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 i
\
m a
-■ UPCOMING SHOWS
mmssm
PARKWAY DRIVE miss may i, thy art is
MURDER, IN HEARTS WAKE
254 East Hastings Street
604.681.8915
m
m
L7
KNIFE PLEATS
THE MAIN EVENT #TBT
URBAN DANCE SHOWCASE & PARTY
D.O.A&GOB
BOIDS.WETT STILETTOS
HATE ETERNAL misery index, beyond
CREATION, RIVERS OF NIHIL, TYRANT'S BLOOD
LILA ROSE
SELINA KOOP, THE KYLA KOOPMAN BAND
THE REAL MCKENZIES the brains, the
ISOTOPES, LOS KUNG FU MONKEYS, & MORE
NERDFEST V blackberry wood,
THE RUNAWAY FOUR, & MORE
TESSERACT
THE CONTORTIONIST, ERRA, SKYHARBOR
KMAN AND THE 45S
CARACAS, THE BRASS ACTION
19-21
THE LOVERS CABARET
LOVERS OF ZEPPELIN
HI
ESI
1
MOVITS!
SIDEWALK CHALK
TEXAS IN JULY reflections, to the wind,
INVENT ANIMATE, GALACTIC PEGASUS & MORE
DEATH IN JUNE miro snejdr - herr
LOUNGE CORPS, NIGHT PROFOUND
THE MAHONES
LOS FURIOS & MORE
EARLY SHOW: 7PM
COMEDY SHOCKER, SEVEN DEADLY SINS
KYLE BOTTOM, JASON KRYSKA & MORE
LATE SHOW: 10PM
POINTED STICKS
VAMPIRE BATS, POLLY, NERVOUS TALK
Additional show listings, ticket sale info, videos and more: WWW.RICKSHAWTHEATRE.COM
1 Features
TABLEOFCONTENTS
08 BIG JOY BARBER & SALON
Not just a witty name, Big Joy Barber & Salon is the
beautiful, welcoming and creatively-infused passion
project business of Shaunn Watt— artist, musician
and hair dresser.
12 88 TUNED BONGOS
Having the Western Front's Disklavier piano fall on
your head may not be so bad. Interviews with Doug
Blackley, Andrew Czink, Remy Siu and Vicky Chow
explore alternative sound.
16 REVERED
"Pseudo-new-wave-prog-rock catharsis of ego?"
From improv comedy to record release, Emmett
Hall and Pietro Sammarco demand reverence with
But What If I'm Right?
52 ART ROCK?
Discorder sits down with Casey Wei, curator of the
monthly art rock? series at the Astoria, to question
the tension between art and rock, and fog machines.
56 TOMMY TONE
Released on YouTube last month, Fax Me A Brain,
is the most recent project by Tom Whalen, seeking
catharsis and enlightenment in junk, performance
and humiliation.
60 CHEAP HIGH
And higher expectations. The post-punk band of
brothers discusses the collaborative spirit of the
Fraser Valley in preparation for their upcoming LP,
Subterranean Suburbia.
04—EDITOR'S NOTE
06—CHARTS
20—SHELF LIFE
24—DISCORDER REVISITED
27—ON THE AIR
30—REAL LIVE ACTION
36—CALENDAR
38—ART PROJECT
42—UNDER REVIEW
50—HOMEGROWN LABEL
66—PROGRAM GUIDE
ADVERTISE: Ad space for upcoming issues can be booked
by calling (604) 822-4342 or emailing advertising@citr.ca.
Rates available upon request.
CONTRIBUTE: To submit words to Discorder, please contact:
editor.discorder@citr.ca. To submit images, contact: artdirector.
discorder@citr.ca
SUBSCRIBE: Send in a cheque for $20 to #233-6138 SUB
Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T 1Z1 with your address, and we will
mail each issue of Discorder right to your doorstep for a year.
DISTRIBUTE: To distribute Discorder in your business, email
distro.discorder@citr.ca We are always looking for new friends.
DONATE: We are part of CiTR, a registered non-profit, and
accept donations so we can provide you with the content you
love. To donate visit www.citr.ca/donate.
Publisher: Student Radio Society of UBC // CiTR Station
Manager: Brenda Grunau // Student Llason: Elizabeth Holliday //
Editor-in-Chief: Brit Bachmann // Under Review Editor: Jonathan
Kew // Real Live Action Editor: Robert Catherall // Web Editor:
James Olsen // Art Director: Ricky Castanedo-Laredo // Layout
& Production Assisant: Graham McFie // Ad Coordinator:
Nashlyn Lloyd // Accounts Manager: Eleanor Wearing // Calendar
Listings: Sarah Cordingley // Writers: Claire Bailey, Alex de
Boer, Natalie Dee, Fraser Dobbs, Caleb Fanshawe, Matt Hanson,
Jonathon Hernandez, Elizabeth Holliday, Gary Jarvis, Jonathan
Kew, Katherine Kott, Erica Leiren, Alex Lenz, Theano Pavlidou,
Keagan Perlette, Ewan Thompson, Harsh Trivedi, Sam Tudor,
Sachin Turakhia, Eleanor Wearing, Jasper Wrinch// Cover Photo:
Karl Ventura // Spot Illustrations: Olga AbelevaZ/Photographers
& lllustrators:Olga Abeleva, Sara Baar, Duncan Cairns-Brenner,
Josh Conrad, Jonathan Dy, Katherine Cott, Lukas Engelhardt,
Amelia Garvin, Dana Kearley, Sharon Ko, Jimmy Liang, Kim
Pringle, Jaqueline Manoukian, Alison Sadler, Michael Shantz,
Amber Solberg, Ewan Thompson, Karl Ventura, Jon Vincent
Kameko Walker // Proofreaders: Brit Bachmann, Natalie Dee,
Caleb Fanshawe, Elizabeth Holliday, Jonathan Kew, Erica Leiren,
Nashlyn Lloyd, Harsh Trivedi, Sachin Turakhia
©Discorder 2015 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published almost monthly by CiTR, which
can be heard at 101.9 FM, online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487,
CiTR's office at (604) 822-3017, email CiTR at stationmanager®citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write #233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T1Z1, Canada.
J INSTIGATE
EDITOR'S NOTE
This issue is nothing if not an epic, focusing on the local personalities that are challenging and reshaping our perceptions of music and art, with a very prominent undercurrent of humour and wit. A secondary theme — bobbing up through quotes, editorial
comments and reviews — is the topic of audience expectation. The performers featured in
this issue push the boundaries of traditional music or art practices. These folks include
Revered, Tommy Tone, the artists of art rock? and 88 Tuned Bongos, the Cheap High band
of brothers, and the Big Joy banner of Shaunn Watt, with some other surprises tucked
between the pages.
I want to side lunge for a moment to a topic not covered in Discorder, but that definitely
stirred up artists, musicians and activists this time last year—
Late October 2014, Kinder Morgan filed a $5.6 million lawsuit against BROKE (Bur-
naby Residents Opposing Kinder Morgan Expansion) and unnamed persons for nuisance,
intimidation and uttering threats to their workers on Burnaby Mountain. With 'permission' from the National Energy Board, KM workers had cut down 13 (or 15) trees in a conservation area, breaking City of Burnaby municipal law and doing so on the unceded territory of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation. Kinder Morgan, a private U.S. company, was preparing
tests to triple the capacity of the current Trans Mountain Pipeline under Burnaby Mountain, which carries diluted bitumen from Alberta oil sands to the west coast for export.
KM successfully acquired a private-public partnership injunction to prevent protesters
from disrupting the survey, enforced by the RCMP on taxpayer dime. RCMP began making arrests on November 20, 2014 for challenging the injunction line, leading to a frenzy
of civil disobedience that reached its climax in late November / early December with an
estimated 100+ arrests.
Those arrested were not just your crazy hippie neighbours, but professors and students, First Nations elders, grandparents, and even children. The absurdity of the $5.6
million lawsuit, the seemingly sick joke of having RCMP protect the financial interests of
a foreign company in a Canadian park, and the disregard of First Nations land claims
inspired exhibitions and benefit concerts in response and solidarity with protesters. In
these instances, art and activism worked together as instruments of interpretation and
healing.
What I'm trying to say — tangentially — is that while music and art functions as entertainment, it also weaves a cultural foundation that grants society the power to discuss a
range of issues that extend beyond aesthetics.
With the glamour of new government, let's not forget to keep our focus on important
issues. As residents of Canada we are an active audience. Let's keep our expectations high.
A+
BB
PS. Want to keep Discorder in print? We are throwing a fundraiser Thursday, November 19 at the Astoria featuring Revered, Mesa Luna, to ugly, Late Spring and DJ Danny
Vancouver (Horses Records). Join us!
4 EDITOR'S NOTE  O C TO BER/2 015//C HARTS
Supermoon*+
Faith Healer*
Adrian Teacher
and The
Subs*+
Colleen
Godspeed
You! Black
Emperor*
Ponctuatlon*
Braids*
Weed*+
Circuit des
Yeux
Comet
Lovejoy
Cosmic
Troubles
Self-Released
Mint
Dark Glasses*     Dark Glasses
Gary Cas-
Sorta Hafta      Self-Released
Captain of
None
Asunder,
Sweet and
Other Distress
la realite nous
stiff
Deep In The
Iris
Running Back
In Plain
Speech
Suuns & Suuns &
Jerusalem in       Jerusalem in
my Heart* my heart
Kathryn
Calder*
Shamir
Softess*+
Kuzin*
Late Spring*+
Moon*
Prinzhorn
Dance School
Nap Eyes*
Cheerleader
Zerbin*
Buffy St.
Marie*
Tough Age*+
METZ*
Fountain*
Crosss*
Kathryn
Calder
Ratchet
Dark Power
Cavity Kill
Late Spring
Moon
Home Economics
Whine of the
Mystic
The Sunshine
of Your Youth
Darling
Power In The
Blood
Plays Cub's
Hot Dog Day
Fountain II
Lo
Thrill Jockey
Constellation
bon sound
Flemish Eye
Lefse
Thrill Jockey
Secret City
File Under:
Music
XL Recordings
Self-Released
Canyon
Self-Released
Bruised
Tongue
DFA
Plastic
Factory
Bright Antenna
Fontana North
Gypsy Boy
Mint
Sub Pop
Self-Released
Telephone
Explosion
German Army*
Needs*+
Pow Wows*
The Population
Drops*+
Vats
Tan lines
Yukon
Blonde*+
Moon King*
Durrant,
Melanie*
Jerk in the
Can*+
Kappa Chow*
Palma Violets
Hawksley
Workman*
Stefana
Fratila*+
Shilpa Ray
Speedy Ortiz
" Blur
Toro Y Moi
No Joy*
Purity Ring*
Jim O'Rourke
Tasseomancy*
lsotopes*+
East India
Youth
Girlpool
In Transit
S/T
Broken
Curses
Way Down
Excessive
Days
Highlights
On Blonde
Secret Life
Anticipation
Bombs Away
Buttercup
Collected
Output
Danger In The
Club
Old Cheetah
Efemera
Last Year's
Savage
Foil Deer
The Magic
Whip
What For?
More Faithful
Another
Eternity
Simple Songs
Palm Wine
Revisited
Nuclear
Strikezone
Culture of
Volume
S/T
Dub Ditch
Picnic
File Under:
Music
Get Hip
Self-Released
Self-Released
True Panther
Dine Alone
Last Gang
Melo-ds
Self-Released
Self-Released
Rough Trade
Isadora
Trippy Tapes
Northern Spy
Carpark
Parlophone
Columbia
Arts & Crafts
Last Gang
Drag City
Healing Power
Stomp Records
XL
Wichita
CiTR's charts reflect what's been played on the air by CiTR's lovely DJs last month. Records with asterisks (*) are Canadian and those marked (+) are local. Most of these excellent albums can
be found at fine independent music stores across Vancouver. If you can't find them, give CiTR's music coordinator a shout at (604) 822-8733. Her name is Sarah Cordingley. If you ask nicely
she'll tell you how to find them. Check out other great campus/community radio charts at www.earshot-online.com. CITR 101.9 FM PROGRAM GUIDE
Discorder recommends listening to CiTR online at citr.ca every day
6:00-
7:00-
8:00-
9:00-
10:00-
11:00-
12:00-
1:00-
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5:00"
6:00"
7:00-
8:00-
9:00* •
10:00-
11:00"
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2:00-
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4:00"
5:00"
6:00	
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CITR GHOST
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UBC INSIDERS
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C1TI ' FM PROGRAM GUIDE  SILKY SMOOTH HIGHLIGHTS
words by Alex Lenz // photography by Lukas Engelhardt
II illustrations by Amber Solberg
"It's nice to learn
how to have a vested
interest in another
person. I think there's
some value in that,
just as a person in
the world, to not just
talk about yourself
all the time/'
Shaunn Watt may be the textbook definition of someone who doesn't keep all of
their eggs in one basket. In fact, Shaunn
has quite a few baskets, each of which are
filled to the brim with an eclectic mixture
of passion projects. Shaunn's career is a
wild medley of hairdressing, musicianship,   festival  organization,   and  profes
sional nice-guy. Seriously, there isn't a bad
bone in this guy's body.
Upon meeting with Shaunn at his new
Hastings-Sunrise hair studio, Big Joy Barber & Salon, I was instantly calmed by
the combination of the studio's aesthetic
appeal and Shaunn's easygoing nature.
He is soft-spoken and portrays emotional
intuitiveness, a quality which likely contributes to his success as a hairdresser.
Shaunn and Big Joy Salon itself both
exude inclusivity, a trait that Shaunn
strives to reinforce in his various endeavours. Specifically, the salon offers an identity-neutral approach to hair-cutting, a
refreshing take on the conventional norms
of the trade.
"The industry is traditionally very
gender-polarizing. I get that those spaces
exist, but I just felt that there was such a
divide — this is a man's haircut and this is
a woman's haircut. Even prices reflect that
... I want it to be a really inclusive space
— a safe one, where people, regardless of
their orientation can feel taken care of and
that they're paid attention to. They're in
an environment where however they want
L
BIG  JOY SALON
9 to identify is respected and if anything,
celebrated."
To give you a quick (well, maybe not so
quick) snapshot into the life and times of
Shaunn Watt, this is a man who has been
involved with the Vancouver music scene
for quite some time now. He used to play
the bass with Red Cedar, a folk psychedelic rock group. He played drums for
Siskiyou, whom he subsequently toured
with in Europe. He is also the drummer
for Dralms, who just released their debut
album, Shook in the infant days of October. All the while, Shaunn currently plays
guitar in the band Failing. And if that
doesn't have you convinced that Shaunn
is the reigning champion of musical copiousness, then the fact he has also released
three collections of his own demos over the
years should do it.
Shaunn has an effervescence to him,
a dimension which becomes most illuminated when he speaks of his passions.
When talking about hairdressing and
music, he becomes more engaged in the
conversation.
"I love cutting hair. It's been a really
nice way as a young person to get to know
so many people I would have never gotten to know. You learn about different jobs
and different outlooks on life. It's also a
nice way to just not talk about yourself all
the time. It's nice to learn how to have a
vested interest in another person. I think
there's some value in that, just as a person
in the world, to not just talk about yourself
all the time."
Although they may seem like mutually
exclusive undertakings, Shaunn has managed to combine his hairdressing and his
musical career in an unlikely way. He has
recorded quite a bit of music in hair salons, including recording portions of his
full-length solo album, Foil in Kokopelli,
the Commercial Drive salon he used to
work at. Shaunn attributes the balance he
was able to strike between music and hair
dressing to his former boss at Kokopelli,
Lorri, since she was incredibly supportive
of his musical career, allowing him plenty
of time off to tour.
While Shaunn's main focus lies presently with Big Joy Barber and Salon (he
farmed out his drum gig with Dralms to
another musician for their upcoming
tour), Shaunn certainly still has time in
his schedule to satisfy his musical cravings. Namely, this fulfillment comes in the
form of Big Joy Festival, an experimental
music festival that Shaunn organizes with
his friend and local musician, JP Doucet.
Big Joy Festival was launched back
in 2013 to showcase local, obscure talent
and give audience members an alternative approach to festivals and live music in
general. Genres vary from ambient noise
to electro-acoustic to freer jazz music.
"There's definitely a desire for it. It's
not just like going to a rock band where
you can just kind of stand around and
talk over the band. They're much more
immersive and they demand something
from the audience as well. Because it's not
as 'instant-gratification,' you need to let
it wash over you. It demands a bit more
patience. So it's not for everyone, but it's
so cool to see 300 people in a room dead
silent. It's pretty powerful. Those are the
moments that keep me going, when you
put all that time and energy into it, and
people are here because they give a shit.
People have a good time, and they're there
to see it and hear it and experience it."
The name 'Big Joy,' which Shaunn has
doubly used for the festival and his salon,
stems from a place of openness and well,
joy. "I consider myself a pretty happy person, and it's pretty neutral. It's not overt.
It's not alienating you because of your
class, or your gender, or the demographic
you exist in, or the lifestyle you lead."
The theme of acceptance and inclusiv-
ity deeply transcends into Big Joy Festival,
as it does into Big Joy Barber & Salon. "All
10
BIG  JOY SALON Ill
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the events, they're very much safe spaces,
regardless of who you are and why you're
there. There's zero tolerance for any sort of
discriminatory behaviour. It's a very sensitive thing — how you look and how you feel
and how you present yourself. So I think
it's nice if it can be a relaxing and inviting
and open experience."
Big Joy Festival takes place from
December 2-5. The first two nights are at
Selectors' Records, while the last two nights
are at Remington Gallery. Tickets for the
festival are available at local record stores,
Big Joy Barber & Salon, and may be pur-
chased at the door.
BIG JOY SALON
11 "I. ' "• U    " ' "   ■  ■:
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THE SOUND OF 88 TUNED BONGOS
words by Jonathon Hernandez II photography by Jon Vincent
II illustrations by Josh Conrad
'Strange device,
huh?"
The performances by legendary free
jazz pianist, Cecil Taylor are a sight to marvel. At his prime he could strike each key
with a level of power, intensity and speed
that, in this writer's eyes, resembles a sort
of physicality that I can only compare to
the great jazz drummers Gene Krupa and
Buddy Rich (if you haven't seen their epic
drum battles, YouTube it ASAP,) And while
I am far from a piano expert (aside from a
few key Journey melodies I can rip on the
synth), the comparison is in tune with a
philosophy that has been used to describe
Taylor's pioneering style — the piano is
really just 88 tuned bongos, with each key
bearing the tune of a different drum. Taylor's percussive style paved the way to new
ways of thinking about how to play the
piano, breaking down tradition and essen
tially ushering in the era of experimental
jazz.
In order for music to evolve, the unconventional needed space to flourish. Over
40 years ago, Vancouver's Western Front
Society emerged as a space for the exploration and creation of new art forms. Today,
it operates as an artist-run-center for contemporary art and new music. And, in a
wink to the great Cecil Taylor, it is currently
running a series titled, 88 Tuned Bongos —
a performance series highlighting the latest
innovations in experimental piano and keyboard projects.
I visited the Western Front on a cold and
rainy Vancouver evening. Drenched from
head to toe after a regrettable bike-ride, I
stumbled upon a rehearsal between composer, Doug Blackley and pianist, Andrew
Czink. I was immediately astounded by the
whale-like noises emanating from what,
at first glance, looked like a regular grand
piano.
"Strange device, huh?" Blackley said to
me with a wide grin on his face as he captained his instrument. "Literally stick your
head over the strings."
12
88 TUNED  BONGOS I stuck my head into the belly of the
piano, my ears wavering over the strings
as Blackley's hands danced over the keys.
A glowing, supernatural arrangement of
notes flew across the room.
"It's electronic music without speakers,"
explained Czink, laughing.
Blackley was playing an instrument
that he has labeled the 'spectral piano':
a device that allows a traditional acoustic piano to play otherworldly sounds by
'bowing' the strings with electro-magnets.
Blackley's ensemble, consisting of a Diskla-
vier grand piano, multiple keyboards and
a laptop, enable him to emit sounds once
believed to be confined to synthesizers and
pipe-organs from the strings of an acoustic
grand piano.
"20 years ago I thought about how
I could do this — but I never did it," said
Blackley.
Blackley completed his Master's at
Simon Fraser University, receiving funding to develop the unique instrument, and
eventually showcase it in his Master's composition concert.
"I went back to my idea from 20 years
before, of building this sort of stuff, and
spent a couple years [thinking], 'dear god is
this going to work' as I was throwing money
at it to make it happen," Blackley said.
Blackley had recruited Czink to perform his composition onstage.
"He asked me if I would perform [for his
Masters project] and I said sure of course,"
Czink said. "He talked about this technology he'd been working on, and I sort of
understood what we would be doing. But
the first time I came over to his place to
rehearse, and he demonstrated it in his living room, I remember just standing there
and these unearthly sounds came out of
piano, things that I would expect to come
out of the synthesizer, except there was
this really organic sound — because it was
a piano vibrating. And I remember I just
walked up, stuck my head in the piano, and
I looked up with the biggest stupid grin on
my face. Doug reflected that back, because
he understood that I got it. It was just an
amazing moment."
On November 6th Blackley and Czink
will take audiences on a journey through
their innovative sounds and styles utilizing the spectral piano and a ROLI seaboard — a fretless keyboard with vibrato
capabilities. The ROLI will amplify through
the piano, thus cementing the performance
unlike anything the crowd has ever seen.
Utilizing these unique instruments, the
duo will unravel their talents in a structurally improvised piece that is sure to both
astound the audience, and maybe even
leave a few of them scratching their heads.
But before they hit the stage, audiences
will be treated to another unique performance: a multimedia theatre piece by composer, Remy Siu and pianist, Vicky Chow.
Siu, a composer trained at SFU Contemporary Arts, will be putting Chow's
skills to the test, setting her on stage to
complete numerous gestures on a midi-key-
board that will trigger both theatrical light
projections and sounds from the Disklavier
piano upstage.
Speaking with Siu, he explained, "From
a moment to moment basis, Vicky won't
know what she needs to do next." Siu continued, "And some of these gestures are
going to be really difficult."
Chow will be confronted with a failure
option, meaning that if she can't pull off a
gesture, she'll have to do it again.
"One thing that I'm interested in the
audience experiencing is that kind of failure, and that it's okay. Sometimes failure
can be a bad thing, but I want it to be a part
of the piece," said Siu. "It's a struggle, and
Vicky is really up for the challenge."
And even though she's onboard, Chow
still had some concerns.
"The biggest challenge is more psychological to me as a performer, because it's
even more vulnerable to make these mis-
88 TUNED  BONGOS
13 takes in front of an audience," said Chow.
"Even though it's part of the piece, it's so
ingrained in me, trained as a classical
musician, that you're supposed to execute
as perfectly as possible, even though that's
unattainable. So it's probably going to
make me very uncomfortable onstage. But
the failure is part of the piece — I am coming to terms with that."
And while Chow might feel the most vulnerable, the rest of the series' performers
will also be put to the test as they venture
into the unknown. The 88 Tuned Bongo
series won't just give these duos an opportunity to put their unique ideas on display,
but also the chance explore the possibilities
— and limitations — of their own artistic
creations in front of a live audience this
season, and next.
As part of the 88 Timed Bongos Piano
Series, Andrew Czink, Doug Blackley and
Remy Siu are presenting the Composers Clinic workshop November 1, although
pre-registration is required. Under the Hood,
with Vicky Chow & The Spectral Piano Project is November 6 at 8pm at Western Front
Advance tickets are $10115, available at
front.bc.ca. Production assistance by Paul
Paroczat Future 88 Timed Bongos events will
be announced for Winter 2016.
14
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15 - AND ADORED
words by Jasper Wrinch II photography by Jonathan Dy
II illustrations by Karl Ventura
"The persona I put
on onstage is about
a derisive pageantry
towards performance,
and the self-
deprecation through
complete bombast/'
It's not unusual for an artist to have
trouble categorizing their music into any
specific genre. More often than not, music
skirts the line between styles, utilizing elements from disparate genres to form anew
sound. Be it pop-punk or neo-psychadelia,
horrorcore or shoegaze, artists are constantly adapting genre distinctions to better fit their musical stylings. Even still,
some artists have trouble doing even this.
Such is the case for Revered.
Discorder sits down with Emmett Hall,
creator and mastermind behind Revered,
Vancouver's least definable band, to figure out what exactly Revered is. "That's
really tricky," says Hall, "I don't know if I
fit anywhere." When asked what one will
expect to see at a Revered show, after a
long pause Hall responds, "It's just a big
effigy of my ego on display."
But Revered isn't strictly the solo project of Emmett Hall. "I kind of want to
make it a cabaret style thing," says Hall. "I
can be one person performing or I can have
an orchestra and it'd be great. The bigger
the better." At the moment, Revered is only
a duo, the other half consisting of Pietro
Sammarco. Unfortunately, Sammarco
was unable to join the interview, but Hall
explains his role within the band, along
with how the two joined forces initially —
"I'll usually start [a project] at home,
then take it to him." Sammarco, an experienced sound designer and audio engineer,
provides the technical expertise to transform Hall's ideas into refined and complete
songs. "He has a way better engineering
and mixing ear than me. He's done a lot
more of that," explains Hall. "I compose all
the stuff, and he makes it sound worth listening to."
REVERED
17 They initially came together in the
Vancouver comedy scene. Through local
art collective, Weekend Leisure, Hall and
Sammarco collaborated to create an 'Eye
of the Tiger-style' montage rock song for
the independent action movie, Steel Viper
Force. After creating their song titled,
"Hunting For Human," Hall called on Sammarco to collaborate on Revered. They are
releasing their first album, But What If I'm
Right? November 4.
Still relatively unknown in Vancouver's
music scene, Hall admits to being ignorant navigating musical communities and
institutions in the city. "How you get your
music out there? How do gigs work? How
do you sell albums, or anything — I don't
know how any of it works," says Hall. Yet he
is far from green to musical performance.
Working with the Sunday Service, a
weekly improv comedy show at the Fox
Cabaret, Hall has developed a reputation around the city for playing music for
comedy. "Most people know me, in terms
of music, through that, and through the
comedy scene in general." In fact, apart
from a few high school bands, Hall's
musical career has consisted of solely
making music for comedy and improv performances, sketches and films.
"I was taking improv classes, and there
was always a piano in the room, so I would
just noodle around during breaks," says
Hall. "The instructor said they were always
looking  for   people   to   provide   musical
soundtracks and score improv scenes,"
and so Hall became the man to do it. And
that may be a source of inspiration for his
current genre-spanning act, Revered.
In scoring improv comedy, Hall
explains, "I've always got to be quick on my
feet and adapt to different styles — or at
least fake my way, and suggest the sentiment of different styles." His work with the
Sunday Service, along with the countless
other comedy acts in his past, has provided Hall with a set of improvisational
skills that don't go to waste in Revered.
And his experience with the com-
edic form permeates into'Revered's music
to a large degree. For Hall, humour can
18
REVERED be an effective tool in getting a message
across to an audience. "You can have a
lot of subconscious influence over people
when they're being entertained." And by
adopting a comedic character or persona
on stage, Hall can display his darker side
without fear of scaring away his audience.
"It's the worst of me, but I'm trying to
make it palatable," says Hall. "The persona I put on onstage is about a derisive
pageantry towards performance, and the
self-deprecation through complete bombast." In fact, Hall admits one of his character's biggest influences is Randy Newman. "In a lot of his more satirical music,
he's always playing a character and saying horrible things," explains Hall. "You
get to laugh at that character because it's
obviously contrived." It's the performer's
self-awareness of the ridiculousness of the
performance that makes it safe to expose
the darker side of himself.
Yet Hall still sees his ties with comedy
as potentially detrimental to his musical
career in some ways. "I don't want to say
Revered doesn't have a comedic element
— there's hilarious aspects to it." He continues, "I just don't want it to undermine
the attempt at earnest content." While
it's easy to laugh at the eccentricity and
the spectacle of Revered, Hall fears that's
where the attention will stop. "I guess I
wish the music would hold on its own a
little better," says Hall. "But I think you're
really going to get the full effect when you
see it live."
In addition to the persona flail
inhabits on stage, a Revered performance is chock full of sheer entertainment.
"We have a whole visual element in terms
of costumes, props, choreography, and a
kind of stage banter thing," says Hall, At
any given Revered performance, you are
bound to see fog machines, explosions of
ego, and a cape or two. Live shows also
feature a rotating roster of special guests
playing every instrument from guitar to
saxophone.
With all that said, it's still difficult to
pin down what kind of band Revered is.
Sonically, Hall says, "It's a lot of derivative
sounds from 80's synths...You can't really
put your finger on it, and thematically,
it's all about contrast and contradiction."
While no single category exists that could
contain all of what Revered is, Hall's own
mission statement for the band comes
pretty damn close:
"Revered is a taunt to celebrate Emmett
Hall's musical indulgence into a pseudo-
new-wave-prog-rock catharsis of ego. An
effigy to be truly Revered!"
Revereds record release show for But
What If I'm Right? is November 4 at the
Fox Cabaret, with special guest Mark Mills.
Revered is also performing at the Toast Collective November 7 with Nathan Matthews,
The Intelligence Service and Night Bus, and
the Astoria November 19 as part of the Discorder Fundraiser with Late Spring, Mesa
Luna and to ugly.
REVERED
19 :.// ISSUE MAGAZINE
SHELF LIFE
words by Keagan Perlette
photography by Duncan Cairns-Brenner
illustration by Alison Sadler
On East Pender, nestled inconspicuously next to a Chinese herb shop, is
Unit/Pitt Projects. I meet Jamie Ward, the
Building and Office manager of U/P and
the current editor of the gallery's publication, ISSUE. Actually, Ward is hanging out
on the bench beside the door and scares
the shit out of me as I try to get into the
gallery, which, at 6pm, looks very closed.
Ward welcomes me into the space like it's
his own home — the gallery is showing
Joel Doyle's Its a long way from the wishbone to the backbone — and leads me to
the back, where a mini library of curated
books and magazines features some of the
original issues of ISSUE, straight from the
80's.
Ward prefaces the interview by warning, "It's hard to talk about this magazine
without saying the word 'issue' a lot. We
should have a drinking game at staff meetings, how many times can you say 'issue'?"
It can be said that ISSUEs history is not
without its issues: the publication, which
began running monthly issues in 1983,
stopped printing in 1985 when the original editors, Barbara Daniel and Jim Car-
rico ended their time with the gallery. In
2014, Brynn McNab took the responsibility of heading the magazine as a quarterly critical mag until her departure earlier this year. Now ISSUE is in the hands
of Ward and his first team of contributors,
which includes Steff Ling, Shauna Jean
Doherty, Ellis Sam, Zeb Zang, Catherine
de Montreuil and Tom Whalen.
Speaking for himself and Catherine
de Montreuil, the programming assistant
at U/P, Ward says, "We were really drawn
to the first series because they are really
entertaining  to  read."  Ward  continues,
SHELF LIFE
21 "There's this really great blend of 80's
punk sarcasm with a lot of actual intellectual conversation discussing art happening on a local level." It is this local sensibility coupled with that element of entertainment which Ward and his contributors
intend to carry through to the upcoming
publication.
Ward wants ISSUE to be the kind of
magazine that opens the art world to
everyone, and gets readers thinking about
issues surrounding art and what it means
to be an artist in Vancouver. "The push
is to make a publication that can function as a critical analysis of art without
being so didactic that it isolates people,"
he explains. "How do you have open ended
discussions because ... when you are
reading a publication that you don't quite
get, then you don't want to read it, right?
Beyond just art issues, [we want to look] at
labour issues: what it's like having creativity as your labour, as your practice."
"I want [readers that] don't read art
magazines, people that don't read Fou-
cault. I want to break out of these institutional binds," says Ward. "We're intelligent people and we're writing about intelligent things. Our readers are intelligent.
There's no point in pretending that they're
not, but I don't want to sound so 'intelligent' that it's not smart." Ward is interested in discussing the real problems that
emerging artists in the city face. He openly
acknowledges that Vancouver has a rocky
relationship with its artists and is eager to
discuss the truth about the local artist's
lifestyle. "Vancouver amazes me because it
is almost like you are constantly having to
fight against the city itself from crushing
you from doing [your work]." Ward says,
"and because of that, there is so much
more investment, it seems, from people
who really wanna make it happen... It's
such an underdog feeling to me."
ISSUES' goal is to hold a megaphone
to discourse that's already proliferating in
the local art community, and to discuss
those issues in every ISSUE. The resurrection of the mag is a testament to the true
mettle of the artists in the city. It is pure
passion, making the publication so vital.
"I think there are interesting things to talk
about, and I think that everyone who is
writing with us right now feels the same
way: that there are discussions to be had
and [ISSUE provides] an opportunity."
The launch of the next ISSUE will be
November 20th at Unit/Pitt Projects. For
updates or to get involved visit issuemaga-
zine.ca, or drop by U/P Tuesday-Saturday
12-5pm.
22
SHELF  LIFE   I CAN ONLY GIVE YOU EVERYTHING
DISCORDER REVISITED
words by Erica Leiren
illustration by Katherine Cott
photo courtesy of Erica Leiren
Let's start with this. If there is a more
perfect song than The Modernettes' "I Can
Only Give You Everything," I haven't heard
it. Double dare you to listen to it and not air
guitar the main riff.
I walk down the street and I
see the world is broken dreams,
Some man comes up to me and
says all is not what it seems
. . . Don't ask me Baby 'cause I
don't know just what it means
But I can only give you everything.
The Modernettes were a great band
from so many angles. Their gigs had that
exciting air of danger ybu get when a band is
unpredictable and the shows can go either
way. Would they perform gloriously? Or
would it end in a fight? The spectacle and
the performances were always irresistible.
John Armstrong, aka. Buck Cherry,
was The Modernettes' guitarist / vocalist / main songwriter with the good fortune to have both a teen-idol-perfect singing voice, and the good taste to use it with
intent. This is especially true on the band's
masterpiece and final album, View from
the Bottom, where the songs resound with
a bittersweet depth and conviction. Armstrong's rebel-chic persona, smouldering
intensity and the fact that he has a brain
didn't hurt either. Buck Cherry.. . the man
Jack White wishes he could be.
Remarkable at the time was seeing a
girl playing an instrument and holding
her own with the boys. Mary Jo Kopechne
played bass and was obviously a lynch pin
of the band, not just there to ice the cake.
She was tough, talented and strikingly
beautiful, like the film noir heroines the
band idolized. To the boys in the audience,
she was a living doll, but to the girls she
was much more — an inspiration for what
they might accomplish musically.
You can see Mach 1 Modernettes Buck,
DISCORDER  REVISITED
25 Mary and drummer, Jughead in action on
the wonderful short film for "Barbra," the
single off their 1980 debut record, Teen
City. The record went for a phenomenal
five pressings when the initial run of 1,000
sold out. The band released their posthumous, limited run (300 copies) live & demos
record Gone . . . But Not Forgiven with a
note from Buck thanking their fans. It said,
in part "to me, we always seemed like poor
cousins to everybody else. The Pointed
Sticks were slicker, DOA were 'cooler' and
the Young Canadians were virtuosos. All
we had going for us was our songs and our
ability to be either shit-hot or abysmal for
no discernible reason."
The Modernettes, Mach 2 replaced
Jughead with Ian Noble, a fresh face who
Downbeat Magazine lauded as one of the
up-and-coming drummers to watch for. He
later cut a swathe though other Vancouver bands (Go Four 3, The Hip Type) with
his big drum sound that simultaneously
delivered showmanship, power, accuracy
and great rhythmic feel. The other tasty
addition to The Modernettes cocktail was
guitarist Randy Valentino. This lineup
recorded View From the Bottom which was
released just in time for Christmas 1982.
The title and record cover photo (actor William Holden floating face down in a Holly
wood swimming pool) alluded to the film,
Sunset Boulevard.
The records may be hard to find, but
luckily, Zulu's 1995 CD re-release Get It
Straight includes all the songs, plus excellent liner notes and photographs of the
band. The re-mixes add a production lustre
that highlights the power and swaggering
beauty of the two-guitar line-up. Bonus:
it is still available from Sudden Death
Records.
Also well worth the effort to locate is
Armstrong's 2006 autobiography, Guilty of
Everything wherein the author/musician
shows us that he is equally capable of writing fine prose — think Hunter S. Thompson
meets Hemingway in Vancouver, and goes
on a musical bender. Delicious. So good,
in fact, that Vancouver filmmaker and
ex-rocker Patrick Carroll (Picasso Set) plans
to make it into a film. I'm already imagining who will make the best Mary on screen.
For a glimpse of how Buck and Mary easily eclipse most mortals, watch Susanne
Tabata's 2010 documentary, Bloodied But
Unbowed. Larger-than-life characters? How
about skyscraper size? Seems that the view
from the bottom may be one of the best
angles there is.
26
DISCORDER  REVISITED THE SCREEN GIRLS
ON THE AIR
words by Gary Jarvis
photography by Jaqueline Manoukian
illustration by Kim Pringle
probably one of the most liberating things
we've done.
Christina: We wanted the show to be
like when we have our conversations — very
natural, fluid, exactly the way we talk when
we're in the car.
Christina Ghuman and Sarah Sangha
met studying journalism, forming an alliance which has since flourished into a production company, a website and now a radio
show on CiTR, all under the moniker of The
Screen Girls. I met with Sarah and Christina on a wet and windy night in October
at CiTR to find out more about their radio
show and their passions for contemporary
art.
WHAT  WAS  THE   INITIAL   REACTION
WHEN YOU FIRST CAME TO CITR WITH
THE IDEA FOR THE SHOW?
Sarah: They've been so supportive,
[especially] the programming manager,
Robin Alam. It's such an intimidating concept at first, the idea of going on the radio.
But making the transition as radio hosts is
HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE CONTEMPORARY ART?
C: That's what I love so much about it.
Contemporary art is so broad. Music, rap,
hip-hop, all that stuff. That's all part of contemporary art, and some of the stuff we
cover. Contemporary art is everything from
fine art that's more traditional like painting,
sculpture, what people think of when they
hear the term art. But then definitely it's
getting more into the digital art, and talking
to a lot of graphic designers. Digital art is
really exciting right now.
S: We love to explore the mediums of
art that have cropped up in, say, the last 30
years. Hip hop totally falls under that. Yeah,
digital art, and different ways of sculpture.
C: And they all influence each other,
whether it's fashion or music. So it's fun to
ON THE  AIR
27  sit back and see where the trends will pop
up, like Beyonce's music video recreating a
shot from an iconic painting, and us talking
about that on the show. I think with my art
background we're able to pick up on those
trends really quick and almost critique them
to figure out what they mean.
HOW DO YOU TRANSLATE WHAT YOU
ARE INTERESTED IN INTO A RADIO
SHOW?
C: Bit by bit. There's Fuse, the Vancouver Art Gallery event that they do — we'll
go there, we'll film it, we'll talk about it on
the show, we'll recap it, and share some of
the things that caught our attention while
we were there, and we do that with different
galleries around the city. Through all of this
we found a really fun gallery in New West.
S: It's called the New Media Gallery at
the Anvil Centre. They had a display with
over 4,000 balloons and they were black,
so you just kind of walk in. First you've got
all your feelings of claustrophobia. Just
imagine the sounds of that as you're moving through. It made for a really cool auditory experience.
C: At [NMG] during that exhibit they
had four different art works. They had a
film that played on repeat and you could
just hear the sounds of balloons popping.
We played the audio on-air of the popping
balloons, us running through the balloons,
and an interview with the curators. We gave
our first-hand personal experience. It's cool
to be able to share that experience with the
listeners who might not have been able to
visit the gallery.
DOES SOUND ART COME INTO PART OF
WHAT YOU DO?
C: It sounded like the ocean running
through those balloons. Sarah was running
through, and we did a bit of hide and seek
in the balloons. It was all dark. You couldn't
see anything, and she was on one end and
I was on the other end. She could hear my
voice and she would get really close. I could
tell that she was this close to me and I would
be very still.
(Both Christina and Sarah giggle at
the memory)
C: The sounds of it were insane.
The Screen Girls airs Wednesday nights
from 10-1 lpm. You can also listen to past
interviews which they stream on Sound-
cloud, with links at their website thescreen-
girls.com. The website contains a wealth of
information on contemporary art and emerging trends and is engaging reading.
CORRECTION: LAST MONTH'S ON THE AIR WITH
RADIO FREE THINKER, THE WORD "METHODOLOGY" SHOULD REPLACE "MYTHOLOGY".
ON THE AIR
29
J PEACHES /U.S. GIRLS
OCTOBER 6 / COMMODORE BALLROOM
It is usually a good omen when a show's
opening and headlining acts complement
one another. In the case of U.S. Girls opening for Peaches at the Commodore on
October 6, the pairing felt particularly apt:
U.S. Girls recently released the excellent
record Half Free, and Peaches, who also
released her latest effort Rub last month,
had not brought her powerfully feminist and
sex-positive live performance to Vancouver
in six years.
Waiting for Meghan Remy of U.S. Girls to
take to the stage and warm the audience to
the teaches of Peaches, I surveyed the minimal crowd apprehensively. But by the time
Remy was halfway through her first number
"Window Shades" — an ominous cut from
Half Free — my concerns were forgotten.
Remy marched around the stage and delivered her vocals with attitude and fierceness,
pausing every so often to survey the growing crowd with the look of a person gazing
upon their loyal subjects.
Joined on stage by a single backup singer, a stack of cassettes and a small tape
player, Remy seamlessly flipped tapes and
adjusted levels throughout the set to bring
her songs to life. After a captivating rendition
of "Woman's Work," one of the most hypnot
ic, disco influenced songs on Half Free, I
was devastated when Remy announced that
the next song would be their last. The tragedy of this criminally short set was remedied
partially by her closing number, "Damn That
Valley," in which Remy's striking vocals were
at their greatest display, cutting through the
punchy synths and smooth backing vocals
with precision.
Thirty minutes after the U.S. Girls set ended, the lights dimmed as Peaches' entrance
song — Nina Simone's "Four Women" —
diminished the crowd's excited chatter. Clad
in an empress-like golden cape and spark-
ly body suit, Peaches strutted into view and
climbed atop a platform centre stage.
From the moment the drums of opener, "Rub" began, it was clear she was in
her element. Staring down the audience
with a severity not unlike Remy before her,
Peaches spat, grimaced and growled her
lyrics to the enjoyment of the howling fans
before her. Two dancers clad in a variety of
gender-bending costumes joined Peaches
onstage throughout the show, their provocative moves a rousing complement to
Peaches' performance.
During "Vaginoplasty," the dancers
bounced onto the stage in fancy silk vagina
costumes, comically attempting to smother
Peaches at the end of the song. Renditions
of other tracks from Rub including "How You
Like My Cut" and "Dick in the Air," as well
30
REAL  LIVE ACTION as older classics "The Boys Wanna Be Her"
and "Fuck the Pain Away," featured similar
antics, such as a giant inflatable penis and
champagne sprayed all over the crowd by
Peaches herself.
Despite the spectacle of it all, I was most
impressed by the energy and intent that
Peaches brought to each song, switching
swiftly from rapping to singing with aerobics to match. By the time her set culminated with a three-song encore, the power of
Peaches' carefully calculated yet wild world
had fully engulfed the crowd, and my champagne covered body was happy to have
been a part of it.
-Eleanor Wearing
ANGEL OLSEN /
LIONLIMB
OCTOBER 8 / BILTMORE CABARET
The Biltmore was filling steadily. With
a half-assembled audience, opening act
Lionlimb began. Stewart Bronaugh's soft
vocals and noodling momentary guitar melodies established a lo-fi atmosphere.
On Lionlimb's fourth tune, Angel Olsen
appeared. Standing in the back right corner of the stage, she held a short glass with
a straw. Her voice, dark and sweet like the
rum I imagine she was drinking, began to
back up Bronaugh's. As her vocals moved
beyond an echo, a bridge of syrupy sound
connected two discernable instrumental
melodies.
I noticed that within a whole Lionlimb
song, distinguishable sections existed.
Almost interrupting themselves, an arrangement of notes would evolve abruptly, stepping forward, to the side, and back, in a
square or circle. This segmentation was
crafted with skill and precision, but challenging to entirely engage with, as one part
did not always flow seamlessly into the next.
Lionlimb played their recently released
single, "Turnstile," sixth. Cymbals were
struck lightly and piano keys repeated a
short pattern. Bronaugh's vocals emerged
within this haze. Guitar riffs flowed as finlike notes cut in between.
"Turnstile" exemplified the best of
Lionlimb: its song structure was fluid enough
to be immersive while it retained the band's
particularly surreal lo-fi songmanship.
As Lionlimb slowly released the notes
of iheir last song, the audience produced
enough chatter to fill in all the uninhabited
moments of quiet.
After intermission, the room was bursting. I no longer stood in front of the stage,
but to the side of it, near the drummer. From
there Olsen's vocals sounded less asser-
REAL  LIVE  ACTION
31 tive than I might have anticipated and the
drumming was boisterous.
Olsen's band included half of the opening act. Joshua Jaeger played drums and
Bronaugh was on guitar, in addition to
Olsen herself on vocals/guitar and Emily
Elhaj on bass.
Olsen introduced her fourth tune: "This
next song is about getting the fuck out if
you don't want to be there." Bold as its set
up, the bass notes bloomed into dark circles of sound. Olsen's vocals glowed from
within these dim craters, un-haunting and
lovely. Jaeger's drumming initiated the chorus. The drum notes lingered while Olsen's
voice rose.
As the band performed "Lights Out," their
instrumentation heightened and coloured
Olsen's lyrics. Particularly, the bass and
drums provided contrast and intensity to
her words.
As Olsen sang, her vocals were clean
and strong. Her face was not wild with
change, it remained mostly flat and mysterious, and her eyes looked out beyond the
audience and through the Biltmore's back
wall. Her lips outlined arresting words as
they were released, but her eyes, cheeks,
and nose stayed restrained.
Olsen's voice is a universe. Her crooning in "The Acrobat," ran over an unrolling
guitar path, traversing below and above its
steady centre. Her voice was blue with "I
want.." and then rusty as she continued to
implore: "...to be the bed you made."
Near the end of her set, Olsen's band
left the stage. An audience member asked
if she knew a joke. "No I don't and I don't
feel like telling one because I only have a
few songs left." Her somber reply was consistent with her control and poise as a performer. It wasn't a harsh response, it was a
crass request. Olsen tells ballads, not jokes.
-Alex de Boer
ARIEL PINK/BLACK
LIPS/HINDS
OCTOBER 10 / RICKSHAW THEATRE
It's not often Vancouver concertgoers
arrive in time for the opening set, let alone
in advance. But October 10 at the Rickshaw
saw folks patiently lined up in advance of
the 8 p.m. doors. The halfway point in a
short seven-show double-headlining tour
of Ariel Pink and the Black Lips, the night
promised to be a heavy hitter, and it did not
disappoint.
By the time Spanish four piece Hinds
kicked off their opening set, the Rickshaw
was already filling up for what would be a
tightly-packed night. And it was a good
thing, too; though they drew fans of their
own, Hinds doubtlessly made a few more
from the crowd who arrived with nothing but
the double headliners in mind. Though their
first few songs suffered from some audio level issues, Hinds quickly hit their stride with
all of the peppy energy that they've recently
become known for. Continual calls for more
songs allowed them to tack on an extra two,
closing with their energized cover of Thee
Headcoats' "Davey Crockett."
Setting up in front of a sheet adorned with
their name in spray paint, the Black Lips
were next up ... A vigorous mosh pit quickly formed. This could not have been particularly comfortable given the heat emanating from the already closely packed bodies,
but no one seemed to mind. Singer Cole
Alexander's chilled out demeanor seemed
to control the crowd, lulling them into feeling the same way. Joined by Zumi Rosow
on saxophone, they laid out tracks from their
latest effort Underneath the Rainbow along
with older favorites. The crowd got particularly tumultuous as the first few chords of
"Bad Kids" rang out, the mosh pit seeming
to extend through the crowd.
Ariel Pink's polka dot-spattered set came
32
REAL  LIVE ACTION last. Aware that his 11:30 start time was
somewhat late, Pink frequently thanked his
audience for hanging around. He also complimented the interest in moshing, the first
of many moves with which he would win the
crowd over. Part of the appeal of an Ariel
Pink show seems to be the question of
whether or not he'll have a meltdown — at
least, speculation about this could be heard
amongst the crowd throughout the night.
But no drama was to be seen — Pink and
his band, Haunted Graffiti were nothing but
solid and entertaining, mostly playing tracks
from Pom Pom and 2012's Mature Themes.
Encoring with the contemplative "Picture Me
Gone," Pink and Haunted Graffiti ushered
the masses back out into the crisp fall night
in a buzzy haze.
In the midst of Vancouver's notoriously
moody concert scene this night was marked
by the crowd's eagerness, excitement and
positive energy. The audience seemed
ready to forego comfort for the sake of the
music, and it was well worth it.
-Elizabeth Holliday
OUGHT /PEACE/
CAVE GIRL
OCTOBER 14
Entering the venue shortly after doors
opened, I was surprised to hear the main act,
Ought, already running through some tracks
off of their latest full length release, Sun
Coming Down. Only on entering the nearly empty room did I realize that soundcheck
was just finishing and I had gotten there way
too early.
As the last minute or two of their sprawling
David Byrne-inspired art rock song "Beautiful
Blue Sky" trailed off, I settled into one of the
many couches in the room, and watched the
band pack up while people slowly filtered in.
After an  hour or so of watching the
crowd grow denser, Vancouver's own Cave
Girl took to the stage. The garage pop trio
bruised their way through a handful of songs,
often losing their way under an overwhelming
wash of distortion. The charm and melodic
sensibility that their recorded material possesses was almost entirely eradicated by volume, save for a few moments of restraint and
musical virtuosity, from bassist Devon Parker
especially.
That being said, the crowd bid them
farewell at the end of their set with healthy
cheers and applause. After a short intermission, Peace began to play. Their volume was
appropriately lowered, their distortion was
more tastefully applied, and their frontman's
gaze effectively captured the attention of
everyone in the room. Paired with his poetic crooning, Dan Geddes's unwavering stare
not only proved thoroughly entertaining, but
foreshadowed the idiosyncratic frontman of
the headlining band.
The performance of Tim Darcy, guitarist
and vocalist of Ought, was really a sight to
be seen. His lanky frame jerked around the
stage; his hands spastically moved from his
guitar to the air around his head; his voice
shifted between aggressive talking to near
shrieking; his lyrics darted between declarations of literary grandeur — "This is the high
REAL  LIVE ACTION
33 watermark of civilization!"—to statements
of the everyday—"Beautiful weather today /
How's the church? / How's the job?"
But the dynamic and riveting energy he
brought to the stage was not a solo effort.
The rest of Ought filled out the songs with
an incredible focus and determination to hold
true to the record while adding that extra
push to the live performance. The complex
drum beats never wavered, the distorted and
rhythmic keys counterbalanced the explosive
guitar lines, and the bass lines anchored the
expansive post-punk songs.
With an equally frantic and comfortable
energy onstage, Ought powered through
their newest record in its entirety, and even
added a few tracks from their 2014 LP, More
Than Any Other Day, closing the set with
the title track of that record. With only two
full lengths under their belt, one would think
Ought would still be trying to figure out who
they are, or what they want to be. But, after
seeing them perform, it's pretty clear that
they know exactly what they're doing.
-Jasper D Wrinch
DESTROYER / FROG
EYES / DADA PLAN
OCTOBER 17 / COMMODORE BALLROOM
Destroyer and Frog Eyes are both the kind
of bands that are geographically nebulous,
even to the people that share a city with them.
Although respective frontmen Dan Bejar and
Carey Mercer are both long-time locals (Bejar
from Vancouver and Mercer originally from
Victoria), their multitude of musical groups,
including collaborative effort Swan Lake, have
never taken on the somewhat narrow label of
"Vancouver band." Whether this has been an
unconscious result of their mutual success
outside of the Lower Mainland, or a marked
decision to avoid being typecast, watching
both bands play at the Commodore Ballroom
invoked a special blend of hometown pride
and small town envy in much of the audience.
Luckily, the stage returned some of the best
bittersweetness to the crowd in stunning performances dripping with talent.
Unfortunately for the fashionably late concert goers, openers Dada Plan performed
exactly on time, meaning this reviewer and
plenty others besides missed out on the local
group's opening act. Really the only logical
choice to start such a night of Vancouver
power bands, Dada Plan are about as
"Vancouver" as it gets. Fronted by Malcolm
Biddle, the brainchild of past Vancity mega-
bands like Sun Wizard and Capitol 6, the five
piece psychedelic-tinged jazz-pop aren't an
old ensemble, but have already gained a passionate following for their bizarre stage presence and eclectic instrument choices, mixing synths and upright bass with equal parts
conga and drum machine. It was a shame to
enter the venue just as the band was tearing
down, and an even bigger shame to see just
how roomy the Commodore still was before
Frog Eyes' set.
Performing just off of the band's most
accessible releases yet (and easily one of
the best), Pickpocket's Locket, Frog Eyes
went above and beyond to deliver a regrettably compact, but nevertheless powerful and
evocative performance. Carey Mercer greeted the crowd by way of an apology, explaining
that although he is usually fairly talkative in
between songs, the band had decided to cut
out most of the ramblings in favour of, simply, more music. To any audience, the promise of more songs in a shorter time isn't one
to be met with melancholy, and considering
the fairly strict time limit to the band's set, it
was probably the right decision. Still, the two
contrasting and remarkable sides to Mercer
as he switches between conflicted visionary
barking pained operatic literature, and humble and serene speaker, are so fascinating to
observe that it seems like a shame to have
seen a toned down version of the latter.
Regardless  of  the  format,   Frog   Eyes
34
REAL  LIVE ACTION were not only unforgettable but completely mesmerizing, occupying the stage of the
Commodore more deftly than bands twice
their size. With a few choice offerings from
Pickpocket's Locket, plus a handful of older
songs and fan favourites, the group covered
remarkable ground before the end of their
runtime. Bombastic, terrifying, and utterly
poetic, Frog Eyes left an impression inches
deep on the minds of their listeners.
Latecomers that barely missed Frog
Eyes' set, or were too nervous of Carey
Mercer's impressive presence to move
towards the stage, moved forward as if invited by Destroyer's promised warm presence
to occupy every nook and cranny left in the
Commodore before the band ever graced
the stage. It was easy to understand why so
many wanted to be so close to the stage for
Destroyer's long-awaited local gig — from
the first sickly sweet note to the last graceful
flourish, Dan Bejar and his amazing group of
destructively talented individuals were warm,
intimate, and breathtaking. Touring to support
Poison Season, the follow-up to 2011's critically lauded Kaputt, the band leaned heavily
on newer material to supplement a catalogue
of music nearly a decade old.
It can't be emphasized strongly enough
how much of an ensemble cast Destroyer
has become in recent years. Featuring local
heavyweights like JP Carter (Inhabitants,
Fond Of Tigers, Dan Mangan) and John
Collins (JC/DC, The New Pornographers), it
came as some surprise to first-time listeners
in the crowd just how much focus was on the
instrumental side of songs that, on record,
may have relied on Bejar's unique voice for
glue. The frontman took regular pauses to let
the musicians flanking him flourish, literally
taking a knee while the band coaxed a five
minute ballad into an explosive double-length
orchestral movement, replete with trumpeted
crescendos, saxophone wailing, and a musical intensity that no one in the crowd really
expected.
By the end of it all, the whole venue was lit
with a post-coital glow of energy and warmth.
Dan Bejar's collected cool gave way to a
flood of emotion wrapped in artistic integrity, and I think that the band as well as the
crowd walked away having glimpsed something really, truly special. Things were about
as "Vancouver" inside the Commodore as
they're ever likely to be, but this wasn't the
city of pouring rain, noise complaints, or gen-
trification its denizens' complaints had gotten
familiar with. It was something far simpler,
more inviting and far more special.
-Fraser Dobbs
REAL  LIVE ACTION
35 TUESDAY      WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
King Dude, Drab Majesty, Foie
Gras, Animal Bodies, DJ Jason
Corbett
© Fox Cabaret
Shindig: Dried Out, Echuta,
Opposite Shore
© Pat's Pub
L7
© Rickshaw Theatre
Luna, Peace
© Biltmore Cabaret
Revered, Mark Mills
© Fox Cabaret
The Sloths
© Cobalt
Gang Signs
© Fortune
10
Beach Slang, Lithuania, Worries,
Needles//Pins
© Cobalt
Twin River
© Fox Cabaret
art rock?   -
© Astoria
Shindig: Critics, Hill Beast,
Winona Forever
0 Pat's Pub
11
Timmy's Organism, Manic
Attracts, The John Frum
0 Fox Cabaret
New Additions #10: Unstable
Signal / Glitch Video (early show)
©VIVO
12
Red Vienna, Ultrviolence, Koban,
ACTORS, DJ Louise Burns
© Fox Cabaret
Broncho, The Shelters, Pearl
Charles
© Cobalt
Tex Mex: Paintings by Corie
Waugh
© Toast Collective
16
17
Gardens & Villa
© Cobalt
George Nixon/Colby Morgan
+ The Catastrophes/Mother
Upduff/Gina Loes
© Astoria
Shindig: Pale Red, Thejins, Zoo
Strategies
© Pat's Pub
18
Elephant Stone
© Cobalt
DISCORDER FUNDRAISER
W/ REVERED, MESA LUNA,
TV UGLY AND LATE SPRING
FEAT. SETS BY DJ DANNY
VANCOUVER
©ASTORIA
23   %
Oneohtrix Point Never, James
Ferraro
©VENUE
24
Experiments + Noise I
© Astoria
Shindig: Soft Haze, Rainbow
Road, Wallgrin
© Pat's Pub
25
26
Art Studios 18th Annual Winter
Sale and Silent Auction
©Heritage Hall 12-8 PM
30
wmsa&a&sim FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
Sightlines, Kiss Painting, Oldage,
Swim Team
© Astoria
Under the Hood: Vicky Chow &
The Spectral Piano Project
Western Front
DOA, Gob
© Rickshaw Theatre
Dead Soft, Slow Learners, Pinner,
Doppelganger
© Astoria
BENT Showcase (early show)
©VIVO
Revered, Nathan Matthews, The
Intelligence Service, Night Bus
© Toast Collective
13
I Slum Village (Detroit), The Ex
Predents Ft. Mic Flont
©Astoria
Alaska, Anchoress, Blessed,
] Balance
) Askaround
14
Shellshag, Dead Soft, Poor Form,
SBDC
© Astoria
15
Joanna Gruesome
© Cobalt
20
Greys, Indian Handicrafts,
| NEEDS
? WISE Hall
I ISSUE Magazine re-launch
©Unit /Pitt
21
Yo La Tengo
© Vogue Theatre (All Ages)
Tops, White Poppy
© Biltmore Cabaret (Early Show)
The Matadors (Ontario), Butch
Haller '* De Vil In The Woodchuck
©Astoria
27
28
Pointed Sticks, Vampires Bats,
Nervous Talk
© Rickshaw Theatre
Girls Rock Camp Vancouver Gala
© Remington Gallery STEIAS
ALIT^UCf
A Discover
ART PROJECT «nl '    i,H,       ,1
T_ «MMMMHMMMi     )Mll|lr    •■■■J I_  under review
Almonds, Cohen
Ceiling Once, Ltd.
(Self-Released)
ALMONDS, COHEN
CEIUNG ONCE LTD.
% -
Space is fundamental. As a student living
far from home, this is something I realize
more and more. Location — which defines
who and what we are surrounded by —
changes the way we think, how we interact
with our surroundings, and as a result the
nature of the things we create. With this in
mind, I found it especially interesting to discover that Almonds, Cohen's recent album
Ceiling Once, Ltd., released in July 2015,
was recorded intermittently over four years in
three different cities and in seven different
recording spaces.
The album, composed of 12 songs written by Brock Edwards and played by many
skilled musicians, is a pleasant listen.
Edwards' skill on acoustic guitar is a definite
stand-out. The combination of his acoustic
playing and soothing vocals creates a Sufjan
Stevens vibe on many tracks, though not all.
Some sound more Mac Demarco, while others have clear jazz influences. Considering
the range of time and location over which the
album was recorded, this lack of concerted
direction is understandable.
In his song composition Edwards tends
to begin with a musical motif, repeating it
throughout the songs while adding complexity and further instrumentation to the initial
ideas. While this strategy can create a coherent song that grows, fades, and morphs into
something new — as on "Angular Momentum
I (Galileo)" — it can also result in repetitive,
overly-long songs. For example, in "New
Decade" the song seems to be drawing to a
close around the four-minute mark, but continues for another two minutes without much
development. By the end, the phrase "feels
just like a new decade" ironically feels old
and worn-out.
Edwards' strategy is most successful on
tracks such as "I'll Drive" and "Under the
Net," where the motif is less sonically prominent and has a clearer direction. The songs
move forward and come to a close without
feeling drawn-out. On "Under the Net," the
sound builds with Emma Postl's vocals and
John Nicholson's sax solo, and fades with
ambient noise and the sax line carrying over
alone, slowing to a close at the end of the
song.
While Ceiling Once, Ltd. may lack some
coherence and direction within and between
songs, perhaps this reflects what Almonds,
Cohen is trying to say. As Postl sings in
"Quantum Summer," "No nearer to knowing /
Where all this is going."—Claire Bailey
42
UNDER  REVIEW Dilly Dally
Sore
(Buzz)
The intro reeks of irritation and feedback.
With a bubbly yet raspy voice counting to
four, "Desire" is underway. This is the first
track on Dilly Daily's debut album Sore.
From the top there is a blend of distorted guitars gliding over each other backed by
pop-suggestive rhythm sections: a combination that remains within the album's heart.
Sore has been in the works for almost
over a decade. Katie Monks (vocals / guitar) and Liz Ball (guitar) met in high school
through their mutual interests in music and
admiration for (what they call) the "lackadaisical sorrow" of artists such as Kurt Cobain
and Pete Doherty. After going through many
line-up changes on the rhythm section, the
band finally settled for Jimmy Tony (bass)
and Benjamin Reinhartz (drums).
The initial tracks are upbeat, which make a
strong impact on new listeners. Tracks such
as "The Touch," with a slick riff, are definitely
among the heavier moments. Very minutely
turning towards the softer side, yet in no way
less noisy, are tracks like "Next Gold," with
much cleaner, loud and ringing guitars.
"Purple Rage," another pre-released single, stands out and drops more hints regarding Dilly Daily's own style. Repeated claims
of being misunderstood and isolated — "You
don't know me /And you try to stop me / But
I'm nothing" — are voiced through Monks'
own lackadaisical vocal style, while the
band remains tight around the main melody. Another monotony-breaking moment of
self-identification is "Witch Man," a mix of
slow, heavy melody backed by a multi-part
song structure. Monks' balance between
being the honest messenger of her insides
and being the vocal performer tends to fall
ever so slightly towards the latter. It's a ratio
that works rather well most of the time and
results in a better sonic experience.
The final track, "Burned By The Cold"
starts out with sheer minimalism, a sudden yet clever change in direction. The constraint shown on this track makes up for
certain excessiveness in a few songs early
on. Sore consistently plays with themes of
adolescence — personal fears, passionate
desires and fallacious claims — a proud display of the band's deeply rooted inspirations.
In terms of both their literal presence and
their musical development, Sore is a banner painted in a mix of blood and glitter that
reads loud, "We are here."—Harsh Trivedi
Family Band
Family Band '15
(Egg Paper)
'Sunny' is a strange word when used in the
context of music. Whether intentionally or not
the term implies a sort of vapid cheeriness that
any self-respecting artist would take care to
UNDER  REVIEW
43 avoid. Family Band, however, gracefully redefines the term on their new album Family Band
'15. Released on independent Montreal label,
Egg Paper Records this past September,
these seven songs are a skillful marriage of
electronic music, rock music, Caribbean
music, and probably a lot of other types of
music too. Think of it like a meeting between
the Beach Boys, Vampire Weekend and maybe a few members of Devo.
What is most unique about this album is the
way that Family Band merges both the digital
and analog aspects of their instrumentation.
One minute it's drum machines, the next it's
hand drums, and often it's both. The blend is
done so well that neither feels unnatural or out
of place. Standouts in this vein include "While
We're Still Young," which features a kaleidoscope of different rhythms and a monologue
that cleverly subverts a youthful obsession
with clubbing and nightlife. "High Life" is one of
the most 'beach-y' songs on the record, yet it
still feels somewhat digital — reminiscent of a
video game or a PowerPoint slideshow of your
friend's vacation to Hawaii. It evokes a bizarre
sort of nostalgia well suited to the 21 st century.
If there is one risk that Family Band '15
runs it's that of corining across as an unfocused patchwork rather than as one cohesive
unit. You may not need complete uniformity in
order to make something good. But if such a
line exists, Family Band gets close to crossing
it with their unexpected tone shifts and disparate song structures. What seems to make it
work, however, is their tactful rhythm section.
The bass lines are solid and memorable, and
the layers of percussion never lose focus. With
this sort of anchor the diverse arrangements
can serve the songs rather than detracting
from them. Family Band is free to throw all their
whimsy on top of these rhythms without losing
an essential forward momentum.
In short, the undeniable, abundant sunni-
ness heard on this record is something both
unfamiliar and welcoming. As a Vancouver
winter approaches, the strange rays of Family
Band '15 could be your best defense against
this pervasive West Coast greyness.—Sam
Tudor
Gang Signs
Geist
(File Under Music)
"I want you to feel what I feel," she says
before possessing his shaking body. He has
already removed the slipcase from Geist.
Then, everything else becomes music and a
turmoil of emotions piercing every cell of his
surrendered skin. He feels her cold sweat and
the incandescence of her flushed cheeks the
first time she laid her eyes on him, the voltage
in the lines of her lips the first time they kissed,
the swelling of their Sunday pillow-fight bruise
on her back, her heart ablaze when she said
"Go away and never come back." He feels her
endless pain, the saltiness of her dried tears,
her emptiness hanging from the rooftop.
This rollercoaster of feelings cannot be
ignored. Long lasting, electro-eerie sounds
dominate his psyche throughout the 45 minute metaphysical experience. A sonic pattern
is also omnipresent; the metronome rhythm,
the repetitive structure, the reflective tempo
and the wooden texture of this group of sonic
elements are so persistent that, combined with
the whirlwind of repeated phrases — "Come
back up here / Come back up here / You will
lose again," "Gonna take you down / Gonna
take you down," "Oh, how I trusted you / Oh,
how I trusted you" — transform into thousands.
44
UNDER  REVIEW of earworms slowly and carefully spreading
inside every inch of his spinning head; like an
act of delicate brainwashing.
For pleasure's sake, there's straight-forward
EBM and new wave hints ("LA On Mondays,"
"Silver") as well as sexy dance pop notes
fused to the atmosphere with some alternative rock and trip-hop colours ("Back Up," "Stay
Awake," "Heist," "Tonight", "So Long"), revealing themselves as time goes by. Although the
music stays at the forefront, he grasps her
voice echoing and dwelling like a feather in
the hazy background. There lies his own voice
too, responding to her callings; their late hour
discussions becoming a choir of all the things
unspoken.
The music stops. "Heiliger Geist! This time I
truly saw into her. We truly saw into each other.
But did we have to lose each other first?" Gang
Signs does not present the answer in Geist,
but they do create the momentum of reflection.
How far can we go into a relationship? What
does it take to simply understand each other?—Theano Pavlidou
Jerusalem in My Heart
ff He Dies, If If If If If If If
(Constellation)
I listened to JIMH for the first time whilst
freewheeling down West 4th on a clear and
beautiful night with the lights of Vancouver
shimmering all around me. I could not have
picked a better moment.  Radwan  Ghazi
Moumneh's second full-length recording is a
sonic journey — a euphoric experience from
start to finish.
Moumneh's voice is a haunting and unique
instrument. Nowhere is this more apparent
than on a cappella opener "Al Affa, Lau Mat,
Lau Lau Lau Lau Lau Lau (The Hypocrite, If
He Dies, If If If If If If)" where the reverberating
vocal harmonies suck you in. It is Moumneh's
voice that underpins the album. His range
and depth form an instrumental effect that
swirls and surrounds you in a way that conventional singers cannot replicate. Combining
this with his expert buzuk playing he creates an enchanting atmosphere. On second
track "A Granular Buzuk" Moumneh processes said instrument, re-samples, and disrupts
it through real-time custom patches — the
clearest example of his production talents.
Closer "2asmar Sa7ar (The Brown One Cast
A Spell)" also intricately weaves the buzuk and
the ocean to create a spellbinding instrumental
end to the record.
JIMH (comprised of Moumneh and fellow Montreal artist, Charles-Andr6 Coderre)
should be a challenge for listeners. What started out as a purely audio-visual live show —
one never meant to recorded — of Arabic-
electronic fusion is by definition pushing
against the boundaries of typecast Western
music. However, largely due to the exceptional production, glorious vocals and concision, it
makes for an undeniably approachable record.
If you dig deeper you find a record that
merges personal and political inspirations.
Moumneh comes close to a love song on "7ebr
El 3oyoun (Ink From The Eyes)" where the
focus is again his voice with "Me, meV I never
thought you'd betray." Then there is the quiver you hear during "Ah Ya Mai El Sham (Oh
The Money of Syria)" as he sings, "We speak
and speak and speak / But like the mute no
words come out," leaving you feeling his pain
and sorrow as he alludes to the problems in
the east.
I was expecting this record to be an intellectual challenge, due to JIMH's distinctive style
UNDER  REVIEW
45 (—
and the subject matter of the music. What 1
found, however, was a record that is not only
beautiful at face value but also rewarding in its
depth.—Sachin Turakhia
No Aloha
No Problemo
(
Poncho)v
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,
Bt iy
While all us Vancouverites fear that each
sunny day will be our last, No Aloha provide
buoyant beats to keep us hoping we have the
sun for a bit longer. Their new album No
Problemo, which dropped late August, is
packed with radiant energy and immediately
conjures up crashing waves and sunburnt
shoulders. Comprised of Montreal natives,
Andrew Bates, Ben Griffiths, Fraser Roodbol
and Marshall Vaillancourt, No Aloha is situating themselves comfortably as a surfer rock
group. And since their tour tape, they've seated themselves further into garage rock. With a
name like No Aloha, the decision to embrace a
more coastal, beach-rock sound makes sense.
The first few songs feature fast tempos
and poppy riffs. A particularly notable sing-
along track is the song "My Boyfriend's the
Devil." The album advances with the edges
becoming a bit more jagged as a lo-fi feel and
reverb become more prominent. The middle
begins to sound akin to The Ramones' surfer anthems. A strong highlight is the song
"Main Squeeze." After many listens, it's proven exceptionally infectious. The continued riff
"I wanna be /1 really wanna be I \ wanna be
your main squeeze" is one that has been sung
around my room quite often.
As the album continues, No Aloha tidies
up their sound and, while retaining their energy, tightens.up their technique. The remaining songs are reminiscent of recent indie-rock
bands like the Vaccines or San Francisco
band, Girls. The album fades out with a
crunchy, wave-like sample that reminds the listener that this is one for the beaches.
No Aloha's No Problemo feels very
multi-generational. Tucked into the middle
of the album is the 40 second song "Deep
Summer," which could be a Beach Boys
b-side. The slight garage quality that most of
the other songs feature seem to be inspired
by the rock music of the last quarter of the
20th century. Finally, these influences are all
packed together with some songs featuring the
crisper, deliberate sound that belongs among
other well-produced indie pop songs. While
reverb and texture are prominent, the album
still displays a degree of skill and intention —
Katherine Kott
Souljazz Orchestra
Resistance
(Strut)
m.$^,:/4Id^   .:'   ■■:.,'
/VKii->^;:;./no!-)-*?j
The Souljazz Orchestra say the music
they create is greater than the band they've
formed, that Souljazz is a way of life. In the
heart-thumping veins of soul, jazz, funk,
46
REAL  LIVE  ACTION Caribbean, Latin and Afro styles, a six-part
vocal harmony and chorus backing is sure to
rouse a sing-a-long party, even on Parliament Hill during the dead of winter in Ottawa,
where the Orchestra calls home. Led by
francophone composer, vocalist, percussionist and master of vintage keyboards, Pierre
Chretien, Souljazz remains an exhilarating
contribution to the contemporary Canadian,
and global sound.
Souljazz Orchestra are a band that glows
like a spine-tingling aurora on the Canadian
horizon. Every member doubles on vocals,
blasting and shaking throughout the newest
release, Resistance. With previous releases,
Freedom No Go Die (2006), Manifesto (2008),
Rising Sun (2010), Solidarity (2012) and Inner
Fire (2014), Resistance is part of the protest music revolution inspired by longstanding roots in the people power of Canadians
from various diaspora cultures. The struggle
to stand up, back straight, is the meaning of
humanity. A straight back is no place for an
oppressor to sit. That's the essential message of Souljazz Orchestra songs, as they
empower the living with self-affirming lyrics,
uniting ecological and social causes on the
common path towards truth in music.
Juno-nominated and likened to the sound
of Fela Kuti, Souljazz are a soul party that
never stops where the "Sun keeps on burning / And the world keeps on turning," as percussionist and vocalist Marielle Rivard sings
on track four, "As The World Turns." The ten
tracks on Resistance uphold a powerfully moving energy that exudes positivity and
passion. The Afro-Latin rhythms of Souljazz
Orchestra reach the heights of retro funk and
free jazz, psychedelic and entrancing, yet not
in the least dizzying. Listening to Resistance
is like staring into an optical illusion that
continues to reveal greater depth and more
sophisticated patterns.—Matt Hanson
tv ugly
UCLA Yankee Cola
(Alarum)
A quick look at tv ugly's Bandcamp page
shows that the band have labelled themselves
with the genre of garbage pop. And while this
may have been written with tongue firmly in
cheek, it actually hints at the true nature of this
Vancouver quartet. Unapologetically lo-fi,
UCLA Yankee Cola is a collision of trashy guitars and sweet vocal melodies.
Opening tracks "QC" and "Werewolfing" lay
down the band's manifesto: Alie and Rage's
voices lodge catchy melodies in listeners'
minds whilst guitars stretch and bend over
warm, fuzzy bass. The post-punk tinged "Night
Before" switches things up. A lurching bass riff
sets a darker tone before Gal takes a turn on
the microphone to yelp urgently. The songs are
short and sweet and the band sounds tight, but
it's the second half of the EP that shows us that
tv ugly were just getting started.
Standout track, "Shiteating" channels the
abrasive art-punk of Parquet Courts with a
hypnotic riff, yet it's soon balanced out with
cooing vocals. Up next is "Slow Thighs", a
heady mixture of meandering guitar lines and
propulsive drums. With lyrics showing disdain
for other people's "blank gazes," this track
shows that although tv ugly can do laid-back
they sure as hell aren't doing apathetic. The
band saves a killer song for last with the veritable season finale of "Trash Party Island,"
REAL  LIVE ACTION
47 its call-and-response vocals and a decidedly
unf lashy guitar solo bringing the best bits of the
'90s kicking and dancing into 2015.
With its total time clocking in at just under
thirteen minutes, if UCLA Yankee Cola were
a TV show it'd be the one you binge-w^tch in
a single sitting and then wish for more: these
snack-size slices of garbage pop are addictive
indeed. These six short tracks may not have
made tv ugly the kind of cult phenomenon
that their EP and band name knowingly reference. But they are certainly good enough to
serve as a trambopoline to launch tv ugly to
success. Plus, with this being their first EP, it
would seem that we have more garbage pop
to look forward to in the future. What a time to
be alive.—Caleb Fanshawe
War Baby
Death Sweats
(Self-Released)
Two years after its release, War Baby's
debut LP Jesus Horse is still revered amongst
local music fans. The Vancouver power trio's
grubby, agitated brand of noise rock, unique
approach to band merch and disorientingly
loud live sets have won them an enduring fan-
base. To say that their sophomore release
has arrived on a wave of anticipation would
be an understatement. Luckily, Death Sweats
is unlikely to disappoint fans.
A fundamental sense of unease pervades
throughout Death Sweats, with the band
themselves describing the album as being
"the audio equivalent of a chemical imbalance in the brain" and "equal parts fear of the
dark and disgust for the morning light." From
the outset the unsettling nature of War Baby's
music is established, with album opener,
"Master Blaster" combining nervous punk
rock energy with the band's fondness for
darkly surreal lyricism. The track is a refinement of the claustrophobic grunge that characterised Jesus Horse. And running at just
two minutes and thirty nine seconds, the track
leaves you absolutely exhausted.
Having demonstrated the mastering of
their established sound, War Baby throw us
a couple of curveballs with "Spell" and "No
Generation." Both tracks are roomier sounding than most of War Baby's output, sounding like long lost '90s alt-rock anthems. With
a length at almost double most of the band's
output, "Belly Ache" is another example of the
more spacious songs on the record. Its loose,
jangly main riff allows drummer, Kirby Fisher
to demonstrate his vitality before the band
transitions into the tangled heavy metal of
"In Light of" and "Swamp Kunt." The album's
highlight, however, is found in the nihilistic
doom metal of "God is Dead." Perhaps the
album's most immediate track, it manages to
perfectly balance the frenzied grunge, bizarre
lyrics and monstrous riffs that make War Baby
such a compelling band.
Although War Baby never, go full pop
rock on Death Sweats, the record's flirtations with pop sensibilities embedded within intense noise rock indicates a refinement
of their sound, further establishing them as
one of the more exciting and original bands
to emerge from the recent grunge revival.—
Ewan Thompson
48
REAL  LIVE ACTION -•••-
'•••"
I • k *^ ••• 1
1660 EAST BROADWAY
NOV
|     WWW.RIOTHEATRETICKETS.CA     |
OCT
31
ATTACK ON TITAN I & 2
HALLOWEEN MOVIE MARATHON!   1
THE SHINING
HALLOWEEN (1928]
FROM DUSK TILL DAWN
NOV
1
17TH ANNUAL ANIMATION
SHOW OF SHOWSI
SHORT ANIMATED FILM FESTIVAL                    .1
UNDER THE VOLCANO
EXPERIMENTER
•ADDITIONAL SCREENINGS WWW.RIOTHEATRE.CA 1
NOV
4
ARCADE FIRE:
THE REFLEKTOR TAPES
7:00PM
NOV
5
FIRST THURSDAY OF EVERY MONTH!        1
PAUL ANTHONY'S
TALENT TIME
LIVE AT THE RIO
NOV
6
GIRLS! GIRLS! GIRLS!
LONG FORM BURLESQUE
HAROLD AND MAUDE
(FRIDAY LATE NIGHT MOVIE)
NOV
9
GOODNIGHT MOMMY
STRAIGHT OUTTA COMPTON      1
NOV
11
THE GENTLEMEN
HECKLERS PRESENT
TWILIGHT: BREAKING DAWN (PART 1]   1
NOV
15
HOT SUGAR'S
COLD WORLD
W/ HOT SUGAR PERFORMING LIVE      1
NOV
18
THE FICTIONALS COMEDY CO. PRESENT        1
IMPROV AGAINST HUMANITY     1
#IAHATRIO
NOV
20
THE ROOM
•ACTOR GREG SESTERO (AKA, 'MARK')     1
JOINING US LIVEI
DUDE BRO PARTY MASSACRE III
RESERVOIR DOGS
(FRIDAY LATE NIGHT MOVIE)
NOV
22
THE ROCKY HORROR
PICTURE SHOW
40TH ANNIVERSARY SCREENING   1
ALL AGES OKI
•ADDITIONAL DATES WWW.RIOTHEATRE.CA    I
NOV
25
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& DRAGONS COMEDY
EXPERIENCE
,     #DNDLIVE  1
DEC
2
THE GEEKENDERS PRESENT
LOVE IN ALDERAAN PLACES      1
A BURLESQUE TRIBUTE TO STAR WARS   1
DEC
4
NIGHTMARE BEFORE
THE NUTCRACKER
A VERY BURTON XMAS SHOW
•ADDITIONAL DATES WWW.RIOTHEATRE.CA   1 BIG IN JAPAN
HOMEGROWN LABELS
words by Sam Tudor
illustration by Sharon Ko
Big In Japan Recordings is a word of
mouth operation. Happy to fly under the
radar, the Chinatown studio doesn't concern itself with advertising or a flashy web
presence. Knowledge of its existence is
passed among friends, many of whom have
either recorded there themselves or know
someone who has. Knowing this, it was
with both curiosity and a distinct sense of
irony that I showed up on Keefer and Main
Street to speak with Big In Japan's producer, engineer and sole proprietor, Mark
Lawrence.
Anyone who has ever attended a show
at the China Cloud knows what it's like to
ascend the narrow stairway and feel as if
the city is receding behind them. Housed
in the same building, Big In Japan Recordings feels much the same. As a kid I distinctly remember the time of evening when
it was dark, but not yet bedtime. One
could talk quietly, listen to a parent read
a book or something, and turn on lamps.
Pre-night. The Big In Japan studio feels
as though it's perpetually in this space.
Something about the quality of the light,
the worn-in couch, and the old instruments hung on the wall fosters a real sense
of calm. The studio is small and dark and
the mixing console is three feet from the
recording booth, yet somehow it never feels
cramped or claustrophobic.
"I tried to make it easy to forget the fact
that there is a city environment outside,"
says Lawrence. "During the daytime hours
it's really busy in Chinatown. There's a lot
of sensory pollution and it's a loud neighborhood, so it's nice if you can come into
a still environment that makes you feel as
though you're somewhere else."
That isn't to say that there is any sort
of lethargy or lack of energy in this place.
In the five years since Lawrence founded
Big In Japan, he has recorded countless
bands including Wooden Horsemen, Burying  Ground,   Khingfisher,   Devon  Wells,
50
HOMEGROWN LABELS Colin Cowan & The Elastic Stars, Gordon
Grdina, Jack The Bear, Ben Rogers and
more. "Thankfully I don't feel like the community base has changed much over the
years. It just means I was very lucky from
the start," says Lawrence. "But I feel like
myself and the musicians I work with are
growing together, and that's really important to me."
This attitude is characteristic of Lawrence's approach to recording. The clientele at Big In Japan is less a conveyer belt
of artists and more a community of friends
who all have in common the fact that they
want to make records. In a way, the amity
was born out of the studio itself rather
than the other way around. "The community-based nature of this place was an
inadvertent outcome of the situation," says
Lawrence. "The room is a good example
— it's an efficient use of space, and the
intimacy is a byproduct of that. Music is
already such a personal thing and to record it with someone in a room this small
is to get to know each other really well.
Things get personal. My closest friends
have come from this studio."
While talking about artists who inspire
him, Lawrence points to his friend Christopher Leitch's painting on the wall. "What
I admire about him is the intention that
goes into his craft. He'll make line drawings where thousands of lines are used
to create one image. The willpower and
the discipline he has to make the complete piece of these smaller cpmponents is
inspiring." The importance of smaller parts
in the creation of a whole comes up often
in conversation. Commitment to detail is
important to Lawrence. "There is a quote
saying Td rather have a deaf engineer than
a lazy one,' which I know is a huge, bold
statement but I do relate to it in some way."
When asked where he sees Big In
Japan in five years, Lawrence is pragmatic. "Judging by the northern movement of condos from Terminal Avenue in
the last five years, it would be unrealistic to expect this place to last forever. But
places change and things move. I'd like to
be recording music for the rest of my life
and always improving. I think if you work
with people who are constantly inspiring
you, it's a feasible goal. When you run out
of excitement it's time to stop, but I don't
anticipate that happening anytime soon."
With Lawrence's focus, and the support of musicians around Vancouver, it's
apparent that Big In Japan will be around
for some time. What will the place look like
in a few years? Who knows. You probably
won't read about it on the internet. You
might hear about it from a friend.
Big In Japan Recordings occasionally
posts updates on their website,
biginjapanrecordings. tumblr. com.
HOMEGROWN LABELS
51 ^—
1
1     i
II
III THE PRESENCE OF 'POPULAR ESOTERIC
words by Natalie Dee // photography by Lukas Engelhardt
I / illustrations by Amelia Garvin
"Art and rock ... those
two words are so
vague and I want to
keep pushing against
the former night... J
want to continue to
evolve it with every
performance/'
There's a hushed, ethereal atmosphere, a crowd gathered around the checkered dance floor of the Astoria, the lights
dimmed and fog aplenty. The attentions of
the crowd ^— men clad in skinny jeans leaning against the walls and women in long
skirts and beanies sitting cross-legged on
the floor — are thoroughly held by the performer onstage. Aileen Bryant, the penultimate act of the night tends to her synths,
weaving a never-ending undulating web
with her voice and compelling presence.
In theory, it would seem strange that
all these bands fit together as they share
the stage on this Tuesday evening, but
they do. From the earlier spoken-word and
introspective performances of SNOOZER
and Strawberry to the energy of the next
act, JSN, there's a sense of cohesion as the
crowd wanders from the pool tables and
bar to the stage and back as performers
begin and end. The performances are held
together by the audience's attentions and
the sporadic cloaking of fog.
Running to and fro from the fog
machine is Casey Wei, curator for art
rock?. As she describes it over coffee a
couple of days after the show, it's this connection between the performances that
"makes it art." The Vancouver-based artist and musician saw a need for a space
where artists and musicians alike could
freely experiment with making sounds
and poetry without feeling like it had to be
polished or perfected. It's not an open-mic
night, with Wei maintaining creative control over the acts that grace the stage.
Wei approaches her curating process through what she calls the 'popular esoteric '— she aims to explore the
ART ROCK?
53 tensions between audience and performer, between obscurity and popularity, between art and music. Art rock
had its heyday in the 70's and Wei
acknowledges that she isn't going to be
recreating what happened in New York
during that time or that art rock? isn't
going to be pushing limits that haven't
already been pushed. "It's all been and
done."
Instead, the emphasis of the night
is on asking questions, the big ones
such as "what is music" and "what
is sound?" art rock? is about embracing experimental practices that cross
the already blurred lines between art
and music. "Failure is interesting," Wei
states, citing a 'new realism' approach
to the live performances, art rock?
is a space where experimentation
is welcome, and that process sometimes involves fucking up to make "the
very thing that makes live music live,
can actually be seen as part of the
performance."
In the description of the event, the
series is said to be "for and inspired by the
performers of sounds, visuals, and poetics," no mention of musician to be seen.
This lack of distinction is important — the
series gives an opportunity for artists to
express themselves outside of the normal
hierarchies. For the more trained musicians who take the stage at art rock?, it
54
ART ROCK? gives them the freedom to take risks without fearing that it's going to be perceived
as an error by an audience member.
art rock? takes a space in the in-between, not inseparable from both the
vague concepts it takes its name from. The
show is far from a regular gig — someone
could point at all the audience members
and immediately put the 'hipster' label on,
but to use Wei's own words, there's a more
esoteric and intellectual atmosphere in the
room, the event "embracing a level of crit-
icality that we all kind of share as artists."
Wei has given herself one year to put
on monthly shows at the Astoria, 12 'episodes' as she calls them. At the end of the
project, she hopes to put together a publication and DVD. Wei doesn't want the project to become the same thing night after
night. "Art and rock... those two words
are so vague and I want to keep pushing
against the former night... I want to con7
tinue to evolve it with every performance."
However, she knows she can only push
so far before it bleeds into the genres of
electronic or hip-hop, two burgeoning
scenes in Vancouver, unlike that of rock.
With art rock?, Wei wants to bridge that
gap between artists who love music but
are unsure of how to engage with the com
munity, art rock? keeps in mind an older
set, those who don't want to have "a typical
rock show experience, but also don't want
to miss out on anything." Wei is intent on
creating that space, somewhere between a
rock show and an art gallery opening, a
place where friends and relationships can
be built. Vancouver doesn't yet have an art
bar, but the Astoria, at least for one night
a month, is a worthy substitute.
Wei already has acts in place for the
November installment of the series, bringing in both punk and jazz elements — a
far cry from the poetic artists that took
the stage in October. In the end, Wei is
steadfast in her support of performances,
whatever they may be. "We're not doing
it because we want to become rockstars,
or like 'artstars' or anything. We just do it
because, I don't know, it keeps us sane. It's
kind of a romantic idea, but we just do it,
and those people definitely just do it."
art rock? is a series hosted at the Astoria
every second Tuesday of the month. The
next installment is Tuesday, November 10th
from 8pm-late and will feature Mold Grows
on Baby, Only A
Visitor, n213 and
PANTS. $5 cover.
ART  ROCK?
55 TOMMY TONE IS REAL
words by Jonathan Kew // photography by Jon Vincent
//illustration by Jimmy Liang
"Part of the creative
process is salvaging,
about trying to
take something so
despicable, like
cults... and turn it
into something good,
or be productive
about it. That's what
I try to do in all my
art."
As we sit down at the Templeton's
counter, Tom Whalen recounts L. Ron Hubbard's sleeping rituals. Despite his stature,
Hubbard made use of sleep therapy: self-
help tapes would extol to him his capability, his masculinity, his sonorous voice —
he loved to sing for collected friends.
Whalen — musician, video and performance artist, soundtrack composer —
has long been interfacing with junk. Here
'junk' is an amorphous category of fairly or
unfairly marginalized content that encompasses the bleary desperation of tchotkes
and YouTube oddities, of self-help seminars, pyramid schemes and cults. You
know, Tim and Eric shit. Our conversation ranges from baby boomers, Scientology, Silicon Valley, Gamergate, old showbiz, indie video games, Macworld, YouTube
comments, Bartkira and so on.
Whalen has many pseudonyms for
many projects. Irrespective of this variegation our conversation returns to two
threads: the entitlement of men — geek
cultures, cults of personality, wherever
— and the redemption of junk into art
through creative processes.
Tom: "[Self-help] speaks to everyone.
That's why it's so successful, it speaks
to basic dreams, desires."
Jon: "But what can be salvaged? Is it
all junk?"
T "No, you can learn a lot from it.
56
TOMMY TONE  Part of the creative process is salvaging, about trying to take something
so despicable, like cults... and turn it
into something good, or be productive about it. That's what I try to do in
all my art. Take something terrible,
make a statement, even if the statement is 'look at how horrible this is'...
much like with performing, publicly
humiliating myself as a male character... trying to take this thing from a
lot of music with unwarranted affection from men, and take it up to this
absurd level where it loses any serious
notion and becomes this goof fest."
Whalen's commitment to the goof
fest in all capacities is a moral imperative that supersedes cynicism as a critical
approach, the privileged sneer of nihilistic
irony. His latest guise, Tommy Tone, whose
album Fax Me A Brain has just launched
via premiere streaming website Youtube, is
configured as a male effigy.
T "[Tommy Tone is] the personification of desperation as opposed to the
cool confident male ... I wouldn't want
to put something out without a message. At my work they play a lot of
58
TOMMY TONE soft rock, 70's, 80's. The male ballads
have two categories. The Last Night:
the lyrical content is like "one more
time, before we say goodbye, I'll never
love you again," just a dirtbag stereotypical male rejecting a woman after
one night of crazy love. The other one
is this crazy "I'm gonna love you to the
end of time." Like, totally unrealistic
— they both are — but embarrassing:
singing a song like that to any object
of affection, how repulsed you'd be.
You would become a part of the public embarrassment. I wanted to do this
to emasculate myself, to take away my
own guilt being a male. That's what it
is at the core, gender in a sense. My
reservations with being a cisgendered
male."
Tommy Tone is not a joke. Fax Me A
Brain's press release extends beyond an
absurd treatment of caricature, eliciting
genuine pathos: "[Fax Me A Brain] catches
a man in stasis, a wannabe tough guy
with no confidence, paralyzed by his own
self doubt." On the track "Muscle Planet,"
Tommy repeats the lines "I'm so strong I
can eat the Earth and now I live in space."
It's a tragic act of self-abjection and isolation: the failure of masculinity as a social
construct.
T. "I do feel uncomfortable about it
being in vogue for cis white males to be
baring their souls [in music]."
J: "Well, there's Father John Misty."
T. "Don't even get me started. As if no
one has done that before. I want at
least some degree of separation. I don't
think I could do it as myself. I know
how to project it easily to the audience,
so they know the story. They're in on it.
All the stuff I like is really easy to get,
but you can make it structured and
multi-dimensional: something people
can live in for a duration."
As a conceptual artist, Whalen's worlds
often rupture: how an awry YouTube
oddity ruptures your browsing session.
Whalen's Beastcon performance, playing
CultureBeast CEO Kenneth LaMarr Jr.,
ended notoriously with a prolonged climax
of Christmas carols complete with Santa
Claus sharing duet duties, moving from
comedy into an anti-comic exploration of
the effusive. Tommy Tone is a farce, but
Tommy Tone is also real: "If things are falling down that's good. It's all part of the
experience, I want people to maybe think
it'll fall apart. And [consider] what does
happen if it falls apart."
Whalen's array of comic conceits belies
the conviction with which he talks in person: "I got informed in the past few years.
I didn't care about class, gender, how I
was presenting myself. I started to think
about it more, read more about it. I'm trying to do something that says something
about gender norms and rituals. That's
where the public humiliation comes in."
The parody is good, but beyond the gag
Whalen's performances are evocative,
like John Maus' live flagellations. When
Tbnimy throws himself into auto-excoriation on-stage, we are brought into the public embarrassment. That's catharsis.
T. "I love karaoke. I love that everybody is a star. It's so much truer to
me than the concept of American Idol
or America's Got Talent because it's
happening in front of you. People are
heroes."
Tommy Tone's next album will be "a very
long cover of Blinded by the Light,' The Manfred Mann version, which is a cover of the
Springsteen version." Tommy Tone is also
planning a musical about a haunted house.
TOMMY TONE - t,,icx4?
UN-EASILY PUNK
words by Matt Hanson // photography by Sara Boar
II illustration by Ewan Thompson
"We want everyone
to kind of rise up
together/'
"No maximum wage?!" screams Carlos Mendonca on Ego Wholesale, a sparking glory of an EP released on June 9, 2014.
"There goes our obsolete man, I hope not
to be him," Mendonca sings on. "Caffeine
capillaries and ethanol breath fuels the
mules," he alliterates, wickedly intelligent,
to embody the all-too-pervasive white middle-class suburbanite youth sick in a sick
society where poverty is a crime and wealth
a trophy. Soaring above the crackling intensity of riveting rock arrangements from
Cheap High, justly raging and indignant
lyrics rise and fall over the edge of "mundan-
ity, insanity" decrying the "consumer herd"
who work for "Sisyphus Incorporated."
By November of that same year, a second
EP, Idle further sets a most supremely
tight and utterly impressive tone within
West Coast post-punk rock. One year later
Cheap High is rallying fans from Abbots-
ford and beyond with an LP, Subterranean
Suburbia. Now in the mixing and mastering
stages, if leaked singles are any indication,
the music of Cheap High simply says 'WTF'
with unrivalled authenticity.
Outside of the studio — and when
not performing — Cheap High is a happy
family, a collective of two pairs of brothers
who find the time to chill out while conversing with the likes of fans, allies, collaborators and nemeses.
"My brother started playing music later
than any of us," says drumrner Nicolas Mendonca, speaking of the band's mighty lyrical
vocalist, Carlos Mendonca. "We started practicing at my parent's house and my brother
was living at home at the time. He had never
done vocals in any band, but had been writing for a while . . . That was the beginning."
According to Carlos Mendonca, Subterranean Suburbia will feature material
from the band that reaches far back into
earlier days, predating the EPs with recordings from over a year ago. Cheap High is
going confidently against the grain not only
in the content and substance of the music,
but also by aligning a chronologically atavis-
CHEAP HIGH
61 tic discography.
"We've got eleven songs, roughly twenty-
seven minutes run-time. I was listening to it
yesterday, and I've kind of been on the ropes
about it up until now. I'm 3000% very, very
proud of this," says Carlos. "The guy who
recorded it [Corey Myers] is a friend of ours
who's been playing music for a long time."
Myers is the man-about-town in the
Fraser Valley for many emerging and seasoned acts ready to record. He is behind the
mind-blowing fury of the Cheap High EPs.
"The Valley is really, really cool. It's like a
very tight-knit group of people who all party
together, and who are all moving pieces in
different bands." Carlos continues, "You
can throw a rock and hit an amazing musician out here."
Carlos speaks with a truly dedicated,
musician's passion for the local community where so many great bands have formed
alongside Cheap High. Punk is the drug.
Vinyl is the fix. The music scene of the
Valley is an enthusiastic mass of music
lovers steeped in such enduring aspects of
musical appreciation as the aural perfections and artistic triumphs of turntable listening. For many reasons, Cheap High is
going vinyl, to showcase cover art in the biggest way, and simply to satisfy the visceral
nature of possession.
"The aesthetic is definitely a huge thing.
You can pack so much more into the visual presentation. Lake, for our single release
that we're doing on a picture disc 7", hopefully before the New Year. It will feature a
commissioned art piece by Carmen Humphrey [©pacificjspiritbear on Instagram],"
says Nicolas. "I'm so amazed by it. She's
done a really original, collage art style. Carlos shared his lyrics with her, and she based
the art off of the lyrics he sent her."
Nicolas speaks with the confidence not
only of a bandleader. He's on the front-line
of multidisciplinary artists, such as Tyler
Corbett who designed the Ego Wholesale
cover and the band Oh No! Yoko. Cheap
62 '      jff
High draws from just about every poten
tial creative and imaginative means in the
Fraser Valley. "We're just trying to keep all
P^N^Q^^^l^^^^
the homies in everything," says Nicolas. "We
W^^\i^^%e^^
want everyone to kind of rise up together."
Despite  a  successful romp  at home
among many talented compatriots who have
formed a decidedly rocking punk scene in
£"\jL ^jk   %kS:
the Fraser Valley, Vancouver is still a far cry
\\   \     ^N&	
from the extended community. After all is
said and done, collaboration is the key to
unlocking the city gates of Vancouver.
Cheap High evades definite commer
cialization, as pertains to playing within a
preconceived category of music. The band
expresses unease with the post-punk, and
even the punk moniker. The challenge of
^H                        breaking into Vancouver has led  Cheap
UkjjB                       High to question where they stand, and who
to play with in the cliquish, impenetrably
mafia-like music scene in Vansterdam.
f-   '                                                         'X-,-,
"It's tough to get the new cast in," said
Carlos,   speaking  of the  challenges  that
Cheap High has faced in what seems an
unyielding predominance held by certain
^W                                   artists in Vancouver.   "Were not  really a
^B                        punk band, so it's hard to find the appropri
ate bands to play with."
Together with Malk, Open Letters, Dodg
ers, Blessed, and Queen Bee & the Buzz-
kills, Cheap High is one permanent fixture
in the Abbotsford scene fast earning national
renown. Through music videos, releases and
shows in collaboration with everyone from
their backyards to Montreal, Cheap High is
cutting loose with Subterranean Suburbia.
X
vflftll
HI                                        Keep an eye on Cheap High's social
JJj                                   media for updates on the release of the full
|b     *
Subterranean Suburbia LP, in the mastering
stages now. A single on a 7" picture disc will
be released in December. Their next show will
be January 16 at Redgate with Malk, Queen
Bee, Losses, Blessed and Dodgers.
63 0e&***?5 - 'forsm4**2?
THE IMPROV CENTRE, GRANVILLE ISLAND
VANCOUVER |  Sti?9i9b& NOV 10
*0rro$(T£    +V»ins^
~+"4
NOV 17      NOV 24
AT PAT'S PUB & BREWHOUSE
$6 II DOORS AT 8 PM
^Q^ shindig
SILVER FOX
1/0/.;
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^Biueiight ^iA«fisaass   "I-M•■■■:'Sfi ® & nimby?
nnniiMnn h        ^B^JV  , > *»,„. __ ^^_^ Vft WW        School of Rsconttiui X Mudta
BAND MERCH ^^^^^^
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2 free lessons Bepi Crespan Presents... SUN 7am
Bepi Crespan Presents... CiTR's 24 Hours Of Radio Art in a snack
size format! Difficult music, harsh electronics, spoken word, cut-
up/collage and general Crespan© weirdness. Twitter: @bepicre-
span. Blog: bepicrespan.bJogspot.ca
Classical Chaos SUN 9am
From the Ancient World to the 21st century, join host Marguerite
in exploring and celebrating classical music from around the
world.
Arts Report WED 5pm
Reviews, interviews, and coverage of local arts (film, theatre,
dance, visual, and performance art, comedy, and more) by host
Jake Costello and the Arts Reporters.
UBC Arts On Air Alternating Thursdays 6pm
Ira Nadel, UBC English, offers scintillating profiles and unusual interviews with members of UBC Arts world. Tune in for programs,
people and personalities in Art
UBC Insiders FRI 7am
Incisive commentary, interviews, analysis, and the best-informed
rumor mill around on UBC campus life and politics. Our website, ubcinsiders.ca, has been operating since 2007 and has written versions of some of what we talk about on air, and an awesome archive full of 8 years of breaking stories and busting balls
all over the university. We aspire to serious irreverence and fair
contrariness. Join us for the UBC dirt that you won't get anywhere else!
The Community Living Show THU 9am
This show is produced by the disabled community and showcases special guests and artists. The focus is for a positive
outlook on programs and events for the entire community.
Originally called "The Self Advocates", from Co-Op Radio CFRO,
the show began in the 1990s. We showcase BC Self Advocates
with lots of interviews from people with special needs. Tune in
for interesting music, interviews, and some fun times. This program is syndicated with the NCRA (National Community and
Campus Radio Association) across BC and across Canada. Hosted
by: Kelly Reaburn, Michael Rubbin Clogs, and Friends, commu-
nitylivingradio.wordpress.com | communitylivingradio@gmall.
com | Community Living Radio Show | @clivingradio
| #communitylivingradio
News 101 FRI 5pm 	
Vancouver's only live, volunteer-produced, student and commu-       Indigenous Collective MON 11 am
nity newscast. Every week, we take a look back at the week's lo- :•■■
cal, national and international news, as seen from a fully inde-       New Era Alternating Thursdays 8pm
pendent media perspective. Showcases up and coming artists who are considered "under
dogs" in the music industry. The show will provide a platform
Queer FM Vancouver: Reloaded TUE 8am       for new artists who are looking to get radio play.
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transexual commu- Hip-Hop music from all over the world along with features of
nities of Vancouver. Lots of human interest features, background       multi-genre artists.
on current issues and great music, queerfmradio@gmail.com	
White Noise WED 11pm
Radio Free Thinker TUE 3pm       Need some comic relief? Join Richard Blackmore for half an
Promoting skepticism, critical thinking and science, we exam- hour of weird and wonderful radio every week, as he delves
ine popular extraordinary claims and subject them to critical in to the most eccentric corners of radio for your listening
analysis. pleasure. Then stay tuned for the after show featuring a Q
and A with the creator, actors and a guest comic every week.
All Ears THU 1pm       whitenoiseUBC@gmail.com
All Ears is an advice radio program targetted to the UBC commu- 	
nity. We try to answer your questions and address topics sent       Accessability Collective THU 5pm
via social media and over the phone. Interviews and segments	
relating to campus life will be featured, all in our attempt to bet-       Lady Radio FRI 6pm
ter our community and supply positive feedback. A show by CiTR's Women's Collective. Rad women talking about
things they like. Tune in weekly for interviews, music, events,
Extraenvironmentalist WED 2pm       commentary and such.
Exploring the mindset of an outsider looking in on Earth. 	
Featuring interviews with leading thinkers in the area of sus-       Sharing Science WED 6pm
tainable economics and our global ecological crisis. A show by the members of UBC Sharing Science, a group of stu
dents dedicated to making science interesting and accessible
AstroTalk THU 3pm
Space is an interesting place. Marco slices up the night sky with
a new topic every week. Death Stars, Black Holes, Big Bangs, Red
Giants, the Milky Way, G-Bands, Syzygy's, Pulsars, Super Stars...
The Sector FRI 8am
Discussing the world of social justice, non-profits, charities and
activism. Join Ethan for in-depth interviews, examinations of
nonprofit missions and causes, and discussions of everything
from philanthropy to progressive politics.
Synchronicity MON 12pm
Join host Marie B and discuss spirituality, health and feeling
good. Tune in and tap into good vibrations that help you remember why you're here: to have fun! to all members of the community. We discuss current research
and news about a different topic each week, providing vastly
different perspectives based on the science backgrounds of a
rotating set of hosts.
Democracy Now
TUES2pm
Tick Talk THU 7:30pm
CiTR's bi-weekly highlights reel from the Spoken Word
Department! Tune in for half an hour of poetry, interviews,
short radio docs, and live chats with programmers about what
they've been working on.
REGGAE
The Rockers Show
Reggae inna all styles and fashion.
SUN 12pm
ROOTS / FOLK / BLUES
Blood On The Saddle Alternating Sundays 3pm
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-boots country.
Pacific Pickin' TUE 6am
Bluegrass, old-time music, and its derivatives with Arthur and
the lovely Andrea Berman. Email: pacificpickin@yahoo.com
Folk Oasis WED 8pm
Two hours of eclectic folk/roots music, with a big emphasis on
our local scene. C'mon in! A kumbaya-free zone since 1997.
Email: folkoasis@gmail.com
The Saturday Edge SAT 8am
A personal guide to world and roots music—with African, Latin,
and European music in the first half, followed by Celtic, blues, songwriters, Cajun, and whatever else fits! Email: steveedge3@mac.com.
Code Blue SAT 3pm
From backwoods delta low-down slide to urban harp honks,
blues, and blues roots with your hosts Jim, Andy, and Paul.
Email: codeblue@paulnorton.ca
soul/m
Soulship Enterprise MON 6pm
A thematically oriented blend of classic funk, soul, r&b, jazz, and
afrobeat tunes, The Happy Hour has received great renown as
the world's foremost funky, jazzy, soulful, and delightfully awkward radio show hosted by people named Robert Gorwa and/
or Christopher Mylett Gordon Patrick Hunter III.
African Rhyhms
Website: www.africa n rhyth msrad io.com
FRI 7:30pm
PHOP
Nod on the List SAT  7pm
Nod on the List is a program featuring new urban and alternative music, sounds of beats, hip hop, dancehall, bass, interviews,
guest hosts, and more.
Crimes & Treasons TUE 9pm
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill ish. Hosted by
Jamal Steeles, Trinidad Jules & DJ Relly Rels.
Website: http://crimesandtreasons.blogspot.ca.
Email: dj@crimesandtreasons.com.
The Screen Girls WED 10pm
The Screen Girls on CiTR merges music and art together with
discussions of trends and pop culture, arid audio interviews
with artists in contemporary art, fashion and music. We seek to
play a variety of music, focusing on promoting Canadian hip
hop and r&b
Vibes & Stuff TUE 4pm
Feeling nostalgic? Vibes and Stuff has you covered bringing
you some of the best 90s to early 2000s hip-hop artist all in
one segment. All the way from New Jersey and New York City,
DJ Bmatt and DJ Jewels will be bringing the east coast to the
west coast throughout the show.
E-mail: vibesandstuffhiphop@gmaii.com
EXPERIMENTAL
More Than Human SUN 7pm
Strange and wonderful electronic sounds from the past, present,
and future with host Gareth Moses. Music from parallel worlds.
Pop Drones WED 10am
Unearthing the depths of contemporary cassette and vinyl underground. Ranging from d.i.y. bedroom pop and garage rock
all the way to harsh noise and, of course, drone.
Kew It Up WED 3pm
Fight-or-flight music. Radio essays and travesties: Sonic Cate(s)
chism / half-baked philosophy and criticism. Experimental,
Electronica, Post-Punk, Industrial, Noise: ad-nauseum
LATIN AMERICAN
La Fiesta Alternating Sundays 3pm
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue, Latin House, and Reggaeton with your
hostGspotDJ.
The Leo Ramirez Show MON 5pm
The best of mix of Latin American music.
Email: leoramirez@canada.com
ETHIOPIAN
Shookshookta SUN 10am
A program targeted to Ethiopian people that encourages education and personal development.
CHINESE / KOREAN
Asian Wave WED 4pm
Tune in to Asian Wave 101 to listen to some of the best music from the Chinese language and Korean music industries, as
well the latest news coming from the two entertainment powerhouses of the Asian pop scene. The latest hits from established artists, rookies only just debuted, independent artists and classic
songs from both industries, can all be heard on Asian Wave 101,
as well as commentary, talk and artist spotlights of unsigned
Canadian talent. Only on CiTR 101.9 FM.
RUSSIAN
NashaVolna SAT 6pm
News, arts, entertainment and music for the Russian community,
local and abroad. Website: nashavolna.ca.
^      -       -■?■
Rhythmsindia
Alternating Sundays 8pm
Featuring a wide range of music from India, including popular music from
the 1930s to the present; Ghazals and Bhajans, Qawwalis, pop,
and regional language numbers.
S D
Mantra SAT 5pm
An electic mix of electronic and acoustic beats and layers,
chants, and medicine song. Exploring the diversity of the
worlds sacred sounds - traditional, contemporary and futuristic.
Email: mantraradioshow@gmail.com
Synaptic Sandwich SAT 9pm
If you like everything from electro/techno/trance/8-
bit music/retro '80s, this is the show for you!
Website: synapticsandwich.net
The Late Night Show FRI 12:30am
The Late Night Show features music from the underground
Jungle and Drum & Bass scene, which progresses to Industrial,
Noise, and Alternative No Beat into the early morning. Following
the music, we then play TZM broadcasts, beginning at 6 a.m.
Inner Space Alternating Wednesdays 6:30pm
Dedicated to underground electronic music, both experimental
and dance-oriented. Live DJ sets and guests throughout.
Bootlegs & B-Sides SUN 9pm
Hosted by Doe Ran, tune in for the finest remixes from soul to
dubstep and ghetto funk to electro swing. Nominated finalist
for 'Canadian college radio show of the year 2012' Pioneer DJ
Stylus Awards. Soundcloud.com/doe-ran and search "Doe-Ran"
on Facebook.
Canada Post-Rock FRI 10pm
Formerly on CKXU, Canada-Post Rock now resides on the west
coast but it's still committed to the best in post-rock, drone,
ambient, experimental, noise and basically anything your host
Pbone can put the word "post" in front of.
Copy/Paste THU 11pm
If it makes you move your feet (or nod your head), it'll be heard       Crescendo SUN 6pm
on copy/paste. Tune in every week for a full hour DJ mix by Starting with some serene chill tracks at the beginning and
Autonomy, running the gamut from cloud rap to new jack building to the INSANEST FACE MELTERS OF ALL TIMEEE,
techno and everything in between. Crescendo will take you on a musical magic carpet ride that
you couldn't imagine in your wildest dreams. Besides oversell-
Techno Progressive Alternating Sundays 8pm       ing his show, Jed will play an eclectic set list that builds through-
A mix of the latest house music, tech-house, prog-house, and out the hour and features both old classics, and all the greatest
techno. new tracks that the hipsters think they know about before any-
         one else does.
Trancendance SUN 10pm
Hosted by DJ Smiley Mike and DJ Caddyshack, Trancendance       Dave Radio with Radio Dave FRI 12pm
has been broadcasting from Vancouver, B.C. since 2001.       Your noon-hour guide to what's happening in Music and Theatre
We favour Psytrance, Hard Trance and Epic Trance, but also       in Vancouver. Lots of tunes and talk.
play Acid Trance, Deep Trance, Hard Dance and even some
Breakbeat. We also love a good Classic Trance Anthem, es-       Discorder Radio TUE 5pm
pecially if it's remixed. Current influences include Sander       Discorder Magazine now has its own radio show! Join us to hear
van Doom, Gareth Emery, Nick Sentience, Ovnimoon, Ace       excerpts of interviews, reviews, and more!
Ventura, Save the Robot, Liquid Soul, and Astrix. Older influ- :
ences include Union Jack, Carl Cox, Christopher Lawrence,       Duncan's Donuts THU 12pm
Whoop! Records, Tidy Trax, Platipus Records and Nukleuz.       Sweet treats from the pop underground. Hosted by Duncan,
Email:   djsmileymike   @trancendance.net.       sponsored by donuts. http://duncansdonuts.wordpress.com.
Website: www.trancendance.net.
Spice of Life Alternating Thursdays 8pm
Inside Out TUE 8pm       The spice extends life. The spice expands consciousness. The
Spice of Life brings you a variety of Post-Rock, Shoegaze, Math
Radio Zero FRI 2pm       Rock and anything that else that progresses. Join host Ben Life
An international mix of super fresh weekend party jams from       as he meanders whimsically through whatever comes to mind
New Wave to foreign electro, baile, Bollywood, and whatever       on the walk to CiTR.
else. Website: www.radiozero.com Samsquantch's Hideaway Alternating Wednesdays 630pm
All-Canadian music with a focus on indie-rock/pop.
Email: anitabinder@hotmail.com.
Parts Unknown MON 1pm
An indie pop show since 1999, it's like a marshmallow sandwich:
soft and sweet and best enjoyed when poked with a stick and
held close to a fire.
The Cat's Pajams FRI 11am
The cat's pajamas: a phrase to describe something/someone super awesome or cool. The Cat's Pajams: a super awesome and
cool radio show featuring the latest and greatest indie pop, rock,
lo-fi and more from Vancouver and beyond!
The Burrow MON 3pm
Noise Rock, Alternative, Post-Rock, with a nice blend of old
'classics' and newer releases. Interviews and live performances
The Permanent Rain Radio Alternating Wedesdays 1 pm
Music-based, pop culture-spanning program with a focus on
the local scene. Join co-hosts Chloe and Natalie for an hour
of lighthearted twin talk and rad tunes from a variety of artists who have been featured on our website. What website?
thepermanentrainpress.com
Muzak for the Observant THU 2pm
A program focusing on the week's highlights from CiTR's Music
Departments Plus: live in-studio performances and artist
interviews!
ECLECTIC
Transition State THU 11am
High quality music with a special guest interview from the
Pharmaceutical Sciences. Frank discussions and music that
can save the world
Shine On TUE 1pm
An eclectic mix of the latest, greatest tunes from the Vancouver
underground and beyond, connected through a different theme
each week. Join your host Shea every Tuesday for a groovy musical experience!
Soul Sandwich THU 4pm
A myriad of your favourite music tastes all cooked into one show.
From Hip Hop to Indie rock to African jams, Ola will play through
a whirlwind of different genres, each sandwiched between another. This perfect layering of yummy goodness will blow your
mind. AND, it beats subway.
The Shakespeare Show WED 12pm
Dan Shakespeare is here with music for your ear. Kick back with
gems of the previous years.
Breakfast With The Browns MON 8am
Your favourite Brownsters, James and Peter, offer a savoury
blend of the familiar and exotic in a blend of aural delights.
Emaihbreakfastwiththebrowns@hotmail.com.
Chthonic Boom! SUN 5pm
A show dedicated to playing psychedelic music from parts of the
spectrum (rock, pop, electronic) as well as garage and noise rock.
The Morning After Show TUE 11:30am
The Morning After Show with Oswaldo Perez every Tuesday at
11:30a.m. Playing your favourite songs for 13 years. The morning after what? The morning after whatever you did last night.
Eclectic show with live music, local talent and music you won't
hear anywhere else.
Suburban Jungle WED 8am
Live from the Jungle Room, join radio host Jack Velvet for an
eclectic mix of music, sound bites, information and inanity.
Email: dj@jackvelvet.net.
Are You Aware Alternating Thursdays 6pm
Celebrating the message behind the music: Profiling music and musicians that take the route of positive action over
apathy.
Peanut Butter 'n' jams Alternating Thursdays 6:30pm
Explore local music and food with your hosts, Brenda and Jordie.
You'll hear interviews and reviews on eats and tunes from your
neighbourhood, and a weekly pairing for your date calendar.
Live From Thunderbird Radio Hell THU 9pm
Featuring live band(s) every week performing in the CiTR Lounge.
Most are from Vancouver, but sometimes bands from across the
country and around the world.
Aural Tentacles THU 12am
It could be global, trance, spoken word, rock, the unusual and
the weird, or it could be something different. Hosted by DJ
Pierre. Email: auraltentacles@hotmail.com
FemConcept FRI 1pm
Entirely Femcon music as well as spoken word content relevant
to women's issues (interviews with campus groups such as the
Women's Center, SASC, etc.). Musical genres include indie-rock,
electronic, punk, with an emphasis on local and Canadian Artists.
Nardwuar FRI 3:30pm
Join Nardwuar the Human Serviette for Clam Chowder flavoured entertainment. Doot doola doot doo...doot doo!
Email: nardwuar@nardwuar.com
The Medicine Show FRI11PM
A variety show, featuring musicians, poets and entertainment industry guests whose material is considered to be therapeutic. We encourage and promote independent original, local live music and art.
Randophonic SAT 11pm
Randophonic is best thought of as an intraversal jukebox which
has no concept of genre, style, political boundaries, or even
space-time relevance. But it does know good sounds from bad.
Lately, the program has been focused on Philip Random's All
Vinyl Countdown + Apocalypse (the 1,111 greatest records you
probably haven't heard). And we're not afraid of noise. G4E Alternating Tuesdays 12-2am
Vinyl mixes, exclusive local tunes, good vibes from around the
world, a thought and a dream or two. Reggae, House, Techno,
Ambient, Dance Hall, Hip Hop, African, Psychedelic, Noise,
Experimental, Eclectic.
A Face for Radio THU 10am
A show about music with interludes about nothing. From punk
to indie Rock and beyond.
Student Special Hour FRI  10am
A show dedicated to covering student groups, clubs and initiatives. Run by a combination of the CiTR Student Executive and
the student programming coordinator as they specialize in student life and activities and have a great time doing it.
nc
Exploding Head Movies MON 7pm
Join gak as he explores music from the movies, tunes from television and any other cinematic source, along with atmospheric
pieces, cutting edge new tracks and strange old goodies that
could be used in a soundtrack to be.
The Jazz Show MON 9pm
Nov. 2: Alto saxophone master recently left us at age 83 and had
so many triumphs in his life including this one. To honour Mr.
Woods here's "Phil Woods and His European Rhythm Machine
Live at the Frankfurt Jazz Festival" One for the ages, don't miss
this one!
Nov.9: Finally after 60 years a deluxe reissue of pianist Erroll
Garner's "Concert By The Sea-Complete". The best selling Jazz
album of all-time! You are there!
Nov 16: Drummer Max Roach and His Ensemble with a 16 voice
choir and his innovative, militant and intense album: "It's Time!"
Max the maximum!
Nov 23: Pianist Thelonious Monk in a live club setting with
firebrand tenor saxophonist Johnny Griffin (he replaced John
Coltrane in Monk's group). Some of the finest live Jazz by by
Mr. Monk and company.
Nov.30:This is the album that put him on the national Jazz map
and is a classic. The title describes it all. "The Incredible Jazz
Guitar of Wes Montgomery". A must listen!
Little Bit of Soul MON 4pm
Old recordings of jazz, swing, big band, blues, oldies and
motown.
t m
Skald's Hall FRI 9pm
Skald's Hall entertains with the spoken word via story
readings, poetry recitals, and drama. Established
and upcoming artists join host Brian MacDonald.
Interested in performing on air? Contact us on Twitter:
@Skalds_Hall.
Thunderbird Eye THU 3:30pm
The inside edge on the latest UBCThunderbirds varsity teams'
news and results.
Rocket from Russia TUES 10:30am
Hello hello hello! I interview bands and play new, international
and local punk rock music. Great Success! P.S. Broadcasted in
brokenish English. Hosted by Russian Tim. Website: http://rock-
etfromrussia.tumblr.com. Email: rocketfrom russiacitr@gmail.
com. Facebook: https://www.facebook.comRocketFromRussia.
Twitter: http://twitter.com/tima_tzar.
Generation Annihilation SAT 12pm
On the air since 2002, playing old and new punk on the noncommercial side of the spectrum. Hosts: Aaron Brown, Jeff "The
Foat" Kraft. Website: generationannihilation.com. Facebook:
facebook.com/generationannihilation..
L01
Power Chord SAT 1pm
Vancouver's longest running metal show. If you're into music
that's on the heavier/darker side of the spectrum, then you'll like
it. Sonic assault provided by Geoff, Marcia, and Andy.
Flex Your Head
Punk rock and hardcore since 1989.
TUE 6pm
;.;;,.-.-:■:..    *:   :\-:
The Absolute Value of Insomnia SAT 2am
Four solid hours of fresh generative music c/o the Absolute Value
of Noise and its world famous Generator. Ideal for enhancing
your dreams or, if sleep is not on your agenda, your reveries.
m: Part of a network of concert
updated and populated with de
of informed members of th*> m
Integrated with toe a
Vancouver Musicians Dir
the CiTR Radio Sponsored
Vancouver Ba
and the
Vancouver Music i
8 Resource Direct
Community vinylrecords
Vancouver
facebook.com/
vinylrecords ca
WhwL
P*»im
OPEN 12-6 PM DAILY
321W HASTINGS ST
©VICTORY SQUARE
604.488.1234
CHECKOUT DAVID LOVE JONES" AFRICAN RHYTHMS RADIO
EVERY FRIDAY ON CiTR 101.9FM 7:30-9PM
www.africanrhythmsradio.com
African Rhythms Radio
COME AND CHECK
OUT OUR VAST
SELECTION OF
NEW, USED AND
RARE RECORDS

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