Discorder

Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) Oct 1, 2015

Item Metadata

Download

Media
discorder-1.0200822.pdf
Metadata
JSON: discorder-1.0200822.json
JSON-LD: discorder-1.0200822-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): discorder-1.0200822-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: discorder-1.0200822-rdf.json
Turtle: discorder-1.0200822-turtle.txt
N-Triples: discorder-1.0200822-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: discorder-1.0200822-source.json
Full Text
discorder-1.0200822-fulltext.txt
Citation
discorder-1.0200822.ris

Full Text

 OCT.2015
m a 0 a% f tt c
SKIM MILK I NORDIC TRAX ILT. FRANK DIC
IbRALMS I SOFAR SOUNDS ! JONATHAN HODG UPCOMING SHOWS
000000*1
254 East Hastings Street
604.681.8915
RADFEST 2K15 dj caveman lawyer,
DJ DERBEAR, DJ JEF LEOPARD
TOBIAS JESSO JR.
WET
SOULFLY soilwork, decapitated,
SHATTERED SUN, DEAD ASYLUM, PYRAMIDION
VIEUX FARKA TOURE
EARTHLESS
WITH GUESTS
JOYCE ISLAND, ELLIOT C. WAY, RODNEY
DECROOf BEN ARSENAULT, MAC PONTIAC
BLACK LIPS & ARIEL PINK
HINDS
THE BLACK DAHLIA MURDER
IRON REAGAN, HARM'S WAY, MARUTA
EDDIE PEPITONE
GOOD RIDDANCE
OFF WITH THEIR HEADS, FIRE NEXT TIME
PETER TOSH EARTHSTRONG bkenyan,
BOUNTY HUNTA, DJ SELECTA FROGGY, & MORE
DEAFHEAVEN
TRIBULATION
DESERT DWELLERS
KALYA SCINTILLA, EVE OLUTION, DJ EMOG
THE KING KHAN &BBQ SHOW
MILK LINES, IS/IS
I THE SWORD
KADAVAR, ALL THEM WITCHES
IARMYOFSASS
DANCE PERFORMANCE
CARNIVAL OF LOST SOULS heathen strange-
fellow & THE VAUDEVILLE VAGABONDS, & MORE
CATURDAY CREW: INFECTION space laces, pretty
| MUCH?!, KERMODE, REFLEKTOR, & MORE
Additional show listings, ticket sale info, videos and more: WWW.RICKSHAWTHEATRE.C0M TABLEOFCONTENTS
Features
08 LT. FRANK DICKENS
Yes, you can have it all. Sunburned is the
new release by Lt. Frank Dickens, also marking the first release from Horses Records —
a shop he co-owns. Discorder loiters on the
iconic yellow sofa as the Lieutenant closes
up for the evening.
12 WAR BABY
Of course Death Sweats comes with an
interactive board game; Vancouver rockers
War Baby never cease to surprise. This latest
album is two years in the making, a labour of
love and anxiety.
16 SKIM MILK
Drifting somewhere on a sea between the
sexy mid-century jazz era and mid-90's
Detroit hip hop is Skim Milk with his new
release, Ghosts of Jazz. We talk to Sam Davidson about the development of his style.
49 DRALMS
Dralms' much anticipated new album, Shook
releases this month. Discorder catches
Christopher Smith at the start of a European
tour in a candid discussion about the emotive lore and provocation in his debut album.
25 SOFAR SOUNDS
Selective, but not exclusive — Sofar
Sounds is a hush hush concert series with
an international reach. Discorder interviews
the Vancouver organizers on bringing secret
shows to the best coast.
62 NORDIC TRAX
Think the club scene is only for neon lovers?
Think again. Nordic Trax' Luke McKeehan
takes us back to the 90's house music scene
in Vancouver, when renegade producers
used new beats and new venues to subvert
club conservatism.
06   October Chart    21  In Good Humour    53 Shelf Life    30 Real Live Action 36 Calendar
39   Art Project      43   Under Review      56   On The Air      60   Discorder Revisited
65   CiTR Program Guide
o
00
CM
a>
E
<D
+->
Q.
<D
00
ADVERTISE: Ad space for upcoming issues
can be booked by calling (604) 822-4342 or
emailing advertising@citr.ca. Rates available
upon request.
CONTRIBUTE: To submit words to
Discorder, please contact: editor.discorder@
citr.ca. To submit images, contact:
artdirector.discorder@citr.ca
SUBSCRIBE: Send in a cheque for $20 to
#233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T
1Z1 with your address, and we will mail each
issue of Discorder right to your doorstep for
a year.
DISTRIBUTE: To distribute Discorder in your
business, email distro.discorder@citr.ca We
are always looking for new friends.
DONATE: We are part of CiTR, a registered
non-profit, and accept donations so we can
provide you with the content you love. To
donate visit www.citr.ca/donate.
Publisher Student Radio Society of UBC // CiTR
Station Manager Brenda Grunau // Student Liason:
Elizabeth Holliday // Editor-in-Chief: Brit Bachmann
// Under Review Editor Jon Kew // Real Live Action
Editor Robert Catherall // Web Editor. James Olsen //
Art Director Ricky Castanedo-Laredo// Production
Assisant: Graham McFie // Ad Coordinator Nashlyn
Lloyd//Accounts Manager EleanorWearing//
Calender Listings: Sarah Cordingley // Writers:
Evan Brow, Slavko Bucifal, Esmee Colbourne, Fraser
Dobbs, Kenny Drabble, Inaki Gorbena, Matt Hanson,
Jonathon Hernandez, Elizabeth Holliday, Gary Jarvis,
Erica Leiren, Alex Lenz, Keagan Perlette, Elijah Teed,
Jasper D Wrinch// Cover Photo: Tara Bigdeli //
Photographers & Illustrators: Olga Abeleva, Tara
Bigdeli, Eva Dominelli, Cristian Fowlie, Andi Icaza,
Danielle Jette, Rachel Lin, Jaqueline Manoukian, Kalena
Mackewicz, Alison Sadler, Erin Taninguchi, Karl Ventura,
Mel Zee // Proofreaders: Brit Bacnman, Rob
Catherall, Natalie Dee, Jon Kew, Nashlyn Loyd,
Harsh Trivedi
©Discorder 2015 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published
almost monthly by CiTR, which can be heard at 101.9 FM, online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except
Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487, CiTR's office at (604) 822-3017, email CiTR at stationmanager@citr.ca, or pick up a
pen and write #233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T 1 Zl, Canada.
-I FROM ANOTHER NEW EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
EDITOR'S NOTE
Illustrations by Emma Potter
I lit my sleeve on fire boiling tea to accompany the writing of this editor's note.
No, I don't know what it means, but I have been thinking more about signs and the
paranormal.
For the first few weeks as EIC I shadowed Alex — quite literally — walking in her
shadow trying to retain everything she said, which proved to be impossible. Taking
over this position from Alex, and before that Rob, Jacey, Laurel and the rest is like
wandering among ghosts. Their personalized polaroids and handwritten notes are
hidden all over the Discorder office. Press releases and download codes crowd my
inbox addressed to everyone but me. My responses are inadvertently cheeky, signing
my name and title without any masthead cred. I'm the editor equivalent of a pet shop
bunny pulled out of a hat. But I don't mind.
There are perks to anonymity while editing your first issue of Discorder. You
can sneakily ask record stores what they think about content, and most times they
answer honestly. You're also in a position to lean on the art and editorial team,
and the entire CiTR staff. They graciously answer stupid emails and urgent texts.
(Thank you, all of you.)
While I am still faceless, I am not without some qualifications. I have been writing, ranting and drawing about art and music for the last 5 years on different websites and blogs. Even with the bulk of my editorial experience being online, I have
always coveted print. I have an obscene collection of precious books and zines, an
obsession that I share with members of the Discorder team and that will continue
to subtly influence this magazine.
This issue we feature Skim Milk, an experimental jazz / hip hop clarinettist
and one of this year's Shindig finalists; We meet up with Lt. Frank Dickens to discuss his release on Horses Records; War Baby — no strangers to Discorder — give us
a preview of Death Sweats; and Dralms' Christopher Smith explains the sentiments
behind his music. Shifting focus, we interview Nordic Trax and Sofar Sounds on
what it takes to bring a crowd. We are also debuting a column called Shelf Life that
highlights DIY publishing, catching up with Project Space about the 4th annual
Vancouver Art / Book Fair October 17-18.
So yeah, I hope you enjoy these articles and everything else.
I just became that editor who wrote about ghosts in an October issue.
A+
BB
PS. Don't forget to vote strategically in the federal election October 19. Let's retire
a politician, yeah?
4 EDITOR'S NOTE 111:11111:
iflii
muni
■aimmm
llil
mmMimm
::llim%
lllf!!
mm-
HI
■..■:;       .    ■'■  '■    '   '. . •
Illlif:
WmwmmmmMmfmmwmi SEPTEMBER/2015//C HARTS
Supermoon*+
Faith Healer*
Adrian Teacher
and The
Subs*+
Colleen
Godspeed
You! Black
Emperor*
Ponctuation*
Braids*
Weed*+
Circuit des
Yeux
Suuns &
Jerusalem in
my Heart*
Kathryn
Calder*
Shamir
Softess*+
Kuzin*
Late Spring*+
Moon*
Prinzhorn
Dance School
Nap Eyes*
Cheerleader
Zerbin*
Buffy St.
Marie*
Tough Age*+
METZ*
Fountain*
Crosss*
Self-Released
Comet
Lovejoy
Cosmic
Troubles
Sorta Hafta       Self-Released
Captain of
None
Asunder,
Sweet and
Other Distress
la realite nous
suff
Deep In The
Iris
Running Back
In Plain
Speech
Suuns &
Jerusalem in
my heart
Kathryn
Calder
Ratchet
Dark Power
Cavity Kill
Late Spring
Moon
Home
Economics
Whine of the
Mystic
The Sunshine
of Your Youth
Darling
Power In The
Blood
Plays Cub's
Hot Dog Day
II
Fountain II
Lo
Dark Glasses*      Dark Glasses
German Army*
In Transit
Thrill Jockey
Constellation
bon sound
Flemish Eye
Lefse
Thrill Jockey
Secret City
File Under
Music
XL Recordings
Self-Released
Canyon
Self-Released
Bruised
Tongue
DFA
Plastic
Factory
Bright
Antenna
Fontana North
Gypsy Boy
Mint
Sub Pop
Self-Released
Telephone
Explosion
Gary
Cassettes
Dub Ditch
Picnic
Needs*+
Pow Wows*
The Population
Drops*+
Vats
Tanlines
Yukon
Blonde*+
Moon King*
Durrant,
Melanie*
Jerk in the
•    Can*+
Kappa Chow*
Palma Violets
Hawksley
Workman*
Stefana
Fratila*+
Shilpa Ray
Speedy Ortiz
Blur
Toro Y Moi
No Joy*
Purity Ring*
Jim O'Rourke
Tasseomancy*
lsotopes*+
East India
Youth
Girlpool
S/T
Broken
Curses
Way Down
Excessive
Days
Highlights
On Blonde
Secret Life
Anticipation
Bombs Away
Buttercup
Collected
Output
Danger In The
Club
Old Cheetah
Efemera
Last Year's
Savage
Foil Deer
The Magic
Whip
What For?
More Faithful
Another
Eternity
Simple Songs
Palm Wine
Revisited
Nuclear
Strikezone
Culture of
Volume
S/T
File Under
Music
Get Hip
Self-Released
Self-Released
True Panther
Dine Alone
Last Gang
Melo-ds
Self-Released
Self-Released
Rough Trade
Isadora
Trippy Tapes
Northern Spy
Carpark
Parlophone
Columbia
Arts & Crafts
Last Gang
Drag City
Healing Power
Stomp
Records
XL
Wichita
CiTR's charts reflect what's been played on the air by CiTR's lovely DJs last month. Records with asterisks (*) are Canadian and those marked (+) are local. Most of these
excellent albums can be found at fine independent music stores across Vancouver. If you can't find them, give CiTR's music coordinator a shout at (604) 822-8733. Her
name is Sarah Cordingley. If you ask nicely she'll tell you how to find them. Check out other great campus/community radio charts at www.earshot-online.com. i^^^$^^
CiTR HAS
GREAT
FRIENDS
f®
(^
M) W
g
(•)/ o  o ««*-/««- o o  \®
©>
HOW TO BECOME OUR
FRIEND AND GET THIS CARD:
1. BECOME A CITR MEMBER
2. DONATE DURING OUR
ANNUAL FUNDRIVE
FOR A FULL LIST OF BUSINESSES, VISIT US AT CITR.CA
WESTSIDE/UBC
AUSTRALIAN BOOT
COMPANY
15% off
BANYEN BOOKSANDSOUND
10% off
THE BIKE KITCHEN
10% off new parts
and accessories
DENTRY'SPUB
$6.99 wings, $11.99 pitchers
FRESH IS BEST SALSA
10% off
KOERNER'SPUB
10% off
LIMELIGHT VIDEO
10% off
ON THE FRINGE
HAIR DESIGN
10% off (does not stack with
UBC student discount)
PRUSSIN MUSIC
10% off books & accessories
RUFUS'GUITAR SHOP
10% off strings & accessories
UBC BOOKSTORE
10% off UBC crested
merchandise
VANCOUVER
BREWERY TOURS
10% off
MAIN STREET
ANTISOCIAL
SKATEBOARD SHOP
10% off
DANDELION RECORDS
& EMPORIUM
10% off used records
DEVIL MAY WEAR
10% off
EAST VANITY PARLOUR
10% off
FAS IN FRANK
20% off
LUCKY'S COMICS
10% off
NEPTOON RECORDS
10% off
RED CAT RECORDS
10% off
THE REGIONAL
ASSEMBLY OF TEXT
1 free make-your-own button with
purchases over $5
R/X COMICS
10% off
THE RAG MACHINE
15% off
THE WALLFLOWER
MODERN DINER
10% off
TRUE VALUE VINTAGE/
I FOUND GALLERY
10% off
WOO VINTAGE CLOTHING
10% off
BANG-ON T-SHIRTS
10% off
BEAT STREET RECORDS
10% off used vinyl
THE CINEMATHEQUE
1 free bag of popcorn
COMMUNITYTHRIFT
& VINTAGE
10% off
THE FALL TATTOOING
10% off
FORTUNE SOUND CLUB
No cover'Sup Fu?'Saturdays
(excluding special events)
LUKES GENERAL STORE
10% off
SELECTORS'RECORDS
10% off
SIKORA'S CLASSICAL
RECORDS
10% off used CD & Vinyl
STUDIO RECORDS
10% off
VINYL RECORDS
15%offused10%offnew
COMMERCIAL DRIVE
AUDIOPILE
10%offLPs/CDs
BOMBER BREWING
10% off
BONERATTLE MUSIC
10% off accessories
HIGHLIFE RECORDS
10% off
JEAN QUEEN (JQ) CLOTHING
15% off
MINTAGE CLOTHING
10% off
PANDORA'S BOX
REHEARSAL STUDIOS
10% off
PEOPLE'S COOP
BOOKSTORE
10% off
STORM CROW TAVERN
10% off
VINYL RECORD
STORAGE COMPANY
10% off
BAND MERCH CANADA
15% off
HORSES RECORDS
10% off
VANCOUVER MUSIC
GALLERY
2 free lessons ftx***
*ii?
r
:«s.Jt
\l*?A GET SUNBURNED
words by Jonathan Hernandez // illustrations by OlgaAbeleva //
photos by Jaqueline Manoukian
"I think a record
store should be a
place where people's
strange ideas are
allowed to flourish
and develop, for
them as people or
musicians or artists
or just human
beings."
I watch skyscrapers gobble up the
sun before I walk into Horses Records
on one of the summer's last warm
sunsets. The Hastings-Sunrise record shop is closing up for the evening, but we were just about to get
into the groove. Co-owner and operator Lt. Frank Dickens was tearing
down for the evening. I lounge on the
shop's infamous yellow sofa as I get
my gear ready; Dickens tidies up
the odds and ends before finding
some mood music on Youtube.
Moanin' in the Moonlight, the
debut album of the legendary How-
lin' Wolf, starts playing on the store's
speakers.
"It's the same one we have on the
LT.  FRANK DICKENS wall," he says, as I notice that the
album is sitting on display beside a
row of other freshly sealed records.
Howling Wolf is just one of the
many legendary musicians Dickens
has stocked in his eclectic music
and poetry shop, but now he has
his own album attached to the list.
Dickens recently finished recording
his debut solo album Sunburned.
The new tape marks his first departure from Peace, a Vancouver rock/
post-punk band that Dickens has
been a part of for more or less the
past decade, only now he felt it was
time to hone into his own sound.
"[Peace is] a pretty egalitarian
kind of band where everybody contributes their thing and the sound
that results from that is the sound
of the band," says Dickens. "This
was an opportunity to focus in on
just my part of that."
Much of Sunburned seems like
an extraction of Dickens' role with
Peace. But Sunburned is much
softer, as Dickens' smooth and low-
toned vocals carry the album, often
accompanied by acoustic guitar
melodies and even violin.
"I had a bunch of goals going
in, and the sound of it is, but at
the same time I wanted to just let
it happen. To a certain extent I'm
just hoping that my influences come
out naturally," says Dickens. "When
I play in a band I'm hoping to collaborate, but with that comes a bit
of compromise. But when you do
something on your own you can do
something that has a really unique
perspective, which is one of the
things I like the most about music."
One aspect that sets Sunburned
apart from Dickens work with Peace
is the use of percussion. Dickens
only used a pair of floor toms and a
snare throughout the album. Aside
from one lonely song, cymbals are
absent.
"I like the kind of sense of space
that [the percussion] gives the
music, when you don't have a cymbal keeping time," says Dickens, "it
just kind of feels more open."
But perhaps what makes this
album most unique is that it's the
first record to be produced under
the Horses Records label.
"[Releasing an album under
Horses Records] was always somewhere in the back of mind," says Dickens, who will assess the success of this release before working towards another release under
the label. "I think that I'm kind of
attempting to combine everything I
like into one thing. To me, the ultimate dream would be to release my
music through my store, have the
store going, and release other music
that I like while continuing to produce music. I feel pretty happy just
being immersed in the things that
I'm interested in — just being surrounded by my obsession."
Dickens' 'obsession' has undoubtedly led to one of the most unique
record shops in the city. Horses Records has been open for over a year
now under the pretense of being a
record shop with a very open and
diverse attitude towards music. "I
think a record store should be a
place where people's strange ideas
are allowed to flourish and develop,
for them as people or musicians or
artists or just human beings," says
Dickens.
The store not only acts as a celebration of music, but as a celebration of art. Paintings on the walls
don't just add an aesthetic flare that
many of the city's shops aire lacking,
but also highlight the notion that
each and every record in store is art
in and of itself, from the literal cover
art to the music engraved on all
sides. The store doubles as a bookstore — err, poetry store — a feature
that can likely be traced back Dickens love for words and literature.
"In my music and in the store,
one of the most inspiring things for
me as a listener, is the combination of words and music as forms of
communication and as things that
have a kind of infinite potential,
and an explosive potential," he tells
me. "Music can go beyond music.
It can be something that you take
into your life, and it can change you
and it can change your ideas about
the world. I like music that does
that. I'm looking for music that will
change me. And I like to walk away
with concrete ideas, which is why I
like lyrics so much."
Dickens often refers to his poetry
and songwriting as two separate
forms of expression, but when listening to his music, it's easy to
notice how the two intersect. In the
climax of the track 'Losing What I
Had,' Dickens digresses to spoken
word. A separate vocal track of his
own singing rolls on over top, creating a unique juxtaposition that
reflects and highlights the artist's
two passions.
And much like many great writers and poets, Dickens writes and
performs his music under a pen
name to preserve his identity. He's
probably not a lieutenant (although
111 admit, I never asked if he was),
and if you're really curious about
his actual name, a quick skim
through some old Discorder articles
will likely yield the answer you're
looking for. But it might be easier to
go into Horses and ask him yourself
— just make sure you leave with a
copy of his new album.
Sunburned official release party
was September 24, although the
cassette is available for purchase
at Horses Records or listen on
Soundcloud.
LT.  FRANK DICKENS
11  SURVIVING DEATH SWEATS
words by Ely ah Teed //illustrations by Mel Zee //
photos by Tara Bigdeli
"[Survival] is a dog
at a rescue shelter,
and desperation is
a dog at the show.
It's gross. This, the
album, is so much
more important."
"Being in a band in general is
just constantly about survival... For
me, the biggest achievement was
that the whole thing didn't cave in
on itself." It wouldn't be hard to blow
off Kirby Fisher's statement as melodrama, an exercise meant to conjure
up images of The Starving Artist'
slaving away for his love of music.
With a band like War Baby, however,
a group that's so visibly ecstatic to
have survived its own challenges,
the only word Fisher's sentiment
evokes is 'genuine.'
Ever since the release of Jesus
Horse in 2013, War Baby's presence in Vancouver has been nigh
inescapable. "For an independent
band that had no help — not a scrap
of help, no one was interested —
we did quite well," Fisher explains,
without any sense of exaggeration.
From winning CiTR's Shindig 2013,
to headlining the inaugural SnailF-
est, and even opening for the legendary Eagles of Death Metal at a sold
out Commodore performance, the
past two years have seen Fisher and
his cohorts Brock Allen and Jon
Redditt thrust to local notoriety. It's
why War Baby's prerogative to simply survive is so poignant — their
sound may seem ubiquitous now (a
healthy blend of grunge, punk, and
hardcore) but when they started
they weren't an easy band to bill.
Amidst a sea of other acts, the trio
was frequently considered too tough
for some audiences, and not tough
enough for others. Having worked
their way up as an "underdog band,"
as Redditt puts it, is something
they're immensely proud of.
While War Baby is certainly
relieved to have made it this far,
their ambitions don't stop there.
With a future tour of the United
States looking promising, and their
newest effort, Death Sweats coming
out at the end of the month, the trio
are looking forward to the future as
much as they're contented by past
successes.
"We started making Death
Sweats almost the second Jesus
Horse came out," reveals Fisher.
The new album has been nothing if
not a labour of love (and, as its title
would suggest, sweat) for the band.
Despite  their aforementioned vic-
WAR BABY
13 tories these past few years, the new
record is founded upon feelings of
depression, isolation, and anxiety.
It's a common thread felt among the
three rockers; for every award and
every gig, the pressure to do more
and to be more magnifies.
'"There's something to me that's
so dramatically different about desperation versus survival," Fisher
posits. "[Survival] is a dog at a rescue shelter, and desperation is a
dog at the show. It's gross. This, the
album, is so much more important."
For Fisher in particular, the decision
to leave his native Australia to come
to Canada in the hopes of finding a
more diverse and successful music
scene was fraught with challenges.
"I come from a place where, you
know, you don't do this," he laments.
"[People say] what are you doing?
Be a carpenter, be a bricklayer. So
when you think everyone is against
you, that's a horrible feeling. But
all of a sudden, when you begin to
turn against yourself? That's worse
— that's Death Sweatsr
As the lead singer and songwriter
for the band, Redditt couldn't agree
more. "It's anxiety, we all suffer from
it. [The title] came out in conversation randomly and we said 'that's
it!' There was no hesitation about it.
I've had panic attacks my whole life,
and a lot of our lyrics are along the
lines of meaninglessness," Redditt
explains, with his characteristic
grin. Despite the fact his cheery disposition invokes laughter from the
rest of the band, he stands firm in
his response: "Well what can you do
except smile?"
It's this type of juxtaposition that
keeps War Baby excited and active.
Death Sweats is rich with the stuff,
arranging claustrophobic songs like
"Master Blaster" and "Swamp Kunt"
next to broader ones such as "SpeU"
and "Throw Them in the Fire". As
far as War Baby is concerned, the
orchestration of the album in order
14
WAR BABY to achieve its desired sound often
winds up being more difficult for
them than coming up with material
in the first place.
However, this theme of juxtaposition goes much deeper than track
placement, highlighted most prominently in Death Sweats* ridiculous
bonus feature — a fully functional
board game included on the back of
every record.
"It's so weird for us because we
have all these ridiculous ideas that
never, ever come to fruition because
we have no money... But this one we
actually managed to pull off," Fisher
says with a great deal of excitement.
Due in large part to Allen's dedication and creativity, Death Sweats:
the Board Game includes cut-out
pieces with which up to four people
can play at a time. As if that wasn't
enough, the entire game possesses
an interactive element where players must follow instructions from a
special video as their time to complete the game runs out.
With the new album mastered
and their release party lined up, War
Baby is itching to get on to promoting their next noisy triumph. Who
knows, if the last two years have
been anything to go by, the next
time the trio decides to sit down for
a chat those feelings of self-doubt
will be all but sweated out.
Death Sweats will be available on
Halloween, but if that's too spooky for
you head down to the Hindenburg on
October 23rd for the album release
party, featuring performances from
local heavyweights Twin Crystals,
Dirty Spells, Invasives, and more!
L
WAR  BABY
15 ^ BRINGING A LIGHT GLOW
words by Jasper D Wrinch // illustrations by Kalena Mackiewicz //
photos by Andi Icaza
"A good decade and a
half into learning [the
clarinet] I realized
that it's essentially
irrelevant unless I
choose to do something
else with it."
"I think that any artist would
be thrilled that anyone is still even
listening to you after you're dead,"
explains Sam Davidson, the man
behind the moniker Skim Milk.
"I don't see how an artist in any
medium would not like that." And
in his latest genre defying record
Ghosts of Jazz, the issue of musical
legacies is at the forefront of Davidson's mind.
Yet for Davidson, the "Ghosts of
Jazz" aren't intangible or abstract
concepts buried in his music, but
samples of actual jazz records incorporated into his songs. "I feel like
these little sounds are the legacies
of these musicians that have been
dead for decades and decades," says
Davidson. By using these antiquated
sounds in his own music he's "kind
of bringing them back to life."
And mining music's past for
gems to embed into his own music
is what Davidson does best. "In one
song I'll have the thumb snap of
Miles Davis, or a ride cymbal that
SKIM MILK
17 Jo Jontes played on a recording in
1942, and then there's a bass part
from Paul Chambers from 1957," he
explains. His songs are sprinkled
with musical allusions to the jazz
era, quoting some of the artists that
embody what he sees as "the true
flavour of jazz."
"What I'm really after when
I'm looking for a sample is something that captures that early jazz
essence," Davidson states. Even with
the title Ghosts of Jazz, he is clearly
calling back to the jazz era, yet the
sound of his music is undeniably
contemporary. Sample-heavy and
synthesizer-steeped with driving
hip hop beats, Skim Milk synthesizes the legacies of Miles Davis and
Pete Rock, of Jo Jones and Dabrye,
of yesterday's jazz giants and today's
hip hop icons.
In fact, Davidson claims his
music is most akin to hip-hop than
anything else. "The last two records
have been focused around a lot of
sampling of older records. So that
sort of falls in line with hip hop,"
says Davidson. However, his passion
for more experimental hip hop and
electronic music developed later in
Davidson's career.
Graduating from the UBC School
of Music with a degree in orchestral
clarinet, Davidson found himself
at an impasse. "A good decade and
a half into learning [the clarinet] I
realized that it's essentially irrelevant unless I choose to do something else with it," he explains.
Aimlessly surfing the internet, as
one does in times of crisis, Davidson came across videos of esteemed
saxophonist Michael Brecker playr
ing an electronic wind instrument
(EWI), a wind-controlled synthesizer. "It just seemed like the logical
extension of woodwind instruments," says Davidson. Quickly getting his hands on one, he began to
learn and develop his own style with
the instrument. While for some it
may be hard to recognize the sound
of the EWI, Davidson says "it brings
sort of this ambient, ethereal synth
quality to it...It's a light glow that
you might not be aware of."
In addition to incorporating the
EWI into his own music, Davidson brought it to other acts. "I got
accepted to a three month residency [at the Banff Centre for the
Arts] just to study this instrument,"
, explains Davidson. "It just so happened that Brasstronaut was doing
a recording residency then." Joining the critically acclaimed indie
rock band and touring across Eur-
18
SKIM  MILK ope and North America with them,
Davidson's approach to making and
interacting with music was fundamentally altered. "It was just realizing that there are so many ways to
go about music, different ways to
understand it."
His time with Brasstronaut, however, was not the only major shift in
Davidson's musical development. He
credits his time living in Montreal as
pivotal in his musical change of direction. "Montreal has a much deeper
electronic and hip hop scene than
Vancouver... I got exposed to Madlib
and J Dilla, and all this hip hop, and
it really changed the way I heard
music. It really resonated with me."
For Davidson, hip hop became
a way to connect disparate musical
influences. "It became a way to
explore old jazz music that I had
grown up loving, and had really
vested a lot of interest in," he says.
"Hip hop has allowed me to really go
back and take those old recordings
and turn them into something that's
really meaningful for me."
And that's what makes Skim Milk
such a captivating project. By reaching across genres, instruments,
technologies and eras, Davidson
not only evokes impressions of past
greats, but asserts his music as a
new synthesis of these far-flung elements. As he explains, "I think today
it's really hard to be a very specific
artist, or specific musician. If you're
going to pursue it at any length,
you kind of need to be diverse and
expand your abilities if you're going
to cut the mustard."
Even though Ghosts of Jazz is an
homage to the jazz era, it is not a jazz
record. As Davidson expounds, "I
feel like jazz is a huge part of me, but
I hate to pigeonhole myself." Instead
of creating a modern interpretation
of the genre, Davidson adapts some
of the techniques, instruments, and
sounds of jazz to create something
altogether different. "I feel like I'm
sort of on the outskirts of several
scenes," he explains. "I'm just dabbling in where I fit in, but I'm not
solely vested in one genre."
While utilizing those "beautiful, classic sounds," those legacies
of jazz, Skim Milk slips between the
spaces that separate musical styles.
"We're moving so far beyond the past
and technology is advancing rapidly,"
says Davidson, yet that doesn't mean
that the past can be abandoned altogether. For Davidson, Ghosts of Jazz
is "trying to communicate that the
stuff back then is just as hip as the
stuff now, you just have to figure out
SKIM MILK
19 how to work it."
At times, it can be hard to hear
the EWI in Skim Milk's music. The
clarinet is rarely, if ever, the centre
piece of any track. Even the samples
of old jazz records can become lost
in the mix of Davidson's new record
— but he seems to be alright with
that. "It's my secret little trick, getting people to listen to Art Tatum
again, whether or not they know it."
Ghosts of Jazz will be released
October 17. It is also worth noting
that February of this year Skim Milk
played a Sofar Sounds show in Van-
couver, a concert series also featured
in this issue of Discorder.
20
SKIM  MILK
j CHRISTINE BORTOLIN
IN GOOD HUMOUR
words by Evan Brow
illustrations by Cristian Fowlie
photos by Jaqueline Manoukiah
We live in an age of comedy where
producing content is easier than
ever. You don't need a sitcom deal to
make people laugh. You don't need
Johnny Carson inviting you to the
couch to finally pursue *your type
of comedy.' With cameras on our
phones and cheap editing software
on almost every computer, now anyone can create what they think is
funny.  For Vancouver improviser/
actor/writer Christine Bortolin, she
knows comedians can't be lazy in
today's fast-paced, crowd-powered
comedy scene. When Bortolin and
writing partner Bita Joudaki wanted
to make a web series, they made a
web series. And with that web series,
various film credits, and an upcoming weekly improv show, Bortolin is
holding the reigns of her creativity
and pursuing what she wants.
Bortolin always had the instinct
to be funny, but it wasn't a product of her surroundings. Her mother
was a nurse and her father was
"always scheming." Bortolin says he
would have been most proud of her
if she had invented the ShamWow.
IN GOOD HUMOUR
21 Her only influences were the com-
edic tastes of her parents.
"My dad loved Rodney Dangerfield
and he would put it on in the car,"
says Bortolin. "But Rodney Danger-
field was a little risque for kids, so
he would hear the dirtiest part of the
joke, then always turn the volume
down right after. [Laughs] So all we
would hear were the dirtiest bits of
all his jokes."
Bortolin loved dance as a young
girl, but when her parents separated
she was taken out of performance,
and placed in karate and soccer.
Entering Burnaby Mountain High
School she was directionless, ending
up in the smoke pit as a non-smoker
— this was until a bossy friend of
hers took her to the school's improv
club. Her friend thought it would
look good on a college application.
Convinced, Bortolin joined too and
fell in love with improv comedy.
"I think a lot of people who do
comedy find that they don't fit into
a specific group and as a defence
mechanism they can use laughter
successfully to survive high school,"
says Bortolin. "I think that leads
people to improv because there's
acceptance and success there. And
when you fail, you learn from it, work
through it, and begin to fail joyfully,
which you don't have access to anywhere else in high school."
After high school, Bortolin took
a year off to work in retail, forgoing
performance for the time being. She
hated her job, taking 'smoke breaks'
to go to the bathroom and cry. She
knew that she wanted to perform.
She knew she wanted to be funny, to
act, and to enter the unstable world
of scripts, cameras and black box
theatres.
In 2007, Bortolin went to Douglas College for Acting. In 2010, she
transferred to UBC and graduated in 2012 with a BFA in Acting. Since then she has appeared
in The Unauthorized Saved By The
Bell Story, the CBC Comedy Coup
project "Roll For Damage," and the
upcoming VIFF short film Penny's
For Tea.
However, Bortolin always wanted
to create. In November of 2014, Bortolin and Joudaki developed &n idea
for the STORYHIVE contest about
unemployed roommates looking for
work together. When their submission wasn't selected, the idea was
shelved until this past March, when
the two decided to create it by themselves with only the help of their
friends as backing.
Their concept turned into a
five-episode web  series  about  an
22
IN GOOD HUMOUR  ftVVVVVVVVVVV
•••••••••••••4
• •••••••••••• I
• •••••••••••• I
►••••••••••••••••••••••••v
• ••••••••••••I
On her partnership with Bita Joudaki:
"I think that we're playful and we
do things about friendship. Our thing
is that we like to have one real thing or
connection in each storyline. We both
are able to take time on stage to be a
little more theatrical and then a bit
more sincere. Sincerity can be scary in
improv. It's easy to be insincere or to
go for low-blow material and just stay
there. But if you can go up and down
the scale, doing highbrow and lowbrow, that's good. We do a lot of stuff
about relationships between parents,
siblings, friends. I think Bita reels me
in when I'm getting too absurd. She's
always sincere. There's no way she can
be insincere. She just can't. It's one of
the most lovely things. When I get too
weird, she's able to push me back into
the river of the scene."
aggressive and hyperactive Bortolin and a more reserved but confused Joudaki being uncomfortable
at a sister's party, retrieving a stolen
purse from a crazed entrepreneur,
and breaking into a house to steal a
ficus plant, to name a few storylines.
Shot in March and April, edited in
June and July, and released in
August and September, the web series is filled with generous Vancouver
talent, featuring friends and comedians Alicia Tobin, Ivan Decker,
Nima Gholamipour, Caitlin Howden,
Aaron Read, and Andrew Barber
among many, and directed by Cam
MacLeod and Kevin Lee.
"With a web series, it's so easy
to get it out there and show it to
people. Plus they're shorter and
quick. I'm not as worried about
the film quality. We lucked out on
Golden Futures and it looks great,
but you don't have to have great film
quality to do it. The goal is to just
do web series and get content out
there. With web content, it's easier
to share, but it follows along, so you
can have recurring plot points."
Bortolin understands that comedy is a shark. To feel fulfilled in our
world of amateur comedy empowerment, she has to keep moving, creating, devouring opportunities like
they're unfortunate fish. As of now,
Bortolin has been doing exactly this.
Golden Futures is available on
Christine Bortolin's YouTube Channel
and the duo are currently planning
its second season. She will appear in
Little Mountain Improv on Tuesdays
starting October 13th at Little Mountain Gallery.
24
IN GOOD HUMOUR VANCOUVER.
AND YET SO CLOSE
words by Elizabeth Holliday // illustrations by Erin Taninguchi //
s photos by Andi Icaza
"Hopefully it feels
different than just
going down to the
old watering hole to
catch a live band/'
On the front of a non-descript
house in Kits on September the
24th, a small sign reading "Sofar
Sounds" was practically invisible,
folded over and water-logged from
the rain. But no matter, those who
were looking for it knew they were in
the right place. A Sofar show, after
all, is like no other.
Short for 'Songs From A Room,'
Sofar started in London in 2009
when its founders, tired of "the
over-quantified music scene," began
hosting shows in their apartments.
Once they started filming the shows
and putting them on Youtube, Sofar
quickly gained a following among
like-minded folks in other cities who
wanted to get on board. Six years
later Sofar has branches in over 170
cities, including Vancouver.
It's no surprise the Sofar model
attracted so many eager fans— centered on curation, community and
respect for musicians, the experience they offer is truly unique. You
only need to attend a show to palpably feel this.
Aiming to create a singular listening experience, Sofar's by-donation events follow a strict mandate—
SOFAR SOUNDS
25 audience attention is on the music,
meaning no talking or texting, with
the audience members typically
seated on the floor facing the performers. The venues are not venues
in the typical sense; the shows take
place in diverse spaces like warehouses, roof decks, backyards and
offices, and are generally small.
This limited space also means limited attendees, and rather than
the typical first-come-first-serve
model, folks go through a short
online application. Sofar Vancouver's organizers Catherine Hodgson
and Darragh Coward receive about
150 applications per show, and can
only extend invitations to an average of 20 people and their plus-
ones. Accordingly, they're careful to
pick applicants who they "think are
suited for the vibe and really understand and want to support local
musicians."
The musicians snuggled in this
particular Kitsilano house at their
most recent show were Ace Martens, the Luke Wallace Trio, Tramp
and Jody Glenham. Lineups aim to
represent diversity, and this night
spanned genres from shoegaze to
environmental-folk, singer-songwriter stylings to hitchhiking blues.
Selection is done by a voting process:
"Our entire team really engages in
a dialogue around each artist... We
all come from very different backgrounds. Even our ages, preferred
genres and areas of study vary enormously, so it makes for some interesting conversations around representation," explains Catherine.
For the audience and musicians
alike, there is a lot of mystery surrounding Sofar's shows. If you are
invited, you won't know until two
days before the show when the loca
tion is revealed, and the lineup
remains a mystery until you arrive.
This helps dispel any expectations
that could affect the audience's
interaction with the performance.
As Catherine notes, "[This] introduces a new conversation around the
entire experience...there's a discovery element to it to." The organizers also point out that discovery like
this is limited in the typical concert-goers habits, since people will
often decide whether to attend a
show based on names they recognize on the lineup.
This surprise model also means
audience members may hear genres
they wouldn't typically seek out.
"It's strangely common to have an
audience member come up to us in
the intermission and say something
to the effect of, 'I thought I hated
country music until tonight,'" says
Catherine.
Sofar Sound's ever-changing
locations also help bring audiences
out of their usual bubbles. "We've
tried really hard to make each show
be in a kind of unique location...
we've made people go all the way
to Dunbar," Catherine continues,
"[providing a]kind of a scavenger
feel... Hopefully it feels different than
just going down to the old watering
hole to catch a live band." Often the
venues belong to community members, past attendees and fans, so the
spaces tend to reflect the lifestyle of
their audience— their March show
was staged in a 'Vancouver special,'
something the organizers describe
as likely unsafe, but a fantastic time
nonetheless.
Sofar's shows are also quite
unique for the musicians. The concentrated attention of the audience is perhaps the most affecting
26
SOFAR SOUNDS  element, something Darragh and
Catherine have seen shake up many
a composed performer. To suit the
intimacy of the venue, the sets are
asked to be as stripped-down as possible, which can be interesting with
certain bands, like recent guests
JPNSGRLS, "who...have never even
considered that opportunity," says
Catherine. Eschewing the usual set
lists, Sofar gives the artists a chance
to play their more 'unconventional'
numbers.
As compensation, musicians can
choose to take either their cut of
the entrance donations, or a media
package with footage from their set.
Since many of the artists are early in
their careers, the high-quality audio
and video is a valuable resource and
popular choice. Sofar's support of
the musical community doesn't end
there; their social media platforms
are dedicated to the artists' releases
and shows, and the team makes an
effort to attend these shows as a
group. Beyond Vancouver city limits, performing at a Sofar show provides musicians immediate entry
into the global Sofar community.
This often means the opportunity
to perform at Sofar shows while on
tour, where an attentive audience is
guaranteed.
The community aspect of Sofar
its centre; Catherine and Darragh
are full of stories of folks who have
applied seven times per show, who
have written poems as applications,
who have collected every poster.
And the success of the Vancouver
Sofar community is being felt all the
way back to its roots: "We've had
our team members travel to London and speak to Rafe Offer [Sofar
co-founder] who candidly said to
them, 'man, I felt like Vancouver
was going to be a really hard city to
break,'" Darragh shares.
Sofar offers something special to
Vancouver's music community, and
though it may still be in the process of 'breaking,' its word-of-mouth
momentum only looks poised to get
mouthier. So far, it's looking so good.
Upcoming concert dates and documentation from past Sofar Sounds
are on their website and YouTube.
To apply for the next Sofar Sounds
Vancouver visit sofarsounds.com/
Vancouver.
28
SOFAR SOUNDS vancouverartbookfair.com
fe** ""ess; »**"«  A»t   fiiililw I   cm^/iflc  PI  Up  >«ffi^
boms     esse    en   GEIST
£$. f.UCicY'5 KING GIZZARD & THE
LIZARD WIZARD /
MILD HIGH CLUD /
SH-SHAKES
SEPTEMBER 1 / BILTMORE CABARET
Under the cover of darkness of the brisk
Vancouver night, the Biltmore offered an
oasis for those looking to shake off the
weekday blues. Despite the fact that it was
a Tuesday night, the Gregorian calendar
didn't seem to be much of an impediment
to live music fans. Particularly, King Gizzard
& the Lizard Wizard fans — because really, with a Dr. Seuss-esque band name like
that, your fans are going to be anything
but blase. On September 1, the ever-popular psychedelic rock orchestra from Down
Under were going to make Vancouver a little
bit louder and a little bit more hungover.
First to grace the stage with their cool-
kid presence were Sh-Shakes, a local
garage rock band. They had great energy
and set a very lively precedent for the rest
of the night. Sh-Shakes were your typical
four piece band, looking like they were having a grand old time jamming out together. They were the guys in high school that
you'd find smoking weed behind the bleachers and cracking jokes in class. The drum
mer looked like Jack Black from School of
Rock meets John Lehnon, which is always a
bonus. Musically, they were forgettable and
unfortunately, being the first band on stage,
were the ones to take the blow for the sub-
par sound quality that was being toyed with
during their set. Despite this, the band was
incredibly personable and constructed synergy among the audience.
Mild High Club, a Los Angeles-bred
experimental rock group, was up next up.
They were snazzy in a grungy way, with the
lead singer donning an oversized blazer and
a sparkly purple cap, while the girl playing
the synthesizer exuded laid back sexiness
with her grey beret. The acoustic-electric
guitar player was reminiscent of Riff Raff
from the Rocky Horror Picture Show, wearing an all-black suit and a shock of white-
blonde hair. They fit the stage like a display
at a contemporary art museum.
Mild High Qlub's music was amazing, to say the least. It was imaginative
and vast, embodying a multi-faceted and
broad-reaching approach to songwriting.
Their music had a very distinct sound, one
that lingered on your eardrums long after
the show was over. The combination of
instruments was like a smoothie, blended
to perfection. It was hard to make out the
sounds of each individual instrument, but
boy did it taste good. After their set, it felt
like the audience.had come to some kind of
30
REAL LIVE ACTION realization, like a light bulb had somehow
switched on. The crowd was both plentiful
and thirsty. They were undoubtedly ready
for King Gizzard.
There are few bands that can get away
with having two drummers. There are also
few bands that have a full time harmonica
player. Needless to say, King Gizzard & the
Lizard Wizard is one of the ballsiest groups
out there. They encompass a free spirited attitude when it comes to their recorded music, and this was reinforced by their
performance. There were guitar strings
coming out at all angles of the lead singer's guitar and lots and lots of long-haired
head thrashing. The harmonica player stole
the show in terms of visual appeal and
audience reception, as he had the liberty of
dancing on stage and interacting with the
concertgoers since he wasn't tied down to
a heavy instrument.
King Gizzard had utter control over the
audience, which was feeding off of their
energy like leeches sucking blood. The
audience was incredibly rowdy; two thirds
of the Biltmore was a frenzied mosh pit,
with half-full cans of PBR being tossed and
sprayed onto audience members. It was as
though it was a King Gizzard rite of passage
to have something or someone hit you when
you see them live. There was crowd surfing
like never before — literally, one guy was
attempting to walk on the ceiling. Good luck
to you, my friend.
Musically, King Gizzard played a great set,
showcasing a healthy variety of songs from
their prolific portfolio. There were almost
no breaks in between songs, which made it
sound more like King Gizzard was playing
one long continuum, rather than a collection of different songs. Interestingly, the two
drum sets seemed to fade into the background and were hardly distinguishable
against the concoction of the seven instruments playing together. If one thing can be
said conclusively about their set, it's that it
REAL LIVE ACTION
31 was loud. So loud, in fact, that the quality of
music was diluted by the sheer volume. But
hey, you win some, you lose some.
— Alex Lenz
B-LINES / MORMON
CROSSES / KNIFE
PLEATS
SEPTEMBER 13 / HINDENBURG
It had just been short of 15 minutes since
I had comfortably positioned myself in the
Hindenburg's smoke pit, and in a mere
quarter of an hour, a multitude of familiar
faces had already waltzed by to chat me up
or ask for a spare dart. Some of them had
arrived at the venue a while back, eagerly
waiting for the bands to start, while some
others had migrated from an earlier event.
One way or the other, this was the show that
everyone had structured their night around,
all just to see B-Lines play one last time.
The outside crowd was lured back in by
the fuzzed out sounds of Knife Pleats. Who,
with their first album release coming up in
October, were a tight unit displaying great
chemistry, filling up the venue with melodic vocal harmonies and cheerful retro pop
guitar lines. Floating somewhere in between
bubblegum sweetness and a raw garage
edginess, the band set the tone for the evening, leaving a spirited vibe that would be
sustained the entire night.
Local art-punk mainstays, Mormon
Crosses, took over as the middle act. The
band blasted with perverse energy bringing a distinct murkiness to the night, which
plunged the atmosphere into a darkness,
heavily contrasting the previous set. This
type of eclectic lineup has become characteristic of Hockey Dad shows, and, considering the overall feeling of bittersweet celebration that permeated the night, nothing
could have been more fitting.
At last B-Lines took the stage and
seamlessly catapulted into their set with
the intensity that has characterized them
throughout their career. It took just a couple
of songs for B-Lines frontman and Hockey
Dad head honcho, Ryan Dyck, to proclaim
the night was a "teeth out kinda show,"
removing his front denture and putting them
away for later. The rest of the band's presence came across just as strong, with guitarist Scotty Colin shredding through the
songs with immeasurable vigor amidst a
barrage of beer cans, all containing varying
levels of liquid inside of them. Bassist Todd
Taylor and drummer Bruce Dyck provided a
32
REAL LIVE ACTION frenetic rhythm section that complimented
the madness that is B-Lines' live performance perfectly.
Ryan Dyck's stage antics grew in intensity as the night went on, crowd surfing through a good portion of their set,
and smashing their signature cat painting during a particularly memorable rendition of "Nervous Laughter." The band's wild
performance was cut off only briefly so the
band could publicly recognize the contributions of their longtime roadie, Christian. The
vibes escalated quickly back to eleven as
the band went on with the show. The performance veered to an end when "Opening
Band" started blaring, as a now shirtless
Ryan Dyck howled from the top of an amp,
guzzled down the last of his beer, and finally retaliated at the crowd by tossing the can
at them, crowd surfing his way back to the
stage where the band completed their set.
Almost as immediately as the band left
the stage, the crowd's chants for "one more
song" started, prompting the band to come
back for one last encore song that lasted
no more than two minutes. As they retired
their instruments and walked off the stage
for the last time, the chant quickly evolved
into a booming "six more songs! SIX MORE
SONGS," but the chants eventually died
down and we knew the B-Lines were done
for good.
— Inaki Gorbena
HAYDEN / CHAD
VANGAALEN /
SAMANTHA SAVAGE
SMITH
SEPTEMBER 19 V THE IMPERIAL
When I heard that Chad VanGaalen and
Hayden were co-headlining a Vancouver
show, I was surprised to find out they
weren't playing a larger venue than the
Imperial. When I arrived at the venue, I was
even more surprised to see VanGaalen,
Calgary's DIY king, at his merch table, selling his mountain of records, tapes, shirts,
and frisbees.
His presence at the table, fronting the line
of artist-fan interaction, seemed to set the
tone for the rest of the night. It was to be a
casual show. Throughout the course of the
night, it seemed the preparedness of the acts
steadily decreased, while the amount of fun
they were having steadily increased.
Starting the evening off, Samantha
Savage Smith took to the stage. Her songs
were comfortable at their core, despite
Smith herself seeming somewhat stiff and
nervous on stage. While the audience warmly praised throughout her set, it was clear
she was not what they were there to see.
After a handful of songs, she made way for
the roadies to set up for Chad VanGaalen.
Knowing his music, his recording techniques, and his unique approach to instrumentation, I was excited to see which of
his homemade instruments he would bring
on stage, and how he would manage to do
it all himself. Surprising me again, Chad
VanGaalen showed up with a band, instead
of his array of homemade noisemakers.
But his unique approach to instrumentation wasn't completely foregone. With
his acoustic guitar rigged to sound like the
grittiest electric, VanGaalen plunged into a
set almost entirely devoid of his back catalogue. The only song I recognized from one
of his past releases, which he played more
than halfway through his 45 minute set, was
"City of Electric Light," from his 2008 LP Soft
Airplane. The rest were entirely new.
It seems that songs just pour out of
VanGaalen; he seems never to cease composing. In a break between songs, after
a brief aside about sleeping in his van the
night before, VanGaalen starting improvising a song on the spot, with his band catching on just as he began to sing "Vancouver
/ I'd rather move through ya," only to apolo-
REAL LIVE ACTION
33 gize to the crowd for putting down the city.
If their blatant disregard for preparedness or professionalism wasn't undeniably charming, Hayden might have been a
disappointment for some. Yet the prolific
Canadian alt-folk act tumbled through their
set with ease, trying songs they were completely unprepared to try, switching instruments as if they were in their jam space,
making fun of their bass player for being
single, and asking the audience for glasses of water.
While their set trailed on long into the
early hours of the morning, the audience
welcomed it, albeit sleepily. Hayden broke
down the divide between the performers
and the audience, even closing their set with
an unplugged sing-along. A resounding level of intimacy, built over the course of four
hours, had invaded the Imperial that night.
— Jasper D Wrinch
COLIN STETSON 8
SARAH NEUFELD /
LONE WOLF
SEPTEMBER 23 / BILTMORE CABARET
It was a hushed and expectant air that
greeted guests to the Biltmore Cabaret on
a humid Wednesday evening, and descending its steps was more akin to walking
into a wedding ceremony than a crowd of
avant-garde music fans. Rarely has the
Biltmore seen a more focused audience, but
then Colin Stetson & Sarah Neufeld have
that effect on people.
Opener Lone Wolf began the night with
a set of improvised drumming and what
came across as free-verse poetry. The lone
wolf behind Lone Wolf, Ryan Sawyer, is best
known for drumming on At The Drive-in's
first album, Acrobatic Tenement, but his
experience goes much further and wider than that of a post-hardcore kit smasher. Unfortunately, this wealth of experience
— which certainly hit oh aspects of punk
as well as plenty of jazz — failed to translate to an enjoyable or mesmerizing performance. Improvised drum sets can be
impressive, and so can poetry sans-mu-
sique, but together here they stood so at
odds from one another that it was as if two
different musicians were physically fighting
for control of the soundspace.
It goes without saying that Colin Stetson
and Sarah Neufeld are both fantastic musicians in their own rights. Stetson's virtuoso talent with the bass saxophone has
spawned a Polaris short-listed solo album
as well as fantastic contributions to bands
like Arcade Fire, Bon Iver, Feist, Tom Waits,
and TV On The Radio. His New History
Warfare series of albums has completely altered what people thought was able
to be accomplished on a saxophone. For
many, Stetson was the main reason to
come out on a dreary weekday, but it was
Sarah Neufeld's compelling violin work that
remained most present throughout the evening and after.
Neufeld's performance was what grounded and solidified the duo's constantly-wavering tone and timbre. Known primarily
for her work in Arcade Fire as well as the
post-rock ensemble Bell Orchestre, Neufeld
earned her place alongside Stetson early
into the set and easily, commanding a presence that rivalled, and at times overpowered,
her bandmate. The duo's combined sound
was nothing short of miraculous, ranging
from beautiful and empowering and whimsical to a much darker, jungled, feverish forest pace. Fleeting notes touched on Arcade
Fire's work scoring the soundtrack to Spike
Jonze's film adaptation of Where The Wild
Things Are, with dreamlike contributions
from Neufeld balancing out Stetson's oftentimes-chaotic saxophonic slug-fest.
— Fraser Dobbs
34
REAL LIVE ACTION LiveVan.com: Part of a network of concert calendars
completely updated and populated with details by
thousands of informed members of the music industry
Integrated with local profiles in the
Vancouver Musicians Directory
the CiTR Radio Sponsored
Vancouver Band Directory
and the
Vancouver Music Service
8 Resource D1reetoi*f|
nprehensive. Community
REAL LIVE ACTION MONDAY       TUESDAY    WEDNESDAY   THURSDAY v/wm*
ya"M
BillfH,
yssmmm/uMymi
FRIDAY
| Weird Candle / Dead Leaf
Echo / Did You Die /
| Wire Spine
© Ask Around
Braids
© The Cobalt
Knife Pleats / Dozer /
Pitschouse / Ida Nielsen ©
Toast Collective
Uptights / Dany Laj & the
Looks / Double Fuzz /
Skyote © The Emerald
9
Radioactivity
© The Cobalt
Joyce Island / Elliot C Way
/ Rodney Decroo + more
'© The Rickshaw
Hick / Stefana Fratila / Gal
| Gracen + more
© Red Gate
16
Destroyer
© The Commodore
Ballroom
23
Collapsing Opposites /
Supermoon / The New
National Film Board of
Canada
© Horses Records
War Baby
© The Hindenburg
Nomadic Streams
©VIVO
30
Mac Demarco / Alex
Calder / The Courtneys /
Walter TV
© The Commodore
Ballroom
SATURDAY
Tobias jesso Jr.
© The Rickshaw
Psych Fest
© The Hindenberg
10
Black Lips / Ariel Pink
© The Rickshaw
17
Cult Babies
© The Astoria
Anchoress / Witch of the
Waste / Seer / American
Space Monkey
©Ask Around
24
Sean Nicholas Savage
©WISE Hall
The King Khan & BBQ
Show
© The Rickshaw
Nomadic Streams
©VIVO
31
The Internet + Guest
Alexander Downtown
Natalie Prass / Promiseland
Sound
© The Biltmore
SUNDAY
Nick Diamonds & Lila Foy
© The Cobalt
Psych Fest
© The Hindenberg
18
25
HE
msm-
mwt   NOTICE *
:. amu*
,   27iU>
gQtfr.
LlMrtttt
... ml
^^^^^^^^^^—..   ...   ,     Ifr, BAR!
fa, cook; m, EEC,
\BB PIREgCTOK OT MR. CARLItg'VjSBKOR.
ttnCiwiBr am;;
X CUSS1CK,      J. W. JSSKSOrS TKOUFg
HQR*
|w HOWARD & CO., FELDMANT & CO., OHAS. SX
Ik & oo.
lB&g      BOECTBIOAL BI^CTS SY PA
iiir
i^wyiwwigiraigt;
ORES8 CIRCLE,
KekHyOoar. »» Sowing f«i
BOXJ
1«
TAX: id. on 2d>; III, on 3d,, 4d. and 64 Seats; 2if> on 9d, Seats
aseo 8.80.   Ordinary Boors 6,40,   Feriortaafic* <»mamm *M.    &$CO»& HOUSE: Early Boon »-* ^®~
3ER   24   -   OCTOBER   9,   2016
VANCOUVER   INTERNATIONAL
FILM   FESTIVAL
O ROGERS.
TELEFILM
C    R    N    R    D    fl
viff.org
PROUDLY SPONSORED BY
iCITft
808
(UK, 94 MIN.)
Even if the name means nothing to you, the
Roland TR-808 drum machine has played a role
in your life. The machine's dirty bass was the
signature sound of the early days of hip-hop
and the basis for modern EDM. But don't take
our word for it—Alexander Dunn's diverse film
features testimony from Damon Albarn, Arthur
Baker, Afrika Bambaataa, Diplo, Fatboy Slim,
Chris Frantz of Talking Heads, Goldie, Rick
Rubin, Bernard Sumner, Phil Collins, Pharrell
Williams and others. "A must-see."—Rolling
Stone. Dedicated to our dear, departed friend,
Peter Culley.
SAT. OCT 3, 6:30 PM, RIO
WED. OCT 7,1:15 PM, INTL VILLAGE 9
IN PERSON BOX OFFICE:
FILM INFOLINE
604-683-FILM
TICKETS AVAILABLE
0NLINEATVIFF.ORG
SUBSCRIBE TO DISCORDER!
Discorder is Vancouver's ior gest running Independent magazine.
Show your support for Vane over's independent mask community
and the development of new writers, editors, designers, and artists.
GET IT SENT ALL THE WAY TO YOUR DOOR! I
MOULD LIKE AN ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION TO DISCORDER MAGAZINE ($20 F0R CANADA. $25 FOR U.S.)
IWOUSDME TO SUPPORT DISCORDER Wlf H A DONATION OF
ff ! SEND THIS FORN&ND CASH OR CHEQUE TO:
r Magazine #233-6138 SUB Blvd. Vancouver, B.C., V6T1Z1   1
* - ~^- -  under review
The Ballantynes
Dark Drives, Life Signs
(La Tt Da)
Lace up your wingtips and set your
curls, because the Ballantynes are burning up the dance hall with their debut LP,
Dark Drives, Life Signs. The Vancouver ska-
soul-rock-and-roll sextet has graciously
blessed us with an ass shaking, fancy footwork inspiring collection of songs (can I get
a hallelujah?). Dark Drives, Life Signs is a
twelve track party that hearkens back to the
Motown era and sounds more like the sunny
South than our cloudy coast.
Each member of this sextet — which
includes Jarrod O'Dell, Vanessa Dandur-
and, Jennifer Wilks, Corey Poluk, Max Sample, and Michael McDiarmid — plays at
least two instruments and sings (drummer
McDiarmid is the only one who doesn't lend
his voice to the music). The vocals are consistently impassioned, pedal to the metal. It
often sounds as if an entire gospel choir is
singing. The engines driving the big sound
of Dark Drives, Life Signs are the string and
brass ensembles that the band brought in
for the record. Former drummer Trevor Racz
rejoins the band for this recording, and producer Felix Fung adds supporting guitar
for a sound that's as thick as biscuits and
gravy.
The Ballantynes will hold your body
hostage, and there is no use resisting: you
will be shaking your hips and shimmying
your shoulders by the second track, "Let's
Go" — I have never been more compelled
by the danceability of an organ accompaniment. The seventh track, "Argent," had me
pulling dance moves straight from the sixties without inhibition. Even the shining
slow jam, "You Were Mine" will have you
grooving and singing along at full volume.
The Ballantynes keep soul fresh with mosh-
worthy ska inspired brass and bass lines in
"My Place Your Town" and "Us."
There is no way you won't like this
album. Like a strong drink, the music loosens your limbs, warms your cheeks into a
smile and puts a fire into your belly. This
is music to sweat to, to get down to. Dark
Drives, Life Signs will peer pressure you into
losing your shit on the dance floor. It wfll
make sure you're having the best night of
your life. — Keagan Perlette
UNDER  REVIEW
43 %;> if 0
PI.
$*
IT
CFCF
The Colours of Life
(1080p)
Montreal-based experimental electronic
producer Mike Silver — known under the
moniker CFCF — has come out with a wide
variety of challenging music over his nearly
decade long career. But his latest record,
The Colours of Life, proves to be both the
most difficult and the most pleasant of his
releases to date.
Despite being the second full-length
record of 2015 to his name, Silver did not
rush the production of The Colours of Life,
stating on his Bandcamp that he "started
writing [The Colours of Life] in the first half
of 2011." It is hard to understand why, however, he took so long to complete it. For
the entire 41-minute run time, CFCF glides
through a ceaseless mid-tempo drum loop,
with pleasant piano lines, Casio pan flutes,
and sickly sweet synth washes. The Colours of Life sounds like the kind of music
you don't pay attention to in dentists' waiting rooms.
Also on his Bandcamp, Silver explains
his first inspiration for the record was Phil
Collins' 1981 track, "Hand in Hand" off the
breakthrough debut solo album, Face Value.
In fact, the entirety of The Colours of Life
sounds as if Silver took the opening section of "Hand in Hand" and stretched it out
to nearly an hour.
At first The Colours of Life seems almost
too easy to listen to, fully embracing MOR
music in every aspect. It becomes clear,
however, that this was intentional. Consisting of one track in twelve movements, all
sounding suspiciously alike, and all sounding uncomfortably agreeable, the record is
nearly impossible to pay attention to. After
ten minutes or so of the same unassuming synth sequence, the same steel drum
line, the same shaker endlessly shaking in
the background, drifting off from the music
is. unavoidable. Over the course of the record the only thing that jumps out is the
monotony.
While CFCF's other releases move
between reverb drenched house music,
studies in Brian Eno-esque ambience, and
aggressive minimalism, they are, at their
core, attention grabbing and interesting.
But with The Colours of Life, Silver pushes
his music to the edges of tolerable cheese,
testing the listener not with innovation, but
the extremely mundane. — Jasper D Winch
Francesca Belcourt
Zongs
(Genero)
Francesca Belcourt's Zongs sounds
like a bedroom album. Not in the sexy way
— though the argument can certainly be
made. Rather, more like the soundtrack to a
long night where you don't leave your bedroom, burning a few long-unused candles,
44
UNDER REVIEW alternating between self-reflection, listening to records, perhaps some solo dancing.
And if you need inspiration for moves
then look no further than the video for
"Meaning," Zongs's centerpiece featuring
Oshea Adams. "Meaning" sounds something like a synth-based R&B slam poem,
and such combinations are typical of Zongs'
lack of conventionality. Somewhat experimental, its song structures differ from the
more straightforward pop of Mu, Belcourt's
duo with Brittney Rand. But this deviance
should not be mourned. Fans of Mu will find
the same sort of ethereal sensibilities providing the groundwork for the album, and
more consistently than within her last solo
release, 2013's Hush.
Belcourt proves herself a versatile electronic musician on this album/exploring a
wide range of sounds and styles. Drawn-
out and wavering synths combined with
Belcourt's light, sometimes intimate, vocal
touch give the album a trance-like feel. It's
easy to get lost in the soundscape, making for ideal zen or background music. But
that's not to say that Zongs is nothing more
than a pleasant soundtrack. The album easily pulls double duty as a sonic centerpiece,
livened by popping drumbeats and cheeky
lyrics (see the ode to flirtation "Kinda Bad").
The songs have a tendency to get delightfully creepy, as in "Bloody" and opener
"Sketchy Cuddle."
Zongs is also the latest release from
Vancouver all-female electronic label Gen-
ero, and is also a testament to the success
and importance of their project. The album
has been touted by Belcourt as something
of a passion project, and Genero's existence
and insistence on the need for better representation of female electronic artists has
allowed that project to be completed, something for which we should all be grateful.
— Elizabeth Holliday
Frog Eyes
Pickpocket's Locket
(Paper Bag)
Frog Eyes' Carey Mercer has never confined himself to the ordinary register of
human expression. From his time experimenting as a soloist under the name Blackout Beach to now, Mercer has howled from
behind a microphone about both the juvenile
and the intellectual, allowing his experience
and intimate craftsmanship to stand behind
such simple phrases as "Fuck death!" with
resounding fury and intensity. In Pickpocket's Locket, the ninth LP under the Frog
Eyes name, Mercer writes from both sides of
his personal pains with equal weight, balancing the child-like simplicity of his emotions
with a rich literary complexity.
Four of Pickpocket's Locket's ten tracks
were recorded prior to Mercer's radiation
therapy for throat cancer, and the remaining six were recorded some time afterwards.
Which are which is a cryptic deciphering
game for fans familiar with Mercer's decades-long discography. But if anything, Frog
Eyes is sounding vocally stronger than they
have in ages. Musically, the album gains
a fantastic brightness from the inclusion,
once again, of longtime collaborator Spencer Krug (Wolf Parade / Moonface / Sunset
Rubdown) and his compositional skills on
string sections. While the record may boast
the largest collective cast of Frog Eyes' his-
UNDER REVIEW
45 tory, it feels neither bloated nor crowded,
but instead is a warm and indelibly weird
near-folk offering. That this is their most
accommodating release to date may annoy
old fans seeking a writhing death-rattle
war bard, but it's hard to argue with an end
result so captivating and breathable. Mercer
unites a phenomenal cast to tell a tale of life
and death, and all of the intricacies buried
beneath that old story's surface. — Fraser
Dobbs
Lero
Trichomes
(Arachnidiscs)
Lo-fi fuzz breaks over a walled canopy
of silence before spreading out into a dense
shadow of ambient noise. Electric guitar
then licks atop in tasteful drops, liquid like
the sound of Ethiopian jazz, or desert blues.
"Vacheron," the first track on Lero's limited
edition October 28, 2014 digital release by
Arachnidiscs Recordings is haunting, melancholic and stirring.
Recently released on CD, fans and new
listeners are now able to extend the Nashville handshake (aka mutual music exchange)
with a slice of this incomparable artist. As the
ten-track album ensues, vocals creep through
the transmogrified wavelengths. Though the
artist self-describes the record as an "impassioned burst" of soundtrack music, Trichomes
hits the deepest nerve.
This is a mega-focused joint for the
slacker generation still slouching towards
Nirvana in a burnout haze of pursuance,
sonically tragicomic in the fading tones
expressed by talent so raw the musicians
almost sound unprepared. The recordings are
especially appreciable for those with tastes
as long acquired in the midst of intersecting,
alternative scenes.
"Ayler," the second track by Lero, stings
and charms, utilizing all of the originality of
primary colours rat/mini on tape dirt, freeze
on tape drones, DDL on tape loops, Bell &
Howell on tape tones. A post-contemporary
genre mixtape of sound, Trichomes is a lush
impressionism of drone, folk, noise, jazz and
ambient styles. Summer Skin," the album's
third track opens with the flitting obscurity of overdubbed voices. "I don't understand
you," a man mumbles throatily. "You try it," a
woman says nervously.
Lero is a swimming call to DIY performance art in the vein of instrumental and vocal
courage as the group harmonizes to nebulous, arrhythmic tunes that speak volumes in
their animated silences, and that frequently
demand a closer listen, inviting the ear to fall
headlong into an abyss of unknown, rarefied
musical beauty. — Matt Hanson
Ramzi
Houti Kush
(1080p)
Electronic music is exceptionally difficult
for an artist to revolutionize. Vast resources
46
UNDER REVIEW made available by computer software have
made it difficult for electronic artists to stand
out amidst similar-minded musicians. The
task to create original music is even more difficult when an artist's sub genre is defined by
terms like ambient, experimental, or house.
However, it is a lot easier to make bad electronic music, and Houti Kush marks a clear
distinction between itself and the ocean of
mixes on the internet.
Montreal native and Vancouver transfer,
Phoebe Guillemot, or Ramzi, seems determined to explore the capability for unlikely
sounds to layer into dynamic music. As
experimentation, Houti Kush has a uniqueness exemplified by its ever changing tone.
At times Houti Kush is upbeat house, other
times transforming into background ambiance. Slipping by serenely, Houti Kush seems
to slow down and speed up through different
tracks. This time distorting effect heightens
the psychedelic escape of the album, which
is further highlighted by the album's artwork,
designed by Ramzi herself.
Like the bizarre cover art, the title Houti
Kush reveals Ramzi's own vision of the
album's otherworldly presence. Not only an
attempt at recreating East Asian ambiance,
the album's name suggests a view on the
physical realm containing Ramzi's music.
Further evidence for Ramzi's intention to create a sci-fi soundscape is found in her song
titles: "land of kush," "houti kindom" and
"ramzi prophecy" iterate Ramzi's intention to
create a unique terrain.
It is difficult to single out the best tracks as
most flow slowly into one another. However,
certain tracks are more stimulating, "ramzi
prophecy" opens the album with distorted
vocal samples and hypnotic melodies that
set the album's tone. Tcha-moun" is incredibly vibrant, disrupting the album's generally
tranquil melodies, "houti kindom" bookends
the album with pastoral beats, while "land of
kush" is surely the album's best track with the
album's darkest tone. With gradual build up
"land of kush" produces an eventual dance
beat that feels indescribable even among the
rest of the album.
Houti Kush is by no means conventional. Like the smoky basement conjured by
its elaborate soundscape, Kush would most
likely be either loathed or adored depending
on the listener's disposition and interest in
experimental, electronic subgenres. Despite
this fact, Ramzi has produced an undeniably
interesting sound that would provide a unique
experience to any listener. — Kenny Drabble
Teen Daze
Morning World
(Paper Bag)
Abbotsford's Teen Daze has brought us
yet another mystical concoction with their
latest release Morning World. An album that
will soothe your soul and awaken your mind to
the world around you, Morning Worldlaps into
broad philosophical topics and hypnotizes
listeners with its relaxing rhythms. Appropriately titled, Morning World has a big picture
view to it, reminiscent of a mountain's grandeur. It's a humbling feeling, one that reminds
us that despite any banalities in our lives, the
sun will always rise.
A large variety of instruments are used to
create a sound that is peaceful and rejuvenating. The opening track, "Valley of Gardens"
has an orchestral opening to it, which picks up
midway through the song with eclectic drum
beats. The cello has a prominent role on a few
songs, luring in listeners with the instrument's
UNDER REVIEW
47 obscurity. While no single instrument dominates the album, the combination of sounds is
what makes the album so musically endearing. Instrumental, rather than lyrics, give
Morning World its substance.
Morning World is stunningly poetic, lyrically speaking. However, those lyrics are hardly
prolific. Most of the songs on the album have
limited vocals. However, the vocals that are
present leave a lasting mark. Teen Daze's
lyrics would read superbly on their own as
poems or lullabies. The enchantment of the
natural world and its healing capacities is
a topic that is heavily explored. With lines
such as "We can see past those trees / That
go on forever," and "Where does life go when
it's done / A moon replaces morning sun,"
Teen Daze draws on the beauty of nature as
inspiration. The track "Post Storm" serves to
cleanse the auditory palette of listeners by
allowing them to drift off into its misty sounds
and get lost in their thoughts while listening.
Morning World is an album that encourages self-reflection and appreciation of the
little things in life. Teen Daze takes a refreshing perspective and reminds us that the forces
of nature will always be the strongest, so we
needn't dwell on the mundane. — Alex Lenz
Thee Ahs
Names
(Kingfisher Bluez)
It is generally understood that bands write
music from a reflective place and infuse per
sonal experience into their lyrics. It is equally
common to have singers and songwriters use
the actual name of the person for whom their
affection or disdain is dedicated to. What Thee
Ahs have done on their latest record is shred
any attempt of subtlety in the matter and blatantly call out people, including an ex band
member.
Names is the title of the fourth full length
album, and as its name implies is simply a
musical journey through the band's diary. While
we may not know a person named Olga, or Jaci,
or even Artemis, we can all certainly relate to a
person like Olga, or any of the other nine characters featured on the album. Thee Ahs are
taking a slightly more serious approach to the
stories, and the Vancouver foursome are using
their black bubble gum magic to write songs
that everyone can relate to. It is this intimacy
which not only attests to the band's maturity
and development, but makes for some of their
best material to date. Highlights are a-plenty
both lyrically and sonically. While the lyrics are
a shade darker, Thee Ahs' sense of humour still
shines through. "I think it'd be fun if I never saw
you in the flesh again" is the general sentiment
towards "Davie." While we may feel for him,
"Mareesa" (band member?) and "Olga" seem
like legit cool folks.
Then there is "Andrew", whose dedication
is one of the more aurally stimulating tunes on
the record featuring deep and smooth vocals
from Thee Ahs' multi-instrumentalist Dan On.
Consequently, a tribute of sorts to their old
bandmate, "Ridley" Bishop, provides a touching moment when Davinah Shell's vocals
repeat the sentiment "I have named chords
after you." Listening to Names, one gets the
feeling of being invited into a Thee Ahs phone
conversation about love lost and love won,
which in many ways is identical to our own ebb
and flow.
On another note, add Names to the ever
expanding list of indie-pop records that are
destined to be classics and in some way involve
Jay Arner, who seems to have the Midas touch
these days. — Slavko Bucifal
48
UNDER REVIEW COMFORT IN CONTRADICTION
words by Esmee Cotbourne // illustrations by Eva Dominelli
"I wish I could hear
what it sounds like
for the first time."
"I like the idea of creating a
unique feeling by mixing and matching lyrics, sounds, visuals etc —
like mixing colours together," begins
Dralms' Christopher Smith. .
Dralms project members: Smith,
Peter Carruthers, Shaunn Thomas
Watt and William Kendrick, create artistic emotional juxtaposition
by subverting one idea to create a
musical landscape. They do this by
evolving through a song, contrasting and layering dark emotions with
rhythmic pop music. Already in
Europe and about to start his tour,
Smith ducked into an alley and we
connected over the phone about
the thought put into Shook, their
debut album; its binary aesthetic,
and their hiatus from the Vancouver music scene.
Shook, an album built on anxieties and the emotional brights and
darks of living, has been finished for
quite some time. Because of Smith's
writing style — collecting songs over
a long period of time — some of the
intensely personal material has
been stewing for a while. Despite
the length of time it took to produce
and release the album, and Dralms*
sonic evolution, Shook still has a
form of coherence and consistency
throughout. "I wish I could hear
what it sounds like for the first time.
I don't know what somebody hears
when they listen to it," says Smith.
This vibrant, changing sound is
partially through Smith's interesting lyrics, the result of significant
amounts of thought. Most songs
are written long before they are
ever recorded, and Smith definitely
feels Shook is long overdue. Consequently, Shook has become a body
of work reflecting different times and
DRALMS
49 different forms of experimentation.
Natural born lover, fucking cock
sucker /   There's  romance  in  the
phrase, like a dissonant chord
—from "Divisions of Labour "
Like most artists writing to
"organise and articulate" over a long
period of time, being journalistically
compelled and obligated to tell stories is an important part of developing lyrics. Smith, expressed through
many of the songs on the album,
takes comfort in contradiction. The
writing and music has definitely not
been sacrificed for impact. Identifying the current project as pop music,
Smith isn't catering to genre, or following somebody's lead. Dralms'
subversive themes are balanced and
are consistent through to the core.
"The key is being honest and writing
with integrity, and I think the rest
comes after, and inevitably comes
the sound," explains Smith.
"You are locked into these captured moments pf your life, you have
to stand behind, and let them represent you...I think about that a
lot right now because I'm obligated
to present myself and my work...
the responsibility of making art is
explaining yourself and living with
it forever."
The name change from Christopher Smith to Dralms was a conscious decision to help the explanation of his writing and the band's
new album. Dralms has gravitated
towards a new sound and in the
process, developed a disconnect
between the solo record and the
sound of live shows; culminating
in the creation of this new project.
Currently, Dralms, Shook, and their
live music are a cohesive unit, with
the lyrics and themes emanating
from Smith's ideas and concerns.
Smith expands, "I didn't want
to take something that has a message attached to it or that was in
vogue in some way... I just wanted
something aesthetic and surface
for the name. A word that sounded
like the music. I guess its objective
is relative to the individual. That's
how it came about, just going over
hundreds and hundreds of words
and names, and ending up on this
modified word 'dralms'. I feel like it
sounds like halfway between drugs
and the name of a classical music
composer."
Music is the medium that consumes Smith at the moment, but he
is also keen to take the opportunity to express himself through the
visuals associated within the periphery of music by directing two of
his recent music videos. The video
for "Pillars and Pyre" is full of emotionally provocative imagery, for
instance, a black metal drummer
drumming in slow motion throughout the song. Smith describes this
figure as "a character in plight, kicking against a world or system they
are trapped in." While also subtlety
alluding connections between the
church and state, it was never
Smith's intent to make a statement
so much as present a sentiment.
"The harshness of a black metal
drummer set against fairly soft, and
mellow music, parallels the use of
darker, maybe also harsh lyrics."
Dralms has been noticeably
absent from the Vancouver music
community over the past few years,
but don't let this fool you into thinking they aren't making music or performing. In fact, the next couple of
months are packed with European
50
DRALMS  tour dates. "I think that we've played
more shows in Europe in the last
year than we've played anywhere
else, period. Things are just working
out for us over there," says Smith.
He isn't jaded though, and his distance isn't because of negative
experience. Instead, the band has
been exploring new cities with positive responses to Dralms. Paris, Til-
berg and Berlin rank among their
favourite cities, cities that also demonstrate less resistance to experimental styles and produce festivals
celebrating alternative genres of
music.
Shook sounds like late night
thoughts and the moves you make
when you think nobody is watching.
Smith's emotive lyrics, dark aesthetic and imagery is moving. Ultimately, Dralms whispers to the soul,
whether you like it or not.
Shook is out October 2nd. Catch
Dralms9 album release party October
9th at Index Gallery.
52
DRALMS VANCOUVER ART/BOOK FAIR
SHELF LIFE
words by Keagan Perlette
illustrations by Danielle Jette
In its essence, publication is the
process of creating a public— a community who witness a work. This
idea comes from Matthew Stadler,
co-founder of Publication Studio in
Portland, who believes that beyond
the physical manifestation of a book,
the art of publishing encompasses
the building of a community around
that book. The annual Vancouver
Art/Book Fair showcases publications that are themselves 'acts' of
publication — the cultivation of a
public based on Vancouver art bookmakers and the people who enjoy
them.
Tracy Stefanucci, founder and
director of Project Space, the nonprofit that organizes the Vancouver Art/Book Fair, holds this ideology close to her heart. "When we
started Project Space we were inter
ested in the intersection of communities around making books and
publication in general as a practice. Often that involves visual arts
and graphic design, and the literary community. We really wanted to
become a kind of hub for those communities to intermingle and look out
for each other's work, and support
the creation of work — to become an
access point for making a stronger
overall art publishing community in
Vancouver."
In it's fourth year, VA/BF will
be held at the Vancouver Art Gallery from October 17-18 and features exhibits, reading rooms, performances, talks and installations
from over one-hundred art book creators. Local publishers like Moniker
Press, Print Ready and KIOSK will
be exhibiting alongside national and
international publishers. Among the
presenters are Shauba Chang with
Waterfall and Not Today from Taipei; Jp King with Paper Pusher from
Toronto; and Kelvin Soh with DD/
MM/YY and Le Roy magazine from
SHELF LIFE
53 Auckland.
VA/BF is modelled after events
like the New York Art Book Fair and
Broken Pencil's Canzine in Toronto
and Canzine West in Vancouver.
Back in 2006, when Project Space
operated as one cool word magazine,
Stefanucci and the publication's
co-founder Ken Yong attended Can-
zineWest. Stefanucci and one cool
word magazine co-founder Ken Yong
attended Canzine West in 2006. The
event failed to return to Vancouver the following year, and in 2010
Stefanucci approached Broken Pencil founder and editor Hal Niedzviecki
offering to help bring the event back.
While Canzine returned to the West
Coast, Stefanucci still felt there was
a gap in the type of publishing she
wanted showcased. Inspired largely
by the emphasis on art and design
brought to one cool word by the publication's art director Jaz Halloran,
who helped to relaunch the publication as OCW Magazine, Stefanucci
decided to create VA/BF as an event
specifically for art books.
Project Space is also organizing the annual Artists' Books Week,
an extension of the fair occurring
the week of VA/BF in collaboration
with galleries and publishing spaces
across Vancouver. "We started ABW
to help people and organizations
around Vancouver take advantage of
all of the attention to art publishing
that VA/BF stirs up. It is a chance
for everyone to showcase their own
spaces and work," says Stefanucci.
ABW will allow the excitement of
VA/BF to spill over into the city at
large, giving people the opportunity
to see what the local indie publishing scene has to offer.
> Stefanucci perceives publication
as an art: "There's a lot of a different
ways you can explore publication —
it's not always print." She continues:
"It can also be affordable and accessible, especially when you're making
zines; it can be a really good way to
share work. I also really like the different ways artists work with the
idea of publication." For Stefanucci,
print media is a building block for
community in ways that digital publishing is not: "It's a very isolating
experience to do something online,"
she says, "especially because publication is all about connections
between humans, their ideas, their
experiences, and what they are
working on."
In past years, VA/BF has successfully created the kind of community that is the true goal of publication for Project Space. "My favourite thing is always the connections I
make with people, and sharing and
nerding out about this kind of work.
We can get inspired about it and
share our ideas — that's the heart of
it," Stefanucci reflects. "People enjoy
interacting with publishers and artists, but also the publishers and artists enjoy interacting with the public. Artists really want to chat about
their work. It's really not a market-driven activity. People are creating this work because they are
excited about it. So, when someone
asks about your little obscure project you are like 'Oh my god, I have
someone to share this with!'"
Project Space's Vancouver Art/
Book Fair will be at the Vancouver
Art Gallery Oct 16 to 18, 2015. For
more information visit vancouverart-
bookfair.com, or visit prqjectspace.ca
to learn how to get involved.
54
SHELF LIFE  RADIO FREETHINKER
ON THE AIR
words by Gary Jarvis
illustrations by Alison Sadler
The CiTR show Radio Freethinker has been challenging commonly-held views since the 'nought-
ies'. It is a show about scepticism,
first airing in March 2009. Over the
years hosts have included students
of history, psychology and neurosci-
ence. The current host of the sceptical hour is Don McLenaghen, a
UBC grad of Philosophy and Political Science, and consultant for
Microsoft. I started this interview
stating a common definition of scepticism — "Scepticism is the questioning of traditionally held beliefs
and statements."
DON, YOU ADVOCATE FOR SCEPTICISM ON RADIO FREETHINKER.
WHAT ARE THE CHALLENGES IN
CREATING A SHOW BASED ON
SCEPTICISM?
Scepticism, as it is practiced on
the show is not so much a thing, but
a process. I would say RFT attempts
to use scientific scepticism as an
approach to a variety of subjects.
Scientific Scepticism is three parts;
firstly, the use of empirical data as a
foundation of opinion; secondly, the
adherence to the scientific method,
that is making a hypothesis, seeing if there is a real world test of
that hypothesis and adjusting your
opinions based on this mythology,
which is constantly evolving; and
lastly, following the evidence. If I
think that black shirts in summer
cool you down, but study after study
shows they make you hotter, then I
will change my opinion. The only
crime on RFT is dogma. On our website it says 'scepticism is about the
search for knowledge and a process
of applying critical thinking, reason, and reality to a given matter.'
A sceptic is someone who applies
vigorous and systematic research to
any claim, regardless of its political,
religious, or social implications.
56
ON THE AIR -
Breast
Cancer.
US
■ ■
not just a disease
of older women
Shanna (Shan) Larsen was only 24
when she lost her life to
breast cancer
<,
visit or contact us at      *    0
teamshan.ca
facebook.com/team.shan.ca
@TeamShan -v^^
Jm   *"
>X
I       %
\wfi
*;./■■
si ■     ^:..v..:::w:::^S:'':"':;::';: >*&&.
^
1      ' ■..■.-   ■-,
58
ON THE AIR IN THE INTRODUCTION TO YOUR
SHOW YOU DESCRIBE YOURSELF AS A SCEPTICAL PHILOSOPHER AND A POLITICAL SCIENTIST. WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE
BOTH OF THESE?
I am modifying both. It's not that I
am on the one hand a sceptical philosopher and on the other a political
scientist. But, I am both a sceptical
philosopher and a sceptical political scientist. Often people think
that scepticism should be limited to
the hard sciences of physics, chemistry and the like where you can
achieve black and white unequivocal answers, such as gravity existing
full stop. One of the goals of RFT is
to show that you can use scientific
scepticism beyond science, that you
can apply it to the social sciences
as well. You may not get answers
that are as firm as with the harder
sciences, but you can find better
answers so that as our knowledge
grows. We can reject unhelpful,
discredited and/or ineffective attitudes and assumptions; often these
rejects are the foundation of bigotry
and inequality.
HOW DO YQU SELECT CONTENT
FOR THE SHOW?
There's various content. First
a segment called Crytid Corner,
where I discuss various 'undiscovered' creatures. Think Bigfoot. What
are they supposed to be, what evidence is there and how likely is it
they really exist? Second, let's call
it, A Sense of Science, in which I
explain some of the fundamentals
of science, like how magnets work.
Another source of content are thematic shows.  I have done shows
focused on climate change inspired
by topics like the Intergovernmental
Panel on Climate Change report to
the United Nations. And lastly, news
stories such as the death of Alan
Kurdi. If it is a hot topic, there is
a RFT angle or if I think there is a
public interest angle it will become
a segment.
WHAT DO YOU HOPE LISTENERS WILL TAKE AWAY FROM THE
SHOW?
Firstly, an alternative view of the
news. People do not always understand the value of independent
alternative media like CiTR or Discorder. RFT provides an alternative to main stream media. I also
hope [listeners] gain the tools to
think for themselves. Sure I have
opinions about subjects and will
present their cases, but I would
be so disappointed if people just
agreed because I said so. Being able
to think critically is important to
everything you do every day. Lastly,
I hope people learn a thing or two.
Life is learning, and every day that
I can say I learned something new
is a good day. I hope to be at least
one source of knowledge in people's
lives.
X
Radio. Freethinker airs Tuesdays 3-4pm You can also listen
to past shows and download pod-
casts at www.radkfreethinker.com.
Previous shows include the aforementioned Alan Kurdi Edition from
early September.
ON THE AIR
59 PICASSO SET TAKE ONE MILLION AND THREE
DISCORDER REVISITED
words by Erica Leiren
illustrations by Rachel Lin
Joyfully obsessed with super
heroes, cartoon characters and
girls, Picasso Set were Vancouver's
late 80's answer to The Undertones
and the Monkees with a mod twist
that made them truly original.
Mod style and music have reverberated through generations, and
back and forth between continents.
The Picasso Set were linked to the
resurgent 80's mod scene sparked
by the movie Quadrophenia; the
band's audience included Vancouver's young Vespa-riding contingent. At shows the parking lot was
usually crowded with Italian scooters. At gigs, their front row was typically populated by a very happen
ing set of high school and university
students in parkas and sunglasses.
The rude girls, sporting Vidal-Sas-
soon-sleek bobs, mini skirts and
their boyfriends' sweaters, all
danced together. The rude boys wore
turtlenecks, sweaters and chinos or
white jeans with desert boots — or
the tightest, narrowest, most stylish suits, shirts and ties they could
scrounge from their parents' back
closets. Virtually unobtainable pork
pie hats were the preferred topping.
Crushed in a stylish herd at the
front of the dance floor and executing the syncopated, yet restrained
dance moves that marked the genre,
all faces would be raised to the foursome on stage: lead singer/guitarist David Lea-Smith, bass player
Patrick Carroll, keyboardist-a-rama
Jonathan Wong, and drummer
Doug McBride (followed by Ian
Noble, and later Darren Uyeno). Lea-
60
DISCORDER REVISITED Smith's scooter was always parked
outside for a double-quick getaway
— vrooom!
Mods loved the old Brit bands,
classic American soul and girl-
groups. A dose of new blood flowed
in via contemporary UK acts like The
Jam, The Chords, Purple Hearts,
Merton Parkas, Lambrettas and the
two-tone ska bands. Picasso Set
were local faves, along with Evaporators, Smugglers, The Wee Beasties,
One-Eyed Jacks, Seattle's Young
Fresh Fellows, and Montreal's gar-
age-y Gruesomes, to name a few.
British love of hierarchy dictated
a ranking within the original mod
scene, with status rising from 'numbers' (regular audience members or
hoi polloi) to 'tickets' (more influential members of the scene), 'faces'
(all that and good-looking too), and
'ace faces' (the best looking, best-
dressed and coolest of the cool style
leaders).
My first time seeing Picasso Set
was their gig at the old West Van Rec
Centre. My 10-year-younger sister,
Nicole rode along with the Vespas,
and she told me about it. I had my
own band — The Hip Type who at
that time were pretty popular, and
these younger kids were out of my
usual sphere. It was part of the festivities planned for the big Vancouver Island Scooter Run that she and
her mod friends rode to every year.
Lea-Smith recalls that this was one
of at least two shows they played
that were put on by their friend, the
exuberant teenage promoter and
music enthusiast, Nardwuar the
Human Serviette. Province music
writer Tom Harrison, an avid supporter of local bands, also promoted
Picasso Set in his New Alternatives
14 showcase at the Commodore.
So I came to the gig as an outsider
and I was impressed. The crowd was
wild for the band and as I watched
from the back of the packed rec centre ballroom, I was struck by the
energetic, stylish crowd, full of fun
and high spirits, and very young. I
think it was an all-ages gig at a time
when they were rare. There was an
aura of white light around the stage,
and at the very centre of it was lead
singer Lea-Smith in a white leather
jacket. An 'ace face' if ever I saw one,
though he'd be too modest to agree.
Picasso Set charted at CiTR with
two songs — "The Somebody Girl" off
their 1989 cassette release Yummy
featured Lea-Smith's charming voice
and playful lyrics, and had every girl
around town wondering if she might
be his 'Somebody Girl':
You're an Eastern Fashion Baby,
Dreaming of Christian and Yves,
But I just dream about you,
And all the groovy things you say
to me.
Picasso Set's other big hit was
"Kitten with a Whip," evoking the
1964 Ann-Margret movie. This song
had a long life and was recorded
again by Infradig, a Scandinavian-inflected band/performance art
project Lea-Smith later joined.
Picasso Set had its heyday from
1988-92 and then morphed into
a new band called Motorcycle,
wherein the great song-writing duo
of Lea-Smith and Jon Brotherton (
Cannon Heath Down) produced a
whole new set of pensive, rifify and
soulful tunes, including the lovely
"Sundial." I will write more on that
later...
DISCORDER REVISITED
61 I ^
noiruic
r
REWINDING HOUSE MUSIC
words by Alex Lenz II illustrations by Karl Ventura
photos by Tara Bigdeli
"You'll only know
after the fact, when
the EDM wave is
dead and considered
unfashionable by
the very people who
embraced it, whether
it really did trickle
down or whether it
confused things and
ended up getting more
people involved in the
cheesy side of it"
Luke McKeehan is certainly no
stranger to Vancouver's volatile
music scene. As the owner and creator of Nordic Trax, an independent
house music label based out of Vancouver, Luke has managed to create his own brand of house music
that expands beyond our 49th parallel. Nordic Trax was created back
in 1997 and has since put out over
80 releases, featuring a cross-continental lineup that spans from Canada to Europe. The label also throws
shows at various venues in the city
that are frankly, some of the best
places to shamelessly dance your ass
off. Luke has consistently upheld his
beliefs and has maintained a successful, independent label for eighteen years, a feat that is impressive by
any standards.
"I'm lucky enough to have survived the music industry and all of
its trials and tribulations. So now in
62
NORDIC TRAX
L terms of my future goals, I'm focusing more and more down on what I'm
into and not being involved with stuff
that I don't really dig. And that's a
nice privilege to have."
Born and raised in the heart of
Toronto, Luke's interest in house
music grew out of his surroundings.
The Toronto club scene in the eighties was a breeding ground for house
and rap music, and those genres
stuck with Luke into his adulthood.
While attending Queens University
Luke worked as a DJ, finally ending
up in Vancouver after a year as a ski
bum in Whistler.
Luke's initial involvement in Vancouver's house scene was through
partnerships with two musically-focused clubs that were popular in the
late 90s and early 2000s, Sonar and
Chameleon. These clubs cornered
the market for live music and dj sets,
offering underground dj programming on the weekends — a concept
that, at the time, was foreign to Vancouver with most club owners keeping weekend nights for themselves
and only letting indie promoters
fight for weekday scraps. Vancouver became a blank canvas for club
promoters and house music was the
ideal medium.
"A lot of people producing music
in Vancouver in the mid to late 90s
were actually people from the East
Coast who just saw the opportunity here. Toronto and Montreal had
bumping club scenes and it just
wasn't quite happening here on that
level. It wasn't that people weren't
up for it — it was just that the club
owners were kind of conservative.
But some of us saw it as an opportunity, like why aren't people doing
this?"
House music has evolved rapidly
and significantly over time. Particularly with the advancement of technology, the barriers to entry for those
seeking to make music are lower than
ever. Contemporary house music
encompasses a very broad range of
sub-genres, some of which are less
than sophisticated. The throngs of
teens who go nuts over Calvin Harris
and the absolute insanity of mainstream EDM festivals like Tomor-
rowland or Veld have diluted house
music's overall cultivation. Whether
or not this is beneficial for an old-
school, independent label like Nordic
Trax remains an area of contention.
"Since the disco era, there haven't
been this many people in the general public listening to dance music.
And that's an ongoing argument — is
this an entry level or is this bad for
NORDIC TRAX
63 h%^
\ f     ^ I      ■    ■
^1-
?11
N-K^ =_:l -vri-'w
*  -^ ■      11-                      ■ • i      m
"        '                         I1I.^N mm.,    ,    ..,,                                         V
.     ^lj. ^^fc^.^^J
K>CL   *    "    °     "Ti
.<■»
N/".-:?.J {.
>   i  ii the scene? You'll only know after the
fact, when the EDM wave is dead and
considered unfashionable by the very
people who embraced it, whether it
really did trickle down or whether it
confused things and ended up getting more people involved in the
cheesy side of it."
Corporate control in the music
industry is one of the biggest challenges facing artists and producers
in the modern day. 'Coca-Cola Syndrome' gave a nice slap in the face
to the industry, and with the rising
age of file sharing and higher ticket
prices, the difficulties independent
labels face in order to survive corporate takeover have exacerbated. Luke
credits his success to his long-standing and positive relationships with
venues and producers in the city.
"Music was the first of the media
to get slaughtered by the internet.
Thankfully dance music was already
selling on the internet and adapting
to technology, and we still sold vinyl.
So we didn't get killed as quickly
as mainstream music at the start,
when, say, Napster came along...
That changed what the consumer got
to hear because it was being driven
by a bunch of guys in suits in boardrooms in Beverly Hills, literally."
Luke's business model is based
around making sophisticated house
music for a niche market. What he
likes, he makes. "Resisting corporate greed — everyone has to be presented with that. You can work with
these big companies, but to what
level? How much of our scene do they
have to own? That is difficult, trying
to balance the art and the business
side... Why do you think so much
pop music is still marketed with total
tits and ass? I don't need a girl in a
bikini to promote my song. But for
some other people in the music business, successful people in the music
business, no less, that's the absolute way you do it. You do it that way,
and then you spend a million dollars
marketing that you just did it that
way."
Nordic Trax offers a handful
of their releases on vinyl, but the
majority of their sales are through
digital formats. The label employs
freelancers from around the world,
and Luke now spends a portion of
his time in Valencia, Spain, allowing
Nordic Trax to tap into the large
European house music scene.
Nordic Trax's next show will feature Chicago DJ Mark Farina at the
Imperial on October 23.
NORDIC TRAX
65 CITR 101.9 FM PROGRAM GUIDE
DISCORDER RECOMMENDS LISTENING TO CITR ONLINE AT CITR.CA EVERY DAY
6:00-
7:00'"
8:00-
9:00-
10:00-
11:00-
12:00	
1:00- •
2:00"
3:00-
4:00-
5:00-
6:00-
7:00-
8:00-
9:00-
10:00"
11:00-
12:00-
1:00-
CITR GHOST
MIX
BREAKFAST
WITH
THE
BROWNS
LANGUAGE
TO
LANGUAGE
SYNCHRONICS
PACIFIC
PICKIN'
MOON
GROK
I    SUBURBAN
QUEER FM JUNGLE
VANCOUVER: I
RELOADED    I
PARTS
UNKNOWN
I ROCKET FROM
RUSSIA
MORNING
AFTER SHOW
SHINEON
POP DRONES
THE SHAKE-   f
SPEARESHOWl
iJTHEPERMA-ii
I DOWN THE | ^^a..^ i
s     RABBIT     ! NENT RAIN :
HOLE RADI°     !
CITR GHOST
MIX
MOONGROK
THE
COMMUNITY
; LIVING SHOW
A FACE FOR
RADIO
TRANSITION   |
STATE
I    DUNCAN'S
DONUTS
MOON I MOON
GROK   I GROK
CITR GHOST
MIX
UBC INSIDERS
THE SECTOR
MOONGROK
THE CATS
PAJAMS
CITR GHOST
MIX
MOONGROK
THE
SATURDAY
EDGE
CITR GHOST
MIX
I BEPI CRESPAN ;
I   PRESENTS...
CLASSICAL
CHAOS
SHOOK-
SHOOKTA
DAVE RADIO     GENERATION  !
WITH RADIO    ANNIHILATION!
DAVE
FEMCONCEPl^|X
i; STUDENT SPE-f
CIAL HOUR      jjEXTRAENVIRONMEN-
THE BURROW
LITTLE BIT OF
SOUL
THE LEO      '
RAMIREZ
SHOW
SOULSHIP
ENTERPRISE
EXPLODING
HEAP MOVIES
THE JAZZ
SHOW
RADIO FREE
THINKER
KEW IT UP
MUSAKFOR
i THEOBSERVANT
ASTROTALK
RADIO ZERO   !
POWERCHORD!
THE
ROCKERS
SHOW
VIBES & STUFF:   ASIAN WAVE
THUNDERBIRDEYE
! SOUL
SANDWICH
DISCORDER
RADIO
FLEX YOUR
HEAD
INSIDE OUT
ARTS REPORT I     SIMORGH
SHARING SCIENCE
|    sam     j INNER
iiSQUANTCH'S j: SPACE
:: HIDEAWAY  I
y^pg         ,,.,....^.,„.,.,..i
YOU     ^ PEANUT ]
AWARE j BUTTER  j
ji 'N'JAMS I
1   FOLK OASIS
THE    ^  NEW
SPICE  ;   NhW
OF LIFE ._..
CRIMES &
TREASONS
NOD ON THE
LIST
THE SCREEN
GIRLS
I    LIVE FROM
4THUNDERBIRD!
!   RADIO HELL
NARDWUAR
PRESENTS
NEWS 101
STRANDED
AFRICAN
RHYTHMS
SKALDS HALL
| BLOOD 1
i     ON     I
I     | a      !    THE    I
CODE BLUE     F|ESTA SADDLE
MANTRA
CHTHONIC
BOOM!
(NASHAVOLNA
CRESCENDO
ALL EARS
MORE THAN
HUMAN
MOON GROK I   ,ndia    ; PR0GRES
CANADA
POST ROCK
WHITE NOISE |  COPY/PASTE
ITHE MEDICINE!
SHOW
SYNAPTIC
SANDWICH
RANDO-
PHONIC
BOOTLEGS &
B-SIDES
TRANCEN-
DANCE
G4E
2:00-
3:00-
4:00"
CITR
GHOST
MIX
CITR
GHOST
MIX
AURAL TENTACLES
THE
LATE NIGHT
CITR
GHOST
MIX
CITR
GHOST
MIX
SHOW
THE ABSOLUTE
VALUE OF
INSOMNIA
5:00"
6:00	 DIFFICULT
Bepi Crespan Presents... SUN 7am
Bepi Crespan Presents... CiTR's 24 Hours Of Radio Art in a
snack size format! Difficult music, harsh electronics, spoken word, cut-up/collage and general Crespan© weirdness.
Twitter @bepicrespan. Blog: bepicrespan.blogspot.ca
.
Classical Chaos SUN 9am
From the Ancient World to the 21st century, join host
Marguerite in exploring and celebrating classical music
from around the world.
AstroTalk THU 3pm
Space is an interesting place. Marco slices up the night
sky with a new topic every week. Death Stars, Black Holes,
Big Bangs, Red Giants, the Milky Way, G-Bands, Syzygy's,
Pulsars, Super Stars...
The Sector FRI 8am
Discussing the world of social justice, non-profits, charities
and activism. Join Ethan for in-depth interviews, examinations of nonprofit missions and causes, and discussions of
everything from philanthropy to progressive politics.
Synchronicity MON 12pm
Join host Marie B and discuss spirituality, health and feeling good. Tune in and tap into good vibrations that help you
remember why you're here: to have fun!
News 101 FRI 5pm
Vancouver's only live, volunteer-produced, student and
community newscast. Every week, we take a look back at
the week's local, national and international news, as seen
from a fully independent media perspective.
Queer FM Vancouver: Reloaded TUE 8am
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transexual communities of Vancouver. Lots of human interest features,
background on current issues and great music.queerfm-
radio@gmail.com
Radio Free Thinker TUE 3pm
Promoting skepticism, critical thinking and science, we examine popular extraordinary claims and subject them to
critical analysis.
Cited! WED 11:30am
This is a radio program about how our world is being
shaped by the ideas of the ivory tower. Sometimes, in troubling ways. Formerly "The Terry Project" on CiTR.
All Ears MON 6pm
(Alternating with UBC Arts On Air.) All Ears is an advice radio program targetted to the UBC community. We try to answer your questions and address topics sent via social media and over the phone. Interviews and segments relating
to campus life will be featured, all in our attempt to better
our community and supply positive feedback.
Extraenvironmentalist WED 2pm
Exploring the mindset of an outsider looking in on Earth.
Featuring interviews with leading thinkers in the area of
sustainable economics and our global ecological crisis.
Arts Report WED 5pm
Reviews, interviews and coverage of local arts (film, theatre,
dance, visual and performance art, comedy, and more) by
host Jake Costello and the Arts Reporters.
UBC Arts On Air Alternating Wednesdays 6pm
Ira Nadel, UBC English, offers scintillating profiles and unusual interviews with members of UBC Arts world. Tune in
for programs, people and personalities in Art
The Community Living Show THU 9am
This show is produced by the disabled community and
showcases special guests and artists. The focus is for a
positive outlook on programs and events for the entire community. Originally called "The Self Advocates", from Co-Op
Radio CFRO, the show began in the 1990s We showcase
BC Self Advocates with lots of interviews from people with
special needs. Tune in for interesting music, interviews and
some fun times. This program is syndicated with the NCRA
(National Community and Campus Radio Association)
across BC and across Canada. Hosted by: Kelly Reaburn,
Michael Rubbin Clogs and Friends, communitylivingra-
dio.wordpress.com | communitylivingradio@gmail.com |
Community Living Radio Show | @clivingradio
I #communitylivingradio
New Era Alternating Thursdays 7:30pm
Showcases up and coming artists who are considered
"underdogs" in the music industry. The show will provide
a platform for new artists who are looking to get radio play.
Hip-Hop music from all over the world along with features
of multi-genre artists.
Language to Language MON 11am
Encouraging language fluency and cultural awareness.
White Noise SAT 8pm
Need some comic relief? Join Richard Blackmore for half an
hour of weird and wonderful radio every week, as he delves
in to the most eccentric corners of radio for your listening
pleasure. Then stay tuned for the after show featuring a Q
and A with the creator, actors and a guest comic every week.
whitenoiseUBC@gmail.com
Sharing Science
WED
1 6pm
REGGAE
The Rockers Show
Reggae inna all styles and fashion.
SUN
12pm
ROOTS / FOLK / BLUES
Blood On The Saddle Alternating Sundays 3pm
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-boots country. Pacific Pickin' TUE 6am
Bluegrass, old-time music, and its derivatives with Arthur
and the lovely Andrea Berman. Email: pacificpickin@ya-
hoo.com
Folk Oasis WED 8pm
Two hours of eclectic folk/roots music, with a big emphasis on our local scene. C'mon in! A kumbaya-free zone since
1997.
Email: folkoasis@gmail.com
The Saturday Edge SAT 8am
A personal guide to world and roots music-with African, Latin,
and European music in the first half, followed by Celtic, blues,
songwriters, Cajun, and whatever else fits! Email: steveedge3@
mac.com.
Code Blue SAT 3pm
From backwoods delta low-down slide to urban harp
honks, blues, and blues roots with your hosts Jim, Andy,
and Paul.
Email: codeblue@paulnorton.ca
"soulTr*
Soulship Enterprise SAT 7pm
A thematically oriented blend of classic funk, soul, r&b, jazz,
and afrobeat tunes, The Happy Hour has received great renown as the world's foremost funky, jazzy, soulful, and delightfully awkward radio show hosted by people named
Robert Gorwa and/or Christopher Mylett Gordon Patrick
Hunter 111.
African Rhyhms FRI 7:30pm
Website: www.africanrhythmsradio.com
"""": ' HIP HOP	
Nod on the List TUE 11pm
"Nod On the List is a program featuring new urban and alternative music, sounds of beats, hip hop, dancehall, bass,
interviews, guest hosts and more every Tuesday at 11 pm.
scads_international@yahoo.com
facebook-So Salacious"
Crimes & Treasons TUE 9pm
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill ish. Hosted by
Jamal Steeles, Trinidad Jules & DJ Relly Rels.
Website: http://crimesandtreasons.blogspot.ca.
Email: dj@crimesandtreasons.com.
Vibes & Stuff TUE 4pm
Feeling nostalgic? Vibes and Stuff has you covered bringing you some of the best 90s to early 2000s hip-hop artist all in one segment. All the way from New Jersey and
New York City, DJ Bmatt and DJ Jewels will be bringing
the east coast to the
west coast throughout the show. We will have you reminiscing about the good ol' times with Vibes and Stuff
every Wednesday afternoon from 1:00pm-2:00pm PST.
E-mail: vibesandstuffhiphop@gmail.com
_ __
More Than Human SUN 7pm
Strange and wonderful electronic sounds from the past,
present, and future with host Gareth Moses. Music from
parallel worlds.
Pop Drones WED 10am
Unearthing the depths of contemporary cassette and vinyl underground. Ranging from DIY bedroom pop and garage rock all the way to harsh noise and, of course, drone.
Kew It Up WED 3pm
Fight-or-flight music. Radio essays and travesties: Sonic
Cate(s)chism / half-baked philosophy and criticism.
Experimental, Electronica, Post-Punk, Industrial, Noise :
ad-nauseum
if CAN
La Fiesta Alternating Sundays 3pm
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue, Latin House, and Reggaeton with
your host Gspot DJ.
The Leo Ramirez Show MON 5pm
The best of mix of Latin American music.
Email: leoramirez@canada.com
'ETHIOPIAN-
Shookshookta SUN 10am
A program targeted to Ethiopian people that encourages education and personal development.
ci W
Asian Wave WED 4pm
Tune in to Asian Wave 101 to listen to some of the best music from the Chinese language and Korean music industries, as well the latest news coming from the two entertainment powerhouses of the Asian pop scene. The latest
hits from established artists, rookies only just debuted, independent artists and classic songs from both industries,
can all be heard on Asian Wave 101, as well as commentary, talk and artist spotlights of unsigned Canadian talent.
Only on CiTR 101.9 FM.
R!
NashaVolna SAT 6pm
News, arts, entertainment and music for the Russian community, local and abroad. Website: nashavolna.ca.
Rhythmsindia Alternating Sundays 8pm
Featuring a wide range of music from India, including popular music from
the 1930s to the present; Ghazals and Bhajans, Qawwalis,
pop and regional language numbers.
Simorgh THU 5pm
Simorgh Radio is devoted to the education and literacy
for the Persian speaking communities and those interested in connecting to Persian oral and written literature.
Simorgh takes you through a journey of ecological sustain-
ability evolving within cultural and social literacy. Simorgh the mythological multiplicity of tale-figures, lands-in as
your mythological narrator in the storyland; the contingent
space of beings, connecting Persian peoples within and to
Indigenous peoples.
SACRED
Mantra SAT 5pm
An electic mix of electronic and acoustic beats and layers, chants and medicine song.
Exploring the diversity of the worlds sacred
sounds - traditional, contemporary and futuristic.
Email: mantraradioshow@gmail.com
DJ
Copy/Paste THU 11pm
If it makes you move your feet (or nod your head), it'll be
heard on copy/paste. Tune in every week for a full hour
DJ mix by Autonomy, running the gamut from cloud rap
to new jack techno and everything in between.
Techno Progressive Alternating Sundays 8prn
A mix of the latest house music, tech-house, prog-house
and techno.
Trancendance SUN 10pm
Hosted by DJ Smiley Mike and DJ Caddyshack,
Trancendance has been broadcasting from Vancouver,
B.C. since 2001. We favour Psytrance, Hard Trance and
Epic Trance, but also play Acid Trance, Deep Trance,
Hard Dance and even some Breakbeat. We also love a
good Classic Trance Anthem, especially if it's remixed.
Current influences include Sander van Doom, Gareth
Emery, Nick Sentience, Ovnimoon, Ace Ventura, Save the
Robot, Liquid Soul and Astrix. Older influences include
Union Jack, Carl Cox, Christopher Lawrence, Whoop!
Records, Tidy Trax, Platipus Records and Nukleuz.
Email: djsmileymike @trancendance.net.
Website: www.trancendance.net.
Inside Out TUE 8pm
Radio Zero FRI 2pm
An international mix of super-fresh weekend party jams
from New Wave to foreign electro, baile, Bollywood, and
whatever else. Website: www.radiozero.com
Synaptic Sandwich SAT 9pm
If you like everything from electro/techno/trance/8-
bit music/retro '80s, this is the show for you!
Website: synapticsandwich.net
The Late Night Show FRI 1230am
The Late Night Show features music from the underground Jungle and Drum & Bass scene, which progresses
to Industrial, Noise and Alternative No Beat into the early
morning. Following the music, we then play TZM broadcasts, beginning at 6 a.m.
Inner Space Alternating Wednesdays 6:30pm
Dedicated to underground electronic music, both experimental and dance-oriented. Live DJ sets and guests
throughout.
Bootlegs & B-Sides SUN 9pm
Hosted by Doe Ran, tune in for the finest remixes from soul
to dubstep and ghetto funk to electro swing. Nominated
finalist for 'Canadian college radio show of the year 2012'
Pioneer DJ Stylus Awards. Soundcloud.com/doe-ran and
search "Doe-Ran" on Facebook.
IE
Canada Post-Rock FRI 10pm
Formerly on CKXU, Canada-Post Rock now resides on the
west coast but it's still committed to the best in post-rock,
drone, ambient, experimental, noise and basically anything
your host Pbone can put the word "post" infront of.
Crescendo SUN 6pm
Starting with some serene chill tracks at the beginning and
building to the INSANEST FACE MELTERS OF ALL TIMEEE,
Crescendo will take you on a musical magic carpet ride that
you couldn't imagine in your wildest dreams. Besides overselling his show, Jed will play an eclectic set list that builds
throughout the hour and features both old classics, and all
the greatest new tracks that the hipsters think they know
about before anyone else does.
Dave Radio with Radio Dave FRI 12pm
Your noon-hour guide to what's happening in Music and
Theatre in Vancouver. Lots of tunes and talk.
Discorder Radio TUE 5pm
Discorder Magazine now has its own radio show! Join us to
hear excerpts of interviews, reviews and more!
Duncan's Donuts THU 12pm
Sweet treats from the pop underground. Hosted by Duncan,
sponsored by donuts. http://duncansdonuts.wordpress.
Spice of Life Alternating Thursdays 7:30pm
The spice extends life. The spice expands consciousness. The Spice of Life brings you a variety of Post-Rock,
Shoegaze, Math Rock and anything that else that progresses. Join host Ben Life as he meanders whimsically
through whatever comes to mind on the walk to CITR.
Samsquantch's Hideaway    Alternating Wednesdays 6:30pm
All-Canadian music with a focus on indie-rock/pop.
Email: anitabinder@hotmail.com.
Parts Unknown MON 1pm
An indie pop show since 1999, it's like a marshmallow
sandwich: soft and sweet and best enjoyed when poked
with a stick and held close to a fire.
The Cat's Pajams FRI Ham
The cat's pajamas: a phrase to describe something/someone super awesome or cool. The Cat's Pajams: a super
awesome and cool radio show featuring the latest and
greatest indie pop, rock, lofi and more from Vancouver and
beyond! The Burrow MON 3pm
Noise Rock, Alternative, Post-Rock, with a nice blend of
old 'classics' and newer releases. Interviews and live
performances
The Permanent Rain Radio Alternating Thursdays 1pm
Music-based, pop culture-spanning program with
a focus on the local scene. Join co-hosts Chloe
and Natalie for an hour of lighthearted twin talk
and rad tunes from a variety of artists who have
been featured on our website. What website?
thepermanentrainpress.com
Down the Rabbit Hole Alternating Wednesdays 1pm
The best in indie and alternative music from around Canada,
the UK and everywhere in between! Join Stu as he talks
about new releases and gigs in the area and interviews
some of the hottest acts around!
Muzak for the Observant THU 2pm
A program focusing on the week's highlights from CiTR's
Music Departments Plus: live in-studio performances and
artist interviews!
ECLECTIC
Transition State THU 11 am
High quality music with a special guest interview from the
Pharmaceutical Sciences. Frank discussions and music
that can save the world
Shine On TUE 1pm
An eclectic mix of the latest, greatest tunes from the
Vancouver underground and beyond, connected through
a different theme each week. Join your host Shea every
Tuesday for a groovy musical experience!
Soul Sandwich THU 4pm
A myriad of your favourite music tastes all cooked into one
show. From Hip Hop to Indie rock to African jams, Ola will
play through a whirlwind of different genres, each sandwiched between another. This perfect layering of yummy
goodness will blow your mind. AND, it beats subway.
The Shakespeare Show WED 12pm
Dan Shakespeare is here with music for your ear. Kick back
with gems of the previous years.
Up on the Roof FRI 9am
Friday Mornings got you down? Climb Up On the Roof and
wake up with Robin and Jake! Weekly segments include
improvised crime-noir radio dramas, trivia contents, on-
air calls to Jake's older brother and MORE! We'll be spinning old classics, new favourites, and lots of ultra-fresh local bands!
Breakfast With The Browns MON 8am
Your favourite Brownsters, James and Peter, offer a savoury
blend of the familiar and exotic in a blend of aural delights.
Email: breakfastwiththebrowns@hotmail.com.
Chthonic Boom! SUN 5pm
A show dedicated to playing psychedelic music from parts
of the spectrum (rock, pop, electronic) as well as garage
and noise rock.
The Morning After Show TUE 11:30am
The Morning After Show with Oswaldo Perez every Tuesday
at 11:30a.m. Playing your favourite songs for 13 years. The
morning after what? The morning after whatever you did
last night. Eclectic show with live music, local talent and
music you won't hear anywhere else.
Suburban Jungle WED 8am
Live from the Jungle Room, join radio host Jack Velvet for
an
eclectic mix of music, sound bites, information and inanity.
Email: dj@jackvelvet.net."
Are You Aware Alternating Thursdays 6pm
Celebrating the message behind the music: Profiling music and musicians that take the route of positive action
over apathy.
Peanut Butter 'n* jams Alternating Thursdays 6:30pm
Explore local music and food with your hosts, Brenda and
Jordie. You'll hear interviews and reviews on eats and tunes
from your neighbourhood, and a weekly pairing for your
date calendar.
Live From Thunderbird Radio Hell THU 9pm
Featuring live band(s) every week performing in the CiTR
Lounge. Most are from Vancouver, but sometimes bands from
across the country and around the world.
Aural Tentacles THU 12am
It could be global, trance, spoken word, rock, the unusual
and the weird, or it could be something different. Hosted by
DJ Pierre. Email: auraltentacles@hotmail.com
FemConcept FRI 1pm
Entirely Femcon music as well as spoken word content relevant to women's issues (interviews with campus groups
such as the Women's Center, SASC, etc.). Musical genres
include indie-rock, electronic, punk, with an emphasis on
local and Canadian Artists.
Nardwuar FRI 3:30pm
Join Nardwuar the Human Serviette for Clam Chowder flavoured entertainment. Doot doola doot doo...doot doo!
Email: nardwuar@nardwuar.com
The Medicine Show FRI 11 PM
A variety show, featuring musicians, poets and entertainment industry guests whose material is considered to be therapeutic. We encourage and promote independent original, local live music and art.
Randophonic SAT 11pm
Randophonic is best thought of as an intraversal jukebox
which has no concept of genre, style, political boundaries, or even space-time relevance. But it does know good
sounds from bad. Lately, the program has been focused
on Philip Random's All Vinyl Countdown + Apocalypse (the
1,111 greatest records you probably haven't heard). And
we're not afraid of noise.
Stranded FRI 6pm
Join your host Matthew for a weekly mix of exciting sounds,
past and present, from his Australian homeland. And journey with him as he features fresh tunes and explores the
alternative musical heritage of Canada.
G4E Alternating Tuesdays 12-2am
Vinyl mixes, exclusive local tunes, good vibes from around
the world, a thought and a dream or two. Reggae, House,
Techno, Ambient, Dance Hall, Hip Hop, African, Psychedelic, Noise, Experimental, Eclectic.
Sports Is Fun
THU 3:30pm
Student Special Hour
Students play music.
TUES 2pm
A Face for Radio THU 10am
A show about music with interludes about nothing. From
Punk to Indie Rock and beyond.
Exploding Head Movies MON 7pm
Join gak as he explores music from the movies, tunes from
television and any other cinematic source, along with atmospheric pieces, cutting edge new tracks and strange old
goodies that could be used in a soundtrack to be.
JAZZ
The Jazz Show MON 9pm
Vancouver's longest running prime-time Jazz program.
Hosted by Gavin Walker. Features begin after the theme
and spoken intro at 9pm.
Sept 7: Tonight we celebrate the 85th Birthday of one of
Jazz music's living masters with a classic Sonny Rollins recording called "Newk's Time". Sonny as the sole horn with
a burning rhythm section with the great Philly Joe Jones
on drums!
Sept 14: It's back to school time on The Jazz Show and
by tradition we present the classic Leonard Bernstein recording "What Is Jazz". Musical examples by great Jazz
stars and an analysis of what Jazz is and what it isn't by
Maestro Bernstein.
Sept 21: The "back to school" idea continues with alto saxophone master and narrator Julian "Cannonball" Adderley
giving us a brief overview of the History of Jazz from it's
beginnings to 1960 when this recording was done. Despite
it's age, it is still enlightening and relevant.
Rocket from Russia TUES 10:30am
Hello hello hello! I interview bands and play new, international and local punk rock music. Great Success! PS.
Broadcasted in brokenish English. Hosted by Russian Tim.
Website: http://rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com. Email: rock-
etfrom russiacitr@gmail.com. Facebook: https://www.face-
book.comRocketFromRussia. Twitter http://twitter.com/
tima_tzar.
Generation Annihilation SAT 12pm
On the air since 2002, playing old and new punk on the
non-commercial side of the spectrum. Hosts: Aaron Brown,
Jeff "The Foat" Kraft. Website: generationannihilation.com.
Facebook: facebook.com/generationannihilation..
Power Chord SAT 1pm
Vancouver's longest running metal show. If you're into music that's on the heavier/darker side of the spectrum, then
you'll like it. Sonic assault provided by Geoff, Marcia, and
Andy.
Flex Your Head TUE 6pm
Punk rock and hardcore since 1989. Bands and guests from
:..VK.Wii.^AfVVi:
The Absolute Value of Insomnia SAT 2am
Four solid hours of fresh generative music c/o the Absolute
Value of Noise and its world famous Generator. Ideal for
enhancing your dreams or, if sleep is not on your agenda,
your reveries.
Sept 28: One of the great bands in Jazz History and one
of their finest dates. Drummer Chico Hamilton leads his
Quintet with the great Charles Lloyd on flute and tenor saxophone and Hungarian guitar virtuoso Gabor Szabo and
others. "Passin' Thru" is edgy and creative and fun!
Little Bit of Soul MON 4pm
Old recordings of jazz, swing, big band, blues, oldies and
motown.
IjjramaTpoetry	
Skald's Hall FRI 9pm
Skald's Hall entertains with the spoken word via story
readings, poetry recitals, and drama. Established
and upcoming artists join host Brian MacDonald.
Interested in performing on air? Contact us on Twitter:
@SkaldsJHall. Jhstaowun
vinylrecords
Vancouver
facebook.com/
vinylrecords ca
Wiml
JftuXb.
OPEN 12-6 PM DAILY
321W HASTINGS ST
©VICTORY SQUARE
604.488.1234
CHECK OUT DAVID LOVE JONES' AFRICAN RHYTHMS RADIO
EVERY FRIDAY ON CiTR 101.9FM 7:30-9PM
www.africanrhythmsradio.com
an Rhythms Radio
COME AND CHECK
OUT OUR VAST
SELECTION OF
NEW, USED AND
RARE RECORDS
NIRVANA -
NEVERMIND
-GRUNGE ROCK
AUDIOPHILE
GERMAN ISSUE
180 GRM LP $43.95
KAMA5I WASHINGTON'
THE EPIC
-2015 SPIRITUAL JAZZ
3LP $76.95
MAJOR LAZER-
I PEACE IS THE MISSION
-ELECTRO DANCEHALL
I LP $34.95
NOSAJ THING -
FATED
-2015 IDM DOWNTEMPO
WHITE VINYL
180 GRM LP $34.95
I TOUGH AGE-
I GET THE FEELING
I-2015 INDIE GARAGE
ROCK PINK VINYL
LP* INSERT $26.95
HIATUS KAIYOTE-
I CHOOSE YOUR WEAPON
-2015 NEO SOUL
J DOWNTEMPO
180 GRM 2LP $54.95
BIG SMOKE-
THEVANCOUVER
I CONNECTION VOL 1
-2015 VANCOUVER
i INDIE ROCK
I 150 GRM LP $16.95

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.discorder.1-0200822/manifest

Comment

Related Items