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■   ■    ■     :.    ■-
*- >;:-:>    ..   "          -     "■ -■ :     ' UPCOMING SHOWS
H
ooooooo
254 East Hastings Street
604.681.8915
ANDREW JACKSON JIHAD the smith
STREET BAND, JEFF ROSENSTOCK, CHUMPED
1
SUICIDE GIRLS
BLACKHEART BURLESQUE
WISHBONE ASH
THREE WOLF MOON
VANCOUVER WACKEN METAL BATTLE
I FINALS
THE REAL MCKENZIES
THE ISOTOPES, A TOTAL DISAPPOINTMENT
1
1
Additional show listings, ticket sale info, videos and more:
WWW.RICKSHAWTHEATRE.COM
STRUNG OUT
MASKED INTRUDER, LA ARMADA
ELECTRIC WIZARD (SOLD OUT!)
SATAN'S SATYRS
1
HI
Ea
E3
1
1
□
NOTHING IS HEAVY 3 YEAR ANNIVERSARY
DAY 1: SACRIFICE, ANCIENTS, & MORE
NOTHING IS HEAVY 3 YEAR ANNIVERSARY
DAY 2: GORGUTS, TYRANTS BLOOD, & MORE
BARELY ALIVE
DUBSTEP
AGENT ORANGE
IN THE WHALE, THE SHIT TALKERS
BOB SUMNER (THE SUMNER BROTHERS)
ELLIOT C WAY (THE WILD NORTH)
SEPTICFLESH conquerors of the world
TOUR, with M00NSPELL, DEATHSTARS
THE MATADORS
WITH SPECIAL GUESTS
http://facebook.com/RickshawTheatre
©rickshawtheatre uSjj ©rickshawtheatre TABLE of CONTENTS
APRIL
SARAH DAVACHI - PG.16 	
Two days before the record release party for her
full-length debut, Baron's Court, we got to chat
with Davachi in hopes of capturing a bit of everything: her artistic trajectory, the experience of
creating and listening to dronescapes, and calligraphy.
RECORD STORE DAY - PG.22	
Despite its original intention of supporting small
vinyl retailers, Record Store Day has now become
synonymous with Jack White seven-inches and
Beatles box set re-issues. We talk to local record
shops to find out if the world's largest vinyl purchasing day has become more blunder than boon.
VANCOUVER ESPECIALLY - PG.25 	
Modeled after the infamous "Vancouver Special"
housing design of the post-WWII era, Vancouver
artist Ken Lum teams up with Semi-Public gallery
to exhibit a Vancouver Special house that is one
third its normal size, reflecting an exponential rise
in housing costs and gentrification around the city.
SUMAC - PG.42	
Discorder chats with Sumac's Aaron Turner and
Brian Cook to discuss how three established metal
and hardcore veterans started afresh, their crushing debut album The Deal, and what the future
holds for these old longhairs learning new licks.
SNIT - PG.46	
Local dark-wave outfit SNIT chat with Discorder
about the release of their second full-length album, Optimized, their move away from a synth-
infused sound, and how they really feel about the
Sonoran Cactus.
WEED - PG.56	
Fresh off a West Coast Tour, gearing up for an East
Coast one, and with a brand new record in their
hands, Vancouver's unyielding shoegaze rockers
discuss the ins and outs of their touring, recording
process, and just about everything else.
HOMEGROWN LABELS GENERO - PG.l 0
TEXTUALLY ACTIVE THE WRITE STUFF: ADVICE
ON CANADIAN GRANT WRITING - PG.l 3
ON THE AIR FEMCONCEPT - PG.28
REAL LIVE ACTION - PG.31
CALENDAR - PG.36
ART PROJECT OLGA ABELEVA - PG.38
UNDER REVIEW - PG.50
THE STATE OF MUSIC CRITICISM - PG.61
CITR PROGRAM GUIDE - PG.65
ADVERTISE: Ad Space for upcoming issues
can be booked by calling (604) 822-3017
ext. 3 or emailing advertising@citr.ca. Rates
available upon request.
CONTRIBUTE: To submit words to
Discorder, please contact: editor.D/scorder@
citr.ca. To submit images, contact:
artdirector.D/scorder@citr.ca
SUBSCRIBE: Send in a cheque for $20 to
#233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T
1Z1 with your address, and we will mail each
issue of Discorder right to your doorstep
for a year •■
DISTRIBUTE: To distribute Discorder in your
business, email distro.D/scorder@citr.ca We
are always looking for new friends.
DONATE: We are-part of CiTR, a registered
non-profit, and accept donations so we can
provide you with the content you love. To
donate visit www.citr.ca/donate.
Writers: Christopher
Lennox-Aasen, Sam
Tudor, Kristian Voveris,
Brody Rokstad, Jon Kew,
Jon Hernandez, Anise
Makvandi, Catherine Lee,
Fraser Dobbs, Nathan
Pike, Emma Kansiz,
Esmee Colbourne, Erica
Leiren, Andrew Reeves,
Julia Lehn, Jasper D
Wrinch, James Olson,
Ewan Thompson, Jackie
Manoukian, Joshua
Gabert-Doyon
Photographers &
lllustrators:Tara Bigdeli,
Connor McCabe, Brandon
Cotter, Jules Francisco,
Marissa, Hooi, Yuko
Inoue, Dana Kearley,
Sharon Ko, Brandon Lai,
Max Littledale, Jaqueline
Manoukian, Jenna
Milsom, Emma Potter, Erin
Taniguchi, KarlVentura,
Jon Vincent, Kameko
Walker, Ming Wong
Cover: Photography by
Jonathan Dy
Production Assistant:
Ming Wong
Editors: Robert Catherall
& Alex De Boer
Art Director Ricky
Castanedo-Laredo
Under Review Editor.
Alex de Boer
Real Live Action Editor:
Robert Catherall
Ad Coordinator:
Nashlyn Lloyd
Proofreaders: Alex de
Boer, Robert Catherall,
Joshua Gabert-Doyon,
Jacey Gibb, Anise
Makvandi, Ming Wong
Calendar Listings:
Sarah Cordingley
Accounts Manager
Eleanor Wearing
Student Liason: Joshua
Gabert-Doyon
Web Editor. Avery Rawden
CiTR Station Manager
Brenda Grunau
Publisher Student Radio
Society of UBC
EDITORIAL CUTOFF: March 30,2015
©Discorder 2014 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published almost
monthly by CiTR, which can be heard at 101.9 FM, online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White
Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487, CiTR's office at (604) 822-3017, email CiTR at stationmanager@citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write #233-6138
SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T 1Z1, Canada. Dear Grant Committee
EDITORS' NOTE
Illustration by Ming Wong
Hey, I'm Rob! And Pm Alex!
Together we make up the Discorder editorial masthead, including Under Review Editor, Real Live Action Editor, and, for April at
least, co-Editors-In-Chief!
showcasing what the present Vancouver arts
and music scene has to offer and we're going
to show you what's awesome and, in rare cases, what we think might not be so awesome.
Ok, so how is that really different?
I just gotta say it onex last time: Our past
Editor-in-Chief was great. We'll miss you
Jacey!
The both of us have been here, standing by,
and the local music community has never let
us down in giving either of our pens much to
write about, or, more accurately, keyboards
to prattle on about. Whether as writers or
editors, both Of us have been here, examining
what we've been given with a critical, often
admiring eye.
So, now we've got one issue. How to make
a splash in an era when print media is pushing up origami daisies?
To give you an idea: we're interested in
the intersection of art, culture, and criticism. What does that mean? Well, we'll be
In our search to determine whether criticism is a reaction to creation, or vice-versa,
we have sought out the role of art in criticism
and criticism in art. All of this, of course, taking place through the lens of our favourite
medium: music.
This issue is an extension of the changing
cultural landscape that comes with an evolving artistic community that thrives not only
on its internal community, but also from external criticism.
How do we gain access to this knowledge,
and, an even greater question, who controls
the dissemination of it? Where is music criticism headed, and why should we care?
As you might expect, we're using this
EDITORS' NOTE magazine as a shared voice. So, sometimes
we may not agree (and you'll know it) and
other times we'll be gripped in pig-headed
enthusiasm (and that will be obvious too),
but most of all we're showcasing an extension of our ideas and ongoing discourses, not
regurgitating press releases. So we hope you
enjoy!
Building on what Rob has said, I would
like to segue into an anecdote:
I recently spoke with a musician whose
band was reviewed in Discorder last summer.
The band was written about in our Real Live
Action section, and not so flatteringly either.
The review wasn't by any means brutal, but
it was critical. It critiqued the band's rhythm
section as being inadequate.
Knowing both the writer and the musician,
I got both sides of the story. The musician
explained that the review was hurtful, and
served to undercut his confidence, hindering
future performances.
He explained that in a small music community, where artists are trying to gain the
courage to take risks, it serves no one to have
unsupportive music critics. At first this made
sense to me. Being creative is a process of
screwing up, a back and forth between mediocrity and pushing beyond that. Essentially,
being an artist is learning to be vulnerable,
and that lesson is much more easily absorbed
in an atmosphere of encouragement.
I then discussed this with the writer. He articulated that he wasn ft going to sugar-coat
things because they might hurt someone's
feelings; that if everyone were to only give
positive reviews, it would be pretty challenging for artists to advance creatively.
And so we arrive at the trivial nature of
cultural criticism: Discorder is a publication
supporting Vancouver's local arts and culture, both with an open mind and with the inevitability of forming personal relationships
within the community.
To give full disclosure, Discorder has
writers who review their friend's shows or
albums. We have writers covering shows because they think the band is trendy and so do
all of their friends. We have writers who are
stunned by unassuming talent, and implored
to write about it. We also have writers who
come across music they genuinely don't en-
joy.
I agree that it doesn 't help to kick someone
when they're down. It might not make them
play better at their next show, or at the show
after that. But if someone wants to venture
out as an artist, they need to be prepared
not just for criticism, but for the fact that in
the world of music criticism—a world where
often, writers and musicians aren't getting
paid, a world where writers are covering
their friends, or are influenced by the opinions of those they think are cool or uncool—
there is no objective criticism, just as there is
no objectively good or bad art.
Sometimes you 're going to get a writer
who is walking into your set with few preconceived opinions, and other times, it's your
friend who believes you're amazing even
when you hit the wrong notes.
Discorder is a thoughtful compilation of
arts journalism by writers who are willing to
give up their time to showcase Vancouver's
creative class. I hope that those writing .reading, and being written about, can see that we
are all here to make art happen.
As this month's co-Editor-in-Chief, we
have enjoyed continuing this tradition and we
wish you an engaging read in this admittedly
subjective magazine.
As always,
Robert Catherall & Alex de Boer
EDITORS' NOTE This March, Canada's punk scene lost one of its loudest voices. Todd Serious, lead
singer of long time Vancouver punk band, the Rebel Spell. For many, he was an introduction to both radical politics and social justice, proving they didn't have to be
two different things. The Rebel Spell's most recent album was personal, political,
and widely regarded as one of the best punk records to come out of BC in a long
time. Jonny Bones, host of CJSF's Rad Radio put it best when he said, "A lot of punk
musicians fuel their music with hate. Todd's words were powerful, but they always
had hope in them. They didn't always come from a place of aggression, but rather a
unique sort of love."
Todd and I were both raised in the small town of Williams Lake and knew a lot of
the same people. Earlier this March, Todd had finished organizing a full tour for one
of my friends. Planning tours is a lot of work, and in this case, Todd wouldn't get paid,
wouldn't get much glory, and he wasn't in it for any sort of down the road trade-off.
Todd liked my friend's music. That was it. He liked my friend's music and he believed in it so he worked hard to share it. It's too bad that this type of selflessness
is surprising, but in an industry where people can get hung up on the weird idea of
"climbing ladders," doing something exclusively to support someone else is a precious rarity.
Although Facebook may be a surreal place to grieve, it has been a powerful visual
representation of all the people who really, really cared about Todd. On the day we
heard the news, hundreds of people from across the country landed on Todd's page
to remember and thank him for everything he had done, both on a personal level and
for his contributions to the BC music scene as a whole. It would be very difficult to
overstate the influence and importance of Todd to people who care about his music.
He simultaneously "gave the least fucks" and was one of the kindest, most intelligent
people in Canadian punk. He will be deeply missed. STRICTLY THEBEST
ATION AL ANTHEMS OF MARCH 2015
ARTIST
ALBUM
LABEL
1
Freak Heat Waves*
Bonnie's State of
Mind
Hockey Dad
2
Humans*+
Noontide
Hybridity Music
3
Viet Cong*
Viet Cong
Flemish Eye
4
Anamai*
Sallows
Buzz Records
5
Shred Kelly*
Sing To The Night
Self-Released
6
Sleater-Kinney
No Cities To Love
Sub Pop
7
The Crowbots*+
Days Run Away
Self-Released
8
Fashionism*+
Smash the State
(With Your Face)
Hosehead
9
Ibeyi
Ibeyi
XL Recordings
10
Eternal Tapestry
Wild Strawberries
Thrill Jockey
11
Sur Une Plages-
Legerdemain
Self-Released
12
Still Creek
Murder*+
To Shreds
Self-Released
13
First Base*
You've Got A Hold
On Me
Hosehead
14
Whitehorse*
Leave No Bridge
Unburned
Six Shooter
15
Weed*+
Thousand Pounds
b/wTuret
Lefse
16
Girlpool
Girlpool
Wichita
17
Sarah Davachi*+
Baron's Court
Students of Decay
18
Wendy Atkinson*+
The Last Fret
Smarten Up
19
Six Organs Of
Admittance
Hexadic
Drag City
20
Shearing Pinx*+
People
Psychic Handshake
21
PoorForm*+
Demo
Self-Released
22
Baptists*+
Bloodmines
Southern Lord
23
Purity Ring*
Another Eternity
Last Gang
24
Twerps
Range Anxiety
Merge
25
Twin River*+
Should the light
go out
Light Organ
ARTIST
ALBUM
LABEL
26
Sonny and the
Sunsets
Talent Night At The
Ashram
Polyvinyl
27
Michael
The Forgettable
Forward Music
Feuerstack*
Truth
Group
28
Lie*+
Consent
That's Cool
29
SAVVIE*+
Night Eyes
Tiny Kingdom
30
Notta Comet*
Success with
Houseplants
Self-Released
31
Moon Duo
Shadow Of The Sun
Sacred Bones
32
THEESatisfaction
EarthEE
Sub Pop
33
lsotopes*+
Nuclear Strikezone
Stomp
34
Line Traps*
Line Traps
Self-Released
35
Dawn Pemberton*+
Say Somethin'
Do Right! Music
36
B.A. Johnston*
Shit Sucks
Mammoth Cave
37
Chastity Belt
Time to Go Home
Hardly Art
38
Invisible Familiars
Disturbing Wildlife
Other Music
39
Energy Slime*+
New Dimensional
Mint
40
Defektors*+
Black Dreams
Shake!
41
Moss Lime*
July First
Fixture
42
Anna Webber*+
Simple
Skirl
43
Samantha Savage
Smith*
Fine Lines
Pipe & Hat
44
A Place To Bury
Strangers
Transfixiation
Dead Oceans
45
Belle And Sebastian
Girls in Peacetime
Want to Dance
Matador
46
Pow Wows*
Broken Curses
Get Hip
47
The Church
Further Deeper
Unorthodox
48
The Pop Group
Citizen Zombie
Freaks R Us
49
Colleen Green
I Want To Grow Up
Hardly Art
50
Les Chausettes*+
Kate b/w Volcanoes
Punk Fox
CiTR's charts reflect what's been played on the air by CiTR's lovely DJs last month. Records with asterisks (*) are Canadian and those marked (+) are local. Most of these excellent albums can be
found at fine independent music stores across Vancouver. If you can't find them, give CiTR's music coordinator a shout at (604} 822-8733. Her name is Sarah Cordingley. If you ask nicely she'll
tell you how to find them. Check out other great campus/community radio charts at www.earshot-oniine.com.
CHARTS LEVITATIQN
VANCOUVER
JUNE 5-7, 2015
MALKIN BOWL
AFTERPARTIES: RICKSHAW THEATRE,
ELECTRIC OWL, IMPERIAL & COBALT
BUY PASSES: LEWMION-VANCOUVERXOM
THE BLACK ANGELS I BLACK LIPS I BLACK HOUHTAIH
WITCH I DEAD MOOH / TOBACCO / ATLAS SOUND / KIHO WEE
BLACKBIRD BLACKBIRD / SHIfflO / NMTBEATS/WE SWIM/THE WARLOCKS
CURTIS HARDING/LA LUI/ELEPHANT STONE / AMEN DUNES /ROSE WINDOWS
WILLIE THRASHER & LINDA SADDLEBACK/JOEL GION/ALL THEM WITCHES / RfLEY WALKER
MCmmS/mSriCBMm/COSMOHAUTS/m.EimTOR&TMBRAINmm/LA.WITCH
Bmwam/amHDBYtw/Dwmm/joMTiwmBimMLWiDANGoa
THEAMIS/ WHITE POPPY / JWUJM / DADA PLAH/GATEWAY DRUGS/THREE WOLF M00H/& MOM SUSCRIBE TO DISCORDER!
! i
Discorder is Voncouver's lor gest running independent magazine.
Show your support for Vane >uver's independent music community
and the development of new writers, editors, designers, and artists.
JPpkEANMHtUAL
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The AUDIO.   VIDEO   8   PHOTO   8aUerf««
The Vancouver VEMUE Finder
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LIGHT ORGAN RECORDS PRESENTS //
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mO CAT II ZULU II NEPTOON II VINYL RECORDS
INFO AT Wm.LIGHT0RGANREC0RDS.COM/RSD HOMEGROWN LABELS
GENERO
by Kristian Voveris II Photography by Yuko Inoue
II Illustrations courtesy ofJuli Majer
Genero ['xe.ne.ro]
erate, and textile.
Genre, gender, to gen-
The multiplicity of meanings behind the
Spanish namesake of the record label run by
Soledad Muiioz, serves well to characterize
its versatile functions. Releasing tapes by
female artists is one of these functions, with
a discography that so far includes releases
by D. Tiffany and Regularfantasy. Muiioz's
curation has also been behind the Sounds
at Sunset series of outdoor events featuring
unique performances using sound and visual
media. However, what sets this label apart
and simultaneously gives it a coherent identity is the vocal commitment, made by Muiioz and the artists in the label, to consciously
provide an outlet for difference that goes beyond the gender binary.
Complex, yet welcoming and approachable, Genero's direction is not unlike the
presence of Muiioz herself. A Chilean-Canadian artist specialized in textile art, her work
and areas of study range wide into fields of
experimental sound, film, and skateboarding.
Given her background, the metaphor of textile in both the name and the label's logo
makes a lot of sense:
"I like the metaphor of the woven structure, because it's interlaced. You cannot have
a woven structure without a lot of thread. A
thread by itself is just a thread, but you get
this whole textile from threads interacting
with each other."
This unique totality results from different
elements working together symbiotically and
is what Munoz seeks to bring to the Sounds at
Sunset series, which has been happening at a
gallery on Clark Drive named Sunset Terrace
since the summer of 2014. Munoz feels most
at home in this practice, which has previously featured film screenings, installations,
and experimental sound performances. The
list of past sound sculptors at the gatherings
includes Chad Thiessen of Aquarian Foundation, Daniel Rincon, and Munoz's partner
Jaymes Bowman better known by his alter-
ego Young Braised.
10
HOMEGROWN LABELS mMmMm
Wl-M-M
■M0MM
As people began exploring the use of
machines to make previously unheard of
sounds, electronic music quickly became
something of a boys club. In both underground and mainstream contexts, attention
given to male artists has been disproportionately overwhelming. Speaking to me about
how this phenomena continues to occur - despite some of the most pioneering work in the
genre having been done by women - Muiioz
mentions artists like Laurie Anderson, or the
BBC Radiophonic Workshop's Delia Derbyshire and Daphne Oram.
As women suffer in a patriarchal culture,
the narrow variety of music being produced
reflects their suffering. Muiioz explains, "I
feel like the standardization of music is very
easy when it's mainly one gender and one
race doing it. So then, when you give a voice
to difference, it's like, oh, you can do that
with those same instruments!"
Starting an initiative that is openly and vocally feminist is bound to spark criticism and
discussion. Some forms of feminism come
off as propagating a binary in gender that is
already unnecessarily restrictive. Others may
be worried about a feminist tag being used
much in the same way the gluten-free tag has
come to be marketed to a specific culture or
lifestyle.
In recounting the kinds of conversations
she has had with people about Genero, Munoz seems very happy to be generating these
questions and discussions in the first place.
"When I started the project, a lot of people
would question me being very straight up and
calling it a feminist initiative, and I feel like
feminism doesn't refer only to gender."
Citing feminist philosophers and activists
like Bell Hooks, Judith Butler, and Martha
Rosier, Muiioz made the argument that you
can't talk about feminism without talking
about race and addressing discrimination
faced by anyone who is in any way different.
With this broader sense of feminism in mind,
she sums up her point of view with a mantra:
11
HOMEGROWN LABELS "Being feminist should not be a binary, it
should be a natural state of being."
The way that Muiioz sees the state of inequality shifting is not by creating conclusions, but through listening to different perspectives. This, in effect, is the conceptual
purpose of Genero: to provide different perspectives to listen to through sound; a motive
that Muiioz thinks is especially direct and
emotionally affective.
Shedding the "for women, by women only"
perspective, Munoz views Genero as a social
project. Genero has been openly interacting
with the arts community in Vancouver, and
in return has been met with reciprocity, understanding, and support. In telling me about
how Richard MacFarlane, the big daddy behind 1080p Collection, approached her to offer help with producing tapes, Munoz tried
to describe his immense sense of self-consciousness about coming off as being patronizing in any way, which was only surpassed
by his genuine desire to help.
Daniel Rincon, who is responsible for
booking talent for the Fox Cabaret, has also
been crucial in providing spaces for Genero
to feature its artists. So has Chad Murray,
curator of the Free Association multi-room
takeover of Fortune Sound Club happening
in April 2, which will highlight a selection of
Vancouver's creatives. Featured beside locally and internationally established labels,
Pacific Rhythm and 1080p, Genero will be
hosting sets at this April 2 event, with performances by House DJ Jayda G and Montreal-
based experimental artist, RAMZI.
The year ahead for Genero is teeming with
activity, and the eclectic list of planned releases includes the hardware-based techno
abstractions of Minimal Violence (Ashlee
Luk and Lida Pawliuk,) as well as Francesca
Belcourt's smooth and crystalline sense of
R&B, produced with a helping hand from
Patrick Holland (a.k.a. Project Pablo). "I just
want a lot of women to play music," Munoz
tells me, and the stream of releases on Genero works towards that goal.
When asked what she has in mind for the
more long-term future, Muiioz gives a clear
sense of what she wants: "Equality is what
I want, and it's a life-long thing." While she
concedes Genero might not reach that goal
on its own, it is certainly doing its part.
12
HOMEGROWN LABELS TEXTUALLY ACTIVE
THE WRITE STUFF! ADVICE ON CANADIAN GRANT WRITING
by Brody Rokstad II Photography by Marissa Hooi
II Illustrations by Connor McCabe
Getting music grants in Canada is a tricky
business. It can be a real struggle for artists
to actually receive the funding provided by
the government and affiliated government
bodies. Rebecca Apostoli is well aware of
this fact, and with her new book "The Canadian Grant Writing Guide for Musicians"
she hopes to help artists address the matter.
A performer herself, Apostoli has held positions with such organizations as Live Nation
Canada, Access to Music Foundation, and
the Music BC Industry Association, before
becoming the founder and CEO of Music
Grants Canada.
Music Grants Canada is both a funding and
artist development agency, providing grant
writing services designed to help artists get
the funding they're looking for. The mission
statement on musicgrantscanada.com reads:
"Music Grants Canada was founded in fall
2013 to support, sustain, and advocate for
independent music artists and companies in
Canada, and to address critical gaps in education, resources, and support for the music industry." Apostoli is clearly passionate about
her work and articulate in delivering her message: "It should speak for itself. No one else
has really written the book before. It's written
for a specific audience...independent artists,
small business owners, and small labels who
want to get funding but have no idea how to. I
think it's really important that artists are empowered with the tools and become educated
so that they can be more supported at self-
managing."
13
TEXTUALLY ACTIVE ocynftu*^
The music grant system in Canada has long
been seen as structurally flawed, and with the
demise of Mammoth Cave Records out of
Toronto getting headlines in the media lately,
the grant system in Canada has again come
under fire. Serious allegations of nepotism,
lack of accountability, conflicts of interest,
and lack of transparency in their criteria are
but some of the criticisms being lobbied at
the system.
Paul Lawton, the former owner of the small
label, has given voice to commonly held perceptions of the system as opaque and serving
a small number of established artists within
the industry, instead of assisting a wide range
of artists at a grassroots level. Apostoli agrees
that there are improvements that need to be
made to the process. "A small number of successful indie labels have the tools to apply for
and receive the lion's share of the funding.
Partially because the eligibility criteria and
the jurying criteria is set up to cater to those
artists that have achieved a certain level of
success."
Apostoli sympathizes with many of the
arguments being made by critics. "They do
have a responsibility to the community that
they're supposed to be serving to distribute
the funds in a judicious and democratic manner and to be transparent about how they're
going about that. I definitely agree that the
criticisms lobbied at them do have merit. I
definitely see both sides of it."
The other side of the story that Apostoli
alludes to is the way in which artists submit
proposals to the various bodies of the music
grant system. On a first hand basis, she frequently sees a lack of basic knowledge of
the grant process in artists' submissions, and
sees this as a part of the reason why artists
struggle to receive grants. "Canada doesn't
have the same ecosystem of patronage as
somewhere like the United States, which
has wealthy individuals that want to invest
the money. Here in Canada we hand it off to
an organized body to administer patronage,
which can be a lot more bureaucratic, and can
seem a lot more mysterious to an artist. They
14
TEXTUALLY ACTIVE often have no idea how that process works,
where the money is coming from, or who
gets it." She commonly comes across proposals that have not been adequately researched,
and that have weaknesses in their business
plans. "They need to be well researched.
They should know that you have looked at
what projects have been previously funded,
so that you know it fits into that organization's mandate and you've actually applied
to the correct program. Also, having a thoroughly researched marketing plan is important, because it shows that bands are attentive
to the industry."
A certain level of business acumen is required on the part of the artists, and Apostoli
sees this as something that is often absent in
their submitted grant proposals. As an artist,
she's well positioned to help proponents better understand the proposal process because
she's been there herself. "Being an artist
myself, I too was inexperienced when I was
younger until I was sort of forced into working in professional atmospheres to kind of get
my act together to start planning things. This
book and the launching of my company has
definitely been a big learning experience for
me, in learning how to market my own business, do advertising, and publish a book. So I
can see that really influencing how I'm going
to be coaching artists."
So whether you believe that the problem is
systemic or that responsibility lies with the
artists themselves (or a combination of both)
the information in Apostoli's book is helpful
in understanding how to write a great proposal, and for better or worse that's something
that all artists need to know how to do.
Especially coming from someone who has
been on both sides of the process, you can
bet that she knows what she's talking about.
Hopefully her book will have an impact on
getting more funding to artists who need it.
We would all be better off for it.
TEXTUALLY ACTIVE
15 •**&* jAfl/taii
Lmk
by Jon Kew II Illustrations by Emma Potter II Photography by Jon Vincent
"It feels like if you were listening to a
song, and just paused it at one second and
took whatever frequency or texture and drew
it out and listened to individual sounds," Sarah Davachi tells me. "It's a way of slowing
down music and focusing on specific things
you don't normally hear." Describing her
music, Davachi describes stasis.
Only settling in Vancouver two years back,
there's a disjunct between this stasis and the
past half-decade of Davachi's life, which has
been defined by transience and movement.
Since earning an MFA from Mills College
in 2012, Davachi has been composing, writing, performing, and working. She has sat
as an artist-in-residence in Rotterdam, Amsterdam, and Banff. It goes on. When I ask
about this dislocation, Davachi is, as always,
thoughtful — speaking frankly but without
didacticism. She imagines an eventual coherence to her trajectory.
Baron's Court, Davachi's full-length debut, is rich with drones which explore textur-
al expansion while also expressing an interest
in acoustic instrumentation and the analog
thrum of classic synthesizer equipment. She
stresses that there's no hermeneutic puzzle to
be unlocked in the album, or any of her music: "I have noticed I need to be more careful about how to title things. People read into
titles."
If not a literal narrative, the music offers
a worthwhile outlook towards sound and
elsewhere: stabilization informs the music
and emerges from it. Davachi compares it to
meditation: "Tuning out for a bit, regaining
your stability, and then you can go back out
and do crazy things." It sheds light without
being allegorical:,"Even though there's a lot
of [me] moving around, it feels like a singular trajectory. [The music] is similar conceptually in th^t it feels like a singular event
coming together over a long period of time."
This isn't about thundering teleology. It's a
sensing out of things, down-to-earth in multiple senses. "I'm not trying to evoke anything,
I'm not trying to take you on a journey somewhere;" she points, with a jocular voice, towards the cosmic connotations of her genre.
17
SARAH DAVACHI Davachi's work is more Solaris than 2001,
always returning to the human element. Escapism based in "escaping from the external
to go inwards."
Davachi also defers analog elitism. That
her work is informed by that kind of gear is
more pragmatic than fetish: "I have an interest in obsolete technologies ... it's not a historical thing ... I use them because they work
really well for the type of music that I do." In
one of the few times during our conversation,
Davachi becomes technical, espousing the
exploration of psychoacoustic variance and
combination tones only available when using
analog discrepancy.
Back to trajectory; Davachi is currently in
a position to stabilize. She's grown into Vancouver. Her work as an archivist for the National Music Centre can be done a province
away. Baron's Court has just been released.
But things are moving faster: this is the
first year she's had to defer offers due to their
abundance.
"My problem has always been that I'm interested in too many things."
Though Davachi began playing piano at 6,
she gave it up for much of her teenage years,
only to re-engage with music in college. But
the 20th century electronic music Davachi
was studying was stifling, implying an "unspoken pressure" to make music sounding
similar. It wasn't until the flexibility of Mills
College that the sound/music demarcation
became obsolete. Now things can be awkward. "People often tiptoe around it — 'oh,
you're [making] noise stuff — you can call
it music, it's ok!"
She recalls when music became the obvious route: "The reason I picked music ... I
took a calligraphy class and it was so messy.
I was always washing my hands, had to wear
my bad clothes, I had to wear a ventilator
mask — I hated it ... I just loved how clean
music was." She also mentions an appreciation for electronic being performed in total
darkness, or dislocations of artist and stage
— methods that emphasize the sound over
the performer. There seems to be a distilled
focus and freedom from obstruction that
Davachi possesses in music.
When I press the subject of possible conceptual directions in the future, Davachi
returns to her preference for sensation. "It
would be on an aesthetic level rather than
this will represent that idea. I think about it
in terms of colours ... It's always relating to
something, just not in a literal way."
The training that does inform Davachi's
music, returns to sensitivity towards sound as
an open space rather than a podium: "Music's
always subjective, it's an experience.... But I
try to be as responsive to the neutral aspect:
frequency relationships or textures that allow
people to feel something — I don't care what
they feel ... but I'm trying to use sound to
make people look inwards."
Currently serving as a VFS guest lecturer,
a percolating interest in soundtrack composition came up during our conversation. Additionally, Davachi will at some point return to
school and pursue a PhD. More albums are
coming, too.
Vancouver has been receptive. Since her
arrival she has played in Music Waste, Big
Joy, and done multiple shows with close collaborator Richard Smith. The debut of Davachi / Smith was the first set of the first show
of New Forms 2014, the festival's first year at
the Science World: a nice inaugural moment
in that Expo 86 signifier of Vancouver.
When Vancouver comes up, Davachi expresses the hope that she'll be able to do what
she's doing here for as long as it is feasible.
That said, until Davachi is called elsewhere,
and so long as she continues to do what she
wants to do given the circumstances — performing, writing, composing, in a word: exploration — we can likely expect a growing
source of knowledge and contemplation.
18
SARAH DAVACHI  Saturday April 18th!
mrrnmi
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www.vinytfe<ords.com C '/ A HIPSTER'S BLACK FRIDAY
by Jon Hernandez II Illustrations by Brandon Cotter
"THE DAY IS IMPORTANT AS A WAY TO REMEMBER THAT STORES LIKE
US EXIST. IT STARTED OUT AS A GOOD THING, [BUT] THERE'S A SIDE
OF IT THAT'S BECOME CORPORATE."
It's that magical time of year again where
the music aficionados of Vancouver get to
storm the city's record stores in search of
great deals, live shows, and that golden vinyl that's been evading them for so many
years. But more importantly, it's a chance to
celebrate the great revival: the resurgence of
the independent record store, and the unique
culture that comes with it.
What most vinyl collectors will agree on
is the record store atmosphere: music you've
never heard spinning off the speakers, walls
of pretty album covers that keep you occupied for hours, and a person behind the counter that knows way more about music than
you do. In short, walking into these shops and
picking up an album is a lot more fun than
downloading anything online. And providing this experience is something that many
record retailers across the city take pride in.
"We're trying to really celebrate the art,
the artistic aspect of record collecting," says
Daniel Geddes, musician and co-founder of
Horses Records, one of Vancouver's newest vinyl shops. "We see records as the best
way to listen to and collect music, and that's
one facet of our interest in art in general. The
store is a celebration of intellect and creativ-
ity."
Geddes and his store take the philosophy
of Record Store Day and live it each day. But
that doesn't prevent him from recognizing
the importance of the yearly event, despite
his own reservations.
"The day is important as a way to remember that stores like us exist. It started out as
a good thing, [but] there's a side of it that's
become corporate," says Geddes. "There is a
side to it that I think is kind of like Black Friday, which I'm a little bit resistant to."
Geddes' concerns come at the heels of the
great vinyl resurgence into the mainstream
consumer consciousness. And the numbers
don't lie: according to the latest Nielsen
music data report, in 2014 alone, Canadians
purchased over 400,000 vinyl records — a 71
per cent increase from 2013.
Record Store Day is a byproduct of the
vinyl resurgence and has literally become a
global phenomenon. It started out in the US
back in 2008, and has since expanded to become an international event. Cities across
23
RECORD STORE DAY f
the globe participate in the festivities, but for
small retailers like Horses, there can be an
added stress to keep up with the Joneses.
"For a small and new place like us, there's
a certain amount of pressure, which feels a
little bit weird because [Record Store Day]
started to benefit places like us," adds Geddes.
This April will mark Horses' first venture
into the annual festivities, but the retailer
isn't holding back. They're bringing in a variety of special releases, offering a 20 per cent
discount on their records, and showcasing
a breadth of local bands, including Geddes'
own Peace. Regardless of his reservations,
Geddes recognizes the importance of Record
Store Day as an opportunity to not only raise
awareness for his business, but for the local
music scene that he is very much a part of.
Catching live shows across the city is
perhaps the best aspect the yearly event has
to offer. Horses will bring the party to East
Hastings, while on Main Street, you can expect the city's heavyweights to be swinging
full force.
Neptoon Records will be carrying on its
annual legacy of putting on a legitimate music festival.
"I think we just go a little crazy," says Ben
Frith, owner and manager of Neptoon. "We
really try and make it a full day of entertainment and a full day of fun."
And the fun won't stop at Neptoon.
"Between us and Red Cat, we're so close
to each other people just end up going back
and forth all day," adds Frith. "It works out
pretty damn well."
People might view Neptoon and Red Cat
as rivals, but on Record Store Day they'll be
the A and B sides to the same LP: great places
to go to catch live music in a city that sometimes gets a bad rap for being no fun. Part of
the beauty of Record Store Day is the chance
to give live music to the city's youth.
"If you're a kid, there's not a lot of music
you can go and see, it's kind of sad," adds
Frith. "I think it's really cool to have lots of
good local music featured that a lot of people
wouldn't have the opportunity to see."
With live music in mind, Frith won't be
too concerned about sales on April 18. Rather, he'll have his hands full managing the
spectacle. In addition to an in-store signing
headlined by the legendary Eric Burdon, he'll
have upwards of 10 bands performing on his
stage.
Organizing the event has taken months,
and the lead-up will have Frith working well
into the night. But one thing's for certain:
Fritn will be happy when the madness is all
oyer.
"I cannot wait," he says.
24
RECORD STORE DAY s
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■~"v CULTURE VS. COMMODITY
by Anise Makvandi II Illustrations by Erin Taniguchi
In the 2015 "Demographia International
Housing Affordability Survey," Vancouver
was placed as the world's second most unaf-
fordable city to live in, after Hong Kong; with
the flux of the city's inhabitants migrating to
areas, which have affordable and maintainable living accommodations, in defiance of
Vancouver's soaring housing prices. Places
such as Montreal, Berlin, and most recently,
Detroit, have become artistic and cultural
hubs, drawing in those who are searching for
a city where they can afford to live, and still
be surrounded by a progressively thriving
creative community.
Ken Lum, an internationally renowned artist and Vancouver native, has centered his latest exhibition, Vancouver Especially, within
this theme of encumbrance caused by unaf-
fordable housing in one of the wealthiest cities in the world.
Located at 271 Union Street, the piece is
a miniature version of a "Vancouver Special;" a term native to Vancouverites, carrying a connotation of a small dwelling that
costs more to live in than what it is worth.
The phrase derives from the Second World
War. As immigrants flocked into Vancouver,
the city devised housing units that maximized capacity and use within a small lot of
land. In 1973, the cost of purchasing one of
these houses was $45,000, which was Lum's
production budget, funded and exhibited by
Semi-Public, an extension of gallery 221A.
Originally this exhibit, which maintains
white stucco and brick as its notorious characteristics, surrounded by iron fencing, was
too small when it was scaled to its property
value in 1973—thus, it was enlarged 8-fold
by Lum. Still, it is not adequate enough in
size to shelter a single person, let alone a
family.
Vancouver Especially encompasses the
crux of living conditions and affordable housing within the city of Vancouver. Not only
does it point out the drastic rise in residential
property costs—with a Vancouver Special
now on the market for $1.7 million—but it
also makes reference to the cultural negation
the city faces when areas, such as Strathcona
and Chinatown (the neighbourhood housing
the piece), face increasing gentrification.
With Vancouver's consistent influx of
wealth, those with lower incomes are being
driven into the fringes, leaving most of the
26 city's cultural appreciation and growth in
the hands of the wealthy. Culture is no longer synonymous with the appreciation of art,
architecture, literature, and the like. Instead,
its equivalence is met with the latest model
car, or the largest condominium that is being
mortgaged.
Vancouver .is wrought with potential, and
as a young city, it is currently molding itself
into the space it will become in the future.
For a place to prosper artistically and culturally, as a whole, it is pertinent for its inhabitants to be able to afford living accommodations. How else can we propel culture? How
else can we progress in creating alternative
ideas? How else can we continue to afford to
live here?
For one, it is vital that we preserve the areas
and establishments that have been pinnacle
landmarks for the city. Residential areas such
as Hastings Sunrise, Strathcona, and Chinatown, have to be thoughtfully maintained,
instead of remodeled into modern high rises.
The site-specificity of Lum's work, located
on a small plot of concrete in between two
existing buildings, is an exemplary depiction of prime spaces which become vertically
transformed to maximize on square footage,
thus increasing capacity and profit. There is
irony in Lum's work, positioning the iconic
mass produced home of the 1970's in an area
that is now saturated with flash, in the pan-
condo development—our modern day Vancouver Special.
Of course, in order for a city to progress and
flourish, it is important that it sees growth.
Progress is necessary, but it is a question of
how we move forward. What comes into play
is the ancient comparison of quality versus
quantity. Is it imperative for a city to impose
its glass structure, or to focus on growth as
a community, a culture, and cumulatively, a
movement? Longevity is defined as a span
of existence; the content of a space in time,
defines its vigor. It's up to us to decide if we
want to look back upon Vancouver as having
had a glass-encased shelf Mfe, or if we want
to have a view of Keefer Street, underneath
a patchy overhang that lets in drops of rain
from time to time.
l_ :
ON THE AIR
:
FEMCONCEPT
by Catherine Lee II Photography by Tara Bigdeli
II Illustrations by Dana Kearley
Since September of last year, Femconcept
has been riding the airwaves of CiTR every
Friday from 1 to 2 p.m. to bring you fresh
female-generated Content. Discorder recently
sat down with the hosts, Eleanor Wearing and
Erica Dolman, to talk about how Femconcept
got its start, where it's going, and what its
aims are.
HOW DID FEMCONCEPT GET STARTED?
Wearing: We actually met doing drama in
high school.
Dolman: In grade nine, when we were,
whatever, 14? We've been friends for a long
time, throughout the days of Okanagan, Vernon. We moved here in 2011 to start school,
and we're in our fourth years right now. We
started Femconcept in September 2014. Eleanor started Femconcept and I joined.
Wearing: I got the ball rolling. We performed together for most of our friendship,
so we always talked about how sweet it
would be for us to have a show together and
just how fun it would be. I'd been here for
a while without having a show and wanting
one. There are like 90 shows on air ... you
want to come up with something that is a bit
different from what other people are doing,
you know, to give people a reason to listen.
So I was coordinating the programming for
International Women's Day two years ago
and realized, in trying to find content — female content or Femcon — that so much
of the music I had listened to, basically for
my whole life, was not Femcon ... So then,
when we were thinking about getting a show,
we saw that there was only one other show
at CiTR that was entirely Femcon. Out of
90 shows, it felt like that wasn't enough, so
Femconcept was born out of that.
WHAT IS FEMCON?
Dolman: Two of four categories have to
be fulfilled. Someone who identifies as female has to perform in the band, produce the
music, write or compose the lyrics, and then
write or compose the music. People often
think that Femcon is all girl bands, or primarily women in the band with maybe like one
man or whatever, but actually it is essentially
about having a woman recognize her agency
as a performer.
Wearing: I also see it as a way to answer
the fact that historically, women in the performance industry and the music industry
were used as spectacles, or as puppets, [rather] than as contributors of meaningful art.
HOW DOES CITR SUPPORT FEMCON AND
FEMCONCEPT?
Wearing: CiTR is one of the only campus
stations across the country that recommends
programmers play a certain percentage of
Femcon. People here are really into the idea
of us doing an entirely Femcon show; it's
promoted at the station as something that
people believe in.
HOW DO YOU PICK YOUR MUSIC ON
FEMCONCEPT?
Wearing: We try to play a lot of local stuff,
especially from people who have shows coming up, because it just helps to give attention
to local musicians who need it and get people
out to shows in local venues.
Dolman: That's one of our goals when
we're picking music. We could just do international music, but that's not really CiTR's
28
ON THE AIR I
- *^w!n&BooWftlfm" vision. So there's definitely an incentive to
seek out local music and Femcon within that
music. From what we've gathered so far,
Vancouver has a pretty good gender equality ... Well, maybe I can't say that, but there
are females in the bands. I feel like a lot of
bands I see in the city have females playing,
so that's really cool.
ARE THERE ANY ISSUES YOU ARE PARTICULARLY INTERESTED IN OR PUSHING
FOR?
Dolman: As our show evolves, our lenses
regarding intersectional issues and marginalized groups keep expanding. So as we move
along with our show, I feel that it's reflected
in our show ... We've become more aware of
diversity, and we try to play not only a lot of
Femcon but also content from all races and
ethnicities and not just white people.
DO YOU HAVE ANY MEMORABLE MOMENTS FROM FEMCONCEPT?
Wearing: We had Robynn Iwata come on
our show. She is a member of a band from
the '90s called Cub, one of the first bands to
be signed to Mint Records, a Vancouver label
founded by peopie who actually met at CiTR.
I read a book about Mint Records [Fresh At
Twenty] last year, and if you had told me
that Iwata would be on our radio show this
year, I would not have believed you. Iwata
came on our show and talked to us about her
life, things from music to her experiences as
a CiTR alumnus, her involvement with Discorder, and so on. She was really excited
about what we were doing. That was really
cool.
Whether you're into women who rock or
interested in pressing gender issues in the
arts, tune in to CiTR every Friday between 1
and 2 p.m. to hear Wearing and Dolman spin
stories of empowerment.
S &Pp
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REAL LIVE A
MARCH 2015
QUIET CITY #16
MARCH 13 / SKYLIGHT GALLERY
The spring equinox on Mart
the first day of our hemisphere's
ice, snow, and cold, but in Vancouver where
no snow fell nor ice appeared, it wa*
mistake the Friday the J 3th Quiet Cit
case for a symbol of ending hibernations.
Featuring drone and experimental acts Ruhl-
Jmann & Clement, Phonal. Holy Hum, and
Chicago-based Coppice, the evening hosted
i; by Skylight Gallery was as good an awakening as any astronomical event.
It seems that most "underground" venue"
in Vancouver these daycare in tact presented
j above a flight of stairs, and Skylight w;
I exception. Although it failed to live up to is
name with curtained-off windows and po
glass visible on the roof, its central locatfbr
on Pender's Chinatown made it an interesting
1 hub of «is nearby nightclub a
\ venue, the ses were Sbftly si
ambient DJ sets and dull purple lighting.        j
One of the best features of Quiet City (of
which this wa> h edition) is curator/oi|
ganizer Constantine Katsiris and his emphaS|
sis on intimau a. His introduciteniN
tist were poignant and concise an
ly the expectations of the audience
listen, contemplate, and absorb. *    *
m **i
The, first a^t, Ruhlmann & Clement, net
cessitated thefse qualities as they sat perched
behind heaps of synthesizers and electronics.
Their set was a combination of primal hums
and digital swells, at times patient and sparing with the sounds they produced, and at
others almost giddily assembling asymmetric
tones on top of one another. The most asocial
of the performers, the duo's set was just as
*s shut and head dreaming
Vs full focus on t
S RES' Andrew Lee has taken
many fascinating turiis between that band's
art-rock songwriting and his performance
as Holy Hum at Skylight. Lee has talked at
length about his decision to mi > from
red song >gres-
ri mental nusic.
!uft been a projec
inval\ v irlipg cast of memlx
side Lee in the past, for Quiet City
a contemplative and intimate j
Paj^t of Holy Hum's immense appeal is how
opes Lee makes the experimentation to his
nee. Despite his drones being techni-
\y impressive from an electronics perspec-
e, it was easy to observe exactly where
ii sound originated from on the pedal steel
|ront of him. Using a variety of slides and
U tubes to evoke long, symphonic chords
|rpeggio melodies, it was impossible for
crowd to keep their eyes off Lee's demure
wmanship and intense, intimate focus.
After a short intermission, Quiet City resumed with Chicago's Coppice, whose show
It Skylight Gallery marked the first day of
their west coast tour with Ruhlmann & Clement. Their avant-garde performance relied
heavily on a small pump organ and its creaky
bellows. The pair of Noe Cuellar & Joseph
Kramer introduced themselves by asking the
crowd to gather stage-center to enjoy what
they called a "hard stereo" set. As the harmonium archaically grasped for notes, the
sounds were digitally captured and tampered
with before splitting to each of the stage-
side speakers, creating a sound that was at
REAL LtVE ACTION once jarring and comforting. Similar to the
works of Montreal-based Set Fire To Flan
and their approach to recording Tele
In Negative/Mouths Trapped In
largely  unfiltered farmyard barnj
appeal in Coppice was
details of the laboured organ being '*"
amplified, and willingly explored.
Closer Phil Thomson's project P is a
satisfying and enemgtic finish to the eveiih
Digital ianatuiv repositions relied
rhythm and defined beats and patterns, a first
for the night of musicians. Somewhere between fellow Vaneouverite Loscil, and Cliff
Martinez' soundtrack work on 2()()2's Solaris.
J lis set felt nearly relaxing alongside his con-
emporaries. The breadth of mus^ rfc*v*»rpH
n a single evening was <
process fully at the tim
to curating and promoting the best in experimental music is i ng
that the 16th session has b
coming of sp> ng
next. — Fraser Dobbs
• BLACK;
record All My Favorite Singers Are Willie
Nelson gets major points for having an entertaining title and "Beginning of the End" is a
really great track.
^ertaiply not sporting any green edges
i Hayden, who've been at this game
irs. Thornhill, Ontario's Paul Hayden
cesser and his band of three played a set that
was all over, the map, going as far back as
1995's Everything / Long For. They sounded
really good and though 1 haven >been their
biggest supporter or paid rnurh mind to theih
in the pastel to son
newer material •Snri /7"v r ™>*   "]
nicely offered or. „
/ ■    yMm
R»t on to the mai
the band
ven more
*d on re-
and a lot
tully picked away and came down
h of pedal driven noise when
you could feel
had behind then
atmosphere into th
song 1 find as be
>rd. Here, there was
hiry, trumpeter JP
' sh of brass and giii
>gue Theatre!
* d the first of
ming with a
through ev-
~red.
ird of for Man-
veral years he has
aligned himself with some of the city's finest
musicians, but the much needed break they
took from touring and the recording of their
January release Clnh Meds has really seen a
spike in their delivery.
Warming the stage was Astral Swans from
Calgary, who, by this point in the tour, wasn't
completely over his head as far as venue size
and crowd is concerned, but was still a fresh
face whose psychedelic rockabilly-like pop
is refining as he goes. However, his debut
ith "Vessel," the ges-
ramatic, the band more
in lire than a just a few minutes before.
Mangans call of "STOP. WAIT. UNHAND
ME" rang loud, *. over
the crowd, ag; (irdina's amazing
guitarwor) turner Kenton Loewen
and bassist J ept expert time.
Somethi ! about this show
was that Da* m appeared to have
stepped back let Blacksmith do the
talking. Sure. rucial player and without his songwriting and graveled voice the
music would be a t beast altogether;
however, Mai intent on keeping
the focus on the pi; tnd the players did
shine indeed.
REAL LIVE ACTION Dan Mangan photo (pg.32) courtesy of Brandon La
Limit fled photo (pg.33) courtesy of Kameko Walker
Playing to the ho
course with nods to
that pushed Dan N
spotlight.
"Road Regrets" w
thing more blisteri
"Robots" was freeb
who obviously ate it
with members of Hj
everybody joining i
mous lines about p
Sure. I too have had
truthfully it was on
ments that 1'
long time to.cc
At an
1 peerei
out of the bo
son in how
it can chang
by a most gracious _
with energy and in
smile on the faces of
said many times before
guy does me proud.—Na,
faded,
filin"
What does this review offer that others don't?
let me tell you that Discorder's got
hottest scoops on the opening set from
ensington Gore. Indeed, you will find their
e multi-track composition makes for an
crience, and amateur explica-
;iess writer.
/
Wimm-i
commitment moves
k.a.
'orm song
^g to and
SARAH DAVACHI / Kl:      ON GORE
^CH 14 / FOX CABARET
There's play in DavachiV
sic. It suggests the workmanlike deploj
of the tools at hand (all that ge^ and the focus towards sound. But that sits alongside the
luxurious passages that call for*&contemplative, dwelling within.
■II * •
For that to come through there has to be
a commitment from the purveyors —- it's a
good faith relationship. The*ecord release
show of Sarah Davachi's debut. Baron's
Court, commanded such commitment: she
is, to quote Alan Ranta's quicker to the punch
and better review of the sho^ "a treasure."
As he concludes, Davachi warrants increasing attention: arttf it seems things are
going pretty well. As for me — what shall
I do in light of my immediate obsolescence?
Kensin
5mitn's   visuals  projc
They  enunciated a v
nostalgia, sourced  fro
the artists which was t
a shifting color spectn
Contrast darkened Woo<
L. it was a nice bit of n
These visuals contin
While mostly unchan^
appearance, Davachi ga,
more solemn connotation:
slow play and transformati
tices in her music.
REAL LIVE ACTION Davachi's set was more ascetic than Kensington Gore's, and also more invested in the
unfolding of spontaneous acoustic tones;
Specifically, that of a violin's.
Starting with delicate plucks and then
droning bows, these sounds were fed into her
sequencer and looped. Having formed this
rich series of tones, she then set down her violin and set to modulation before concluding
by rising and playing another series of spontaneously sequenced bows; this time more
dissonant, but nonetheless rigid. Throughotit
as tracks entered and exited, the floating in
of old samples, the looping of memory and
time, or the modulation and expansion of
drones, had a sonorous wealth: so much from
. Davachi's dro the ba-
ing conventional noise surreal, and
g the bea: m a large
Thinking back to the set, 1 also remember,
again, the occasional hiss of the fog machine it the
Wfc. Davachi's set, or Gores' for that matter.
eally have the amplitude or cacophony
ssary to obscure these noises. Yet. that
common ; the value
of investm for excuses to t                                               int to
1 don't I It is
in fact a d open
oneself up to ity in music:  the i                                  tire of tones.
Davachi's wonderful
example of ti itment: a
collective J moment in time.—io.
time of rebirth and renewal. A renewal of
sorts was taking place inside the Biltmore
as well, where Vancouver based alt-rock act
Limblifter was set to launch their new album
Pacific Milk, their first release in nearly a decade.
Once inside the venue, the atmosphere was
relaxed with a hint of pleasant anticipation.
The crowd was composed of a diversity of
age groups wearing a delightfully eccentric
assortment of berets, patterned leggings, and
skull embellished sweaters.
Hloured spotlights, the first
*rched their beers on the
aeir set with an
. which mysteriously obscured his face for a wide portion of
the set. was redolent of a medieval wizard.
Though those in my party expressed dismay
that the sound system wasn't equipped to
properly convey Pleskacrfs vocals, 1 found
the lyrical incoherence to be well suited to
the powerful instrumentals and head banging
flair. Invisible Ray hopped from songs about
candy to those about protesting without losing any conviction or eccentricity.
Next up was Vancouver-based The Passenger who took the stage with no warning.
He captivated the audience with his haunting
spacey synth punctuated by the tones of tribal
drums and ethereal wind chimes. As the set
progressed, new layers of instrumentals were
added, cloaking the sound in ever deeper layers of complexity.
Wisps of smoke lent an em
to The Passenger's dynamic ai . I
was profoundly immersed in the sound until
the curtains closed and he de]
with rays of light from the setting sun, and a      heavy chillout act between two alternative
light rain signaling the arrival of spring —a      rock acts to be a strange progression and not
REAL LIVE ACTION necessarily conducive to maintaining crowd
energy or fluidity between the performances.
The curtains opened and the clock inched
towards 11 when Limblifter grabbed their instruments and greeted the raucous, frenzied
crowd —now significantly larger and packed
near the stage. A convivial energy permeated
the space. Having had a string of radio successes in the late nineties, Limblifter drew
quite a crowd this evening. Some attendees
I talked with were enthusiastic about hearing
their fresh material while some were anxious
to get down to some good oV 90's alt-rock;
Limblifter, composed of Ryan Dahle,
Megan Bradfield, Gregory Macdonald, and
Brent Follett, didn't disappoint with their
catchy guitar riffs and lyrics tinged with life
experience and a decidedly eclectic imagination. Nineties favourite "Tinfoil" sent the
crowd into a collective recollection of days
past with its evocation of slacker afternoons
and evenings spent jamming in the parents'
basement.
My personal favorite was "In/Out" a
track with composed, steady drum beats and
moody vocals that resonated off the Bilt-
more's walls. Vocalist Ryan Dahle derived a
melancholy pleasure from his angsty, speculative lyrics: "It's gonna work out /1 tell myself it's about time / This is about the inability
/ To commit against instinct and good reason.
What left as strong an impression as their
music was the tangible enthusiasm and earnestness that Limblifter displayed towards
the crowd; they were completely engaged and
it lent the performance a distinct authenticity.
I left the venue that night with a fond reminiscence over Limblifter's earlier hits and an
eager anticipation towards the band's future
with the release of Pacific Milk on April 7.
— Emnut Kansiz
REAL LIVE ACTION SUN
MON
TUE5
WED
1
- Weed 0 Antisocial
- Matt Mays, Adam
Baldwin, Dustin
Bentall e The Imperial .
Tomorrow's Tulips,
Tarek Wegner, Skinny
Kids, Soft Haze 0 The
Cobalt
Ibeyi 0 Fortune
Sound Club
The Wild Romantics,
Revenge of the Trees
0 Railway Club
Kaki King 0 The Biltmore (Early show)
8
Wishbone Ash, Three
Wolf Moon 0 Rickshaw Theatre
Belle & Sebastian,
Perfume Genius 0
Vogue Theatre
12
Strung Out, La Armada, Masked Intruder 0
Rickshaw Theatre
13
14
Electric Wizard,
Satan's Satyrs 0 Rickshaw Theatre
15
Neko Case 0 Vogue
Theatre
Simon Scott, Marcus
Fischer & Loscil 0
WISE Hall
19
20
Kilroy Katerwol 0 The
Astoria
26
Agent Orange, In
the Whale, Shit
Talkers 0 Rickshaw
Theatre
Leaf Rapids, Slow
Leaves® Railway
Club
21
Acid Mothers Temple,
ST 37 0 Electric Owl
Kaiser Chiefs 0 Commodore Ballroom
22
Clean Bandit 0 Cor]
modore Ballroom
28
Lady Lamb @ Electric
Owl
29 THURS
-The Thrashers, The Binz, Sexy
Decoy ® Railway Club
-Sunkid, Chris Organix, Angel @
Electric Owl
-Magma ©Venue
-Cherry Glazerr, Sunflower Bean,
The Buttertones 0 Studio East
-Red Vienna Album Release w/
Actors 0 Fox Cabaret
-Mark Sultan, Sh-Shakes, Strange
Things 0 Hindenburg
-Waka Flocka Flame ©
Venue
-Dave Hause, Kalle Mattson
© Hindenburg
-Sun K, J] Shiplett, Charles
Johnson © Railway Club
-BOAN & Marie Davidson,
Cosmetics, Daniel R © Fox
Cabaret (Early show)
16
SAWIE, Fever Feel®
Electric Owl
23
Digitour, Hayes Grier
0 Vogue Theatre
Laraaji, Ramzi© HR
MacMlllan Space
Centre
FRI
-Twerps, Pink Lincolns © Fox
Cabaret
-Peach Kelli Pop, The
Courtneys, Cult Babies^©
The Cobalt
-Jeff The Brotherhood, Bully
© Biltmore Cabaret
-Saint Motel © Venue
10
Psychic Pollution © The Lido
Bakermat © Electric Owl
War Baby, Pale Red, Owl
Skowl, Did You Die, Dried
Out, Zen Mystery Fogg,
Phoenix Thunderbird © -
Railway Club
17
- Discorder Fundraiser ©
The Astoria
- The Dead Milkmen, Lie ©
Fortune Sound Club
- Two Gallants, Clear Plastic
Masks © Electric Owl
- Los Furios, Warless,
Kutapira, The Hang Ten
Hangmen © The Imperial
24
Twin Shadow, Erik Hassle ©
The Imperial
Clark © Electric Owl
Mac DeMarco, Dinner ©
Vogue Theatre (All Ages)
SAT
-Andrew Jackson Jihad, The Smith Street
Band, Jeff Rosenstock, Chumped 0
Rickshaw Theatre
-Sheer Mag, Needles//Pins, Flagpolers 0
Hindenburg
-Broncho, Wyatt Blair 0 Electric Owl
-Outside Dog, Summering, The Wandering Halls 0 Railway Club
11
-BA Johnston, Ace Martens, Up-
tights, Joel Butler © The Astoria
-Wand, Chastity Belt, Vexx © The
Cobalt (Early show)
-Supermoon, Miens, Digital Houdi-
ni, Leon Partriz © Thor's Palace
-Audio Osmosis © The Lido
-The Real McKenzies, The Isotopes,
A Total Disappointment © Rickshaw
Theatre
18
-Record Store Day Live Broadcast on
CiTR 101.9 fm
-Dead Soft, Koban, War Baby 0 Hindenburg
-V.Vecker, Cassette Merchant, PDA, and
Mi'ens 0 333
-Mason Jennings, Lucette 0 The Imperial
-Vancouver Noise Fest V 0 Black Lab
25
-Inherent Vices, Ace Martens, Mary ©Railway Club
-Jose Gonzalez, Olof Ar-
nalds 0 The Imperial
-Mac Demarco 0 Biltmore
Cabaret
-The Soft Moon 0 Electric
Owl &mm»m$imm ■     .
'   :      J,::,
^vH,
r
*
^
iip
V
^ tmm& t :  ■. .
$ w i
-BM0M   HOW THE PIECES FORM THE WHOLE
by Christopher Lennox- Aasen II Photography by Jonathan Dy
II Illustrations by Sharon Ko
"There are two sides to the name Sumac.
One is just the aesthetic of it: the way the
word looks and sounds. The other side is
wanting to have something that had to do
with the idea of passionate living, and naming the band after a living thing made sense,"
says Aaron Turner, guitarist and vocalist of
Sumac. "Additionally, the root of the word
means 'red' in a couple of different languages. I also like how the plant can be medicinal,
poisonous, or used in food. That reflects the
emotional spectrum of the music."
The art metal trio played their first show at
the Rickshaw Theatre in Vancouver this past
December. A few months later, I'm sitting
with Turner and bassist Brian Cook at the
Biltmore Cabaret, a few hours before they hit
the stage for their third show, a kick off for a
tour of the Pacific Northwest. Drummer Nick
Yacyshyn can't make it because of rehearsal
with another band, Erosion, who are playing
that night before Sumac.
"We want to do Sumac full-time. It looks
like even though Brian is busy with Russian
Circles, we'll be able to do what we want
with this exact lineup," says Turner. These
guys are used to the balancing act that being
in several bands calls for. Turner is currently
in Old Man Gloom and Mammifer; Cook in
Russian Circles; and Yacyshyn in Baptists,
Erosion, and The Blood River Band.
Sumac have an impressive legacy between
them, including most notably Isis, Botch,
and A Textbook Tragedy. These histories
now intertwine with this new band, creating
something different, something gloomy and
festering.
"We've sort of paid our dues. People seem
to be willing to let us start off with a bit of a
step up, which is really, really nice. I don't
foresee being constantly on the road, I'd rather be tasteful and do things that fit into our
agenda," says Cook.
Sumac has been fermenting in Turner's
subconscious for a while, and after a long
SUMAC
43 _
_
"/ NEVER FELT LIKE I WAS GOING TO ABANDON HEAVY MUSIC, I JUST
REALIZED I NEEDED TO DO IT WITH DIFFERENT PEOPLE."
string of events, the ball started rolling.
"I actually hoped ISIS would go in this
direction, but it seemed that wasn't really
possible, not with that group of people. Two
years ago I actively started writing. I knew
the foundation piece was finding the right
drummer," explains Turner. "I saw Baptists in
Seattle, and then reached out to Nick. Prior to
him and I writing the record, we hardly knew
one another. Brian and I had been wanting to
be in a band together since '98."
The album was solidified once Turner and
Yacyshyn got together and the songs began
to gel.
"I suggested Nick come down to visit me
for a week after our first jam. I had the arrangements down and had sent him demos.
We had about seven days of rehearsal, and
went right into the studio at the end of that.
It felt right and we followed the path," says
Turner.
The Deal, Sumac's debut album, was recorded with minimal embellishments. Most
of what we hear on the record are first takes.
Other than some feedback overdubs and a
lead line Turner admits to taking the liberty
with, the record is in essence what you will
hear live: dark, crushing, raw, and genre-defying post-metal.
"It was really tracked as a duo. The bass'
role was to be percussive, and be accent driven instead of filling up an entire space. It was
a challenge, but there's no point in not challenging yourself," says Cook.
M
I wanted to capture the performance. The
whole album is supposed to be as stripped
down as possible. Both in instrumentation
and in the way it was recorded," says Turner.
"Lyrically, the album is about entering into
familiar or social contracts that aren't necessarily voluntary or conducive to positive
living. It's about the process of individualization, becoming your own person that can
relate to and connect to other humans, but
not letting your life be dictated to those constructs."
Turner pauses for a second, choosing his
words: "I also needed time away from full-
time rock and roll after ISIS. It was a very
crucial interval for me to reflect on my own
intentions as far as what I wanted to do with
bands, and on how to properly move forward.
I never felt like I was going to abandon heavy
music, I just realized I needed to do it with
different people."
As we're finishing up, I ask how they felt
coming off the stage after that first show.
Turner and Cook look at one another.
"Relief!" laughs Cook. "I haven't been in
a new band for a long time. There's so much
you take for granted when it's an established
band, down to the way people behave on
stage."
"I felt the same," says Turner. "I knew the
songs were good ... I knew Nick is a good
drummer, and Brian is a good bass player,
and I know how to play guitar so I thought
we'd be good live ... but now I know we are.
Now we can get into it for real."
There's a tangible electricity in the air as
the doors to the Biltmore open, and I shake
hands with Turner and Cook. People start
streaming in. Cook mans the merch table.
Turner seeks some solitude. Yacyshyn shows
up with double kick drums in tow.
"It's going to be a loud night," I think to
myself.
*
44
L
SUMAC  \
LITTLE BURSTS OF ANGER
by Esmee Colbourne II Photography by Jaqueline Manoukian
II Illustrations by Maxwell Littledale
This is a band that you look for, not one
you stumble across listening to the radio.
Vancouver darkwave group SNIT's new release, Optimized, is an introspective album.
Its songs radiate an odd binary feeling of being both over the moon, yet still trapped by
clouds. Reflecting some of the more shadowy
areas of the city, Optimized pops and gnashes
its teeth, like little forceful bursts of anger.
As guitarist Trevor puts it, SNIT is sulkily
"purging a lifetime of guilt, frustration, and
pain."
The current members of SNIT are the
band's second incarnation, consisting of lyricist Jessie, bassist Rob, drummer Kati, and
Trevor* on guitar. Optimized, the band's
second full length release, has made a move
from Rob and Trevor's synth heavy sound,
by adding Kati on drums and switching out
the mainly male vocals to female vocals. The
less synthy sound in Optimized was not by
choice, but instead became the result of the
synthesizer frying while plugged into the
wrong power supply. SNIT hopes to bring
the machine's musical elements back into
their sound eventually. Rob explains, "We are
having a lot of synthesizer nightmares, so this
record will be barebones."
SNIT's music writing is a communal process, requiring time to fully take shape. Rob
describes creating songs as the "bass first,
then everybody else fills in their part ... a
skeleton of something ... then everybody
paints the flesh and the eyeballs, and Jessie,
you're the T-shirt and the dress." Jessie's vocals are some of the last layered elements of
the songs on Optimized. She builds up rakish
lyrics on top of the rest of the band's music.
"Start your life over as somebody new / A
brand new you / A younger you"—like most
of SNIT's lyrics, the main refrain from "Seconds," the first track on Optimized, is fast
paced. Each sentence, like the sudden change
in tempo, is a jarringly upbeat reference to
the movie Seconds, starring Rock Hudson.
Trevor believes SNIT's jangly lyrics and melodies in Optimized arc internal monologues,
reflecting Vancouver's eternally grey effect.
"Looking at what goes on, being part of the
community, and whatever happens, affects
us," he explains.
46
SNIT :;:.•.-: ,ft V;:-::.;:::.   ;■;.:;........::.,,,,,.:.,,,-.  Although Vancouver is an inspiration for
SNIT, it is not the only city where SNIT has
fans. They have a solid American fan base
and even have sent a tape to a fan in the U.K.
They also just completed a tour, which included playing a showcase at SXSW. As well
as being Kati's first tour with the band, this
showcase attempted to reach out to American fans. Rob believes that Americans like
SNIT's music because they are still a little
rough around the edges — but maybe that
mentality has something to do with the NRA
hat he sometimes likes to wear when playing
shows.
While speaking about Austin and their
ironic assertion that the band is non-partisan,
SNIT was easily distracted—SXSW soon
morphed into a conversation fueled by Kati's
question about where a bullet goes when you
shoot it into the sky, in relation to Rob's respect to the plight of the Sonoran cactus.
He began, "For the record SNIT is so
against people that shoot Sonoran cacti. The
Sonoran cactus population is depleted because people with guns shoot them up. We
have a lot of fans in Arizona and New Mexico, and that's one thing we really believe.
Stop shooting the fucking cacti."
Trevor agrees, "That's not what guns are
for."
Being a local band, finding rooms and venues to practice and to play in can be tough,
but finding the right sound and the right
crowd has really helped keep SNIT's vibe
alive. Trevor exclaims, "It sucks that all
those amazing independent venues in people's basements are just gone now. It feels
like Toronto with all those new venues moving in." Red Gate, where the band is being
interviewed, is an example of a performance
space that SNIT loves. Rob describes Red
Gate as "home ice," because it's where they
have the most fun and are the most comfortable.
play. The band statement being: "we play
shows, you should come to them."
SNIT is a whirlwind of sound, especially
when playing for a room slightly unsure what
to make of them, and too hip to pay complete
attention. Rob's heavy, rhythmic bass, combined with Kati's sweet drum action creates a
solid base for their jams. Topped by Trevor's
guitar's confused wild static and the gritty
sentiments of Jessie's vocals, the band's sepa- *
rate sounds mesh really well with each other.
On stage, SNIT is able to embrace their beats
to have excellent jam sessions which, as an
audience member, is incredibly fun to watch
and is definitely captured in Optimized.
SNIT's attitude matches the energy of their
music. Both in conversation during the interview, and through their music, the band's
chatter and attitude enables them to weave
in and out of intimacy using a layer of noise
to protect themselves. Although lacking the
synth of previous albums, Rob speaks about
how on Optimized, SNIT's noisy edge is still
alive. "Trevor plays the guitar like a mosquito... it sounds like a mosquito buzzing
around on the new record, I really like it. It's
really cool."
Enjoyably moody, Optimized, SNIT's current release, is a little burst of anger and annoyance, able to combine upbeat lyrics with
dynamic sounds to create songs that are
shady and a little unsettling.
SNIT have currently released Optimized
on Napkin Records as a digital download,
and are anticipating a physical release that
includes more tracks in the near future
* surnames have been withheld at the request of the band
Although feeling at home at Red Gate,
SNIT has a tight set up live, wherever they
49
SNIT PILL SQUAD
Pill Squad
(Self-Released)
This ain't no baby Aspirin. Pill Squad's
debut release is a punk master class for everyone who wishes they were there when...
take this!
Their rock family tree is extensive. Tracy
Brooks is the distinctive lead singer in earlier
Vancouver bands, the Hip Type and Infradig.
As a songwriter and singer, she is one of my
favourites, and has a voice most easily compared to Debbie Harry's. With an appreciation of film kitsch plus her Finnish sense of
humour, Brooks' stage personality comes off
as entertaining and enthralling. Next, take
drummer Scott Beadle, also from the Hip
Type, add Tim Chan formerly of Victoria's
64 Funny Cars and his bandmate Gord Berry
of China Syndrome; stir, shake, and you have
the effervescent concoction that is Pill Squad.
The four exciting songs on their debut EP
give the listener a short, sharp taste of who
they are. Recorded by Adam Payne at Vancouver's "House of Payne," Pill Squad's selection of covers and originals showcase their
range and talent. When was the last time you
heard anyone do a Girls at Our Best song?
Not since Vancouver's late great Debutantes
(who included "Pleasure" and "Fast Boyfriends" in their early 80's sets). Pill Squad
lay down an exhilarating version of "Getting
Nowhere Fast." Next is their take on Big Audio Dynamite's "I Turned Out a Punk" which
is (to my ear) even better than the original
and an ideal manifesto for Pill Squad's musical credo.
I love the third track, "He'll Look Better
(When He's Dead)." This perfect punk-pop
tune's clever lyrics are Brooks' paean to The
Damned's Dave Vanian. She wrote and first
performed this song with the Hip Type, and
its incarnation on this EP coincides serendipi-
tously with the inclusion of a Hip Type CiTR
live performance version of the song on this
year's 15 song CiTR Fundrive cassette.
This irresistible first release from Pill
Squad wraps up nicely with an excellent cover of China Syndrome's "Cantopop." It won
me over by virtue of the hand claps alone
(all my favourite songs seem to include hand
claps!) The catchy chorus and sharp lyrical commentary all wrapped up in the candy
coating of Brooks' voice make this sweet pop
confection delicious.
For some high-altitude-aftitude and that
extra thrill that only a band with wit, style,
and great pop-punk sensibilities can deliver,
this album is the perfect intro. Pill Squad are
BOSS! - Erica Leiren
DOLDRUMS
The Air Conditioned Nightmare
(Sub Pop)
The Air Conditioned Nightmare is the
second full-length release from Doldrums,
the musical brainchild of Arbutus Records
50
UNDER REVIEW alumnus Airick Woodhead. While not a solo
project per se — Woodhead performed with
a backing band while touring, in support of
his 2013 debut, Lesser Evil, and has said this
collaborative, nomadic milieu heavily influenced his songwriting — Doldrums is nonetheless, predominantly the spawn of Wood-
head's twisted, visionary intellect.
Nightmare is a mad scientist's assemblage
of alien synths and strangely danceable beats,
soldered together with DIY samples that
sound like field recordings from another dimension. Woodhead's elfin vocals glide over
and through these soundscapes like a cybernetic hawk navigating the ruins of a dystopic
metropolis. This album is not a drastic divergence from its predecessor, it is a sleeker,
upgraded version; the parts fit together better, it's more polished, and it runs more efficiently.
Aside from the bold and complex range
of sonic texturing to be heard on this album,
what also makes Nightmare special is that
the lyrics have an authentic literary quality,
not often prominent in electronic music. The
album is named after a collection of essays
by Henry Miller about his experiences driving through America after a decade in Europe. These essays are a scathing critique of
a culture based on greed and cruelty, mass
production, and exploitation. True to this
spirit, Doldrums' tracks like "Video Hostage"
don't hesitate to draw their imagery from the
grotesque, alienating aspects of modern existence: "Laying by the exit in plain view / No
one slows down to notice you / Is he sleeping
or is he dead? / Is it a cry for attention? /Video hostage, one billion views / No one stays
long enough to know it's you." Woodhead's
shamanic crooning delivers this subject matter like a dadaist prank; gilded with such rich
sounds and alluring beats that it's already
embedded deep in your subconscious by the
time you realise what he's singing about.
Other tracks like "HOTFOOT," "Loops,"
and "My Friend Simjen,." give high-energy,
manic, distortions of EDM revelry, which
impishly mess with your expectations and
take you places you hadn't realised you
wanted to be. The Air Conditioned Nightmare manages to be dark, trippy, seductive,
and ecstatic in a variety of ways. The gestalt
of these elements becomes both an expression of social revolt and also some gesture
towards a better way of life; one founded
more on creative community and respect for
life, than personal gain at the expense of others. But none of that would matter if it didn't
sound so good, and this album is definitely
worthy of much replay. -Andrew Reeves
FREAK HEAT WAVES
Bonnie's State of Mind
(Hockey Dad Records)
The first time I stumbled across Victoria's
Freak Heat Waves, I was browsing through
the "suggested" section of Red Cat Records.
The flashy album artwork of Bonnie's State of
Mind drew my attention immediately, along
with a sticky note on the album reading: "for
the post-punk looking for a good time."
After listening to the album I realized that
each song on Bonnie's State of Mind sounds
unique. As a result, the record listens like a
compilation. Despite its retro post punk feel,
the futuristic beats add a new groove to the
genre. Red Cat nailed their description of this
record; if you are looking for a good time,
you'll find it in Bonnie's State of Mind.
Freak Heat Waves use timing to draw
you into the record. The first two tracks
UNDER REVIEW
51 - "Plastic-Coated Dancers," followed by
"Bonnie's State of Mind" - listen as one, chill
intro. The swirling synths are neat but forgettable until they cut off suddenly, as the tone
switches into the pulsing beat of the third
track, "Design of Success." Steven Lind's
monotone vocals are very soothing, like he
is whispering something alien just below the
surface of the guitar riff. In "Dig a Hole,"
Lind's vocals are just audible, cooing: "It's
just a uniform / No pride of industry / Guaranteed to make you want money for your
time." Although this is the closest song on
the record to a single, the collective scrappi-
ness of these songs has an appeal of cohesive
diversity.
The diversity of this record was inspired
largely by mixtapes. The three band members - Steven Lind (guitar/vocals), Thomas
Di Ninno (drums), and James Twiddy (bass)
- were all extensively involved in the production process and are prone to instrument
swapping which solidifies the compilation/
mixtape sound of the record. The retro guitar
riffs tied in with futuristic beats and elusive
vocals make Bonnie's State of Mind a slick
listen from start to finish. Considering their
front cover feature in the February edition
of Discorder and the fact that they're touring with fellow post-punk success story Viet
Cong this spring, Freak Heat Waves is definitely a band to keep an eye out for. -Julia
Lehn
POLARHORSE
Data
(Self-Released)
The worst thing about Data, Polarhorse's
seminal new recording, is that there isn't
more. Continuing the work that guitarist
Adrian Yee contributed to now-defunct Vancouver band The Barcelona Chair, Polarhorse
is a fantastic blend of all the "-rock" sounds:
post, prog, math, and experimental.
Data is their most cohesive album to date,
and easily the most polished. Data blends
the frenetic musicianship of LA. duo El Ten
Eleven, with cues from Japanese acts like
Sgt. (noticeable in Yee's trumpet and saxophone work) and Uchu Conbini, where parallels between the infectiously happy guitar
work are apparent. Each track—graced with
fantastic titles like "Bob Marley's Tesseract"
and "Colorless Green Ideas Sleep Furiously"—changes tack quickly, and often without
warning, moving from mathy guitar licks to
punchy full-band jamming and back to serene melody-led post-rock. Polarhorse is a
fantastically dynamic band and Data is the
first release to really showcase that breadth
of talent and skill.
There's a lot going on under the covers of
this six-track album, whose recording members include Arthur Delahooke (drums), Daniel Baxter (bass), and Trevor Wong (guitar).
Songs often feel much larger in scope and
sound than a four-member bill usually allows
for, but instead of feeling overdubbed into
52
UNDER REVIEW existential crisis, Data comes across as very
visceral and live-off-the-floor. Added bits of
noise, clicks, and background noise help add
to this impression in between songs, and far
from sounding amateur they merely add another layer of professionalism to Polarhorse's
recording. Data is a grand example of what
Polarhorse are capable of, and a welcome
addition to Vancouver's instrumental music
library. - Fraser Dobbs
VIET CONG
Viet Cong
(Flemish Eye/Jagjaguwar)
Rising from the ashes of esteemed lo-
fi psych-rock group Women—which was
tragically cut short by the death of frontman
Christopher Reimer—Calgary post-punk
outfit Viet Cong have a lot to live up to, and
their debut self-titled album does just that.
Running a quick 37 minutes from beginning
to end, the record shifts between the comfort
of commercial indie rock and the confused
paranoia of experimental noise. With their
lead single "Continental Shelf'—easily their
most accessible and poppy track—nestled
right in the middle of the album, the song's
catchy vocal melody and shimmering guitar
lines prove that Viet Cong can produce a radio hit without compromising their distinct,
industrial sound.
However, they are quick to go after more
challenging musical concepts. Starting with
the album's opener, "Newspaper Spoons,"
the band introduces themselves with a pummelling, static filled drum beat followed by
an almost cult-like chant. As the song drones
on, distant electronic distortion builds, rising
slowly into cacophony, only to fade out into
warm, angelic synth sounds. And that's just
the first song.
The rest of the album skirts between dissonance and euphony, aggression and ease,
white noise and whatever the opposite of
white noise is.
On "March of Progress"—their most radical and most rewarding track— there are
nearly three minutes of drums pounding in
an elusive time signature resound, overtop a
droning synth. As the song grinds on, pushing closer and closer to near-fatal monotony,
it switches into an arpeggiated and bright
verse, punctuated by a steady kick drum and
an Eno-esque vocal melody. Then, it bursts
into something new all over again. A lively,
spacious, poly-rhythmic guitar line takes
over, with vocalist Matt Flegel crooning out
words that defy every aspect of tjie song in
which they inhabit: "Tell me, tell me, tell it to
me, tell it straight."
The sonic diversity on "March of Progress," much like the rest of Viet Cong, is staggering—especially given that, in all its multiplicity, it sounds so cohesive. Songs range
from three to eleven minutes long; traditional
song structures are both embraced and abandoned; harsh noise merges with clean tones.
While the album navigates carefully between
experimentation and commercial appeal,
the balance and poise with which Viet Cong
move is enough to prove that their debut full-
length is worthy of attention.
- Jasper D Wrinch
JONS
Serfs of Today
(Self-Released)
The DIY aesthetic encourages, if not
champions, a special level of intimacy between a musician and their listener. The wall
of separation between the artist and their audience is all but shattered on records which
UNDER REVIEW
53 :
more," by using simple instrumentation and
carefully penned tunes to communicate relat-
able and positively human anguish.
-James Olson :
communicate universal emotion with poignancy. Jons' second album, Serfs of Today,
almost achieves this feat, faltering only when
the otherwise strong songwriting shows inconsistencies.
Advertised as a home recording on a pair
of Tascam 488 8-track tape machines, Serfs
of Today unveils large scale angst on a small
scale stage. The Victoria band's blend of garage rock, psych, surf, and even folk is coloured in varying shades of melancholia.
Jons don't sound sad per se, but they certainly are downcast. The chiming guitar intro on
"Sugarfree" that serves as the listener's point
of entry to the album sets the tone for the rest
of the record in more ways than one. It's subdued, restrained, and tinged with unease. The
highest peaks on Serfs of Today are, in contrast, depictions of severe emotional lows.
"Orcachief' is a dour breakup song, executed
in a fashion similar to Lou Reed's early solo
work which floats up into ether on the wings
of a tastefully executed keyboard melody.
Late album highlight "Softspot" feels positively weary; the line, "I grew up in a home /
But it wasn't my own," speaking volumes in
its raw, painful simplicity.
The only critique that can be leveled at
Serfs of Today is that the songwriting is inconsistent. For every stroke of brilliance
shown on tracks like "I Haven't Learned"
and "Last Minute," there are numbers like
"Get Away From the Thing" and "Catamaran," which feel like throwaways despite using similar sonic ingredients. However, Jons
successfully confirm the old adage, "less is
54
UNDER
SUMAC
The Deal
(Profound Lore Records)
There are few recent innovators of heavy
music as accomplished as Sumac's guitarist/
vocalist Aaron Turner. His impressive output
is revered within the heavy metal pantheon
and includes, but is not limited to, pioneering
work with the now defunct post metal outfit
Isis and the eccentric doom entity Old Man
Gloom.
The Deal sees Turner team up with drummer Nick Yacyshyn ofVancouver's Baptists
and bassist Brian Cook of Russian Circles,
with the expressed goal of making some of
the heaviest music Turner has ever been involved in. While this has clearly been fulfilled
by way of Turner's lurching, menacing riffs,
and distinct bellowed vocals, the album's
heaviness is only part of what makes it so
intoxicatingly thrilling to listen to; The Deal
is staggering avant garde metal. Although
notably more minimalistic than either Isis or
Old Man Gloom, Sumac's peculiar personality lies somewhere between the ethos of
both projects. The former's focus on scope,
repetition, and nonlinear song evolution is
balanced with the latter's tendencies towards
suffocating heaviness, playful experimental-
ism, and bizarrely infectious riffs.
REVIEW Like many of the great sludge/stoner/doom
metal bands, Sumac understands the power
of a riff being so captivating that it merits
repetition. However, this is not conducive
to the record's hooks being repeated ad nau-
seum. Vacyshyn's intricate drumming carries
the songs through some of the more unabated passages on the album, and allows them
to evolve from creeping sludge to frenzied
hardcore in a way that seems organic rather
than disjointed.
This sophisticated approach to structure allows feverish thrash, monumental riffs, and
weirdly groovy passages to arise amidst the
album's brooding, sinister landscape, and illustrates Turner's capacity as a truly original
and important songwriter. Although perhaps
not as game changing as his work with Isis,
The Deal is an example of how metal—now
in its fifth or sixth decade of existence—can
still be exhilarating, exploratory, and relevant.   - Ewan Thompson
FAITH HEALER
Cosmic Troubles
(Mint Records)
A certain kind of nonchalant coolness oozes out of Cosmic Troubles, an album concocted by Edmonton-based artist Jessica Jalbert
and engineered by Renny Wilson. If you're
a supporter of the musical styling of the bygone era of the 470s, you'll find lots to vibe
with in this album.
Jalbert is no newbie to the world of music.
In fact she's been collaborating with, and has
played in various bands for a hearty number
of years. Jalbert has played in the Tee-Tah's,
Jom Comyn, and plays part of the Renny
Wilson Punk Explosion. Faith Healer, is doing just what the name suggests: restoring
faith in today's music scene with the effortless groove of yester-years.
Cosmic Troubles is home to eleven tracks
packed with '60s garage pop punch and
laced with surf rock beats. This melding of
genres acts as a serving dish for harmonies
sung by Jalbert. The album eases into itself
with the first track "Acid." Here, the guitar
strumming is breezy and effortless, with the
chord progression bearing a spacey similarity
to "Sweet Jane" by the Velvet Underground.
Jalbert's harmony melts over the tune, and
despite the cold lyrics: "You can have my
acid /1 don't want it on my tongue / The last
time that we passed it / I just hated everyone," it's easy to find your hips wanting to
shake along with the upbeat tempo.
A few tracks in, "Canonized" shifts the
tone of the album unexpectedly towards
more ominous vibes, with its use of slow guitar strums and hypnotic drum beats. Dazed,
and more carefree than confused, "No Car"
continues on a psychedelic pop wavelength.
Although the album treads lightly on a sweet
note, there is still a variation in emotion produced out of the songs that sounds satisfying
to whatever mood you might be in.
Despite what the name suggests, Cosmic
Troubles is really in no trouble at all. It kicks
major ass with its breezy compilation of head
nodding tunes. If a psychedelic pop revival is
your kind of musical palette, let the dreamy
sound of Faith Healer give you the goods.
-Jackie Manoukian
UNDER REVIEW
55 BACK AND STILL RUNNING
by Jasper D. Wrinch II Illustrations by Karl Ventura
II Photography by Tara Bigdeli
As the sun dips below the brick buildings
of Gastown, I stand with Kevin Doherty, guitarist and founding member of Vancouver's
premiere 'sludge-fuzz rock' band Weed, at
the base of the iconic Hotel Europe. Cars plod
across the cobbled streets as bassist Hugo
Noriega joins us; the band is assembling.
After driving by a few times in search of an
elusive parking spot, Will Anderson, the third
and final band member arrives, ready to answer "anything hard-hitting. We'll talk shit."
Moving across the street to Hot Pie Pizza, a
hidden gem ofVancouver's dollar-slice pizza
joints, I opt to get the basics out of the way
first: "How would you describe your sound?"
While the listener might circle around
words like loud, melodic, or aggressive to
characterize their sound, and while one might
try to pin them down as rock, grunge, or punk,
Weed themselves see their music in a different manner. Between mouthfuls of fresh pizza, Doherty explains that Weed has "no fixed
genre. There's a new one every night."
That's a lot of genres, considering how often they find themselves playing shows and
touring. "Usually as soon as we get back
from a tour," Anderson explains, "we start
planning the next one ... It works out to about
three per year."
As it stands, the band is about to embark
on yet another tour, this time down from
New York to Florida, in support of their newest full-length record, Running Back, out
April 7 on Lefse Records. In their markedly
DIY style, Weed does all their own booking,
which leads them to a wide variety of venues across the continent. "Coffee shops are
always awkward," remarks Doherty, "but
basements are usually the most successful."
Despite their strict self-prescribed all-ages policy to their shows, they find they can
make the most out of all the veijues they play.
"We play a lot of cool spaces overall," notes
Noriega. "Unconventional places that aren't
necessarily made for music."
When asked why they refuse to play anything but universally accessible shows, Anderson says, "It's important for kids to see
shows," and leaves it at that.
Despite a new record label, a studio
change, and having been done for over a
year, Running Back is far from a radical departure of their previous releases. Drenched
in intensity and distortion, guitar lines still
force their way through the noise into clear
56
WEED 3
*v melodic structures; Anderson's subdued vocals still float across the songs before exploding into throat bursting screams; the band's
pop sensibility still shines through the fuzz,
the sludge, and the volume.
Unlike their previous effort, 2013's Deserve — which was recorded and mixed by
Seattle native Dylan Wall — Weed decided
to work with someone new to record Running Back. "We just heard some really great
things about the recording process with Jordan [Koop]," Anderson remarks.
I might add that Koop runs the Noise Floor
recording studio, out of his converted boat-
house on scenic Gabriola Island, and just got
back from a one week internship with the
legendary underground recording engineer
Steve Albini in France. With that sort of resume, you'd think working with him would
be a dream come true.
"We loved doing it," says Anderson, "but
we didn't like the way the recordings turned
out. That's why we went back to Dylan
[Wall] and we re-recorded a lot of stuff." The
band is quick to add, however, that they feel
no ill will towards Koop. "That's no slight to
Jordan at all. We just felt the way our band
was captured was better with Dylan."
With two full-length releases under their
belt, and a slew of EPs and seven-inches, it
comes as a surprise that Weed is still in need
of a drummer. "Our last drummer — our
drummer on the records — left to pursue
another career," remarks Anderson. Yet with
their near-constant touring, somehow Weed
manages to get by. Along with a list of drummers they can ask to play, Anderson explains
that "Graeme [McDonald] is our local dude.
He plays with Dead Soft, but he's pretty busy
with that band."
So for all you drummers out there, looking
to play with the 'sentimental dream-grunge'
kings of Vancouver, Weed is in need. "They
have to be really good at drums," notes
Noriega, "and really cool."
While the band finishes their slice of pizza,
the topic of musical influences comes up.
Like their genre, it's hard to pick out clear
artistic influences from their music. While I
suggest Dinosaur Jr, or Built To Spill as having some impact on their music, all three
members of Weed move in a completely different direction. "I'd say we rarely listen to
music," notes Noriega. "Our influences include a dash of Smash Mouth," adds Doherty.
"Macklemore," says Anderson, "but collectively, Limp Bizkit."
As our conversation drifts into dark would-
you-rather questions, the cinematic merit of
Dunston Checks In, and their favourite Drake
albums, it's a toss up between Nothing Was
The Same and Take Care, for those of you
wondering, I sit back and take note of who
I'm sitting with. This is Weed: the finest foolish-sludge rockers in Vancouver — if not the
world.
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OF PROPERTY SPECULATION
by Jonathan Kew and Joshua Gabert-Doyon (JoJo)
Illustrations by Jenna Milsom
Over the past few years we've seen a number of niche Canadian music magazines fold;
most recently Calgary's Fast Forward Weekly. These magazines are not unlike Discorder.
It's not a revelation that the arts underground is at risk of catching fire — we all
know it's been burning for a while. Essential
to the shared imagination of undergrounds is
a constant sense of peril. If it's not real estate, it's lack of arts funding. If it's not lack of
funding, it's that scary monolith called the Internet. Ironically, there appears to be no other
means of understanding an "underground."
We're always one summer away from the last
venue shutting down.
As Discorder writers, we decided not to
throw our hands up, but instead to poke at
some of the assumptions which make evident
Discorder's role in this crisis — and not just
because we're both unqualified to review the
latest indie rock release. We may lack a rousing call to action, but we can offer a meek defence of what Discorder does do right, given
the contradictions and challenges that face
Discorder's writers and local music-goers.
Criticism within any local niche is caught
between being critical, and supporting the
community. Given the latter, what can criticism — often, by necessity or mandate,
written by amateurs — contribute? "2014:
What is 'Critical' About Contemporary Music Criticism," an excellent article by James
Parker and Nicholas Croggon, argues that a
THE STATE OF MUSIC CRITICISM
61 "ONLY A FEW OF US CAN FIND-AND EVEN FEWER OF US CAN AFFORD-
THE TIME REQUIRED FOR THIS KIND OF CRITICAL WORK/'
thorough critical purview, grounded in expertise, is what useful criticism requires. This is
especially the case when criticism can perpetuate consumption by acting as a consumer
guide and eliding the political and economic
concerns which threaten alternative spaces,
thereby creating "No Fun City." As Parker
and Croggon say, this is what a criticism
based around "purely sentimental response,"
ends up doing.
That said, the criticism Parker and Croggon argue for instead demands rigor. "Only
a few of us can find — and even fewer of
us can afford—the time required for this kind
of critical work," they write. And unlike the
sleek mags we hope to be published in one
day, Discorder cannot afford to pay its writers. This means that many who do write for
Discorde are the passionate, who choose to
write about shows they want to see, albums
they want to hear, and bands they want to interview. If there's an ideal of critical purity
at stake here, Discorder is far past that point.
To some extent, Discorder is defined by its
amateur, "on-the-ground" perspective. It is a
collection of commentaries that doesn't exist to make year-end lists or generate ranking
criteria for a taxonomy of modern music. As
much as it's due to the limitations we've just
discussed, we nonetheless find great value in
Discorder's role, documenting Vancouver's
arts scene and sharing music on a local scale.
But beyond our mandate to train amateur
writers, it's worth asking; why can't we afford to pay for critics? Why do Discorder
and other local culture magazines lack funding? A variety of reasons: inaccessibility of
grants, lack of advertising, the high cost of
living in the city, etc. Again we arrive at the
political and economic conditions which create "No Fun City."
And there's no denying that there is a crisis. To quote local gallery operator Andrew
Volk from a recent article by Alex de Boer,
"It's just going to get harder for people at the
bottom. If you're not an established gallery,
then fucking get established. If you have no
money, it's best to get some."
Volk's by-the-bootstraps appeal is a reaction to a city where every success of the underground is interlocked with a squeeze on
the underground. It's fantastic that bands like
Nu Sensae and Cool TV played the Khatsah-
lano Block Party, and it's great to support local events, but it's also worth examining what
institutions like Khatsahlano Block Party
represent. By supporting these events uncritically, we ignore their role in gentrification
and other factors which make "No Fun City"
no fun in the first place.
It's not to say that appreciation of the scene
creates gentrification itself — underground
bands getting coverage is good! But when we
62
THE STATE OF MUSIC CRITICISM  just cheerlead every explosion in music culture, we ignore the ways that arts appreciation
is tied to increasing housing costs. After all,
Kitsilano (where Khatsahlano Block Party
is held) is Vancouver's premiere counterculture enclave-turned gentrified neighborhood;
where property value is propped up on top of
creative production. Khatsahlano is precisely
the kind of event that is (by no means intentionally) a part of Vancouver's continuing
marketization and real estate inflation.
A fervor for more music, more festivals,
and more culture is the sentimental response,
or soft critique, that Parker and Croggon
write about — and Discorder writers have to
move beyond it. We're faced with the contradiction though, that an on-the-ground critique is precisely what Discorder does well,
and what its writers want to be doing.
A particularly explosive example: last
Summer we faced a lot of negative feedback
when our magazine was perceived as attacking an underground Canadian artist (which,
in light of our perpetual crisis, was understood as kicking a dog when it was down). To
remain an institution and as a consequence
of political-economic conditions (remember,
our writers), there's a general sense that Discorder must fill that role as cheerleader.
But it should not fulfill this role without
a constant awareness of the circumstances
under which artists make art within in Vancouver. Things are complicated for us kids.
A hardline stance is difficult. We're always
trying to hold these contradictions together;
to cover the scene and be good to the community, without losing the critical impetus and
oversight that allows us to talk about these
crisis issues.
That said and all things considered, we'd
like to end on another high-falluting quote,
this time from Vancouver Noise Fest's Face-
book page: "This isn't about being mellow
and connected and spiritual, this is about
harshing everyone's fucking mellow!"
64
THE STATE OF MUSIC CRITICISM CITR 101.9FM PROGRAM GUIDE
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3:00"
4:00"
5:00"
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CRIMES &
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NOD ON THE
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STRANDED
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NASHA VOLNA    CRESCENDO
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SOULSHIP
ENTERPRISE
MORE THAN
HUMAN
WHITE NOISE
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RHYTHMNS     PROGRES-
IND1A            SIVO
SKALDS HALL
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SYNAPTIC
SANDWICH
RANDOPHONIC
BOOTLEGS &
B-SIDES
TRANCENDANCE
AURAL TENTACLES
CITR
GHOST
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THE
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SHOW
THE ABSOLUTE
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CITR
GHOST
MIX
6:00"
CITR 707.9 FM PROGRAM GUIDE DIFFICULT
Bepi Crespan Presents... SUN 7am
Bepi Crespan Presents... CiTR's 24 Hours Of Radio Art in a snack
size format! Difficult music, harsh electronics, spoken word, cut-
up/collage and general Crespan© weirdness. Twitter: (©bepicrespan. Blog: bepicrespan.blogspot.ca
%# H** •- *■ J*% ILs
Classical Chaos SUN 9am
From the Ancient World to the 21 st century, join host Marguerite
in exploring and celebrating classical music from around the
world.
I rtLpL
Alphabet Soup Alternating Wednesdays 6pm
Alphabet Soup is a talk show which focuses on the writing of
MFA Creative Writing students at UBC.Topics include events happening in the program and the Vancouver art scene while promoting the writers and the genre which they are working in.
Aloud Alternating Thursdays 1pm
Aloud features authors and literary critics reading, analyzing and
discussing their favourite short stories. Every month we invite a
prominent Vancouver-based author or critic to share one of their
favourite pieces of short fiction on air. The show—one hour in
length—begins with the guest reading selections from the story
and ends with an engaging discussion of the work with Aloud
host, David Gaertner—a UBC postdoctoral fellow with a PhD in
Literature. Theme and interstitial music provided by Vancouver
musician Jason Starnes with support from UBC's First Nations
Studies Program. Read more at aloudliterature.tumblr.com and
follow us on Twitter @Aloud_Lit.
AstroTalk THU 3pm
Space is an interesting place. Marco slices up the night sky with
a new topic every week. Death Stars, Black Holes, Big Bangs, Red
Giants, the Milky Way, G-Bands, Syzygy's, Pulsars, Super Stars...
The Sector FRI 8am
Discussing the world of social justice, non-profits, charities and
activism. Join Ethan for in-depth interviews, examinations of
nonprofit missions and causes, and discussions of everything
from philanthropy to progressive politics.
Synchronicity MON 12pm
Join host Marie B and discuss spirituality, health and feeling
good. Tune in and tap into good vibrations that help you remember why you're here: to have fun!
News 101 FRI 5pm
Vancouver's only live, volunteer-produced, student and community newscast. Every week, we take a look back at the week's local, national and international news, as seen from a fully independent media perspective.
Queer FM Vancouver: Reloaded TUE 8am
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transexual communities of Vancouver. Lots of human interest features, background
on current issues and great music.queerfmradio@gmail.com
Radio Free Thinker TUE 3pm
Promoting skepticism, critical thinking and science, we examine popular extraordinary claims and subject them to critical
analysis.
Terry Project Podcast WED 11:30am
There once was a project named Terry, That wanted to make
people wary, Of things going on In the world that are wrong
without making it all seem too scary.
All Ears Alternating Wednesdays 1pm
(Alternating with UBC Arts On Air.) All Ears is an advice radio program targetted to the UBC community. We try to answer your
questions and address topics sent via social media and over the
phone. Interviews and segments relating to campus life will be
featured, all in our attempt to better our community and supply positive feedback.
Extraenvironmentalist WED 2pm
Exploring the mindset of an outsider looking in on Earth.
Featuring interviews with leading thinkers in the area of sustainable economics and our global ecological crisis.
Arts Report WED 5pm
Reviews, interviews and coverage of local arts (film, theatre,
dance, visual and performance art, comedy, and more) by host
Jake Costello and the Arts Reporters.
UBC Arts On Air Alternating Wednesdays 6pm
Ira Nadel, UBC English, offers scintillating profiles and unusual interviews with members of UBC Arts world. Tune in for programs,
people and personalities in Art
Sexy In Van City WED 10pm
Your weekly dose of education and entertainment in the realm
of relationships and sexuality, sexyinvancity.com/category/
sexy-in-vancity-radio.
The Real Whirled THU 8am
The Reel Whirled is an hour long escapade through the world
of cinema, be it contemporary or classic, local or global. From
our perspective as the UBC Film Society, we talk about film intellectually, passionately and goofily. With select music from
our cinematic subjects, we pull your Thursday mornings into focus, from bleary eyed to sharp and worthy of the silver screen.
ubcfilmsociety.com | chairperson@ubcfilmsociety.com
The Community Living Show THU 9am
This show is produced by the disabled community and showcases special guests and artists. The focus is for a positive
outlook on programs and events for the entire community.
Originally called "The Self Advocates", from Co-Op Radio CFRO,
the show began in the 1990s We showcase BC Self Advocates
with lots of interviews from people with special needs. Tune
in for interesting music, interviews and some fun times. This program is syndicated with the NCRA (National Community and
Campus Radio Association) across BC and across Canada. Hosted
by: Kelly Reaburn, Michael Rubbin Clogs and Friends, communi-
tylivingradio.wordpress.com | communitylivingradio@gmail.com
| Community Living Radio Show | @clivingradio
| #communitylivingradio
The Social Focus Alternating Thursdays 6pm
An interview-based show about how students, past and present, have come up with creative ways to overcome social challenges in the community. Each episode will invite individuals
to share their stories of success and failure, along with actionable advice on how to start an innovative initiative that serves
the community. Hear from UBC students, alumni and others involved in the community!
The Matt & Ryan Show Alternating Thursdays 7:30pm
the Matt and Ryan show featuring Ryan and Matt. An hour and
a half of pure fun and good music. Matt and Ryan take calls,
give advice, and generally tell you what's up. The phone lines
are open.
Language to Language MON 11am
Encouraging language fluency and cultural awareness.
White Noise SAT 8pm
Need some comic relief? Join Richard Blackmore for half an
hour of weird and wonderful radio every week, as he delves
in to the most eccentric corners of radio for your listening
pleasure. Then stay tuned for the after show featuring a Q
and A with the creator, actors and a guest comic every week.
whitenoiseUBC@gmail.com
SOUL IF
The Rockers Show
Reggae inna all styles and fashion.
SUN 12pm
RC / FQU JS
Blood On The Saddle Alternating Sundays 3pm
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-boots country.
Pacific Pickin' TUE 6am
Bluegrass, old-time music, and its derivatives with Arthur and
the lovely Andrea Berman. Email: paciflcpickin@yahoo.com
Folk Oasis WED 8pm
Two hours of eclectic folk/roots music, with a big emphasis on
our local scene. C'mon in! A kumbaya-free zone since 1997.
Email: folkoasis@gmail.com
The Saturday Edge SAT 8am
A personal guide to world and roots music—with African, Latin,
and European music in the first half, followed by Celtic, blues, songwriters, Cajun, and whatever else fits! Email: steveedge3@mac.com.
Code Blue SAT 3pm
From backwoods delta low-down slide to urban harp honks,
blues, and blues roots with your hosts Jim, Andy, and Paul.
Email: codeblue@paulnorton.ca
Soulship Enterprise SAT 7pm
A thematically oriented blend of classic funk, soul, r&b, jazz, and
afrobeat tunes, The Happy Hour has received great renown as
the world's foremost funky, jazzy, soulful, and delightfully awkward radio show hosted by people named Robert Gorwa and/
or Christopher Mylett Gordon Patrick Hunter III.
African Rhyhms
Website: www.africanrhythmsradio.com
FRI 7:30pm
H-5r
Nod on the List TUE 11pm
"Nod on the List is a program featuring new urban and alternative music, sounds of beats, hip hop, dancehail, bass, In*
terviews, guest hosts and more every Tuesday at 11pm.
scads_international@yahoo.com
facebook-So Salacious"
Crimes & Treasons TUE 9pm
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill ish. Hosted by
Jamal Steeles, Trinidad Jules & DJ Relly Rels.
Website: http://crimesandtreasons.blogspot.ca.
Email: dj@crimesandtreasons.com.
Vibes & Stuff TUE 4pm
Feeling nostalgic? Vibes and Stuff has you covered bringing
you some of the best 90s to early 2000s hip-hop artist all in
one segment. All the way from New Jersey and New York City,
DJ Bmatt and DJ Jewels will be bringing the east coast to the
west coast throughout the show. We will have you reminiscing
about the good ol' times with Vibes and Stuff every Wednesday
afternoon from 1:00pm-2:00pm PST.
E-mail: vibesandstuffhiphop@gmail.com
New Era Alternating Thursdays 7:30pm
Showcases up and coming artists who are considered "underdogs" in the music industry. The show will provide a platform
for new artists who are looking to get radio play.
Hip-Hop music from all over the world along with features of
multi-genre artists.
More Than Human SUN 7pm
Strange and wonderful electronic sounds from the past, present,
and future with host Gareth Moses. Music from parallel worlds.
Pop Drones WED 10am
Unearthing the depths of contemporary cassette and vinyl underground. Ranging from DIY bedroom pop and garage rock all
the way to harsh noise and, of course, drone.
Kew It Up WED 3pm
Abrasive fight-or-flight music played at hot loud volumes, uncooperative songs for things that are not alright. Punk, Noise-Rock,
Post-Punk, Experimental, Industrial, Noisy, ad nauseum :, :    V*     '-::■:   '       •
La Fiesta Alternating Sundays 3pm
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue, Latin House, and Reggaeton with your
hostGspotDJ.
The Leo Ramirez Show MON 5pm
The best of mix of Latin American music.
Email: leoramirez@canada.com
ETHIOPIAN
Shookshookta SUN 10am
A program targeted to Ethiopian people that encourages education and personal development.
CHINESE / KOREAN
Asian Wave WED 4pm
Tune in to Asian Wave 101 to listen to some of the best music from the Chinese language and Korean music industries, as
well the latest news coming from the two entertainment powerhouses of the Asian pop scene. The latest hits from established
artists, rookies only just debuted, independent artists and classic
songs from both industries, can all be heard on Asian Wave 101,
as well as commentary, talk and artist spotlights of unsigned
Canadian talent. Only on CiTR 101.9 FM.
RUS       N
NashaVolna SAT 6pm
News, arts, entertainment and music for the Russian community,
local and abroad. Website: nashavolna.ca.
man
Rhythmsindia
Alternating Sundays 8pm
Featuring a wide ' range, of music from India, including popular music from
the 1930s to the present; Ghazals and Bhajans, Qawwalis, pop
and regional language numbers.
PEBS1AN
Simorgh THU 5pm
Simorgh Radio is devoted to the education and literacy for the
Persian speaking communities and those interested in connecting to Persian oral and written literature. Simorgh takes ypu
through a journey of ecological sustainability evolving within
cultural and social literacy. Simorgh the mythological multiplicity of tale-figures, fands-in as your mythological narrator in the
storyland; the contingent space of beings, connecting Persian
peoples within and to Indigenous peoples.
Mantra SAT 5pm
An electic mix of electronic and acoustic beats and layers, chants and medicine song. Exploring the diversity of the
worlds sacred sounds - traditional, contemporary and futuristic.
Email: mantraradioshow@gmail.com
DANCE/ELECTRONIC
Copy/Paste THU 11pm
If it makes you move your feet (or nod your head), it'll be heard
on copy/paste. Tune in every week for a full hour DJ mix by
Autonomy, running the gamut from cloud rap to new jack
techno and everything in between.
Techno Progressive Alternating Sundays 8pm
A mix of the latest house music, tech-house, prog-house and
techno.
Trancendance SUN 10pm
Hosted by DJ Smiley Mike and DJ Caddyshack, Trancendance
has been broadcasting from Vancouver, B.C. since 2001.
We favour Psytrance, Hard Trance and Epic Trance, but also
play Acid Trance, Deep Trance, Hard Dance and even some
Breakbeat. We also love a good Classic Trance Anthem, especially if it's remixed. Current influences include Sander
van Doom, Gareth Emery, Nick Sentience, Ovnimoon, Ace
Ventura, Save the Robot, Liquid Soul and Astrix. Older influences include Union Jack, Carl Cox, Christopher Lawrence,
Whoop! Records, Tidy Trax, Platipus Records and Nukleuz.
Email: djsmileymike @trancendance.net.
Website: www.trancendance.net.
Inside Out
TUE8pm
Radio Zero FRI 2pm
An international mix of super-fresh weekend party jams from
New Wave to foreign electro, baile, Bollywood, and whatever
else. Website: www.radiozero.com
Synaptic Sandwich SAT 9pm
If you like everything from electro/techno/trance/8-
bit music/retro '80s, this is the show for you!
Website: synapticsandwich.net
The Late Night Show FRI 1230am
The Late Night Show features music from the underground
Jungle and Drum & Bass scene, which progresses to Industrial,
Noise and Alternative No Beat into the early morning. Following
the music, we then play TZM broadcasts, beginning at 6 a.m.
Inner Space Alternating Wednesdays 6:30pm
Dedicated to underground electronic music, both experimental
and dance-oriented. Live DJ sets and guests throughout.
Bootlegs & B-Sides SUN 9pm
Hosted by Doe Ran, tune in for the finest remixes from soul to
dubstep and ghetto funk to electro swing. Nominated finalist
for 'Canadian college radio show of the year 2012' Pioneer DJ
Stylus Awards. Soundcloud.com/doe-ran and search "Doe-Ran"
on Facebook. / POP / INDIE
of lighthearted twin talk and rad tunes from a variety of artists who have been featured on our website. What website?
thepermanentrainpress.com
Canada Post-Rock FRI 10pm
Formerly on CKXU, Canada-Post Rock now resides on the west
coast but it's still committed to the best in post-rock, drone,
ambient, experimental, noise and basically anything your host
Pbone can put the word "post" infront of. Transition State THU 11am
High quality music with a special guest interview from the
Crescendo SUN 6pm Pharmaceutical Sciences. Frank discussions and music that
Starting with some serene chill tracks at the beginning and can save the world
building to the INSANEST FACE MELTERS OF ALL TIMEEE,
Crescendo will take you on a musical magic carpet ride that Shine On TUE 1 pm
you couldn't imagine in your wildest dreams. Besides oversell- An eclectic mix of the latest, greatest tunes from the Vancouver
ing his show, Jed will play an eclectic set list that builds through- underground and beyond, connected through a different theme
out the hour and features both old classics, and all the greatest each week. Join your host Shea every Tuesday for a groovy mu-
new tracks that the hipsters think they know about before any- sical experience!
oneelsedoes.    	
Soul Sandwich THU 4pm
Dave Radio with Radio Dave FRI 12pm A myriad of your favourite music tastes all cooked into one show.
Your noon-hour guide to what's happening in Music and Theatre From Hip Hop to Indie rock to African jams, Ola will play through
in Vancouver. Lots of tunes and talk. a whirlwind of different genres, each sandwiched between another. This perfect layering of yummy goodness will blow your
Discorder Radio TUE 5pm mind. AND, it beats subway.
Discorder Magazine now has its own radio show! Join us to hear
excerpts of interviews, reviews and more! The Shakespeare Show WED 12pm
Dan Shakespeare is here with music for your ear. Kick back with
Duncan's Donuts THU 12pm gems of the previous years.
Sweet treats from the pop underground. Hosted by Duncan,
sponsored by donuts. http://duncansdonuts.wordpress.com. Up on the Roof FRI 9am
s-•• • Friday Mornings got you down? Climb Up On the Roof and wake
Spice of Life THU 2pm up with Robin and Jake! Weekly segments include improvised
The spice extends life. The spice expands consciousness. The crime-noir radio dramas, trivia contents, on-air calls to Jake's
Spice of Life brings you a variety of Post-Rock, Shoegaze, Math older brother and MORE! We'll be spinning old classics, new fa-
Rock and anything that else that progresses. Join host Ben Life vourites, and lots of ultra-fresh local bands!
as he meanders whimsically through whatever comes to mind
on the walk to CITR. Breakfast With The Browns MON 8am
Your favourite Brownsters, James and Peter, offer a savoury
Samsquantch's Hideaway Alternating Wednesdays 6:30pm blend of the familiar and exotic in a blend of aural delights.
All-Canadian music with a focus on indie-rock/pop. Email: breakfastwiththebrowns@hotmail.com.
Email: anitabinder@hotmail.com.
Parts Unknown       , MON 1pm
An indie pop show since 1999, it's like a marshmallow sandwich:
soft and sweet and best enjoyed when poked with a stick and
held close to a fire.
The Cat's Pajams FRI 11am
The cat's pajamas: a phrase to describe something/someone super awesome or cool. The Cat's Pajams: a super awesome and
cool radio show featuring the latest and greatest indie pop, rock,
lofi and more from Vancouver and beyond!
The Burrow MON 3pm
Noise Rock, Alternative, Post-Rock, with a nice blend of old
'classics' and newer releases. Interviews and live performances
The Permanent Rain Radio Alternating Thursdays 1 pm
Music-based, pop culture-spanning program with a focus on
the local scene. Join co-hosts Chloe and Natalie for an hour
Chthonic Boom! SUN 5pm
A show dedicated to playing psychedelic music from parts of the
spectrum (rock, pop, electronic) as well as garage and noise rock.
The Morning After Show TUE 11:30am
The Morning After Show with Oswaldo Perez every Tuesday at
11:30a.m. Playing your favourite songs for 13 years. The morning after what? The morning after whatever you did last night.
Eclectic show with live music, local talent and music you won't
hear anywhere else.
Hans Von Kloss' Misery Hour
Pretty much the best thing on radio.
WED 11pm
Suburban Jungle WED 8am
Live from the Jungle Room, join radio host Jack Velvet for an
eclectic mix of music, sound bites, information and inanity.
Email: dj@jackvelvet.net. Are You Aware Alternating Thursdays 6pm
Celebrating the message behind the music: Profiling music and musicians that take the route of positive action over
apathy.
Peanut Butter'n'jams Alternating Thursdays 6:30pm
Explore local music and food with your hosts, Brenda and Jordie.
You'll hear interviews and reviews on eats and tunes from your
neighbourhood, and a weekly pairing for your date calendar.
Live From Thunderbird Radio Hell THU 9pm
Featuring live band(s) every week performing in the CiTR Lounge.
Most are from Vancouver, but sometimes bands from across the
country and around the world.
Aural Tentacles THU 12am
It could be global, trance, spoken word, rock, the unusual and
the weird, or it could be something different. Hosted by DJ
Pierre. Email: auraltentacles@hotmail.com
FemConcept FRI 1pm
Entirely Femcon music as well as spoken word content relevant
to women's issues (interviews with campus groups such as the
Women's Center, SASC, etc.). Musical genres include indie-rock,
electronic, punk, with an emphasis on local and Canadian Artists.
Nardwuar FRI 3:30pm
Join Nardwuar the Human Serviette for Clam Chowder flavoured entertainment. Doot doola doot doo...doot doo!
Email: nardwuar@nardwuar.com
The Medicine Show FR111 PM
A variety show, featuring musicians, poets and entertainment industry guests whose material is considered to be therapeutic. We encourage and promote independent original, local live music and art.
Randophonic SAT 11pm
Randophonic is best thought of as an intraversal jukebox which
has no concept of genre, style, political boundaries, or even
space-time relevance. But it does know good sounds from bad.
Lately, the program has been focused on Philip Random's All
Vinyl Countdown + Apocalypse (the 1,111 greatest records you
probably haven't heard). And we're not afraid of noise.
Stranded FRI 6pm
Join your host Matthew for a weekly mix of exciting sounds, past
and present, from his Australian homeland. And journey with
him as he features fresh tunes and explores the alternative musical heritage of Canada.
The Vampire's Ball WED 1am
Eclectic audio alchemy; the soundtrack for your transmutation.
Rock, weird stuff, dark stuff, and whatever's banging around
in the mind of maQLu this week, thevampiresball@gmail.com
thevampiresballoncitr.com
Wize Men MON 6pm
Join your hosts Dan and Austin for an exuberant adventure filled
with drama, suspense, action, romance and most importantly
wisdom. Our musical tastes span across genres and each week
there is a new theme!
G4E Alternating Tuesdays 12-2am
Vinyl mixes, exclusive local tunes, good vibes from around the
world, a thought and a dream or two. Reggae, House, Techno,
Ambient, Dance Hall, Hip Hop, African, Psychedelic, Noise,
Experimental, Eclectic.
Student Special Hour
Students play music.
TUES2pm
BVP Radio Alternating Wednesdays 1 pm
BVPradio is Blank Vinyl Project's radio show companion on CiTR.
It features musicians from UBC and its surrounding community.
Interviews, performances live on air, and advice to developing
bands.
A Face for Radio THU 10am
A show about music with interludes about nothing. From Punk
to Indie Rock and beyond.
Exploding Head Movies MON 7pm
Join gak as he explores music from the movies, tunes from television and any other cinematic source, along with atmospheric
pieces, cutting edge new tracks and strange old goodies that
could be used in a soundtrack to be.
JAZZ
The Jazz Show MON 9pm
Vancouver's longest running prime-time Jazz program, Hosted
by Gavin Walker. Features begin after the theme and spoken intro at 9pm. April 6: Tonight we celebrate the Birthday of one of
the most widely recorded Jazz drummers. Arthur Taylor (1929-
1995). This fine date features two of Mr. Taylor's favourite tenors:
Charlie Rouse and Frank Foster. "Taylor's Tenors".
April 13: Another birthday today and it's vibist/composer/
bandleader/Teddy Charles. (1928-2012). Tonight his landmark
recording "The Teddy Charles Tentet". One of the essential Jazz
recordings and a "desert island"favourite.
April 20: Yet another Birthday and another vibes master: the
pioneer artist Lionel Hampton. (1908-2002). Hampton's musical artistry was captured with this date that includes pianist
Oscar Peterson, bassist Ray Brown and drummer Buddy Rich.
Four giants!
April 27: Bassist/composer/musical icon Charles Mingus. A rare
live performance at a German concert in 1975 with arguably
his last great band. Mingus with trumpeter Jack Walrath, teno-
rist George Adams, pianist Don Pullen and of course drummer
Dannie Richmond. Look out!
Little Bit of Soul MON 4pm
Little Bit of Soul plays, primarily, old recordings of jazz, swing,
big band, blues, oldies and motown. DRAMA / POETiY
Skald's Hall FRI 9pm
Skald's Hall entertains with the spoken word via story
readings, poetry recitals, and drama. Established
and upcoming artists join host Brian MacDonald.
Interested in performing on air? Contact us on Twitter:
@Skalds_Hall.
Sports Is Fun THU 3:30pm
PUNK
Rocket from Russia TUES 10:30am
Hello hello hello! I interview bands and play new, international
and local punk rock music. Great Success! P.S. Broadcasted in
brokenish English. Hosted by Russian Tim. Website: http://rock-
etfromrussia.tumblr.com. Email: rocketfrom russiacitr@gmail.
com. Facebook: https://www.facebook.comRocketFromRussia.
Twitter: http://twitter.com/tima_tzar.
Generation Annihilation SAT 12pm
On the air since 2002, playing old and new punk on the noncommercial side of the spectrum. Hosts: Aaron Brown, Jeff "The
Foat" Kraft. Website: generationannihilation.com. Facebook:
facebook.com/generationannihilation..
LC
Power Chord SAT 1pm
Vancouver's longest running metal show. If you're into music
that's on the heavier/darker side of the spectrum, then you'll like
it. Sonic assault provided by Geoff, Marcia, and Andy.
Flex Your Head TUE 6pm
Punk rock and hardcore since 1989. Bands and guests from
around the world.
Gl: 'E
The Absolute Value of Insomnia SAT 2am
Four solid hours of fresh generative music c/o the Absolute Value
of Noise and its world famous Generator. Ideal for enhancing
your dreams or, if sleep is not on your agenda, your reveries.
71 vinylrecords
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3pm JPNSGRLS (Light Organ Records)
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4pm JaySOIl Hoover (Canada's R+B King)
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