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 %¥\      If HIT 254 East Hastings Street   604.681.8915 B3
UPCOMING SHOWS
KVELERTAK
TORCHE, WILD THRONE
CLOUD CITY FT. ABJO (SOULECTION) & SLIMKID3
(THE PHARCYDE), BODY OF WORK, THE X PRESIDENTS,
HOSTED BY KHINGZ & MIC FLONT OF OTOW
THUNDERSTONE titan s eve, scythia (cd
RELEASE), TERRIFIER, MOURNIR
KID CONGO AND THE PINK MONKEY BIRDS
STRANGE THINGS, THE VICIOUS CYCLES, FORD
PIER VENGEANCE TRIO
LUCA TURILLI'S RHAPSODY & PRIMAL FEAR
(CO-HEADLINING) UNLEASH THE ARCHERS
LA CHINGA (ALBUM RELEASE), BLACK RIVER
KILLERS, DOCTOR CLAW, THE HIGHWAY KIND,
SMASH ALL?Y :
AT THE RICKSHAW: MOLOTOV CARAVAN 5
THRILLS, COMEDY, BURLESQUE, BELLY DANCE
AT THE COBALT: SUPERSUCKERS in the
WHALE, SHAWN JAMES & THE SHAPESHIFTERS
RAPE IS REAL AND EVERYWHERE: A NATIONAL
COMEDY TOUR LAUNCH with Kathleen mcgee,
JANE STANTON, EMMA COOPER & MORE
*| DIANA ARBENINA& NIGHT SNIPERS
METALOCALYPSTICKFEST FUNDRAISER
ELYSIUM ECHOES, AMERICAN SPACE MONKEY, & MORE
BUZZCOCKS
RESIDUELS
CARAMELOSDECIANURO
CARACAS
WITHOUT MERCY (EP RELEASE) neck of the
| WOODS, DEAD ASYLUM, XUL, OBSIDIAN
KING GIZZARD AND THE LIZARD WIZARD
| THE MURLOCS, DEAD GHOSTS
Additional show listings, ticket sale info, videos, and more:
ITRE.COM
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SPARTACUS BOOKS
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THINGS WE LIKE: RADICAL
THEORY. FEMINISM. ZINES
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U OUR HAPP^ HOUR SPE Features
06
Columns
MOSFETT
Jammin'
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24        HORSEPOWAR
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27       SO LOKI
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51        HITS AND MISSES
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Smile time
60        NIGHT MAYORS
Advocating for Vancouver nightlife
ADVERTISE: Ad space for upcoming issues can be booked
by calling (604) 822-4342 or emailing advertising@citr.ca. Rates
available upon request.
CONTRIBUTE: To submit words to Discorder, please contact:
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SUBSCRIBE: Send in a cheque for $20 to LL500 - 6133 University Blvd. V6T 1Z1, Vancouver, BC with your address, and we will
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DISTRIBUTE: To distribute Discorder in your business, email
distro.discorder@citr.ca. We are always looking for new friends.
DONATE: We are part of CiTR, a registered non-profit, and
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To inform Discorder of an upcoming album release, art show
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editor.discorder@citr.ca. You may also direct comments,
complaints and corrections via email, or visit during office
hours at CiTR Tuesdays 4-6pm.
04
EDITOR'S NOTE
05
HOTHEAD
10
IN GOOD HUMOUR:
AMYSHOSTAK
13
FILMSTRIPPED:
CINEMA SPECTACULAR
21
GENERATION GAP:
AMBIGUOUS MUSIC
30
REAL LIVE ACTION
36
CALENDAR
38
ART PROJECT:
GABI DAO AND ELLIS SAM
42
UNDER REVIEW
65
PROGRAM GUIDE
71
CHARTS
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EAT
CONDOS
EDITOR'S NOTE
This month, two bands share their perspectives on the impact of Vancouver's
changing skyline — MOSFETT mourns the loss of late night practicing at Renegade as a
result of noise restrictions, and So Loki blames unaffordability for the struggles of artists seeking to establish themselves.
Thus, accelerated commercial and residential development became an unintentional
theme of this issue, also showing up like an elephant in Brenda Grunau's contextualiz-
ation of the SXSW panel, "Why Every Music City Should Have A Night Mayor."
With the closures of local venues, and the constant threats towards affordable studio spaces, it's no surprise our community of artists, musicians, promoters, and friends
are feeling sad and pissed off at the rize of condominiums. (Though, Jane Jacobs would
argue we only have ourselves to blame — we made our neighbourhoods attractive and
trendy for exploitative developers, when we should have been hiding in our live / work
studios filtering coffee through toilet paper.)
But it's okay, we can shuffle around the city finding other neighbourhoods to call
home. And one day, when we can no longer afford the costs of food from the periphery,
we will charge back into Vancouver and eat the mould off condos as if feasting on fine
cheese platters.
A+
BB
EDITOR'S  NOTE As a relative newcomer to Vancouver, The Railway
became a hub of my activities, the nexus to many worlds.
Through work (conveniently a block away), I bonded with
coworkers and their circle of friends for late Thursday nights.
Through radio, I caught up with fellow hosts at either Shindig on Tuesdays or shows put up by associated bands, audience members, other friends or whoever wound up near the
mic on Saturdays. Sometimes up front to catch the frontal
onslaught, sometimes along the narrow corridor leading
to the west room, conspiring or jaw agape at amazement.
Then there was the separate room towards Seymour that
looked as plush as a past coronation and often a mess of
a gettogether. Some weeks, I'd be there 3 nights a week;
some nights, as I pinballed between friends, kept going until
they locked the outside doors, keeping us woozy and inside,
trying to chase a homey vibe whilst realizing the next day
awaited. Cherry petals would bloom at window height, rain
putting pause to leaving right away. Staff would amuse us
with past glories and future plans, the regulars as constant
as the miniature trains that puttered overhead. For a time,
the pints flowed passionately. However, in the recent past,
bands were paid less, the supplies weren't always refilled
in time, the union broken and much like the carpet torn out,
years of footfalls and drops of loose beverages erased, the
life drained out slowly. It felt like the vaunted "third space"
was never acknowledged for what it was; a welcome source
of comfort and entertainment, intentional or otherwise. Out-
oftowners would hear about its spirit and bask in it, hearing
of the time when the back patio housed as many smokers
as there were attendees by the stage, people squeezed in
tight, jackets left by radiators. It felt like magic but the last
magician didn't grasp its power and it spilled out. I see "Self
Serve Bar" still lit in red and purple from Dunsmuir as I ride
past; oh to walk back up as instructed and find my self,
served, unbarred. This venue was home and we were all
orphaned - Anonymous
It doesn't happen often, that something superlatively
good is also really, really popular, but Prince was. CiTR
played the early albums, but after his leap to big mainstream
success, he belonged to everybody. My friends and I may
have been music snobs to a certain degree, but Prince, we
could all agree, was undeniably a genius.
Everybody loved him, but especially the girls. Prince
clearly was a man who liked women, and not just as objects,
but also as people, friends and fellow musicians. He promoted them, played in his bands with them and wrote songs
with and for them. Prince empowered women. Like his song
says, Prince could imagine himself as our 'girlfriend." Those
tiny stamping boots and his glamfunky, slightly effeminate
new romantic outfits were irresistible, like catnip. Plus, we all
noted, even though he took up with a succession of beautiful, talented and highvisibility women, none of Prince's exs
ever complained; in fact, they all seemed to still adore him.
No one had a bad word, which spoke eloquently of his character and talents.
I found out the shocking news of his death from my
good friend Sally. She was with me both times I saw Prince
perform. First time was from the floor of the Pacific Coliseum in 1988 on the LoveSexy tour. He funked it up so bad.
The staging, dancing and playing by Prince and his troupe
was so utterly fantastic that it is one of my all time favourite concerts.
The second time, at Rogers Arena just before Christmas 2011, was made memorable when a few songs into the
set, with the audience showing typical Vancouver restraint,
Prince shouted "Don't be cool Let's have Fun!" The party
rocket took off right then, and it didn't touch down again until
the audience finally insisted on a third encore, with Prince
rushing out from backstage to play in what he informed us
was his "do rag" (a cloth wrapped around his hair to keep
the style in place.) It seemed like an informal setwithinaset,
because he'd been getting ready to dial it down after the show,
but couldn't resist the call to return once more to play just a
little bit longer for his enraptured audience... - Erica Leiren
// To read the rest of this entry visit discorder.ca
vvv
■ ■ ■
Want to give feedback on Discorder? Or the music scene we
love? Email your message to editor.discorder@cltr.ca. ATTN: Hot
Head, or leave a note in the Discorder office ATTN: Editor-in-Chief
HOT HEAD MOSFETT
TOTALLY MOSFETT
words by Bryce Warnes // photos by Matthew Power
illustrations by Max Littledale
The three guys in MOSFETT are sitting
on a minivan seat under an overpass outside their jam space. It's Sunday, the day
that bassist Brendan Manning commutes
by ferry from Victoria, BC and the group
practices. Their session is over, so it's time
to drink beers and absorb some April sun.
MOSFETT was once a two-piece named
Hemogoblin, formed around 2010 by
guitarist Ian Kinakin and drummer Chase
McKenzie. Their sole release, a tape called
Roswell, initially came out under Napkin
Records, and then again with the band's
own run under the MOSFETT moniker.
To some ears, Roswell is an addictive
slab of doomy sludge-pop, including songs
such as "Hand Sanitizer Cocktail," "If you
Leave Me I'll Hurt Myself' and a crunchy
take on the Friends theme — "Matthew
Perry / Central Perk."
But opinions differ.
"I think it sounds kind of shitty nowadays," says McKenzie. "We did it ourselves
and it took a really long time to make."
And it was difficult to perform the
songs live. Kinakin had to run his instrument through both a guitar and a bass
amp, play extra low notes to fill out the
sound, and mess around with loop pedals in order to layer multiple guitar parts.
"Often the loop would be off time, or it
would just screw up," says Kinakin, claiming early shows agitated him.
Around 2014, Nick Sabre joined as a
bassist, easing live performance tensions.
His addition allowed the group to change
the style of their songs, freeing up Kinakin
to shred sans loops.
Sabre couldn't make it for the band's
first tour, though — a jaunt down the West
Coast to L.A. — so Kinakin's cousin Bren- *
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dan Manning filled in. Soon Sabre dropped
out for good, and Manning joined full-time.
Though taking the ferry from Victoria can
be a drag, he doesn't plan to permanently
join his bandmates on the Mainland any
time soon.
"Vancouver is a great place to visit," he
notes dryly.
So with the band settled into their current lineup, MOSFETT started amassing new songs, many of which will appear
on their self-titled debut LP due out mid-
July Recorded by MOSFETT and mixed
and mastered by Jordan Koop at the Noise
Floor, it will be released on Manning's fledgling label Astro Supreme. Playing shows
and touring together — last spring, they
hit Alberta and the West Coast with pals
Dead Soft — MOSFETT has put together
plenty of new material, and changed their
sound as well.
There is a "more bluesy influence in
[our older] stuff," says Kinakin. Now, "It's
a different band to me." He likens MOS-
FETT's current voice to a blend of "Sabbath and Pixies. Alternative, poppy songs
but with a lot of heavier riffs."
Because their new record took so long
to tape — members of the band all have full-
time day jobs, and McKenzie and Kinakin
both play in another band, Doppelga-
nger — the amount of new material MOSFETT is writing outpaces actual releases.
By band members' reckoning, they've got
another one or two albums up their collective sleeves. The trouble is finding the time
and resources to record them.
Part of that is a result of issues many
independent bands in Vancouver face. Just
finding a reliable place to practice and record can be difficult. East Van condo creep
chased MOSFETT out of their previous
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FETT THANK YOU! TO ALL OF OUR
WONDERFUL DONORS!
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Alexander
Bobbie Blue
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Elozino Olanivc
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Margaux M
Marilyn Mullai
Marley
Matt Iianasvk
Max Wainwright
Melanie Kuzyk
Mengistu Orion
Michelle
Nancy S McCoy
Neal C L Yon.son
la A RatclilTe
Sarah King
Sean Condon
Simon Doran
Spencer Lindsay
Stelvio Bandiera
Steve Zhang
TennisPhysicil
The Capital Media
racy Windsor
'RANCKNDLANC
D. Waldinan
Davis McKenzie
Deborah J. Bras
Kent & Terra
Jakobsen
Kevin Weigan
Lani Morand
Philip Kane
Philip Vogl
rh Saxtone
you're not on this list, it might have been because you chose to be anonymous, left the recogni-
sld blank, or because we have yet to find out if we have permission to publicly thank you. Thanks
understanding, and our apologies if we missed you! We really appreciate your support. AMY SHOSTAK
IN GOOD HUMOUR
words by Evan Brow
photos by Han-Yu Lee
illustrations by Ewan Thompson
Comedy has always been subversive.
We associate it with spontaneity, with
a grunge-like resilience, and with ramshackle rooms that somehow always smell
"off." However, few think of the directors,
the writers, the organizers who pour hours
and hours into their work and think, "This
can be better. This can be great. If we all
put the work in, everyone will look like a
star." In Edmonton, Amy Shostak was that
person. As the Artistic Director of Rapid
Fire Theatre, Edmonton's longest-running
improv theatre, Shostak did it all: programming shows, festivals, casting, finding corporate gigs, developing workshop
opportunities, marketing, and expanding
the company's festival roster from two festivals to four. In 2015, Shostak decided
to leave the position. January 1st, 2016
(coincidentally, her birthday), Shostak
moved to Vancouver, drawn by its expansive improv scene.
Shostak was born and raised in Edmonton. Attending Eastglen High School, she
constantly went and saw the improvised
soap opera Die Nasty on Monday nights
and Rapid Fire Theatre's Theatresports
on Friday nights. Her love of theatre and
improv fostered at the same time, leading
her to the University of Alberta, graduating in 2002 with a Drama major and Art
History minor.
"I didn't realize until later that my
family was more artistic," says Shostak.
"My mom worked at a bank for a number of years, but by night she was a musician. My dad was in scenic carpentry, so
he would build sets for the opera or displays at the museum. We'd always get to
go with him to these cool events. But at
the time, it wasn't on my radar. So I was
rebelling. I'd think, Tm going into drama
because my parents don't want me to.'
But I think I was more influenced by them
than I thought."
In the summer between high school
and university, Shostak joined Rapid Fire
Theatre's junior cast. During the next
seven years, Shostak worked, graduated,
thought about a career as a museum curator, became Rapid Fire's Associate Artistic Director, but ultimately didn't know
what the future would hold. She never
thought she would become Artistic Director. It seemed too daunting. But when
Kevin Gillese stepped down, Shostak
applied for the position and threw herself
at the challenge, becoming Artistic Director in 2010. As a disciplined improviser, an
ambitious organizer, and an improv theory
connoisseur, Shostak defined her vision
for Rapid Fire's future.
"I wanted to focus on communication between players," says Shostak. "I
felt there was a big divide. The senior
players had certain things they wouldn't
10
IN  GOOD  HUMOUR Shostak, on her most played improv
r ha ranters-
"I generally always play a British person. It's a pitfall I have. I think
improvisers have a well of characters they always play. Ideally you
always want to expand that, so eventually you have 30 characters
you can play, but I know that my first one is an innocent child and my
second is a British woman."
IN  GOOD  HUMOUR do. For example, they wouldn't clean up
after shows or they'd go to the bar for
the first half of the show while the junior players were onstage. Things like that
impacted people socially offstage and as
well onstage. Getting the group feeling
more like an ensemble was the goal. Additionally, one of the things we started doing
was having face-to-face meetings with performers twice a year, which didn't happen
before ... Even when you're asking someone to leave an ensemble, it's so much easier if you have a face-to-face meeting with
them."
Shostak wanted to keep the position
until the company completed its goal to
purchase a theatre. But when that goal
was pushed several years, Shostak decided
her time was up. With love, passion and
wanderlust, Shostak stepped down and
left her hometown. Currently, she has
been guesting on local shows, teaching
sporadic Instant Theatre workshops, and
preparing to begin a Dialogue and Civic
Engagement Certificate at Simon Fraser
University. While somewhat burnt out in
an administrative capacity, Shostak has
always been driven by improv, seeking to
establish herself as a professional impro-
viser and improv teacher. Wishing to join
or create a rigorously rehearsed ten-person improv troupe, Shostak is as hungry
as ever for artistic craftsmanship.
Amy Shostak can be found at amyshos-
tak.ca. She regularly performs with the
Vancouver TheatreSports League and often
teaches workshops with Instant Theatre.
3 ^f^
pi
^ CINEMA SPECTACULAR
FILMSTRIPPED
words by Ryder Thomas White
photos by Sophia Sauvageau
illustrations by Grace Ng
Cinema Spectacular's founder and
executive director Laurel Brown is, among
other things, a marine biology enthusiast.
That's not the main gist of our conversation, but it does explain why she used the
intertidal zone (the area of the ocean shore
between the low and high tide marks) as
a metaphor for the sometimes perilous
FILMSTRIPPED
13 purgatory between novice filmmaking and
gaining professional traction. "It's rocky,"
she laughs, 'You can be eaten by any number of things."
Brown found herself adrift in this same
situation after finishing her first independent short film in early 2014. And, despite
the ever-present buzz about film in Vancouver, found herself with few local opportunities to show off the final product.
But instead of doing what a lot of people
do (submit to a bunch of distant festivals
online, get into one or two) or what I would
have done (put it on YouTube, walk away),
she rented the Vancity Theatre, made a
poster, and set up her own screening.
Content came from a grassroots group of
locals in the same situation — "I recruited
them to my cause," Brown says.
That cause solidified about six months
later. Somewhat by chance, the first year
had met a somewhat unfilled niche in the
Vancouver film scene: the one-day screening contained only work under 20 minutes
long, but included music videos, collage
films, and trailers for independent feature
films mixed in with short-form drama and
comedy. Filmmakers like Nathan Douglas responded well to the idea that projects were chosen more for their ideas than
anything else they represented, with "the
freedom to showcase work that is more
thoughtful, challenging, or messy" than
standard festival fare. By christening the
little event 'Cinema Spectacular' rather
than  something   ending  in   'Film  Fest,'
14
FILMSTRIPPED Brown had created a loosely-curated space
for people to try out their motion picture
work, whatever their formal or stylistic
traits, in a brick-and-mortar venue.
The real, live cinema is a crucial point
for the festival, and for Brown: "One of the
important things is to see people watching
your film. You kind of forget, while you're
struggling to make it, that someone is
going to actually watch it."
Douglas, a 2015 festival alumnus
whose film Son In The Barbershop premiered at Cinema Spectacular and went
on to win awards around the world,
agrees. "[The festival] also serves as a natural meeting point for up and coming filmmakers to see each other and realize that
they aren't alone."
If there is anywhere that Cinema Spectacular is still finding its feet, it is in bridging the gap from the film world in Vancouver to the general public. BC filmmakers
are a distinctively insular bunch — it was
really not until the "Save BC Film" campaign in 2012 that the sector made a concerted effort to reach out — but Brown and
festival coordinator Alexandra Caulfield
have sought to curate a diverse program
of work this year that includes under-
represented perspectives and stories from
across the country with a focus on the
unexpected. The long-term goal of the festival is to facilitate a touring program of
films, renewed annually, to allow for cultural exchange of micro-budget projects
across the country.
For right now, anyway, Laurel Brown
and her festival are happy to exist within a
smaller group of people who are interested
in a variety of forms of image-based storytelling. "I was not trying to create something super-serious," she tells me. "It's
more about having fun."
Perhaps Brown's off-the-cuff inter-
tidal zone of filmmaking remark means
more than first intended, then: it's a rough
place, for sure, uneven and slippery, but
there is also an incredible interplay of life
there. And even for the casual passerby,
there's certain to be something cool to look
at.
Cinema Spectacular 2016 will be held
on Sunday, May 29 at Vancouver International Film Centre's Vancity Theatre.
Tickets and info at cinemaspectacular.com.
FILMSTRIPPED
15 1*
LEVITATION
VANCOUVER
JUNE 16-19, 2016 • MALKIN 8QVVL + NIGHT SHOWS
FLYING LOTUS • TYCHO
THE GROWLERS • of MONTREAL
THEE OH SEES • FfMM • ALLAH-LAS
THUNDERCAT • HOIK «JCK • WHITE LUNG
HINDS • ffUSS/A/V CfffClfS • MAD MEADOW
COM TRUI5E ' SHABAZZ PALACES • 5IH/WS
CfffffffK CLAZERR • 5VM4C * THC FLATLINERS
NOTHING • MORGAN DELT ' HOLY WAVE • BOOGARINS
DEAD GHOSTS • PAT LOK (LIVE) • HERON OBLIVION • SAOtl MONTI
TOGETHER PANGEA • TROTH • WRONG • CULTURE ABUSE • BEACH MAST Iff
BABA PLAN • LOUISE BURNS • YOUTH 1EW • AOUANAUT • WAINCKO • SUMMERING
ISICCMPEIU I THE B1RT • SEVEN NINES AHA TENS • THE RABUTWN flOWERS • BETRAYERS
'THE ORANGE KITE ■ BIB YOU BIE • SHAUHK • NINA MENBOZA • HMD ALCHEMY LICHT SHOW i
i  *
KM
f\
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CLUSTERFOLKS
words by Brody Rokstad II photos by Pat Valade
illustrations by Kat Dombsky
Soon after sitting down for beers
with mandolinist Alex Marusyk, guitarist
Andrew Mueller, bassist Dave Wise, and
drummer Marc Lovisa of Vancouver-based
Cornshed, I realized I was going to have
a great interview. Not that I didn't expect
it; they're defining a new genre affectionately termed clusterfolk — a unique blend
of punk, bluegrass, country and folk.
But what I loved was that minutes into
the conversation, it was hugely apparent
that these guys are playing music for all
the right reasons and that they really love
what they do. And why wouldn't they love
it? Their band is fun as hell and they're
carrying a unique sound out into the
world, so it was no surprise that they were
brimming with enthusiasm as they told
me about Cornshed.
The band started in 2011 when Mueller and Lovisa, formerly in a hardcore
group together, were jamming around and
playing with ideas. "We got pretty drunk,
and Andrew started playing some acoustic shit and I just started throwing punk
beats to it, and we were like, "That's what
we're gonna do,"' recalls Lovisa. Mueller
adds, "Then we had a gig, and we had no
one else in the band." So they grabbed a
fiddle player and a mandolin player, and
Cornshed was born.
This    characteristic    make-it-up-as-
you-go approach is what gives Cornshed
CORNSHED
17 appeal, but also credibility. They write with
minimal pre-conceived notions or ideas. It
is a diplomatic and democratic process,
and clearly that's way they like it. Wise
explains, "A song usually comes from a riff,
and then everyone sort of builds around
it. And then we arrange it all together. We
just pull it out, it's awesome." That's not to
say these musicians don't take a long view,
or that they lack patience in their compositions — they have cultivated some sophisticated and structured tracks. They just
like to leave room for flexibility and spontaneity in their work, and that in turn creates an atmosphere of inclusivity and fearlessness in which creativity can flourish.
"No one's ever had their feelings hurt in
this band," shares Marusyk. "You bring
an idea and they're like 'Hell yeah man, I
bet that could fit right here.' It's awesome.
"YOU BRING AN IDEA AND THEY'RE LIKE HELL YEAH MAN, I BET THAT
COULD FIT RIGHT HERE.' IT'S AWESOME. I'VE NEVER HAD ANYTHING
TURNED DOWN, AND SOMETIMES THE IDEAS ARE PRETTY WACKY."
I've never had anything turned down, and
sometimes the ideas are pretty wacky."
The musicians in Cornshed all hail
from Ontario — Lovisa, Mueller and
Marusyk from a small town called Fort
Frances, and Wise from Ottawa. Growing
up with Ontario's long winters gave them
plenty of time indoors to hone their instruments. They grew up either being fans of,
or bandmates in each other's bands. The
incarnation of Cornshed in Vancouver, I
suppose, could be considered an Ontar-
ian reunion of sorts, with Wise joining
Mueller and Lovisa in 2013, and Marusyk
joining in 2014.
This band has evolved a lot over
the span of three albums. Their music
started out as mostly acoustic and until
recently, was entirely instrumental. Over
time they added more amps and effects,
18
CORNSHED  and have seen a few members and instruments come and go. The most recent addition to their sound is a big one, however
— Marusyk's vocals. "We wanted to fill the
sonic gap that dropping the fiddle left, but
we didn't want to sacrifice the fun level —
the fact that we bring it like a train," says
Wise, "And it didn't take away from that.
It even made it more enjoyable in some
ways. The reality is, is that vocals just
make your music more relatable. People
love to hear someone sing." Lovisa agrees,
directed at Marusyk, "Why wouldn't we
utilize your fucking voice, dude? It would
be stupid not to use it. The guy sings like a
god-damned angel man." They have a yet-
to-be-titled four song EP coming out this
summer showcasing Marusyk's exalted
vocal chords.
Cornshed's' live show is something to
behold. They have a frenetic and ridiculously high energy, and it just begs you to
drink beers, stop thinking, And lose yourself with the band. "We all explode. Like
he's fucking insane on the drums," says
Wise, pointing at Lovisa. "He'll just grab
his drum in the middle^ of the song and
then be in the audience, and we're all like,
'Ok well let's keep this going while he's
pushing that guy with one hand and playing the drum with the other.' It gets out of
control. And none of us are trying to control it." The chaos and spontaneity of their
live show comes from their love of music
in its raw, unpredictable authenticity. Wise
concludes with a sentiment that encapsulates the spirit of Cornshed. "People love
that shit cause it's real."
Cornshed has entered the CBC Searchlight
contest and uM be releasing an album later
this summer. Visit comshedbarvdcarnp.comfor
more info, and search them on YouTUbe to see a
teaser of met Hue set.
20
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2 free lessons AMBIGUOUS MUSIC
GENERATION GAP
words by Daniel Geddes
illustration by Eva Dominelli
Some music doesn't make you want
to dance or sing, it doesn't have words (or
they are inaudible), isn't beautiful or ugly,
and is neither shocking in its decadence
nor beguiling in its minimalism. It isn't
pop, and it isn't obviously original. Instead,
it is ambiguous and exists somewhere in
between all of these qualities along the
infinite plane of imagination, possibility
and potential. This music has very little
commercial appeal because it demands
an explanation, and offers even less definition than the average release. This is
not what many people are looking for from
music. The onus is on you as the listener
to come up with an interpretation and to
create meaning. Perhaps it is the tone, or
the musicality, or a snippet of comprehensible lyricism. But only you can unlock it,
and if you don't try, there is no hope.
I think that the music of Jandek fits
22
GENERATION GAP into this category. His first album, 1978's
Ready for the House, is the kind of thing
that causes people to ask themselves,
'Why am I listening to this?' There is no
obvious payoff, and no instantly pleasing
attributes. Instead, what we have is one
softly strummed, out-of-tune acoustic guitar, and one deeply disconcerting ghost of
a voice, whispering what one gathers are
fairly dour sentiments. No particular talent
is on display here, other than for creating
an unnerving atmosphere. But it is exactly
this perplexing quality that can be so
mind-expanding for us as music listeners.
It is a feeling that I have always noted as I
discover some new frontier on my musical
horizon: the questioning of why it exists as
it does. Ready for the House is essentially
one chord throughout, and feels inert. It is
the opposite of a lot of the music we hear,
and is enjoyable to me because it lacks the
qualities of popular music. This makes it
fertile ground for all kinds of unique mental activity. Ready for the House makes my
mind wander to places most music doesn't
cause me to go.
Similarly, the late 2015 album Vertigo
by The Necks is devoid of common convention. But here there is one obvious difference: demonstrable musical talent. In
some ways it is even stranger that professional musicians would set out to make
this kind of fractured music than an amateur auteur like Jandek, but just as inspiring. After listening to the Jandek record,
this album sounds rich with notes and textures, but I think it still exists out on that
undefined vista of free and open ambiguity.
There is no singing here, just constantly
changing splatters of sound and music.
The drones are consistently interrupted,
which negates the effect that drone music
usually has. But just as Ready for the
House has an almost oppressive musical
continuity, there is a relentlessness to Vertigo. There are no crescendos, it simply
evolves. As people who live in a world dominated by popular music we are trained
to listen for tension and release, and anything that only builds tension is bound to
stand out. In fact, it is probably this quality which unites the two albums in terms
of compositional approach.
I don't think that all music must challenge our preconceived notions of what
makes listening to it an enjoyable experience. Sometimes, in order for the more
directly communicative aspect of music
to take place, we must be able to accept
it instantly so that we can comprehend it.
This is what makes music such as folk and
pop such potent vehicles for ideas, radical
or otherwise. But it is also important, and
pleasurable I might add, to be constantly
expanding our boundaries so as to build
new kinds of acceptance into our musical
ontology. It is good to seek these things
out because it reminds you of the limitless
potential of creation in all mediums, and
the boundlessness of human expression.
GENERATION  GAP
23 HORSEPOWAR
THE POWAR OF WORDS
words by Eleanor Wearing II photos by Lukas Engelhardt
illustration by Francesca Belcourt
The first time I met Jasleen Powar,
a.k.a. Horsepowar, was back in 2013. We
were hanging out in the CiTR news office,
and she was working on a rap about Hamlet, occasionally enlisting my minimal
Shakespearean knowledge to verify her
lyrics. Though I was initially confused
(why would someone rap about Hamlet, of
all things?) this was quickly replaced with
amazement. I listened as Jasleen took a
subject that many find to be excruciatingly
dull, and turned it into a clever, energized
and skillful rap. Three years later, Horsepowar is no longer rapping about Shake
speare - but her energy and skill has continued to intensify.
This past March, Horsepowar released
Out2Lunch, sl 5 track EP that is as fun
as it is diverse. Throughout the EP, intricate lyrics weave between classic hip hop
beats, Bollywood samples, and catchy
synth-driven melodies. Dropping just
under a year after her last EP Bollywoes,
Out2Lunch demonstrates an impressive
balance between growth and consistency.
"You know how everyone says, 'Do you,
do you and don't ever change?' That's what
I'm doing," says Jasleen after asking how
her sound has evolved. "I think Bollywoes
24
HORSEPOWAR and [Out2Lunch] show that I've made progress, but they still play true to who I am ...
Sonically, the quality of Out2Lunch is way
better because I got it mixed and mastered,
and I'd never done that before."
Produced and recorded from December to February after Jasleen finished her
Theatre degree at the University of Victoria, Out2Lunch features collaborations
with Homeboy Jules, who Jasleen met on
the Crimes & Treasons show at CiTR, as
well as Francis Got Heat. The EP picks
up where Bollywoes left off — it is high
energy, but shows more vulnerability and
maturity. Part of this comes from Jasleen's
decision to introduce more of her singing
voice. And while this might be a daunting
choice for some rappers, she approaches
this decision with confidence.
"You just gotta go with it. That's kind of
how I dress myself. You know, people say, 'I
don't know if this goes!' You just gotta rock
it - if you say it does, it works, it's gonna
do that. So I just do the sing, speak type,
Kid Cudi meets Drake style."
Growing up as the youngest in a big
family, Jasleen found herself seeking
out the spotlight from an early age. Her
first foray into performance was through
dance, and despite the fact that she was a
shy kid, getting on the stage to perform in
dance shows is where she believes Horsepowar began to take form. From dance, she
moved into slam poetry, and then drama,
before landing on rap. This wide range
of experiences has helped her to craft a
unique sound, and take Horsepowar from
a vision to reality.
When I inquire as to whether she feels
like Horsepowar is her alter ego, Jasleen
explains, "You know dress rehearsal, and
then the final performance? Jasleen Powar
is like dress rehearsal, but Horsepowar is
who I am at my full potential, at that exact
moment. It's still me, but it's just like,
fuckin', a lot of Horsepowar in there! I'm
ready to go, and I'm ready to go fast!"
So far, this approach has paid off. Both
Bollywoes and Out2Lunch have received
attention from Noisey, The FADER, HipHop
Canada, CBC and Nylon Magazine. Internationally, they have also received attention from GQ India and Buzzfeed India.
"It's a nice feeling," reflects Jasleen, "It
makes me feel like Horsepowar is bigger
HORSEPOWAR
25 i i'El. / #
than I originally thought it could be. But
now I definitely see a global aspect, and I
really appreciate all the love that India has
shown me."
Part of this love, Jasleen suggests,
comes from the samples of Hindi, or Bollywood music found throughout her last
two projects. Ranging from subtle background beats to full blown, captivating hooks, these samples give listeners a
taste of some of Jasleen's influences. And
though she has a self-proclaimed love for
Hindi music, her choice to include these
samples is not always an easy one.
"Sometimes I feel like I don't want to
play that Brown girl rapper ... I just want
to be a rapper - so then do I stop playing
with Hindi songs? But then I think back
to my actual personal taste. And I fucking love Hindi music. So I am going to play
true to the hip hop aesthetic, and pull,
and sample. It's all about taking something that is already there, and creating
something new with it. If I'm doing that,
I'm going to choose stuff that I like, that I
have a personal connection with. And that
is Hindi music, and so, I just can't fight
that."
Going forward, Jasleen hopes to incorporate more collaboration into her work,
and play more shows in Vancouver and
beyond. As a performer, she strives to
give her audiences a performance that is
at once intimate and fun. She sees shows
as an opportunity for the audience to get
to know her. Her favourite performers are
those who make her want to get up on
stage, to be involved, and this is the feeling
she wants for her audiences as well.
"I love to point at people, look at them
in the eye, say lines to them. I love breaking the fourth wall," she says, referencing
her experience in theatre. "Being on stage
is like [the audience] getting to know me,
it's me hanging out with a bunch of people
at the same time."
Considering what she has accomplished so far, I have no doubt that there
will be a lot more people looking to hang
out with Horsepowar in the near future.
You can get to know Horsepowar at the
Bhangra Festival in June, where she will be
facilitating a workshop on June 16 and performing on June 18. You can also hear her
as a host of Crimes & Treasons, Tuesdays
from 9-11PM on CiTR 101.9FM.
26
HORSEPOWAR mr"awm^
SOL
o
YOU'VE GOT ME
SCRATCIIN
ITCHIN
words bu Callie Hitchcock II photos by August Bramhofj
With the smashing release of
Supermanic in February, hip hop and rap
group So Loki hit the scene hard and fast
after a year of collaboration. The album's
infectious energy has carried rapper Sam
Lucia and producer Natura a.k.a. Geoffrey
Millar into the light of well deserved success, and new music is on the way.
"My first love was hip hop," says Millar. "I like working with vocalists a lot. I
don't really like just making instrumen-
tals." Influenced by punk, pop punk, and
electronic music, "This is a project where
I can come back and do hip hop while still
bringing all my other influences."
Lucia similarly produced solo music
before meeting Millar through a mutual
friend. "I was producing all my own stuff.
I'm self taught and I'm not fantastic at it.
I can do it but it's not gonna sound how
I wanted it to." Instead of spreading thin
wearing all the creative hats, a strong, creative relationship formed between Lucia
and Millar. "The way Geoffrey puts things
together, he pushes me to make it worth it
every time. I always have to impress him
because he impresses me with it."
Millar agrees that fruitful creative relationships are "such a hard thing to find.
I've never had this kind of... We're just on
the same page. Usually I'll think of something and he'll be like, 'I know what you're
thinking.'"
Placing themselves within a hip hop
context, Lucia says, "I used to listen to
a lot of hip hop. The second we started
working together I notice a lot of it stopped
interesting me. Obviously the landscape is
always gonna change, but everyone is following so closely to trend now that it feels
like there's nothing different." Vibrant
and explorative, So Loki tries for something new. "Especially where we are in
Canada, especially in Vancouver, there's
a lot of diversity so we're definitely trying
to push that boundary a bit. Make people
feel weird."
SO  LOKI
27 The lack of rigid style conformity in
Vancouver music is an asset for newer talent like So Loki. While New York and LA.
might seem alluring for its historical reputation, building a body of work in a music
scene that already has a specific expectation of sound associated to it could be stifling. "It's so set in stone that it will change
the way you create music," says Millar.
And Lucia agrees: "No one's jumped
out in the spotlight yet so there's a lot of
ideas that haven't been brought to light
yet. There's a lot of new feelings that you're
not going to get from scenes like New York
and L.A., and the classic hip hop cities."
What results is an untapped thirst for
creative work in Vancouver. Lucia remarks,
"They are craving it." While some other
high-volume music cities might be too
saturated, Vancouver maintains the raw
energy of creative beginnings and people
wanting to be a part of it.
One of the main issues for music in
Vancouver is what So Loki perceives as a
lack of interconnectivity. "A lot of people
hate on the music scene in Vancouver
but I think that it's just because it's not
connected," says Millar. "People in Vancouver are really shy. They are shy about
approaching each other and shy about collaboration. They're not trying to be snobs."
Lucia's concern is that "people aren't
angry enough out here. People are going
to start getting upset soon though. The big
thing is housing. The reason why I don't
think the groups connect is, how am I
going to afford to go out to all the hip hop
shows that happen in a month and then
try to make it out for the Chapel Sound
events, or Groundwerk? Because if we live
in a place that's more affordable we would
do it. I think people are starting to notice
that there's a lot of outlets but there's not
enough funding behind it. Everyone's putting our dollars together in our own little
groups making our own. Once people get
punk on it and they wanna do something
about it I think it's gonna blow up, and a
lot of kids are starting to get there. I should
be able to do a lot more than I am."
No matter what the music landscape
looks like, So Loki's fire power cannot be
tamed. With new music on the way, "Our
next step is we are going to be the biggest
fucking name on the West Coast." Amen.
So Loki will be releasing something special for Cinco de Mayo on Owake Records, and
will be performing next at the Emily CarrGrad
After Party May 7, location to be announced
They also just released their debut video for
"Lil y*~" which can be viewed on YouTube.
Visit soundclouolcomlsolokisolokifor more.
UveVan.com: Part of a network of concert
completely updated and populated with details by
thousands of informed members of the music ind
Integrated with local profiles in the
Vancouver Musicians Oii
the CiTR Radio i
Vancouver Band Qh
Vancouver Music \
9 ResourceC
28
SO LOKI  YUNG LEAN
MARCH 31 / VOGUE
I must have missed the "You must be this
young to enter" signs when I walked into the
Vogue Theatre to see Yung Lean, because,
maybe not surprisingly, I was the only person
there over 22-years-old.
While I arrived late, missing the opening acts Tommy Genesis and Thaiboy
Digital, I walked into the theatre, full of teenagers dancing to Rihanna over the house
speakers. A few minutes later all the music
stopped. Everyone started chanting for Yung
Lean. Not long after the chanting began, I
heard a strange sound. Rather than a group
of rappers coming on stage, some obnoxious, honky-tonk country music came over
the P.A. At first I thought it was a joke but
it lasted a little too long for it to have been
unintentional. The young crowd went with it,
though — teenage mosh pits began to form.
Finally Yung Sherman, producer and
member of the Sad Boys Crew, rolled out
first, wearing a green bomber jacket, white
tee, chain, and baseball hat. Following him
and a huge roar from the crowd, Yung Lean
and Bladee, both Sad Boys members, came
running on stage. Yung Lean, a baby faced
19-year-old, was wearing a black metal tee,
adidas track pants, and had (fake) blood
leaking from both his eyes.
While The New Yorker called his music
"confessional rapping over airy, melancholy
rap beats," it didn't take long to notice that
this Swedish rapper has probably listened to
his share of Bathory and Anti Cimex — both
popular hardcore Swedish punk bands from
the '80s. If you listen carefully, you can hear
the influence they've had on Lean's music.
His instrumentals can have a similar style to
the guitars in Swedish black metal — high
pitched, distorted, and fast. And, if you follow him on Twitter, you might have noticed
his recent Anti-Cimex post, paying tribute to
the hardcore group that lots of punks still listen to today.
While the Sad Boys performed, the
crowd — what looked like a mix between
young goths and young jocks — couldn't
contain themselves. Most of what they
played was from Yung Lean's 2016 album
Warlord, but when they played tracks from
2014's Unknown Memory, people lost it. A
few audience members tried climbing over
the barriers but they were quickly escorted
to the back — it almost felt like the security
guards were babysitters, first and foremost.
Some kids even tried to light up inside, but
that too was curtailed as soon as it began.
Yung Lean's set was about 15 tracks
long, including two in the encore, but hearing
the voices outside after the show, it seemed
like everyone thought it was too short. The
young crowd was still hyped and so was I.
30
REAL  LIVE ACTION As I unlocked my bike to ride home, it looked
like at least half of the teenagers were getting picked up in their parent's cars. After all,
this was a school night.— Sarah Charrouf
BLOCKTREAT/
SUN SETS WEST/
WALLGRIN
APRIL 9 / CHINA CLOUD
In 2012, Brandon Hoffman was living in Vancouver and recording music under the name
Blocktreat. In 2014, he moved to the interior of
British Columbia to "get back to the land" or some
hippy shit like that, but his brand of electronica still
has a devoted fan base here in Lotusland. The
audience in China Cloud at the release of his new
a' urn Exciting New Ventures In Fucking Up was,
without a doubt, a community of friends rather
than the disparate, withdrawn crowd so often complained about in regards to Vancouver shows.
Wallgrin opened the evening with her distinctive loop based violin playing. Her combination of octave pedals, dissonant tones and operatic vocals have a grandiosity that usually leaves
people raising their eyebrows at each other and
exhaling loudly through the mouth in an appreciative "Holy shit are you hearing this?" gesture.
Tonight was no exception. The room was completely silent during her performance, and enthusiastic applause followed each song.
Sun Sets West followed soon after. Frontman
Craig Aalders spends much of his time as a guitar
guru for bands such as Graftician, Leathan Milne,
and Pacific Sound Collective, so it made sense
that his own project left lots of space in which
bass player Nicolas Bermudez could experiment.
Aalders' throaty vocals and acoustic guitar in combination with Bermudez's basslines led to some of
the more mellow, but not unappreciated moments
of the evening.
Blocktreat's albums are serene, dream-like
productions, and his live show was no different.
It's one of the few electronic shows I've been to
where it's completely acceptable to lean back into
a couch, close your eyes, and drift off as part of
the experience. The dimly lit China Cloud encouraged this subdued energy.
On stage, Hoffman performed with a quiet,
confident precision. As he worked his samplers
and added elements of mandolin, he constantly
cued Brent Morton, his counterpart on live drums.
Slight nods and hand signals made the rhythm
louder or softer, more complex or more simple.
Watching him, one gets the impression of a spider
in a web or a sort of puppet master. This subtle
process between Morton and Hoffman, although
revealing the logistics of this sort of project, was
strangely satisfying to watch.
Leaving the show, I was thinking about what it
must be like for Hoffman to return to this city after
being gone so long. The Vancouver nickname lotus-
land' is a reference to The Odyssey, in which Odysseus visits a land whose inhabitants are befuddled
by a narcotic lotus. I still don't fully understand the
Vancouver connection, but the name was stuck in
my head that evening. Blocktreat may no longer be
a Vancouver resident, but his music feels about as
close to a narcotic water plant as you can get.— Sam
Tudor
ORA CUGAN/ACE
MARTENS/PAUL
STEWART
APRIL 14 / FOX CABARET
The opener for Ora Cogan's album
release for Shadowland was Paul Stewart,
performing a soft set accompanied by Missy
Donaldson on keys, and Justin Devries on
drums. The stage was cluttered with instruments, equipment, and what seemed like
miscellaneous furniture, giving a claustrophobic aura to a folk set that was otherwise
feathery and light.
The performance was a crescendo that
started airy, but grew stronger. The trio
ended how they should have opened — full
H
REAL  LIVE ACTION
31 and atmospheric, doing justice to the individual talents of those on stage. But in saving
this energy for the end, they lost the attention
of their audience. Though beautiful, it was a
set of false starts, technical malfunctions,
and uncomfortable pauses between songs
that left a lot to be desired.
When Ace Martens took the stage the
Fox became a lounge scene from Twin Peaks
— the spotlight burned a little brighter, and
the red velvet stage curtains seemed more
velvety. Ace Martens as a band brought an
immediate dynamism, with Ace Martens
himself on guitar and vocals, Bianca Carr
on bass guitar, and Sarah Cordingley on
drums. They moved to their own music with
an excitement that rippled off stage.
Their sound started out stylistically fuzzy,
but got progressively more intense, perhaps
unintentionally. Near the end of the set every
pause was filled with the hum of feedback,
but Ace Martens went along with it. As if
fuelled by it, Cordingley's drums became
more urgent, and Martens' guitar solos more
animated.
The band played all the tracks off their
new cassette, Palm Springs, and some
older hits, "Baby Blue" and "Breezy" being
standouts. They ended the set with "Palm
Springs," the title track off their most recent
release. Like the cool cat that he is, Martens' triumphantly took off his guitar before
the song had ended, letting the chords die
in a whine.
The room had been slow to fill up, not
uncharacteristic for a mid-week show. But
by the time Ora Cogan took the stage, the
venue was packed. Despite being crammed
together, the close-knit crowd still seemed
comfortable and the ambiance of the room
preluded Cogan's performance with an intimacy that grew throughout the performance.
The fuzz of the previous Ace Martens
set was replaced with the crisp vocals and
instrumentation of Cogan, accompanied by
Ryan Bekolay on bass, Chris Gestrin on
keys, Justin Devries on drums, and guests
Trish Klein and Marin Patenaude who joined
throughout the set. They opened with "Too
Long", a song with a steady beat and a fluttering chorus that captivated the audience
immediately. Cogan played all the songs
from her new album, Shadowland, and some
surprising covers of "It Hurts To Be Alone" by
Bob Marley & The Wailers, and "Disinformation" by Buffy Sainte-Marie.
Cogan's stage presence was calm and
confident, with between-song banter that
praised collaborators and friends who had
helped with Shadowland — itself, a revitalizing and bold love letter to the alternative folk
genre. It is obvious how infatuated Cogan is
with these songs and the narratives behind
them, bringing an impressive vocal range
that emanated such sincere pleasure during
her performance. Closing the set with a solo
encore curled over her guitar, Cogan left the
audience breathless.— Leigh Empress
32
REAL  LIVE ACTION THE RESIDENTS
APRIL 14 / THE RIO
One prevalent comment in reviews for
The Residents' current Shadowland tour is
that they, whoever they are, have been demonstrating virtuosity, repudiating the critique
of the collective as hardly musicians at all.
Of course this is bunk, The Residents are
innovators responsible for essential avant-
garde: from the experimental panoply of
Not Available, to the chanting humanism "of
Eskimo.
What is less bunk, is the critique that The
Residents are showing their age. Their transition into the digital era was from anarchic
tape primitivism towards dark cabaret kitsch.
It's a bit much for any artistic outfit to retain
vitality over four decades. Nonetheless, The
Residents still do a kind of The Residents
wfell enough to keep fans pleased. Packed
with fans fetching posters and vintage tees,
their show at The Rio was evidence enough.
As a quick aside, the evening began with
The Theory of Obscurity, a film about The
Residents. If you're interested analyzing The
Residents' oeuvre, the movie is lacking. The
movie is propulsive and fun, but it's for the
fans.
Shortly after the film, an inflatable orb
was moved towards the center, and The
Residents, rather, the trio currently embodying their live presence, took stage. Back-
lit with black and white checkering, The
Residents wore white faux-crocodile skin
jackets and skulls, scrambling the dignity
of Shadowland's themes: birth, rebirth,
and near-death — bastardized by a holy /
foul paroxysm of casino extravagance. The
vocalist's performance of the Randy character was particularly strong, in the vogue-
ing and boyish splaying across the stage, in
the juxtaposition of his old-man mask and
taut muscled skin-suit complete with silver
speedo, all of which emphasized a gross
confluence that is uniquely Residents.
Shadowland is not an unqualified success. Vignettes projected into the inflatable
orb, presenting skull-faced spectres describing their run-ins with rebirth and death, were
more odd than provocative. The music falters similarly. With their electronics-heavy
set-up, The Residents excelled at synthetic
rhythms, brighter industrial tones with pop
and flourish via wavedrum. The vocalist's
howling channeled the id of previous incarnations towards greater mania. The guitarist soared and snaked over scrappy beats.
But the set began to drag, guitar shredding
became oppressive, the superfluous theme
refused to climax. The setlist breadth was
enough to satisfy any fan, but it didn't service what Shadowland could've been: a
work of developing power according to The
Residents' greatest works, as opposed to a
best-of.
But whatever. We're still on the heels
of The Residents' 40th anniversary and it's
time for retrospection. As much as they parrot the rock 'n' roll persona as a gag, The
Residents are living the dream for any icons.
The Residents at the Rio, Paul McCartney
at Roger's Arena: same difference.— Jonathan Kew
COURTNEY BARNETT/
ALWAYS
APRIL 19 / COMMODORE BALLROOM
Granville was covered in lines of folks
happily braving the unseasonably hot evening for the sake of their favourite acts: Austrian electro-swing at the Vogue, hip hop-influenced K-Pop at the Orpheum, and Courtney Barnett and Always at the Commodore.
Being a twice sold-out show, I should
have anticipated that people would want
to see the entirety of the impressive bill.
The Commodore's sizable dance floor was
REAL  LIVE ACTION
33 almost full by the time Toronto-based five-
piece Always punctually began their set.
Their snappy, solid set was packed with
much-loved dreamy indie-pop numbers from
their self-titled first album, including "Next of
Kin" and "Party Police," closing out with audience-favourite "Marry Me Archie." They also
played a few new songs, one with a particular wash of '80s dream-ballad nostalgia, that
bode well for the future.
Lead singer Molly Rankin's performance
style was focused, almost deadpan. Though
this was somewhat unexpected — the lightness of the music could easily allow for a
more loose-limbed approach — the group's
dynamic is clearly well-oiled. It's easy for
bands to appear singer-centric, but Always
represented a good sense of collectivity.
They operate as a unit, and they do so very
well.
Despite the show falling in between two
surely draining Coachella weekends, Courtney Barnett brought in rowdy energy from
the minute her trucker-capped head hit the
stage. Following opener "Dead Fox" from
her breakout Sometimes I Sit and Think, and
Sometimes I Just Sit, Barnett was quickly
forced to make small talk with the crowd
as technical difficulties intervened — "First
song in we're already fucked," she cracked.
Though these snuck up again once or twice
through the set, it would take a lot more than
some amps going off to fuck up Barnett's set.
In front of graphics fluctuating between
silly and trippy, Barnett and her two cohorts
played a selection from Sometimes I Sit,
with one or two older EP numbers. The
only hint Barnett gave of new material was
the recently released "Three Packs A Day,"
which the audience received as eagerly as
her older tracks.
Folks who had come to hear Barnett's
clear cut, sardonic lyrics may have been
somewhat disappointed, finding a sea of
nodding heads disturbed by a small but roiling mosh pit at the crowd's core. This group,
34
REAL  LIVE ACTION surprisingly, was whipped into a frenzy on
slow-burning "Small Poppies," the vigour of
which carried into the plaintive "Depreston;"
so much so that Barnett remarked it was
possibly the loudest anyone had sung along.
She took care to check in that the pit wasn't
getting dangerous, showing a care for her
audience that translated in her performance.
Closing out with "Nobody Really Cares
If I Don't Go To The Party," the crowd was
not ready to let Barnett go without a strong
encore, and she delivered. Between "Pickles
From the Jar" and "Avant Gardener," Barnett told us this may have been one of her
"funnest shows." Whether this was lip service or her trademark earnestness, we may
never know. But as the sweaty mob seeped
out into the warm Vancouver night, we certainly felt like the funnest people in town.
— Elizabeth Holliday
III
To have a live show considered for review in Discorder
Magazine and online, please email event details 4-6 weeks in
advance to Jasper D. Wrinch, Real Live Action Editor at
rla.discorder@citr.ca.
REAL  LIVE  ACTION Illustrations by Katherine Kott
SUN.
Main Street Record Fair XIII
© Heritage Hall
Napalm Death, Melvins, Melt
Banana ©VENUE
MY
DOXA Documentary Film
Festival © Vancity
An Evening with David
Sedaris © vogue
| Coasts, Knox Hamilton,
Symmetry
© Biltmore Cabaret
FieldAgent, Mary, Plazas
© Astoria
DOXA Documentary Film
Festival © Vancity
Rape is Real and Everywhere:
A National Comedy Tour
© Rickshaw Threatre
29
Chelsea Wolfe, A^Egack
Forest Index © Imperia
The So So Glos, The Dirt
© Cobalt
DOXA Documentary Film
Festival © Vancity
TUES.
WED.
Serve the People: A Study
and Discussion on the
legacy of the revolutionary
Asian American movement ■D.O: gpocurt    tarMFi
Psychic Mirrors:
MendozaMGoft
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somsr® Im&eriall
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DOXA Documentary Film Festival
©Vancity
Performance by Jeneen Frei Njootli
(daytime) © Morris
| and Helen Belkin Art Gallery
Har Mar Superstar © Cobalt
Late Spring LP release
© the red place
Emily Gnarr (Industry Night), Skinny Kids,
Indian Wars © SBC
DO)£AjE[ocumentary Film Festival
©Vancityit
Sound + Salt presents"Hive Mind (LA)
© Astoria
The Pack A.D., Dead Soft, Glad Rags
© Cobalt
Film Screening: The Day I Became a
Woman © Spartacus Books
Rettir Leinahtan, Crawling Human ©
Selectors' Records
DOXA Documentary Film Festival
Rabit, Animal Bodies, Koban, DJ Tristan Orchard
® Astoria
Plazas, Prison Hair, Pavel, Gran Am e Toast
Collective
The Pack A.D., Les Chaussettes, Tough Customer
@ Cobalt
So Hideous, Bosse-De-Nage, Finite, Seven Nines
and Tens ® Funky s
Peach Pit, Wallgrin, Wind-Up Birds © Pat's Pub
Bloom, Balance, Black Pills, Black Knight Satellite
© Askaround
SAT.
DOXA Documentary Film Festival
© Vancity
Hosehead Records Showcase © Astoria
Project Pablo, Secret Lover, Coral Beech,
Jesse Bru © Open Studios
Vancouver Noise Fest VI © Red Gate
Pop Drones Invazion © Selectors' Records
The Range, Rome Fortune
© Biltmore Cabaret
Link/
Winona Forever, Acab Rocky, Sad
Photography, Scum Laude © 333
14
DOXA Documentary Film Festival
© Vancity
Arabrot & Helen Money © Astoria
Damien Jurado & The Heavy Light, Ben
Abraham © Biltmore Cabaret
tv ugly, Inherent Vices, Wishkicker,
Doppelganger, Cindy Vortex © 333
The New Black, The Diviners
© The Princeton Pub
No Sinner album release, Shelter, Old Soul
Rebel © Cobalt
I Chapel Sound Festival © Red Gate
Chapel Sound Festival © Red Gate
U.S. Girls, FIVER © Biltmore
Joseph Arthur © Cobalt
Andrew Bird © Orpheum
Black Mountain. Ashley Shadow
© Commodore Ballroom
Koban, Milk, MOSFETT, Soft Haze
© Astoria
King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard, The
Murlocs, Dead Ghost © Rickshaw Theatre Fanta~glyph<f In 3.1
Picture jams for a project hy Gabi Dao 8l Ellis Sam
opens at POOL August 2016
Mn 1923 a cartoon made fun of a woman who heard people singing through her headphones'
Images:
l)Dolby water mark,   proscenium arch, text, couch, text: 'Generally credited with rendering sound visible"
2) Sound wave water mark, 3 speaker cones, pbotophone, listeners (1884), centre speaker, right 8l left
3) Proscenium water mark, audio wave blue print, 5.1 surround sound system, figure of an ear, 1/2 beat note  r
#
~^  under review
You're Me
Plant Cell Division
1080p
The beauty and serenity of Salt Spring Island
appears to have been deconstructed on Yu Su
and Scott Johnson Gailey's debut collaboration.
Calling themselves You're Me, the Vancouver duo
visited Salt Spring to set up a recording studio,
and were no doubt inspired by their surroundings.
With Plant Cell Division they have created 45 minutes of ambient wanderings that are at times sensual and in other moments completely elusive. As
an example, "Oot Re Mi" starts off with the most
intimate and satisfying motif on the record featuring a steady pulse that offers the only real dance-
able opportunity, though only for a few fleeting
moments.
The life force of the track deviates towards all
sorts of ambient musings and off-kilter percussive
pieces. It is no mistake that "Oot Re Mi" is immediately followed by something completely inconclu-.
sive in "Tabletalk." Here lies the deconstruc-
tion. Nature in some sense is an ironic concept
because the initial perception gained by spending any significant amount of time in a pleasing
natural setting is usually one of awe and wonder.
A more focused analysis of the organic ebb and
flow, however, tends to reveal a level of absurd
and bizarre interactions that undermine everything, yet bind it all together.
And so it is with Plant Cell Division. On tracks
like "Lucidity", "Walled Garden" and the previously
mentioned "Tabletalk," the ambient layers and textures feel like organic life forms all marching to their
own rhythms. Left to interpret the dreamy sound-
scape from afar, they are a mesmerizing example
of total cohesiveness and serve as a metaphor
that defines the natural world. Upon deeper listening, there are elements of complete randomness,
bordering on entropy, with subtle synth parts arriving and departing seemingly impervious to any
musical structure or time signature. Still unity is
achieved with this unusual interplay and in this
way the record mimics the very random yet calculated design of life on our planet.
And while Plant Cell Division obtains its
beauty by combining simplicity and complexity, there is one major complaint that should not
be dismissed. The album is way too short and it
seems just as we cozy up to the relaxed chaos.
"Soft Opening," like a few other tracks, leaves us
all too abruptly.-— Slavko Bucifal
42
UNDER  REVIEW Koban
Abject Obsessions
(Avant!)
Despite the onset of summer and the inevitable stream of sunshine-filled pop anthems and
beach clad Vancouverites, local gothic post-punk
duo Brittany Westgarth and Sam Buss of Koban
are still filling hearts with enough despair to last
the warm weather. With new album Abject Obsessions, fans of this city's ever-present dark music
scene will no doubt be pleased. These veterans
have stuffed their third LP with mechanical beats,
screeching guitars and piercing dual vocal techniques. It's complex and moody, and an indulgence to accompany an introspective evening, or
crowded night in a dive bar.
The album conveys a sense of melancholy
paired with a raw energy that grinds throughout its
entirety. The first track, titled "This Pursuit", begins
with an elongated sonic drawl that is quickly
replaced with Koban's tight electronic drum beat, a
near iconic sound. The noise is infectious, punctuated with the chilling monotone voice of Westgarth
coupled with Buss's backing vocals. Sliding in next
is "Instinct of Ego," which at first, could have been
the beginning to a nightmarish version of any classic New Order song. Naturally, the gothic nature
of Koban is powerful and that notion quickly subsides. It's grating and provocative, and sets the
pace of the rest of the album.
The danceability created through electronic
darkness may be just what puts Koban at the forefront of the gothic backdrop of Vancouver. In the
fourth track "Elias See's," Westgarth moans the
words "eternal bliss" over and over. Despite the
despair in her voice, it's dreamy. Reminiscent
of The Sisters of Mercy, though perhaps not as
accessible, each song creates imagery of dark,
dingy bars filled with '80s attire. It's an assault to
the senses, both intricate and rhythmic, a testament to Koban's ability to produce thought provoking music.
The album ends with "We Run Red Lights", a
Joy Division infused, industrial delight. Its energy
subsides and finishes quietly.
Koban seem to be growing in confidence,
exploring new sounds and perfecting their vocal
techniques. It's not a huge leap from their previous
album, Vide, but it's certainly a step up. The duo
have created something with poetic sensibility, artfully crafted. It's a sinister, heart throbbing thriller,
from beginning to end.— Evangeline Hogg
Tim Hecker
Love Streams
(4AD I Paper Bag)
I am forgetting my adolescence. I still remember certain phrases said to me underneath high
school bleachers. But faces and places are now
simple smudges. Important details have been lost.
Ambient music tends to deal with this sort of
dissolution. William Basinski's The Disintegration
Loops, the Caretaker's An Empty Bliss Beyond
this World, and Mark Van Hoen's The Revenant
Diary all offer listeners with the sounds of the past
being lost. For instance, The Disintegration Loops
is composed of deteriorating tape loops recorded
during Basinski's own youth. As each track is
. .* ;',
UNDER  REVIEW
43 gradually drowned out by static, previously sharp
melodic elements become echoes. Familiar forms
vanish.
Tim Hecker's newest release, Love Streams,
can be viewed as a spiritual companion to The
Disintegration Loops. Both Hecker and Basin-
ski have one foot firmly wedged in the past. But
while Basinski toys with something from his own
youth, Hecker looks back to 15th century Iceland. Love Streams not only utilizes a full choir
and an Icelandic woodwind ensemble, but was
also recorded in a church-cum-studio in Reykjavik. This fascination with classical arrangements,
churches, and frozen island nations is nothing new to Hecker. Both of his previous releases
(Ravedeath 1972 and Virgins) saw the use of Icelandic church-studios, pipe organs and antiquated
string ensembles.
The Disintegration Loops leaves the listener
melancholic and self-reflective, but Hecker aims
to disquiet. In Love Streams, the deterioration of
memory is something more than nostalgia. Classical instrumentation and musical structure do
not linger, but are re-appropriated. Love Streams'
opener, "Obsidian Counterpart," begins with a lush
arrangement of flutes. The repetition of notes
breeds a sense of calm, while the flutes are pleasant and familiar. But an alien throbbing erodes this
serenity. The original melody becomes a component of something large, multifaceted and modern,
another tone in a mishmash of synth and bass
beats. By the end of the song, the flutes seem
wholly new. Their original context as a classical,
familiar instrument is lost. Similarly, the choir
in "Violet Monument Pt 1" sounds nothing like a
choir. It is neither soothing nor angelic. The choir
is a jutting oddity; an almost robotic presence far
removed from its roots in worship.
Through the warping of classical elements,
Hecker illustrates the fluidity between the past
and the present. Memory will decay; the past will
become distant. But continuation is assured: elements of the past will be absorbed. Unlike Basin-
ski, things do not linger. For Hecker, nothing fades
away.— Max Anderson Baier
Ace Martens
Palm Springs
(Self-Released)
In 2014, Ace Martens released their first EP,
Silent Days. Eleanor Wearing, writing for Weird
Canada described it as a "Lunar Daydream."
Fast-forward 2 years and we have the second EP,
Palm Springs. DIY weird-pop is still the platform,
only now instead of inspiring daydreams of walking on the moon, the overall effect is more akin to
a hallucination in Southern California or experiencing a mirage in the Joshua Tree desert.
This is not surprising seeing as the EP is titled
Palm Springs, featuring a track with the eponymous name and another entitled "Desert Highway."
The latter creates this sun-scorched mood exceptionally. Ace's guitar has such intense vibrato that
you can almost feel the heat waves hazing in the
background, comparable to the midday sun beating down. Sarah Cordingley's driving drum beat
leads the track as it traces out your slow plod
through the desert. These differing elements
combine to create a powerful image of scorching
fantasy.
Trippy elements are constant throughout the
tape, underpinning all five tracks. The warm haze
seeps into you and leaves you daydreaming about
the fast-approaching summer. However, the EP
does get a little samey if you're not giving it your
full listening attention.
If you give this EP the time it deserves and
delve under the surface, you'll uncover something special. "On To Me" is a tender pop song
about unfaithful love, "Looks like she's coming
44
UNDER REVIEW onto me / You special baby." The track features is
an immensely catchy synth hook. It's a real album
highlight and impossible not to whistle for the rest
of the day.
Elsewhere on "Somebody Else," as Ace sings
"It's been a while since I needed somebody else,"
he oozes Alex Turner-esque debauched swagger.
This is immediately followed by very similar sentiments on "Baby Blue." But here he sounds delicate and almost vulnerable, singing "I see myself
in your mirror /1 see myself so much clearer."
It's these contrasting effects that make Palm
Springs an interesting listen. They showcase Ace
Martens' ability to create great sundrenched pop.
The task now is to combine this with a lunar daydream and create a full length album that shows
us their full box of tricks. I'd be willing to bet that
they'll do just that.— Sachin Turakhia
trog'low
Japan Digs: SHOWA
(Self-Released)
The latest EP by Vancouver-based artist
trog'low, Japan Digs: SHOWA, is a fluid mix of old
school hip hop beats, turntabling, Japanese-inspired melodies, and urban soundscapes. The
album is composed of samples from records
trog'low picked up while travelling through Japan.
Showa refers to the period when Japan was
ruled by the emperor Hirohito, from 1926 to 1989.
By the end of Hirohito's reign, Japan was the
world's second largest economy. The prosperity
of the late Showa period is an appropriate asso
ciation for the album's rich instrumentals. While
trog'low samples records from the late Showa
period, he layers the samples to create a modern sound, "daimyo" transitions from conversation
over soft strings to a rhythm and melody that is
at once reminiscent of '90s West Coast hip hop
and traditional Japanese music. In another juxtaposition of Eastern instrumentation and Western
popular music, shimmering chimes support the
prominent electronic riff in "kasui."
On the album's Bandcamp page, trog'low
explains the etymology of showa: "Japanese,
from sho 'bright, clear' + wa 'harmony'." The derivative meanings of showa are fitting descriptions
of Japan Digs: SHOWA. The tracks form a bright,
cohesive 23-minute whole. The album's sound is
multifaceted, in contrast with the minimalist production that is currently popular in ambient hip
hop. "koi" makes a playful romp through electronic
sound effects, while "omoi" is built around a vocal
track, scratched and interspersed with melodic
samples, "romansu" is a sunny walking tempo
track, with horns and chimed scales. With its light,
nostalgic sound, the track would make a fitting
score for a modern day silent film.
The album's final track, "BeFreePartThree," is
an effective summation of Japan Digs: SHOWA.
trog'low pairs doo-wop vocals with a sample of a
laidback MC verse, both of which are overdubbed
with record scratches and a regular beat. Rather
than become the point of prominence, the vocal
samples on "BeFreePartThree" blend seamlessly
with the track's instrumentation. All the musical
elements work in clear harmony.— Courtney
Heffernan
UNDER  REVIEW
45 Princess Century
Rendezvous
(Paper Bag Records)
Work goes late so you have barbecue chips
for dinner. You weren't sure you were up for a night
/out but now you're giddy. Up some stairs, into a
room heavy with fog and bodies. People are in the
dark or glowing red, pink, green. Find your friend.
You have room to dance, like really dance.
You're in the mood for an darkwave night, a
Rendezvous in quiet hours. Prolific Maya Postep-
ksi dishes out another Princess Century goodie
when you haven't yet tired of last month's remix.
Rendezvous is a short trio of tracks with too much
dancefloor intensity for 2015's cool, airy Progress.
Postepski's beats belong on a European dance
floor but suit any dark, throbbing room just fine.
"Robber" hits you and yes, this is what you
came for. The mood is eerie and appetizing. It renders movement. Unrest drips onto your shoulders
and down your back. You're sinister and there's
an urgency to the groove you're working. No one
takes a cigarette break.
That fog sits on your burnt skin, cool and
thick. Rendezvous continues with "Wet." The
throbbing beat grips you and leads you into a
maze. You escape towards the satin pulse of the
music. Nervous energy keeps you awake and your
movements taut. She leaves you dancing with
acquaintances, people you didn't know were fun.
"Rendezvous" — it's the last song and you
have to wake up in a few hours. Build up to the
drop lasts two minutes and the wait puts you in a
frantic daze. Sirens? A laughing dolphin? It's so
funny, it's so fun. The synth wiggles and fades.
Why are you alone? Who cares. You don't catch
feelings.
Rendezvous is a soundscape with beats reminiscent of the supremo, retro techno of the 80's.
The album and the moment are brief. When you
leave, you say bye to the stranger-friends. It's
understood that the relationship ends with the
night, but the evening's parallel play created intimacy.™ Christine Powell
Nicholas Krgovich
The Hills
(World Sentence)
Vancouver-born singer/songwriter and multi-instrumentalist, Nicholas Krgovich, is a master of
creating memorable songs. On Krgovich's new
album, The Hills, he delves into the orchestral pop
of the 60s and 80s, maintaining a balance of mellow, haunting, and upbeat. Not only a great songwriter, Krgvoich is also a great singer. His voice is
warm and unique, lending each song its own character. As such The Hills is an album that is easy to
get lost in: a nostalgic world.
"The Hills I" is an opening track that sets the
mood perfectly. It captures all of Krgovich's key
elements, particularly the serene atmospheres
created through strings and backing vocals. The
R&B-influenced "Sunset Tower," an early standout
of the album, starts with strings, and seamlessly
transitions to Krgovich's layered vocals, accompanying fingersnaps, piano chords and a jazzy
bassline. These elements lead to an intense outro
46
UNDER  REVIEW that makes for a memorable song. All the instrumental elements are combined with Krgovich's
powerful vocals to conclude the song in a way that
is both quiet and explosive at the same time.
The haunting "Written in the Wind" is the record's most minimal song. It features sombre guitar chords accompanied with gentle background
vocals, joining Krgovich's equally plaintive vocals.
"You came to me like a dream" he says to his past
lover. The song as a whole is reminiscent of Chet
Baker's "My Funny Valentine" and highlights the
moodier side of the album.
Other high points include "Mountain of Song"
and "Out of Work Jazz Singer," both influenced
by '80s pop. The keyboard motif in "Mountain of
Song" is distinct, and the mix of horns with Krgovich's vocals compliment well. The combination
sounds like a duet, rather than a formulaic mix of
vocals and instrumentals . The weaker spots on
the album are the orchestral interludes, such as
"Backlot Detail" and "PCH Detail." They're beautiful, but underdeveloped. They stand on their own,
detracting from the album's cohesion.
But overall, The Hills is a textured album that
demonstrates Krgovich's artistry and attention to
detail. The melodies, memorable instrumentation and mixing, along with Krgovich's honest and
relatable lyrics create something beautiful that
has a lasting effect on the listener long after it is
finished.— Sam Mohseni
Operators
Blue Wave
(Last Gang)
The ever prolific Darj Boeckner (Wolf Parade,
Handsome Furs, Divine Fits) is at it again. Boeck-
ner's project Operators brings him together with
drummer Sam Brown (New Bomb Turks, Divine Fits) and multi-instrumentalist Devojka (since
recording the band has also appropriately added
Dustin Hawthorne, formerly of Hot Hot Heat).
Blue Wave, the full length follow up to 2014's
release EP1, is an outstanding work of what Beck-
oner calls "sci-fi dance punk." Recorded by Graham Walsh (Metz, Viet Cong) in an old barn in
southern Ontario, Blue Wave sounds like something that cranked out of the speakers in a dark,
chain link adorned bar in the mid eighties, but with
a fresh, well-rounded perspective. While the guitars are much more prevalent here than on EP1,
the new album also sees Boeckner's long nurtured fixation with synths and keyboards come to
fruition, resulting in consuming sound.
Within the first few seconds of album opener
"Rome," it is also evident that Blue Wave is much
more punk than their premier release. It is darker,
more aggressive and louder. The upbeat pop of
EP1 is not completely abandoned, as it seeps
through the chorus of "Rome" and is interspersed
throughout other tracks as well. Driven by a steady
rhythm, the glitched out second track "Control" is
very methodical, until it rises into airy pop that carries the track out. The title track "Blue Wave" is well
orchestrated as it slowly builds and then breaks
into something huge, feeling much like a crest-
UNDER  REVIEW
47 ing wave. "Bring Me The Head" is another synth
heavy, sweat soaked number, while guitars and a
classic beat are the driving force behind "Evil." The
other-worldly "Space Needle" is the perfect closer,
an all encompassing song that fills the room,
swirling around your head to a poignant, almost
abrupt finish, leaving you breathless and satisfied.
Blue Wave is a convergence of Boeckner's many
sides. It is like the smashing of atoms to create boundless energy. A collision between dark
and light, Blue Wave is at once perfect for summer drives with the windows down and late night
dance parties. All that matters is that it is played
loud and played often.™ Mark Paul-Hus
Vulva Culture
Hydromorphone
(Craft Singles)
Haunting, dreamy, yet undeniably sinister,
Vulva Culture's two track cassette Hydromorphone
is charming, in a twisted sort of way. Since their
last few albums, Vulva Culture have remained true
to a melancholic sound, and focus on foreboding.
The first song, "Hydromorphone," starts with
ominous, pouty guitar in the background, and features an anxious, fluttering guitar at the front. Each
lyric is delivered by the breathy Amy Vinnedge.
The song is named for the morphine derivative
7.5 times more potent than the morphine .itself.
The song is relaxing, yet there is abrasion leaking in from the distorted guitars, echoing vocals,
and sombre lyrics. The calmness of the music
seems unnatural — like there is something lurking
in the shadows. Naming the track after a powerful
sedative that is addictive to the point of debilitation
was a fitting choice.
Track two, "Let's Stay Dead," sounds like a
sleepy, distant love song in the beginning, featuring one soft electric guitar. Vinnedge opens singing "Take my hands...," which immediately evokes
the chorus of the Elvis Presley song "Can't Help
Falling in Love." That sentimental association
fades and gives way to a darker reality as the
lyrics continue with "... they are bleeding." More
guitars saunter in and offer a sinister backdrop.
Vinnedge repeats "I'm yours" as haunting guitars
riff in the background.
Trepidation remains present. Heartfelt, these
songs are soothing for the ominous romantic
within us all.™ Katherine Kott
III
To submit music for review consideration in Discorder
Magazine and online, please send a physical copy to
the station addressed to Jon Kew, Under Review Editor
at CiTR 101.9FM, LL500 6133 University Blvd., Vancouver BC, V6T1Z1- Though our contributors prioritize
physical copies, you may email download codes to
underreview.discorder@citr.ca. We prioritize albums
sent prior to their official release dates.
(M$t&"*
48
UNDER  REVIEW Illustration by Ewan Thompson ffisim*T
§ contact: advertising®**-081 HITS AND MISSES
RUNNING A RECORD STORE IS A HIT AND MISS
words by Charmaine Li II photos by Pat Valade
illustrations by Mel Zee
'It :
"The medium for punk has always
been vinyl. So it has never gone away, in
my mind."
So says Peter Genest, owner of Hits And
Misses record store. The shop houses punk,
metal, '60s garage rock, and "rock 'n' roll from
the '50s to the present, any sort of off
shoot," and is located on Hastings amidst
farm markets, Chinese bakeries, and odd
shops. Gems line the walls, from recognizable Rancid albums to Dissonance's record in a pizza box.
I catch Genest outside, taking a smoke
break from his 20-year-long gig as a record store owner across four cities and two
HITS AND  MISSES
51 <WK^5B!i|.  w
countries. When asked the age-old question of whether vinyl actually sounds better, he's more confident than most. "Absolutely," he says. "It was the way things
were supposed to be made. Things were
supposed to come out on vinyl. [It's] more
fun too."
Genest's relationship with record stores
began with Roundhouse Records in Portland, which he founded and ran for four
and a half years (1992-1996). Admittedly,
Portland remains his favourite city to hang
out and buy records. Wanting a "change
in life," he moved to Seattle in 1996 and
opened Singles Going Steady, and its satellite in Vancouver. After .ten years in
Seattle, he moved back to his hometown of
Toronto in 2006 to open up the first incarnation of Hits And Misses, but business
there was horrible. "I love the city, I love
the layout, I love the transit system," says
Genest, but "nobody cares about punk
52
HITS AND MISSES mot m j/ip/i
111 *i r*^rft iiT 111 *F ? "
rock stuff ... probably 20 per cent of my
customers were from Hamilton."
Running Hits And Misses in Vancouver is still not easy. "So, you're saying I shouldn't run a record store when I
grow up?" I jokingly ask. "Not unless you
wanna live on Mr. Noodles and become a
serious alcoholic, and never get a day off,"
he warns. "You want all that, you should
open up a record store, because that's
what your life is gonna turn into."
Genest got into punk at the
"gullible"  age  of fifteen in the
early '80s,  and  says,  "It sorta
changed my life ... Bands were
actually  saying  stuff."  He was
tired of five-minute solos amidst
even longer  epics,  but  admits
that "punk doesn't mean what it
used to mean," referring to the
mainstreaming   and   commodi-
fication of the genre. He points
out that you couldn't even get
Ramones t-shirts in malls during
the '80s. Now even babies wear
them. Punk was a smaller scene
in Portland back then, with 60-70
people all knowing of each other.
The same few bands would play
over and over, and a good turnout to a show was 30-40 people.
The names of Genest's record shops are shouts out to the
legends   of punk.   Roundhouse
Records was named after a London club he heard about in a
Mott The Hoople song. Singles
Going Steady was the name of a
Buzzcocks LP, also the name of
a punk store in Portland in the
'80s: "It had been closed for over
10 years, but [I] always thought
it was such a cool name for a
store." Hits And Misses is named
after a song from Stiff Little Fingers' Go For It
As for what the media calls
the return of vinyl', Genest has his own
theory. "It [is] the major labels' last attempt
at selling records by pushing this 'vinyl
comeback' because they have nothing else.
Nobody buys CDs." And he is convinced it
won't last when people realize they can
buy $45 AC / DC records in London Drugs
or Urban Outfitters as $10 used originals.
Still, he thinks it's cool that young people
are getting into vinyl, though he wishes
HITS AND  MISSES
53 they'd collect their own stuff instead of
buying back what their parents listened
to. Most of Hits And Misses' clientele are
older collectors that didn't grow up with
social media, preferring the, well, hit-and-
miss process of record-hunting.
A visiting customer, Damien, tells me
how he found new bands as a kid: "You
open up the liner notes, the thank you's,
and you hear all these weird names, and
you go to the record store and boom, you
find 'em." After a bit of crate-digging, he
unearths Youth Brigade's Sound & Fury
and is visibly stoked. "Now there's a life-
changing album right there," Genest
chimes in. Intrigued, I ask for names of
punk albums for newbies and leave with a
big list, including Sound & Fury.
Sure, vinyl might be dead, dying, or
very much alive (who knows?) but discovering new music never gets boring. So if
you happen to prowl East Hastings one
afternoon, hungry for something fresh,
look for the bull's-eye logo of Hits And
Misses. You might find a hit.
Hits And Misses is located at 2629 East
Hastings between PenUcton and Slocan. It
is open Sunday- Friday 12-7pm, andSaturday
ll-7pnx pretty good not bad
VICTORIA, BC
JUNE 17-19
LAUREL HALO - JEAN-MICHEL BLAIS
LOSCIL - FREAK HEAT WAVES - SOUNS
PHEDRE - FOUNTAIN - HYENAZ - ICEBERG FERG
BROKEN RHYTHMS - MAGNETICRING - OKPK - SISTER BLANCHE
EMP INTERACTIONS - SHEARING PINX - SEAN EVANS
CHRIS DAMMEYER - NUU-CHA-NULTH SINGERS - COMP ZIT
LIQUID TRANSMITTER - PSYCHIC POLLUTION - ZAD KOKAR
SOUTHWOODS - TRANSIENT - T.A.C. - JRO & KEES - RUSALKA
MASS MARRIAGE - MOT - CROSSS DARTO - NEARLY DEAD
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Tickets available online at PGNB.
FACEBOOK /prettygoodnotbad
INSTAGRAM ©prettygoodnotbad
#PGNB2016
B0MBER8SEWIN6X0M
CRAFT BREWED
BOMBER AT YOUR LOCAL LIQUOR STORE OR NEIGHBOURHOOD PUB.
OAYS A WEEK 12-11PM • PINTS. FILLS, BEER TO GO
J |onds by Natalie Dee II Pi
illustration by Gili
"Glad Rife\: they don't talk much, they
iments Tracy Thorn, and
the moment I i
view. The stateme
in recording our inter-
lughter as
over our mugs of cd
afternoon,.
Sitting down with U
finding yourself in the
mass off
ces beirl
bers, and theii
impossible to U
It's the kind of band djjjami<
around mutual support cinu
that  extend past   simply making music
together.
-Glad Rags was initially a collaboration
friends Selina Koop and
>r, guitarists and vocal-
p. Koop describes their
etween long
\rah Janq "
ists for the
^GLAO  RAGS beginnings as follows: "We were like, 'Can
you play guitar?' 'Not really.'" This led to
a conclusion that starting a punk band
would be a great idea, and their next question was, "Who do you know that can play
drums?" And so drummer Andrea Demers
was added to the lineup, along with Thorn
on bass.
They were a cover band for a brief period at their inception and it served as a
learning experience for then-novice guitarists Koop and Taylor — "Strings got broken
every week," adds Thorn. Playing covers
of bands like Bikini Kill and Hole allowed
them to hone their talents. Writing original tunes came naturally, however, and
the band released their debut self-titled
EP in August 2014 a few months after getting together. The effort was a way to get
Glad Rags out there, but their upcoming
full-length Smile is more focused.
Recorded at Rain City Recorders, Glad
Rags have upped the ante with faster songs
and more of their signature to-the-point
lyrics. There's an intentional cohesiveness
to the release, with overarching themes,
sounds, and aesthetics. "Recording itself is
such a strange experience, and so we were
SLICES A PIES
^©N>
Licensed Potto'
GtfwahPbz&a/
Cfood 3imeV
3240 Main St. more comfortable with it the second time,"
explains Taylor.
The title itself is tongue in cheek —
there is no smiling on the album cover,
instead an image of the band members'
mouths smeared garishly with lipstick,
surrounded by flowers. "It carries an
aspect of humour ... [being told to smile]
is an annoying demand that gets thrown
at people, and we're trying to make a joke
out of it — this is how we're going to smile
for you if you tell us how to smile," explains
Demers.
"The whole thing is a reaction to the
things we're not happy about from a female
perspective," Demers says of Smile. Glad
Rags are quick to point out, however, that
they don't take themselves too seriously,
nor are they trying to label themselves.
"The initial attitude towards [the band]
was 'Let's be loud instead of being quiet,'"
says Taylor, and Koop is quick to note, "It
was a 'Let's crank it to 11' kind of thing."
For them, it's all about being less passive.
Amongst the loud beats and fast
rhythms that are punk with a pinch of
pop, Glad Rags are not shy about any of
the subjects they address. "It started as,
and still is so much fun, but all of a sudden it changed into 'Woah, we have a lot of
things to say,'" explains Koop. "Anorexia"
is the lead single off Smile. If the name
wasn't provocative enough, the accompanying video shows some creepy footage of women 'exercising' in the mid twentieth-century, the machines surrounding them resembling an assembly line.
"There's something about anorexia that
seems about being totally in control, but
also being not in control," says Demers.
"The song is sympathetic to that, not judgmental of that," adds Taylor.
With all of these strong female themes,
it's hard not to think of the word 'feminist'
to describe Glad Rags. "It is like a feminist thing for me, in that it's a tool to help
me express myself, and we're hoping other
people will get something from it," admits
Demers, but Taylor maintains that "It's
all personal standpoints ... We don't walk
around with a title on everything we do."
They don't want to be pigeonholed as a
band by making up their own genre labels
such as 'popsicore,' and controlling their
own image while maintaining an upbeat
outlook. Proud of what they've accomplished, Glad Rags have even sprung for
a vinyl release of Smile. "This is our first
one, so we wanted to put it on something
we really value," says Thorn. Koop adds,
"Go big or go home."
Most of all, Glad Rags is a band that
is unapologetically female and unapologet-
ically fun. It's even in their name, taken
from a vintage slang term that means to
wear your nicest clothes, a juxtaposition
of the position of 'glad' with the ominous edge that 'rag' brings. Their ambitions include having their own personalized chip merch at their shows, with all
the best flavours merged together. "Being
onstage and being a part of this entity ...
that's hugely empowering. I'm happy the
stuff that we're saying is stuff that I'm also
passionate about," says Thorn. From the
chemistry and positive atmosphere that
radiates from them, Glad Rags is a flavor
combination that works.
Glad Rags are opening for the Pack A.D.
May 12 at the Cobalt They will be playing
an album release show for Smile at SBC
May 28 with NEEDS and Spring Breaks.
Glad Rags are also playing Music Waste and
Sled Island this year, schedules to be confirmed. Visit gladragsband.bandcamp.corn
to listen.
58
GLAD  RAGS *w»* NIGHT MAYORS
IN PRAISE OF NIGHT
words by Brenda Grunau II illustrations by Sharon Ko
It is impossible to attend Austin's
music industry festival, SXSW, without
comparing the streets to your hometown of
Vancouver and imagining all the possibilities. Every cafe, cupcake shop and patio
is turned into a venue, sound is inescapable and you find a new stage installed in
the alley behind your hotel while roaming
for your morning coffee. The City of Austin
is the real star of SXSW, with the desire
to host 70,000 people and the regulatory
flexibility to do it.
It is impossible to transplant this to
vision to Vancouver, where the regulatory
red tape and nimbyism make this explosion of healthy nightlife unfathomable.
What would it take to nurture a vibrant
night culture in Vancouver?
At SXSW, I attended the session "Why
Every Music City Should Have A Night
Mayor," featuring the Night Mayors of
Amsterdam and Groningen, both cities in
the Netherlands. Over 20 cities in Europe
now have Night Mayors, including Paris
and Geneva, with cities such as London
considering this Dutch invention. City
officials spend their working hours in the
sunshine, paying most of their attention
to the activities of the daytime. The Night
Mayor's job is to represent and advocate
for people and businesses that operate at
night, while city officials are dreaming in
good legislation if you don't know what's
going on?"
In Amsterdam, the Night Mayor is
the head of a not-for-profit that engages
between the city and small business
owners, funded half by the (day) Mayor's office and half by night life establishments, operating like a BIA of the night.
The Night Mayor represents the night
economy for a cohesive lobby, working pro-
actively for a safe and rich night life, overcoming people's distrust of what happens
in the dark.
Also on the panel was Don Pitts, Music
In  the words  of Amsterdam's  Night
Mayor Mirik Milan, "How can you make
Austin, and Simon Lamb, COO of the Electric Daisy Festival. In Austin sound is the
biggest problem, with condo development
spurting up in cultural neighbourhoods
attracted by the night life, then shutting
down concerts with sound complaints.
They implemented an 'agents of change'
principle, where the new neighbour is
responsible for paying for sound mitigation, and the incumbent is protected. Austin also issues outdoor sound licenses, will
help you develop a 'Sound Impact Plan,'
and has a universal phone app that will
measure if the sound on your property is
above the allowed 75 decibels.
In Austin, the witching hour is closing hour, when thousands of people spill
out on the street. In Amsterdam, venues
can apply for a 24 hour licence, choosing
when they close their doors accommodating the needs of their clientele. People can
NIGHT  MAYORS  "HOW CAN YOU MAKE GOOD
LEGISLATION IF YOU DON'T KNOW
WHAT'S GOING ON?"
stay out as long as they want to, entertained and not wandering around the city
getting into trouble. Staggering closing
times eliminates all the issues caused by
dumping everyone onto the streets at the
same time.
Responsible Hospitality Edmonton is
a city department created in 2007 to deal
with the same issues. On Whyte Avenue,
one of the city's cultural districts, there
is no transit service past 1:30 am, and
finding a cab is difficult. When the bars
close, everyone is stuck trying to get home
at the same time, creating an atmosphere ripe for fights, noise, public urination and boorishness. RHE implemented
NIGHT  MAYORS a public transit pilot program, installed a
public washroom, and works with business and club owners to create a safe and
healthy environment for Edmonton's cultural districts. The department works with
the local business association, the police
and the owners of night establishments
to build cases for changes to city policies,
programs and bylaws.
So, what's happening here in Vancouver? In 2009, the City of Vancouver recognized the licensing hurdles impeding the
operation of cultural spaces, and launched
a regulatory review for live performance
venues hoping to streamline the processes.
a new indoor arts event license, allowing
cultural events in unconventional spaces
and dramatically reducing the paperwork
and regulatory hoop jumping.  How did
The alternative arts venues in town
have regular meetings, to discuss strategies, keep things safe, and collectively
approach the City of Vancouver. Vancouver
Art and Leisure and Red Gate Arts Society
were main proponents of the indoor arts
license.
"People need to be given the keys to the
city, and not treated like children. People
need to be able to decide when they go to
bed," asserts Vancouver Art And Leisure
Executive Director Matt Troy. "It's important in a healthy city and healthy economy
to have people making use of the city and
the infrastructure at different times. It's
just a better use of space."
Many people view the night with distrust, but all sorts of industries operate
at night, including technology companies,
doctors, nurses, shift workers and bakers.
Vancouver Art and Leisure has championed the fact that art doesn't stop at 2
am, and cultural events invest in people,
small businesses, and freedom of expression for our communities. And, despite the
headway, there's a long way to go.
"There's a certain sense of anarchy
among the City departments," adds Matt
Troy. "Everyone smiles and nods but from
the back, you have someone from land use
calling you and asking why your arts centre has an ATM and how that fits the zoning, and why do you have port-a-potties
and how is that art?"
The reality is that change happens
when people with common goals get
together; it doesn't matter whether this
change happens is spearheaded by a city
department, or by the community of the
night making their voices heard. A Night
Mayor is an ambassador, a catalyst and
rallier of these voices.
In the words of Matt Troy: "I think a
night mayor would be a great symbolic
to recognize the vitality and importance of
nightlife and night time culture."
NIGHT  MAYORS TAKE A HIKE
zjzmcar
Gas, insuran
Join for $20 at zipcar.com/ubc
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TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
ALTERNATING SUN. 8 PM
A mix of the latest house music, techouse,
prog-house, and techno.
TRANCENDANCE
SUN. 1 PM
Hosted by DJ Smiley Mike and DJ Caddyshack,
Trancendance has been broadcasting from Vancouver,
B.C. since 2001. We favour Psytrance, Hard Trance and
Epic Trance, but also play Acid Trance, Deep Trance,
and even some Breakbeat. We also love a good Classic
Trance Anthem, especially if it's remixed. Current
influences include Sander van Doom, Gareth Emery,
Nick Sentience, Ovnimoon, Ace Ventura, Save the Robot,
Liquid Soul, and Astrix. Older influences include Union
Jack, Carl Cox, Christopher Lawrence, Whoop! Records,
Tidy Trax, Platipus Records, and Nukleuz.
Email: djsmileymike (©trancendance.net.
Website: www.trancendance.net.
■ DIFFICULT
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS...
SUN. 7 AM
Bepi Crespan Presents... CiTR's 24 Hours Of Radio Art
in a snack size format! Difficult music, harsh electronics,
spoken word, cut-up/collage and general Crespan©
weirdness. Twitter: @bepicrespan.
Blog: bepicrespan.blogspot.ca
■ DRAMA/POETRY
SKALD'S HALL
FRI. 9 PM
Skald's Hall entertains with the spoken word via story
readings, poetry recitals, and drama. Established and
upcoming artists join host Brian MacDonald. Interested in
performing on air? Contact us on Twitter:
@Skalds_Hall.
■ ECLECTIC
A FACE FOR RADIO
THU. 10 AM
A show about music with interludes about nothing.
From Punk to Indie Rock and beyond.
ARE YOU AWARE
ALTERNATING THU. 6 PM
Celebrating the message behind the music:
profiling music and musicians that take the
route of positive action over apathy.
AURAL TENTACLES
THU. 12 AM
It could be global, trance, spoken word, rock, the unusual
and the weird, or it could be something different. Hosted
by DJ Pierre. Email: auraltentacles@hotmail.com
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
MON. 8 AM
Your favourite Brownsters, James and Peter, offer a
savoury blend of the familiar and exotic in a blend of aural
delights.
Email: breakfastwiththebrowns@hotmail.com.
PROGRAM   GUIDE
66 CHTHONIC BOOM!
SUN. 5 PM
A show dedicated to playing psychedelic
music from parts of the spectrum (rock, pop,
electronic) as well as garage and noise rock.
FEMCONCEPT
FRI. 1 PM
Entirely Femcon music as well as spoken word content
relevant to women's issues (interviews with campus
groups such as the Women's Center, SASC, etc.).
Musical genres include indie rock, electronic and punk,
with an emphasis on local and Canadian artists.
LIVE FROM THU.NDERBIRD RADIO HELL
THU. 9 PM
Featuring live bands every week performing in the
CiTR lounge. Most are from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country and around the world.
THE MEDICINE SHOW
FRI. 11 PM
A variety show, featuring musicians, poets, and
entertainment industry guests whose material is
considered to be therapeutic. We encourage and
promote Independent original, local live music, and art.
THE MORNING AFTER SHOW
TUE. 11:30 AM
The Morning After Show every Tuesday at 11:30(am).
Playing your favourite songs for 13 years. The
morning after what? The morning after whatever you
did last night. Eclectic show with live music, local
talent and music you won't hear anywhere else.
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
FRI. 3:30 PM
Join Nardwuar the Human Serviette for Clam Chowder
flavoured entertainment. Doot doola doot doo...doot doo!
Email: nardwuar@nardwuar.com
PEANUT BUTTER'N'JAMS
ALTERNATING THU. 6:30-7:30 PM
Explore local music and food with your hosts,
Brenda and Jordie. You'll hear interviews and
reviews on eats and tunes from your neighbourhood
and a weekly pairing for your date calendar.
RANDOPHONIC
SAT. 11 PM
Randophonic has no concept of genre, style, political
boundaries or even space-time relevance. Though
we have been known to play pretty much anything by
anybody (as long as it's good), we do often fix our focus
on a long running series, the latest of which (due to
premiere in April-2016) is The Solid Time of Change
(aka the 661 Greatest Records of the Progressive
Rock Era ~ 1965-79) And we're not afraid of noise.
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
WED. 12 PM
Dan Shakespeare is here with music for your ear.
Kick back with gems of the previous years.
SHINE ON
ALTERNATING TUE. 1 PM
An eclectic mix of the latest, greatest tunes from
the Vancouver underground and beyond, connected
through a different theme each week. Join your host
Shea every Tuesday for a groovy musical experience!
SOUL SANDWICH
WED. 8 PM i
A myriad of your favourite music tastes all cooked into
one show, from Hip Hop to Indie Rock to African jams.
Ola will play through a whirlwind of different genres, each
sandwiched between another. This perfect layering of
yummy goodness will blow your mind. It beats Subway.
STUDENT SPECIAL HOUR
FRI. 10 AM
Tune in to learn about on-campus events and
initiatives in-between sweet tunes.
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
WED. 8 AM
Live from the Jungle Room, join radio host Jack
Velvet for an eclectic mix of music, sound bites,
information and inanity. Email: dj@jackvelvet.net.
■ ETHIOPIAN
SHOOKSHOOKTA
SUN. 10 AM
A program targeted to Ethiopian people that
encourages education and personal development.
■ EXPERIMENTAL
KEW IT UP
WED. 3 PM
Fight-or-flight music. Radio essays and travesties:
Sonic Cateschism / half-baked philosophy
and criticism. Experimental, Electronica, Post-
Punk, Industrial, Noise: ad-nauseum
MORE THAN HUMAN
SUN. 7 PM
Strange and wonderful electronic sounds from
the past, present, and future with host Gareth
Moses. Music from parallel worlds.
POP DRONES
WED. 10 AM
Unearthing the depths of contemporary cassette and vinyl
underground. Ranging from DIY bedroom pop and garage
rock all the way to harsh noise and, of course, drone.
■ GENERATIVE
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF INSOMNIA
SAT. 2 AM
Four solid hours of fresh generative music c/o
the Absolute Value of Noise and its world famous
Generator. Ideal for enhancing your dreams or,
if sleep is not on your agenda, your reveries.
■ HIP HOP
CRIMES & TREASONS
TUE. 9 PM
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill $h*t. Hosted by Jamal
Steeles, Homeboy Jules, Relly Rels, LuckyRich &
horsepowar. Website: www.crimesandtreasons.com
Email: dj@crimesandtreasons.com
NEW ERA
ALTERNATING THU. 7:30 PM
Showcases up and coming artists who are considered
"underdogs" in the music industry. The show will
provide a platform for new artists who are looking
to get radio play. Hip-Hop music from all over the
world along with features of multi-genre artists.
VIBES & STUFF
TUE. 4 PM
Feeling nostalgic? Vibes and Stuff has you covered
bringing you some of the best 90s to early 2000s hip-hop
artist all in one segment. All the way from New Jersey and
New York City, DJ Bmatt and DJ Jewels will be bringing
the east coast to the west coast throughout the show.
We will have you reminiscing about the good ol' times
with Vibes and Stuff every Tuesdays afternoon from 4-5
pm PST. E-mail: vibesandstuffhiphop@gmail.com
67
PROGRAM   GUIDE ■ INDIAN
RHYTHMS INDIA
ALTERNATING SUN. 8 PM
Featuring a wide range of music from India, including
popular music from the 1930s to the present; Ghazals and
Bhajans, Qawwalis, pop and regional language numbers.
■ JAZZ
THE JAZZ SHOW
MON. 9 PM
May 2: This month The Jazz Show and host Gavin Walker
is paying tribute to the 90th Anniversary of one of Jazz
Music's major figures: Miles Davis. For the 5 Mondays
this month the Jazz Feature will present in chronological
order 5 significant recordings by Mr. Davis. Tonight, we
begin with "Cookin" With The Miles Davis Quintet". This
1956 date was one of the finest documents of Miles
Davis' "first great quintet" that featured a young man who
was basically unknown to the general public at this time,
tenor saxophonist John Coltrane! This band boasted one
of the finest rhythm sections in Jazz driven by the fiery
drummer Philly Joe Jones. One listening and you will
realize that "great" is not enough to describe this band.
May 9: Drummer Tony Williams referred to this date
as "the best Jazz record ever, bar none". "Milestones"
was marked by the return of a fully developed
John Coltrane to the mix and the magnificent alto
saxophonist Julian "Cannonball" Adderley to the
front line making it a sextet. This 1958 session was
driven once again by the drumming of Philly Joe
Jones and marked some important new steps by
Miles Davis and company. "Milestones" is classic!
May 16: The "Second Great Quintet" is presented
in a peak live performance in Europe in 1967. The
group moved together as a unit, shifting moods,
tempos and breathed as one. Miles Davis with
Wayne Shorter (tenor saxophone), Herbie Hancock
(piano), Ron Carter (bass) and Tony Williams
(drums) all led by Mr. Davis. No words...just listen!
May 23: Change was in the air for this amazing recording
done in the Summer and Fall of 1968. The final statement
by the 2nd Great Quintet and the next step with Chick
Corea (piano) and Dave Holland (bass) replacing
Hancock and Carter. "Filles de Kilimanjaro" was the
beginning of some new concepts and directions for Miles
Davis. An overlooked masterpiece.Little Bit of Soul
mon. 4 PM
Old recordings of jazz, swing, big band,
blues, oldies, and motown.
■ LATIN AMERICAN
LA FIESTA
ALTERNATING SUN. 3 PM
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue, Latin House, and
Reggaeton with your host Gspot DJ.
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
MON. 5 PM
The best mix of Latin American music
Email: leoramirez@canada.com
■ LOUD
FLEX YOUR HEAD
TUE. 6 PM
Punk rock and hardcore since 1989. Bands
and guests from around the world.
POWERCHORD
SAT. 1 PM
Vancouver's longest running metal show. If
you're into music that's on the heavier/darker
side of the spectrum, then you'll like it. Sonic
assault provided by Geoff, Marcia, and Andy.
■ PERSIAN
SIMORGH
Thur. 4 pm
Simorgh Radio Is devoted to the education and literacy
for the Persian speaking communities and those
interested in connecting to Persian oral and written
literature. Simorgh takes you through a journey of
ecological sustainability evolving within cultural and
social literacy. Simorgh the mythological multiplicity of
tale-figures, lands-in as your mythological narrator in the
storyland; the contingent space of beings, connecting
Persian peoples within and to Indigenous peoples.
■ PUNK
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
TUE. 10:30 AM
Hello hello hello! I interview bands and play new,
international and local punk rock music. Great Success!
P.S. Broadcasted in brokenish English. Hosted by Russian
Tim. Website: http://rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com.
Email: rocketfromrussiacitr@gmail.com.
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RocketFromRussia.
Twitter: http://twitter.com/tima_tzar.
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
SAT. 12 PM
On the air since 2002, playing old and new punk on the
non-commercial side of the spectrum. Hosts: Aaron
Brown, Jeff "The Foat" Kraft.
•Website: generationannihilation.com.
Facebook: facebook.com/generationannihilation/
■ REGGAE
THE ROCKERS SHOW
SUN. 12 PM
Reggae inna all styles and fashion.
■ ROCK /POP /INDIE
ALBION
TUE. 2 PM
The best new music coming out of the UK along
with the most exciting Canadian artists British
host Sachin finds as he explores Vancouver.
THE BURROW
MON. 3 PM
Noise Rock, Alternative, Post-Rock, with a
nice blend of old 'classics' and newer releases.
Interviews and live performances.
CANADA POST-ROCK
FRI. 10 PM
Formerly on CKXU, Canada-Post Rock now
resides on the west coast but it's still committed
to the best in post-rock, drone, ambient,
experimental, noise and basically anything your
host Pbone can put the word "post" infront of.
THE CATS PAJAMAS
FRI. 11 AM
The cat's pajamas: a phrase to describe something/
someone super awesome or cool. The Cat's
Pajamas: a super awesome and cool radio show
featuring the latest and greatest indie pop, rock,
lofi and more from Vancouver and beyond!
CRESCENDO
SUN. 6 PM
Starting with some serene chill tracks at the beginning
and building to the INSANEST FACE MELTERS OF ALL
TIME, Crescendo will take you on a musical magic carpet
ride that you couldn't imagine in your wildest dreams.
Besides overselling his show, Jed will play an eclectic
set list that builds throughout the hour and features both
old classics, and all the greatest new tracks that the
hipsters think they know about before anyone else does.
PROGRAM   GUIDE
68 DAVE RADIO WITH RADIO DAVE
FRI. 12 PM
Your noon-hour guide to what's happening In Music
and Theatre in Vancouver. Lots of tunes and talk.
DISCORDER RADIO
TUE. 5 PM
Discorder Magazine now has its own radio show! Join
us to hear excerpts of interviews, reviews and more!
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
THU. 12 PM
Sweet treats from the pop underground. Hosted by Duncan,
sponsored by donuts. http://duncansdonuts.wordpress.com.
MUZAK FOR THE OBSERVANT
THU. 2 PM
A program focusing on the week's highlights
from CiTR's Music Department. Plus: live in-
studio performances and artist interviews!
PARTS UNKNOWN
MON. 1 PM
An indie pop show since 1999, it's like a marshmallow
sandwich: soft and sweet and best enjoyed when
poked with a stick and held close to a fire.
THE PERMANENT RAIN RADIO
ALTERNATING TUES. 1 PM
Music-based, pop culture-spanning program with a focus
on the local scene. Join co-hosts Chloe and Natalie for an
hour of lighthearted twin talk and rad tunes from a variety
of artists who have been featured on our website.
thepermanentrainpress.com
SAMSQUANTCH'S HIDEAWAY
ALTERNATING WED. 6:30 PM
All-Canadian music with a focus on indie-rock/
pop. Email: anitabinder@hotmail.com.
SPICE OF LIFE
ALTERNATING THU. 7:30 PM
The spice extends life. The spice expands
consciousness. The Spice of Life brings you a
variety of Post-Rock, Shoegaze, Math Rock and
anything that else that progresses. Join host
Ben Life as he meanders whimsically through
whatever comes to mind on the walk to CITR.
STRANDED: THE AUSTRALIAN-CANADIAN MUSIC
SHOW
TUE 11 PM
Join your host Matthew for a weekly mix of exciting
sounds, past and present, from his Australian homeland.
And journey with him as he features fresh tunes and
explores the alternative musical heritage of Canada.
■   ROOTS/FOLK/BLUES
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
ALTERNATING SUN. 3 PM
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-boots country.
CODE BLUE
SAT. 3 PM
From backwoods delta low-down slide to urban harp
honks, blues, and blues roots with your hosts Jim,
Andy, and Paul. Email: codeblue@paulnorton.ca
PACIFIC PICKIN'
TUE. 6 AM
Bluegrass, old-time music, and its derivatives
with Arthur and the lovely Andrea Berman.
Email: pacificpickin@yahoo.com
THE SATURDAY EDGE
SAT. 8 AM
A personal guide to world and roots music—with African,
Latin, and European music in the first half, followed by
Celtic, blues, songwriters, Cajun, and whatever else fits!
Email: steveedge3@mac.com/
■   RUSSIAN
NASHA VOLNA
SAT. 6 PM
News, arts, entertainment and music for the
Russian community, local and abroad.
Website: nashavolna.ca/
SACRED
MANTRA
SAT. 5PM
An electic mix of electronic and acoustic beats and layers,
chants and medicine song. Exploring the diversity of
the worlds sacred sounds - traditional, contemporary
and futuristic. Email: mantraradioshow@gmail.com
■ SOUL/R&B
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
FRI. 7:30 PM
Website: www.africanrhythmsradio.com
SOULSHIP ENTERPRISE
SAT. 7 PM
A thematically oriented blend of classic funk, soul,
r&b, jazz, and afrobeat tunes, Soulship Enterprise
has received great renown as the world's foremost
funky, jazzy, soulful, and delightfully awkward radio
show hosted by people named Robert Gorwa and/
or Christopher Mylett Gordon Patrick Hunter III.
■ TALK
ALL ACCESS PASS
THU. 5 PM
CiTR Accessibility Collective's new radio show.
We talk about equity, inclusion, and accessibility
for people with diverse abilities, on campus
and beyond. Tune in every week for interviews,
music, news, events, and awesome dialogue.
ALL EARS
WED. 9 PM
Looking for advice? Hosts Brandon and Mormei
think they can help you with that. All Ears is an
advice radio program where the hosts read real
questions from the UBC community and answer them
live. Other content includes interviewing students,
consulting experts, and giving campus life advice.
Submit your question at http://ask.fm/allearsubc
ARTS REPORT
WED. 5 PM .
Reviews, interviews and coverage of local arts (film,
theatre, dance, visual and performance art, comedy,
and more) by hosts Ashley Park and Christine Kim.
ASTROTALK
THU. 3 PM
Space is an interesting place. Marco slices up the
night sky with a new topic every week. Death Stars,
Black Holes, Big Bangs, Red Giants, the Milky Way,
G-Bands, Syzygy's, Pulsars, Super Stars...
CITED!
FRI. 8:30 AM
This is a radio program about how our world
is being shaped by the ideas of the ivory
tower. Sometimes, in troubling ways.
THE COMMUNITY LIVING SHOW
THU. 9 AM
This show is produced by the disabled community and
showcases special guests and artists. The focus is on
a positive outlook on programs and events for the entire
community. We showcase BC Self Advocates and feature
interviews with people with special needs. Hosted by
Kelly Reaburn, Michael Rubbin Clogs and Friends.
PROGRAM   GUIDE EXTRAENVIRONMENTALIST
WED. 2 PM
Exploring the mindset of an outsider looking in on Earth.
Featuring interviews with leading thinkers in the area of
sustainable economics and our global ecological crisis.
LADY RADIO
FRI. 6 PM
CITR Women's Collective's new radio show! Rad
women talking about things they like. Tune in weekly
for interviews, music, events, commentary, and such.
NEWS 101
FRI. 5 PM
Vancouver's only live, volunteer-produced, student and
community newscast. Every week, we take a look back
at the week's local, national and international news,
as seen from a fully Independent media perspective.
PETE'S PICKS
THU. 11:30 PM
From the CITR Archives! Our Digital Library Coordinator
Peter Doolan shares selected gems of CiTR history,
digitized from the original audiotape reels!
QUEER FM VANCOUVER:RELOADED
TUE. 8 AM
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transexual
communities of Vancouver. Lots of human interest
features, background on current issues and great music.
queerfmradio@gmail.com
RADIO FREE THINKER
TUE. 3 PM
Promoting skepticism, critical thinking and
science, we examine popular extraordinary
claims and subject them to critical analysis.
THE REEL WHIRLED
THU. 11-11:30 AM
The Reel Whirled is a half hour long escapade through
the world of cinema, focused around UBC Film Society's
program; be it contemporary or classic, local or global.
From our perspective as the UBC Film Society, we
talk about film intellectually, passionately, and goofily.
With select music from our cinematic subjects, we
pull your Thursday mornings into focus, from bleary
eyed to sharp and worthy of the silver screen.
SHARING SCIENCE
WED.   6 PM
A show by the members of UBC Sharing Science, a group
of students dedicated to making science interesting and
accessible to all members of the community. We discuss
current research and news about a different topic each
week, providing vastly different perspectives based on
the science backgrounds of a rotating set of hosts.
SYNCHRONICITY
MON. 12 PM
Join host Marie B and discuss spirituality, health and
feeling good. Tune in and tap into good vibrations that
help you remember why you're here: to have fun!
UBC ARTS ON AIR
ALTERNATING WED. 6 PM
Ira Nadel, UBC English, offers scintillating profiles and
unusual interviews with members of UBC Arts world.
Tune in for programs, people and personalities in art
UNCEDED AIRWAVES
MON. 11 AM
Unceded Airwaves is a radio show produced by CiTR's
Indigenous Collective. The team is comprised of
both Indigenous and non-Indigenous people who are
passionate about radio, alternative media and Indigenous
topics and issues. We are committed to centering
the voices of Native people and offering alternative
narratives that empower Native people and their stories.
We recognize that media has often been used as a
tool to subordinate or appropriate native voices and
we are committed to not replicating these dynamics.
VANCOUVER, RIGHT?
THU. 8 AM
Hangout with Alex Biron and Simon Armstrong
as they share personal stories of gigantic
embarrassment and accidental success.
WHITE NOISE
SAT. 8 PM
Need some comic, relief? Join Richard Blackmore for half
an hour of weird and wonderful radio every week, as he
delves in to the most eccentric corners of radio for your
listening pleasure. Then stay tuned for the after show
featuring a Q and A with the creator, actors and a guest
comic every week. Email: whitenolseUBC@gmail.com
PROGRAM   GUIDE
70 CITR 101.9FM
APRIL MONTHLY CHARTS: VIEWS FROM THE 604
ARTIS"
ALBUM       LABEL
ARTIST ALBUM       LABEL
BLACK MOUNTAIN**     IV
DINE ALONE
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
ACE MARTENS*.
PALM SPRINGS        SELF-RELEASED
ROC0CODE*.
DON'T WORRY IT
WILL BE DARK SOON
MARQUIS
NAP EYES'
THOUGHT POCK      YOU'VE
FISH SCALE CHANGED
ORA COGAN* i
SHADOWLAND
THE SMALL
GLORIES*
WONDROUS
TRAVELLER
SELF-RELEASED
UNDERWORLD
BARBARA
BARBARA, WE
FACE A SHINING
FUTURE
CAROLINE
PARQUET COURTS
HUMAN
PERFORMANCE
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CHRIS COOLE*
THE TUMBLING
RIVER AND
OTHER STORIES
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NORTH
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LAKOU MIZIK
WA Dl YO
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SWOONER
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DUMBS
BEACH CHURCH
SELF-RELEASED
SARAH NEUFELD*
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ARMOUR
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CHARLES BRADLEY
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YOUR BAND
SUCKS & PUNK'S
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JAN ST. WERNER
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THRILL JOCKEY
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SECRETLY
CANADIAN
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SHOTGUN JIMMIE*
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BASIA BULAT*
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26
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CHASSEES
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POET'S END
(REISSUE)
TELEPHONE
EXPLOSION
28
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GOD DON'T
NEVER CHANGE:
THE SONGS OF        ALLIGATOR
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JOHNSON	
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THE GREAT
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FRANKIE COSMOS       NEXT THING
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35    PET SUN* PET SUN THE HAND
36    HERON OBLIVION
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42 REDRICK SULTAN*+      FLY AS A KITE
43 BONNIE'PRINCE' ^^ ^Qcm
44    JORDAN
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47    IGGY POP
48    TEEN*
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49    NOTTA COMET* EMBANKMENT
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