before touring Jay Arner] and I was getting a sense of the bigness of the world, and
how unimportant I am. A lot of my songs are
personal songs and the albums are about
stuff going on inside my own mind and seeing
the world gave everything a context. Singing about your problems when the planet is
dying is kind of absurd, but I'm not skilled
enough to write a beautiful political song, so
I'm just stuck writing what I'm writing." In
"World of Suffering" Arner sings, "I've got the
perfect life blues again," an example of the
dialectic he apprehends: the relationship between one's personal woes and larger social
issues.
"I have a few songs about the idea of moving away as a way to solve your problems, but
then everything just comes with you, you're
still the same person," says Arner. "Crystal
Ball" is about the idea that "even if you knew
what was going to happen you'd still make
the same decisions or mistakes" while the
track "Wannabe," a blatant and intentional
reference to the Spice Girls, is a reflection on
the single-minded pursuit of a fruitless goal.
There's even something existential about the
song "Street Freaks," which, on the surface
seems to be about walking past some weirdos
at the park, but echoing vocals and the final
line, "Summer is gonna be over again and everybody's gonna need a new place to go" leave
the listener misty-eyed.
Jay II is both a revelation of Arner's inner anxieties and a kind of remedy. "It seems
like we're really ramping up to the apocalypse," says Arner. "I think WelFsee some
really fucked things in our lifetime. If I knew
what else to do I would do it, but I'm just
that dumb music guy, so I'm just gonna keep
playing my guitar even though there's all this
stuff going on."
But Arner has a heart of gold and an aptitude for care. As we walk to Arner's practice space, he spots a feisty cat picking a
fight with a squirrel and promptly breaks
up the action before blood is shed. Keeping
the peace between neighborhood critters and
creating thoughtful synth-pop, refusing to
eschew creativity for the security of normalcy, seems to me a beautiful way to keep the
apocalypse at bay.
Jay II comes out June 17 on Mint Records.
Check out jayarner.bandcamp.com for more
information and past releases.
JAYARNER 1'
i •
V '        /\       A
ill'
i* HOT ART WET CITY
WHAT'S UP HOT DO'OHHH MY GOD!!!
words by Jonathan Kew // illustrations by Michael Shantz
I used to take a lot of strolls down Granville. This was when Dougie Dog, the hot dog
cart franchise, had a brick & mortar store; I
always relished their Chicago dog facsimiles.
Outside, there was the reliable parting glance
from an anthropomorphic hot dog statue, set
to his cosmetic task, tongue squished out in
concentration, squeezing out ketchup to create a hairline above his pert sausage body.
For an instant it all goes away — the throngs
of tourist and suburbanite, the neon district
tinge of human waste and cologne — I am implicated in the perverse, yet populist realm of
anthropomorphic (auto)cannibal death drive.
This hot dog wants you to eat him.
We have entered a peculiar universe. Later this year, Seth Rogen's parody of CGI fare,
Sausage Party, will depict anthropomorphic
foodstuffs who gush with desire over being
"chosen," until they learn what being chosen
entails. It's an acerbic take on the genre of
visual design where anthropomorphic creatures are happy to offer themselves for our
consumption; or cooking up their kin; or,
most disturbingly, rapt in gluttonous pleasure as they slice off pieces of themselves
for our delectation. You've seen it on BBQs,
butchers, storefronts, advertisement: we're
culturally indicted.
Chris Bentzen knows. In June, his Hot Art
Wet City gallery on Main Street will present
Eat Yo Self, a show about anthropomorphic
animals and foodstuffs devouring themselves and their compatriots. It was in the
interest of exploring this sick, yet compelling
phenomenon, that I initially sat down with
Bentzen. While Eat Yo Self is perhaps one of
Bentzen's more disturbing ideas, the Main
Street space has been striking psychic nerves
for three years through open calls-for-^sub-
mission: with subjects like David Suzuki,
John Hughes, cartoon nudity, pizza, internet
memes, and more. Additionally serving as a
yoga space and comedy venue, Hot Art Wet
City has made a name on its accessible and
unpretentious experience.
After graduating from Emily Carr in
graphic design, Bentzen found himself more
interested in organizing than heavily practicing his own art. He tells me, "I had come out
of punk rock culture. A lot of other galleries
feel ivory tower. You're not sure if you can
walk in. The audience Fm looking for are not
necessarily interested in going to galleries, or
buying art. Often a lot of people feel like they
need to be initiated. Here, what you see is
what you get: fun stuff, weird stuff."
Besides welcoming newcomers to the art
world, Hot Art Wet City has helped open up
the field in a repressed artistic culture. Born
and raised in the Lower Mainland, Bentzen '
notes that "there's a lot of illustrators, animators, comic artists [here! I think those
artists often don't recognize themselves as
people who could be in a gallery. Commercial
versus fine art — those lines are blurring in
the U.S., especially in the pop surrealist galleries. There's a lot of artists doing that here,
HOT ART WET CITY \fte but it's not getting recognition ... If you go to
a Granville Street gallery you'll see paintings
of flowers, abstract landscapes. It's just a
function of buyers. Maybe Vancouver's more
conservative that way."
Pop surrealism, a.k.a. lowbrow, with roots
in L.A. comic and hot-rod culture, seems appropriate in this city given Vancouver's '80s
hardcore heritage. Bentzen has featured artists such as Andrea Hooge, Ali Bruce, Scott
Sueme, and even occasional higher art incursions from artists like Caroline Weaver, Jeremiah Birnbaum, and the Phantoms in the
Front Yard group. Altogether, the gallery's
offerings channel an alternative Vancouver
art. In a return to Bentzen's punk origins,
the gallery has also been able to feature Jim
Cummins, a.k.a. I, Braineater, whose pop
surrealism has coloured Vancouver since the
70s.
Bentzen wonders about taking this Vancouver art to other cities; making connections
beyond the Lower Mainland. To digress, if
Vancouver eats itself, it's through the a program of gentrification, recolonization, and
the dislocation of its people and history. "I
wanted to provide a gallery where artists I
like could show, where I would want to go to
myself. The closest in Vancouver was Ayden
Gallery, now they're closed."
W ABLE TO
SHOW THE ART,
EXPOSE IT. BUT
THE ARTISTS
HAVE TO PUSH
THEMSELVES."
As it maintains, Hot Art Wet City is a refuge on Main Street; a space besides. More
events may be on the way, perhaps "performative dance, because the space is so compact, there's intimacy between performers
and the audience." Bentzen is thinking about
using the back room as a studio. Still, as valuable as it is, Bentzen is modest about HAWC
when it comes to getting artists exposure. "I
think it's up to the artist. I'm able to show
the art, expose it, but the artists have to push
themselves. And because there's not many
opportunities to show, just being available is
helpful. But it's always up to the artist."
So there will be art that touches common
nerves. And there will be people who want
to see it. The alternative is more frightening
that a pig eating its own rump.
Actually never mind. That's way more
twisted.
Hot Art Wet City is located at 2206 Main
Street, and is open Wednesday-Saturday
12 - 5pm. Eat Yo Self runs from June 2-25,
with an opening reception June 3 at 7pm. For
upcoming events and full submission guidelines, visit hotartwetcity.com.
HOT ART WET CITY words by Natalie Dee //photos by Pat Valade // illustrations by Alicia Lawrence
Arbutus' is a name that may not mean
much to anyone in Montreal, but it is a name
familiar to many who've grown up in Kitsila-
no. Though Arbutus Records is based out of
Montreal, founder and owner Sebastian Cowan grew up alongside the street. Sitting down
with Discorder, he's quick to reminiscence
about the now-defunct Ridge bowling alley,
and summers spent on the Gulf Islands surrounded by the peeling bark of arbutus trees.
To those in Montreal, however, Arbutus
is synonymous with the record label that
emerged from Lab Synthese. The warehouse
live-performance space transformed into Arbutus Records in 2009 — however, only in the
past couple of years has Arbutus become a
"real record label," according to Cowan, incorporating and opening up a proper office
space.
The turning point for the label was with
the release of Grimes' 2012 smash album, Visions. At the time, Cowan was also her man
ager, and so Grimes' departure from her label
made room for the changes that occurred.
The label still functions like a collective
— "We still rely and identify very strongly
with the people around us and the people
that help us, and it wouldn't be possible otherwise," says Cowan. Contracts are now used
to create a distinction between the personal
and professional relationships Cowan has
with the artists on his label, which include
the likes of Braids, TOPS, Blue Hawaii, and
Sean Nicholas Savage.
Another integral aspect of Arbutus is its
DIY aspect, which goes hand-in-hand with
artists being given the freedom to create as
they please. "We accomplish a lot with very
little ... I've never believed that there's a correlation between money and good art," Cowan says.
Being friends with the musicians has contributed to Arbutus' unusually small roster of
artists, but it's one of the label's distinguish-
HOMEGROWN LABELS
mm ing features. Instead of relying on a certain
sound or aesthetic to bring cohesion to the
label, Arbutus functions on friendships and
giving new artists the time to develop. Cowan
was once deciding whether or not he was going to put out an album when a friend asked
him: "If no one buys a single copy, would you
still do it?" Cowan responded yes — this kind
of passion summarizes the approach of Arbutus Records.
Arbutus has been expanding, with the
recent announcement of Sounds of Beaubi-
en Ouest (SOBO), a new label dedicated to
releasing electronic music. Named after the
street that Arbutus Records is located in on
Montreal. Cowan has had a longstanding
interest in the genre, and "would love to be
able to put it under Arbutus as well, but it
doesn't always work like that." Cowan makes
no secret of his excitement to be collaborating
with Patrick Holland (a former Vancouver
and Bowen Island resident) of Project Pablo
— "The ppportunity to work and learn from
him is such a pleasure."
Another project launched in 2016 was
nlO.as radio (pronounced like 'antennas').
Broadcasting out of Arbutus' offices, the online radio station "fills a huge gap," says Cowan. He had always been interested in some
kind of radio project, but lacked the technological knowledge to do so. He was then
approached by friends of a friend who had
the technology, but not the industry know-
how. "Everyone is on board and ready to do
it. That, coupled with how many different
presenters there are, put so much goodwill
toward [the project!"
"The office space is really doing something socially and culturally and professional, it's been amazing," Cowan notes, not only
referring to nlO.as radio. In recent years, the
space has been hosting parties regularly. "We
evolved out of a warehouse venue. Throwing
parties is very intrinsically linked to where
we've come from ... it's a huge part of what
HOMEGROWN LABELS
we do," explains Cowan. Arbutus has even
begun to throw parties in DIY venues in other cities, bringing their brand to places such
as Los Angeles, Detroit, London and Toronto.
Arbutus Records has changed, but remains true to their origins of working closely
with their artists, and providing creative and
social spaces. "If I'm doing what I'm doing, I
want to do it in a way that is congruent with
our message and what I believe in."
Check out arbutusrecords.com for more. ON THE AIR
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
words by Bryce Warnes //photos by Sara Baar
illustrations by Dana Kearley
It's impossible to talk to Tim Bogdachev
for more than two minutes without becoming convinced that punk rock is the human
race's greatest achievement. Bogdachev has
spent his entire adult life organizing shows,
playing in bands and — since 2012 — the
spreading the Gospel of Punk through his
show on CiTR 101.9FM, Rocket From Russia. His enthusiasm is infectious. He traces
its origins back to 1994, in his hometown of
Novosibirsk, Siberia.
An uncle had just returned from studying
abroad in the USA, bringing home a boom-
box. He made his nephew two tapes.
"One was Green Day, Dookie. The other
was Offspring, Smash" says Bogdachev. He
pauses. "Holy shit."
Before long, he was going to shows. A lack
of age limits in Russia meant that a 13-year
old Bogdachev could make it into any club he
liked. Punk music wasn't big in Novosibirsk,
but eventually he found sympathizers, and
they began establishing a local scene. They'd
bring in bands from St. Petersburg and Moscow. Attendance started off small, but grew.
Bogdachev played in Siberian bands as well,
touring towns by rail. He made it as far south
as Kazakhstan, where the show he was playing, billed as "hardcore," turned out to feature a lineup consisting of Limp Bizkit cover
bands.
In 2004, Bogdachev's mother immigrated
to Vancouver. At the time, he was attending
university in Siberia. Visiting Vancouver, he
got in touch with members of the local scene
online, and ended up appearing multiple
times of CiTR's Flex Your Head to discuss
Russian punk. In 2006, he moved to Vancouver to be with his mother.
Two weeks later, he was at a D.O.A. show.
Before long, Bogdachev was immersed in
Vancouver's punk scene.
In 2010, he began co-hosting the show We
All Fall Down, eventually taking over full-
time duties when the original host left. By
2012, he'd left for a new timeslot and a new
show —Rocket From Russia, currently airing
Tuesdays from 10:30-ll:30am.
While he was well-versed in punk rock,
Bogdachev faced a learning curve when it
came to English. After first arriving in Vancouver, he attended Pacific Audio Institute's
music business program. He says he learned
a lot about the music business, as well as or-
<
ganizing shows and booking interviews, but
he struggled with the language.
"So, I went and worked for three years at
the music store HMV," he says. The experience helped with his conversation skills, and
gave him a chance to spend all day talking
about music. Today, Rocket From Russia —
ON THE AIR pronounced with long, rolling R's — bills
itself as being "Broadcast in broken-ish English."
Off the air, Bogdachev daylights as a financial advisor. While he's the first to admit
that his career doesn't fit the typical punk
image, he notes that he has a mother and a
grandmother to support, and that his first
duty is to them. Also, he's genuinely enthusiastic about the work.
"Wearing a suit to work, talking about
retirement plans, talking about things that
punk rockers don't talk about — I love that
shit," he says, without irony.
Rocket From Russia features Bogdachev's
musical selections, plus interviews with
bands visiting Vancouver. He says that his
primary goal is to have fun and share his
passion for the music. Over the past four
years, he's honed his skills as an interviewer, bowling over members of Anti-Flag, for
instance, with Nardwuar-style deep research
and surprise gifts, and generally impressing
anyone he shares a mic with.
And, having crossed half the globe
to get to Vancouver, Bogdachev has internationalist tastes when it comes to music.
"People message me and they're like, 'Hey,
you're crazy, you play bands from Paraguay,
from South Korea, and then from Luxembourg in one show," he says. To Bogdachev,
part of the joy of discovering new music
comes from crossing borders.
"If I have the option to download a band
from New York or to download a band from
Chile, I'm going for Chile," he says. "No disrespect to New York people."
Bogdachev is constantly on the search for
bands from far-flung locales to feature on his
show, and himself has played a part in music
scenes not even close to being on most Canadians' radars. (How many of us can claim to
have experienced Kazakhstan's Limp Bizkit
fandom?) All the same, he calls Vancouver
home; Bogdachev's a huge supporter of Terminal City punk rock, frequently organizing
Rocket From Russia-sponsored live shows,
and evangelizing Vancouver bands to anyone
who will listen.
"I believe that Vancouver has a special
scene," he says. "I think I'm lucky to be here."
On June 25, Tim Bogdachev is celebrating
his ten-year anniversary in Canada with a
Rocket From Russia live show at the Media
Club featuring Vancouver bands the Greatest Sons, You Big Idiot, Ellesmere, Dried Out
and Corpse.
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CRAFT BREWED
ASK FOR BOMBER AT YOUR LOCAL LIQUOR STORE OR NEIGHBOURHOOD PUB.
1488 ADANAC ST • OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 12-11PM • PINTS, FILLS, BEER TO GO CiTR 101.9FM PROGRAM GUIDE
DISCORDER RECOMMENDS LISTENING TO
CITR EVERYDAY
■
MON
TUES
WED
THUR
FRI
SAT
SUN
6 AM
CITR GHOST MIX
PACIFIC PICKIN'
CITR GHOST MIX
CITR GHOST MIX
CITR GHOST MIX
CITR GHOST MIX
CITR GHOST MIX
6AM\
7 AM
BEPI CRESPAN
7Am\
8 AM
OUEER fm
SUBURBAN
VANCOUVER,
RIGHT?
PRESENTS...
8Am\
CITED
9 AM
BREAKFAST WITH
THE BROWNS
VANCOUVER:
RELOADED
JUNGLE
THE COMMUNITY
LIVING SHOW
WIZE MEN
THE SATURDAY
EDGE
CLASSICAL
CHAOS
9Am\
10 AM
POP DRONES
A FACE FOR RADIO
STUDENT SPECIAL
HOUR
SHOOKSHOOKTA
ioAM\
ROCKET FROM
11 AM
UNCEDED
AIRWAVES
RUSSIA
THE REEL WHIRLED
SUMMER JAMS
iiAM\
MORNING AFTER
SHOW
PETE'S PICKS
12 PM
SYNCHRONICITY
THE
SHAKESPEARE
SHOW
DUNCAN'S
DONUTS
DAVE RADIO WITH
RADIO DAVE
GENERATION
ANNIHILATION
THE ROCKERS
SHOW
12Pm\
1PM
PARTS UNKNOWN
SHINE
ON
PERMANENT
RAIN
STUDENT FILL-IN
FEMCONCEPT
POWER CHORD
1PM
2PM
SUMMER MIX
EXTRAENVIRO-
NMENTALIST
MUZAK FOR THE
OBSERVANT
RADIO ZERO
2Pm\
3 PM
THE BURROW
RADIO FREE
THINKER
KEW IT UP
ASTROTALK
CODE BLUE
LA
FIESTA
BLOOD
ON THE
SADDLE
3Pm\
NARDWUAR
PRESENTS
4 PM
LITTLE BIT OF
SOUL
VIBES & STUFF
ASIAN WAVE
SIMORGH
4PM\
5 PM
THE LEO RAMIREZ
SHOW
DISCORDER
RADIO
ALL ACCESS PASS
NEWS 101
MANTRA
CHTHONIC BOOM!
5 PM\
6PM
SUMMER MIX
FLEX YOUR HEAD
SHARING SCIENCE
ARE
YOU
AWARE
UBC ARTS
LADY RADIO
NASHA VOLNA
CRESCENDO
6Pm\
SAMSQU
ANTCH'S
HIDEAWAY
INNER
SPACE
PEANUT
BUTTER
'N' JAMS
7PM
EXPLODING HEAD
MOVIES
UBC INSIDERS
FILL-IN
MORE THAN
HUMAN
7PM\
TICK TALK
AFRICAN
RHYTHMS
8PM
INSIDE OUT
SOUL SANDWICH
THE
SPICE
OF LIFE
NEW
ERA
SOCA
STORM
RHYTHMS
INDIA
TECHNO
PROGRE
SSIVO
8PM\
9PM
THE JAZZ SHOW
CRIMES &
TREASONS
ALL EARS
LIVE FROM
SKALDS HALL
SYNAPTIC
BOOTLEGS &
B-SIDES
9PM\
10 PM
THE SCREEN
GIRLS
RADIO HELL
CANADA POST
ROCK
SANDWICH
TRANCENDANCE
ioPM\
11 PM
STRANDED: CAN/
AUS MUSIC SHOW
WHITE NOISE
COPY/PASTE
THE MEDICINE
SHOW
11PM\
12 AM
RANDOPHONIC
i2AM\
1AM
iAM\
2AM
CITR GHOST MIX
CITR GHOST MIX
CITR GHOST MIX
AURAL TENTACLES
j
THE LATE NIGHT
SHOW
THE ABSOLUTE
CITR GHOST MIX
2AM\
3 AM
3 AMI
4AM
INSOMNIA
4 AMI
5 AM
5AM\ ■ CARIBBEAN
SOCA STORM
SAT. 8 PM
DJ SOCA Conductor delivers the latest SOCA
music tracks out of the Caribbean. This party music
will make you jump out of your seat. This show is
the first of its kind here on CiTR and is the perfect
music to get you in the mood to go out partying!
It's Saturday, watch out STORM COMING!!!!
■ CHINESE/KOREAN
ASIAN WAVE
WED. 4 PM
Tune in to Asian Wave 101 to listen to some of the
best music from the Chinese language and Korean
music industries, as well the latest news coming from
the two entertainment powerhouses of the Asian pop
scene. The latest hits from established artists, debuting
rookies, independent artists and classic songs from
both industries can all be heard on Asian Wave 101
as well as commentary, talk and artist spotlights of
unsigned Canadian talent. Only on CiTR 101.9 FM.
■ CINEMATIC
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
MON. 7 PM
Join Gak as he explores music from the movies, tunes
from television and any other cinematic source, along with
atmospheric pieces, cutting-edge new tracks and strange
old goodies that could be used in a soundtrack to be.
■ CLASSICAL
CLASSICAL CHAOS
SUN. 9 AM
From the ancient world to the 21st century, join
host Marguerite in exploring and celebrating
classical music from around the world.
■   DANCE/ELECTRONIC
BOOTLEGS & B-SIDES
SUN. 9 PM
Hosted by Doe Ran, tune in for the finest remixes from
soul to dubstep, ghetto funk to electro swing. Nominated
finalist for Canadian college radio show of the year, 2012
Pioneer DJ Stylus Awards.
soundcloud.com/doe-ran and search
"Doe-Ran" on Facebook.
COPY/PASTE
THU. 11 PM
If it makes you move your feet (or nod your head), it'll
be heard on copy/paste. Tune in every week for a full
hour DJ mix by Autonomy, running the gamut from cloud
rap to new jack techno and everything in between.
INNER SPACE
ALTERNATING WED. 6:30 PM
Dedicated to underground electronic music,
both experimental and dance-oriented.
Live DJ sets and guests throughout.
INSIDE OUT
TUE. 8 PM
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
FRI. 12:30 AM
The Late Night Show features music from the
underground Jungle and Drum & Bass scene, which
progresses to Industrial, Noise, and Alternative No
Beat into the early morning. Following the music,
we play TZM broadcasts, beginning at 6 a.m.
RADIO ZERO
FRI. 2 PM
An international mix of super-fresh weekend party jams
from New Wave to foreign electro, baile, Bollywood,
and whatever else. Website: www.radiozero.com
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
SAT. 9 PM
If you like everything from electro/techno/trance/8-bit
music/retro '80s, this is the show for you!
Website: synapticsandwich.net
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
ALTERNATING SUN. 8 PM
A mix of the latest house music, tech-
house, prog-house, and techno.
TRANCENDANCE
SUN. 1 PM
Hosted by DJ Smiley Mike and DJ Caddyshack,
Trancendance has been broadcasting from Vancouver,
B.C. since 2001. We favour Psytrance, Hard Trance and
Epic Trance, but also play Acid Trance, Deep Trance,
and even some Breakbeat. We also love a good Classic
Trance Anthem, especially if if's remixed. Current
influences include Sander van Doom, Gareth Emery,
Nick Sentience, Ovnimoon, Ace Ventura, Save the Robot,
Liquid Soul, and Astrix. Older influences include Union
Jack, Carl Cox, Christopher Lawrence, Whoop! Records,
Tidy Trax, Platipus Records, and Nukleuz.
Email: djsmileymike @trancendance.net.
Website: www.trancendance.net. *
■ DIFFICULT
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS...
SUN. 7 AM
Bepi Crespan Presents... CiTR's 24 Hours Of Radio Art
in a snack size format! Difficult music, harsh electronics,
spoken word, cut-up/collage and general Crespan©
weirdness. Twitter: @bepicrespan.
Blog: bepicrespan.blogspot.ca
■ DRAMA/POETRY
SKALD'S HALL
FRI. 9 PM
Skald's Hall entertains with the spoken word via story
readings, poetry recitals, and drama. Established and
upcoming artists join host Brian MacDonald. Interested in
performing on air? Contact us on Twitter:
@Skalds_Hall.
■ ECLECTIC
A FACE FOR RADIO
THU. 10 AM
A show about music with interludes about nothing.
From Punk to Indie Rock and beyond.
ARE YOU AWARE
ALTERNATING THU. 6 PM
Celebrating the message behind the music:
profiling music and musicians that take the
route of positive action over apathy.
AURAL TENTACLES
THU. 12 AM
It could be global, trance, spoken word, rock, the unusual
and the weird, or it could be something different. Hosted
by DJ Pierre.
Email: auraltentacles@hotmail.com
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
MON. 8 AM
Your favourite Brownsters, James and Peter, offer a
savoury blend of the familiar and exotic in a blend of aural
delights.
Email: breakfastwiththebrowns@hotmail.com.
PROGRAM   GUIDE
66 CHTHONIC BOOM!
SUN. 5 PM
A show dedicated to playing psychedelic
music from parts of the spectrum (rock, pop,
electronic) as well as garage and noise rock.
FEMCONCEPT
FRI. 1 PM
Entirely Femcon music as well as spoken word content
relevant to women's Issues (interviews with campus
groups such as the Women's Center, SASC, etc.).
Musical genres Include indie rock, electronic and punk,
with an emphasis on local and Canadian artists.
LIVE FROM THU.NDERBIRD RADIO HELL
THU. 9 PM
Featuring live bands every week performing in the
CITR lounge. Most are from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country and around the world.
THE MEDICINE SHOW
FRI. 11 PM
A variety show, featuring musicians, poets, and
entertainment industry guests whose material is
considered to be therapeutic. We encourage and
promote Independent original, local live music, and art.
THE MORNING AFTER SHOW
TUE. 11:30 AM
The Morning After Show every Tuesday at 11:30(am).
Playing your favourite songs for 13 years. The
morning after what? The morning after whatever you
did last night. Eclectic show with live music, local
talent and music you won't hear anywhere else.
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
FRI. 3:30 PM
Join Nardwuar the Human Serviette for Clam Chowder
flavoured entertainment. Doot doola doot doo...doot doo!
Email: nardwuar@nardwuar.com
PEANUT BUTTER  N' JAMS
ALTERNATING THU. 6:30-7:30 PM
Explore local music and food with your hosts,
Brenda and Jordie. You'll hear interviews and
reviews on eats and tunes from your neighbourhood
and a weekly pairing for your date calendar.
RANDOPHONIC
SAT. 11 PM
Randophonic has no concept of genre, style, political
boundaries or even space-time relevance. Though
we have been known to play pretty much anything by
anybody (as long as it's good), we do often fix our focus
on a long running series, the latest of which (due to
premiere In April-2016) is The Solid Time of Change
(aka the 661 Greatest Records of the Progressive r
Rock Era - 1965-79) And we're not afraid of noise.
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
WED. 12 PM
Dan Shakespeare Is here with music for your ear.
Kick back with gems of the previous years.
SHINE ON
ALTERNATING TUE. 1 PM
An eclectic mix of the latest, greatest tunes from
the Vancouver underground and beyond, connected
through a different theme each week. Join your host
Shea every Tuesday for a groovy musical experience!
SOUL SANDWICH
WED. 8 PM
A myriad of your favourite music tastes all cooked into
one show, from Hip Hop to Indie Rock to African jams.
Ola will play through a whirlwind of different genres, each
sandwiched between another. This perfect layering of
yummy goodness will blow your mind. It beats Subway.
STUDENT SPECIAL HOUR
FRI. 10 AM
Tune In to learn about on-campus events and
Initiatives in-between sweet tunes.
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
WED. 8 AM
Live from the Jungle Room, join radio host Jack
Velvet for an eclectic mix of music, sound bites,
information and inanity. Email: dj@jackvelvet.net.
■ ETHIOPIAN
SHOOKSHOOKTA
SUN. 10 AM
A program targeted to Ethiopian people that
encourages education and personal development.
■ EXPERIMENTAL
KEW IT UP
WED. 3 PM
Fight-or-fllght music. Radio essays and travesties:
Sonic Cateschism / half-baked philosophy
and criticism. Experimental, Electronica, Post-
Punk, Industrial, Noise: ad-nauseum
MORE THAN HUMAN
SUN, 7 PM
Strange and wonderful electronic sounds from
the past, present, and future with host Gareth
Moses. Music from parallel worlds.
POP DRONES
WED. 10 AM
Unearthing the depths of contemporary cassette and vinyl
underground. Ranging from DIY bedroom pop and garage
rock all the way to harsh noise and, of course, drone.
■ GENERATIVE
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF INSOMNIA
SAT. 2 AM
Four solid hours of fresh generative music c/o
the Absolute Value of Noise and its world famous
Generator. Ideal for enhancing your dreams or,
if sleep is not on your agenda, your reveries.
■   HIP HOP
CRIMES & TREASONS
TUE. 9 PM
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill $h*t. Hosted by Jamal
Steeles, Homeboy Jules, Relly Rels, LuckyRich &
horsepowar.
Website: www.crimesandtreasons.com
Email: dJ@crimesandtreasons.com
NEW ERA
ALTERNATING THU. 7:30 PM
Showcases up and coming artists who are considered
"underdogs" in the music industry. The show will
provide a platform for new artists who are looking
to get radio play. Hip-Hop music from all over the
world along with features of multi-genre artists.
■ INDIAN
RHYTHMS INDIA
ALTERNATING SUN. 8 PM
Featuring a wide range of music from India, including
popular music from the 1930s to the present; Ghazals and
Bhajans, Qawwalis, pop and regional language numbers.
■ JAZZ
THE JAZZ SHOW
MON. 9 PM
June 6: Tonight is The Jazz Show's annual Jazz
Festival show where the ebullient media director
and radio personality John Orysik takes over
the show with host Gavin Walker for a preview
of the 2016 Vancouver Jazz Festival.
67
PROGRAM   GUIDE
_J June 13: A latter day classic tonight with vibe genius
Bobby Hutcherson and co leader tenor saxophonist
Harold Land with the amazing Chick Corea on piano,
Reggie Johnson on bass and Joe Chambers on drums.
"Total Eclipse" was one of this band's best recordings.
June 20: One of the great living masters of the
alto saxophone is in the spotlight tonight. Charles
McPherson with pianist Barry Harris, bassist
Buster Williams and drummer Roy Brooks.
"McPherson's Mood". An unforgettable sound!
June 27: We close the month with a great live set by
trumpeter Nat Adderley away from his brother Cannonball
Adderley and on his own with tenor saxophone great
Smokin' Joe Henderson, pianist Joe Zawinul, bassist
Victor Gaskin and drummer Roy McCurdy. Live at
Memory Lane in deepest Los Angeles. A killer set!
LITTLE BIT OF SOUL
MON. 4 PM
Old recordings of jazz, swing, big band,
blues, oldies, and motown.
■ LATIN AMERICAN
LA FIESTA
ALTERNATING SUN. 3 PM
Salsa, Bachata> Merengue, Latin House, and
Reggaeton with your host Gspot DJ.
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
MON. 5 PM
The best mix of Latin American music
Email: leoramirez@canada.com
■ LOUD
FLEX YOUR HEAD /
fUE. 6 PM 	
Punk rock and hardcore since 1989. Bands
and guests from around the world.
POWERCHORD
SAT. 1 PM
Vancouver's longest running metal show. If
you're into music that's on the heavier/darker
side of the spectrum, then you'll like it. Sonic
assault provided by Geoff, Marcia, and Andy.
■ PERSIAN
SIMORGH
Thur. 4 pm
Simorgh Radio is devoted to the education and literacy
for the Persian speaking communities and those
interested in connecting to Persian oral and written
literature. Simorgh takes you through a journey of
ecological sustainability evolving within cultural and
social literacy. Simorgh the mythological multiplicity of
tale-figures, lands-in as your mythological narrator in the
storyland; the contingent space of beings, connecting
Persian peoples within and to Indigenous peoples.
■ PUNK
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
TUE. 10:30 AM
Hello hello hello! I interview bands and play new,
international and local punk rock music. Great Success!
P.S. Broadcasted in brokenish English. Hosted by Russian
Tim. Website: http://rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com.
Email: rocketfromrussiacitr@gmail.com.
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RocketFromRussia.
Twitter: http://twltter.com/tima_tzar.
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
SAT. 12 PM
On the air since 2002, playing old and new punk on the
non-commercial side of the spectrum. Hosts: Aaron
Brown, Jeff "The Foat" Kraft.
Website-.generationannihilation.com.
Facebook: facebook.com/generationannihilation/
■   REGGAE
THE ROCKERS SHOW
SUN. 12 PM
Reggae inna all styles and fashion.
■   ROCK/POP/INDIE
THE BURROW
MON. 3 PM
Noise Rock, Alternative, Post-Rock, with a
nice blend of old 'classics' and newer releases.   '
Interviews and live performances.
CANADA POST-ROCK
FRI. 10 PM
Formerly on CKXU, Canada-Post Rock now
resides on the west coast but it's still committed
to the best in post-rock, drone, ambient,
experimental, noise and basically anything your
host Pbone can put the word "post" Infront of.
CRESCENDO
SUN. 6 PM
Starting with some serene chili tracks at the beginning
and building to the INSANEST FACE MELTERS OF ALL
TIME, Crescendo will take you on a musical magic carpet
ride that you couldn't imagine in your wildest dreams.
Besides overselling his show, Jed will play an eclectic
set list that builds throughout the hour and features both
old classics, and all the greatest new tracks that the
hipsters think they know about before anyone else does.
DAVE RADIO WITH RADIO DAVE
FRI. 12 PM
Your noon-hour guide to what's happening In Music
and Theatre in Vancouver. Lots of tunes and talk.
DISCORDER RADIO
TUE. 5 PM
Named after CiTR's sister magazine, Discorder,
this show covers content in the magazine and
beyond. Produced by Jordan Wade, Matt Meuse,
and Claire Bailey. Email: discorder.radio@citr.ca
DUNCANS DONUTS
THU. 12 PM
Sweet treats |rom the pop underground. Hosted by Duncan,
sponsored by donuts.
http://duncansdonuts.wordpress.com.
MUZAK FOR THE OBSERVANT
THU. 2 PM .    ;
A program focusing on the week's highlights
from CiTR's Music Department. Plus: live in-
studio performances and artist interviews!
PARTS UNKNOWN
MON. 1 PM
An indie pop show since 1999, it's like a marshmallow
sandwich: soft and sweet and best enjoyed when
poked with a stick and held close to a fire.
THE PERMANENT RAIN RADIO
ALTERNATING TUES. 1 PM
Music-based, pop culture-spanning program with a focus
on the local scene. Join co-hosts Chloe and Natalie for an
hour of lighthearted twin talk and rad tunes from a variety
of artists who have been featured on our website.
thepermanentrainpress.com
PROGRAM   GUIDE
68 SAMSQUANTCH'S HIDEAWAY
ALTERNATING WED. 6:30 PM
All-Canadian music with a focus on indie-rock/pop.
Email: anitabinder@hotmail.com.
SPICE OF LIFE
ALTERNATING THU. 7:30 PM
The spice extends life. The spice expands
consciousness. The Spice of Life brings you a
variety of Post-Rock, Shoegaze, Math Rock and
anything that else that progresses. Join host
Ben Life as he meanders whimsically through
whatever comes to mind on the walk to CITR.
STRANDED: THE AUSTRALIAN-CANADIAN MUSIC
SHOW
TUE 11 PM
Join your host Matthew for a weekly mix of exciting
sounds, past and present, from his Australian homeland.
And journey with him as he features fresh tunes and
explores the alternative musical heritage of Canada.
■ ROOTS/FOLK/BLUES
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
ALTERNATING SUN. 3 PM
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-boots country.
CODE BLUE
SAT. 3 PM
From backwoods delta low-down slide to urban harp
honks, blues, and blues roots with your hosts Jim,
Andy, and Paul. Email: codeblue@paulnorton.ca
PACIFIC PICKIN'
TUE. 6 AM
Bluegrass, old-time music, and its derivatives
with Arthur and the lovely Andrea Berman.
Email: pacificpickin@yahoo.com
THE SATURDAY EDGE
SAT. 8 AM
A personal guide to world and roots music—with African,
Latin, and European music in the first half, followed by
Celtic, blues, songwriters, Cajun, and whatever else fits!
Email: steveedge3@mac.com/
■ RUSSIAN
NASHAVOLNA
SAT. 6 PM
News, arts, entertainment and music for the^Russian
community, local and abroad.
Website: nashavolna.ca/
■ SACRED
MANTRA
SAT. 5PM >
An electic mix of electronic and acoustic beats and layers,
chants and medicine song. Exploring the diversity of
the worlds sacred sounds - traditional, contemporary
and futuristic. Email: mantraradioshow@gmail.com
■ SOUL/R&B
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
FRI. 7:30 PM
Website: www.africanrhythmsradio.com
■ TALK
ALL ACCESS PASS
THU. 5 PM
CiTR Accessibility Collective's new radio show.
We talk about equity, inclusion, and accessibility
for people with diverse abilities, on campus
and beyond. Tune in every week for interviews,
music, news, events, and awesome dialogue.
ALL EARS
WED. 9 PM
Looking for advice? Hosts Brandon and Mormei
think they can help you with that. All Ears is an
advice radio program where the hosts read real
questions from the UBC community and answer them
live. Other content includes interviewing students,
consulting experts, and giving campus life advice.
Submit your question at http://ask.fm/allearsubc
ASTROTALK
THU. 3 PM
Space is an interesting place. Marco slices up the
night sky with a new topic every week. Death Stars,
Black Holes, Big Bangs, Red Giants, the Milky Way,
G-Bands, Syzygy's, Pulsars, Super Stars...
CITED!
FRI. 8:30 AM
This is a radio program about how our world
Is being shaped by the Ideas of the ivory
tower. Sometimes, in troubling ways.
THE COMMUNITY LIVING SHOW
THU. 9 AM
This show is produced by the disabled community and
showcases special guests and artists. The focus is on
a positive outlook on programs and events for the entire
community. We showcase BC Self Advocates and feature
interviews with people with special needs. Hosted by
Kelly Reaburn, Michael Rubbin Clogs and Friends.
EXTRAENVIRONMENTALIST
WED. 2 PM
Exploring the mindset of an outsider looking in on Earth.
Featuring interviews with leading thinkers in the area of
sustainable economics and our global ecological crisis.
LADY RADIO
FRI. 6 PM
CiTR Women's Collective's new radio show! Rad
women talking about things they like. Tune in weekly
for interviews, music, events, commentary, and such.
NEWS 101
FRI. 5 PM
Vancouver's only live, volunteer-produced, student and
community newscast. Every week, we take a look back
at the week's local, national and international news,
as seen from a fully independent media perspective.
PETE'S PICKS
THU. 11130 PM
From the CiTR Archives! Our Digital Library Coordinator
Peter Doolan shares selected gems of CiTR history,
digitized from the original audiotape reels!
QUEER FM VANCOUVER:RELOADED
TUE. 8 AM
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transexual
communities of Vancouver. Lots of human interest
features, background on current issues and great music.
queerfmradio@gmail.com
RADIO FREE THINKER
TUE. 3 PM
Promoting skepticism, critical thinking and
science, we examine popular extraordinary
claims and subject them to critical analysis.
THE REEL WHIRLED
THU. 11-11:30 AM
The Reel Whirled is a half hour long escapade through
the world of cinema, focused around UBC Film Society's
program; be it contemporary or classic, local or global.
From our perspective as the UBC Film Society, we
talk about film intellectually, passionately, and goofily.
With select music from our cinematic subjects, we
pull your Thursday mornings into focus, from bleary
eyed to sharp and worthy of the silver screen.
69
PROGRAM   GUIDE SHARING SCIENCE
WED.   6 PM
A show by the members of UBC Sharing Science, a group
of students dedicated to making science interesting and
accessible to all members of the community. We discuss
current research and news about a different topic each
week, providing vastly different perspectives based on
the science backgrounds of a rotating set of hosts.
SYNCHRONICITY
MON. 12 PM
Join host Marie B and discuss spirituality, health and
feeling good. Tune in and tap into good vibrations that
help you remember why you're here: to have fun!
UBC ARTS ON AIR
ALTERNATING WED. 6 PM
Ira Nadel, UBC English, offers scintillating profiles and
unusual interviews with members of UBC Arts world.
Tune in for programs, people and personalities in art
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
MON. 11 AM
Unceded Airwaves is a radio show produced by CiTR's
Indigenous Collective. The team is comprised of
both Indigenous and non-Indigenous people who are
passionate about radio, alternative media and Indigenous
topics and issues. We are committed to centering
the voices of Native people and offering alternative
narratives that empower Native people and their stories.
We recognize that media has often been used as a
tool to subordinate or appropriate native voices and
we are committed to not replicating these dynamics.
VANCOUVER, RIGHT?
THU. 8 AM
Hangout with Alex Biron and Simon Armstrong
as they share personal stories of gigantic
embarrassment and accidental success.
WHITE NOISE
SAT. 8 PM
Need some comic relief? Join Richard Blackmore for half
an hour of weird and wonderful radio every week, as he
delves in to the most eccentric corners of radio for your
listening pleasure. Then stay tuned for the after show
featuring a Q and A with the creator, actors and a guest
comic every week.
Email: whitenoiseUBC@gmail.com
l
PROGRAM   GUIDE 70 CITR 101.9FM
MAY MONTHLY CHARTS: A TWO-CAR FUNERAL
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