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  UPCOMING SHOWS
9O90O66
254 East Hastings Street
604.681.8915
[BfTHEDUVETTES
| RELATIVE, DJ JOEY GOLD
|i',Ml COMEDY SHOCKER simon king, chris gaskin
| RYAN LACHANCE, CARL TURNBULL & MORE
EE3 SPOON RIVER SH-SHAKES, THE WANDERING
| HALLS, ERIC CAMPBELL & THE DIRT, & MORE
El ANDREW JACKSON IIHAD the smith
1 STREET BAND, JEFF ROSENSTOCK, CHUMPED
EH ENSLAVED
1 YOB, ECSTATIC VISION, ANCIIENTS
1 SUICIDE GIRLS
1BLACKHEART BURLESQUE
CTJl FLAMIN'GROOVIES
| BUM, RICH HOPE AND HIS EVIL DOERS
Ej WISHBONE ASH
P:M WITH SPECIAL GUESTS
El THE CAVE SINGERS
Vj*l KATHRYN CALDER
E3 VANCOUVER WACKEN METAL BATTLE
HJJ FINALS
Ell lARABEDE PALO
E3| LOS FURIOS, CARACAS
Eg] THE REAL MCKENZIES
| THE ISOTOPES, A TOTAL DISAPPOINTMENT
E3 RANDOM RAB&SAQI
Kit APPLECAT
Ej STRUNG OUT
jfrl MASKED INTRUDER, LA ARMADA
Additional show listings, ticket sale info, videos and more:
WWW.RICKSHAWTHEATRE.COM
http://facebook.com/RickshawTheatre
^J ©rickshawtheatre [iSlJ @rickshawtheatre
DmrnpriPP
IK
CDmPLETE!
ID BEARS OF DISCORDER mHCRZiniE
are nay diiliiie.uiiit ul.ju.discdrder.cr
FDR RLL OF HOUR TIME TRRUELLiflD REEDS.
^PTHHRKi TD RORERT iTIBRBUSI + CECELIH RD1E
FRDmUEC LIERHRS'S DIDITIZBTIDO CEHTRE** TABLE of CONTENTS
MARCH
PACIFIC RHYTHM - PG.8	
With a physical location now open in Chinatown,
Pacific Rhythm is the latest Vancouver record
shop catering to the city's ever-growing dance
crowd. Browse through tough-to-find house and
techno-oriented wax and cassettes or pick up
some party supplies from their in-store neighbours Snack City. It's a win-win-win situation.
JORDAN KOOP - PG.42 r
Recently relocated recording engineer Jordan
Koop heads from the Noise Floor to Southern
France for a week of intense analogue education
from one of rock'n'roll's angriest frontmen: Steve
Albini.
SUR UNE PLAGE - PG.20	
Legerdemain, Sur Une Plage's new release,
tells stories through electronic dance beats and
thoughtful lyrics. Check out what members Joshua Wells and Colin McKill have to say about entering the world of electronica for the first time,
releasing Legerdemain through their own record
label, and "The Balloon Factory."
SILVER FOX POSTERING - PG.56	
What's the story behind the countless pieces of art
and advertisement plastered all around our city?
The fine folks at Silver Fox Postering shed light
on the industry and the effort it takes to become a
successful independent poster service.
ART SIGNIFIED - PG.24	
Part promotions company, part artist management,
part art creative collective, the folks at Art Signified are doing it all — and doing it well. Read on
to learn about how the Art Signified tag-team got
started and where they are headed next.
LITTLE RED SOUNDS - PG.61	
Running the show at Vancouver's most exciting
recording studio, Little Red Sounds, Felix Fung
sat down with Discorder to discuss his time working with the city's most electrifying acts, as well as
his philosophy on music and the creative process
from behind the scenes.
FILM     STRIPPED     TOMORROW     IS     ALWAYS
TOO LONG - PG.13
DISCORDER REVISITED NINETEEN: THE YEAR OF
THE GHETTOBLASTER - PG.17
REAL LIVE ACTION - PG.28
ON THE AIR THE MORNING AFTER SHOW - PG.32
CALENDAR - PG.36
ART PROJECT SEAN KAREMAKER - PG.38
IN GOOD HUMOUR ERICA SIGURDSON - PG.46
UNDER REVIEW - PG.60
CITR PROGRAM GUIDE - PG.65
ADVERTISE: Ad space for upcoming issues
can be booked by calling (604) 822-3017
ext. 3 or emailing advertising@citr.ca. Rates
available upon request.
CONTRIBUTE: To submit words to
Discorder, please contact: editor.D/scorder@
citr.ca. To submit images, contact:
artdirector.discorder@citr.ca
SUBSCRIBE: Send in a cheque for $20 to
#233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T   .
1Z1 with your address, and we will mail each
issue of Discorder right to your doorstep
for a year,
DISTRIBUTE: To distribute Discorder--in your
business, email distro.Discorder@citr.ca We
are always,looking for,new friends.
DONATE: We are part of CiTR, a registered
non-profit, and accept donations so we can
provide you with the content you love. To
donate visit www.citr.ca/donate.
Writers: Evan Brow,
Robert Catherall, Esmee
Colbourne, Meredyth Cole,
Selina Crammond, Kenny
Drabble, Fraser Dobbs,
Patrick Gillin, Erin Jardine,
Erica Leiren, Christopher
Lennox-Aasen, Julia Lehn,
Alex Lenz, Daniel Lins,
Nathan Sing, Elijah Teed,
Hannah Thomson,
Max Wainwright, Jasper
Wrinch
Photographers &
lllustrators:Addison
Amit, Tara Bigdeli, Severn
Bowen, Shane Burzynski,
Tara Dwelsdorf, Jules
Francisco, Patrick Gillin,
Alisa Lazear, Yuko Inoue,.
Dana Kearley, Sharon Ko,
Jaqueline Manoukian,
Kalena McKiewicz, Jenna
Milsom, Kim Pringle,
Emma Potter, Alison
Sadler
Cover Photography by
Tara Dwelsdorf
Editor: Jacey Gibb
Art Director: Ricky
Castanedo-Laredo
Under Review Editor:
Alex de Boer
Real Live Action Editor
Robert Catherall
Ad Coordinator:
Nashlyn Lloyd
Copy Editors: Robert
Catherall, Alex de Boer
Proofreaders: Alex de
Boer, Robert Catherall,
Joshua Gabert-Doyon,
Erica Leiren
Calendar Listings:
Sarah Cordingley
Accounts Manager
Eleanor Wearing
Student Liason: Joshua
Gabert-Doyon
Web Editor Avery Rawden
CiTR Station Manager
Brenda Grunau
Publisher Student Radio
Society of UBC
EDITORIAL CUTOFF: February 23,2014
©Discorder 2014 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published almost
monthly by CiTR, which can be heard at 101.9 FM, online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw In White
Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487, CiTR's office at (604) 822-3017, email CiTR.at stationmanager@citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write #233-6138
SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T 1Z1, Canada. EDITOR'S NOTE
TWO INTRODUCTIONS AND A FAREWELL
Illustration by Alison Sadler
Alright folks, we've got a lot to talk about
and an ever-depleting word count to do it in,
so let's get right into it.
This March 2015 issue is a special one
for a couple of reasons. It marks a satisfying
personal payoff for me because it's a near
exhaustive realization of a goal set back in
the summer. At a strategic planning meeting, Discorder's finest came together to talk
about what we'd like to see in the next year
from the magazine. We agreed that one of the
things we do really well is highlight content
that's hyper-local and generally emerging,
but something I've had the personal desire
for is pursuing stories beyond our bread-and-
butter band profiles. I wanted to showcase
other areas of the Vancouver music scene and
a result of this is our latest issue.
We're taking a look at areas that don't always get the same attention as the musicians
performing on stage in front of you, like our
cover feature on Silver Fox Postering, a local
postering company with an amazing outlook
on building community, or our profile on
prominent recording studio Little Red Sounds
and the man at the helm of it, Felix Fung. We
also caught up with Noise Floor Recording's
Jordan Koop and talked about his recent experience as an understudy for Steve Albini in
France, as well as a piece on Pacific Rhythm's
new brick and mortar location, some of our
regular columns, and, just because having no
band features would be ridiculous, we have
a piece on electronic ambient duo Sur Une
EDITOR'S NOTE Plage. It's a fairly unique issue and I'm immensely proud of everyone who worked so
hard to make it a reality.
Now that you're familiar with what to expect in the pages to come, I guess we should
address my note's titular "farewell": mine, to
all of you. March 2015 will be my last issue
as editor-in-chief of Discorder.
It's not like this editor's note is my literary
equivalent to dropping the mic. I'll be staying
on through next month in a supporting role
but as far as having a direct, open channel to
our readers, this is it.
After suffering stage-three writer's block
for the last several weeks, I found myself
pursuing the Discorder archives and gander-
ing at previous editors' farewell notes, hoping
for some inspiration or maybe a hint of what
direction I should take my goodbye in. The
general consensus of exiting editors seems
to be the same every time: their experiences
at Discorder were incredible (like mine have
been), they enjoyed getting to know the rad
staff and students at at CiTR and Discorder
(sometimes they're too rad), they couldn't
have been prouder of getting to watch countless writers, photographers, and illustrators
develop (I know I couldn't be), and no matter how amazing all of these things were, it
was time for them to move onto other things.
Paraphrasing aside, I couldn't have put it better myself.
Twenty months—or just over one-and-
a-half years—may not seem like a lot, but
it's hard to quantify this kind of a job with
increments of time. The reality is this was
the kind of job that permeated every aspect
of my life, ranging from being introduced at
shows as the editor and getting to hear some
of my favourite albums before their release
date, to getting texts from writers at 3 a.m.
and checking my emails nine times a day. It's
an encompassing, fast-paced, fun world to be
a part of, but with my time in post-secondary
nearing its twilight, it's time for me to leave
this rollicking position for someone new to
enjoy it.
In the meantime, until your new EIC takes
over at the start of April, I feel great knowing
that the magazine is in good hands: for the
next month, our two section editors Alex de
Boer and Robert Catherall will be co-helming
the April issue as co-editors. In my time at
Discorder, I've known both Catherall and de
Boer as talented writers, supportive editors,
and dear friends, and it's fitting for me to see
these brilliant, capable individuals join editorial forces in my absence. Working alongside
them has made a dream job somehow even
better and I'll miss it probably more than I
should.
In whatever capacity we may have known
each other in—whether as a contributor, a
reader, a friend, an online heckler, a co-worker, a collaborator, or even just someone I got
to talk to at a show—thanks for having me.
I'll let my friend Vonnegut lead me out via
signoff, one last time.
So it goes,
Jacey Gibb
Editor-in-chief
EDITOR'S NOTE CiTR HAS
GREAT
FRIENDS
fs
(±^
YOUR NAME HERE
[*][*]
IS A FRIEND OF CITR 101.9 FM
%
<®
®/ o  o — O o \®
FOR A FULL LIST OF BUSINESSES, VISIT US AT CITR.CA
WESTSIDE/UBC
AUSTRALIAN BOOT
COMPANY
$30off Blundstones
and RM Williams
BACKSTAGE LOUNGE
10% off food
BANYEN BOOKSANDSOUND
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THE BIKE KITCHEN
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and accessories
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UBC student discount)
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instruments and amps
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gifts, stationery
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10% off used, $1 off new
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No cover Saturdays
(excluding special events)
HITZ BOUTIQUE
15% off regular priced
clothing and shoes
PACIFIC CINEMATHEQUE
1 free bag of popcorn
SAVE ON MEATS
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SIKORA'S CLASSICAL
RECORDS
10% off
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VINYL RECORDS
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COMMERCIAL DRIVE
AUDIOPILE
10%offLPs/CDs
BONERATTLE MUSIC
10% off
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JEAN QUEEN (JQ) CLOTHING
15% off
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BOOKSTORE
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10% off
VINYL RECORD
STORAGE COMPANY
10% off
BAND MERCH CANADA
20% off iSTRICTLYTHEBEST
M ATIN6CALLS OF FEBRUAR
2015
ARTIST
ALBUM
LABEL
1
Freak Heat Waves*
Bonnie's State of
Mind
(Hockey Dad)
2
Loscil*+
Sea Island
(Kranky)
3
Lie*+
Consent
(That's Cool)
4
Defektors*+
Black Dreams
(Shake!)
5
The Cyrillic
Typewriter**
Best Suit
(Jaz)
6
Animal Bodies*+
The Killing Scene
(Self-Released)
7
Moss Lime*
July First
(Fixture)
8
Various*
Native North
America
(Light In The Attic)
9
Skim Milk*+
Skim Milk
(Self-Released)
10
Secret Pyramid*+
The Silent March /
Movements of Night
(Students of Decay)
11
Young Braised*+
Northern
Reflections
(1080p)
12
MALK*+
Prehistoric
(Wiener)
13
Andy Stott
Faith in Strangers
(Modern Love)
14
Neu Balance*+
Rubber Sole
(1080p)
15
Zola Jesus
Taiga
(Mute)
16
Shearing Pinx*+
People
(Psychic
Handshake)
17
ian William Craig*+
A Turn of Breath
(Recital)
18
Poor Form*+
Demo
(Self-Released)
19
OK Vancouver OK*+
Influences
(Kingfisher Bluez)
20
Leah Barley*
Close Your Eyes
(Self-Released)
21
ThePoles*+
Merman/The Pest
(Self-Released)
22
Subtle Lip Can*
Reflective Drime
(Drip Audio)
23
The Lad Mags*
Hypnotized / Alien
Bride
(Self-Released)
24
Alex Calder*
Strange Dreams
(Self-Released)
25
Shooting Guns*
Wolfcop: OST
(Sundowning
ARTIST
ALBUM
LABEL
26
Ariel Pink
pom pom
(4AD)
27
Johann
Johannsson
The Theory of
Everything OST
(Back Lot Music)
28
Underpass*+
Assimilation
(Desire)
29
Energy Slime*+
New Dimensional
(Mint)
30
Rec Centre*+
Monster of the
Week
(Self-Released)
31
Ace Martens*+
Silent Days
(Self-Released)
32
Skinny Kids*+
Strangers
(Kingfisher Bluez)
33
Viet Cong*
Viet Cong
(Flemish Eye)
34
Les Chausettes*+
Kate b/w Volcanoes
(Punk Fox)
35
Slim Twig*
A Hound At The
Helm
(Paper Bag)
36
Sleater-Kinney
No Cities To Love
(Sub Pop)
37
Dean Blunt
Black Metal
(Rough Trade)
38
Belle And Sebastian
Girls in Peacetime
Want to Dance
(Matador)
39
Earth Girls
Wrong Side of
History EP
(Grave Mistake)
40
Century Palm*
Century Palm
(Mammoth Cave)
41
WTCHS*
It's not a Cross, it's
a Curse
(Self-Released)
42
John Orpheus*
John Orpheus Is
Dead
(Bruzen VI Gada)
43
AUSMUTEANTS
Order Of Operation
(Goner)
44
Babe Rainbow*
Music for 1 Piano, 2
Pianos, & More Pianos
(1080p)
45
Dark Orchard*
Blossom
(Self-Released)
46
Oozing Wound
Earth Suck
(Thrill Jockey)
47
Meatbodies
Meatbodies
(In The Red)
48
Annie Lou*+
Tried And True
(Self-Released)
49
Still Creek Murder*+
To Shreds
(Self-Released)
50
Nicholas
On Sunset
(Self-Released)
CiTR's charts reflect what's been played on the air by CiTR's lovely DJs last month. Records with asterisks (*) are Canadian and those marked (+) are local. Most of these excellent albums can be
found at fine independent music stores across Vancouver. If you can't find them, give CiTR's music coordinator a shout at (604) 822-8733. Her name is Sarah Cordirsgley. If you ask nicely shell
tell you how to find them. Check out other great campus/community radio charts at www.earshot-online.com.
CHARTS /
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PACIFIC RHYTHM TOUCHES GROUND
IN CHINATOWN
by Daniel Lins II Photography by Jaqueline Manoukian
II Illustrations by Dana Kearley
As with the now-extinct Blockbuster or endangered bookstore, you're far more likely to
see a record shop boarding up its windows
than opening its doors these days — which
makes it all the more exciting when a new
one crops up.
Enter Pacific Rhythm in Chinatown, the
freshest spot in Vancouver to pick up dance-
oriented music in physical formats. The store
was born in 2013 as an online hub for anyone looking to avoid the prohibitive shipping costs of ordering records from Europe,
as well as a North American outlet for Vancouver-based labels. An expanding customer
base led to a highly anticipated brick-and-
mortar location, which had its opening party
on February 8 and featuring an afternoon of
music from some of the city's most respected
DJs.
Based out of Snack City, a boutique convenience store just off the corner of Hastings
and Gore, Pacific Rhythm is a pleasantly
informal affair. Moving past coin-operated
candy machines and shelves chock-full of
everything from kettle corn and bulk quinoa
to Band-Aids and cat food, the vinyl stacks
are cozily located in the back, across from
a table covered by neatly arranged cassette
tapes. Overlooking the collection from a
Mac-adorned desk, like a benevolent mafia
boss of house music and good vibes, is store
founder Derek Duncan. When he isn't shipping orders across the continent and around
the world, Duncan is also known as the remarkably busy DJ D.Dee, spinning records
into early morning hours on a near-weekly
basis. Equally important to the functioning of
Pacific Rhythm are Dane Brown and Russell
Cunningham, who along with Duncan run
the organization's logistical side.
The store boasts a sophisticated selection
of dance records, rarities and must-haves,
and some classics but mostly new stuff. The
labels represented include Beats in Space,
L.I.E.S., Future Times and Peoples Potential
Unlimited, among other smaller imprints that
are difficult, if not impossible to find in most
PACIFIC RHYTHM Vancouver record shops. When I spoke with
Derek in mid-February, Pacific Rhythm's
bins were filled mostly with backstock from
the online store, but with a slew of new arrivals on the way, he expected the number of
titles to double in coming weeks. There's also
a rapidly growing used records section with
affordable and tastefully curated choices.
Though Pacific Rhythm caters to, and is
frequented by a particular niche of house and
techno DJs, its collection is an accessible and
valuable resource for anyone with an interest in the rich world of electronic music that
strays from the mainstream. It's also shaping
up to be the local go-to for finding exclusive
pressings at reasonable prices — as an example, I picked up White Visitation's shop-only
2014 release on L.I.E.S. for under $20 at Pacific Rhythm, a record that currently sells on
Discogs.com for prices as high as $50 (plus
international shipping).
But like an Autobot, Pacific Rhythm is
more than meets the eye, playing a much
bigger role in Vancouver than just as a really
good local record outlet.
Last year was a big one for the city's dance
music scene, though this might come as news
to those not thoroughly aware of its bubbling
existence. Due in large part to the record label and party collective known as Mood Hut,
as well as Vancouver-based cassette purveyors 1080p collection, 2014 saw releases
from local artist like Pender Street Steppers,
Hashman Deejay, D. Tiffany, and Lnrdcroy
that reverberated powerfully on the web and
across the globe. Long overdue, the first Vancouver Boiler Room session streamed live in
January of last year and 1080p was among
the top imprints on several reputable websites' end-of-year favourites lists. This galvanizing surge of musical output and international attention is solidifying Vancouver's
place on the map alongside London, Berlin,
and New York.
Pacific Rhythm has been an important
nexus in this process. They regularly throw
mind-blowing and unique parties showcasing DJs and producers from Vancouver and
beyond. These include Good Feelings, a series of dance events that take place on long
10 © "BUT LIKE AN AUTOBOT, PACIFIC RHYTHM IS MORE THAN MEETS
THE EYE, PLAYING A MUCH BIGGER ROLE IN VANCOUVER THAN AS
JUST A REALLY GOOD LOCAL RECORD OUTLET."
weekend Sundays, and Pacific Rhythm Sessions, the sixth and most recent of which
featured live performances from New York-
based dark techno guru Terekke and local
synth wizard Friendly Chemist.
On top of that, Pacific Rhythm is also a
burgeoning record label. It only has one 12-
inch in its catalogue so far, but it's a hell of
a release: Rhythms of the Pacific Volume
1 came out late last year to widespread acclaim, with tracks from Lnrdcroy (one of
them an extended version of the essential
"Sunrise Market"), Memory Man, and Vancouver's reigning authority on hardware and
acid house, Cloudface. The record sold out
quickly, but was promptly repressed in January, and is available in-store.
2015 is turning out to be a special year
for anyone in Vancouver who enjoys getting
sweaty on warehouse dancefloors and in studio spaces filled to the brim with human heat.
Pacific Rhythm's motto, printed on the back
of their official T-shirts, reads "Stay out late,
it feels great!" And they've made it their mission to help you do it.
If you 're looking to expand your vinyl collection — and pick up some snacks while
you 're at it — Pacific Rhythm is located at
441 Gore Ave. in Chinatown, and is open
Tuesday to Sunday, from 11 a.m. until 7p.m.
12
pacific Rhythm FILM STRIPPED
TOMORROW IS ALWAYS TOO LONG
by Selina Crammond II Illustrations by Kalena McKiewicz
Part musical, part documentary, Tomorrow is Always Too Long is perhaps most effectively described as a multimedia collage.
Its defining visual elements include blasts of
public access TV-meets-YouTube clips intertwined with silhouette animation reminiscent
of Lotte Reiniger's pioneering work.
The film is also the ultimate exercise in
collaboration as filmmaker Phil Collins —
British video artist, not the guy from Genesis
— is joined by an auspicious crew of writers,
animators, indie musicians,.an orchestra, and
everyday Glaswegians who come together
to create an endearing, bizarre homage to
Glasgow, Scotland.
Are you with me now?
At its core, Tomorrow is Always Too Long
is a musical documentary, the most understated, glorious film genre in which ordinary
folks sing their story, superseding the more
traditional talking head interview. Collins
features a wide cross-section of brave ordinary Glaswegians in his film who surrender
to song, if only for three minutes, breaking
free from the drudgery of daily life.
The chosen subjects span the generations
and social enclaves of Glasgow, from punk-
rock parents in a birthing class to preppy
teens singing in a classroom as a teacher leads
them through an unmistakably pre-pubescent
13
FILM STRIPPED dance routine. There's also a young man
singing in his jail cell, as well as an elderly
couple who wail as they weave themselves
around a ballroom dance floor. Each musical
sequence is set to Cate Le Bon's 2013 psych-
pop album, Mug Museum. What makes these
"covers" extra special is that Le Bon's songs
have been rearranged and performed by the
Royal Scottish National Orchestra, making
for larger-than-life musical breakdowns.
Musical sequences aside, the rest of the
soundtrack is scored by Mogwai's Barry
Burns and Glasgow locals Golden Teacher.
The often eerie, electronic soundscape these
musicians create accompany shadowy animated sequences from Matthew Robins. His
silhouette animation depicts pleasure-seeking
creatures, both human and animal, in voyeuristic scenes humping in the forest, snorting lines in a bathroom stall, and drinking
alone at a bar. Their eyes are cut-out holes,
allowing the background to shine through.
There's something about this transparency,
combined with the non-stop debauchery that
make these creatures vulnerable, disturbed,
and the most human of all.
Between the musical numbers, and interlaced with some of the raunchy animated sequences, is an imaginary TV channel. It features an assortment of sardonic vignettes with
an aesthetic reminiscent of early '90s public
access television. There are fake commercials
for made-up products, such as "Search Me,"
a device that guarantees anyone wearing it
will succeed in getting a groping from airport
security; a game show in which contestants
nonchalantly answer questions about pop
culture and terrorism; and most poignant of
all, a disgruntled mystic, whose 1-800 info-
mercial is centered smack dab in the middle "SIMPLY DESCRIBING COLLINS' ERRATIC FILM IS HARD ENOUGH, SO
TRYING TO MAKE SENSE OF IT IS ANOTHER FEAT ALTOGETHER."
of the film. In the longest single-take of the
piece, she laments technology for an increasingly alienated society and longs for a time
when people were genuinely connected.
But in Collins' film, it is clear that "online
culture" is not the only thing to blame for isolation: the cityscape and institutions also play
a considerable, disruptive role.
Simply describing Collins' erratic film is
hard enough, so trying to make sense of it is
another feat altogether. But what I liked most
is that despite its frenetic pacing, the structure is cyclical, self-reflective, and almost
soothing. While themes of alienation run
wild — whether it's due to technology, institutions, or the city itself — there's a warm air
of nostalgia that breezes through each scene.
Collins' wacky brand of storytelling shows
that sometimes it's easier, and more satisfying, to re-create the past than it is to imagine
a future. For if tomorrow is always too long,
then yesterday wasn't long enough.
15 READ ALL
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six.     t
cent DISCORDER REVISITED
nineteen: the year of the ghettoblaster
by Erica Leiren II Illustrations by Kim Pringle
, aa-A/v^
In 1980, I convinced two of my best
friends, Colleen and Marianne, we should
spend the following school year studying
French at Laval University in Quebec City.
Once we'd all secured bursaries for living expenses, the plan became a reality.
Together, along with a French-Canadian
roommate, we took over a four-bedroom
dungeon/basement suite in Quebec. We all
got along great and even shared most of our
meals together, but one thing we didn't share
was our tastes in music.
During that year, Marianne had the only
means of playing our cassettes, a small tape
player/recorder, which she kindly shared. We
practiced our harmonies anytime the tape
player was in the kitchen but if Marianne
felt like getting romantic with her boyfriend
(and future husband), she'd retreat to her own
room where they listened to Billy Joel and
Chris de Burgh. Bleh.
Despite Marianne's generosity, I was getting no time at home on the communal tape
player for my own music. I'd brought along
a bunch of cassettes taped off my own vinyl
from home: The Pointed Sticks singles, The
Subhumans, Young Canadians, Maurice &
the Cliches. My roommates were polite but
I could tell they hated my weird music; I
needed my own machine to listen to my own
tapes.
My music situation was still a problem
around the time our university announced
that they would be organizing a New York
trip for students during reading break.
I was the only one of the roommates who
signed up for the New York trip, though Fd
convinced another friend Patrice that the trip
couldn't be missed. And so we set out early
one day mid-reading week with a busload of
fellow Laval students, bound for a city we'd
heard was the place for cut-rate electronics
— and my holy grail, a ghettoblaster to play
my own music on.
The first evening, before our hotel was
ready for us to check in, we unleashed some
pent up energy from the long bus ride by hitting the streets in excited groups, sightseeing
as we foraged for dinner. Each succeeding
crosswalk elicited increasing thrills as we
recognized the names and numbers from the
songs and movies we'd enjoyed our entire
lives. When we came to legendary Broadway,
corny though it may seem, we actually burst
into the song spontaneously and skipped and
danced down the street from the sheer joy
and excitement of being there and being 19
and being with our friends.
I rode the subway for the first time, which
was a thrill in itself. I don't remember where
we went, but what sticks in my mind from
the ride is how extravagantly the subways at
that time were decorated — and I don't mean
DISCORDER REVISITED
17 officially. It was the graffiti. Graffiti was
something we didn't have in Vancouver then,
but we'd heard about it and here it was for
real. Menacing, multi-coloured, jagged and
angular, the graffiti smothered every single
surface, including the ads all along the top
of each car and every available in-between
space.
It was most striking not for what it said — I
don't recall any of the slogans or the names
— but for the intent with which it was executed. The graffiti quite clearly expressed
sheer wild violence and willful unbounded
nihilism of a sort that I had never seen before (or since). In fact, the next time I was in
New York, six years later, I was astonished
to find that there was no graffiti whatsoever
anymore on the subway. The city had been
wiped clean by its crusading mayor and it
was as though the graffiti had never been
there. I was traveling with my boyfriend that
time, and it was hard to convey to someone
who didn't know just what it was like. The
feeling of threat evoked was omnipresent on
the subway as you rode. We all just sat tight
and took it in. This most definitely, Dorothy,
was not Kansas anymore.
At the same time as our visit, David Bowie
was playing at The Booth Theatre on Broadway in The Elephant Man. We loved Bowie
and seeing a Broadway play in New York was
mandatory, so this was perfect. We learned
that you could buy same-day tickets cheaply
if you showed up at the box office and opted
for a matinee, which was the cheapest; the
plan worked and during one of our New York
days, we got tickets. Being that close to Bowie was mind-blowing. It was early on in the
run — he played at The Booth Theatre from
late September 1980 to early January 1981
— and by the time we saw the play, he'd perfectly settled in but the performance was still
fresh.
The last day was D-Day for purchasing my
ghettoblaster. Our group trouped to Times
Square together, then at its most squalid,
ringed by peep shows and not much that reminded us of Dick Clark's New Year's Eve
countdown. However, we had no other basis
for comparison, and were unconcerned by
the parade of working girls and boys. I remember way-cool looking guys with huge
ghettoblasters heaved up on their shoulders
and blasting some unfamiliar type of talking-
music, mostly rhythm to our unschooled ears.
We'd never seen ghettoblasters in action before.
Cutting to the chase, a few of us scoped the
electronics stores in the vicinity. Like they
all were, the store where I found my baby
was brightly lit and sparkled enticingly from
within like some electronics Aladdin's Cave.
Inside, all lined up and stacked on the full
back wall behind the counter, was the treasure, an array of ghettoblasters shining in all
their silvery glory. I was in a bit of a hurry
because the bus was leaving soon, I decisively forked over the $150 for my beautiful
Sharp GF-5656 AM/FM Radio cassette tape
recorder. It's sitting on the chair beside me,
even as I write this.
Looking like some modern take on a shortwave radio, it sports a beautiful, long extendable aerial, with the biggest part of its front
taken up by the speaker grill. The buttons are
numerous, and give a fully satisfying sensation when punched.
That day, I carried it proudly to the bus and,
with that, our mission was accomplished.
For the rest of our Laval University
year, that ghettoblaster took over the prime
broadcasting location on our kitchen table.
I listened to Vancouver saxophonist Fraser
McPherson's wonderful cassette Live at the
Planetarium whenever I did my homework
and saved my faster tunes for non-school related activities. If also played centre stage in
early December at our big Christmas party
that year, before exams hit —and during the
soiree, I made sure to give everyone's music
fair play.
18
DISCORDER REVISITED  F3! AfnF
I       I    *    \\   H	
SLEIGHT OF HAND
Zry Esmee Colbourne II Photography by Tara Bigdeli
II Illustrations by Jenna Milsom
"You better go get some shoes."
Under normal circumstances, an afternoon
at the Grandview Bowling lanes would seem
commonplace; but on a pleasant Sunday with
ambient electronic duo Sur Une Plage, it's the
perfect setting for an interview.
Surrounded by pizza parties, young children, and men drinking beer, Sur Une Plage's
laidback atmosphere and impressive bowling form instantly break the ice. The lane's
vintage pins and homey atmosphere disintegrate any distance between interviewer and
subjects — so much that I decide to save my
questions for after the game, opting to focus
on trying to bowl straight and not lose too
hard.
Feeling a bit out of my league, I watch with
Joshua Wells as his bandmate Colin McKill
bowls a strike on his first try. Thought it ultimately proves to be a feat of luck rather than
skill, the strike is still intimidating.
"I just want to make sure that it's noted how
clutch that was," says McKill, "because that
was pretty clutch. I was like, 'Oh man, maybe bowling is super easy' and then I got, like,
one other strike the entire time ... [That's] the
first time I've played in two years."
While bowling may not be a full-time passion for the two men, they do share the pastime of music together. Both are involved or
have been involved with a myriad of recognizable Vancouver bands, including Black
Mountain and Hard Drugs, but our focus
for the interview is on a newer collaborative
project: Sur Une Plage.
The pair's debut album, Legerdemain —
which translates to "sleight of hand" — is a
gratifying listen filled with cosmic synths, a
heavy-beating bass heartbeat, and forlorn lyrics centred around tragedy. The album itself
was influenced by a manifestation of music heard during childhood and the beats of
20
SUR UNE PLAGE   "IT'S CALLED THE BALLOON FACTORY BECAUSE THE LANDLORD
SAYS THAT'S WHAT IT WAS BEFORE, BUT NO ONE BELIEVES HIM. NO
ONE BELIEVES HIM FOR A SECOND THAT THERE WAS ACTUALLY A
BALLOON FACTORY IN A SKETCHY BASEMENT IN EAST VANCOUVER."
hip-hop; while McKill likes the precision and
beats of electronic music, and tries to "inject
some sort of feeling" into robotic walls of
sound, Wells is "really into the primal years
of synthesized music and particularly when
that collided with pop music."
The album was recorded and produced at
The Balloon Factory, a studio Wells shares
with his partner in the band Lightning Dust,
Amber Webber. The origin story of the studio and jam space is something of a mystery:
it's called The Balloon Factory because their
landlord claims that's what it was before they
moved in, though neither are convinced he's
telling the truth.
"No one believes him for a second that
there was actually a balloon factory in a
sketchy basement in East Vancouver," says
Wells, still in denial.
Aside from recording and producing Legerdemain in their own space, Sur Une Plage
are enjoying the kinds of freedom that come
with releasing an album independently — or
rather through their own record label, Party
Product.
Wells and McKill opted to release on their
own label so they could have a quicker release time by not having to pitch and then
become part of a release schedule. Wells has
always wanted to see a record through start
to finish, having experienced producing punk
cassettes and seven-inches, appreciating the
creative process, and having worked on LPs
with other bands.
Another benefit to having their own record
label is that McKill and Wells were able to
control all of the marketing for their new LP.
Hard to witness and yet easy to absorb, Sur
Une Plage's goal with their YouTube channel
is to above all make people laugh while announcing tours and releases. Marketing isn't
their first priority, so they decided to have fun
with filming. Purposely awkward, with terrifying jump cuts, colour inversion, and the
inclusion of Chauncey, a white 1988 Cadillac, their videos are definitely worth checking
out.
In terms of other band promotion, the duo
has also created a perfect link between the
record's sound and its artwork. McKill explains: "The literal interpretation is it's the
interior light from this 1988 white Cadillac
that I stumbled across." The extreme close-
up of the light creates sharp texture, not unlike some of the harder synths sounds in their
music. It also shows square symmetry to the
vortex of an otherwise black cover. A mutual
love of vinyl, they believe that the physical
act of putting a needle on a record establishes
a secondary intimacy with the music, making listeners establish a relationship with the
sound. As Wells puts it, "This record feels as
good as it sounds."
Experimenting with wintery electronic
sound and leaving behind the traditional band
format, Sur Une Plage have complete control
over what they do, aiming to enjoy themselves through learning and creation.
Sur Une Plage's album Legerdemain drops
March 17, available through local Vancouver
record stores, online, or through their Bandcamp.
23
SUR UNE PLAGE «#©
VANCOUVER'S PARTY PROFESSIONALS AND THEIR
PUNK ROCK WORK ETHIC
by Christopher Lennox-Aasen II Photography by Severn Bowen
II Illustrations by Sharon Ko
Art Signified hit the ground running two
years ago. As I walk from The Bottle Shop
liquor store to Suna Studios with Mitch Ray
and Taya Fraser, they tell me about the whole
thing got started.
"Even before Art Signified, I was forcing
myself to book a show a month," explains
Ray. "I set a rule and I wasn't willing to break
it. It was a good way to get into the grind of
it and develop my work ethic." He punches
in the code for a security door and we walk
inside.
"I used to work at Iron Road (a jam space
which doubled as an after-hours venue) and
I wanted to bring that vibe back to life,"
says Fraser as we settle into some well-worn
couches. "I never wanted to promote, but
it just sort of happened. We kept referring
bands to one another, and it hit us. Now we're
busy all the time. Last year we did roughly
eight shows a month."
The raging success that was their anniversary party back in January can attest to how
integral to the scene they've become. The
show consisted of nearly 30 bands on two
stages over two nights. The duo have become
known for putting on exactly this sort of creative and exciting concerts, such as their 10-
band bills and their upcoming "day drunk"
shows. They always have a few other ideas
up their sleeves, but you'll just have to wait
to hear about them — we wouldn't want to
spoil the surprise.
"I think we're lucky because we've gotten
to the point where we have creative licence
to do all the weird shit we want, because
we've been so successful," says Ray, grinning broadly. "Or maybe we're just lucky."
"We just try to make sure it's a show that
we'd want to go see," adds Fraser. "We like
to party and have a good time as well, and
we want everyone to have the very best time
they can."
24
ART SIGNIFIED Ray explains: "We want bands to be able
to show up and not worry about anything. We
deal with all the details. We want the crowd
to have the shows they remember for years,
you know? The thing is, we have a huge
game plan. We know what we want to do,
and that's already a full plate. There is also
an abundance of stuff thrown at us, and that
can double or triple the workload."
For instance, Art Signified has dived into
the world of band management.
"Eric Campbell & The Dirt came to us and
asked us out of the blue to manage them,"
says Ray. "It was a curveball, but they're talented, and we love them, so it worked out.
BRASS was the natural second addition.
As of right now we don't want to bring on
more ... but we're learning, maybe down the
ways."
"I like working with bands that are goal-
oriented, you know? We never work with
bands we don't think are awesome," says
Fraser. "We want to move into booking tours
also."
What Art Signified, and all promoters, do
is largely thankless, behind-the-scenes grunt
work. However, Ray and Fraser have reached
the point where people come out to their
shows because they know an Art Signified
show is going to be good. It's a great way for
people to discover new music, and the contributions they've made to strengthening the
scene are tremendous. I tell them so and they
laugh, not maliciously; they just don't know
what to say.
ART SIGNIFIED
25 "WE WANT BANDS TO BE ABLE TO SHOW UP AND NOT WORRY ABOUT
ANYTHING. WE DEAL WITH ALL THE DETAILS. WE WANT THE CROWD
TO HAVE THE SHOWS THEY REMEMBER FOR YEARS."
Ray cracks a fresh beer as he muses: "The
thing is, we do the little things, and when you
do the little things, you always think no one
notices. But the right people do, and when
they do it really makes me feel that much
more optimistic in general."
For a promoting company to have as good
of a track record and reputation as Art Signified does is really difficult; booking punk-
rock shows can be a topsy-turvy business. I
ask what their closest near-miss has been and
Fraser and Ray stare at each other for a moment. Fraser motions for Ray to tell the tale:
"In February of last year, we did a show
with Radio Moscow, which to this day might
be one of the biggest bands we've worked
with. We put everything into that show. It was
at [a venue that didn't have a licence]. We had
to send slightly illegal border paperwork to a
big band with a big booking agency. Because
the show was only semi-legal, we couldn't
publicly promote the show as much as I'd
like. It had to be an 'ask around' sort of thing.
We couldn't reveal the name of the venue on
posters and whatnot. With a big band with a
high guarantee, that's not an ideal situation
at all."
"We also had another show going on that
night already," adds Fraser, "but it was just
such a big opportunity and we couldn't turn
it down."
"I was texting the band, and around 8 p.m.
they go quiet," says Ray between sips of beer.
"After an hour, they let me know they were
going through an awful search. I was thinking, 'Fuck, my money is all gone. I fucked
up with one of my favourite bands and a big
booking agency.' It was fucked. But they
made it! They showed up halfway through
Black Wizard's set and it was absolutely incredible. That really was the closest we've
come to an absolute disaster.
"Instead, we made the guarantee and were
still able to pay the locals. It was a fucking
homerun."
26
ART SIGNIFIED  HEAL LIVE ACTION.
FEBRUARY
WEED'/ SO PITTED
FEBRUARY 5 / ZULU RECORDS
To kick off their tour for the forthcoming
Running Back LP, Weed lit up Zulu Records
on February 5 with their signature muddy
punk sound. Teenagers to fans in their 50s
crammed the aisles of Zulu Records wearing
everything from spiked bracelets and black
lipstick to American Apparel hoodies and
Louboutins.
Opening was Seattle band So Pitted, who
snatched the attention of scattered music
junkies scouring for records with their ear-
splitting sound check. Their set delivered raw,
metal-laden punk full of attitude. Supersonic
beats and piercing sounds altered the mood
from song to song as the discordant feedback
kept the feeling alive. They wrapped up the
set with extremely harsh reverberation and
singer/guitarist/drummer Nathan Rodriguez
yelling, "I'm so fucking full of hate!"
Weed then took the stage and their namesake's smell filled the room as well. When 1
first saw them, what struck me was how different all of them were; the way they moved
and dressed. But n to play their
music, I  saw the  inti n  between
them for the passion of the music they were
producing, And the all ages, immensely dissimilar crowd seemed to find a common
ground as they moved to the thick grunge
noise that I thm.
The instrumentals were so overpower-
probably ifitentionalh k between sets mu *e and
cheers. Hugo Noriega moved with the music,
twisting with every strum of his basMThe
contagious en* m the music fueled the
crowd as they be; ounce their Wads
while guitarist Ke ie the
background, usually not facing the crowd.
In the back, drummer Bobby Siadat gave an
energetic and adrenalized performance. The
band concluded their show after a short set
of seven songs, leaving the audience in awe.
During the set, 1 contip. sked my
self what exactly it was about inted
wall of noise that made it ei >uple
times I even questioned if
Was it the blasting loud p ? The
long screech of the guitar between songs?
The scarcely heard vocals? The few guys in
my peripheral vision 1
beat1?
I honestly couldn't tell yot
vou is that — through all th<
craziness — Weed's set wor
They're not your convent
Vancouver band. Their hai>
scare or discomfort some p_
nitely is not for everyone. But under all <
feedback and noise was something
and throughout the gritty and inten
mance the raw aspect of their mu
through, captivating everybody in the room
with their individuality.—Nathan Sing
WEEKEND BENDER
FEBRUARY 5-8 / THE ASTORIA
Well thought-out and timely scheduling drove the Astoria Weekend Bender, as
it brought together a complete muddle of
genres over the course of four days. Many
bed a "festival" these days, but
the events that truly give off that energy practice more unison in the types of acts and 'l
recurring guests to each act. The event
hired one touring group, Automelodi, ma
the Saturday evening a more expensive o
charge for the Astoria at $12. The rest of t._
shows were just ; kend event in
the Vancouver
AL LIVE ACTION Freak ileal Waves
photo courtesy of Patrick 'Gillin tpg.2,.
Thursday night commenced with power-
pop outfit Sightlines. The vocals were good
with a clear infusion of '90s poppy adult
alternative, but at points a competition for
volume v instru
ment; rth the
audience, which gave off an awkward yet
endearing vibe. The succeeding band, Weird
out crowd. The dark sounding vocals work
well with the prog-influenced guitar. Jasc.
Puder sounded like a complete monster, and
his weird microphone height made him look
like a headbanging dinosaur. Their sound
came through the Astoria's system clearly,
with tons of unique structure to their s«gs
that experimented with various sub-genres.
roy KaterwoFs gritty performance and vo-     da Saturday night, and I had difficulty hear-
-als. "Come closer so I'm not by myself."     ing any clarity from their surf-y riffs. They all
—n s
*mlf hour set. The evening
took an ups* *
show
no*.
f% To end the night,
e vibe down to a dark,
ominous vocals that unfortunately at times
major, 1 was stoked on fyramidion's ancient
t themed metal. R^le Sco to the
narrative for about half r|e time before he reverted back to a normal |et. The two handed
tapping technique on thi guitar was a miss
for P><  midi a bit
ed with the lack oi 1 a theat-
from an iPod to introduce!songs. Neck of the
Woods took th(
a well~exeeute< nsky
rowdily toe a minute of in
strumental intp s were well struc
tured and every member had a great set of
riffs that kept the set engaging. 1 enjoy seeing
stagnant audience, andJkadomsky put a positive spin on his solo rffoshing by exclaiming,
"Every time I t« 1.1 get excited;*
shows at the Astoria, 1 know that the PA isn't
the ideal setup tor a lot of electronic artists,
the music, some time spent setting the balance and done
\\/<\n/tarv f/M-thf* c\mth :\r\iI unfile at^te    i Lnruv?
how the system can sound, and it i\
tated how much I enjoyed the bands on Safi
A s per-
Skull Vultur
edat 1 a.m. for a thinned
tp catch Montreal based AutomeW8L Charia-
tanVlise of iioisftlbased guitar effects struck a
strange balance Between difficult to decipher
vocals and looping electronic bass tones. He
did throw a Jot of sound for one person, and
the combination of musical elements echoed
throughout the room. The touring act, Au-:
tomelodi, graced the stage quickly. His take
on c
viewer with an impending head-cold. Bib
set up was percussion and keyboard based,
giving it a sound that vaguely temiiided me
of Pi
After the third night, I took an educated
guess that 1 n >e been the only person
to try and co il four nights. 1 was un-
succ d to a nasty hea
cold on Sunday morning, causing Sunday
night to not be reviewed. It was an admirable
feat, coordinating four nights of shows in a
row. However, this event will not be on my
year. —Erin Sardine
REAL LIVE ACTION FREAK HEAT WAVES / DADA PLAN /
WOOLWORM / WET FACE / FEBRUARY 7 /
THE FOX CABARET    ^
On the nig
toria's Frea,J
solid lineuj
to highlig'
Bonnie's
Havit
i
turnec
befop
;
^§W:WMm&M    \ IS ■    '        "-;:':::'; ■
they laid down a set with throbbing, steady
bass and vocals expertly treading the line between robotic notion, all anchored by
their stage prl subdued,
the same can't be said of their energy, which
it sound won
|e tor anoth*
Imruajiyv
back to the
llin
THEATRE
February  11  at The Rickshaw, Ariel
tk's first won- is eager crowd were,
n ere's the smoke?" Whether his goal was
>scure our view or heighten the aesthetic,
lear that the man had an eye for detail.
:1 #riel Pink's whisper of an entrance,
\t Jack Name and his two band-
med a triangle and faced inward
• instruments. Occasional vocals
t of the triangle's peak. Name con-
in Ariel Pink's 2014 release, Pom
hich explained his presence, but the
1 a bit out of place.
Then, donning  glitter an              \\   print
loungewear, aviation gr> is head,
Ariel Pink launched into lis new
album.
ii^lHli
ber th
drums.
igas. The latter are a rare sight
and as soon as they were set up
ing we were in for something
—as g one who
miliar is sure to rem
^eco coming from the
Finally, the time came for the main event:
Freak Heat Waves. The trio made the stage
seem very large, but the first song made it
obvious that their sound could fill the Fox
with energy to spare. In good krautrock form,
1 first saw Ariel P iti at
Jkin Bowl in 201 ng for the Flam
ing Lips. Pink's 201 ? e undoubtedly
showcases this influence — the first half of
the set was infused with bizarre fun, spilling
magic and dopamine onto the people below.
Ariel Pink's fascination with post-production, evident in the album itself, carried over
to the live performance. His vocals were a
distortion of a distortion, amplifying the effect in the studio recording. The performance
seemed to be less about hitting the right note
and more about expanding the live medium.
REAL LIVE ACTION riesy of Shane Bitrzynski (pgJO,
Three s
late Kim :
tic Rainq
-written
byFowlex
a productive
celebratioa
eband.
•Put Your Number
Phone" was a
love I
— slimy in
its subject and cynic*
delivery. Pink
performed j
ne mess
found on j
though a
phone, he compe
high-pitched imitation of thWwKm
tp make contact was
stomach-churning but
accurate.
accurate. The
about ii
The spirit of the show was clearly divided utes. Til
near its midpoint. The up-tempo tracks of lot to get
Pom Pom bled into its slower songs and other deal inch
older material. Pink's vocals switched from them ate
that of a cheery cult leader to a Morrisey-like
murmur. He clutched a rffcr and conducted
stayed low for most of
re picking up and clos-
the gorgeous "Dayzed
ss reintroduced Pink as
1 efore declaring that
ngs in the encore. It
»e band's older
1 The crowd
s. and the
mmmknm
mah Thomson
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^E&^Hra
REAL LIVE ACTION ON THE AIR
THE MORNING AFTER SHOW
By Meredyth Cole' II Photography by Addison Amitt II
Illustrations by Alisa Lazear
*This interview has been edited and condensed for print*
For a decade and a half now, The Morning
After Show has been bringing you a breadth
of musical flavours courtesy of the airwaves
at CiTR. Discorder recently sat dowii with
host Oswaldo Perez — who's been with the
show for 13 of those 15 years — to learn
about how things have changed since he took
over the show and about their upcoming anniversary party at the Rickshaw Theatre on
March 24.
WHAT DO YOU THINK HAS CHANGED IN
THE 13 YEARS YOU'VE BEEN WITH THE
SHOW?
The staff of CiTR has changed about three
times since I've been there. I've seen a lot
of shows come and go, shows that were before my show and after my show. The Morning After Show was originally at night and
it started as more of a punk-rock show. It's
more eclectic now. I still play some punk but
I play mostly ska, reggae, and a lot of local
indie Vancouver bands. Also the technology
has changed; we have new programs in the
studio, so it's easier to find music and other
things.
AS SOMEONE WHO WRITES, WHAT DO
YOU LIKE ABOUT DOING RADIO AS OPPOSED TO MORE TRADITIONAL, WRITTEN
JOURNALISM?
Radio is on the spot, right there. If you
make a mistake, there's no way of fixing the
mistake. On the other side, the mistake gets
forgotten really fast because you just continue with the show. With writing, you have a
lot of time to go through an article or do more
research and once it's published, it's there.
There's no going back. Radio allows me a
lot of spontaneity. I don't really prepare my
shows anymore, I have a vague idea of what
I'm going to play. So a lot of improvisation
too, I could be playing a song and go, "Oh, I
have a song that's going to go well with this"
and then I just improvise and go with that.
At the beginning, I used to even have the
times of the songs and everything. I used to
have everything planned and now I just kind
of know. It gets that way with experience;
you learn to manage the time better. I also
think radio is more fun than writing.
32  DO YOU HAVE ANY ADVICE FOR STUDENTS WHO WANT TO START THEIR OWN
RADIO SHOW?
It's easier than people think to go on the
radio. At CiTR, you just need to take the
training and then practice. My advice would
be a lot of practice, get familiar with the
equipment. We have a studio where you can
practice without going on the air, but you can
record.
YOU'VE SAID THAT YOU FEEL THERE'S A
LACK OF SUPPORT FOR THE ARTS IN VANCOUVER. ARE THERE ANY PLACES IN THE
CITY THAT YOU FEEL TRY TO COUNTERACT
THAT?
Yeah, there's the Pacific Cinematheque and
Vancity Theatre. Those are good examples,
they promote a lot in the film industry. The
station, CiTR. There are a few good venues
that like to support emerging bands — not
necessarily well-established bands — like the
Hindenburg. It's a new place supporting the
local scene.
DO YOU HAVE ANY MEMORABLE MOMENTS FROM THE MORNING AFTER
SHOW?
Yeah, I think one of them is when I interviewed Jon Anderson from Yes. That was a
cool interview 'cause he was joking around
and he speaks with the same voice as when
he sings, very high-pitched. I interviewed
a couple of my musical idols when I was
younger, like the guys from Dead Can Dance
and the Cocteau Twins. Those were pretty
cool interviews, for sure.
Join The Morning After Show for their 15-
year anniversary party on March 24 at the
Rickshaw Theatre, where they'll be celebrating alongside Jarabe de Palo, Los Furios,
and Caracas. Advance tickets are available
at Horses Records, Zulu, Highlife Records,
The Laughing Bean Coffee Co., Red Cat, and
Neptoon Records. $^&$&&j§i&Ms^Mi'^S'i$
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UB5UKIBU IU UlbUUptK!
Discordt#r is Vancouver's lor g§s! running independent mbgozine.
Sbw your supper! for tac wWs mdepenfa music community
ond the development of new writers, editors, designers, and artists.
GETITSENTALi THEWAjTTO YOUR DOOR! |
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Diicormr Magazine §233-6138 SUB Blvd. Vancouver, B.C., V6T1Z1 SUN
MON
TUES
WED
1
FUNDRIVE
2
FUNDRIVE
3
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4
FUNDRIVE
Leisure Cruise, Young
Liars 0 Venue
Tommy Castro & the
Painkillers 0 Electric
Owl
Single Mothers, The
Dirty Nil, Needs 0
Electric Owl
•
-
8
9
10
11
™
The Twilight Sad 0
Biltmore Cabaret
Enslaved, Yob, Ecstatic Vision, Anciients
0 Rickshaw Theatre
Sumac 0 Biltmore
Cabaret
Wolf Alice 0 Biltmore
Cabaret
sV
W fir'
1  1%
15
16
17
i, IT'
Trash Talk, Rat King,
Lee Bannon 0 Korean
Hall
Language Arts ©
Railway Club
Tycho 0 Commodore
Ballroom
Electric Six 0 The
Imperial
22
23
24
25
walk the moon, The
Griswolds 0 Commodore Ballroom
Anvil 0 Venue
:'    -•>:-
Jarabe de Palo, Los Furios,
Caracas 0 Rickshaw Theatre
Dirty Spells, Sean McArdle,
Julia Dream © Railway Club
The White Buffalo e Biltmore Cabaret
This Will Destroy You
0 Electric Owl
OK Go 0 Commodore
Ballroom
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29
30
31
M.
Guster, Kishi Bashi ®
Venue
jsSi©-'
- THURS
FUNDRIVE
- kode 9, Ikonika, DJ Spinn, Taso,
Max Ulis © Fox Cabaret
- Colby Morgan & the Catastrophes, Moon Tan © The Railway
Club
- Sales © Biltmore Cabaret
12
FRI
6
FUNDRIVE FINALE SHOW!
A band lottery featuring brand new bands
with randomly-assigned members!
Jon & Roy, FRANKIE, Jesse
jpper © The Imperial
19
Limblifter 0 Biltmore
Cabaret
26
Random Rab, SaQi,
AppleCat 0 Rickshaw
Theatre
Bobby Bazini, Bell-
woods 0 Media Club
Common Courtesy
release party 0 The
Hindenburg
The Boom Booms 0
The Imperial
Anti-Flag® Venue
20
- Kimmortal, JB the First Lady,
Janette King, Laydy Jams, Purple
Hearts Social Club ©the Wise
Hall
-The Cave Singers, Kathryn
Calder © Rickshaw Theatre
-Skateistan Benefit: Anchoress,
Self ist, Pyramidion, Balance ©
SBC Restaurant
27
Moon Duo, Craft Spells ®
Biltmore Cabaret
Black Ladybugs, The
Flintettes, Keg Killers ® SBC
Restaurant
Craft Spells, The Bilinda
Butchers ® Electric Owl
SAT
Archivist, Fugal, AOS, Phillip, Nancy Dru,
Reducer © Secret Location
BRASS © Railway Club
Kevin Devine & The Goddamn Band,
Dads © Media Club
Kindness © Biltmore Cabaret
14
Shred Kelly 0 Electric Owl
Flamin Groovies,
Bum, Rich Hope & His Evil
Doers 0 Rickshaw Theatre
Witch of the Waste, Bloom, dead hand,
No Boy © 333
Hurray for the Riff Raff © Electric Owl .
Skateistan Benefit: Devil in the Wood-
shack, The Pretty's, Jesse LeBourdais, The
Goodtimes © SBC Restaurant
28
The Ting Tings 0 Venue
Viet Cong 0 Biltmore
Cabaret fvS***%ft§ f*f
4he ne^vy ! NERVOUS IN CROWDS
SEAN KAREMAKER
A Discorder Art Project  f>
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T Was 3^ng i
'uStt*-to ihtf    j  DON'T TOUCH THAT DIAL... UNLESS STEVE ALBINI SAYS SO
by Robert Catherall II Illustrations byR. Castanedo
"Steve really made us feel like peers when
we were in the studio. He had his hero/mentor when he was starting out and fully understood what it meant to us," Jordan Koop explains to me during an online chat. Alluding
to Steve Albini's lifelong relationship with
influential English recording engineer John
Loder of Southern Records, Koop is now
able to draw a parallel to his own relationship
with Albini.
Steve Albini is a Household name to most
within the North American indie music circuit. Whether for his work as frontman of
hard-hitting Chicago outfits Big Black and
Shellac, or behind the glass on seminal Gen
X works like Nirvana's In Utero or The Pixies' Surfer Rosa, Albini can count over a
thousand songwriting, performance, and engineering credits to his name. Although, with
a storied reputation that includes his devotion
to analogue techniques and staunch recording
ethos, it's likely his work as a recording engineer where most will remember him from.
Local recording engineer Jordan Koop —
who, by all rights, should also be a household name to anyone who's been around the
Vancouver music community in the past 15
years — might remember him a little differently though.
"Steve was smaller than I expected. That
was my first impression."
Still fresh in his mind from a week-long
mentorship with Albini, Koop and 14 other
participants got a rare chance to learn under
the infamous Chicago engineer in a program
called "Mix with the Masters." The program
arranges seminars between budding producers and recording engineers at La Fabrique
Studios in Southern France, where they learn
recording techniques while developing personal relationships with seasoned industry
veterans.
Having worked with countless local musicians — from the likes of Shearing Pinx
and You Say Party! to assisting iconic local
synth-punk outfit Radio Berlin with the recordings of their 2003 masterpiece, Glass
— the British Columbian recording engineer
was ecstatic to find he had been accepted to
learn under the guidance of Steve Albini.
43
JORDAN KOOP "MY INTENTION WAS TO GET OUT [OF] VANCOUVER, TRY TO BUY A
HOUSE, TRY TO LIVE ON A GULF ISLAND, AND ALSO INCORPORATE
THE STUDIO. IT HAD A LOT TO DO WITH MY OWN LIFESTYLE, AND THE
FACT THAT MY CLIENTS ARE WILLING TO TREK OUT HERE WAS THE
ICING ON THE CAKE."
"[I] was lucky enough to be accepted as
one of a dozen or so people from around the
world," types Koop. "He's someone whom
[sic] I respect a lot as an engineer/musician/
business owner."
Totalling more than 100 engineering,
mixing, and mastering credits to his name,
Koop's own resume counts Mushroom Studios, FaderMaster, The Hive, and the Emergency Room (Strathcona) among his residencies. Now, he finds himself quietly recording
some of British Columbia's heaviest bands at
the Noise Floor, his home recording studio
on Gabriola Island. It's a B&B-style recording studio operated by Koop and his wife on
one of British Columbia's more accessible
retreats.
"My intention was to get out [of] Vancouver, try to buy a house, try to live on a gulf
island, and also incorporate the studio. It had
a lot to do with my own lifestyle, and the fact
that my clients are willing to trek out here
was the icing on the cake. Now I get to share
a bit of my lifestyle with my clients and it's
good for everyone," Koop explains.
After a week of intense Albini tutelage in
mid-February, Koop reflects on the unique
opportunity, "During the sessions with Steve
it was very much master-student, but in the
off hours all the participants discussed recording and mixing philosophies in addition
to regular life topics." But things became
rapidly more congenial: "After demonstrating our own work to Steve, I think I saw a
few light bulbs go off in his head too. Not
only did we learn from Steve and Greg Norman (his right hand man), but we also learned
from each other."
Seeing Albini implement his unique recording style left an unforgettable impression
on Koop: "Watching him execute the technical requirements of an all analog session was
pretty intense. His brain is operating entirely
on the left side."
Having picked up a variety of new recording skills during his time in France, from
knob-twiddling philosophies to drum-tuning
techniques, Koop is eager to get the tape rolling again. When asked who he's most excited
to get back in the studio with, he humbly
replies, "I'm excited for the work waiting
for me ... but if my calendar was wide open
and [I] could start a new project with somebody, I would want to record the sophomore
Dead Soft album, and Group Vision — I was
blown away by those guys when they played
recently with my band." Despite the Noise
Floor's packed recording schedule for the
near future, let's hope that's not just wishful
thinking.
What can local music fans otherwise expect from the Noise Floor in coming months?
The result is rather inviting.
"I can't afford to be a snob about who I
work with ... I'll work with anyone that wants
to work with me ... I do the best job I can,
no matter what the project is." So if you're
looking to escape the city for your next batch
of recordings, Koop's relaxing locale and recently acquired expertise make the choice an
obvious one.
44
JORDAN KOOP  IN GOOD HUMOUR
ERICA SIGURDSON
By Evan Brow II Illustrations by Jules Francisco
Erica Sigurdson was 25 years old and
working at a bank. She had always wanted to
do comedy, but it was a little secret she kept
to herself.
When she was seven, Sigurdson saw her
first comic on Johnny Carson. She fell in love
with the idea of this person standing, talking, making the audience laugh, and getting
laughs out of her dad in such a unique way.
In grade nine, she told a boy about her desire
to do comedy.
The boy said, "Oh, girls don't do that."
Sigurdson responded, "Oh, well you just
watch. One day you'll see me on TV"
"That was the last time I had ever told
anybody," says Sigurdson. "Because if you
tell someone you want to be funny, it's like
telling someone you want to be a model. You
just open yourself up to people saying, 'Oh,
you're not funny enough or pretty enough or
good enough.' So I didn't tell anyone else
until one day I was working in a bank and I
used to do these funny newsletters — it's not
hard to be the funny person at a bank — and
everyone was in the lunch room laughing at
it. They said, 'You're going to be the person
that we say 'We knew you when...' and then
that was the first time I felt validated."
Stepping on stage for her first show in 1999,
Sigurdson is now a well-seasoned comedy
pro. Appearing on The Debaters, The Winnipeg Comedy Festival, The Halifax Comedy
Festival, and Just For Laughs on numerous
occasions, Sigurdson has established herself
as a staple in Canadian stand-up comedy, despite being a little shy growing up. Coming
from a religious background with little exposure to stand-up comedy, Sigurdson mainly
stayed away from performance, save for a
few exceptions.
"I did get up at church camp and give
fake sermons," says Sigurdson. "Everyone
46
IN GOOD HUMOUR s"**dsoh, 0N
n s Credibly %Int,tekesj
thought I was going to be a preacher. That
did not go as planned."
But doing comedy was always what she
wanted. Sigurdson grasped onto the idea of
humour and absurdity and holding someone's
attention and being funny.
"It was the first thing in life I said I wanted
to do and then really kept going with it. I'm
infamous for signing up for a month of hot
yoga and then never going again. I'm constantly finding new passions and then going,
'Ugh, I'm not as passionate anymore.' But
comedy was the one thing that I stuck with.
And now I'm in too deep. I can't do anything
else [laughs]."
With this persistence, Sigurdson has become very comfortable as one of Canada's
most established comics. Even the scary
parts have become tame.
"The longer you've been doing it, having
a joke not work used to be devastating when
you were a new comic," says Sigurdson. "But
now you're like, 'Hmm, that's not for you I
guess. Whatever.' Everybody drops a cup at
work sometimes. And those jokes are just my
broken wine glasses."
And while Sigurdson occasionally "signs
up for Athabasca University online to become a dental hygienist after a bad show,"
she's in comedy for the long haul, gathering
47
IN GOOD HUMOUR fascinating experiences such as performing
a televised stand-up show for Canadian soldiers in Kandahar, Afghanistan.
"My agent called me and said, 'We have
this offer for you to go to Afghanistan for the
CBC And immediately my first instinct was
fear," says Sigurdson. "But I found out that
Shaun Majumder, Mark Critch, Tim Nutt,
and Irwin Barker would be there too. And I
said, 'Okay, I know that the CBC wouldn't
put Mark Critch or Shaun Majumder in any
danger. So I said, 'Okay, I'll go.' It was a
10-day trip. And everyone is so appreciative
of you going there and giving live entertainment. I went in 2006, so there wasn't great
Internet or access to YouTube.
"But it's weird when the whole audience
has machine guns. They carry their guns everywhere they go, so they're just sitting there
with guns, and you're like, 'Well this is pressure.' And it's so strange to be telling jokes
about such insignificant things when these
people are in Afghanistan, at war, and you
know, 'Oh, this is a funny story about my
cat.' But we were told that that was what they
wanted. They wanted to be taken out of this
and back to their regular lives. It was such
a great experience. How many people go
to Afghanistan? We got bombed too. There
were a couple rocket attacks. Before it was
all, 'Look at what we're doing!" and after it
was, 'Oh, holy shit, we're not in control of
what happens here.'"
Through festivals, newsletters, and rocket
attacks, Sigurdson's drive for comedy runs
strong. Much like when she discovered it at
seven years old, Sigurdson will continue to
hold stand-up as her truest passion. Whether
she's performing, debating, or writing that
book she swears she's going to write one day,
Erica Sigurdson's comedic mind will live on.
To learn more about Erica Sigurdson, visit
her website at www.ericasigurdson.com or
check out her emceeing the Comedy Mix for
Phil Hanleyfrom March 12 to 14!
48
IN GOOD HUMOUR  9 under /ei/Jew*
OK VANCOUVER OK
Influences
(Kingfisher Bluez)
The multi-faceted local group Ok Vancouver Ok is back with their ninth full-length
release, Influences. Instrumentally, the album borrows sounds from bands that have
inspired them in the past and lyrically builds
on their own past two releases, Escape the
Common People and Food Shelter Water.
Influences features an eclectic collection of
artists, including special performances by
Ashley Eriksson and Eli Moore. Like much
of their previously released music, Influences
continues to explore themes of anti-capitalism, sustainability, and freedom.
Ok Vancouver Ok has produced a poetic
and thought-provoking album in hopes of
positively inspiring others with their forthright lyrics. While Influences lacks a standout
track, this appears deliberate. The album, in
its entirety, is a dreamy masterpiece. It takes
form after a complete listen, with the bass and
guitar ebbing and flowing from song-to-song,
while up-tempo beats from the drums provide
an overall unique mood. Ok Vancouver Ok
has succeeded in producing a smooth sound
filled with hazy, raw individuality. The lyrics in Influences reference diverse and broad
subjects such as family and life, working well
with lead singer Jeff Johnson's distinct and
brilliant vocals.
Influences was written shortly after Johnson and Laura House (drums) wrapped up a
six-month long tour. While they were on tour,
their son Henry was born, which inspired the
song "Collection Of Changes." The first and
last song on the album ("Building A Way"
and "Changes") lyrically reflects before and
after having Henry and how he has changed
their lives.
Influences \s a poetic and pleasurable listen; a warm indie-pop soundtrack for a night
in with family and friends. The blurred tones
and crisp guitar strums make for a unique listening experience that takes you into Johnson's world of inspiration and creativity.
—Nathan Sing
MALK
Prehistoric
(Wiener Records)
Lately, Vancouver's music appreciators
have noticed a renewed interest in '60s-
tinged psychedelic and surfy garage rock.
Prehistoric, the latest EP offering from Ab-
botsford's MALK, is one of them. As the title
may suggest, MALK's sound is indebted to
this '60s era of sound, now long past, and of
50
UNDER REVIEW this variety of retro revivalist albums, Prehistoric is one of the most inspired.
Keefer Pelech's recent Discorder feature
explains how MALK recorded Prehistoric
almost entirely live off the floor with producer Felix Fung. Fung's traditional approach
could not have benefited Prehistoric more.
The last track, "Satellites," is a slow-
burning menace of a brooder, helmed by Miranda Maria's seductive vocal performance.
While Maria's gothic crooning floats about,
the song builds to a point of no return, as it
finally erupts in a Morricone-meets-Vangelis
cyclone, suggesting drummer Jaydee Bate-
man's familiarity with Stephen Morris.
On paper, MALK may seem like any other
band riding the current wave of surfy garage
rock. However, one listen to Prehistoric will
reveal a young, lively, and distinguishable
band whose success is derived, not only from
an articulate amalgam of influences, but also
from an unrivaled sense of urgency. Supported by Fung's exceptional production, it's obvious that MALK runs much deeper, below
the waves.—Max Wainwright
The album's emphasis on live performance
is best heard in the opening and title track,
which explode with surf rock's signature
claustrophobic energy. Fung successfully
captures MALK's vigourous performance,
placing the listener right there in the room
with the band. (Only it doesn't sound like
a room, but more like a concrete tunnel, no
greater than a couple of metres wide.) Kyle
Schick's cutthroat guitar riffs sound-off like a
rabid doomsday crier, roused by Fung's rich,
but tasteful pall of reverb.
Though the '60s surf rock vibe is ever-
present, Prehistoric is brushed with shades of
'80s new-wave and post punk. Alex Smith's
vocal delivery often conjures Fred Schneider's deadpan intensity in the B-52's. However, Smith's words forgo the absurdism, in
favour of old-fashioned sincerity and whimsy. In "Each Other," he bemoans a failed relationship in the style of a lovelorn doo-wop
single: "We sat around and sucked up the
sky / Now all we do is make each other cry "
The track's sinister guitar and synth textures,
however, recast these sentiments in the same
despair of The Cure's Disintegration.
The
Cyrillic
Typewriter
BEST SUIT
The Cyrillic Typewriter
(JAZ Records)
In just a few shorts years, artful indie outfit
The Cyrillic Typewriter has come a long way
from traditional West Coast twee to laudable
endeavours into the avant-garde. Lead by
Vancouver music veteran Jason Zumpano,
whose name you may recognize from Destroyer and his own Zumpano project, his
work as The Cyrillic Typewriter has seen
him collaborate with a revolving cast of local
UNDER REVIEW
51 heavyweights on four full-length albums in
as many years.
The Cyrillic Typewriter's third album, Custodian, arrived in late 2013 and took a number of fans by surprise with its sharp left-turn
towards conceptual cinematic pop. Developed as a soundtrack to a movie that doesn't
exist, Custodian saw Zumpano's songwriting
move in a drastically different direction, and
his latest outing adds a second tally to that
record of conceptual, yet visually unaccompanied releases.
Given its stripped down and digitized aesthetic, it should come as no surprise that Best
Suit also offers The Cyrillic Typewriter's
shortest personnel listing to date. Though
the album is performed entirely by Zumpano
(keys and long-time strings) and collaborator Megan Bradfield (double bass), there's
no hiding the pop sensibilities of these 13
markedly minimal creations. Dynamic and
immersing, some of Best Suifs songs are
landmark expanses, full of buzzing ethers
you're bound to get lost in — the dizzying
"Whirlpool" clocks in at just under eight minutes — while others like "Closing In On Both
Sides" and "Light Upon Feet" give listeners
little more than a conceptual vignette, leaving
much to the imagination of what Zumpano
could be alluding to: twisted, beautiful, or
otherwise.
Self-released on Zumpano's own JAZ Records, and distributed through The Business
record shop in Anacortes, WA, physical copies of Best Suit might be tough to track down,
but it's for those who take the time that this
record holds the greatest appeal. And, with
processing credits going to the currently-
buzzing Loscil on three of the songs, "1st
Suit," "2nd Suit," and "3rd Suit," Zumpano
has again proven his quiet reach within the
local music community and his determination to continue down the path of conceptual
pop experimentation.—Robert Catherall
ENERGY SLIME
New Dimensional
(Mint Records)
If you happen to have a spare 13 minutes in
your life and you're looking to fill that time
void with something strange to listen to, New
Dimensional may be your perfect fit. Yes, it's
incredibly short in length, and so is each of
the ten songs that comprise the album. This
new sound from Energy Slime is a sucker-
punch to the face of eclectic pseudo-psychedelic tracks that make you want to get really
weird.
This isn't the first rodeo for frontman Jay
Arner. If you've listened to his self-titled solo
album, New Dimensional is going to sound
like a chemically-soaked, kid-pop rendition
of his previous work. Now joining hands
with Jessica Delisle, this duo's camaraderie
is evident on the album. With song titles like,
"Graham Fucks The Queen" and "So Long
Snakes," many of the tracks on New Dimensional seem like they were written based off
of inside jokes between these two on an acid
trip. Fantastical and fairytale-esque, this album is creative in an oddly intimate way, like
the rainbow-coloured vomit from two peculiar psyches.
New Dimensional is a beautifully inclusive
album that fosters an instantly personal connection with listeners. There are no pretensions — what you hear is what you get —
and Energy Slime certainly doesn't flinch at
52
UNDER REVIEW proudly showcasing their oddities. However,
what the album breeds in zest, it lacks in
maturity. At times, discombobulation reigns
supreme over sophistication when the latter would be preferable. New Dimensional
is sporadic, messy, and frankly, slimy. The
harmonies are all over the place and there is
a lack of cohesive flow. That being said, the
energetic and offbeat pace of the album are
what make it the candid and truthful voice
that it is.
New Dimensional is truly a piece of art; a
piece of colourful abstract art that you look
at a million times but never truly understand,
which is why you keep looking at it.
—Alex Lenz
degree of flow from track to track. Despite
running a little on the long side, the record is
cohesive, original, and fresh.
Even though Skim Milk has a unified sound,
there are some true stand out moments. In the
second track "Two Ways Out," Skim Milk
has incorporated piano lines, clarinet, and
synthy drum beats into an interesting experimental mix of sounds. Similar moments
pop up in "Truth and Consequence." "Blood
Sweat and Tears" is only two minutes and 31
seconds long, but is a great slow-build tune.
The swell of trumpet on top of a twirling clarinet solo is an example of Davidson's ability
to combine layers of different instruments
while also smoothly transitioning the record
into the finale "Heartbeat."
SKIM MILK
S/T
(Self-Released)
Sam Davidson, a.k.a Skim Milk, provides
a stark reminder that originality can be built
from a wide variety of musical influences.
This self-titled release offers a multi-faceted
listening experience, pulling from a multitude
of genres and sounds — jazz, experimental,
electronic, and hip-hop — making it a treat
for anyone looking to listen to something a
little different and innovative.
Davidson's influences range from Bach
to Boards of Canada, and both are relevant
and can be heard clearly in this record. Specializing in clarinet, bass clarinet, and electric wind instruments (EWIs), Davidson's
clarinet pieces can be heard far above the
variety of instruments (trumpets, bass, guitar, and trombone) and musicians he pulled
in to make this record. Davidson states on his
website that he strived to create "the world's
first clarinet-infused hip-hop album," and he
may have achieved just that. The record's
variety of instruments spans many eras and
genres, and this is what separates it from the
majority of local music released in 2015.
Skim Milk offers a different, unified, and
eclectic combination of sounds with this new,
self-titled release. A diverse sound mix, combined with the overall feel of a classical genre
provides the perfect night-in soundtrack.
This is a great record to settle down to with a
good book and a fresh pint. If you are looking
for something different to listen to, definitely
check out Skim Milk's latest. —Julia Lehn
Skim Milk's hooks are driven by dancing
clarinet lines backed by drum samples and
waves of synths, giving the album a high
UNDER REVIEW
53 SECRET PYRAMID
The Silent March
(Students of Decay)
Vancouver's Amir Abbey is best understood in the painstaking devotion he takes
in crafting the dense and meticulously constructed records of Secret Pyramid. His rare
local performances are a fantastic look into
Abbey's world of micro-focused drone arrays and fuzzed-out ambient floods, but even
these are only slight preparation for the all-
encompassing blocks of sound that Secret
Pyramid spends so much time constructing
for recordings.
The Silent March, originally issued as a
cassette by Nice-Up International in 2011,
is finally seeing a re-pressing by veteran
weird-music record label, Students of Decay. Because of Secret Pyramid's minimal
online presence, any new excuse to snap up
physical copies of his releases is something
to be cherished, and The Silent March is absolutely worthy of being reissued. The album
marries the patience and clarity of Stars of
the Lid with the sonorous thunder of a Sunn
O))) doom jam — although the seven tracks
are anything but metal, The Silent March is
produced with a similar penchant for noise,
feedback, and inescapable fuzz.
Deep, sweeping chords and sounds undulate, at times swirling and pulsing, in mournful minor keys on both sides of The Silent
March. Although  the  themes  that  dance
around the edges of the album aren't happy
ones, the completely overwhelming chaos
inside each song remains up to the listener
to interpret. This is about as good as drone
music gets.—Fraser Dobbs
YOUNG BRAISED
Northern Reflections
(1080p)
For a rapper based out of the rainy Pacific
Northwest, it's fitting that Young Braised's
Northern Reflections furthers his exploration
of cloud-rap based sounds. Featuring smooth
beats and distorted vocals, Reflections is notable for its endless stream of entertaining
samples and clever rap vocals; exploring new
sounds while still feeling rooted in an older
rap sound that endures throughout the album. Reflections succeeds most by blending
dreamy beats with samples of old school rap.
This fusion validates Young Braised's own
rapping abilities while also showcasing his
unique exploration into new areas of sound
mixing.
Not many artists choose to rap over the
extensive layering of beats in the way that
Young Braised does. Under the moniker
Young Braised, rapper Jaymes Bowman displays immense patience with his listeners,
selling the long intros and outros that build
and recede throughout the album without being overindulgent. "Entertainment's" slow,
bass-filled build and vocal sampling nearly
54
UNDER REVIEW hides the point, as Bowman actually begins
rapping over the song. Even his verses obscure the listener's sense of consciousness.
Repeated rap lines, choruses, and distortion
prove to be Bowman's signature tools in producing this track's dark, dream-like allure.
The album's middle lightens up in tone
significantly, becoming slightly more upbeat while not overusing its laugh-inducing,
tongue-in-cheek samples. Tracks "Casserole" and "Canada's Economic Action Plan"
share computer-like glittery samples, while
bookending the sentiments of sound with
voice recordings.
Songs "Meditation" and "Middle Class
Homie Quan" settle back into a darker tone
for Reflections, with bells and synths establishing the tracks' cold tone. Sharper drum-
lines and vocals by Bowman infuse these
songs with a dark, contemplative sound,
more commonly found on modern rap releases. Bowman, however, never takes himself too seriously in these songs, as is evident
in the comedic rap phrases that are repeated
jokingly throughout the album.
Indeed, it is the constant juxtaposition of
Bowman's vocals and his immense collection of samples that make Northern Reflections sound so unique, yet so easy to listen
to. Never too grating to enjoy or too slow to
ignore, Reflectionswill suck you in and just
as easily drift by while you listen. Northern
Reflections holds appeal for rap lovers and
electronic music enthusiasts alike.
—Kenny Drabble
UNDER REVIEW
55 war & paste:
the truth behind vancouver's poster scene
by Elijah Teed II Photography by Tara Dwelsdorf
In the 1980s, Vancouver witnessed a peculiar increase in visual marketing: street posters had started to become a business venture.
For one company in particular, what began
as a small group of allegedly forward-thinking and non-partisan people became something egregiously misshapen. Eventually a
monopoly was formed in this niche marketplace. Turf wars were rumored, threats were
allegedly made, but one thing was certain: a
poster mafia had been born.
Most visibly in recent years though, a
pushback against the dominant force in Vancouver's poster scene has emerged. Slashed,
covered over, and torn down, the independent
companies have suffered to have their product remain in public view.
Near the forefront of Vancouver's independent poster scene is Silver Fox Postering,
run by partners Josh Garvin and Kristl Buck-
land. The company is a labour of love in all
senses, with the couple each putting in substantial work to acquire, organize, and plaster
thousands of posters every week. Garvin got
his start in the business roughly 10 years ago,
while working at a pub that was struggling
to keep their ads up around town. As a way
to earn some extra cash, he agreed to take
on the lengthy postering process for them —
and from those humble beginnings, he built a
network of clientele suffering from the same
problem.
"I started my own company entirely out of
word of mouth," Garvin explains with satisfaction. "I don't do any real advertising. People that genuinely want their stuff to do well
will come to me."
The choice to become an independent and
not fall in with the poster mafia speaks to Silver Fox's almost philanthropic business model. Garvin frequently and happily posters for
cheap or for free without hesitation, with him
and Buckland each thrilled to be able to help
the city's entangled poster and music scenes.
"I don't just worry about money because
money doesn't really matter," says Garvin.
56
SILVER FOX POSTERING :      $mgmi  'Cf^fSlK "Someone just might not have enough money
to do their show. There's something, I think,
that's much more satisfying and gratifying in
supporting people."
"If, in the whole world, everyone just worried about looking out for each other, no one
would have to worry about looking out for
himself or herself," adds Buckland.
Garvin attests much of Silver Fox's success to this mentality, and it's hard to argue
with. Knowing he and Buckland care about
the bands to the extent that they do certainly
makes working with independent contractors
like them seem all the more appealing.
"I like the idea that people can have choice
58
and options rather than having to be forced to
use one large company. I can bring complete
integrity to my work and know that I'm doing it properly ... I can always make sure that
whatever I'm doing is 100 per cent aligned
with what I believe in."
For Garvin, while postering may have
started as a side job, it quickly became a full-
time enterprise. On average, Buckland and
Garvin estimate Silver Fox puts up 600 posters a day, six days a week in the off-season,
and twice that when it's busy. Besides cycling
around town, packaging posters and making
glue (their homemade recipe, the result of
tireless trial and error by Buckland herself)
adds additional time to the process, turning
what may seem like an easy exercise into
SILVER FOX POSTERING 1
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an all-day event. The workload, however, is
something they're both grateful for, considering the hazards their clients*are subjected to.
"Our customers will get harassed," says
Buckland, with Garvin elaborating: "They'll
get phone calls from the big guys ... and I
think they do it because they don't know any
better. It's that weird, cartoonish bully thing."
And it's not just their customers who've
felt the pressure of the poster mafia. Even
though business is going well, Garvin and
Buckland still find the need to be careful,
moving around the city and changing routes
to stay as safe and anonymous as possible.
Nevertheless, despite the risks associated
60
with using an independent service, Garvin
sees camaraderie growing in the face of
adversity and is happy that Silver Fox is
amongst the group of homegrown poster services responsible for change. "Over the last
few years, [the community] has been getting really strong. The power that the bigger
companies have is dwindling now, and it will
continue to do so."
Their confidence in the cause only matched
by their passion for the work, Garvin and
Buckland will no doubt continue to see more
success in the future with Silver Fox bringing
a level of compassion and integrity to every
poster plastered.
SILVER FOX POSTERING VANCOUVER'S BLACK ARK
by  Jasper   Winch  II  Photography   by   Yuko  Inoue  II
Illustrations by Emma Potter
"Produced by Felix Fung at Little Red
Sounds."
It's a sentence you see a lot these days if
you're even the slightest bit involved with
Vancouver's music scene. Fung's name pops
up everywhere — in the linear notes of CDs,
in the credits listed on Bandcamps, on the
tips of people's tongues — and wherever it
is, a mention of Little Red Sounds is sure to
follow.
Even if you've never heard of Fung or his
studio, you've undoubtedly heard something
he's produced. The Pretty's, Qid You Die?,
The Ballantynes, Les Chaussettes, MALK,
Animal Bodies, Candela Farm. The list could
go on for ever — and for good reason. The
music coming out of Little Red Sounds is
consistently top-notch and the more they help
create, the more bands want to be a part of it.
Four years after relocating Little Red
Sounds to its present East Hastings location,
Fung is still intent on capturing and enhancing the city's vibrant musical community.
Far from just producing records, the studio
stands in as a community space and a place
for musicians to explore and interact with
one another.
"It's not really run like a recording studio,"
notes Fung, "more of a drop-in centre."
And, as it goes, it seems as though there are
always people just dropping by. Max Sample,
employee of Little Red Sounds and bassist in
The Ballantynes, drops by during Fung's interview, as well as members of Did You Die?
and The Pretty's, just to hang out — but it's
an opportunity that Fung always seizes.
"When someone new is in the room, you
hear it through them," explains Fung. Instead
of seeing drop-ins as an interruption, Fung
sees them as a chance to gain new perspective. A new set of ears is always welcome at
Little Red Sounds.
In a room with a drum set on one end and a
mixing board on the other, the open space of
the studio provides ample opportunities for
action-packed and lively sessions; with the
room filled with guitars, keyboards, amps,
and couches, it's easy to see how bands could
enjoy their time there.
62
LITTLE RED SOUNDS  "We create an environment for the bands'
dream-selves to occupy," says Fung. Be it
rock 'n' roll, country, garage, or electronic
music, the studio is open to anything and
ready to shift and morph into an accommodating space. "There's something cool within
every genre that I want to make believe and
play with it. Whatever it is, we can occupy
that, reflected in how we record, how we set
up the room."
No matter what's being recorded, Fung
finds a way to bring a liveliness and energy to
the process. "I'm trying to get people to play
that one take where there's something exciting, that something happened. I'm not going
to call it magic; sometimes it's not magic, it's
just something that happened that's very exciting, that you can't recapture."
While Fung's recording process is in constant search of surprises and worthwhile
idiosyncrasies, most of all, Fung is looking
for "something everybody can be proud of.
That's very important, that everybody's character is showing through, that they're truly being themselves, and that it sounds awesome.
So I'm waiting for that take where I can hear,
see, and feel the people playing like a band."'
With nods of encouragement and agreement
from the musicians around the room, it's
clear that Little Red Sounds lives by those
words. Music is not simply recorded there: it
is created, explored, challenged, pushed to its
limits, and finally captured there.
On his role in the studio, Fung attests to his
active role in the recording process. He sees
himself more of a producer than a recording
engineer: "I'm an instigator. Fuck mediating.
What people need in the studio is somebody
to push them to the point where it's really exciting. We're not trying to capture a perfect
take; we're trying to capture excitement." With a steady stream of bands coming and
going, recording remarkable tracks, and playing off one another in the space, Little Red
Sounds is one of the most sought after recording studios in Vancouver. What elevates
it from just a studio into a undoubtedly extraordinary situation is Fung's golden touch.
As Richie Alexander, guitarist and vocalist of
local rockers Did You Die?, explains during
his drop-by, "Felix can help elevate [a band].
He's a fresh set of ears, eyes, and has the experience and know-how."
As bands file through the studio, all gaining that prestigious tag — "Produced by Felix Fung at Little Red Sounds" — Vancouver's tight-knit music community continues
to embrace Little Red Sounds. And while
Fung himself is no stranger to performing in
bands, his heart and mind are fully at home
at the studio: "I'm back to the thing that I do
best, and the thing that I love, and that's making records." CITR 101.9FM PROGRAM GUIDE
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ROCKET FROM
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UP ON THE
ROOF
A FACE FOR       THE SCREEN
POP DRONES RADI° GIRLS
THE
SATURDAY
EDGE
TRANSITION        THE CATS
THE TERRY PROJECT STATE PAJAMS
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CHAOS
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MORNING
AFTER SHOW
SHINEON
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SPEARESHOW        DONUTS DAVE
ALL       BVP    THEPERMA
EARS   RADIO NE™,N ALOUD FEMCONCEPT
GENERATION
ANNIHILATION
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STUDENT SPECIAL HOUR
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TAUST RADIO ZERO
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KEW IT UP
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FM PROGRAM GUIDE Bepi Crespan Presents... SUN 7am
Bepi Crespan Presents... CiTR's 24 Hours Of Radio Art in a snack
size format! Difficult music, harsh electronics, spoken word, cut-
up/collage and general Crespan© weirdness.Twitter: @bepicre-
span. Blog: bepicrespan.blogspot.ca
-.■
Classical Chaos SUN 9am
From the Ancient World to the 21st century, join host Marguerite
in exploring and celebrating classical music from around the
world.
Alphabet Soup Alternating Wednesdays 6pm
Alphabet Soup is a talk show which focuses on the writing of
MFA Creative Writing students at UBC. Topics include events happening in the program and the Vancouver art scene while promoting the writers and the genre which they are working in.
Aloud Alternating Thursdays 1pm
Aloud features authors and literary critics reading, analyzing and
discussing their favourite short stories. Every month we invite a
prominent Vancouver-based author or critic to share one of their
favourite pieces of short fiction on air. The show—one hour in
length—begins with the guest reading selections from the story
and ends with an engaging discussion of the work with Aloud
host, David Gaertner—a UBC postdoctoral fellow with a PhD in
Literature. Theme and interstitial music provided by Vancouver
musician Jason Starnes with support from UBC's First Nations
Studies Program. Read more at aloudliterature.tumblr.com and
follow us on Twitter @Aloud_Lit.
AstroTalk THU 3pm
Space is an interesting place. Marco slices up the night sky with
a new topic every week. Death Stars, Black Holes, Big Bangs, Red
Giants, the Milky Way, G-Bands, Syzygy's, Pulsars, Super Stars...
The Sector FRI 8am
Discussing the world of social justice, non-profits, charities and
activism. Join Ethan for in-depth interviews, examinations of
nonprofit missions and causes, and discussions of everything
from philanthropy to progressive politics.
Synchronicity MON 12pm
Join host Marie B and discuss spirituality, health and feeling
good. Tune in and tap into good vibrations that help you remember why you're here: to have fun!
News 101 FRI 5pm
Vancouver's only live, volunteer-produced, student and community newscast. Every week, we take a look back at the week's local, national and international news, as seen from a fully independent media perspective.
Queer FM Vancouver: Reloaded TUE 8am
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transexual communities of Vancouver. Lots of human interest features, background
on current issues and great music.queerfmradio@gmail.com
Radio Free Thinker TUE 3pm
Promoting skepticism, critical thinking and science, we examine popular extraordinary claims and subject them to critical
analysis.
Terry Project Podcast WED 11:30am
There once was a project named Terry, That wanted to make
people wary, Of things going on In the world that are wrong
without making it all seem too scary.
All Ears Alternating Wednesdays 1pm
(Alternating with UBC Arts On Air.) All Ears is an advice radio program targetted to the UBC community. We try to answer your
questions and address topics sent via social media and over the
phone. Interviews and segments relating to campus life will be
featured, all in our attempt to better our community and supply positive feedback.
Extraenvironmentalist WED 2pm
Exploring the mindset of an outsider looking in on Earth.
Featuring interviews with leading thinkers in the area of sustainable economics and our global ecological crisis.
Arts Report WED 5pm
Reviews, interviews and coverage of local arts (film, theatre,
dance, visual and performance art, comedy, and more) by host
Jake Costello and the Arts Reporters.
UBC Arts On Air Alternating Wednesdays 6pm
Ira Nadel, UBC English, offers scintillating profiles and unusual interviews with members of UBC Arts world. Tune in for programs,
people and personalities in Art
Sexy In Van City WED 10pm
Your weekly dose of education and entertainment in the realm
of relationships and sexuality, sexyinvancity.com/category/
sexy-in-vancity-radio.
The Social Focus Alternating Thursdays 6pm
An interview-based show about how students, past and present, have come up with creative ways to overcome social challenges in the community. Each episode will invite individuals
to share their stories of success and failure, along with actionable advice on how to start an innovative initiative that serves
the community. Hear from UBC students, alumni and others involved in the community!
The Matt & Ryan Show Alternating Thursdays 7:30pm
the Matt and Ryan show featuring Ryan and Matt. An hour and
a half of pure fun and good music. Matt and Ryan take calls,
give advice, and generally tell you what's up. The phone lines
are open.
Language to Language MON 11am
Encouraging language fluency and cultural awareness. Crimes & Treasons TUE 9pm
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill ish. Hosted by
Jamal Steeles, Trinidad Jules & DJ Relly Rels.
Website: http://crimesandtreasons.blogspot.ca.
Email: dj@crimesandtreasons.com.
White Noise SAT 8pm
Need some comic relief? Join Richard Blackmore for half an
hour of weird and wonderful radio every week, as he delves in
to the most eccentric corners of radio for your listening pleasure. Then stay tuned for the after show featuring a Q and A
with the creator, actors and a guest comic every week, whiten-
oiseUBC@gmail.com Vibes & Stuff TUE 4pm
 ^ _ „        Feeling nostalgic? Vibes and Stuff has you covered bringing
you some of the best 90s to early 2000s hip-hop artist all in
 ■■        one segment. All the way from New Jersey and New York City,
The Rockers Show SUN 12pm       DJ Bmatt and DJ Jewels will be bringing the east coast to the
Reggae inna all styles and fashion. west coast throughout the show. We will have you reminiscing
         about the good ol' times with Vibes and Stuff every Wednesday
R( ES afternoon from 1:00pm-2:00pm PST.
E-mail: vibesandstuffhiphop@gmail.com
Blood On The Saddle Alternating Sundays 3pm
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-boots country. New Era Alternating Thursdays 7:30pm
Showcases up and coming artists who are considered "under-
Pacific Pickin' TUE 6am       dogs" in the music industry. The show will provide a platform
Bluegrass, old-time music, and its derivatives with Arthur and       for new artists who are looking to get radio play.
the lovely Andrea Berman. Email: pacificpickin@yahoo.com Hip-Hop music from all over the world along with features of
  multi-genre artists.
Folk Oasis WED 8pm —	
Two hours of eclectic folk/roots music, with a big emphasis on
our local scene. C'mon in! A kumbaya-free zone since 1997.	
Email: folkoasis@gmail.com More Than Human SUN 7pm
Strange and wonderful electronic sounds from the past, present,
and future with host Gareth Moses. Music from parallel worlds.
The Saturday Edge SAT 8am
A personal guide to world and roots music—with African, Latin,
and European music in the first half, followed by Celtic, blues,
songwriters, Cajun, and whatever else fits! Email: steveedge3@
mac.com.
Code Blue SAT 3pm
From backwoods delta low-down slide to urban harp honks,
blues, and blues roots with your hosts Jim, Andy, and Paul.
Email: codeblue@paulnorton.ca
SOUL / H&B
Soulship Enterprise SAT 7pm
A thematically oriented blend of classic funk, soul, r&b, jazz, and
afrobeat tunes, The Happy Hour has received great renown as
the world's foremost funky, jazzy, soulful, and delightfully awkward radio show hosted by people named Robert Gorwa and/
or Christopher Mylett Gordon Patrick Hunter III.
African Rhyhms
Website: www.africanrhythmsradio.com
FRI 7:30pm
Pop Drones WED 10am
Unearthing the depths of contemporary cassette and vinyl underground. Ranging from DIY bedroom pop and garage rock all
the way to harsh noise and, of course, drone.
Kew It Up WED 3pm
Abrasive fight-or-flight music played at hot loud volumes, uncooperative songs for things that are not alright. Punk, Noise-Rock,
Post-Punk, Experimental, Industrial, Noisy, ad nauseum
La Fiesta Alternating Sundays 3pm
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue, Latin House, and Reggaeton with your
host Gspot DJ.
The Leo Ramirez Show MON 5pm
The best of mix of Latin American music. Email: leoramirez@can-
ada.com
-       'WiAH
Nod on the List TUE 11pm
"Nod on the List is a program featuring new urban and alternative music, sounds of beats, hip hop, dancehail, bass, interviews, guest hosts and more every Tuesday at 11 pm.
scads_internationakS)yahoo.com
facebook-So Salacious"
Shookshookta SUN 10am
A program targeted to Ethiopian people that encourages education and personal development.
Asian Wave WED 4pm
Tune in to Asian Wave 101 to listen to some of the best music from the Chinese language and Korean music industries, as well.the latest news coming from the two entertainment powerhouses of the Asian pop scene. The latest hits from established
artists, rookies only just debuted, independent artists and classic
songs from both industries, can all be heard on Asian Wave 101,
as well as commentary, talk and artist spotlights of unsigned
Canadian talent. Only on CiTR 101.9 FM.
RUSSIAN
NashaVolna SAT 6pm
News, arts, entertainment and music for the Russian community,
local and abroad. Website: nashavolna.ca.
Rhythmsindia
Alternating Sundays 8pm
Featuring a wide range of music from India, including popular music from
the 1930s to the present; Ghazals and Bhajans, Qawwalis, pop
and regional language numbers.
pi. =..i,\
Simorgh THU 5pm
Simorgh Radio is devoted to the education and literacy for the
Persian speaking communities and those interested in connecting to Persian oral and written literature. Simorgh takes you
through a journey of ecological sustainability evolving within
cultural and social literacy. Simorgh the mythological multiplicity of tale-figures, lands-in as your mythological narrator in the
storyland; the contingent space of beings, connecting Persian
peoples within and to Indigenous peoples.
SACRED
Mantra SAT 5pm
An electic mix of electronic and acoustic beats and layers, chants
and medicine song. Exploring the diversity of the worlds sacred
sounds - traditional, contemporary and futuristic. Email: man-
traradioshow@gmail.com
DANCE / ELECTRONIC
Copy/Paste THU 11pm
If it makes you move your feet (or nod your head), it'll be heard
on copy/paste. Tune in every week for a full hour DJ mix by
Autonomy, running the gamut from cloud rap to new jack
techno and everything in between.
Techno Progressivo Alternating Sundays 8pm
A mix of the latest house music, tech-house, prog-house and
techno.
Trancendance SUN 10pm
Hosted by DJ Smiley Mike and DJ Caddyshack, Trancendance
has been broadcasting from Vancouver, B.C. since 2001. We favour Psytrance, Hard Trance and Epic Trance, but also play Acid
Trance, Deep Trance, Hard Dance and even some Breakbeat.
We also love a good Classic Trance Anthem, especially if it's
remixed. Current influences include Sander van Doom, Gareth
Emery, Nick Sentience, Ovnimoon, Ace Ventura, Save the Robot,
Liquid Soul and Astrix. Older influences include Union Jack, Carl
Cox, Christopher Lawrence, Whoop! Records, Tidy Trax, Platipus
Records and Nukleuz. Email: djsmileymike @trancendance.net.
Website: www.trancendance.net.
Inside Out
TUE8pm
Radio Zero FRI 2pm
An international mix of super-fresh weekend party jams from
New Wave to foreign electro, baile, Bollywood, and whatever
else.
Website: www.radiozero.com[
Synaptic Sandwich SAT 9pm
If you like everything from electro/techno/trance/8-bit music/
retro '80s, this is the show for you! Website: synapticsandwich.
net
The Late Night Show . FRI 1230am
The Late Night Show features music from the underground
Jungle and Drum & Bass scene, which progresses to Industrial,
Noise and Alternative No Beat into the early morning. Following
the music, we then play TZM broadcasts, beginning at 6 a.m.
Inner Space Alternating Wednesdays 6:30pm
Dedicated to underground electronic music, both experimental
and dance-oriented. Live DJ sets and guests throughout.
Bootlegs & B-Sides SUN 9pm
Hosted by Doe Ran, tune in for the finest remixes from soul to
dubstep and ghetto funk to electro swing. Nominated finalist
for 'Canadian college radio show of the year 2012' Pioneer DJ
Stylus Awards. Soundcloud.com/doe-ran and search "Doe-Ran"
on Facebook.
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Canada Post-Rock FR110pm
Formerly on CKXU, Canada-Post Rock now resides on the west
coast but it's still committed to the best in post-rock, drone,
ambient, experimental, noise and basically anything your host
Pbone can put the word "post" infront of.
Crescendo SUN 6pm
Starting with some serene chill tracks at the beginning and
building to the INSANEST FACE MELTERS OF ALL TIMEEE,
Crescendo will take you on a musical magic carpet ride that
you couldn't imagine in your wildest dreams. Besides overselling his show, Jed will play an eclectic set list that builds throughout the hour and features both old classics, and all the greatest
new tracks that the hipsters think they know about before anyone else does.
Dave Radio with Radio Dave , FRI 12pm
Your noon-hour guide to what's happening in Music and Theatre
in Vancouver. Lots of tunes and talk. Discorder Radio TUE 5pm
Discorder Magazine now has its own radio show! Join us to hear
excerpts of interviews, reviews and more!
Duncan's Donuts THU 12pm
Sweet treats from the pop underground. Hosted by Duncan,
sponsored by donuts. http://duncansdonuts.wordpress.com.
Spice of Life THU 2pm
The spice extends life. The spice expands consciousness. The
Spice of Life brings you a variety of Post-Rock, Shoegaze, Math
Rock and anything that else that progresses. Join host Ben Life
as he meanders whimsically through whatever comes to mind
on the walk to CITR.
Samsquantch's Hideaway Alternating Wednesdays 6:30pm
All-Canadian music with a focus on indie-rock/pop.
Email: anitabinder@hotmail.com.
Parts Unknown MON 1pm
An indie pop show since 1999, it's like a marshmallow sandwich:
soft and sweet and best enjoyed when poked with a stick and
held close to a fire.
The Cat's Pajams FRI 11am
The cat's pajamas: a phrase to describe something/someone super awesome or cool. The Cat's Pajams: a super awesome and
cool radio show featuring the latest and greatest indie pop, rock,
lofi and more from Vancouver and beyond!
The Burrow MON 3pm
Noise Rock, Alternative, Post-Rock, with a nice blend of old
'classics' and newer releases. Interviews and live performances
The Permanent Rain Radio Alternating Thursdays 1 pm
Music-based, pop culture-spanning program with a focus on
the local scene. Join co-hosts Chloe and Natalie for an hour of
lighthearted twin talk and rad tunes from a variety of artists
who have been featured on our website. What website? theper-
manentrainpress.com
mind. AND, it beats subway.
- !», fel ^ $ '"r
Transition State THU 11am
High quality music with a special guest interview from the
Pharmaceutical Sciences. Frank discussions and music that
can save the world
Shine On TUE 1pm
An eclectic mix of the latest, greatest tunes from the Vancouver
underground and beyond, connected through a different theme
each week. Join your host Shea every Tuesday for a groovy musical experience!
Soul Sandwich THU 4pm
A myriad of your favourite music tastes all cooked into one show.
From Hip Hop to Indie rock to African jams, Ola will play through
a whirlwind of different genres, each sandwiched between another. This perfect layering of yummy goodness will blow your
The Shakespeare Show WED 12pm
Dan Shakespeare is here with music for your ear. Kick back with
gems of the previous years.
Up on the Roof FRI 9am
Friday Mornings got you down? Climb Up On the Roof and wake
up with Robin and Jake! Weekly segments include improvised
crime-noir radio dramas, trivia contents, on-air calls to Jake's
older brother and MORE! We'll be spinning old classics, new favourites, and lots of ultra-fresh local bands!
Breakfast With The Browns MON 8am
Your favourite Brownsters, James and Peter, offer a savoury
blend of the familiar and exotic in a blend of aural delights.
Email: breakfastwiththebrowns@hotmail.com.
Chthonic Boom! SUN 5pm
A show dedicated to playing psychedelic music from parts of the
spectrum (rock, pop, electronic) as well as garage and noise rock.
The Morning After Show TUE 11:30am
The Morning After Show with Oswaldo Perez every Tuesday at
11:30a.m. Playing your favourite songs for 13 years. The morning after what? The morning after whatever you did last night.
Eclectic show with live music, local talent and music you won't
hear anywhere else.
Hans Von Kloss' Misery Hour
Pretty much the best thing on radio.
WED 11pm
Suburban Jungle WED 8am
Live from the Jungle Room, join radio host Jack Velvet for an
eclectic mix of music, sound bites, information and inanity.
Email: dj@jackvelvet.net.
Are You Aware Alternating Thursdays 6pm
Celebrating the message behind the music: Profiling music and
musicians that take the route of positive action over apathy.
Peanut Butter'n'jams Alternating Thursdays 6:30pm
Explore local music and food with your hosts, Brenda and Jordie.
You'll hear interviews and reviews on eats and tunes from your
neighbourhood, and a weekly pairing for your date calendar.
Live From Thunderbird Radio Hell THU 9pm
Featuring live band(s) every week performing in the CiTR Lounge.
Most are from Vancouver, but sometimes bands from across the
country and around the world.
Aural Tentacles THU 12am
It could be global, trance, spoken word, rock, the unusual and
the weird, or it could be something different. Hosted by DJ
Pierre.
Email: auraltentacles@hotmail.com
FemConcept FRI 1pm
Entirely Femcon music as well as spoken word content relevant
to women's issues (interviews with campus groups such as the Women's Center, SASC, etc.). Musical genres include indie-rock,
electronic, punk, with an emphasis on local and Canadian Artists.
Nardwuar FRI 3:30pm
Join Nardwuar the Human Serviette for Clam Chowder flavoured
entertainment. Doot doola doot doo...doot doo! Email: nard-
wuar@nardwuar.com
The Medicine Show FR111 PM
"A variety show, featuring musicians, poets and entertainment industry guests whose material is considered to be therapeutic. We encourage and promote independent original, local live music and art.
Randophonic SAT 11pm
Randophonic is best thought of as an intraversal jukebox which
has no concept of genre, style, political boundaries, or even
space-time relevance. But it does know good sounds from bad.
Lately, the program has been focused on Philip Random's All
Vinyl Countdown + Apocalypse (the 1,111 greatest records you
probably haven't heard). And we're not afraid of noise.
Stranded FRI 6pm
Join your host Matthew for a weekly mix of exciting sounds, past
and present, from his Australian homeland. And journey with
him as he features fresh tunes and explores the alternative musical heritage of Canada.
The Vampire's Ball WED 1am
Eclectic audio alchemy; the soundtrack for your transmutation.
Rock, weird stuff, dark stuff, and whatever's banging around in
the mind of maQLu this week, thevampiresball@gmail.com the-
vampiresballoncitr.com
WizeMen MON 6pm
Join your hosts Dan and Austin for an exuberant adventure filled
with drama, suspense, action, romance and most importantly
wisdom. Our musical tastes span across genres and each week
there is a new theme!
G4E Alternating Tuesdays 12-2am
Vinyl mixes, exclusive local tunes, good vibes from around the
world, a thought and a dream or two. Reggae, House, Techno,
Ambient, Dance Hall, Hip Hop, African, Psychedelic, Noise,
Experimental, Eclectic.
CIA
if
Student Special Hour
Students play music.
TUES2pm
BVP Radio Alternating Wednesdays 1 pm
BVPradio is Blank Vinyl Project's radio show companion on CiTR.
It features musicians from UBC and its surrounding community.
Interviews, performances live on air, and advice to developing
bands.
A Face for Radio . THU 10am
A show about music with interludes about nothing. From Punk
to Indie Rock and beyond.
Exploding Head Movies MON 7pm
Join gak as he explores music from the movies, tunes from television and any other cinematic source, along with atmospheric
pieces, cutting edge new tracks and strange old goodies that
could be used in a soundtrack to be.
JAZZ
The Jazz Show MON 9pm
Vancouver's longest running prime-time Jazz program. Hosted
by Gavin Walker. Features begin after the theme and spoken
intro at 9pm. March 2: A special Jazz Feature on the music of
Miles Davis from all eras for the special Fundrive Edition of The
Jazz Show.
March 9: Tonight we celebrate the 85th Birthday of
innovator and Jazz revolutionary, alto saxophonist/composer
Ornette Coleman. "The Ornette Coleman Trio at The Golden
Circle".
March 16: The late "poet of the piano"Tommy Flanagan
would have been 85 today so we celebrate his anniversary with
an amazing trio date called "The Tommy Flanagan Trio Overseas"
with bassist Wilbur Little and the dynamic Elvin Jones on drums.
March 23: "Johnny Griffin's Studio Jazz Party". One of the
bosses of Modern Jazz tenor saxophone, Mr. Griffin hosts a Jazz
party with a fine quintet blowin' up a storm!
March 30: One of the finest organizations to ever grace
the stage of the now closed Cory Weeds' Cellar Jazz Club was
drummer Louis Hayes'"Cannonball Adderley Legacy Band". With
Mr. Hayes: alto saxophone master Vincent Herring and power
trumpeter Jeremy Pelt. A major tribute!
Little Bit of Soul MON 4pm
Little Bit of Soul plays, primarily, old recordings of jazz, swing,
big band, blues, oldies and motown.
DRAMA/POETRY
Skald's Hall FRI 9pm
Skald's Hall entertains with the spoken word via story
readings, poetry recitals, and drama. Established
and upcoming artists join host Brian MacDonald.
Interested in performing on air? Contact us on Twitter:
@Skalds_Hall.
SPORTS
Thunderbird Eye THU 3:30pm
Your weekly roundup of UBC Thunderbird sports action from on
campus and off with your host Wilson Wong.
;--:x
Rocket from Russia TUES 10:30am
Hello hello hello! I interview bands and play new, international
and local punk rock music. Great Success! P.S. Broadcasted in
brokenish English. Hosted by Russian Tim. Website: http:// rocketfromrussia.tumblr.com. Email: rocketfrom russiacitr@
gmail.com. Facebook: https://www.facebook.comRocketFrom-
Russia. Twitter: http://twitter.com/tima_tzar.
Generation Annihilation SAT 12pm
On the air since 2002, playing old and new punk on the noncommercial side of the spectrum. Hosts: Aaron Brown, Jeff "The
Foat" Kraft. Website: generationannihilation.com. Facebook:
facebook.com/generationannihilation..
Power Chord SAT 1pm
Vancouver's longest running metal show. If you're into music
that's on the heavier/darker side of the spectrum, then you'll like
it. Sonic assault provided by Geoff, Marcia, and Andy.
Flex Your Head TUE 6pm
Punk rock and hardcore since 1989. Bands and guests from
around the world.
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The Absolute Value of Insomnia SAT 2am
Four solid hours of fresh generative music c/o the Absolute Value
of Noise and its world famous Generator. Ideal for enhancing
your dreams or, if sleep is not on your agenda, your reveries.
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