Discorder

Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) Jun 1, 2015

Item Metadata

Download

Media
discorder-1.0200819.pdf
Metadata
JSON: discorder-1.0200819.json
JSON-LD: discorder-1.0200819-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): discorder-1.0200819-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: discorder-1.0200819-rdf.json
Turtle: discorder-1.0200819-turtle.txt
N-Triples: discorder-1.0200819-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: discorder-1.0200819-source.json
Full Text
discorder-1.0200819-fulltext.txt
Citation
discorder-1.0200819.ris

Full Text

 L/     I      O
]
;
G   O f\
1
j
U            'hi    i
'■■■■:-; ■'■■•■...'"■
-                                                              .
:•■■•:' ^■:F-:;-vV;^'-- 'F:-:F:...     .       .       -     ,   ..
j;
JUNE 2i-              .;;.;
HT
■t.iiw
E^^n    f i Wl I 3HIH
W^
nnv i*• UPCOMING SHOWS
ooooooo
254 East Hastings Street
604.681.8915
U
SHIRLEY GNOME VS. COLIN LAMB
HOSTED BY WES BORG
LEVITATION FESTIVAL LAUNCH PARTY
A PLACE TO BURY STRANGERS, & MORE
LEVITATION NIGHTLY SHOWCASE tobacco,
SHIGETO, BLACKBIRD BLACKBIRD, & MORE
LEVITATION BURGER RECORDS SHOWCASE king
TUFF, DEAD GHOSTS, COSMONAUTS, & MORE
VEIL OF MAYA revocation, gift giver,
ENTHEOS, GALACTIC PEGASUS, & MORE
CROWBAR
BATTLECROSS, LORD DYING, TERRIFIER, BOG
THE GETMINES cawama, smash alley,
COLOURSURROUND, MAT DENNISON
THE COVENANT FESTIVAL MMXV rites ofthy
DEGRINGOLADE, MITOCHONDRION, & MORE
GOATWHORE black breath, ringworm,
THEORIES, SKULL VULTURES, KLANDESTIN
DOUG STANHOPE
WITH GUESTS
BOLT THROWER
HELLSHOCK, BAPTISTS
EAST VAN CHOIR COLLECTIVE
LUCITERRA BELLYDANCING
STUDENT SHOWCASE
THE DOWNWARD SPIRAL COMEDY SHOW
FEATURING KATHLEEN MCGEE, & MORE
THE LOVERS CABARET
SIX WORD STORIES
THE ARISTOCRATS
TRAVIS LARSON BAND
YAHELWAIV-BELLYDANCE SHOWCASE
Additional show listings, ticket sale info, videos and more: WWW.RICKSHAWTHEATRE.COM
FU MANCHU: 25TH ANNIVERSARY SHOW
WITH GUESTS WAINGRO
I "n ft!
1mi B «■
FAITH HEALER
COSMIC TROUBLES
REUASEPARTY: M ■
MUMP ■■
THECOBftlT |U
FEELING   II II
ICENTRAl   II m
TOUGH AGE II M
lF&DIGITAL:06/23/1S D I | £§
Plus do
forget <
3ys cub's ho+dog day
mint records
©mintrecords  www.mintrecs.com TABLE of CONTENTS
JUNE 2015
MUSIC WASTE - PG.08 —	
Vancouver's favourite volunteer-run d.i.y. music
festival is back again for another year of music,
art, and comedy on the cheap. Discorder speaks
with Art Waste organizer and curator Katayoon
Yousefbigloo to discover what sets this festival
apart from the rest and why it's still only $15. Got
your pass yet?
STEFANA FRATILA - PG.l4    —
Derived from her formative experiments in electronic music, Stefana Fratila's upcoming album
Efemera offers a mediation on nostalgia and
memory. Discorder recently sat down with Fra-
tila to discuss politicizing the dance floor, making
critical art, and how Efemera spans from the past
into the present day."
SOFTESS- PG.27  	
After a period of inner sonic explorations, the
three-piece group from Vancouver reveals itself.
Authentic and nostalgic but also aware and rebellious, they share their course in music and present
aspects of their individual personalities as well.
Through the glass of the past, the present, and the
future, Discorder discovers the band's wide spectrum is what makes them provocatively unique.
LEVITATION VANCOUVER - PG.48  	
This June's music festival season is a bit more
cluttered than usual. Could that ever be a bad
thing? With our own twenty-one year strong
Music Waste falling on the same weekend as
Texas-based satelite festival, Levitation Vancouver, Discorder chats with festival partner, Timbre
Concerts, about how this overlap is more convivial than contentious.
TIM THE MUTE - PG.54	
An inside look into the mind of Tim the Mute,
a.k.a. Tim Clapp a.k.a. the mastermind behind
Kingfisher Bluez. Discorder explores his upcoming debut album Why Live?, offering some insight
into the existential wallowing of Clapp's lyrics,
what drives him to be so proliferous, and why he
doesn't care about having a perfect singing voice.
DISCORDER REVISITED - PG.21
IN GOOD HUMOUR DAN QUINN - PG.23
REAL LIVE ACTION- PG.31
CALENDAR - PG.36
ART PROJECT LATE CUTS - PG.38
ON THE AIR THE MATT & RYAN SHOW ■
NO FUN FICTION- PG.60
CITR PROGRAM GUIDE - PG.65
PG.58
ADVERTISE: Ad space for upcoming issues
can be booked by calling (604) 822-3017
ext. 3 or emailing advertising@citr.ca. Rates
available upon request.
CONTRIBUTE: To submit words to
Discorder, please contact: editor.discorder@
citr.ca. To submit: images, contact:
artdirector.discorder@citr.ca
SUBSCRIBE: Send in a cheque for $20 to
#233-6138 SUB Blvd.,Vancouver, B.C., V6T
1 Zl with your address, and we will mail each
issue of Discorder right to your doorstep
for a year.
DISTRIBUTE: To distribute Discorder in your
business, email distro.discorder@citr.ca We
are always looking for new friends.
DONATE: We are part of CiTR, a registered
non-profit, and accept donations so we can
provide you with the content you love. To
donate visit www.citr.ca/donate.
Writers: Evan Brow,
Esmee Coulbourne, Garth
Covernton, Fraser Dobbs,
Joshua Gabert-Doyon,
Gary Jarvis, Jon Kew,
Erica Leiren, Bronwyn
Lewis, Charmaine Li,
Anise Makvandi, Mark
PaulHus, Theano
Pavlidou, Keagan Perlette,
Andy Resto, Nathan
Sing, Hannah Thompson
Jasper D Wrinch
Photographers &
Illustrators: Olga Abeleva,
Sara Baar, Josh Conrad,
Dana Kearley, Alisa
Lazear, Jimmy Laing,
Max Littledale, Jaqueline
Manoukian, Kim Pringle,
Konstantin Prodanovic,
Max Power, Michael
Shantz, Erin Tanaguchi
Karl Ventura
Cover: Photography by
Sara Baar
Editors: Robert Catherall
& Alex de Boer
Art Director: Ricky
Castanedo-Laredo
Under Review Editor:
Alex de Boer
Real Live Action Editor:
Robert Catherall
Ad Coordinator
Nashlyn Lloyd
Proofreaders: Alex de
Boer, Ricky Castanedo-
Laredo, Robert Catherall,
Gary Jarvis, Jon Kew,
Julia Lehn, Kristian
Voveris
Calendar Listings:
Sarah Cordingley
Accounts Manager:
Eleanor Wearing
Student Liason: Joshua
Gabert-Doyon
Web Editor: TBA
CiTR Station Manager
Brenda Grunau
Publisher Student Radio
Society of UBC
L
EDITORIAL CUTOFF: May 31, 2015
J
©Discorder 2014 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published
almost monthly by CiTR, which can be heard at 101.9 FM, online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except
Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487, CiTR's office at (604) 822-3017, email CiTR at stationmanager@citr.ca, or_pick up a
pen and write #233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T 1 Zl, Canada. EDITORS' NOTE
NO CRITICAL MASS FOR
CULTURE
Illustrations by Max Littledale
That gloved, dancing doughnut-like character on my Music Waste pass forecasts chill
times to come on the weekend of June 4-7th.
His jazzy shimmering hands motion in four
days of local music and art. That sloppy
toque (bought at some animated Army &
Navy store), suggests the rotating crowd of
underpaid twenty-somethings I will be co-
audience members with.
At 21 years y Music Waste is the careful
concentration of one of Vancouver's most
stable alternative music festivals. Local on
all levels, volunteer-run; it's a point of pride,
a celebration of community.
And now, encroaching on all those warm
feelings of insularity and cool, comes Texas-
based satellite festival, Levitation Vancouver,
with its dusty assertions of international acts
and openness.
\
Discorder's Juni issue will delve into the
space occupied by both Music Waste and
Levitation Festival. The literal shared space,
as both festivals are happening on the the
same weekend. The nuances of this overlap
are interesting and, as such, debatable.
And even as we discuss these festivals
themselves, our conversations can barely be
heard over the vast assortment of bands hosted by both. What we found is that, at the end
of day, contemplating the potential conflict
between these two overlapping psychedelic
festivals loses out to the exhilarating, anticipatory, existence of both.
The fact is, Alex, physical music sales are
dropping. For everyone in the game. Not just
indies or majors. Everyone.
It should then come as no surprise that the
rise of the epically large music festival is due
to nothing more than basic economics. Low
record sales? That's ok, all you need to do is
start selling out stadiums. How do you do that? Just offer college
students and would-be young professionals more musicians than they know whaft to
do with, tell them they get a half-week of
debauchery, and jack up the ticket prices.
Simple.
It's been a slow embrace in Vancouver,
however, as mid-sized festivals like Olio and
stadium-sized ones like Edgefest have come
and (for the latter, thankfully) gone. Even
more unnerving, this year Shoutback has announced they'll be on hiatus and Girls Rock
Camp has packed up and headed south of the
Fraser.
Meanwhile, we've got mainstays like Music Waste, New Forms Festival, and Khatsahlano as well as newcomers Levitation and
Fvded In The Park. Last year even garnered
us an iteration of the Mad Decent Block Party
as Paul Devro thought he might try his hand
at a hometown crowd. Yet, I don't see that
one back again this year... I hope it wasn't
something we said.
Meanwhile, in recent weeks there's been a
number of articles touting the dos and don'ts
of festival behaviour, or praising Canada as
the next big music festival destination. To
which all I have to say is: once again you're
late to the party, North America.
Like so many other things, Europeans have
bawked at us for being timid to embrace
large-scale music festivals and, yet, once we
do, we pretend like it's not happening anywhere else except right here, as if no one else
had ever thought to converge in one communal, oversized area for a few days to celebrate
music, food, art, and, yes, you guessed it,
culture. That last one being something our
Mayor and Premier recently took the time to
remind the Economist we have in spades, assuming you consider "intense recreation" a
part of culture.
Well, if you're not someone who regularly derives enjoyment from punishing your
knees on the Chief at sunrise (me neither)
nor someone who thinks that sitting around
a fire drinking shitty beer and consuming a
selection of burnt-on-the-outside-raw-on-
the-inside packaged meats equates to culture,
music festivals may just be the answer you're
looking for. And while some say two festivals
on the same weekend is too many, I do not.
Simply put: you can never have too much
of a good thing.
So, regardless of which festival you choose
to attend, or maybe you're planning on catching both, just make sure to go out and have
a good time — support the bands, hang out
with your friends, and make new ones. Just
please don't go out there and complain about
how crowds are being split or spew some colonial politic about corporate interests taking
over a di.y. festival. We have a long way to
go before hitting a critical mass of culture in
this city.
As always,
Alex & Rob f*TI
RICTLY THE CREATES
IAMN HITS flF MAY?
*T 	
■■ST
!■■■
GODE
015
ARTIST
w w mm m
ALBUM
LABEL
•                 ARTIST
w l¥
ALBUM
LABEL
1
Faith Healer *
Cosmic Troubles
Mint
26   Twin River *+
Should the light
goout
Light Organ
2
Tough Age *+
Plays Cub's Hot
Dog Day
Mint
27   Courtney Barnett
Sometimes 1 Sit And Think,
And Sometimes 1 Just Sit
Mom + Pop
3
Weed *+
Running Back
Lefse
28  Sun Belt *+
Cabalcor
Self-Released
4
Adrian Teacher and
The Subs *+
Sorta Hafta
Self-Released
29   Speedy Ortiz
Foil Deer
Carpark
•
The Backhomes *
Tidahvave
Self-Released
30  EP Island *+
Astonish
Self-Released
6
Kimmortal *+
Sincerity
Self-Released
31   Moon *
Moon
Bruised Tongue
7
Colleen
Captain of None
ThrillJockey
32   Portico
Living Fields
Ninja Tune
8
Nervous Talk *+
S/T
Hosehead
_„   The Real
33
McKenzies *+
Rats In The Burlap
Stomp
9
Lee Harvey
Osmond *
Beautiful Scars
Latent
34  Kathryn Calder *
Kathryn Calder
File Under. Music
10
The Population
Drops *+
Way Down
Self-Released
35   Leaf Rapids*
Lucky Stars
Black Hen
OK Jazz *
OK Jazz
Self-Released
36   East India Youth
Culture Of Volume
XL
»
Softess *+
Dark Power
Self-Released
37   Supercrush *+
.M.«.^M*WNM,
Debt Offensive
13
Chastity Belt
Time to Go Home
Hardly Art
38   Line Traps*
Line Traps
Self-Released
14
Great Lake
Swimmers *
A Forest of Arms
Nettwerk
39   Purity Ring*
Another Eternity
Last Gang
15
Quitting *+
This Life
Self-Released
40   JohnWiese
Deviate from
Balance
Gilgongo
16
April Verch *
The New Part
Slab Town
41   Sleater-Kinney
No Cities To Love
Sub Pop
17
Isotopes *+
Nuclear
Strikezone
Stomp
42   Shearing Pinx *+
People
Psychic Handshake
18
Eugene Ripper *
Fast Folk 4.0
Self-Released
43   Fashionism *+
Smash the State
(With Your Face)
Hosehead
19
Moon King *
Secret Life
Last Gang
44   METZ *
II
Sub Pop
20
Doldrums *
The Air Conditioned
Nightmare
Sub Pop
45   Lower Dens
Escape From Evil
Ribbon
21
Hello Blue Roses *+
WZO
Jaz
46   Kappa Chow *
Collected Output
Self-Released
22
Liturgy
The Ark Work
ThrillJockey
47   Anamai *
Sallows
Buzz
23
JoelPlaskett*
The Park Avenue
Sobriety Test
Pheromone
48  Wand
Golem
In The Red
24
Lightning Bolt
Fantasy Empire
ThrillJockey
49   Shilpa Ray
Last Year's Savage
Northern Spy
25
Monophonics
Sound of Sinning
Transistor Sound
50   Freak Heat Waves *
Bonnie's State of
Mind
Hockey Dad
CiTR's charts reflect what's been played on the air by CiTR's lovely DJs last month. Records with
found at fine independent music stores across Vancouver. If you can't find them, give CiTR's mus
tell you how to find them. Check out other great campu
asterisks (*) are Canadian and those marked (+) are local. Most of these excellent albums can be
ic coordinator a shout at (604) 822-8733. Her name is Sarah Cordingley. If you ask nicely she'll
i/community radio charts at www.earshot-online.comH
CHA
RTS CiTR HAS
GREAT
FRIENDS
'<£
YOUR NAME HERE
(M
M) (M
IS A FRIEND OF CITR 101.9 FM
J>
(•)/    O     O    w-9m/cm-   O    O     \®
®>
FOR A FULL LIST OF BUSINESSES, VISIT US AT CITR.CA
WESTSIDE/UBC
AUSTRALIAN BOOT
COMPANY
$30off Blundstones
and RM Williams
BACKSTAGE LOUNGE
10% off food
BANYEN BOOKSANDSOUND
10% off
THE BIKE KITCHEN
10% off new parts
and accessories
THE COVE
10% off food
DENTRY'S PUB
$6.99 wings, $11.99 pitchers
DISPLACE HASHERY
10% off
THE EATERY
10% off
FRESH IS BEST SALSA
10% off
GARGOYLES TAP+GRILL
10% off
KOERNER'SPUB
10% off
LIMELIGHT VIDEO
10% off
LOTUS LAND TATTOO
10% off
NUBAKITSILANO
10% off food
ON THE FRINGE
HAIR DESIGN
10% off (does not stack with
UBC student discount)
PRUSSIN MUSIC
10% off
RUFUS'GUITAR SHOP
10% off everything but
instruments and amps
UBC BOOKSTORE
10% off clothing,
gifts, stationery
MAIN STREET
ANTISOCIAL
SKATEBOARD SHOP
10% off
DEVIL MAY WEAR
10% off
LUCKY'S COMICS
10% off
NEPTOON RECORDS
10% off used, $1 off new
RED CAT RECORDS
10% off
THE REGIONAL
ASSEMBLY OF TEXT
1 free make-your-own button with
purchases over $5
R/X COMICS
12% off
THE WALLFLOWER
MODERN DINER
10% off
WOO VINTAGE CLOTHING
10% off
DOWNTOWN
BANG-ON T-SHIRTS
10% off
BEATSTREET RECORDS
10% off used vinyl
DUNLEVY SNACK BAR
10% off
THE FALL TATTOOING
10% off
FORTUNE SOUND CLUB
No cover Saturdays
(excluding special events)
HITZ BOUTIQUE
15% off regular priced
clothing and shoes
PACIFIC CINEMATHEQUE
1 free bag of popcorn
SAVE ON MEATS
10% off food
SIKORA'S CLASSICAL
RECORDS
10% off
USED HOUSE OF VINTAGE
10% off
VINYLRECORDS
15% off
COMMERCIAL DRIVE
AUDIOPILE
10%off LPs/CDs
BONERATTLE MUSIC
10% off
HIGHLIFE RECORDS
10% off
HORSES RECORDS
10% off
JEAN QUEEN (JQ) CLOTHING
15% off
MINTAGE CLOTHING
10% off
PANDORAS BOX
REHEARSAL STUDIOS
10% off
PEOPLES COOP
BOOKSTORE
10% off
PRADOCAFE
10% off
STORM CROW TAVERN
10% off
VINYL RECORD
STORAGE COMPANY
10% off
BAND MERCH CANADA
20% off  A FESTIVAL OF WASTE: ART AND MUSIC AT THE
INTERSECTION OF COMMUNITY
by Anise Makvandi
Illustrations by Erin Taniguchi
Established 21 years ago, Music Waste
is Vancouver's first and longest running independent music festival. Free of corporate
sponsorship, the gathering, which historically spans over the first weekend in June, solely
relies on the committed volunteers and locals
who help organize the event. Volunteers curate the musicians and spaces in which the
shows take place, and have also given other
bands access to booking their own shows that
Music Waste in turn helps them promote.
As Vancouver's artistic community is continuing to grow and become more diverse,
events such as Music Waste, and the avid
members who are involved in propelling its
movement, play a huge contributive role to
Vancouver's music and arts culture. It's important to build a community that feels accepting and open to all because it contributes
to a thriving and diverse creative network.
Only $15 for the festival pass, the venues
for these shows are dispersed throughout
town, allowing people to go to spaces and
explore neighbourhoods that they may have
not been to before.
MUSIC WASTE "MOST OF ALL I HOPE THE SPIRIT OF ART WASTE ENCOURAGES NEW
ARTISTS TO GET THEIR WORK OUT THERE AND IGNORE SOME OF THE
BARRIERS WHICH MAY HAVE BEEN HINDERING THEM BEFORE."
In conjunction with Music Waste is Art
Waste, an independently run art festival that
brings together local artists and gallery spaces during a four-day exhibition. Every year,
the curators of Art Waste select a theme and
open submissions to the community. The artists that are selected then come together to
exhibit their work in a group show (held at
Astro Turf this year). Simultaneously, locally
run galleries are also called upon to curate
and exhibit their own shows that are affiliated with the festival.
I had the chance to briefly speak with Katayoon Yousefbigloo, one of the curators of
Art Waste, and gain some insight into the inner workings of this year's show, including
how it came together and its intentions for the
future.
discorder: how, when, and by whom
was art waste started?
Yousefbigloo: Art Waste in its current format began in 2013 when Music Waste decided to expand it's small art contingent. That
year, curator Sylvana D'Angelo and myself
expanded the idea of Art Waste into a multi-
gallery event consisting of a large group
show at Gallery Gachet. The group show
was meant to be in the same spirit as Music
Waste: an open call for submissions from artists of all disciplines and experience. For the
past two years, Sara Wylie and myself have
been curating the group show together.
10
BOTH MUSIC WASTE AND ART WASTE
ARE FUNDED INDEPENDENTLY FROM CORPORATIONS; MOST OF THE WORK RELIES
ON VOLUNTEERS AND THE COMMUNITY
COMING TOGETHER. HOW DO YOU THINK
THIS ATTRIBUTES TO VANCOUVER'S CULTURAL ARENA (MUSIC, ART, COMMUNITY
IN GENERAL)?
In my opinion, the art scene in Vancouver,
more so than the music scene, can feel very
institutional and intimidating. I think the fact
that this festival is a part of Music Waste,
which is completely supported by volunteers
and is aimed at showcasing new music (often
if a band has played more than three Wastes
in a row, then they are bumped for a new
band), encourages a broader range of artists
to submit and consequently we see work that
is outside of the current Vancouver art trends.
But also because of this, it excludes us from
some artists and galleries who desire an institutional legitimacy that a "d.i.y." art festival
may not provide them.
THIS YEAR, LEVITATION AND MUSIC
WASTE ARE PROGRAMMED ON THE SAME
WEEKEND. AS LEVITATION IS PREDOMINANTLY RUN ON CORPORATE FUNDING,
WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS ON THIS?
I think, for Art Waste, Levitation is of no
concern as far as competition for art shows.
It will be interesting to see how this will affect Music Waste, but for me I think they are
two polar opposite festivals. Music Waste
MUSIC WASTE is about local talent at an affordable price
organized by members of the music community. Levitation is a big ticket event with
famous out of town bands organized by a
large promotion company. I think the vibe at
the Malkin Bowl versus the vibe at the Red
Gate or SBC are going to be very different.
It's unfortunate that Levitation is happening
on the same weekend that Music Waste has
historically been on, but I'm sure that must
have been unavoidable.
WHAT IS THE THEME FOR ART WASTE
THIS YEAR, AND HOW DID YOU COME UP
WITH IT?
for curators and pair them up with galleries.
But most of all I hope the spirit of Art Waste
encourages new artists to get their work out
there and ignore some of the barriers which
may have been hindering them before.
Both Music Waste and Art Waste run from
Thursday, June 4 to Sunday, June 7. You can
check out the acts and venues on their website at:
http:llmusicwaste.ca and
http://artwaste .tumblr.com, respectively.
The theme this year is "In Dreams." For
the past couple of years we've dealt with issues such as displacement and gentrification.
This year, we wanted to make it less of a cultural or environmental theme and more of a
psychological or personal theme. We're very
pleased with the submissions we received
and we think that this year, thematically, the
group show is the most coherent.
WHERE WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE ART
WASTE GROWING AND BUILDING TOWARDS
IN THE FUTURE?
I'm hoping Art Waste will be able to involve more and more galleries as time goes
on. I'd also love to do a call for submission
MUSIC WASTE
11    .7/^*
sk
PRESENT PAST
by Jon Kew II Illustrations by Dana Kearley
II Photography by Sara Baar
The day I sat down to interview Stefana
Fratila, a month away from the release of her
album Efemera, Pitchfork featured another
Vancouver electronic artist on its front page,
naming Pender Street Steppers' "The Glass
City" as a Best New Track.
When I mention this anecdote, Fratila is
filled with praise for the city's electronic
community. "I think Mood Hut are amazing
and do really great work in our city. Vancouver is just brimming with talent. And I think
slowly we're getting recognition."
Currently studying in UBC's Political Science MA program, Fratila is simultaneously
conscious of the privileges within art subcultures and the violent colonial dimension of
Vancouver.
"I feel supported in Vancouver but there's
darker sides to any scene: the less sincere or
more superficial aspects, like when people
turn a blind eye." In her research and music,
sincerity is a response to facility in music and
action: "I can't think of a way to not be political."
Bringing her politics directly into the
venue, Fratila asks "What is my role here?
Sometimes when I go out and dance I get
upset because everybody's in their bubble
of privilege and uninterested in confronting
themselves, especially as settlers. But I think
about this all the time and feel ashamed."
This tension between Fratila's academic
work and escapist elements of the dancefloor
informs the directions her music has taken.
"I put intention and care into my music.
That there's a sense of urgency within my
process: I should be working on a paper, but
instead I'm working on my album. When I
produce sound, it connects to my research."
15
STEFANA FRATILA  "I'M JUST TRYING TO - NOT DISTURB THE PEACE -BUT DISRUPT.
AND I THINK I DO DISRUPT."
This drive to create critical and informed
music reflects the dynamic of change Fratila has undergone in the past six years. This
makes Efemera an especially intriguing album: Fratila is moving into the future by reconnecting with the past.
"I wrote this music around 18, recorded
it at 19... now I have a lot more experience
with producing so the album is an accumulation of years of memory and learning." This
developing consciousness presents an interesting conjunction: Efemera's songs evince
an interest in nostalgia and a reexamination
of the past. But the Efemera project — as it
spans across music, video, and venue — is
also itself an interface between Fratila's current work and the recordings of her nascent
electronic period.
Musically, the album is a chimera of dance
and off-kilter electronic concepts, with instrumental touches derived from the lush pop
music comprising Fratila's earliest material.
"The album is organic and floral: there's guitar solos but it's also electronic dance music.
The album finishes with a house track that
samples a warbling ukulele improvisation
at the end of a reel. It's so many different
things."
While Fratila's experience was deployed to
polish the album, it retains that quality of unknowing and experimentation. She explains,
"I was coming from a place of total openness
about electronic music... previously I was
writing for instruments in a band. So it has
this unique sound and I don't think I'll be
able to make music like it again."
Beyond choices at production level, Efem-
era's release also offers Fratila the excellent
opportunity to conceptualize past material in
a new visual dimension. Fratila collaborated
on three music videos for Efemera. These
videos — respectively for the songs "Pixel
Plant/Hound Dawg," "Nero," and "Edmon-
bomb"— can service as points of entry into
the album.
"Pixel Plant / Hound Dawg," shot at the
Bloedel Floral Conservatory, touches upon an
ailment Fratila suffered. "That song is about
my experience with vertigo, which I had at
the time of this recording. I went ta music because I was always dizzy and sick so I wrote
this dizzy song." With frequency crunched
instrumentals, lurching uptempo beats, and
vocalization that moves between atonal and
beautifully disembodied, this track sets the
album's disorienting tone.
"Nero" is drawn from Fratila's childhood
affinities: "I've always been obsessed with
Classics. A lot of the album has to do with
transformation, learning about the past and
nostalgia for an unattainable past. I was trying to interrogate this chauvinistic historical
figure. I recently added these beats that sound
like Nero's knocking at the door, trying to get
me. The layers of time have been very fulfilling to revisit: looking at what was fascinating
to me then and where I am now. Lyrically the
song makes your skin crawl, it's in two time
17
STEFANA FRATILA signatures, everything comes at you at once."
Reevaluation resurfaces on "Edmonbomb"
where Fratila reflects on her own experience
growing up in Vancouver. "The video connects to my current research: transitional justice. We're using footage from places which
have experienced political violence: I went to
Bali, Sara Wylie [the Director] went to Guatemala, and the third location is Vancouver,
which experiences colonial violence against
Indigenous people "
For Fratila, these themes touch upon the
act of unsettling, especially unsettling nostalgia: "I'm completely obsessed with memory,
how people understand the past, what kind of
stories people tell about themselves. We have
so many contested histories — everywhere
— but especially in Vancouver. And now that
I know, I want to go further."
Fratila explains, "I don't want to be com-
plicit, I want to break down barriers." People
often vaguely identify the venue as a transformative space, but Fratila is not talking
vaguely. "People love going out dancing.
Maybe the dance floor is a space to get political dialogue in. I'm just trying to — not
disturb the peace — but disrupt. And I think
I do disrupt."
Because of that, Efemera doesn't sit still.
Closing the album, "Efemer(a)" follows a
house beat from warm ambience to digital
stutters. And as a conclusion, it's more suggestive than typical dance tracks: maybe a
gesture for contemplation, maybe an offer of
rest. With the layers Fratila has put into her
album — into its morphing soundscapes —
Efemera doesn't offer simple answers. But it
does seem to ask the right questions.
Stefana Fratila's Efemera is. out on cassette and digitally through Trippy Tapes and
Summer Cool Music this June 21st, 2015.
On the opposite page:
- Top still from "Edmonbomb" music video
Director: Sara Wylie
Director of Photography: Evan Mason
- Second still from "Pixel Plant/Hound Dawg" music video.
Director/Cinematography: Briggs Ogloff
- Bottom still from "Nero" music video
Director: Bita Joudaki
Director of Photography: Mohamed Ibrahim Ali
18
STEFANA FRATILA  DISCORDER REVISITED
VANCOUVER'S FIRST PUNK ROCK ALBUM
by Erica Leiren II Photos courtesy of the writer
Like a flash of phosphorus, they flared
brightly and were gone. No Exit's historical
significance to Vancouver music far exceeds
their brief, incandescent burst onto the scene.
No Exit's Mark Hons (16), Bruce Wate
(16), Scruff (15), and manager Vijay Sondhi
(16), released Vancouver's very first punk album in the Spring of 19.80. Their independent
release scooped D.OA.'s full length debut by
a mere month. Chuck Biscuits was choked.
Spawned in North Vancouver, No Exit exemplified teenage energy and disaffection. I
caught up with No Exit's Sean Newton (aka
Scruff) and the band's early champion and album financier, Grant McDonagh, in separate
interviews this week.
"Mark and I met at school in Sept 1979,"
recalls Scruff "and we started jamming almost right away. We got Bruce to play drums
and Vijay to be our manager. We played
our first gig opening for the 45 's on April 3,
1980. We played 11 shows at the Buddha that
month!"
McDonagh (founder of Zulu Records, then
at Quintessence Records) saw the potential in
No Exit's rambunctious, chaotic talent, and
prolific live performing.
"After playing a gig opening for D.O.A.,
Grant and Don Betts — whom we knew from
hanging out at Quintessence — came up to
us backstage and said: 'We want you guys to
make an album. We'll lend you the money to
do it,'" remembers Scruff.
In April 1980, McDonagh put up the $800
it cost to produce the self-titled album. Song
titles like "Downtown Weekend," "Whose
War?," and "Parliament Swindle" still sound
timeless and archetypal.
The vinyl LP was originally $3.99. Today
it goes for $ 1,200 — the most expensive Vancouver record you can buy. Who would have
guessed it when the band recorded, pressed,
packaged, and sold out all 200 copies of the
independent album in just over one short,
memorable month in Spring 1980.
McDonagh recalls that when No Exit took
the stage of Vancouver's premier punk venue, the Smilin' Buddha, at their release party,
they were blown away by the number of fans.
The place was packed. Before the record
came out they'd been playing for 20 friends.
Remarkable for its cheeky wit, No Exit's
double-sided album art played off record
covers by the Damned and the Clash. The
hand-made record was a clever riff on both;
the pastiche brought to life with the help of
photographer Bev Davies.
One side was No Exit in the same pose the
Damned strike on Damned Damned Damned.
"We went out and bought a coconut cream pie
and smashed it all up in each other's faces,"
recounts Scruff. Their haircuts were courtesy
of Hons' girlfriend Annette.
The other side was a collage: the Clash's
first record with the faces of No Exit pasted
20
DISCORDER REVISITED A website completely updated and
populated with information by thousands
of informed promoters, musicians and fans
Vancouver's Community Driven Concert C3len«is||
The CiTR Radio Sponsored
Vancouver Baiifi
Directory over top and a spray-painted "No Exit." Another nice touch was the maple leaf overlaid
on the Union Jack over Paul Simonon's heart.,
Later McDonagh met Joe Strummer at a
party in East Van after a Clash concert. When
he described No Exit's record jacket to the
Clash's lead singer, McDonagh recalls that
he appreciated the homage. "That is so punk
rock!" Strummer said.
released in 1981 by Friends Records. The
band mutated several more times until the
final No Exit line up played its last gig on
August 13,1983.
No Exit put out the first punk rock album in
Vancouver, heating up a scene that generated
some of the best music the world has ever
seen. Rock On!
Scruff idolized the band Crass. According
to McDonagh, Crass heard No Exit's album
and loved it so much they sent the band a fan
letter declaring No Exit was the best band
ever!
No Exit continued with various new members. The 1980-81 line up of Hons, Scruff,
Jimmy-Joe Pearson (later of Toxic Reasons),
and Kevin Lucks, had two songs on the Vancouver   Independence   compilation   album
SUBSCRIBE TO DISCORDER!
Discorder is Vancouver's lorigest running independent mpgoiine.
Show your support for Vane Tver's independent music community
and the development of new writers, editors, designers, and artists.
GET IT SENT ALL THE WAY TO YOUR DOOR! I
^JLD LIKE AN ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION JO DISCORDER MAGAZINE ($20 F0R CANADA. $25 FOR U.SJ
IW0UE0JKE TO SUPPORT DISCORDER Wtf H A DONATION OF '
fSEND THIS FQRRKND CASH OR CHEQUE TO:
■ Magazine #233-6138 SUB Blvd. Vancouver, B.C., V6T1Z1
22
DISCORDER REVISITED IN GOOD HUMOUR
DAN QUINN
by Evan Brow II Illustrations by Alisa Laear
Dan Quinn wants to be that comedian. He
wants to be the guy with the funniest tour*
the freshest set, and the hottest room in town.
And while many comedians strive to be the
best, few grew up on a farm, isolated from
comedy, taking in stand-up only through the
TV
"For me, there wasn't a comedy network
or anything. There just weren't comedians
on TV," says Quinn. "So it'd be like you're
watching a late night program and all of a
sudden a comedian would come on and that
was a big deal, because that might be the
only stand-up you saw for the next month.
I remember I liked Steven Wright and any
time he would be on TV, my mom would say,
'Dan! Your favourite comedian's on!' "
At 18, Quinn struck out to Edmonton. It
was then that he first saw live stand-up, an experience he still says is the hardest he's ever
laughed at a show. After that show, Quinn
realized he could do stand-up. It wasn't just
something that these strangers did on the TV.
"I had been writing jokes for a year at that
time and my best friend and roommate Shad
knew that, so he saw an ad in the paper that
said, 'Comedians Wanted.' So I called, got an
interview, and got all dressed up; you know,
like it was a job interview. Like I was going,
'I'm here to apply for the funny job, sir.' I
went in and the guy said, 'Have you ever
done comedy before?' and I said, 'No, but
I've been writing jokes for a year.' And he
said, 'No, you need to have done comedy. I
can't book you for gigs if you haven't done
it.'"
Quinn quickly started doing open mics,
going back every week and learning from
Edmonton's best comedians. Soon enough he
was a regular performer and even placed third
23
IN GOOD HUMOUR  !SL'S: WiV more m	
J uo and getting belter " y and
in Edmonton's Funniest New Comic competition in 1994. With comedy in his sights and
with the prospect of acting filling his mind,
Quinn decided to move to Vancouver in July,
1995, sensing a natural fit between his more
personal style of humour and Vancouver's
comedy culture.'
"I always thought that in the west comedy came from a more emotional place and
a physical place," says Quinn. "The east always felt like it was a mental thing, where
they're much more concerned with 'Here's
a surprise joke!' Whereas the west has this
ability to make you laugh on an emotional
level."
Quinn became a staple in the city and a
homestay in Canadian stand-up, sometimes
spending close to 50 weeks per year on the
road. After 14 years of building his "reputation and crafting his honest, personal stage
presence, Quinn struck gold when he came
up with the Snowed In Comedy Tour.
"It was really a bit of a fluke," says Quinn.
"I wanted to go snowboarding and not pay
for it, so I took a two-week vacation and put
shows around my snowboarding so that I
could pay it all off. I mentioned this to Glenn
Wool and he wanted to come with me. I started planning and Glenn told Craig Campbell
and Ed Byrne about it and they wanted to
come too. I said, 'Guys, that's cool, but now
with four comics it's got to take on its own
life' ... so I changed our whole structure. I
said, 'Okay, we're going to do this big,' and
I put a lot of work in and we made money.
IN GOOD HUMOUR
25 And people liked it. It was nine shows and
we didn't make much money, but it was fantastic so we went back again, and people told
friends and now it keeps growing."
While the Snowed In Comedy Tour takes
up a solid month of the year for Quinn, in
early 2015 he began looking for a permanent
space in Vancouver to showcase great stand-
up. He was tired of the comedy clubs, filled
with stags and stagettes, pushing himself
comedically not to lob out the easy jokes.
He wanted a space where comedy was held
up on a pedestal. That's why he established
Comedy At The Biltmore in April 2015, a
weekly stand-up show run at the Biltmore
Cabaret.
night,' like what we had back in the Urban
Well days. I want to give that chance to newer comedians to get on stage alongside great
comedians and grow. That sort of thing I'm
hoping will make these young guys think,
'Qh, that's the level I need to get to. That's
the guy I want to beat.'"
You can catch Comedy At The Biltmore every Tuesday at 9pm at the Biltmore Cabaret.
The Snowed In Comedy Tour typically runs
from early January to early February.
"I saw the Biltmore and thought, 'This is
the best performance venue in the city for
comedy.' It's set-up theatre-style, everybody's facing the stage. This is how comedy
is supposed to be performed," says Quinn. "I
wanted it to be the place where great comics
could go and push each other. I want them all
to think, 'No, I'm going to get the set of the
26
IN GOOD HUMOUR POST PUNK POWER UNLEASHED
by Theano Pavlidou II illustrations by Josh Conrad
II Photograph by Konstantin Prodanovic
1565: small numbers in specific order
nailed upon the weathered wood of an old
house, well-hidden behind sticky leaves,
somewhere on the East side of town. 1565:
the serial code to enter the alternate universe
of Softess, an emerging post-punk band from
Vancouver which, like anything worth finding, first has to be persistently searched for.
The narrow stone path surrounded by wild
grass leads to the backyard. Untamed flowers, curious flying bags among mumbling
trees composing a unique field of energy. And
then, somewhere in between, a tiny wooden
room where all the no-wave mystery unfolds;
black shiny drum set, vintage amplifiers,
scratched leather cases, colourful rags and
sprayed fabrics on the walls which seem to
have soaked up the dreams and aspirations of
the band. Under the soft lights hanging from
the low ceiling and in front of the intense
stare of the skull ornament, Softess have
fun writing dark songs, rehearsing material
off their debut album Dark Power - recently
released on Thankless Records - messing up
with chords and, sometimes, even messing
with the underworld.
"Oh boy, Bauhaus is the band I would like
to raise from the dead and share the stage
with, they were amazing! I don't know how
well that would fit though, but it would be
fun!" laughs Mel Zee, who looks after bass
and vocals in the trio.
"Joy Division, also!'
vocalist Bill Batt.
adds drummer and
Even though finding the right band name
has been a long and daunting process for
Softess, eventually resulting in an intelligent
contradiction between the tenderness of the
name and the hardness of their sound, the
chemistry between them has been there from
the very beginning.
"Technically, we started in 2014 but we
kinda kept it a secret for about six months just
for kinda working a way out in our songwriting. The time really gave the songs a chance
to breathe," points out Batt.
SOFTESS
27 "ONE CAN EXPECT A SOFTESS SHOW TO BE A SEANCE OF FATALIST
ENTHUSIASM."
"Yep, 'cause, for example, in my other
band, I'm used to writing a song and being
like, 'Ok, yep, done!' and then getting it released as soon as possible. But in Softess we
kind of purposely took our time. We were
playing for six months writing the songs for
our debut, then returning to it later and making desirable changes to get it exactly how
we wanted it to sound. You see, we all clicked
together right away; we even wrote one of the
songs on the first day," remembers Zee.
Refusing to conform to a disciplined bio,
Softess refer to themselves through an unusual description that feels like a sassy manifest.
"As Howard Zinn once said, 'dissent is the
highest form of patriotism.' Softess are New
Nationalists as we do not believe in traditional or accepted norms of political engagement,
such as voting and Christian holiday celebrations organized by the state. If you believe in
the nation of Canada, it's best to disengage
and try to bring it down," declares guitarist
and vocalist Don L'Orange.
"Then I dissent! All Christian holidays except for Christmas, Don! I love it... hehe!"
responds Zee.
"And I vote, Don! Still against?" laughs
Batt.
But when it comes to lyric, "An overarching theme in pretty much all of the lyrical
content involves the overcoming of childhood indoctrination and brainwashing one
must do to experience an increased sense
of freedom when coming of age," explains
L'Orange.
"It's really cool having the three of us
writing the lyrics actually; everyone puts
something on the table and we bring them
all together ... My lyrics for instance are like
diary entries... just personal things," laughs
Zee.
"Mine are somewhere in between - there is
a lot of vague personal stuff in them but they
can also be perceived as harsh criticism,"
says Batt.
And all these experiences and thought provoking contemplations have been fitted into
a black 'n' white cassette. Whether it's the
sound of the plastic case when it's opened
or the glossy paper that slips into the fingers
with the songs written on it, there's always
something familiar about cassettes bringing
back memories of turning a pencil inside
their little holes and praying to the player not
to chew the tape.
"Cassettes are really great when urgency is
a matter. I'd like to put the album on vinyl but
it takes a lot of time especially these days.
We follow a d.i.y. approach anyway. Also
the sound... sounds good on a cassette," says
Batt.
The members of Softess come from many
different bands; almost like a league of su-
perheroes.
"We definitely wanted to write songs. We
were so used to playing sets where 20%
was rehearsed and 80% was improvised. We
wanted to tighten that up. It's also good having played in a lot of other bands because we
have learnt new styles and new things from
other people," explains Bratt.
"I really liked Stamina Mantis, Don and
Bill's other band, and I think that these guys
liked my other band, Phonecalls, also. We
28
SOFTESS
_ 29 served different musical styles; Phonecalls
are so really simple while Stamina Mantis
are a little more... testosterone maybe?" says
Zee.
Having the 80's goth music in their blood,
Softess are not afraid to hang out with darkness and reinvent their relationship with it.
Emerged from a pool of recent post-punk
bands, they dare to go against the stereotypes
and taboos that have been stigmatising the
goth music scene and subculture for years.
"Maybe our music sounds depressing but
we aren't really necessarily depressed people;
we don't come off this way anyway. In between songs, you aren't going to be crying,"
laughs Zee.
"One can expect a Softess show to be a seance of fatalist enthusiasm. There's nothing
fancy to it. It may be disappointing for some
while enjoyable for others," says L'Orange.
Fully energized, Softess are eager to start
touring, spreading their Dark Power all over
from BC to Saskatchewan. Vancouverites can
catch their tour kick-off at the Astoria on
June 18 with Mormon Crosses, Failing, and
Inherent Vices. * Seoul photo (pg 31) courtesy of Matthew Power
REAL LIVE ACTION.
MAY 2015
LT. FRANK DICKENS / S.P. DAVIS/ BURN-
SIDE / KELLARISSA / ADRIAN TEACH§£/
MOURNING COUP
TOAST COLLECTIVE
The lyast Collective i
deniably charming miniature
perfectly describe Vancouver!
music culture. At times it hi
breakfast spot or sweaty p..
sic Waste location, but on this ni^.
a fundraiser for Music Waste's 2015 iterati*
it was a humble and gracious location for tl
absorption of equally gracious soloists.
Morning Coup, aka Chandra M
low, started the night with looped s\
and echo-splashed yelps. Normally ae
nied by four other musicians, Tallow h
and sounded isolated standing behii
lone synthesizer and microphone. Wh
set began in unsteadiness, it qui
oped rhythm and warmth and won ^
assembled crowd. Mourning Coup's err
ing overcame its technical limitatn
fumbled with glorious ease
Adrian Teacher )6l
TV) has never look 4age
or with a guitar In roast
Collective may have s< with as
many of the curtains pulled vay from
his rockstar persona as we're likely to see
any time soon. Playing material from his new
"solo" project. Adrian Teacher & The Subs,
Teacher performed with his usual amplitudes
of charm. Separating him from his bandmates
iidn't do anything to subtract from the man's
ability to really communicate with his audience in a v intimate and wonder-
and s f same time. Although
took th i mid-song, to rue the
_.c of his supporting musicians — including fellow Apollo Ghosts alumni Amanda P g
back on drums — the show only proved that
cher is just as instantly relas i his
,7nesome as he is with a smiling cast of supporting characters.
Teacher's stellar acoustic performance
gave way to Kellarissa's soothing one: the
singer known for her work in Fake Tears
and How To Dress Well lulled the assembled
;rowd not into slumber but revelry, as those
\i the front of the venue took to sitting down
on the sidelines and absorbing her crystalline
-rmsjes comfortably. Kellarissa's synth and
i setup appeared to be mostly self-auto-
fed. leaving her free to palm the occasion-
■Mxi progression and sing with all the in-
kid mysticism of an opera performer.
F of the evening — early to start,
sh, with quieter performers and
..pectful audience — lit the Toast to a
.ee. While last year's Musit howcase
had the tiny venue packed to the rafters and
^realize,!
i someone
*s meant
singer/guitarist Burns
politics managed to co
ever note? managed to
quiet venue's doors.
ling just outside its doors.
fe "laying a set. Unfortu-
g Inherent Vices*
"--form solo, as an
"bout Ukrainian
mi
through the
The multi-instrumental won
cer Davis gave a stunningly i
virtually flawless performance a
his instrumeni tic finger-pick
Perhaps bette as one part oi
ceptional noise-punk project Cowards, or as
the drone-heavy electronica musician resj
sible i\ or as the kindest
and most sincere sound guy in Vancouver. It
is alv in audience's reac
tion from the man, but not the
music, on s mastery of the acous
tic guitar . not be apparent from
the numb] -ach he has to crafting both
intricate and delicate arrangements, but the
longer he played at The Toast Collective the
more people in the crowd craned their necks
forward to see just how he was manipulating
his instrument.
REAL LIVE ACTION The night ended with Dan Geddes, performing under his stage name Lt Mck-
ens in a rare solo performance. I
fronting the Velvet Undergi eets-
Talking-Heads band Peace, the uniquely
suppressed performance was both incredibly refreshing and startlingly personal. To
call Geddes' songwriting literary would be a
critical understatement. Often venturing into
the realm of spoken word poetry, his solo set
saw him use his acoustic guitar almost as a
segue rather than a primary instrument. Long
passages and verses were obviously meticulously crafted and calculated, and removed
from the rock 'n' roll noises of Peace, it was
even easier to focus, simply, on the lyrics.
Geddes' unique delivery might come across
like an English Lit professor's Vonnegut lecture to some, but a more musical approach. 1
think, would have threatened to overshadow
what Lt. Frank Dickens obviously cherishes
most — the wordplay.—Fraser Dobbs
SEOUL / BALLET SCHOOL / MU
THE MEDIA CLUB / MAY 5
On May 5 at the Media Club, a select few
concertgoers sacrifice< ht with  New
Kids on the Block at Rogers Arena in favour
of a more intimate affair: Montreal's Seoul
and Berlin's Ballet School. The pair of up-
and-coming acts have been touring the States,
alon^kwith the big Canadian three (Toronto,
Montreal, Vancouver), since mid-April, hitting Vancouver as their third-last show of the
er duo Mu took the stage first,
showcasing their experimental, lean-dance
sound. Despite some technical problems,
Francesca Belcourt and Brittney Rand put on
a§ entertaining show. Refusing to limit themselves to any one particular genre, the artists
played with stoic electronica and engaging
talk-singing which briefly brought Belcourt
onto the dance floor. The duo had to contend
with a slow-to-warm-up crowd, but interesting personas and a conscious aesthetic intrigued listeners as the show progressed.
The dance floor filled out as we waited for
Berlin-based Ballet School to ascend onto
the stage. The band members had mingled
amongst the audience members during Mu's
set, demonstrating their own unwavering
appreciation for live music. Ballet School
have already made a name for themselves
in Europe, having first been signed in Berlin and later in the UK. They are now taking
on America and I have faith that this group,
overflowing with talent and stage presence,
w ill soon be an international sensation.
Rosie Blair's voice was nothing less than
astounding. Her vocals were reminiscent of
Kate Bush and Grimes, but she possessed an
energy and an otherworldly sound that was
all her own. Michel Collet accompanied her
powerhouse vocals on guitar, and the result
was a sound that would not have sounded
out a arcade version of Dance
•n. Touring drummer Angus
Tarnawsky   "
back in B<
d tin
hei
1 in for the band's drummer
nd his enthusiastic attention
nance to even more impress's high-cheekboned poise
her the most intimidating
m, but instead she was ap-
proa< smble, and encouraged ev-
eryon I with her after the set.
A1 ermission, Montreal-based
act S heir set. Ballet School was
front i the audience, keeping the
rener| heir touring partner's set
Seou heir personal connection to
the v led bittersweet memo
ries for the band. Their all-n I harmo
nies were beautifully intertwined to the point
that I often could not tell where one voice
ended and the next began. Seoul performed
one of their latest singles, "The Line," which
was a major highlight. Although they have
yet to release an LP, this act has major potential for success.
While Ballet School and Seoul seemed
a bit of an odd pairing for a co-headlining
tour, their shared enthusiasm for live music
and desire to show the audience a good time
REAL LIVE ACTION Neil Hagerty & The Howling Hex (pg.32-33) courtesy of Matthew Power
made it a unique night at Vancouver's Media
Club, which never fails to deliver a memorable show.—Hannah Thomson
NEIL HAGERTY & THE HOWLING HEX
/ GRETCHEN SNAKES BAND / MORMON
CROSSES
FOX CABARET / MAY 9
Sitting at a side table in the Fox Cabaret
Saturday evening, trailing disco lights and
revolving red squares with the Howling Hex
playing on stage and I felt like I had missed
something, like I walked into the middle of
a set of sorrie band that everyone was supposed to know, but if they were all to pause
for a second, I am sure the confusion would
be shared.
"It's the Howling Hex, everybody!"
Hagerty repeated at least three times during a
thin 15-20 minute set. Then the songs would
start with the percussionist/tambourinist rambling about some man rifling through pockets
at a bus stop, or meeting four people like the
four corners of the earth. And the song would
swell, and Neil would shout a hook with repetition befitting an alt-punk mainstay, and
the band would jam, and the song would
ebb, and end. About five or six times. Then
they depart, and instead of any sort of encj|g
Hagerty walks back to the microphone to
claim, "It's time to dance!" and proceed
pack up his equipment. Folks shuffle about,
I shuffle out.
It was underwhelming to say the least. Not
that they played poorly, in fact some of it was
quite exciting, however there was an ephemeral quality to it, like we should just catch on
to what we could and enjoy. Though in a way,
what was I expecting? For anyone showing
up to hear some Pussy Galore or Royal Trux,
get over it. This was the HOWLING HEX,
everybodv!
the other eight or so spectators, which is too
bad, because catching them live for the first
time really elevated my appreciation for the
group. It was a much louder, intense assault
than what I anticipated from their recordings,
complete with a terrific, relentless approach
from Bryce on drums. They kept speakers
rattling and sonic tension encompassing,
without venturing too far into the dangers of
jamming out. The set was focused and tough,
it deserved to have more people see it.
Then came what for some in attendance
may have been the main event of the evening: the debut of the Gretchen Snakes Band.
Brody McKnight has apparently spent the
last few months taking his oriental, sinister and brooding guitar pieces and translating them into a four-piece Gretchen Snakes
soundscape, occasionally even throwing in
some lyrics, delivered monotonically yet
with purpose. The performance didn't disappoint, occasionally reveling in some nice guitar freakouts common to those familiar with
the Mutators or Nu Sensae, and included a
good sense of style. The two other guitarists
kept their backs turned to the audience while
flooding us with a dirge that will hopefully
soon see the light of day in one form or another. Not that you would listen to it in the
light of day, of course, lt belongs in dark corners, murky dreams or the dim red and black
of the Fox.
suddenly it's over and you realize
aving a show at 10pm; you try to
keep the Gretchen Snakes Band at the front
of your mind to distract you from the disappointment of the Howling Hex, here and
gone again, flitting by like some anecdote
you hear somebody else telling on the bus,
that you just don't quite catch.—Andy Resto
JOHN WIESE / MASS MARRIAGE / Al-
LEEN BRYANT / FOX CABARET / MAY 14
Back to the beginning. An understandably
sparse crowd for Vancouver alt rock three-
piece Mormon Crosses, jilted into playing
an earlier-than-early show, already one song
deep by the time I arrived at 7:45pm to join
I was at The Getty last August. The afternoon hovered around 30°C: desultory conditions for tourists like myself. So, walking
around the museum's grounds, I found myself lazing on the grass. Down the hill, in
REAL LIVE ACTION a garden, with pillars of foliage gated into
sprouting shapes and polite outcroppings of
color, sound emerged from a hidden set of
speakers. There was an uncertain cycle: a
soothing drone accompanied by the creak of
weather vanes, giving way to murky horns,
divots of noise and the movement of hard
matter. This installation, "Wind Changed Direction," was my first encounter *with American interdisciplinary and noise artist John
Wiese (outside of a brief infatuation with
Sissy Spacek).
This is all to say that Wiese is an interesting
figure. The Getty Center, perched above Los
Angeles, accessible by air-conditioned tram-
a fixture in the constellation of transnational
art culture-is shades apart from the gallery
backrooms and basements where noise-niks
typically do their work. To its credit, The Fox
had a warehouse tone on Thursday: meager
attendance meant that the circulator silhouettes were especially visible on the wall adjacent to the stage. Sonic masochists even had
to orient themselves to a new kind of terror:
chunky beats from the bar upstairs that bled
out over many of Wiese's films. The impropriety!
Earlier that night, establishing an austere mood, Vancouver local Aileen Bryant
opened. With an ascetic-electronic set-up, her
voice, and a controller, Bryant gave the audience a compelling dirge. Dissonant sustains
of voice evince Bryant's powers as a singer.
But this uncanny vocalization was also abetted digitally, with time-stretched voice and
layers of pitch-shifted auto-harmonization.
Bryant would fill the silence after particularly
harrowing passages with electronic pulses, or
deploy chimes, gurgles, and droplets to further impress the mood of sparseness.
Mass Marriage's set was typically good.
Mel Paget's rattling drones possess a density evocative of oscillating concrete: and a
minimal focus that allows the listener to hone
into a slight rhythmic pulse. Seeing Paget's
performance for the fourth or fifth time and
speaking as a fan of her visual art, I wonder
if there is room for confluence between the
graphic dimension of her work and these
types of performances.
After these sets, Wiese presented a series
of his short films (not all of which are described here). Some provided documentation of music makers: i.e. Joseph Hammer or
The Tenses with John Wiese. Here, footage
of the creative process is sequenced in montage, with samples of the titular artist's music
featuring on the soundtrack. However, outside of rare moments of diegetic audio, the
soundtracks are desynchronized from the recording happening on-screen. Wiese's shots
are often similarly arresting decisions: candid
and with a textural sensitivity-a close-up of a
person's face, proximate shots or odd angles,
refractions of light.
Untitled, comprised of brief cuts and lush
colors, follows a woman from the beach-
rife with shallow water life-to the studio in
portraiture. But while the previous films* are
scored with noise, Untitled features no audio
at all. Wiese's reticence to suggest a mood
with sound points towards depiction that is
non-didactic: suggestive but wandering. Untitled, which evokes an intimacy and inner-
space, may be considerate of the overpowering signification that a designed soundtrack
would confer.
Besides a multifaceted concern for sound,
these choices delineate a curious tension:
noise pranksterism versus Wiese's seriousness. Wiese on stage, sitting behind a laptop,
does not give the impression of automatic action. It would be far-fetched for me to try and
articulate each component in his composition
or to suggest that there is some inherent coherence linking this brass squawk with that
commercial excerpt or this field sample with
that AM broadcast, but there is a tonal logic
in the assemblage.
REAL LIVE ACTION  MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
Greg Macpherson, Joel
R.L Phelps, the Up-
:s ® Hindenburg
Great Lake Swimmers,
Weather Station 0 the
Vogue
-Music Waste 0 Various Venues
-Local Artist, Bobby
Draino, Robin Banks,
Nervous Operator 0
Selectors' Records
-Belle Game with
Dave Vertesi ® the
Biltmore
Shotgun jimmie, Slow
Learners, Knife Pleats
the Cobalt
lext Music From
TokyoVol7-OWARI-
KARA, mothercoat,
otori, PENs+, Atlantis
Airport 0 the Biltmore
18
Softess, Mormon
Crosses, Inherent
Vices, Failing ®
Astoria
WPP, Slow Learners, Stress Eating <
Hindenburg
Ben Frost, Tim
Hecker ® The
Imperial
Suuns and Jerusalem
in my Heart 0 Fortune
Sound Club
Gaytheist, War Baby,
Anchoress, Ape War e
the Biltmore
Weird Candle w/
Brutes ® the Astoria
jacco Gardner, Calvin
Love, Dada Plan 0
the Fox
Porno 0 Fortune
Sound Club
29
30
Faith Healer w/
Monomyth, Nap Eyes,
Supermoon ® the
Astoria
Christopher Owens 0
the Cobalt  Ballet School Photo (pg.34-35) courtesy of Matthew Power
After an opening crescendo of soothing
drone pulled from "Wind Changed Direction," Wiese set upon a vortical path. Imagine the undulation of bass, acoustic rattles,
and howls of metallic or submerged atonal-
ity: planetary frequencies upon which other
motifs or loops orbit. The pace is steady -
indomitable - and the collection of sounds
is manic. So it is impressive that neither the
audience nor Wiese lost themselves in dissolute or apathetic action. If Wiese's films point
towards particular experiences, then perhaps
the breadth ofhis live material points towards
a praxis: a response and organizing principle
towards material within what doomsday i
orists would lambast as today's hyper-saturated society.
At any rate the music was beautiful. The
performance's closing was sensitive as well:
not rushing towards a climax, but instead almost seeming like a matter of mere logistics.
Unlike an installation, John Wiese can't sit
around and play all day.—Jon Kew
COLIN COWAN & THE ELASTIC STARS
THE CHINA CLOUD/ MAY 22
The release party of Spring Myths celebrated eleven days of hard work, Sun Ra and
Cowan's birthday, and the three quarter completion of Cowan's seasonal themed project,
"Seasonal State-of-Mind Tetralogy."
The tiny, mystical space that is the China
Cloud can only be found bi through a
black, unmarked, Dow side door,
and up a steep staircasv *f the low
lights transformed I wishing
lantern floating in \ vith overstuffed furniture, a he China
Cloud resembled a s eclectic
Cowan's incredibly lush music created a
shared heartbeat. Seemingly renewed after
living through the Eye of Winter, Cowan &
tic Stars seemed to bask in the new
sunb .hanging seasons. His heavier
songs, \\\ y's Millionaires," con
nect* Something about
couraged some spi
charged dancing.
?e a band that seemed
i Ivith each other, and
audience to do their
amps, a Califone
ben heart shaped
the drummer, it
b vinyl chang-
Why it was
ume it's con-
rhaps sound-
record Kx
chair. Control fe
was mysterioi
ing halfway i
there I can oi
nected to wh
ed like train effects.
Slightly d..y., a pot was utilized for additional vocal it verb.
Cowan ended the show by playing a lilting
acoustic solo piece, finalizing the release by
the lyrics "Don't you stop." Although abrupt,
the ending was fitting for a show that felt like
one long connected lullaby.
Although a small-scale show, this springtime mellow performance was yet another
chance for Cowan and his Elastic Stars to
create and share a wo? through rose
tinted glassls.—Esmec me
I felt like I was era dly birthday
party. There was an a intimacy,
but that was ok, becai definitely
induced a warm, comm
iREAL LIVE ACTION  BISi§l§
-. v f:or,
****
M     ,2  £ under rwkw.*
PINNER
#2 DEMO
(Self-Released)
It's easy to throw around words like "raw"
and "vulnerable" when talking about low-fi
punk releases. But #2 demo does more interesting things with genre than simply wear it
as a fashion.
#2 demo has that empowering emo, "we're
all in this together" spirit, found most explicitly in folk-punk. There's a link there I already half-regret making — this isn't a folk-
punk release. #2 demo's vulnerability isn't
nearly as forced as some of the music coming
from that genre.
Pinner's shaky, out of tune vocals might
sound like they belong on a folk-punk anthem, but the two don't really originate from
the same source. Everything is held together
by a string, sure, but it's not held together in
that sort of aestheticized folk-punk-y way.
It's not deliberately seeking to announce its
vulnerability.
You can tell the members of Pinner set out
to just write compelling music: that's where
the honesty emerges. It's an attempt at creating a good demo, and the attempt feels like a
successful one.
There's typical tape-rock trappings here
— it's melancholic, it's really personal, it's
cathartic — but something interesting and
original comes from it. Often, it seems as if
this album was written individually in parts
— there's a good riff, a good baseline, whatever. They don't clash with each other, but
they each feel independently dense and focused. And in part because of how the demo
is mixed, the individual elements seem distant from each other. It's this stripped down
composition that defines #2 demo. It feels
practiced, but it's still practice.
"Learn to swim" exemplifies this best. The
song begins with a false start and then builds
up energy through repeated melodies. It
sounds as if someone is replaying a section of
a song while sitting on a dingy couch in their
basement in order to learn it; the composition emerges from the mechanics of practice.
There's force in that indeterminacy.
It would be far-fetched to call this an "exploration" of the demo as form, but there's
definitely a reason why it's released as a
demo and not an album.
There's a great deal of honesty in the way
#2 demo is played. Our relationships, communities, and lives can often feel like this
everyday practice of repetition. But like #2
demo, our relationships, communities, and
lives are works in progress — and that's pretty rad. -Joshua Gabert-Doyon
KIMMORTAL
Sincerity.
(Self-Released)
Sincerity, opens with the melancholic "Doubts," tricking you into thinking the album will continue on in typical
42
UNDER REVIEW singer-songwriter fashion, but when the violin and soft drums kick in, it becomes clear
that Kimmortal is serving up something a
little more innovative.
The second track, "Dying in Flight," is an
anthem set to ukulele chords in which Kimmortal lets us know that she's a capable rapper, releasing words with power on a level
somewhere between the rawness of an artist
like Angel Haze and her own impassioned
spoken word.
"She" reveals Sincerity.'s political undertones. The album deeply explores themes
of womanhood and queerness in songs like
"Blue & Orange" and "Peace." Kimmortal
delves into her ancestry and speaks about her
life as a woman of colour. "I'm Not Sorry"
is a triumphant declaration of selfhood and
artistry which can be taken as a personal rebellion all on its own.
Backed by cinematic cello strings, Kimmortal sings a quiet song of longing on "Between the Earth & Sky," two tracks after she
rages in "Brushing by Heaven's Shoulder" as
she sings, "So I'll be criticized for searchin'
outside of these lines / So you'll be criticized
for thinkin' outside of these lines / So we'll
be criticized for lovin' outside of these lines."
The album ends with the title track "Sincerity." which emerges as an earnest prayer to
the self.
Kimmortal has a brave and vulnerable
voice which moves fearlessly from soft
song in "Blue & Orange" to rap that seems
to come from the belly in "Ancestral Clock
(Boom Bop)," but it is her honest, observant
lyrics that carry this album.
Kimmortal's courage is both inspiring and
soothing. Sincerity, is for anyone who needs
to feel like there is someone in their corner, a
strong hand on their shoulder.
- Keagan Perlette
illi
BRAIDS
Deep In The Iris
(Arbutus Records/Flemish Eye)
"We wanted to leave winter, to leave what
we were familiar with, to go to a place where
we felt sunlight on our face, a great expanse
when we looked out, roads that we had not
walked, a sky that was new." — BRAIDS on
their Facebook page, February 10
And with that, just in time for cool summer
evenings of introspective stargazing comes
BRAIDS' lush third album, Deep In The
Iris. As mentioned in their Arbutus Records
profile, the album was recorded in seclusion
in an Arizona cabin in the woods, between
hikes and campfires. Here, the Montreal trio
departed slightly from its experimental tradition towards something less conceptual. The
result is deliciously palatable dream-pop lyricism anyone can love.
The band's power comes from fragile, confessional lyrics delivered by Raphaelle Stan-
dell's luxurious vocals. "We spent a lot of
time breaking down barriers of self scrutiny,
judgement, expectations," the band writes on
43
UNDER REVIEW its Facebook page, "pushing to be raw and
vulnerable in front of one another." Such honesty is captured in tracks like "Happy When"
and "Getting Tired" by aching, hypnotizing
lyrics such as, "Spun around till I fell down /
Blood upon my knees as I kneel now."
Perhaps the most compelling track, however, is "Miniskirt." It's a scathing commentary on using women's fashion choices to
victim-blame survivors of sexual assault. (A
friend of mine was peacefully enjoying the
otherwise serene album when the scalding
line: "but in my position / I'm the slut / I'm
the bitch / I'm the whore" woke him up from
his daydream).
For those looking for a more uplifting
backtrack to a sunny day drive with their significant other, play "Taste." It's definitely a
catchy treat to the ears and perhaps the least
serious and most affirmative track of the record.
BRAIDS' new album is definitely for the
private and thoughtful indie buff. In terms of
relatable sound, they're a little less electronica than Canadian contemporary Purity Ring
and a little more mellow than American duo
Cults.
Perhaps the otherwise laid back record
could benefit from a few more energetic numbers like "Taste" and "Letting Go." Regardless, honest writing and uniformly tranquil
sound makes Deep In The Iris a restrained,
yet refreshing album for the summer.
- Charmaine Li
JOEL PLASKETT
The Park Avenue Sobriety Test
(Pheromone Recordings)
Nationally adored singer/songwriter Joel
Plaskett makes his return to music with his
fourth solo release The Park Avenue Sobriety
Test.
On the cusp of 40, Plaskett reveals a more
philosophical and serious side to himself as
he shares his experiences with love, success, adulthood, and belonging. Along with
mm»m^    »•
^ *
m >«       F    :
	
»r     i
mm   t%mm   «w    at
mm
lit    m
m*&*   m    m   mm
Mm
mm mm.
*-   mm   -   mmm
m   m
mr wfi*
mm     *.*   m   mm it
O    ,
m|    psSi wm
mm   m***   *.   m^ *
*mm
alii   +.   mmm   wm
k    m
Wjk      vSlm wS
m mmm   m   m   **l
te   u» m **ags
m -**L ##& n«ft«tt C
m^l^l
utm w&
*P' - m &m* pwk &*%
»8$a&*$# $tst
instrumentals from his longtime touring band
the Emergency, The Park Avenue Sobriety
Test features a multi-talented group of artists
with appearances by Mo Kenney, Tim Brennan, and JP Cormier.
Broadening his musical landscape, Plaskett has succeeded in blending other genres
with his own beloved folk sound. This includes his addition of a Celtic vibe on tracks
including "On a Dime;" which is enhanced
by an ebullient performance by JP Cormier
on the fiddle.
He continues to explore genres on "Alright/
OK," a jaunty track that emits a backyard
party vibe. "Credits Roll" brings Plaskett's
toe-tapping live experience to life, whereas
"For Your Consideration" reveals a sorrowful side of Plaskett we haven't yet seen in his
previous work.
While changes in genre from song-to-song
make for a consistently odd shift in mood,
Plaskett's habitual folk sound is never lost,
making the album an intriguing listen.
Despite this venturing into different musical styles, long-time followers will be more
than fulfilled with the few familiar, heartwarming, and witty tunes, which are matched
perfectly with his genuine lyrics.
The Park Avenue Sobriety Test is a freewheeling, thought-provoking album, exhibiting the many new sides of Plaskett's unique
musical style. Both first time listeners and
44
UNDER REVIEW long time admirers will be equally as satisfied with his unique Maritime-folk sound
paired with nostalgically familiar lyrics.
Packed with catchy tunes, a few laughs,
and a little of the unexpected, Plaskett has
raised the bar for himself and succeeded in
exploring new genres without losing his true
roots.- Nathan Sing
THE REAL MCKENZIES
Rats in the Burlap
(Stomp!/Fat Wreck Chords)
Warped Tour Vancouver 1998: NOFX
takes the stage for a headlining set before
blasting into a tune from one of their many
iconic '90s albums. Fat Mike declares that he
has just witnessed one of the greatest bands
he's ever seen — the Real McKenzies. The
Real McKenzies were already an institution
in Vancouver at this point, so the crowd's
uproarious reaction to Fat Mike's proclamation was no surprise, nor was it surprising
when the McKenzies released an album on
Fat Wreck Chords' subsidiary Honest Dons,
a couple years later.
Fast-forward to 2015: the McKenzies have
released their seventh studio album, Rats in
the Burlap with Fat Wreck Chords (released
on Stomp! in Canada). This is their eleventh
release in total since the Scottish influenced
punk band's inception in 1992, four years
before the formation of a certain Irish influenced Boston band the McKenzies are so often compared to.
As usual the album has a number of more
Celtic influenced songs, like the vigorous
bagpipe laden opener "Wha Saw the 42nd,"
the spirited "Lilacs in the Alleyway" and the
bouncing "You Wanna Know What."
The McKenzies have never been hesitant
to keep the punk in Celtic punk. This is most
evident in full out rockers like "Who'd a
Thought," and pop punk tracks like "Catch
Me." All the songs on Rats in the Burlap
showcase the band's solid musicianship and
their ability to include traditional Celtic instruments — particularly bagpipes —■ throughout
the album without sounding kitchy.
The McKenzies' notorious sense of humour
is also present, particularly on "Bootsy the
Haggis-Eating Cat"— which apparently is a
true story. The reeling "Spinning Wheels" is
an ode to the McKenzies' epic tours and notoriously fun performances — shows where
you might be treated to a 'friendly' onstage
punch up, or be called out by vocalist Paul
McKenzie for standing around in the crowd:
"You in the back, uncross your fuckin' arms
and dance!"
It's nice to see that 23 years in, these Celtic
punk pioneers are still hammering out genre
defining albums. Rats in the Burlap is another fist full of rousing good times that the Real
McKenzies have become legendary for. They
show no signs of slowing down as Paul McKenzie sings in "Spinning Wheels:" "We've
been here before / We play here again / To
raise up a glass with all our friends."
-Mark PaulHus
RIVER OF KINGS
The Sway
(Self-Released)
Though River of Kings' The Sway will be
released on June 9, this EP's dark sound is far
from a carefree summer listen.
River of Kings is the solo effort of Vancouver musician Jordan Irwin. The Sway is his
second EP — a collection of songs featuring punk-infused guitar playing and scratchy
45
UNDER REVIEW River of Kings.
vocals. This EP marks a heavy departure
from Bleak Sounds — Irwin's first EP —
playing host to grungy bass and reverberating
distortion in place of more upbeat, synthetic
sounds and soft vocals.
If you're looking for a throwback to the
days of meandering around town in shredded
Chuck Taylor shoes and black skinny jeans,
this is your album. Distorted vocals in "Damage (What Are You Fighting For)" harken
back to classic '90s pop punk and reminds
the ears of early '00s bands featured on Van's
Warped Tour. "Caught In The Sway (Ritual),"
the EP's single, clearly reflects Irwin's influences: Interpol, Radiohead, Tame Impala,
Muse, and the like.
The EP's hidden gem is the final track
"Exit (Get On Your Way)," which is completely instrumental. Haunting guitars echo
behind a chugging bass line, showing off Irwin's deft control over his instruments and
his understanding of his own sound. "Exit"
sonically mirrors the first track "Intro (Come
This Way)," which uses minimal vocals and
gives the album a kind of cyclical feeling, as
if the last song js the shadow of the first.
Irwin has clearly grown as a musician since
his last release and has no trouble wearing his
inspirations on his sleeve. The Sway is proof
that you can never take the emo kid out of the
hipster. - Keagan Perlette
WEED
Running Back
(Lefse Records)
It's taken Weed one phenomenal 7" single,
an EP, and a long-play (2013's Deserve) to
seemingly wrap up their experiments in no-fi
production, or at least shift that fidelity into
the realm of discernibility.
On Running Back, Weed's sophomore album, frenetic drum hits are — for the first
time in the band's history — audible beyond
a white-wash of cymbal hits, and equally surprising is how relatively far forward singer
Will Anderson's trademark croon is in the
mix. More than ever does Running Back see
Weed falling further in love with shoegaze —
and though this record isn't a rock-fueled version of Loveless, it's not far off.
In many ways, Running Back is a naturally
more mature version of Weed's previous releases. After struggling to retain the perfectly
shit-fi recording quality the band captured
on With Drug/Eighty, it's refreshing to hear
songs that aren't chasing that particular rabbit
any longer.
Guitars are just as, if not more, Big Muffed
than usual, but this time punch through in all
the right spots instead of being swallowed up
by the rest of the mix. In part, this means the
tenaciousness that so many fans found solace
in is somewhat lacking throughout the ten
songs that make up the LP — it's a less abrasive album and suffers less from the reckless
46
UNDER REVIEW youthfulness that plagued Deserve and Gun
Control (2012), but this maturity comes at
the cost of some of the intensity and sense of
wild abandon that those records shared.
Running Back is a solid and strong progression of the core ideas that Weed has explored
over the last four years, even if it suffers
slightly from a restrained energy. Most importantly, perhaps, it answers a question that
has plagued music nerds since hearing the
amazing With Drug/Eighty split that the band
put out after first solidifying its lineup: just
how long can four people pour blood, sweat,
and tears into their records before they're
forced to reign things back? The reigns here
make for a slightly less chaotic and brash
Weed experience, but Running Back is as
solid a sophomore album as listeners could
have expected.- Fraser Dobbs
ZOO STRATEGIES
Separation
(Self-Released)
When one thinks of math rock, one tends
to imagine carefully arranged, exquisitely
performed, and impenetrably dense songs,
that are equal parts rock 'n' roll and quadratic
equation. And while this may be the case with
most math rock bands out there, Vancouver's
own Zoo Strategies have their own approach.
Made up of members from Polarhorse
and Yes Bear, Zoo Strategies embrace math
rock's irregular time signatures, unyielding
melodic instrumentation, and limited reliance
on vocals, yet adopt their own short-form,
seemingly laid back approach to songwriting.
Steadily churning out EPs — Separation
being their third in two years — Zoo Strategies opt for a handful of short, and powerful
glimpses into their own brand of math rock.
With a runtime of just under nine minutes,
this EP doesn't waste any time, despite the
first track. At a sparse 28 seconds long, this
title track starts in silence, and stays there.
Only the slight sound of wind can be heard
before pure silence falls again. A tone is set,
to which the rest of the EP should be listened
— calm, cold, and open. After the intro track,
the EP bursts into life.
"Actual Birthday," the lorigest song on
the EP, at just under three minutes, begins
with relentless stop-and-start bass and drum
in tandem. After a few bars, the full band
kicks in, with light guitar lines and an easier
feel; the composition is anything but simple,
though. Throughout this instrumental track,
tempos change and guitar lines race between
harmonizing and counteracting one another.
The songs start and end in quick succession, never dwelling on any one musical
concept for long. At first listen, Separation
may seem to be too short to take seriously. In
actual fact^ it is packed to the brim with snippets of compositional anomalies and unique
phrases, that are performed just long enough
to be noticed, and no longer.
Whether it be with or without vocals, every
song on Separation is rich in musical dexterity and ability. However brief it may be, Zoo
Strategies' latest release is a showcase in how
comfortable and accessible math rock can be.
- Jasper D Wrinch
47
UNDER REVIEW  A HIT OF AUSTIN'S PSYCHEDELICS
by Jasper D Wrinch II Illustrations by Karl Ventura
It's festival season, though most music-
loving Vancouverites already know that.
With some of the continent's biggest and best
music festivals already come and gone, the
opportunity to attend these unique concert
experiences is quickly slipping away with the
month of June.
And while there are a great and many assortment of festivals around Vancouver and
the nearby areas, Vancouver proper has only
recently adopted its very own full-fledged international music festival.
From June 5-7, Levitation Vancouver will
host its inaugural psychedelic music festival
across six venues in the city, stretching from
Stanley Park to Main Street. The Malkin
Bowl will act as the epicentre of the festival, and will host two all-day concerts with
musical acts both large and small — from
Beach Fossils to the Backhomes. From there,
festival-goers can move East to Main Street
to see a variety of showcases at a selection
of local venues including the Rickshaw, the
Electric Owl, and the Cobalt, among others;
each curated to an individual style and sound
of music.
While Levitation is committed to showcasing the talent and culture of Vancouver cre-
atives, the festival's roots stretch all the way
into tfye heart of Texas.
"A number of people who work at Timbre
[Concerts] have been going down to Austin
Psych Fest for years," says Grace McRae-
Okine, Social Media Coordinator for Vancouver's Timbre Concerts. Sitting down
with Discorder, McRae-Okine discusses the
49
LEVITATION FEST r
"WITH CAREFUL PLANNING AND TIMING, IT'S POSSIBLE TO CATCH
NEARLY ALL OF YOUR TOP ACTS FROM BOTH FESTIVALS."
details of how Levitation Vancouver came
about, what it's trying to accomplish, and
how Vancouver can respond to a new festival.
After Austin's own psychedelic music festival re-branded itself Levitation Festival and
sent satellite festivals to both Chicago and
France, Vancouver's loyal following of concert promoters were eager to jump on board
to help organize a satellite festival in Vancouver. "Vancouver is just a market that makes
a lot of sense," says McRae-Okine, "mainly
because psych music is so prevalent here."
With a well-established audience, a city
lacking an international summer festival, and
an itch to expand their concert series, Levitation joined forces with Timbre Concerts to
bring their already successful festival series
to Vancouver.
Referring to the lineup, McRae-Okine says,
"If you give them a chance, they're probably
going to blow your mind." In accordance
with the festival's mandate to exhibit exciting, innovative, and sometimes challenging
music to their audience, Levitation Vancouver is "trying to bring in the most eclectic,
experimental, often international sounds that
we can, and expose them to an audience that's
never seen them or heard them before."
Shows taking place in Stanley Park act as a
sort of overview for the variety and diversity
of Levitation Vancouver's roster. The Malkin
Bowl will host international names such as
the Black Angels and Beach Fossils, as well
as Vancouver's own talent, with the likes of
Black Mountain and Dada Plan, among many
others. "We just want to give people a full
festival experience within even just that venue," explains McRae-Okine.
On top of that, the night time Main Street
shows offer rfiore specific and distinct varieties of music. As McRae-Okine explains,
"The [Main Street shows] have each been
individually curated to cater to people with
specific musical interests."
Varying from Saturday's electronic showcase at the Rickshaw, to Sunday's heavy metal showcase at the Electric Owl. The Main
Street showcases also stand in as alternatives
to paying for an entire festival pass, being
that tickets to each showcase can be bought
individually.
However diverse and exciting the introduction of a new festival is to Vancouver's flourishing music scene, Levitation Vancouver
doesn't arrive completely free of controversy.
Since 1994, Music Waste, a volunteer-run
music festival, has been put on to highlight
Vancouver's independent music scene, with
a wide variety of locally established and
up-and-coming artists. This year, Levitation
Vancouver falls on the same weekend.
"As is Shania Twain," McRae-Okine
points out in an effort to offer perspective.
And although Shania Twain is playing at
Rogers Arena that same weekend, the demographic attending likely won't be mourning
the loss of missing out on either Music Waste
or Levitation.
Regardless, McRae-Okine is adamant that
this festival overlap was unintended. "In no
50
LEVITATION FEST way was it [Levitation Vancouver] planned to
happen on the same weekend." Yet as a result, this concurrence of two music festivals,
within the same city is a cause of concern for
concert-goers with an affinity for psychedelic
music. A weekend that was once full of bands
to see and music to listen to has become absolutely overflowing. But that doesn't mean
both can't be at least partially enjoyed.
"Music Waste is one day longer than us,
which is super cool, so on the 4th, everyone
can check that out," notes McRae-Okine.
The notion of infringement on Vancouver's
own cultural wealth from the outside is a vital
issue in Vancouver's music scene. For those
working and living within the city, Vancouver's Levitation Festival may be perceived as
doing just that. However, McRae-Okine, as
well as the rest of Timbre Concerts, are committed to avoiding this clash.
"There's no animosity. We love Music
Waste, they've been doing an awesome volunteer run festival for twenty years... but we
definitely think that we're doing two fairly
different things," McRae-Okine reasons.
Music Waste offers itself up as a detailed
look into the city's art and music makeup,
while Levitation Vancouver exists as an event
in which musical tastes can be expanded by
both local and international acts. With both
festivals happening simultaneously, Vancouver shows itself to be a city that can embrace
culture from both within and without.
While the overlap is noted, McRae-Okine
also argues: "It's hard not to have two awesome things happening at the same time in
the summer in Vancouver," and encourages
those split between the two festivals to try a
bit of both. "We have our schedule out, Music Waste has their schedule out." With careful planning and timing, it's possible to catch
nearly all of your top acts from both festivals.
And although Levitation Vancouver may
land on an already inhabited weekend in Vancouver's music scene, the festival expands
opportunities and avenues through which
music fans in the city can access and experience music. As McRae-Okine so aptly puts
it, "That's the whole point; to open your ears,
find new sounds, explore new experiences."
51
LEVITATION FEST •■•Cir TIM THE NOT SO MUTE
by Garth Covernton II Illustrations by Jimmy Laing
II Photography by Jaqueline Manoukian
The man behind the scrappy twee punk
project Tim the Mute, is Tim Clapp, and he
can only be described as someone operating on another plane of existence from your
average human. Between playing shows and
releasing five seven-inches as Tim the Mute
since 2011, Clapp also runs the extremely
prolific local label Kingfisher Bluez, releasing a never-ending stream of records from up
and coming indie/punk bands.
Clapp is usually bouncing around in a ra-
men and energy drink fuelled fury, frenetically assembling records, mailing records,
picking records up, going to shows, playing
shows, and selling merch for other bands at
shows. He collects-things, especially vinyl,
and his record collection currently numbers
around 6000 LPs and singles, including obscure recordings of train sounds, bird sounds,
weird religious albums from the '80s, and
even an album of complete silence. He also
collects white teapots shaped like animals
and is obsessed with trains. I know this because Tim Clapp is also my roommate.
I talk to Clapp about his alter ego, Tim the
Mute, and his upcoming full-length album
Why Live? in our kitchen while he assembles
his latest Kingfisher Bluez release. Stacks of
records are everywhere and he's simultaneously attempting to eat a hastily microwaved
dinner of rice, some strange vegan fish substitute, and mushy peas: Clapp's favourite
food and the name of his latest seven-inch,
just released this May.
When I ask where Tim the Mute began, he
tells me the name first came into existence as
his stage name at age 14. At this time Clapp
53
TIM THE MUTE 54 "AS CLAPP PUTS IT, WHEN PEOPLE LISTEN TO HIS RECORD HE WANTS
THEM TO THINK, "OH, I'M FEELING PRETTY BAD, BUT AT LEAST I'M
NOT THIS GUY.""
was playing in his previous band, the Shiny
Diamonds, in his home town of Roberts
Creek, BC. When the Shiny Diamonds broke
up in 2010, he started putting out music as a
solo artist. His debut album Why Live?, set
to be released at the end of June, consists of
10 songs written over the course of Clapp's
entire musical career. As he puts it: "This being my first album, I've had my whole life to
write it. It's basically like, everything I had
inside me that I wanted to get out."
Why Live? is a perfect analogue of the label Kingfisher Bluez itself, with Clapp the
captain at the helm and his favourite musicians the wind in his sails. Clapp plays guitar
on the album, but all the other instruments are
recorded by friends from other bands, including contributions from members of Canadian
bands Greys and Dead Soft, and from American big-timers, Xiu Xiu. "I like to bring in
people who I think would really do well on a
song," says Clapp.
The songs behind Why Live? are full of
lyrics as bleak as the title suggests, written
from all the lowest points in Clapp's life. In
his own words: "All of the sad-sack stuff that
I make comes from a real place, but it's a bit
tongue-in-cheek because it's so melodramatic."
Indeed at times the lyrics stretch beyond
the normal scope of self pity to something
that seems closer to ridicule. Generally following a theme of depression, angst, and inner dialogue, as Clapp puts it, when people
listen to his record he wants them to think,
"Oh, I'm feeling pretty bad, but at least I'm
not this guy."
The musical contributions from Clapp's
star cast of friends and the quality recording done both in his friend's hpme studio in
Glasgow and Little Red Sounds here in Vancouver, tighten up the sounds on Why Live?,
bringing a level of sophistication absent
from the sloppy home recordings of some of
Clapp's previous releases.
Opening with the title track "Why Live," a
sunshiney anthem to desperation, the album
immediately leaps boundaries and defies expectations. Pretty, downtempo synth ballads
like "Hard" and "Rock and Roll Suicide"
float by, while songs like "Is It Right" and
"Don't Kill Yourself are examples of nostalgic indie rock that would sound current if
released any time in the last decade.
It's hard to pin down a single genre or way
of describing Tim the Mute's sounds, but
Clapp admits this is exactly what he wants.
As he puts it: "I imagine people listening to
my record and going like, this is a guy who's
never heard music before."
Despite the dark notes, there are still moments of lightness found in songs like,
"When You Got Your Face Tattoo," written in
the style of previous Tim the Mute antics like
"Mushy Peas" and "Doctor Who Cosplay."
Clapp's songs are a quirky insight into his
own unique mind. The way he rambles in
his warbling chant-singing is a refreshing
alternative to the manufactured emotions
TIM THE MUTE
55 and cliches of so much modern music. As
someone who knows Clapp personally I can
promise you, his words are truth. When he
sings about how much he loves mushy peas
or Doctor Who, he's really not joking.
When I ask Clapp about what drives his
music he brings up his relationship with his
song-writing and his unconventional approach to singing. "For me it's very important to have my own voice, and when I hear
myself on a record that I don't think, oh it
could be someone else — it couldn't be anyone else. That's important to me."
Clapp describes watching a documentary on the Talking Heads and seeing David
Byrne say something along the lines of, "the
better someone's voice is, the less believable
they are," and thinking, "That's great! I'm a
fucking terrible singer so people are bound to
believe me. When I put out a record I want
people to stop me in the street and say: 'Are
you ok?'"
If only for the great and honest songwriting and intricate arrangements, Why Live? is
an album worth listening to. If you can see
past Clapp's lack of attention to what note
he's singing, perhaps you'll find something
that merits coming back to in times of feeling
as lost as a broken-hearted teenager, taking
comfort in the fact that someone else is just
as lost as you are.
56
TIM THE MUTE  ON THE AIR
THE MATT & RYAN SHOW
by Gary Jarvis II Illustrations by Olga Abeleva
Matt Hagarty & Ryan D Anderson are the
hosts of The Matt & Ryan Show. It's a show
packed full of wit that broadcasts live on
CiTR every second Thursday from 7:30 to
9:00 p.m. Before the first question had been
asked about their ensuing intellectual property rights debacle, they commenced jostling
with Matt asking Ryan if he had been to the
recent Kids In The Hall performance.
Matt: Did you go to Kids In The Hall?
Ryan: No.
M: Oh, it was awesome. It was two nights
ago.
R: Did you go?
M: Kids In The Hall.
R: Yeah, you went?
M: ...And you're a fan of comedy?
This is the type of banter I've anticipated
before even asking my first question...
YOU'LL HAVE A GUEST IN FOR THE
SHOW AND SOMETIMES CALLERS, IS THAT
GENERALLY THE FORMAT FOR THE SHOW?
M: That is pretty much it.
R: Our guest is usually a comedian or a
musician and we'll ask for callers. The calls
are open to the general public. We don't know
what sort of weirdo we're gonna get. Usually
it's a weirdo. Sometimes it's not such a weirdo, just like a regular call. But it's usually a
weirdo that we poke and prod with questions
and see what they're all about.
WHAT KIND OF PREP DO YOU DO BEFORE
A SHOW?
M: Well, we start by meeting up before the
show. I ask Ryan if he has anything prepared
for the show. He says no. He asks me if I have
anything prepared for the show, which I do
not, and then we go from there.
R: The answer's always no.
THERE'S A FOOD INTEREST?
M: Yeah I have a restaurant.
R: And I'm a hungry guy.
58
ON THE AIR HOW DO YOU KEEP THE MOMENTUM GO
M:
What kind of phone do you have that
ING IN THE SHOW?
you only have a certain amount of calls?
M: Sometimes we don't.
JB: It's like a death clock. Counts down
every time you dial it. I can't really explain.
R: It stops like it's being hit by a brick wall
I found it in the lost and found here at the
but we always have the caller aspect to rely
hotel.
on and if there's no calls we generally have -1
hesitate to say - "segments."
R: It's a death clock, sorry, what?
M: We have some things I go to. I review a
M: I'm sorry, I don't understand how you
t.v. show that I don't watch anymore. I think
called Ryan.
that's our only segment: me reviewing a t.v.
show that I don't watch anymore.
JB: Well, I had a number written down
here on my hand for a locksmith and I guess
R: I kind of like doing what has happened
some of the numbers sweat off.
in the last two weeks since we've seen each
other and rifting off of that and bouncing
Ryan looks up from his phone.
from one story to the next.
R: This is the type of stuff. It's coming into
At that moment Ryan's cell phone begins to
my personal line now. I mean, this is the sort
ring. He answers it.
of stuff we deal with on CiTR all the time.
R: Sorry - Hello - this is a perfect example
Back to the call.
of someone calling.
JB: I'm really in a tight spot. There's a lot
Ryan puts the caller on to speaker phone
of cars that have got to get picked up. There's
and places his phone on to the table.
people pounding on the door. I have the only
key.
Caller: I need a locksmith here. I'm in a bit
1
of a tight spot.
R: So you want me to call you a locksmith?
JB: Come over maybe. You got a crowbar?
R: No you called Ryan.
,
Caller: Are you downtown right now?
/5^*             XA
R: No, I'm doing an interview right now
•    C1   £ :0*
with Discorder.
fc_*\, '       * /% ~
Caller: Well, hello, I'm Jim Bucksco and
m                      m
I'm a doorman down at the Fairmont Hotel
■ ;?:".■■■■■ ■■■■;::'■■■■                         ^\'';'ffv7#::F
down here and I'm kinda locked in a utility
closet. I came in to get keys, valet some cars,
^^•fc^A          ^^^ # # ft
and I've somehow plumb locked myself in.
R: I don't know what to do, do you wanna
call a locksmith?
/ ^^C^^           -* - I \
JB: Well I only have one call left on my
If
phone and I used it to call you up.
ON THE AIR                                        Wf erd/na
uNBRAu
by Brownyn Lewis II Illustrations by Michael Shantz
"There's a funeral this Saturday."
"Are you going?"
"Well, I feel like we kind of have to, don't
you?"
"Yeah... At least there'll probably be some
good food eh?"
"Where is it?"
"Some club."
"A club??"
"I dunno. It's not like a club, it's just a
space but it's called a club. Lemme check...
The Anza Club."
"Ohh yeah. Okay."
The mourners approached. The line slowly
filed up the aisle to the coffin beside a blown
up photograph of the deceased. One at a time,
those who wished would approach and pause,
maybe touch the polished wood of the lid, or
say a few words before moving back to their
seat. The coffin was closed.
Asa's girlfriend elbowed her and nodded
her head in the direction of April, who sat
in the front row, head bowed, chest heaving
every now and then with a sob, tears streaming from behind her big black sunglasses.
Asa felt uncomfortable and looked away. She
wished she was back outside in the sun, instead of sitting in this dark room facing an
empty stage, in front of which was the small
coffin.
"I feel so bad for her," her girlfriend said,
dabbing her eyes with Kleenex.
Asa felt bad for herself. She couldn't cry.
Didn't even cry at her own father's funeral.
She looked instead at the floor, at the ugly
runners the man in front of her was wearing.
She wondered what there would be to eat after. Hopefully more than just stale veggies
and dip, or sad floppy rolls of unidentified
deli meat and cheese. Maybe smoked salmon
60
NO FUN FICTION or shrimp salad on a blini, or little sliders.
Asa's stomach rumbled audibly and her
girlfriend turned to give her a dirty look.
They were getting closer to the coffin and to
April, where she sat. The young man currently at the coffin tugged on his collar, cleared
his throat, said nothing to the coffin, didn't
touch it, and moved along. Asa wouldn't
have touched the coffin either. It was so shiny
and she could see the marks left behind by
the many fingers.
"How much do you figure that set them
back?" a man behind them asked his wife.
"I don't know. How would I know? You
know my mother was cremated."
"Okay, okay. I bet it was a lot though. It's
a nice box but it's just going in the ground."
Asa considered the benefits of cremation
over burial.
Suddenly, the woman at the end of the
line began to wail and fell to her knees, and
turned her broken-hearted, deep, dark eyes to
the ceiling and cried in gasping sobs. April
looked to her from behind her sunglasses and
seemed to relax, as if what had been holding her bound had been loosened. It was like
it was a relief to have someone else express
what she was feeling, like she was getting
worn out being the face of grief.
Asa's girlfriend turned and took Asa's arm.
She was worried for the woman. Under her
breath, Asa reassured her, "She's a professional."
"What?"
"A professional mourner."
There was little need to whisper. Asa remembered that when her father died, her aunt
explained that such professionals could be,
and were, hired.
Johnny, a friend, leaned forward, "Did you
say she's a professional?" His phone was in
his hand, he touched the screen in a reverse
pinch, zooming in on the performer, recording a video.
"Johnny!"
"What? She's great!"
Someone else, a relative of April maybe,
leaned over, "She should be good. She's an
aspiring actress. Used to be a server, like in a
restaurant, but she said she got sick of being
paid to smile. You know, emotional labour."
"So why not get paid to cry instead?" finished Johnny, laughing. "She does a damn
good job!"
There she was, doubled over and sobbing
on the floor, before but not on the stage that
stood empty and dark behind the little coffin.
April's mother moved forward and helped
her up and out of the way. Everyone took
their seats. April's boyfriend stood up in front
of the coffin and the blown up glossy picture.
He stood for a moment looking at the picture
before he began.
"When I first started dating April, she told
me about Ferdinand right away. I couldn't
wait to meet him because I knew he was such
a part of her life. She loved him so much. He
became part of my life too. We were a family."
April cried quietly. So did the mourner.
Johnny slid out ofhis seat, whispering 'scuse
me's. The bartender was polishing glasses
and carefully lining them up in a row on the
bar that wrapped around along the wall, to
the left of where they were all sitting. A girl
who worked for the caterer was taking the
greenhouse-like saran wrappings off trays of
food. Asa tried to see what was on the trays.
"... always there to say hello when I came
home. And we'd have so much fun in the
park together, walking the Seawall."
61
NO FUN FICTION F
April cried a little less quietly. Her boyfriend paused and looked to her. He hurried
to his conclusion, "He touched many lives
and he will be dearly missed. We hope — We
know he's chasing balls and sniffing trees
and rolling in the grass in doggy heaven."
A subdued, kind of confused cheer went
up from the crowd and there was some halfhearted applause. No one knew quite how to
act or what to do. Except the mourner.
She was the first to stand and rush to April.
She took both April's hands in her own and
spoke to her, looking earnestly and sensitively into her eyes. Everyone else watched.
"She is damn good," whispered Asa's girlfriend. Asa was trying to edge closer to the
front of the group. The sooner she could have
her moment with April the sooner she could
check out the food.
"That sucks, dude. I biked. I'm gonna get
wasted."
The group had formed another line, this
time to April instead of Ferdinand's coffin. Condolences were to be expressed. The
mourner had moved aside and was dabbing
under her eyes with a Kleenex, careful not to
muss her makeup.
Johnny approached, said a few words, and
she brightened/Wearing a big smile, she
tucked the Kleenex away and from her bag
pulled out a business card. She and Johnny
shook hands. He came back over to Asa and
her girlfriend.
"Well, she's gonna come in handy!"
Behind them, one guy nudged another.
"There's a brewery next door. Let's go grab a
beer before this reception thing gets going."
'Sure. But I drove. I can't have more than
one.
62
NO FUN FICTION To/v\ocHA
Cr/INO/,;
yoi^
£
^»-*
•NteJ
^ST=*y
„■#
0 sAO\K'. CITR 101.9FM PROGRAM GUIDE
DISCORDER RECOMENDS LISTENING TO CITR ONLINE
AT CITR.CA EVERY DAY
6:00"
7:00"
8:00"
CITR GHOST
MIX
9:0°"    BREAKFAST
WITH
THE
10:00"      BROWNS
11:00"
12:00"
1:00"
3:00"
4:00"
5:00"
6:00"
7:00"
8:00
9:00"
10:00"
11:00"
12:00"
1:00"
LANGUAGE TO
LANGUAGE
SYNCHRONICS
PACIFIC
PICKIN'
QUEER FM
VANCOUVER:
RELOADED
ROCKET FROM
RUSSIA
MORNING
AFTER SHOW
SHINEON
CITR GHOST
MIX
MOON
GROK
SUBURBAN
JUNGLE
CITR GHOST
MIX
CITR GHOST
MIX
CITR GHOST       CITR GHOST
MIX MIX
MOON GROK      MOON GROK
THE REEL
WHIRLED
THE
COMMUNITY
LIVING SHOW
THE SECTOR
UP ON THE
ROOF
POP DRONES
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
A FACE FOR
RADIO
TRANSITION
STATE
DUNCAN'S
DONUTS
THE SCREEN
GIRLS
THE CATS
PAJAMS
DAVE RADIO
WITH RADIO
DAVE
THE
SATURDAY
EDGE
BEPI CRESPAN
PRESENTS-
CLASSICAL
CHAOS
SHOOK-
SHOOKTA
GENERATION
ANNIHILATION
PARTS
2:00"     UNKNOWN
MOON     BVP    theperma- FEMCONCEPT
GROK   RADIO   NENTRAIN
RADIO
THE BURROW
STUDENT SPECIAL HOUR
RADIO FREE
THINKER
EXTRAENVIRONMEN-      MOON GROK
TALI ST
KEW IT UP ASTR°TALK
SPORTS IS FUN
WIZEMEN       VIBES & STUFF     ASIAN WAVE
THE LEO
RAMIREZ
SHOW
ALL EARS
..    EXPLODING
DISCORDER
RADIO
FLEX YOUR
HEAD
HEAD MOVIES      INSIDE OUT
THE JAZZ
SHOW
CRIMES &
TREASONS
NOD ON THE
LIST
ARTS REPORT
SOUL
SANDWICH
SIMORGH
SHARING SCIENCE
ARE
YOU       PEANUT
INNER    AWARE    butter
'N'JAMS
SQUANTCH'S     SPACE
HIDEAWAY
THE
SPICE
OF
LIFE
FOLK OASIS
THE
MATT
&
RYAN
SHOW
RADIO ZERO
NARDWUAR
PRESENTS
NEWS 101
STRANDED
AFRICAN
RHYTHMS
SKALDS HALL
LIVE FROM
fruumw,kl     THUNDERBIRD-      ^A„1Ar™
SEXY IN VAN        RADIO HELL CANADA
HANS VON
KLOSS MISERY
HOUR
POWER CHORD
THE
ROCKERS
SHOW
BLOOD
ON
I A THE
CODE BLUE      F||^TA   SADDLE
MANTRA
CHTHONIC
BOOM!
NASHAVOLNA
CRESCENDO
MORE THAN
SOULSHIP
ENTERPRISE
HUMAN
WHITE NOISE
RHYTHMNS       TECHN0
INDIA          PR0GRES"
SIVO
COPY/PASTE     THE MEDICINE
SHOW
SYNAPTIC
SANDWICH
RANDOPHONIC
BOOTLEGS &
B-SIDES
TRANCENDANCE
G4E
2:00"
3:00"
4:00"
CITR
GHOST
MIX
CITR
GHOST
MIX
CITR
GHOST
MIX
AURAL TENTACLES
THE
LATE NIGHT
SHOW
CITR
GHOST
MIX
THE ABSOLUTE
VALUE OF
INSOMNIA
5:00"
6:00"
CITR 707.9 FM PROGRAM GUIDE DIFFICULT
Radio Free Thinker TUE 3pm
Promoting skepticism, critical thinking and science, we examine popular extraordinary claims and subject them to critical
analysis.
Cited! WED 11:30am
This is a radio program about how our world is being shaped
by the ideas of the ivory tower. Sometimes, in troubling ways.
Formerly "The Terry Project" on CiTR.
Bepi Crespan Presents... SUN 7am
Bepi Crespan Presents... CiTR's 24 Hours Of Radio Art in a snack
size format! Difficult music, harsh electronics, spoken word, cut-
up/collage and general Crespan© weirdness. Twitter: (©bepicrespan. Blog: bepicrespan.blogspot.ca
CU AL
  All Ears                                                                       MON 6pm
Classical Chaos                                                         SUN 9am (Alternating with UBC Arts On Air.) All Ears is an advice radio pro-
From the Ancient World to the 21st century, join host Marguerite gram targetted to the UBC community. We try to answer your
in exploring and celebrating classical music from around the questions and address topics sent via social media and over the
world. phone. Interviews and segments relating to campus life will be
  featured, all in our attempt to better our community and supply positive feedback.
Aloud                                             Alternating Thursdays 1pm Extraenvironmentalist                                              WED 2pm
Aloud features authors and literary critics reading, analyzing and Exploring the mindset of an outsider looking in on Earth,
discussing their favourite short stories. Every month we invite a Featuring interviews with leading thinkers in the area of sus-
prominent Vancouver-based author or critic to share one of their tainable economics and our global ecological crisis,
favourite pieces of short fiction on air. The show—one hour in
length—begins with the guest reading selections from the story Arts Report                                                              WED 5pm
and ends with an engaging discussion of the work with Aloud Reviews, interviews and coverage of local arts (film, theatre,
host, David Gaertner—a UBC postdoctoral fellow with a PhD in dance, visual and performance art, comedy, and more) by host
Literature. Theme and interstitial music provided by Vancouver Jake Costello and the Arts Reporters,
musician Jason Stames with support from UBC's First Nations
Studies Program. Read more at aloudliterature.tumblr.com and UBC Arts On Air                         Alternating Wednesdays 6pm
follow us on Twitter @Aloud_Lit. Ira Nadel, UBC English, offers scintillating profiles and unusual in-
  terviewswith members of UBC Arts world. Tune in for programs,
AstroTalk                                                                  THU 3pm people and personalities in Art
Space is an interesting place. Marco slices up the night sky with
a new topic every week. Death Stars, Black Holes, Big Bangs, Red Sexy In Van City                                                     WED 10pm
Giants, the Milky Way, G-Bands, Syzygy's, Pulsars, Super Stars... Your weekly dose of education and entertainment in the realm
of relationships and sexuality, sexyinvancity.com/category/
The Sector                                                                  FRI 8am sexy-in-vancity-radio.
Discussing the world of social justice, non-profits, charities and
activism. Join Ethan for in-depth interviews, examinations of The Reel Whirled                                                       THU 8am
nonprofit missions and causes, and discussions of everything The Reel Whirled is an hour long escapade through the world
from philanthropy to progressive politics. of cinema, be it contemporary or classic, local or global. From
our perspective as the UBC Film Society, we talk about film in-
Synchronicity                                                        MON 12pm tellectually, passionately and goofily. With select music from
Join host Marie B and discuss spirituality, health and feeling our cinematic subjects, we pull your Thursday mornings into fo-
good. Tune in and tap into good vibrations that help you re- cus, from bleary eyed to sharp and worthy of the silver screen,
member why you're here: to have fun! ubcfilmsociety.com | chairperson@ubcfilmsociety.com
News 101 FRI 5pm
Vancouver's only live, volunteer-produced, student and community newscast. Every week, we take a look back at the week's local, national and international news, as seen from a fully independent media perspective.
Queer FM Vancouver: Reloaded TUE 8am
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transexual communities of Vancouver. Lots of human interest features, background
on current issues and great music.queerfmradio@gmail.com
The Community Living Show THU 9am
This show is produced by the disabled community and showcases special guests and artists. The focus is for a positive
outlook on programs and events for the entire community.
Originally called "The Self Advocates", from Co-Op Radio CFRO,
the show began in the 1990s We showcase BC Self Advocates
with lots of interviews from people with special needs. Tune in
for interesting music, interviews and some fun times. This program is syndicated with the NCRA (National Community and
Campus Radio Association) across BC and across Canada. Hosted
by: Kelly Reaburn, Michael Rubbin Clogs and Friends, communi-
tylivingradio.wordpress.com | communitylivingradio@gmail.com
| Community Living Radio Show | @clivingradio
| #communitylivingradio The Social Focus Alternating Thursdays 6pm
An interview-based show about how students, past and present, have come up with creative ways to overcome social challenges in the community. Each episode will invite individuals
to share their stories of success and failure, along with actionable advice on how to start an innovative initiative that serves
the community. Hear from UBC students, alumni and others involved in the community!
The Matt & Ryan Show Alternating Thursdays 7:30pm
the Matt and Ryan show featuring Ryan and Matt. An hour and
a half of pure fun and good music. Matt and Ryan take calls,
give advice, and generally tell you what's up. The phone lines
are open.
Language to Language MON 11am
Encouraging language fluency and cultural awareness.
White Noise SAT 8pm
Need some comic relief? Join Richard Blackmore for half an
hour of weird and wonderful radio every week, as he delves
in to the most eccentric corners of radio for your listening
pleasure. Then stay tuned for the after show featuring a Q
and A with the creator, actors and a guest comic every week.
whitenoiseUBC@gmail.com
SOUL/R&B
Soulship Enterprise SAT 7pm
A thematically oriented blend of classic funk, soul, r&b, jazz, and
afrobeat tunes, The Happy Hour has received great renown as
the world's foremost funky, jazzy, soulful, and delightfully awkward radio show hosted by people named Robert Gorwa and/
or Christopher Mylett Gordon Patrick Hunter III.
African Rhyhms
Website: www.africanrhythmsradio.com
FRI 7:30pm
HIP HOP
Sharing Science
WEC
i 6pm
REGGAE
The Rockers Show
Reggae inna all styles and fashion.
SUN
12pm
ROOTS / FOLK / BLUES
Nod on the List TUE 11pm
"Nod on the List is a program featuring new urban and alternative music, sounds of beats, hip hop, dancehail, bass, interviews, guest hosts and more every Tuesday at 11pm.
scads_international@yahoo.com
facebook-So Salacious"
Crimes & Treasons TUE 9pm
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill ish. Hosted by
Jamal Steeles, Trinidad Jules & DJ Relly Rels.
Website: http://crimesandtreasons.blogspot.ca.
Email: dj@crimesandtreasons.com.
Vibes & Stuff TUE 4pm
Feeling nostalgic? Vibes and Stuff has you covered bringing
you some of the best 90s to early 2000s hip-hop artist all in
one segment. All the way from New Jersey and New York City,
DJ Bmatt and DJ Jewels will be bringing the east coast to the
west coast throughout the show. We will have you reminiscing
about the good ol' times with Vibes and Stuff every Wednesday
Blood On The Saddle Alternating Sundays 3pm       afternoon from 1:00pm-2:00pmPST.
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-boots country. E-mail: vibesandstuffhiphop@gmail.com
PacificPickin' '       . TUE 6am EXPERIMENTAL
Bluegrass, old-time music, and its derivatives with Arthur and       — —— —— —	
the lovely Andrea Berman. Email: pacificpickin@yahoo.com More Than Human, SUN 7pm
Strange and wonderful electronic sounds from the past present,
Folk Oasis WED 8pm      and future with host Gareth Moses. Music from parallel worlds.
Two hours of eclectic folk/roots music, with a big emphasis on
our local scene. C'mon in! A kumbaya-free zone since 1997. Pop Drones WED 10am
Email: folkoasis@gmail.com Unearthing the depths of contemporary cassette and vinyl un
derground. Ranging from DIY bedroom pop and garage rock all
The Saturday Edge SAT 8am      the way to harsh noise and, of course, drone.
A personal guide to world and roots music—with African, Latin, 	
and European music in the first half, followed by Celtic, blues, song-       Kew It Up WED 3pm
writers, Cajun, and whatever else fits! Email: steveedge3@mac.com.      Abrasive fight or-flight music played at hot loud volumes, uncooperative songs for things that are not alright. Punk, Noise-Rock,
Code Blue SAT 3pm      Post-Punk, Experimental, Industrial, Noisy, ad nauseum
From backwoods delta low-down slide to urban harp honks, —-— ■•■•■•———-—————-
blues, and blues roots with your hosts Jim, Andy, and Paul. LATIN AMERICAN
Email: codeblue@paulnorton.ca —-—	
La Fiesta Alternating Sundays 3pm
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue, Latin House, and Reggaeton with your
hostGspotDJ. The Leo Ramirez Show MON 5pm
The   best   of  mix   of  Latin   American   music.
Email: leoramirez@canada.com
ETHIOPIAN
Shookshookta SUN 10am
A program targeted to Ethiopian people that encourages education and personal development.
CHINESE / KOREAN
Asian Wave WED 4pm
Tune in to Asian Wave 101 to listen to some of the best music from the Chinese language and Korean music industries, as
well the latest news coming from the two entertainment powerhouses of the Asian pop scene. The latest hits from established
artists, rookies only just debuted, independent artists and classic
songs from both industries, can all be heard on Asian Wave 101,
as well as commentary, talk and artist spotlights of unsigned
Canadian talent. Only on CiTR 101.9 FM.
RUSSIAN
Nasha Volna SAT 6pm
News, arts, entertainment and music for the Russian community,
local and abroad. Website: nashavolna.ca.
INDIAN
Rhythmsindia
Alternating Sundays 8pm
Featuring a wide range of music from India, including popular music from
the 1930s to the present; Ghazals and Bhajans, Qawwalis, pop
and regional language numbers.
PERSIAN
Simorgh THU 5pm
Simorgh Radio is devoted to the education and literacy for the
Persian speaking communities and those interested in connecting to Persian oral and written literature. Simorgh takes you
through a journey of ecological sustainability evolving within
cultural and social literacy. Simorgh the mythological multiplicity of tale-figures, lands-in as your mythological narrator in the
storyland; the contingent space of beings, connecting Persian
peoples within and to Indigenous peoples.
SACRED
Mantra SAT 5pm
An electic mix of electronic and acoustic beats and layers, chants and medicine song. Exploring the diversity of the
worlds sacred sounds - traditional, contemporary and futuristic,
Email: mantraradioshow@gmail.com
DANCE/ ELECTRONIC
Copy/Paste THU 11pm
If it makes you move your feet (or nod your head), it'll be heard
on copy/paste. Tune in every week for a full hour DJ mix by
Autonomy, running the gamut from cloud rap to new jack
techno and everything in between.
Techno Progressive Alternating Sundays 8pm
A mix of the latest house music, tech-house, prog-house and
techno.
Trancendance SUN 10pm
Hosted by DJ Smiley Mike and DJ Caddyshack, Trancendance
has been broadcasting from Vancouver, B.C. since 2001.
We favour Psytrance, Hard Trance and Epic Trance, but also
play Acid Trance, Deep Trance, Hard Dance and even some
Breakbeat. We also love a good Classic Trance Anthem, especially if it's remixed. Current influences include Sander
van Doom, Gareth Emery, Nick Sentience, Ovnimoon, Ace
Ventura, Save the Robot, Liquid Soul and Astrix. Older influences include Union Jack, Carl Cox, Christopher Lawrence,
Whoop! Records, Tidy Trax, Platipus Records and Nukleuz.
Email: djsmileymike @trancendance.net.
Website: www.trancendance.net.
Inside Out
TUE8pm
Radio Zero FRI 2pm
An international mix of super-fresh weekend party jams from
New Wave to foreign electro, baile, Bollywood, and whatever
else. Website: www.radiozero.com
Synaptic Sandwich SAT 9pm
If you like everything from electro/techno/trance/8;
bit music/retro '80s, this is the show for you!
Website: synapticsandwich.net
The Late Night Show FRI 1230am
The Late Night Show features music from the underground
Jungle and Drum & Bass scene, which progresses to Industrial,
Noise and Alternative No Beat into the early morning. Following
the music, we then play TZM broadcasts, beginning at 6 a.m.
Inner Space Alternating Wednesdays 6:30pm
Dedicated to underground electronic music, both experimental
and dance-oriented. Live DJ sets and guests throughout.
Bootlegs & B-Sides SUN 9pm
Hosted by Doe Ran, tune in for the finest remixes from soul to
dubstep and ghetto funk to electro swing. Nominated finalist
for 'Canadian college radio show of the year 2012' Pioneer DJ
Stylus Awards. Soundcloud.com/doe-ran and search "Doe-Ran"
on Facebook.
ROCK /POP /INDIE
Canada Post-Rock FRI 10pm
Formerly on CKXU, Canada-Post Rock now resides on the west
coast but it's still committed to the best in post-rock, drone,
ambient, experimental, npise and basically anything your host
Pbone can put the word "post" infront of. Crescendo SUN 6pm Shine On TUE 1pm
Starting with some serene chill tracks at the beginning and An eclectic mix of the latest, greatest tunes from the Vancouver
building to the INSANEST FACE MELTERS OF ALL TIMEEE, underground and beyond, connected through a different theme
Crescendo will take you on a musical magic carpet ride that each week. Join your host Shea every Tuesday for a groovy mu-
you couldn't imagine in your wildest dreams. Besides oversell- sical experience!
ing his show, Jed will play an eclectic set list that builds through- 	
out the hour and features both old classics, and all the greatest Soul Sandwich THU 4pm
new tracks that the hipsters think they know about before any- A myriad of your favourite music tastes all cooked into one show,
one else does. From Hip Hop to Indie rock to African jams, Ola will play through
a whirlwind of different genres, each sandwiched between an-
Dave Radio with Radio Dave FRI 12pm other. This perfect layering of yummy goodness will blow your
Your noon-hour guide to what's happening in Music and Theatre mind. AND, it beats subway,
in Vancouver. Lots of tunes and talk. y
The Shakespeare Show WED 12pm
Discorder Radio TUE 5pm Dan Shakespeare is here with music for your ear. Kick back with
Discorder Magazine now has its own radio show! Join us to hear gems of the previous years,
excerpts of interviews, reviews and more!
Up on the Roof FRI 9am F
Duncan's Donuts THU 12pm Friday Mornings got you down? Climb Up On the Roof and wake
Sweet treats from the pop underground. Hosted by Duncan, up with Robin and Jake! Weekly segments include improvised
sponsored by donuts. http://duncansdonuts.wordpress.com. crime-noir radio dramas, trivia contents, on-air calls to Jake's
older brother and MORE! We'll be spinning old classics, new fa-
Spice of Life Alternating Thursdays 7:30pm vourites, and lots of ultra-fresh local bands!
The spice extends life. The spice expands consciousness. The
Spice of Life brings you a variety of Post-Rock, Shoegaze, Math Breakfast With The Browns MON 8am
Rock and anything that else that progresses. Join host Ben Life Your favourite Brownsters, James and Peter, offer a savoury
as he meanders whimsically through whatever comes to mind blend of the familiar and exotic in a blend of aural delights,
on the walk to CITR. Email: breakfastwiththebrowns@hotmail.com.
Samsquantch's Hideaway Alternating Wednesdays 6:30pm
All-Canadian music with a focus on indie-rock/pop.
Email: anitabinder@hotmail.com.
Parts Unknown MON 1pm
An indie pop show since 1999, it's like a marshmallow sandwich:
soft and sweet and best enjoyed when poked with a stick and
held close to a fire.
The Cat's Pajams FRI 11am
The cat's pajamas: a phrase to describe something/someone super awesome or cool. The Cat's Pajams: a super awesome and
cool radio show featuring the latest and greatest indie pop, rock,
lofi and more from Vancouver and beyond!
The Burrow MON 3pm
Noise Rock, Alternative, Post-Rock, with a nice blend of old
'classics' and newer releases. Interviews and live performances
The Permanent Rain Radio Alternating Thursdays 1 pm
Music-based, pop culture-spanning program with a focus on
the local scene. Join co-hosts Chloe and Natalie for an hour
of lighthearted twin talk and rad tunes from a variety of artists who have been featured on our website. What website?
thepermanentrainpress.com
Chthonic Boom! SUN 5pm
A show dedicated to playing psychedelic music from parts of the
spectrum (rockrpop, electronic) as well as garage and noise rock.
The Morning After Show TUE 11:30am
The Morning After Show with Oswaldo Perez every Tuesday at
11:30a.m. Playing your favourite songs for 13 years. The morning after what? The morning after whatever you did last night.
Eclectic show with live music, local talent and music you won't
hear anywhere else.
Hans Von Kloss' Misery Hour
Pretty much the best thing on radio.
WED 11pm
ECLECTIC
Transition State THU 11am
High quality music with a special guest interview from the
Pharmaceutical Sciences. Frank discussions and musk that
can save the world
Suburban Jungle WED 8am
Live from the Jungle Room, join radio host Jack Velvet for an
eclectic mix of music, sound bites, information and inanity.
Email: dj@jackvelvet.net.
Are You Aware Alternating Thursdays 6pm
Celebrating the message behind the music: Profiling music and musicians that take the route of positive action over
apathy.
Peanut Butter 'n' jams Alternating Thursdays 6:30pm .
Explore local music and food with your hosts, Brenda and Jordle.
You'll hear interviews and reviews on eats and tunesfrom your
neighbourhood, and a weekly pairing for your date calendar.
Live From Thunderbird Radio Hell THU 9pm
Featuring live band(s) every week performing in the CjTR Lounge.
Most are from Vancouver, but sometimes bands from across the country and around the world.
Aural Tentacles THU 12am
It could be global, trance, spoken word, rock, the unusual and
the weird, or it could be something different. Hosted by DJ
Pierre. Email: auraltentacles@hotmail.com
FemConcept FRIIpm
Entirely Femcon music as well as spoken word content relevant
to women's issues (interviews with campus groups such as the
Women's Center, SASC, etc.). Musical genres include indie-rock,
electronic, punk, with an emphasis on local and Canadian Artists.
Nardwuar FRI 3:30pm
Join Nardwuar the Human Serviette for Clam Chowder flavoured entertainment. Doot doola doot doo...doot doo!
Email: nardwuar@nardwuar.com
The Medicine Show FRI 11PM
A variety show, featuring musicians, poets and entertainment industry guests whose material is considered to be therapeutic. We encourage and promote independent original, local live music and art.
Randophonic SAT 11pm
Randophonic is best thought of as an intraversal jukebox which
has no concept of genre, style, political boundaries, or even
space-time relevance. But it does know good sounds from bad.
Lately, the program has been focused on Philip Random's All
Vinyl Countdown + Apocalypse (the 1,111 greatest records you
probably haven't heard). And we're not afraid of noise.
Stranded FRI 6pm
Join your host Matthew for a weekly mix of exciting sounds, past
and present, from his Australian homeland. And journey with
him as he features fresh tunes and explores the alternative musical heritage of Canada.
WizeMen MON 4pm
Join your hosts Dan and Austin for an exuberant adventure filled
with drama, suspense, action, romance and most importantly
wisdom. Our musical tastes span across genres and each week
there is a new theme!
G4E- Alternating Tuesdays 12-2am
Vinyl mixes, exclusive local tunes, good vibes from around the
world, a thought and a dream or two. Reggae, House, Techno,
Ambient, Dance Hall, Hip Hop, African, Psychedelic, Noise,
Experimental, Eclectic.
Student Special Hour
Students play music.
TUES 2pm
BVP Radio Alternating Wednesdays 1 pm
BVPradio is Blank Vinyl Project's radio show companion on CiTR.
It features musicians from UBC and its surrounding community.
Interviews, performances live on air, and advice to developing
bands.
A Face for Radio THU 10am
A show about music with interludes about nothing. From Punk
to Indie Rock and beyond.
CINEMATIC
Exploding Head Movies        „ MON 7pm
Join gak as he explores music from the movies, tunes from television and any other cinematic source, along with atmospheric
pieces, cutting edge new tracks and strange old goodies that
could be used in a soundtrack to be.
•"<        'v>
The Jazz Show MON 9pm
Vancouver's longest running prime-time Jazz program. Hosted
by Gavin Walker. Features begin after the theme and spoken intro at 9pm. June 1: Time for some Charlie Parker! Two of Bird's
final great studio recordings on tap tonight. The great alto saxophonist with piano bass and drums. "The Quartets of Charlie
Parker"
June 8: One of the most important editions of The Jazz Show.
Gavin with co-host and Coastal Jazz's Media Director and radio personality John Orysik. Our annual look at this year's Jazz
Festival.
June 15: Tonight we celebrate the Birthday, life and music of the
iconic pianist/composer and bandleader Jaki Byard.'The Jaki
Byard Experience" with Rahsaan Roland Kirk!
June 22: The Jazztet was one of the finest groups of the 60s. Led
by trumpeter Art Farmer and tenor saxophonist Benny Golson.
"Meet The Jazztet" is their debut recording and one that featured
a young pianist named McCoy Tyner!
June 29: The trio of pianist Keith Jarrett, bassist Gary Peacock and
drummer Jack DeJohnette needs no introduction. The recording is called "Changes". A stunning disc from their early years.
1 A/POETRY
Skald's Hall FRI 9pm
Skald's Hall entertains with the spoken word via story
readings, poetry recitals, and drama. Established
and upcoming artists join host Brian MacDonald.
Interested in performing on air? Contact us on Twitter:
@Skalds>lall.
^ORTS
Sports Is Fun
THU 3:30pm
Rocket from Russia TUES 10:30am
Hello hello hello! I interview bands and play new, international
and local punk rock music. Great Success! P.S. Broadcasted in
brokenish English. Hosted by Russian Tim. Website: http://rock-
etfromrussia.tumblr.com. Email: rocketfrom russiacitr@gmail.
com. Facebook: https://www.facebook.comRocketFromRussia.
Twitter: http://twitter.com/tima_tzar. Generation Annihilation SAT 12pm
On the air since 2002, playing old and new punk on the noncommercial side of the spectrum. Hosts: Aaron Brown, Jeff "The
Foat" Kraft. Website: generationannihilation.com. Facebook:
facebook.com/generationannihilation..
Power Chord SAT 1pm
Vancouver's longest running metal show. If you're into music
that's on the heavier/darker side of the spectrum, then you'll like
it. Sonic assault provided by Geoff, Marcia, and Andy.
Flex Your Head TUE 6pm
Punk rock and hardcore since 1989. Bands and guests from
The Absolute Value of Insomnia SAT 2am
Four solid hours of fresh generative music c/o the Absolute Value
of Noise and its world famous Generator. Ideal for enhancing
your dreams or, if sleep is not on your agenda, your reveries.
»»&» W1VES
i   • !        . . j,
9 contact: advertising@ditr.ea
71 vlnylrecords
Vancouver
facebook.com/
vinylrecords ca
V^fa
OPEN 12-6 PM DAILY
321W HASTINGS ST
©VICTORY SQUARE
604.488.1234
CHECK OUT DAVID LOVE JONES' AFRICAN RHYTHMS RADIO
EVERY FRIDAY ON CiTR 101.9FM 7:30-9PM
www.africanrhythmsradio.com
-     mmm
African Rhythms Radio
COME AND CHECK
OUT OUR VAST
SELECTION OF
NEW, USED AND
RARE RECORDS
VENETIAN SNARES -
VSNARES - 2370894
-2002 IDM BREAKCORE
LTD 500 RSD BLUE 2 LP
$68.95
Mr
™^e»
IF**
\
\
SUFJAN STEVENS
K   \ ■..,.'-        CARHII& LOWELL
ITAMEIMPALA-
I BE ABOVE IT
-EROLALKAN REWORK
-2013 MODERN PSYCH
I ROCK TECHNO HOUSE 12"
I $29.95
> STOW DAY '
IVI KM I
RUN THE JEWELS-
BUST NO MOVES EP
-2015 RSD HIP HOP
j LTD 5000 CLEAR VINYL
I4TRK12"
I $39.95
SUFJAN STEVENS - ROMARE - PROJECTIONS
CARRIE & LOWELL -2015 UK DOWNTEMPO
I -2015 INDIE FOLK ELECTRONIC ♦ DEEP HOUSE
ROCK LP ■ 180 GRM 2LP
$29.95 I $43.95
I      o m              [
A. I  4% \*
I  * ** II n
G-EASY- TIMMAIA-
THESE THINGS HAPPEN NOBODY CAN LIVE FOREVER
-2014 HIP HOP -BRAZIL PSYCH SOUL FUNK
2LP $49.95 a* *«.95

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.discorder.1-0200819/manifest

Comment

Related Items