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  JNOTICE   OF   INTENT   TO   DIGITIZE)
[back   ISSUES    OF   DISCORDER  MAGAZINE
He are so excited that Digital Initiatives
is going to help us release every issue of
Discorder onlinet
With the help of UBC Digital Initiatives,
CiTR is planning to scan back issues of
Discorder  Magazine and make them available
online. CiTR has never had formal copyright
agreements with its contributors, and all
content has been produced by volunteers and
disseminated for free to eager audiences.
Likewise, CiTR does not have express
permission from Discorder  contributors to
publish the magazine electronically and make
it available to eager readers online. When
Discorder  began, the founders had no idea
we'd be published on the Internet—sorry Mike
and Jennifer—and it would be impossible for
CiTR to identify all of the contributors
and obtain permission to republish their
work electronically. Who knows where all you
creative people are and what cool things you
are doing.
Therefore, CiTR is shouting out to our
alumni and asking any authors, illustrators,
and designers who object to let us know
as soon as possible. Please contact me at
stationmanager<*citr.ca if you have any
questions or concerns, or don't want your
contribution published online. If we do
not receive objections, we will assume that
permission has been granted. If objections
are made, we will omit these issues from the
archive. However, we hope you see the value
in releasing this content to the public.
Please share this notice with your peers
and fellow alumni I We will begin scanning
shortly and need to spread the news far
and wide.
Discorder  provides an incredible history
of Vancouver'3 local music scene, and we're
very excited to share this with our readers.
Sincerely,
Brenda Grunau
CiTR Station Manager and Publisher of
Discorder  Magazine
statiomnanagerScitr.ca
UPCOMING SHOWS
H
H
rnj
m
RiCKSWAW
ooooooo
254 East Hastings Street
604.681.8915
KARMA TO BURN
SIERRA, MENDOZZA, 88 MILE TRIP, CRATERS
HELLCHAMBER
CITY OF FIRE, LA CHINGA, THE THICK OF IT
IS THIS A JOKE? COMEDY SHOWCASE ron funches.
BENT MORIN, RICK GLASSMAN, DINO ARCHIE
ARIEL PINK
JACK NAME
PIRATEFEST 2015 alestorm,swashbuckle,
THE DREAD CREW OF 0DDW00D, CRACKWHORE
CRYSTAL PISTOL nim vind, danger thrill
SHOW, BLOODY BETTY, STARBOYS, & MORE
NAPALM DEATH &V0IV0D exhumed, iron
REAGAN, BLACK CROWN INITIATE, & MORE
Additional show listings, ticket sale info, videos and more:
WWW.RICKSHAWTHEATRE.COM
ST. PAUL & THE BROKEN BONES
SEAN ROWE
CRO-MAGS bishops green, power, vacant
STATE, ACQUITTED
ADHAM SHAIKH & DRUMSPYDER oj nils, lady
RA, THE SAMAR ORIENTAL DANCE ENSEMBLE
AN EVENING WITH
MACHINE HEAD
GUARDIANS OF THE MYSTICS
CATURDAY CREW
THE DUVETTES
SPECIAL GUESTS
ENSLAVED
YOB, ECSTATIC VISION
http://facebook.com/RickshawTheatre
t>J @rickshawtheatre [kSj] ©rickshawtheatre TABLE of CONTENTS
FEBRUARY
FREAK HEAT WAVES - PG.14 	
If Robocop, Stanley Kubrick, and an N64 video
game developer collaborated on a mixtape, it
would probably sound something like Freak Heat
Waves' new record, Bonnie's State Of Mind.
Originally from Victoria, the experimental trio
have created a dystopian soundtrack that you can
still get down to. We caught up with the band during their visit to the rainy city to discuss recording, composing, and "making it all up."
LOOKING BACK, MOVING FOWARD PG.20 	
February brings with it one of the most wonderful
times of the year: Fundrive! Whether you're wondering what "Fundrive" is or you're a seasoned
Fundrive pro, this feature will provide all of the
information you need to get excited about CiTR
and Discorder's annual fundraiser.
NEU BALANCE - PG.24 ———--——
From the depths ofVancouver's DIY dance music
scene, Neu Balance debut their new exploratory
album, Rubber Sole. Discorder speaks with Sam
Beatch and Sebastian Davidson about provoking
thought, collaging sound's, and what it means to
have a "Rubber Sole."
DID YOU DIE - PG.44	
From the minds behind shoegaze darlings Fantasy
Prom, this seasoned Vancouver three-piece hit the
ground running in September, releasing a single a
month leading up to their debut EP, Careless, is
January. The band hope to carry their simplistic,
honest approach to musk into their next venture: a
full-length album.
BRASS-PG.60 	
"It was weird. It wasn't the crowd we're used to,
y'know? They didn't throw beer cans." Music
Waste 2014 marked the beginning of a new chapter for local punks BRASS, as Discorder learns
about how the band nearly broke up, their debut
album, and Devon Motz's favourite guitar smash.
MEMORIAL I PLAYED WIMPY'S BASS - PG.6
DISCORDER REVISITED DEREK'S BOHEMIAN
RHYTHM SECTION - PG.10
VENEWS THE LIDO - PG.28
REAL LIVE ACTION - PG.31
CALENDAR - PG.36
ART PROJECT NATASHA BROAD - PG.40
UNDER REVIEW - PG.50
NO FUN FICTION THE SUNNY UNSEEN
PG.55
CITR PROGRAM GUIDE - PG.66
ADVERTISE: Ad space for upcoming issues
can be booked by catling (604) 822-3017
ext. 3 or emailing advertising@citr.ca. Rates
available upon request.
CONTRIBUTE: To submot,words to
Discorder, please contact: editor.discorder@
citr.ca. To submit images, contact:
artdirector.discorder@citr.ca
SUBSCRIBE: Send in a cheque for $20 to
#233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T
1 Zl with your address, and we will mail each
issue of Discorder right to your doorstep
for a year.
DISTRIBUTE: Tq distribute Discorder in your
business, email distro.discorder@citr.ca We
are always looking for new friends.
DONATE: We are part of CiTR, a registered
non-profit, and accept donations so we'eari
provide you witltfhe content you tove. To
donate visit www.citr.ca/donate. -
Writers: Alex de Boer,
Manoukian; Mark
Konstantin Prodanovic,
Under Review Ed itor
Garth Covernton, Barnaby
CiTR Station Manager
Victoria'Canning,
Paul Hus, Yasmine
Alison Sadler, Nolen Sage,
Alex de Boer
Sprague
Brenda Grunau
Esmee Colboume,
Shemesh, Adam Smylie,
Karl Ventura, Jon Vincent,
Real Live Action Editor:
Calendar Listings:'
Publisher Student Radio
Garth Covernton, Fraser
Hannah Thomson, Sam
Ming Wong
Robert Catherall
Sarah Cordingley
Society of UBC
Dobbs, Najma Eno,
Tudor, Chris Yee, Eleanor
Cover Photography by
Ad Coordinator
Accounts Manager
/
Joshua Gabert-Doyon,
Sam Hawkins, Jonathon
Wearing, Jasper Wrinch.
Photographers &
HlustratorsrTara Bigdeli,
Nolen Sage
TBD
Eleanor Wearing
Hernandez, Natalie Hoy,
Editor. Jacey Gibb
Copy Editors: Robert
Student Liason: Joshua
Erin Jardine, Emma
Marissa Hooi, Alisa
Art Director Ricky
Catherall, Alex de Boer
Gabert-Doyon
Kansiz, Jonathan Kew,
Lazear, Rachel Lin, Dana
Castanedo-Laredo
Proofreaders: Alex de
Web Editor: Avery Rawden
Erica Leiren, Christopher
Kearley, Kim Pringle,
lfl*$
Boer, Robert Catherall,
Lennox-Aasen, Jacky
EDITORIAL CUTOFF; January 27,2014
©Discorder 2014 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. AH rights reserved. Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published almost
monthly by CiTR, which can be heard at 101.9 FM, online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw fn White
Rock. Call the CITR DJ line at (604) 822-2487, CiTR's office at (604) 822-3017, email CiTR at stationmanager@citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write #233-6138
SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T1Z1, Canada. EDITOR'S NOTE
CITRS JUST WANT TO HAVE FUNDRIVE
Illustrations by Alisa Lazear
Fundrive: it's a theme that runs heavily
throughout our first issue of 2015 and one
you're hopefully already familiar with. Every
year, CiTR — and through direct association,
Discorder — has a large-scale fundraiser
for the station and magazine. Even though
the majority of people involved with both
CiTR and Discorder are volunteers, there are
still a lot of costs that go with managing the
two: day-to-day operating costs, buying and
maintaining equipment for the station, actually printing this magazine, and so on. At the
end of the day, media can be an expensive
endeavour and the student fee collected by
CiTR only goes so far.
Most years Fundrive has a tangible goal for
everyone to work towards, with past objectives including purchasing new soundboards
for our on-air studios and helping cover the
cost of our big move into the SUB later this
year, which leads me into the theme for 2015:
"Let's get digital." I won't go too heavily
into the details of this upcoming Fundrive —
CiTR's current student executive president
Eleanor Wearing's already done a great job
of that on page 20 — so instead I'll turn to an
anecdote-based approach.
On the Sunday of every production weekend, the staff and volunteers of Discorder
converge in the lounge at CiTR to proof our
upcoming issue and eat copious amounts of
pesto hummus. It's a nice chance for everyone to catch up on the month that was, but
it's also the root behind a memory that I think
perfectly encapsulates the importance of
Fundrive and CiTR.
After one of our proofing parties last year,
a man came into the station with his teenage daughter and asked me if he could look
around; he'd been a DJ at CiTR years ago
and happened to be on campus that day, so he
wanted to show his daughter the place where
EDITOR'S NOTE he'd spent so much of his time during university.
As someone with weekly office hours at
CiTR, I admittedly don't pay much attention
to my surroundings anymore, but the way
this guy saw the station still resonates with
me. From the faded comic strips that line
the station hallway to the perpetually messy
listening lounge, it was like he was looking at an old friend he hadn't seen in years.
We eventually came to the station's record
library, a small enclosed area with shelves
upon shelves of physical records, and he
grabbed an older one to show me litde notes
scrawled on the back.
"DJs would leave comments for each other
on the album covers," he said, "things like
'Don't play track seven. People always play
track number seven and it sucks.' or 'Number three is the only decent song on the album.' Sometimes there would even be people
arguing via the comments." It's the kind of
history you take for granted, considering if I
want to hear a hundred different opinions on
a new release, all I have to do is do a quick
Google search.
It was a scene straight out of a coming-of-
age drama, when the two of them started to
leave and I heard the father say to his daughter, "And that's why you're going to UBC."
I'd be hesitant to say adoration for CiTR and
Discorder is hereditary, but it definitely has a
way of permeating generations.
So it goes,
Jacey Gibb
EDITOR'S NOTE IN MEMORIAM
I PLAYED WIMPY'S BASS!
by Erica Leiren II Photo courtesy ofBev Davies
<\<M
K.l.r
ft-
CO
iC*
OYGO
014
MPY
The Subhumans weH p of us. The one-two knockout^BRch °£ me*r I3P%
incisive anthems "
and "FuckYou" oil their 1979 12-inch are unmatched for punk asperity   - plus a great
sense of humour.
"IfiuliVi
>urself. So%hen Wmtpf' leapt on stage and handed me his bass, I was blown
away.
It was a benefit gig in the mid '80s, at the Ukrainian Hall and my band, The DUet-
tantes|?was playing before the heavy hitters came on. Brian was in DOA then. I was a
* real tyro, just learning the bass, and suddenly a string broke. Potential disaster.
' .4
Before I could even think twice, like some superhero, in one deft antt graceful motion, tip leapt Wimpy to my rescue. He handed me his bass and 1 was off to the races
again^ with barely a|jfeak. I finished the set playing Wimpy's bass. I've never forgotten this kind, instinctive act of a true gentleman. Thanks again, Wimpy. We're sure
gonna miss vou. STRICTLY THE BEST
JINGLES OF JANUARY 2015
ARTJST
1      Loscil**
ALBUM
Sea Island
LABEL
Kranky
2     Animal Bodies *+        The Killing Scene        Hard Beat
3    Energy Slime *+
Love Cuts *+ /
Burnt Palms
5 Rec Centre**
6 Moss Lime *
7 Ariel Pink
OK Vancouver
New Dimensional       Mint
Split Tape
Monster of the
Week
July First
Lost Sound Tapes
Self-Released
Fixture
pom pom 4AD
8
OK-
Influences
Kingfisher Bluez
9    Lien- Consent That's Cool
10   Frazey Ford *+
Indian Ocean
11   Ace Martens *+ Silent Days
Johnny de Courcy
12
13 Defektors**
14 Slim Twig*
15 Various *+
16 Babe Rainbow*
117 Century Palm*
illlllit§£fi
18 Poor Form *+
19 tfmmlbm**
20 Peaking Lights
ill Young Braised**
22 Spoon River *+
Nicholas Krgovich
24 NeuBalance**
25 Zola Jesus
Alien Lake
Black Dreams
A Hound At The
Hem
MM Records Presents:
Hot Heroes
Music for 1 Piano, 2
Pianos, & More Pianos
Century Palm
Demo
Nettwerk
Self-Released
Neptoon
Shake!
Paper Bag
Mint
1080p
Mammoth Cave
Self-Released
A Dada Plan Is Free    Self-Released
Cosmic Logic
Northern
Reflections
The New Sun
Ahhhhh Hotel
On^ffltset
Rubber Sole
Taiga
Domino
1080p
Tonic
i||i|iRased
1080p
Mute
ARTIST
26 High Ends**
27 Gazelle Twin
28 Secret Pyramid*
ALBUM
Super Class
Unflesh
The Silent March/
Movements of Night
LABEL
Dine Alone
Last Gang
Students of Decay
29   Ian William Craig**     A Tom of Breath        Recital
They Promised You
30  Amelia Curran*
North Atlantic
Mercy
My Father Was A
Explorers** Sailor
32   Skinny Kids *+ Strangers
33   Flying Lotus
The Vicious
Cycles**
35   Leah Barley *
You're Dead!
Bad News Travels
Fast
Six Shooter
Anniedale
Kingfisher Bluez
Warp
Teenage Rampage
Close Your Eyes        Self-Released
36 Shooting Guns *        Wolfcop: OST
37 John Orpheus •
John Orpheus Is
Dead
il^PliBarr Brothers *     Sleeping Operator
Syro
39 Aphex Twin
40 Various*
41 Underpass **
42 Fashionism *+
_ The Cyrillic
Typewriter *+
44 Art Bergmann *
45 The Vaselines
Misery Loves Co. Complete
Oncography Vol. 2
Assimilation
Smash the State
(With Your Face)
Best Suit
Songs For the
Underclass
V for Vaselines
46  The Courtneys *+       Mars Attacks
47   Fanny Bloom * Pan
Sundowning Sound
Recordings
BruzenVIGada
Secret City
Warp
Misery Loves Co.
Desire
Hosehead
Jaz
Weewerk
Rosary
Hockey Dad
Grosse Boite
'48  Oh Susanna ** Namedropper Sonic Unyon
49   Dean DrouiHard *        UFO Houses
50  Earth Girls
Wrong Side of
History EP
Backward Music
Grave Mistake
CiTR's charts reflect what*s been played on the air by CiTR's lovely DJs last month. Records with asterisks (*) are Canadian and those marked {*) are local. Most of these excellent albums can be
found at fine independent music stores across Vancouver. If you can't find them, give CiTR's music coordinator a shout at (604) 822-8733. Her name is Sarah Cordi ngley. If you ask nicely she'll
tell you how to find them. Check out other great campus/community radio charts at www.earshot-online.com.
CHARTS CiTR 101.9 FM
FUNDRIVE
FEBRUARY 26 - MARCH 6
•2015-
Let's get digital
CALL TO DONATE
604-UBC-UNIT
604-822-8648
FUNDRIVE FINALE
MARCH 6
AT PAT'S PUB
CITR.CA/FUNDRIVE CiTR 101.9 FM
FUNDRIVE
FEBRUARY 26 - MARCH 6
> 2 0 1 5 •
I WANT TO DONATE TO
DISCORDER!
Let's get diqital
JD#30  Q$60  C$101.5HO $150  O$250  O$500  O$1000
GOTHER
NAME OlsrOARD
CARD NUMBER
EXPIflY
SIGNATURE
OI would like to ree^ye CiTR swag + partial tax receipt.
OI would like to receive a tax receipt foRjjpy donation.
J^jr^i^jll be recognizing donors on our website, in our annual
report and in Discorder magazine. I would like my name to
appejfpn donor lists as:
please       ^Pp&£Nidio c/o UBC Annual Giving,
donatons to: 500-5950 University Blv^pancouver, BC, V6T 1Z3
People who choose swag will receive a partial tax receipt; tax receipts will arrive within
four weeks. The information on this form is collected by the University of British Columbia to process your gift, maintain contact and keep you up-to-date with University
information and events. The University abides by the BC Freedom of Information
and Protection of Privacy Act. Charitable Business Number: 108161779 RR0001.
Internal use only Receipt(A242)	
Non-gift Receipt(A245)	
_CD_ DISCORDER REVISITED
DEREK'S BOHEMIAN RHYTHM SECTION
by Erica Leiren II Photos courtesy of Neil Lucente
It is a truth universally acknowledged that
a rock 'n' roll band in possession of a charismatic singer, a smokin' guitar player, and a
cute bassist must be in want of a drummer.
"My dear Mr. Bailey," said our guitarist
over the phone one day, "have you heard of
The Hip Type?"
We discovered later that Derek Bailey was
a nice guy and a real chick magnet. Tryouts
for our new drummer were being held at our
practice space and by the time Derek showed
up, we'd already gone through a slew of duds.
Why we were looking for a drummer?
Scott, who'd been Hip Type's drummer since
before I joined in 1986, had a feel like no
other. But that didn't stop Tracy from kicking him out for missing too many practices.
Scott's girlfriend really monopolized his time
and the band came second. Tracy wrote the
lyrics for our single, "Glass Pussy," about
that particular girlfriend. Sadly, she died
from a heroin overdose a few years ago,
much too young, but she lives on in the song:
"You know she's not made of glass / There's
never been a girl like that / She can smile and
break your back / Glass Pussy, she's a girl
like that."
Together, the drums and bass are the
rhythm section of the band and you need
them working together to get the band to
rock. I like to play "in the pocket," which
means that the bass hits every time the drum's
bass kick pedal does, so that the bottom end
gets reinforced nice and tight. Done right, the
bass playing "in the pocket" with the drums
is the backbone of the songs. It frees up the
singer and guitarist to be as freewheeling as
they like because there is a solid foundation
behind them.
When Derek showed up for his try out, we
knew right away he was the right drummer
for us. He was a hard-hitter, seemed like a
good fit for our group, and seemed like an
overall nice guy. The fact that he was also
good-looking didn't hurt either. I mean, you
don't want to ah-ha it up too much, but being
easy on the eyes never harms a band's appeal.
(Think of all the times you've been to see a
band you like: the music had better be good,
and there needs to be at least one person in
the band who's nice on your eyes. More than
one is better. None sucks.)
As soon as Derek left, the three of us convened on the couches at the front of our practice space and agreed: we'd found our new
dnimmer, and it was going to be a lot of fun
playing together.
And it was. Derek hit hard and true and
although he didn't say much, he got along
well with the rest of the band. His good
looks went over well with our audience too.
He had a surfer physique, chiseled jaw, and
dirty blonde shoulder-length hair that mussed
perfectly. Rapt in concentration, seemingly
oblivious to his audience appeal, it only took
a few of our faster songs — and they were
pretty much all fast songs, except for our
opener "Faster Pussycat" and the love song
10
DISCORDER REVISITED  Klfl.bHUKt.Nav.-ligJl^Sl "Under You" — and Derek would strip off
his shirt. He'd finish the set bare-chested,
muscles rippling, much to the secret delight
of Tracy and me, along with our appreciative
audience members.
One time an enthusiastic young DJ and fan
of The Hip Type who we knew from CiTO
asked us if we'd like to headline a five-band
bill he was putting on at The Seymour Street
Arts Club. He even created a theme for the
pre-Christmas gig: "Amelia. Earhart's 50th
Annual Christmas Party" on December 20,
1987 at 7:36 p.m. precisely. The mastermind
of this affair was a friend of my sister's from
the Norm Shore's mod scene;-and the evening was planned not only to showcase some
of his favourite bands but also to launch his
own new band, The Evaporators.
The hilarious, dada-esque on-air and stage
name he used was Nardwuar the Human
Serviette. Nard's manic enthusiasm could at
times verge on annoying, at least to our lead
singer, Tracy, but when he asked The Hip
Type to headline his extravaganza, we were
happy to join in. It was an awesome night,
with the bands on the bill including The Wee
Beasties, King Martin K. & the Tribal Beats,
and The One-Eyed Jacks.
Derek was with us right to the end of The
Hip Type in 1988, when Tracy and Pat split
up and then so did the band. But before that
happened, we had many adventures together,
The Hip Type's swan song was our Honey-
Trap recording session, where we laid down
six songs along with the help of Dennett
Woodland at Grapevine Studios. We broke up
right after that and never released any of the
songs, even though we considered them to be
some of our best. One song, "Darker Than
This" was included on Grant McDonagh's
Zulu Records' excellent and definitive double
CD Last Call: Vancouver Independent Music
1977-1988. It can still be Jwind and is well-
worth looking for, both for the music and the
impressive liner notes.
Where are they today, these two spectacular odrummers I played with in The Hip Type?
Scott is playing in his new band Pill Squad
with Tracy. (Yes, they ended up happily together.) Pill Squad have a playful punk sensibility they gig regularly at LanaLou's and
other local venues. I'm not sure where Derek
is today, but with his talents I imagine he's
in charge of his own remote Gulf Island, living an idyll of bliss- surrounded by an adoring
crowd of lovelies. Wherever you are Derek,
you were one of the best to play with. The
last I heard from you was a posting on The
Hip Type website sometime ago where you
referred to me as The Hip Type's "hot" bass
player. I'd no idea! What a nice surprise and
a lovely compliment. So this is right back at
you.
13
DISCORDER REVISITED THE FUTURE THAT ALREADY HAPPPENED
by Sam Tudor II Illustrations by Karl Ventura II photography by Nolen Sage
The first time I listened to Freak Heat
Waves, I was on a mostly empty transit bus.
Desperately trying to shake my reputation as
a lover of docile songwriters who use forest
metaphors, I was listening closely for something I could understand in a record labeled
as a "strange and sexy look into an alien
nightclub." Post-punk had not been my forte
in the past, but I had a stubborn determination to understand it. About halfway through
the album, an interesting thing happened: a
female vocal jumped in, saying something
that sounded vaguely like "Cambie Street." It
took me a second to realize that it wasn't the
song, but the automated voice of the bus. For
a brief moment Freak Heat Waves and the BC
Transit robot were performing a duet.
The fact that I couldn't differentiate between the song and the vehicle I was in has
stuck with me.
It's easy to characterize Freak Heat Waves
as '70s influenced retro-futurism and be done
with it; but when the retro-futuristic sound
fits so seamlessly with the tangible world we
live in, it makes me wonder if Freak Heat
Waves is more grounded in reality than they
let on. This was the first point of conversation when we all met in a Kitsilano apartment
to talk about the band's new record, Bonnie's
State Of Mind.
Freak Heat Waves is loosely defined as
a trio. Consisting of guitarist/vocalist Steven Lind, drummer Thomas Di Ninno, and
bassist James Twiddy, it is a band with a
constantly shifting structure. Each member
is heavily involved in production, and each
member is prone to switch instruments and
do something different at any time. "We're
not really pinned down to our positions in the
band." says Di Ninno. "Actually, we talked
once about how amazing it would be to do a
whole record where we don't play anything.
Whatever it takes to get the sound we hear in
our heads, that's what we want to do."
14
FREAK HEAT WAVES  SHU
^
is
4*»*
.-3s
v**«
•w
^^
>»-
^      fet
m**& J£
-',>"*
f^i "ITS ALMOST LIKE A COMPILATION ALBUM. ITS VERY INSPIRED BY
MIXTAPES AND THE IDEA OF A MIXTAPE. WE DIDN'T JUST WANT TO
RECORD A LIVE SET AND HAVE ONE UNIFORM SOUND. EVERY SONG
CAN AND SHOULD BE A MIND WIPE OF THE LAST SONG."
i
In speaking to Freak Heat Waves it also
becomes evident that the experimental process is almost as important to them as the
final product itself. "We seem to really like
demos," laughs Di Ninno, referring to almost
a year's worth of test songs being altered,
scrapped, or just lost in the ether. "We spent
months sending different tracklists back and
forth. I think we had 36 pieces of music to
choose from when we started tracklisting."
Recording locations were equally as inconsistent. Although the band hails from Victoria, the record was done on Pender Island, in
Medicine Hat, in Montreal, and elsewhere.
There isn't a hometown for these songs —
this lack of unity is something intentional.
"It's almost like a compilation album,"
says Lind. "It's very inspired by mixtapes and
the idea of a mixtape. We didn't just want to
record a live set and have one uniform sound.
Every song can and should he a mind wipe of
the last song."
The band also credits their label, Vancouver's own Hockey Dad Records, with a flexibility and openness that you would never see
on something bigger and less directly connected to local music. "Ryan [of Hockey Dad
Records] was always supportive of anything
we wanted to do. He basically told us to bring
a record to him and he would make it happen."
Perhaps the best example of Freak Heat
Waves' decision-making process on Bonnie's
State Of Mind is the song "Dig A Hole." As
in most of the songs, Steven Lind's vocals
prove that "monotone" doesn't necessarily
mean "emotionless." Sometimes he sounds
like a sort of lethargic prophet telling people
off. Other times his voice takes on a sickly
nature, like someone speaking from a hospital bed. In "Dig A Hole" he sounds like some
sort of demented, all-seeing robot. If Freak
Heat Waves have created a dystopian sound-
scape, then lind is the Dalek bearing down
on you in a dimly lit hallway.
17
FREAK HEAT WAVES When Lind speaks about the track, he is
quick to establish the band's priorities: "It's a
scrappy song, and the guitar track at the end
was totally improvised, but in a way we want
it to feel like it could very easily go wrong at
any time. Like it's riding the rails a bit. It had
a really cool energy though, which is more
important than a perfectly recorded track."
Somewhere near the middle of the track,
in what could very loosely be defined as a
hook, Lind sings, "It's just a uniform / No
pride of industry / Guaranteed to make you
want money for your time." Here — and in
many of the other songs — there are hints of
an attack on the idea of financial security and
regular old class structure. But lind, Twiddy,
and Dininno are all quick to dispel any idea
of an exact meaning. 'There are aspects of
feeling exploited [in the song]," says Lind,
"but I'd rather paint a broad picture of the
world that is partly real and partly not. I like
when a line can stand on its own, regardless
of the other lines on the song. Less black and
white. There is an implied meaning to everything but you can't try and nail it down."
This ambiguity leads to interesting definitions of the Freak Heat Waves aesthetic. A
friend of mine called it "porno-pop-punk,"
while another compared the feel to older dystopian narratives, things like Orwell's 1984
or Paul Verhoeven's Robocop. And this, at
least, is no coincidence. When the films are
mentioned, all three band members begin to
speak enthusiastically.
"I think we all take a lot from old futuristic
movies like Robocop, Repo Man or Clockwork Orange? says Dininno. "All those
movies take place in a time that already past.
But they all predicted things that have a basis
in reality."
"The movie Possession was a big one for
us," adds Twiddy, "that was a film that definitely had some sort of bearance on the album."
But to say that Freak Heat Waves is all
about retro-futurism would be doing the band
a great injustice. They have an aesthetic, no
question, but they are adding something distinct to a well established genre. That's the
thing about Bonnie's State Of Mind. It reveals
some sort of meaning without actually defining it. In caring little about "truth," Freak
Heat Waves ends up being an uncommonly
truthful band. I'm still not sure if it's frightening or really cool. Probably both.
Freak Heat Waves new record, Bonnie's
State Of Mind, comes out on Hockey Dad
Records this February 3.
18
FREAK HEAT WAVES  FUNDRIVE
LOOKING BACK, MOVING FORWARD
by Eleanor Wearing II Illustrations by Ming Wong
Everyone has their own story of how their
relationship with CiTR or Discorder began.
My story starts in February of 2013, when I
signed up to volunteer for Funodrive, the annual week-long funodraiser where CiTR and
Discorder volunteers, programmers, and staff
come together to raise money for the station.
At this point, the organization was still a
mystery to me. I had no idea about all that
went on at the station, I didn't understand the
relationship between CiTR and Discorder,
and I was completely oblivious of the importance of both to Vancouver's local arts and
music scene. Despite this, I remember being
impressed and intrigued by the energy in the
station and the way so many people were
working together to ensure Funodrive's success. By the time I left the Fundrive Finale
party at the end of the week, I was hooked. I
had met a slew of other rad volunteers, saw
my first Gal Gracen performance, drooled
over the fancy silent auction prizes, and experienced the excitement of reaching a fund-
raising goal. Though CiTR was still a mystery in many ways, it was a mystery I wanted
to be a part of.
Fast forward two years and Fundrive is
upon us once again. This year's theme is
"Let's get digital" and the money raised will
go towards two projects: the digitization of
CiTR's collection of historic reel-to-reels,
and the creation of a new website that will
integrate and highlight CiTR and Discorder
content from the past and present. Together
with the completion of the digitization of
Discorder's archives later this month, these
projects will make the history of CiTR and
Discorder accessible like never before.
One of the things that makes these projects
so exciting is how they will expose people
to the impact that CiTR and Discorder have
20
LOOKING BACK, MOVING FORWARD had on Vancouver. "If it's not online,It didn't
happen," says CiTR alumni Susanne Tabata.
As the filmmaker behind Bloodied But Unbowed, a history of Vancouver's punk music
scene, Tabata is aware of the work involved
with scouring archives to tell a story about
Vancouver's past. Tabata believes that the
digitization of all the historical archives is
important to anyone interested in Vancouver.
"It [will provide] cultural reference points for
writers, journalists, musicians, historians, designers, artists, you name it."
• As someone who continues to be baffled
and blown away by the history of CiTR and
Discorder, Tabata's words feel incredibly relevant, History provides perspective and with
perspective comes a new appreciation for all
that we have now. As the current president of
CiTR's Student Executive, learning this history has provided me with incredible gratitude for those who advocated for CiTR and
Discorder in the past. Without their support,
who knows where we would be now?
To Randy Iwata, CiTR alumni and co-
founder of Vancouver's Mint Records, it is
important to acknowledge the weight that the
reels themselves hold: "Because most people
didn't make records of that time, there's not
EVERYONE HAS THEIR OWN STORY OF HOW THEIR
RELATIONSHIP WITH CITR OR DISCORDER BEGAN.  much else mat exists. The onus, the responsibility, the pressure is on [CiTR], to have
recorded this period in time. The fact that
die reels have been saved for so long is incredible. All of the reels, all of the print that
Discorder produced, it's part of the cultural
fabric of Vancouver. [CiTR] needs to take advantage of the fact that they exist."
Now, it might go without saying that the
tradition of capturing and preserving moments in Vancouver's music, arts, and political landscape continues to happen today.
What has changed though is the volume and
nature of media and information we can access daily through our computers, phones,
tablets, or whichever gadget is most popular
— all of which have effectively transformed
tiie meaning of radio and print media.
For former CiTR program manager and
current programmer Bill Mullan, this gives
particular importance to the creation of a new
website.
"The notion of integrating Discorder and
CiTR, the radio and the print, online, that's
a natural fusing of media," explains Mullan.
"What I particularly like about [the website]
is that I think it will pull the station together;
it will take all the strands going out in different directions and bring them to a common
platform. It will be easier for people to know
what everyone else is up to."
Considering the projects that tins year's
Fundrive will support, along with CiTR and
Discorder moving — for the first time in over
45 years — into a station in the new Students'
Union Building, it seems more important
than ever to let people know what we're up
to so they can join in.
And so, please consider this a personal invitation to come take part in this year's Fundrive, one of my favourite times of the year.
Whether it be through volunteering at the
station, donating to receive rad swag like a
CiTR cassette tape featuring notable recordings from the past (thanks, archives!), or raging at the Fundrive Finale, history shows that
you're going to have a good time.
Fundrive^ takes place from February 26 to
March 6, ending with the Fundrive Finale at
Pat'sPub on Match 6.
23
LOOKING BACK, MOVING FORWARD  APPROPRIATING THE PARTY
by Esmee Coulbourne
II Illustrations by Alison Sadler
II Photography by Jon Vincent
Best enjoyed while lying on the floor next
to speakers and a sub woofer set to max, Neu
Balance's Rubber Sole is a record ideal for
losing yourself to. Within the album's warm
bass and lush, ambient sounds, sweet conversations emerge, taking the listener on a hazy
trip.
After five years of working together, Sam
Beatch and Sebastian Davidson's (a.k.a. Neu
Balance) debut release is on 1080p, a Vancouver label which deeply reflects both the
band's and the city's electronic sound; Rubber Sole pulls from genre, replacing suggestions of dance beats with ambience. By exploring themes of dystopia, through extremes
of lo-fi haze textured with hi-fi sounds, Neu
Balance travels through the opposing forces
of dissonance and consonance — or in the
words of Beatch, "what is totally fucked and
what is totally pop."
Within Rubber Sole, Neu Balance create a
juxtaposition between minimal music, moments of textural sound, and the blatant expression of pop and commercialism in their
branding. Beatch and Davidson even paid
a voice actor $5 on fiverr.com to do shout
outs, West Coast radio show style. Beatch
believes,"It's hilarious, it's superficial, [and]
it's a detachment. It's a way to communicate
to people without using microphones." Rubber Sole presents itself as tongue-in-cheek
goofy, in an ironic way.
Instead of being just two guys with a keyboard, a drum machine, and Abletunes, Neu
Balance's album is the product of their skills
building rich electronic textures, sometimes
getting stuck on one amazing loop. In technical1 terms: "Audio is abstracted from processing through multiple stages of analog mediums, tape, ghetto samplers, etc., and then
sequenced live by computers."
Beatch believes that sound design is a major focus in their work: "We treat our sound
design with subtlety and heavy attention to
crafting sonic-detail. While we utilize bla-
tancy in creating signifiers for dance music,
the future, and the commercial world because
we are confused for an American company."
Absorption in creation — not presentation
— is the pinnacle of Neu Balance's enjoyment. "Listening to a sound we've made for
five hours straight is interesting," says Davidson. "With electronic music, you will get
to the final moment in your song before anything else. The main idea before the intro."
This being said, producing live is important to the duo, their goal always to "appropriate the party when confronting people with
dance music ... really engage with people,"
to create movement to "try to make computers speak in a human way," and to play with
signifiers of dance music within their sound.
Mirroring Neu Balance's album, their live
sound is more a maximal, direct, fucked, future psychedelia. They achieve this through
the use of two connected laptops, not setting
anything in stone. As a result of the spontaneity and random human error, the duo create
rich, multi-layered compositions.
NEC/ BALANCE
25 Neu Balance actively challenge the notion that computer-based music can only feel
cold, and the performance of producers is not
human, even if accessible. As explained by
Beatch, "Bullshit, but it is a lot different ...
we try to be live humans making sounds on
the spot and engaging the dancefloor. Once
you've produced a song to the point where
you press play on it, you don't want to perform anymore."
When producing live, the duo rarely speaks
and use separate computers to construct and
layer their sounds. To the audience, who only
sees the pair periodically ignore each other, it
can be surprising that Neu Balance achieve
coherence. Having been asked by people regularly: "How the fuck do you know what the
other guy is doing?" Neu Balance ultimately
answer: "We just practice."
"When we're jamming, we don't have to
talk much," says Davidson. "We can go to
each other's laptops, and if we want to turn
the other's sound off to see how [the beat]
sounds without something or need space for
new sounds and experimenting that way."
"I think that having another person validates what you're doing," continues Beatch.
"[Sebastian] has great input, and helps my
ideas, creates feeling sometimes in ways that
I couldn't."
i
Both Beatch and Davidson enjoy being part
of the Vancouver dance scene and are disparaging of the "No Fun City" label Vancouver's
been accused of. Instead they are thriving inside the city's DIY dance community, spreading the word via friends, friends of friends,
and word of mouth. It has to be secretive and
DIY because of the likelihood of being shut
down, coupled with the fact that it's getting
harder to find places to play. At one point,
Davidson asks: "Can we say 'Fuck the police!' in this?" over top of which Beatch adds,
"The great thing about Vancouver is that instead of being beat down ... people will start
new venues."
While some readers might be curious as to
what genre the duo fall under, Neu Balance
don't consider themselves vaporwave and
dislike umbrella terms like outsider electron-
ica. Rubber Sole is a multi-genre conceptual
album that builds off the local dance music
culture that they readily identify with. Beatch
explains: "We love the culture around it. It
can be very transformative getting people
dancing, and giving people that experience."
"We also believe in groove and texture.
We want to stimulate the mental as well, and
want there to be more to it; we think we can
do it through live music."
With a name like Neu Balance, there are
many layers of meaning over and beyond the
use of shoe visuals. "The superficial understanding of our name is that company ... It's
important to be able to express while not taking yourself too seriously," says Beatch.
But another understanding, reflected in
Rubber Sole's album cover, could be in reference to Karl Marx's Accelerationism. A
black outline of the New Balance shoes depicting the problems with the corporation as
humans, the yellow background representing
solutions to the problem, and the white lettering of Neu Balance representing them, at
peace in solving these problems, or just settling for future dystopia. Or Neu Balance is
just a reference to Neu! The name parallels
the music and, as for Beatch and Davidson,
context and understanding is everything.
The pair exploit the intersection of discourses on thought, art, and dance, while still
being quite accessible and thought-provoking. It may be difficult to dig into the smoke
and mirrors of the metaphor that is their
name, but Rubber Sole is an interesting collage worth dissecting.
Be sure to check out Neu Balance at Skylight on February 7 when 1080p presenst:
Neu Balance + Friendly Chemist Album release party, along with DJs Scott W and LNS.
26
NEU BALANCE  VENEWS
THE LIDO
by Jonathon Hernandez II Photography by Severn Bowen
II Illustrations by Rachel Lin
"It's like drinking in someone's living
room."
Those were the first words I ever heard
used to describe the Lido as I stood amidst
a crowd of East Van socialites gearing up to
hit the town. The prospect of the Lido for a
Friday night watering hole sounded enticing: it was close, unexplored, and, from what
I heard, sounded low-key — a welcomed
change of pace from my weekly excursions
to the Biltmore. (I'm an addict.) And now,
as a Lido veteran of many, many beers, it's
hard to remember what life was like before it
sprung up just seven months ago.
additions to Mount Pleasant's pub scene. Its
modest location and unassuming exterior
might keep it on the outskirts of Vancouver's
mainstream nightlife; but inside, its retro d€-
cor and thrifty Feng-Shui play into the vintage vibes that many of the neighbourhood's
hot spots have come to embrace over the
years.
"It's so comfy," said Mount Pleasant resident Conor Kennelly as he spread his legs
across the Lido's antique settee for the first
time. "I could see myself coming here during
the day to study and sticking around all night
for the live show."
Situated two short blocks west of Fraser        Each week, the Lido hosts local and visiting
and Broadway, the Lido is one of the newest     artists of all styles and genres. Showcasing
28
VENEWS everything from folk to electronic on their
intimate stage, the bar has appealed to steady
crowds that regularly fill-up their 65-person
capacity — so much so that the owners are
looking towards city hall to increase their
limit.
If all goes as planned, the Lido will soon
open up a patio, adding 18 chairs and bringing the overall capacity up to 95 persons.
They'll add food and beverage service to the
mix in addition to current bar service. But before these things-can come to fruition, owners
have put the call out to their patrons, starting
a letter-writing campaign directed at the City
of Vancouver in support of making the changes to their current liquor licence. Whether or
not these changes get made remains to be
seen, but for the sake of patio beers, I'll be
writing a letter. ^
The future looks bright for the Lido; a lot
brighter than it did before.
Year$ before its recent resurgence, the Lido
sat unutilized and mysterious. It was an established deli, but its doors were always locked
while the shelves inside collected dust. The
business was sporadically open, owned by
an elderly German woman named Margaret
Rothweiler.
When Rothweiler passed in 2008; the
cleanup probably looked like a scene from
A&E's Hoarders. Vancouver's 1-800-GOT-
JUNK was called to the job, reportedly
29
VENEWS pulling out 10 truck loads of garbage and
furniture, including mountains of old clothes
and rusty tuna-cans. But amongst the trash
was a treasure that has now become the subject of an East Vancouver legend: $400,000
in cash.
The money was in 80-year old bills and
apparently looked like it came out of a Monopoly box. But it was eventually proven authentic and dispersed to Rothweiler's heirs.
No one has ever figured out where it came
from, although wishful theorists have drawn
connections to the infamous 1911 BMO heist
in New Westminster.
Whether or not the Lido's hidden treasure
was the loot of bandits or simply the Rothweiler's family fortune, it will be forever
etched into the East Van mythology. For the
binge-drinkers like myself who like to wet
their beaks east of Main, it's just another reason to check out the Lido, alongside the good
vibes, great jams, and cheap beer.
To contribute to the Lido's letter-writing
campaign, send an email to liquor.com-
ments@vancouver.ca
"I'D SAY THE FUTURE
LOOKS BRIGHT FOR
THE LIDO; AT LEAST A
LOT BRIGHTER THAN
IT DID BEFORE."
30
VENEWS Fountain photo courtesy ofYuko Inoue (pgJl)
REAL LIVE ACTION.
DECEMBER & JANUARY
ALWAYS / ABSOLUTELY FREE
DECEMBER 3 / THE BILTMORE
WHITE LUNG / MORMON CROSSES
/ FLOWERS & FIRE
DECEMBER 5 / ELECTRIC OWL
"...Nova Scotia-bred lead singer Molly
Rankin's lollipop sweet vocals conjured
up images of high school beach parties and
ooardwalk broken hearts. "Archie, Marry
'HKS&could easily be on the soundtrack to
a Ha indie reimagining of the Sandra Dee
j&ssra||dget. With lyrics like "You've ex-
presseo^iejplicitly your contempt for matrimony / Yo»|ve student loans to pay and will
not risk the ahmony," Always related to the
urban 20-something crowd.
Throughout the set Rankin's vocals were
complemented by the harmonic instrumental to form a thoroughly appealing indie pop
jljckage. Time sped by as Molly entranced
th|| crowd with her edgy, girlish charm and
irpverent attitude.. "—%Zmma Kansiz
*M>0read the rest of
to wMwdiscorderjT
DEA
DEC
eview, head over
^KW^t9int,&a^&-concert;
heave^s^teMent jjprm of blact afcetjjPiJioe-
gaze/pos^rotik, mi|pt|be lostjryiie audio that
often cofi^mis^s life ev
Fortunafet^r^ whether Mis^5 th_.
the sound engineers thatjpvening or tu
the ban^tii^pselves in consciously playfe
a lowerff vel tha&;other groups might — IjL
sound i(^:impeccM>Ie anfeverything camH
through pist^e the^stud&ftcordings.
With intricate guitar pfoglbssions, astounding drum patters, and painfully hoarse vocals,
the band held nothing back on what was their
last show of the year..."— Sam Hawkins
*To read the rest of this review, head over
to www.discorder.ca
The day has come. Yes, rue on you, White
Lung, and all Vancouver buzz-bands, for returning^ Ttp City of No Fun. Prepare for
your utmost devastation at the hands of a cjfjL
lege radiomagazine.
If the rise to indie fame must be ac^^^H
nied by the snark of hometown contrarians,
it's a small price to pay. An4 notwithstanding
my mixed feelings on Deeg Fantasy f White
Lung deserve their rising stir. While possibly
the least weird of their local contemporaries,
the band's effortlessly powfcul ppnence and
manic anthems r^ke^^lemiMtai, j$&& a& th
show proved, people are paying atte*
As the authenticity arms race mar
the Electric Ow) fluitd itself packed v
Pros and middlfe Jped white collars. I
kind of a Grart^lle Street crowd: t
ronment where'chauvinistic condes
frosff guys to tliegr female friends — e,g.>
"Opo, you went mto the mosh pit? Look at
yqluu!^— was hard to construe as even
fshgh!tjpronic.
MffilH
Flowers & Fire came on first. Their music
suggested a predilection for the dreary mood
of goth rock with a prettier tone and a cleaner
timbre, not unlike The Cure, or locals Mode
Moderne. The music was distinguished by
"^full-bodied' voice of the vocalist* The
sumed languorous postures, as the
his head dojsja. conjuring the
tangyL
Were Flow*
could accuse|th#;4
character. Tie fjr
bounce, smles %
face and the drummer's at
were right; ft was a good til
tangents and
ten you
taking
„ Constant
bying his
hose two
REAL LIVE ACTION Next was my first time seeing Mormon
Crosses; it was great. Lit with Kenneth Anger
Magick Red, Mormon Crosses's performance
lod posh authority and
a heavy psychedelic fetish.
Bryce KPAs busy drum work pedaled like
a total inclination toward the crash. There
was a disorienting disparity of tempo between percussion and guitar, with Jesse Taylor's shuddering sense of rhythm. The two
resolved as the drums became impossibly
urgent, while the guitar's pummeling moved
from deliberate to feral. While these features
received vocal credit from the increasingly
engaged audience, the bass deserved praise
as well.
Casey Preston's onstage embodiment of
stiff upper lip while subtly tunneling lines
anchored the band in style and substance. If
I had a minor complaint, it's that the band's
potential for thuggish brutality and their
more adventurous compositions remained
somewhat separate. As a nice note> local
fixture JNic Hughes, with dramatic flair on-
point, joined the band on -stage for trie final
song. Good as it was. we all knew eoripulso-
ry moshing must be saved for the heaaliner.
Which was decent, 1 guess.
Ok, if I do have a problem with White
Lung's live sound in the timis I've seen them,
it's that Mish Way's ability to snarl with melodic sustain and ti|e manic tone of Kenneth
William's guitar melodies are muddied by
low end in the mix. Perhaps it's just my taste,
but it is a shame, because the sharpness of
those features is an idiosyncratic strength.
Nonetheless, the chops were there. The
guitarwork remained dizzying in speed and
agitation. Way retained her didactic star
edge, with sharp rhetorical gestures that contrasted the vulnerabilities of her lyrics with
her onstage might. Anne-Marie Vassiliou's
confident rhythm maintained. And newfound
bassist, Hether Fortune, added more power to
the band's front-line presence, issuing furious
vocal harmonies. Altogether the performance
did a good job of impressing the band's talent
for melodic composition: yeah, 1 was humming on the way home.
The quality aside. White Lung stopped
playing after about 30 minutes — no encore.
The applause quickly gave way to indignation from entitled dudes who expect "Free-
bird" finales from punk bands, or something.
And thus ended White Lung's return to Vancouver: a large disturbance of boos rising
above the brief din of applause. Like Yeezy
says: "Soon as they like you, make 'em unlike you."
That seems pretty punk to
White Lung was a good
outside features. But sometimes audiences
change while bands stay the same. After the
show, I got to see at least one person make
a huge TGIF spectacle chucking his empty
onto the street with deliberate aplomb like
he's Lonely Island or some shit: a powerful
display of Privileged Male Anger that catapulted my experience towards yet unknown
levels of PUNK TRUTH. Fuck it: not like
he's trashing his own neighborhood or anything . — Jonathan Kew
1080P CHRISTMAS PARTY W/ THE COURTNEYS / WATERMELON /GAL GRACEN
DECEMBER 12/ANZA CLUB
".. .Openers Gal Gracen set the bar for the
evening, despite some teething problems with
the ANZA Club's PA, which seemed wont to
bury their vocals, whether they wanted it or
not. Overall, ttie band was able to indulge
their reveries: drum machine balladry cutting
through cosmic polysynth pads and shimmering chords. The fact, then, that frontman
Patrick Geraghty's vocals were sornetimes
pushed to the back wasn't much of a problem
at all.
It certainly helped that Geraghty cut the
tension with his charmingly cornball banter,
whether musing on how Santa washes his suit
(with "Yule Tide," 'natch) or self-deprecat-
ingly introducing a song as having "low energy" and the one after as having "even less
energy," making the best of the intermittently
REAL LIVE ACTION poor sound situation.. .^—^^is^Yee
*To read the rest of this figwiw^ead o^f^
to www.discorder.ca
CATLOW / THE LION / COMBINE THE VICTORIOUS
DECEMBER 18 / THE HINDENBUR6
Two cats walk into a bar. One burly and
bearded, the other, pretty and blonde. They
sit together, pawing at bottles of beer and surveying the land before them.
The felines refer to The Lion, folk, musician known better J#y his human name, Christopher Arruda, o/ one third of the band Hue
Lion The Bear The Fox, and frontwoman
of indie-pop outfit Catlow, who paswers to
Natasha Thirsk. Another pair of creatures —
Combine the Victorious — was, at this point,
nowhere to be found until later when they
emerged from the shadows.
Bad analogies aside, the plains of the Hin*
denburg were still barren {couldn't resist) by
the time The Lion took the stage at 10 o'clock
and, unfortunately remained sparse fa( the
duration' of the night. Th& scaMj||?wd was
likely due to the absence of hcadUners The
Lower."4S> who,^lfer undisclosed rH
coul<l$K WSsj^tS^^k^^stt tHJl^
ers who were, Ag^,iajA^TO*ered an^EeHent
evening and deserved moi4 than just a few
eyesfwl «WS. For whai-it's%pfa, though, attending patrons lad enough ent&isiasmtp fill
up the entire room. ^*r
Stripped of the usual energejc stomp that
accompanies him while plasjig with The
Lion The Bear The Fox, Arruda was com$
pletely acoustic and doubly impressed on
the keyboard and the gu
intimate set displaying his
marked his first solo jaunt in a while -i- the
inaugural under The Lion moniker — an$ hfl
vulnerability, through earnest banter aft m
decided downtempo'set* wW%arAlt.l
Voice was dyroRttc; Broadway-
The Prettys photo courtesy of Shane Burzynski (pg. 32 - 33)
then compelling on "Home," an inspiring an-
them about his bandmates who encouraged
him never to give up on music.
Next up was Combine the Victorious. ||||
luminated only by two white lights that jttt'4
eerie shadows upon members jfebell^JBfti^p
lop and Mark Henning, Ift^tt^pVHEnme^
ing synths got ene^l^^uzzing^meri^ttl:
some adorable* d^^^Mt^m^t m4 &$4f'
gentleman idling ^p^^Wto^fefi^^plifei;
'°Pyta& danced through' Henniag's -tiansl*.
tioss* adding electronica of her own on the .
fpkc Hits Still'On,* which saw Henning MC
the highest soprano as the lights strobed la >
crescendo
ART SIGNIFIED'S TWO YEAR ANNIVE .
PAUm';
JANUARY 9 & 10 f&fW0>$dsT
"...Mdfflpits   of   bitterfpeet ^^^KStry
flooded me crowd with this f&tip*
Cattow, normally a four-piece, added fiddle and glockenspiel to their lineup and were
Jhe loudest net of the night (in a good way),
ijtarwrag from their latest album. Pinkh
Thhtgst as well as from new tracks, the 01
chestral arrangements made fox more riotou
renditions than on die record,
ntamtng spurts of punk' on ^hmsy *
v.iamed so because she thought it sounded
like The Shins) and girlish coy on **House
Arrestf* Dreamy jam **8torm Sa<f* fcroug^
things <kmn a notch but the new cut mat
tamed momentum with tireless percussion
hazy riffs, squealing fbdtikty and twi
glockensjsaeL      ' .
The short but sweet show concluded
stroke of midnight, much to the chagrin of the
Sound guy who cried/'More, more, MORE!
This can't be the ax&V* But as plulosopfaer
and theologian Albert Sen1
"There are two means of refuge from the miseries ot life: music and cats." On Thursdavkf-
we had both.— Yasri
was pensi^filn the key-drWeitfefflW "Stork,"     and Sabrina Robson injected unforg
REAL LIVE ACTION .energy into southern rock and
Their set was quickly rebounded by the abrasive, gritty stoner metal oiy^SffTERiQilD; i
only wished they had |^3i^M^^giJ^^mse]
I love watching J
After a ten-minufl
our heart rates setl^fejilf^^4^iSi^^^
pation was pa 1 pable for the fantiistic Johnny
de Courcy. His sultry rx«|f^|pij|i^rg^Hff
everyone's attention ana^^^nWSreaOT:
from their spot the entire time he played.
BRASS Was in their element on the floor
stage. A full, elevatedjrgleeful  moshypit
thrived  with  Devon   Motz's^flailin^^^l
BRASS' barging punJ^fiijfs. It DecattjAsDe|.
cially clear to me during BRASS that a Wti
relationship was occurring betwee.
the crowd, as Jf they were playij|g fl
their best f riejlds. (That's becausJ they "ip&r^
Punk heMr'weights WTpHDR- siarnmed
into the show wiflPi warmly Jrelcom™,.
'GKTFU^ED.' Fans were nfformed ttT
bring their best Braveheart imjc^rejugans because the band had a surprise.^gd m, many
blow-up battleaxes were dumpejp^ffl^"—
Erin Jardine
*To read the rest of this review, head ov^sr
to www.discdrder.ca
YUKON BLONDE / FOUNTAIN
JANUARY 15 / THE BILTMORE
"...Yukon Blonde burst to the stage, Jeff
Innes clad in big hair and '90s print, his alluring vocals Captivated my attention and rekindled ^MMhusiasn|; of longtime fans in the
crowd !fed^rei|noj:e t^an a few injjividu-
als hopping in place and belting out every
word. As an imd ^is^jjjl^jo^km^^simt
album as Yukon E^oh<M^ybid >a hard time
adjusting to the new sound* which is a major.
departure from their early material. But the©
they absolutelyxkille44|^toc
sofPllpened my- nundJfaSfe
Hannah Thomson
■       M    ft  '
*To read the rest of this review, head^^
to www.discorder.ca
WlE IJJBTTY'S ALBUM RELEASE W/ THE SE-
HIET^hMNY KIDS, LES CHAUSSETTES,
Hxy^^H^
^Nl^^P6 / THE KREMLIN
JBJpk has been revived once more,
jlgo, pherTelectric guitars began falling into
IIhe hBds of kids with time and passion to
llpare^M|iarkedly DIY style of rock/n' roll
ibega^p permeate the music scene.
\ Only occasionally peeking its head out
pinto the mainstream, the influence of decades
?dt not giving a shit about what the masses
^thought of your sound shaped the way music was made and experienced. Whether it be
^Sleeping your music in aggression, humour,
( rlii^'iifxPer*niWtaUon' 8ara§e roc^
rved^jij^utlet for the musical whims of
nd thos«||r^^A,^i^^|Y^ at The Kr#ftlin
*%fn January Ift^in^fe^StoCi31^^]^^
is malfy!alftj|but;,
The wa^httie-^^venulki; ^wi£fe'm?hit#$|le
walls and a sqplKstftfCk sujrrounded % staljl^
of amplifiers uklVSHpNt; secme#M 0Ot|gh ife
could take a beam^^^^B^PiB BJNIiMf"'*
ner; a cardboard and Iharpre sign declarin|
the price of a cassette tapj^atmeflMMAtriWK
a desk lamp duct taped to a ngciflpHli WKm *
to illuminate the sound boardfc!
As me floor filled with feet, and the ambience grew to a dull roar, the positive arkyself
reliant atmosphere thickened. You can feel it.
You caia feel it.
From opening act The Secrets ,rfH|HPtiieir
blues tinged, psychedelic rock, rifelwith guitar Sijps and vocal effects, to the closers Sexy
Deco^*^hj|se punk rock sound descended
into delectable chaos with screams! feedback,
and tortureof^JllSHMPy faces °f
garage rock got 'm^^SS^0Stfmt,m the spot"'
Withkvarying intensity, the nve bands that
took fe4fl^stage battered out their must
messHMMDaR audienctf demanding to hear
what^^^^Bri> say.    m
REAL LIVE ACTION Skinny Kids' set, short and tight, gave the
audience a taste of their psychedelic surf
sound. Despite seeming eager to leave the
stage, the crowd danced in their washes of
guitar, bass, and drums.
Les Chaussettes' garage pop sound —
tinged black with both distortion and volume
— charged the crowd into pseudo-moshing;
their harmonies and shimmering guitar lipes
caused every stationary foot in the room to
start bouncing along.
rf\ !  . £      •; "
But the event was really tytiriti£&u& Pretty's; it was their album relea^NrittfelNril. They
not only brought excess pa&si#Raggression,
and rock-and-roll attitude to^pe'stage, they
also brought their own evening wear. The
proto-punk-pop foiu-pieje; all clad in dresses, brought the crowd tlia tumult with songs
from their freshly released record Empty
.J^ea^fs.,- afe^cioii^ith hooks catchy enough
iu cvai v 11
before.
Yukon Blonde photo courtesy of Yuko Inoue (34 - 35)
drummer caused jaws to drop. I closed my
eyes and let the furious drum and bass lines
drive me through visualisations of a huge
dark British Columbia rainforest like a warrior. Drury's versatile Vocals toasted me away
from the work-week mental state.
Baptis|| and BBM^Bream shaft, Southern
Lord aswtecord llfiel, and theif sequential
performSles   complimented   each^Hro
Black Breath's dirty take^i what it is to |§ a
heavy band is something awesome and fairly
unique. I associate therewith a plethofa off
genres depending on the mpmenyoutfthBr
European death metal influence's Jfo&t As/
tently clear. Their glitzy gottaJsoMft wire on
point and their rolling headbanging was^ks-
sic and did not stop the entire time. .Jf
Jardine
■■■■ti
*To read the rest of this reW^w^^^^^^l-
to www.discorder.ca "mm
'$iP^;3ftHLa|j'|fcj|weat bid beer cans 'flew
.across the i^o^^landtng i%the faces of gri'
ning men S| wo^ten^^etftig a taste of J
^ilRCCJwh^p mu^cdr underground, and lov-
^ every minute of j£j&~ ^PiT Wrinch >
m'-mmtn^ j||mm|j|uroc
/AitillESIAll j^|r*f*
Jopening baiidliaid down the Kin^
btlfl^tSpre ^^^sf^pchnical grinding
carried fijriS3w&& d-*beats and excerpt,!
' concentrated sfadge Ifjuitarv' Moustache'dlib- '.<
calist Andrew T>t^f%-p^^^^-€>pz stage wfe
fueledVwith the energy thaCTapuWlia^ J&jf,
come kftown for. As a victim of ind3&lfew$*
frequent ankle injures, I detected a limp an#-
physical pain behind his sustained gaze.
In the interest of^rury's bum leg, the low,
yet raisedtMftitiss a pro for the evening,
fltfftfJrhga'the band separated from the whirling pit that formed during their set. Grinding
through their pain, the solid instrumentals
took over every thought in my mind. The
»g^ v.
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fn
f-Hpwjih £in,Wpiahk fapel  }
iiti    fii L*~~y J
I Dfad|Qi|et, Thjr ee/V\|olf Moorv^
fill Mil     s   —^     l
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39  RES NULLIUS
NATASHA BROAD A.K.A- MAUS HUNT
A Discorder Art Project
"Res Nullius: a thing which has no owner"
&    AN UNACCUSTOMED, BUT SELDOM 'CARELESS' APPROACH TO MUSIC
by Natalie Hoy II Illustrations by Kim Pringle
II Photography by Marissa Hooi
"Life is only as complicated as you make
it," according to the members of Did You Die.
Take their name, for example. Attention-
grabbing and direct, I hoped for a rousing
account of its origins as I sat down with
the grunge rock outfit before their Biltmore
Cabaret show. Vocalist and guitarist Richie
Alexander is, however, swift to dismiss its
death-defying tone.
"Our friend Grace texted that while she
was waiting for me once; I was really late,"
Alexander explains. In search of a namesake
for their new project, the phrase stuck.
"A lot less dramatic than you might think,"
drummer Jamie Cessford adds with a laugh.
Along with Rafael Ceppetelli on bass, the
three-piece has been immersed in the Vancouver music scene for (mite some time in
various capacities. Alexander and Ceppetelli
have played in a few bands together — most
notably shoegaze act Fantasy Prom. Cessford co-hosts his own radio show, focussing
on the dry's underground music scene. With
an inventory of songs already written by Alexander, Did You Die's first singles began
surfacing online in September, culminating
in the release of their debut EP, Careless, in
January.
Written and recorded in Alexander's home
studio, the EP features five originals and a
cover of The Yardbirds' moody hit "Heart
Pull of Soul." "We get along well, and I think
that's more important than how [musically]
talented you are," says Alexander, of the collaborative effort. "There is a friendship that
didn't really exist in some other bands."
His counterparts nod in agreement, noting their minimalist approach as key in their
hopeful longevity.
"What we learned from the other bands is
don't try to do too much — just do one thing
awesome," Ceppetelli chimes in. *That is
what we are [trying to do] with this."
Drenched in hazy vocals and chord-heavy
distortion, Careless explores '90s post-punk
nostalgia with a charmingly novel perspective. "All the Way to Her" is a jangly rock
number, while "Forever Knows When" employs lo-fi drones and melancholic vocal delivery in its seven-minute tenure. Their rendition of "Heart Full of Soul" is of particular
importance to Alexander, who has been listening to The Yardbirds since he was a child.
"Hiked the lyrics; I could relate to them,"
he shares. "Lyrical themes, for me, are based
on real-life experiences. I prefer the raw, introspective emotion." When asked to sum
up their sound, Cessford also references the
impact of his youth. "It's a nice combination
of the things I listened to growing up — pop
punk and grunge, and trying to find a marriage between the two."
Averse to the perceived standards in releasing music these days, Did You Die took
a slightly different approach in the release
of their EP. Instead of releasing a single and
channeling their time and energy into heavy
promotion for said EP, the band released five
singles over four months — unveiling Care-
less with almost no warning.
"The logistics behind putting together and
recording an album is quite daunting," tells
UNDER REVIEW
45 "WHAT WE LEARNED FROM THE OTHER BANDS IS DON'T TRY TO
DO TOO MUCH - JUST DO ONE THING AWESOME."
Cessford. The trio hoped the staggered releases would keep listeners interested while
simultaneously attracting new ones. According to their download statistics, the plan
seems to be running smoothly.
Released digitally via Alexander's own
label Sizzie Teen Records, plans to produce
Careless in physical format have been placed
on the backburner with a new project already
in the works: a full-length album. "When
we started this band, I wrote and recorded
20 songs, and six made the EP," Alexander
shares. The trio will soon be heading into the
studio alongside Felix Fung (Chains of Love,
The Ballantynes) to record the demos that
didn't make the original cut. i||>
Did You Die is also looking to expand
their live presence in Vancouver — which, in
their opinion, harbours one of the best music
scenes in Canada.
"Please play more shows, Womankind,"
adds Ceppetelli. "Play shows with us."
Concise and honest, the members of Did
You Die refuse to be defined by process or
sound, keeping their drama-free creative
juices flowing into the slacker-rock aesthetic
they hone so well. "We draw our inspiration
from getting together and writing songs,"
Ceppetelli maintains. "There is nothing behind it. It's just like, this is what it is."
Fuzz-tinged melodies and crashing guitars
never seemed so simple.
Careless is available for digital download
via Did You Die's Bandcamp page. You can
also catch the band live at The Hindenburg
on February 7, alongside The Dead Zones,
Ornament & Crime, and wild/kind.
"I really like The Courtneys," says Alexander. "I want to play with them one day.
[Also], Fundamentally Unsound is one of the
best bands no one's heard of yet."
46
UNDER REVIEW  i/nder #e\//ew*
A DAOMIIN IlllHIO
DADA PLAN
A Dada Plan is Free
(Kingfisher Bluez)
For its dazzling musical composition and
its lyrical brilliance, Dada Plan's A Dada
Plan is Free could certainly be considered a
masterpiece of contemporary art — or rather,
anti-art.
Frontman Malcolm Jack's Dada Plan is
comprised of Matt Krysko on synth, Dave
Biddle on saxophone, Colin Cowan on bass,
and Justin Williams on congas. Jack has inevitably received much praise for the band's
originality, chaotic intricacies, and dystopian
gaze.
Dada Plan has succeeded in creating a
sound rich with dizzying, nonlinear originality; the poetic mastery of lyricism which
emerges from the depths of saxophones and
synths is not to be overlooked.
In harrowing realms where "History pulls
out all your teeth / If you give it wings,"
where, "It's harder to find peace / Than to
find wealth," and where, "The sun burns
people in its cars / When there's hundreds of
us crowded into bars," this album is effective in conjuring up a dark and loaded social
commentary guised in the haze of perfectly
imperfect musical arrangements. Though
it effectively challenges the often isolating
experience of modernity, lyrics like, "It's
easy to place all of the blame / On a life with
phones," suggest that this isolation is one
which speaks not only to modernity but also
to the general human experience.
Dada Plan has successfully presented a
work of anti-art that challenges and mocks
the stability of history, identity, time, and reality — all while sounding amazing.
Rather than presenting such bold challenges in one boisterous or rebellious sound,
A Dada Plan is Free reflects on the ludicrous-
ness of contemporary culture with the quiet
subtlety of a mirror. The "hanging mirrors"
Dada Plan presents on the track "The Hanging Mirrors Of Life-Skype" could very well
describe their own work.
As any great piece of art, the album holds
a mirror,up to the strange absurdities of the
human experience; the voyeuristic observations presented by the melancholic persona
of this album awaken a desire to study the
individual we see in the looking glass and to
ponder the paradigms we blindly accept as
truths.—Najma Eno
SISKIYOU
Nervous
(Constellation)
Inspired by an isolated winter spent in the
Yukon, Nervous is an album born of catharsis,
minor chords, and the supernatural — the latter being a byproduct of intense hyperacusis
lead singer/songwriter Colin Huebert battled
UNDER REVIEW j'.siiyr/
during his stay and residence in a house that
he said, "felt utterly haunted."
It's through fleeting notions of the ethereal,
and Huebert's own meditative experiences
prior to recording, that Siskiyou (pronounced
sis-ki-you) have been able to create songs
that soar and dive through different verses;
songs that induce quiet reflection and reverent exclamation.
Opening track, "Deserter" sets the wistful tone of the album. From its dramatic and
haunting choral introduction (courtesy of the
St James Music Academy Senior Choir) to
the vacillating whispers and cries from Hue-
bert, it stands as one of the strongest tracks
on the album. It paves the way for proceeding songs, "Bank Accounts and Dollar Bills
(Give Peace a Chance)" and "Wasted Genius," which pull art-rock inspiration from
bands like Arcade Fire and Paul Banks.
"Violent Motion Pictures" begins much
like Interpol's "Untitled." It employs delicate sonic arrangements and surrealist melodies that carry the listener away, while the
whispering vocals throughout "Jesus in the
'70s" invoke a film noir tone of mystery and
intrigue. There is a refreshing quality to the
arrangements in both these songs that piques
tired interest and reignites long lost imagination,   jf?^
Unfortunately for me, this is where Nervous peaks and loses its palatability. The
span from "Deserter" to "Jesus in the 70's"
feels intimate, mysterious, and seductive,
while the concluding tracks lack something.
The change of pace and the optimistic vibe
brought on by folkier tracks like "Oval Window" and "Imbecile Thoughts" (though
strong songs in their own right) feel too lively
and out of place on an album that was previously cool and melancholic. "Nervous" and
"Babylonian Proclivities" fall short of the bar
set by their predecessors and as such, unjustly fade into background noise quite easily.
There is no denying the beautiful craftsmanship of the album, produced by Huebert
himself with the assistance of John Raham
(Frazey Ford, The Be Good Tanyas) and Leon
Taney (Owen Pallett, Sebastien Grainger ofe
The Mountains). Each track is its own diamond in the rough, driven by Huebert's endearing vocal cadences, lyricism, and the finesse of his fellow musicians. Executed any
other way, it would have been easy to saturate this record with too many ideas and lose
the delicate musical intricacies that make Siskiyou so unique. The fine line walked here is
a testament to the talented individuals who
participated in the creation of Nervous.
—Victoria Canning
IN CONTRA.
LJTTLE CHURCH
(Self-Released)
Self-recorded in a little church in Burnaby,
BC, in contra.'s first fuil-length album, aptly tided little church, is a glorious mess of
49
UNDER REVIEW sound and colour. Ten years in the making,
little church's opening chords make it clear
that this is a creation of friends; a result of
endless hours of good times and unabashed
experimentation with noise and genre.
Like the albums of many other post-rock
bands before them, in contra.'s little church
lacks conventional song structures. Every
moment of beauty and repose is a knife's
edge away from an eruption of tense guitar noise and hammering drums. Every epic
build could suddenly give way to a tender
melody, an eerie banjo line, a cacophony of
violins and percussive noise, or simply guitar
feedback. Spanning an ambitious hour and
14 minutes, this is the perfect album for late-
night walks home in the rain, soundtracking
an alien invasion, or an intense apartment
cleaning session.
While all eight songs blend together,
there are definite standout moments on little
church. The first half of "Guns of the Tim-
berland" is an anthemic build reminiscent
of Explosions in the Sky. "Byzantine Conduit" is appropriate amounts ominous post-
rock, blissful slo-mo montage, and gratuitous
drone. "Paul Newman (vs. Rodney Danger-
field)" is a beautiful journey through a snowy
landscape of swirling guitar and driving bass.
Interlaced with wafting horns, the culmination of sounds forms relentlessly into a gentle
ruin.
What in contra, lacks in focus they make
up for in sheer intensity and enthusiasm. The
last decade of their musical tinkering has
resulted in a piece of work that continues a
legacy of Canadian post-rock, little church
was built on foundations put in place by such
legends as Godspeed You! Black Emperor
and Do Make Say Think.—Garth Covernton
HOOKERS
It's Midnight. .. The Witching Hour
(Razorback)
The sky darkens over Vancouver as menacing clouds slowly slip in and veil the moon. In
the distance you can hear a faint rumble. The
doom-laden air thickens with pressure and
CLAP! Your heart pounds and your flesh
pales as you realize that it's not just any ol'
thunder surrounding you; it is genuine Kentucky heavy-metal thunder.
Formed at the crossroads of punk and metal by Adam Neal (Rock'N'Roll Outlaw and
formerly of Nashville Pussy), Hookers have
gone through a multitude of lineup changes
since '94. Over the past few years, Vancouver's own Juan Badmutha (SpreadEagle,
Evilive) and his bass guitar have become
one of the Outlaws' staunchest henchmen.
For It's Midnight, Badmutha recruited fellow
Vancouverites Randy Romance (Red Hot
Lovers) on guitar and Russia (Black Wizard,
Hopeless) on drums. The resulting album is
one of Hookers' heaviest works to date. As
indicated by the sinister cover art, the 12
tracks on It's Midnight were concerned with
the same depraved themes as Hookers' past
releases: sex, horror, and the devil.
"The Devil's Wedding Night" starts things
off at a frantic pace — a quick piece of blood
curdling thrash to set the mood. "Violent
Love Reaction" is the album's longest track
at 3:08; it plays like a gruesome love ballad
with sludgy riffs, a hard, intent beat, and the
Outlaws' demonic bellow. The same gruff
vocals keep the more punk and rock 'n' roll
sounding tracks like "Kneel Before Me" and
"Bad Man on the Run" in an evil place. The
album's reign of terror comes to an end with
50
UNDER REVIEW the riotous "Tonight Was Made For Killing"
— a perfect track to lay the album to rest.
Not for the meek, It's Midnight... The
Witching Hour is a diabolical dose of Hookers' infamous heavy metal thunder that will
consume any fiend who dares to cross its
threshold.—Mark PaulHus
JOHNNY DE COURCY
Auen Lake
(Self-Released)
The nature of Alien Lake is a fluid one.
Johnny de Courcy reveals no limit to his
creative and musical capability, infusing this
latest album with inspiration from various
genres. While each track may sound different
from the next, there is a notable flow in the
. way Alien Lake progresses. De Courcy and
his banodmates are careful not to sacrifice variety for cohesiveness.
An influence of sounds, ranging from
psychedelic-blues to country-infused rock,
are evident on this eclectic 10 track album.
The album's ninth song and title track is a
mysterious and lucid tune, orchestrated by a
beautiful piano ballad, as well as a saw (yes,
a saw). De Courcy and his crew got pretty
innovative on Alien Lake, offering variety in
each song that will satisfy any musical craving you might have. Recorded in the Okana-
gan, de Courcy partnered up with Malcolm
Biddle and Dada Plans' Matt Kyrsko to piece
together this strategically eclectic album.
Right off the bat, "I Can't Be That Man"
cracks like a whip. The buildup starts off
fuzzy and loud, but by the chorus the tune
mellows out. A heavy guitar riff that pays
homage to Heart's "Barracuda" brings the
song to an end. Next up, "Southern Plain"
continues to showcase the album's rock 'n'
roll side. This track is a concoction comprised
of one part Tom Petty, two parts Chris Isaak,
and three parts a seamless highway drive.
Alien Lake continues on with "Amelie,"
which is dripping with a sweet melody and
happy lyrics, like "And now you're the most
important part of me." Hard to believe these
words are coming from the same person
singing "Please be wary of my love" on the
album's first track. Soon to follow, "Wind
Chimes" begins with an ominous tone that
completely shifts gears when the chorus
strikes. Hard hitting drums and vocals, combined with a booming guitar solo remind
us of the versatility de Courcy plays with
throughout the album. One minute a brooding track, and the next a heartfelt belt-out,
de Courcy taps into all your emotional reservoirs and musical palettes.
Johnny de Courcy really takes on the role
of musical shapeshifter in this album, playing
with a range of different genres and merging
them together in his songs. If Alien Lake is
a place that truly does exist, I'm packing my
bags now. - Jackie Manokian
REC CENTRE
Monster of the Week
(Self-Released)
Rec Centre is the project of Vancouver
musician/music journalist Alex Hudson. Enlisting help from friends Jay Arner and Jessica Delisle on instrumentation, Monster of
the Week is a deceptively glittery personal
tale of everyday monotony and ambivalence.
Departing somewhat from the guitar-driven
indie pop of his debut album Times a Billion,
with Monster of the Week Hudson has centered his excellent songwriting on layers of
UNDER REVIEW
51 spacey synthesizer hooks straight out of '80s
video games to create a washed out mix of
post punk, slacker rock, and C86 style indie
pop.
Monster of the Week suffers from some
mild genre identity issues and its shifts in
mood can be somewhat abrupt. Straight-
ahead indie bangers like "Provincials" slip
by pleasantly, but it's in the sauntering beauty
of blissed-out tracks like "Celebrity Deaths"
and "Laser Floyd" where Hudson's songwriting really shines. The opening lines of the
former, "I finally figured out / Don't want to
be famous / I guess it's just as well / I was
never in danger," immediately instil a feeling
of nostalgia and placid introspection.
I
While most songs on the album maintain
a sunshiny disposition, catchy melodies, and
purposeful beats, a darker message of apathy
and avoidance lurks in Hudson's lyrics; this
theme of apathy can also be found in moments of musical repose on tracks like the
instrumental synth dirge "Theme #6."
On "Regency" Hudson sings, "Heard you
say / Before the line went dead / What an asshole / Fuck him / And I barely care / So I
know you're right /I'm unfeeling / So what?"
What might have become a moment of fragility is instead passed off with a shrug, and yet
the tenderness of the voice behind those lyrics suggests a sham.
Hudson's unique vocals lend themselves
perfectly to dreamy synths and jangling guitars. Every track on Monster of the Week
manages to identify itself from the others,
both sonically and emotionally. The cynical
and superficial lyrics paint a tongue-in-cheek
portrait of Hudson's disillusioned generation
and his own struggle for self-identity from
the perspective of an insider in the fickle music industry.
With Monster of the Week, Rec Centre has
accomplished something that is not always
easy: creating an album that is interesting on
the inside and out. Its driving synth pop is
both an acceptable soundtrack for a sunny
summer's day, as well as a welcome companion for a rainy winter's night.
— Garth Covernton
LOSCIL
Sea Island
(Kranky)
Sea Island is the latest release by Scott
Morgan (better known as Loscil), which
explores spaces in and around Vancouver
through ambient noise-making. Previous releases such as First Narrows, Sketches from
New Brighton, and Strathcona Variations,
had already established Morgan as a Vancouver ambient mainstay.
On Sea Island, Morgan bends the limits
of how we think about space in a traditional
sense — through the traces of history, implied
52
UNDER REVIEW material realities, and a blending of organic
and inorganic textures — until neither of the
two are certain or stable.
Morgan utilizes instrumentation (violin,
piano, vibraphone) and some vocal work for
this album, which has become more common on ambient releases over the past few
years. What really differentiates Loscil from
his peers is his ability to synthesize these elements with electronics and field recordings
in order to create poly-rhythmic pieces with
conceptual weight.
The album is subtle and hard to pin down.
Sonar pings reccur throughout, revisiting a
deep-sea/nautical theme Morgan has played
with in the past. Morgan uses the formless
and the fluid as embodied in a clunky metal
tube (a submarine), employing a navigational
system used by deep-sea animals.
A sizeable chunk of the literal Sea Island
became an airport in 1931, thrusting the island into the gears of industrial modernity.
Sea Island has also been the location of a
warplane factory — "Catalina 1943" referring to the Catalina seaplane — commercial
aviation industry, several skytrain stations,
and a major sewage treatment plant on the
Iona Peninsula, all landmarks of a distinctly
peripheral space.
"Iona," an eight-minute drony metallic
ode to that peninsula (also the site of the album's cover artwork), is full of whirrs and
hisses that sound remarkably like airplane
propellers, or sea winds. "Sturgeon Bank" is
notably more beat-driven, becoming almost
danceable at points; it is also the name of a
marshy sector opposite Sea Island, a wildlife
management area which is slowly eroding
into the Fraser River.
Most of the tracks, however, are deeply
cryptic. They are studies of the liminal space
between the organic and the inorganic. "Sea
Island Murders" is the album's pearl nestled
in an oyster of drone. Whether a clever newspaper tag line or a rusting urban legend,
there's nothing to indicate if the murders actually took place; instead they become part
of the landscape (and soundscape) as it's experienced by listeners — story told as place,
place told as story.
—Joshua Gabert-Doyon
LIE
Consent
(That's Cool)
Lie's Consent is almost as infectiously
listenable as it is disconcerting and nerve-
wracking. At once, Consent manages to be a
record that is as fun to listen to as it is politically and philosophically violent and confrontational.
Guitarist Ashlee Luk's screeching instrumental wails at times read like White Lung-
lite, buried only slightly further back in the
mix than I'd like. "Casual Embrace" starts
with a furiously rapid lead arrangement that
only gives up during the bridges, where it
twists itself into a dissonant arpeggio which
is not quite as haunting as Luk's vocal material. Like the other songs on Consent, "Casual Embrace" deals head-on with issues of
feminism, sexual power, and subjugation.
The album is not comfortable source material, which makes each track all the more engaging to absorb.
Consent sits firmly within an already saturated darkwave revival, but it would be hard to
come across a better example, executed more
firmly than with Lie. Strong and aggressive
instrumentation, including an ever-present
UNDER REVIEW
53 guitar scream and looming drum fills, keeps
the nine songs on this LP steaming all the
way towards the fantastic finisher, "Seams."
Post-punk fans in particular will find a lot to
like behind the album's relatively clean production, although the very modern amount of
reverb on some tracks' vocals sometimes has
the tendency to cover up Luk's naturally stellar singing.
Either standing as a punk record for goth
kids, or a coldwave album for punk nerds,
Consent manages to bridge the gap between
ear candy and brain candy, providing both
points to ponder and beats to stomp to.
—Fraser Dobbs
THE CROWBOTS
Days Run Away
(Self-Released)
What do you get when you spend a year
and a half scavenging the carcasses of 20th-
century rock songs, then spend another year
and a half frankensteining them back to life?
If you're The Crowbots, you get five energetic tracks that sound at once classical and
freshly technical.
Recorded in 2013 by Justin Guptell, this
album sounds like you're getting a rockin'
live performance in the comfort of your own
headphones. That's because The Crowbots
recorded the whole band in the same room,
at the same time. As a result, the sound is raw
and loose and under-produced, but also right
on the money. The Crowbots draw you in
with familiar sounds so you're close enough
to feel the blast when they put the hammer
down in songs like "The Shakes," or when
they cross into the realm of advanced waveforms, metallic pulses, and fuzzy frequencies right in the middle of boppin' songs like
"Ceci Doo-Wop" and "Gridlock Boogie."
Days Run Away moves like a noisy river
through rock's tumultuous history and picks
up its fair share of treasures along the way.
If there's one fault in this debut EP, it's that
it's easy to think you've heard it all before
— but keep listening. It's the same bottle,
yes, but the wine is new. Those Marty Mc-
Fly Fender Strat solos turn into dreamy ice
cream beats, and those Jimi Hendrix riffs turn
into Mark Mothersbaugh synth pop, just for
fun. All things considered, Days Run Away
is refined but still spontaneous, like a good
hair day. It marks The Crowbots as a band to
watch out for in 2015. —Adam Smylie
54
UNDER REVIEW by Alex De Boer II Illustrations by Dana Kearley
Up Main, hiking up, we pressed our foreheads against a moving wall of rain. Past 5th
the road became a wishbone and we were
drawn towards the piece that would have,
no doubt, been shorter. This piece, a street
crowned Kingsway, also happened to be the
most direct route to cheap drinks. Doubles
were six bucks, or five fifty, or something in
that price range.
The bar was above the Charles Cabaret —
sat on top of it like a hat hiding an inebriated head. Only it was actually the opposite
of that. The Charles was like a red velour cap
and Avanti's Sports Bar was a sloppy face
with a toothy beer-glass smile.
Jane and I entered this garish grin. It was
foggy and dark inside; some of the lights
might have been broken, a couple were flickering. As I began to feel a fine mist imbed
in the already smoky air, I considered asking
Jane her thoughts. Avanti's had always been
a den, but tonight it was cavernous.
There's a table in the corner.
Alright.
The table we slid towards, much like all the
rest, was held in the palm of a padded booth.
The pillowy leather seats were restrained by
deep-stitched seams that felt like giant fingers frozen in gesture.
NO FUN FICTION
55 A second set of double gin and tonics appeared on our table. 1 looked over and Jane's
hand, gripping a small pen, drew curtains on
her napkin. These curtains blew out from a
window in a lapping sweep. Jane's posture
and forward-facing head hid her hand motions while her vertical gaze pointed towards
the illustration.
As I noticed her scribbling, I remembered
thinking that I wanted to take a sip of my
drink. Did I take that sip or just desire to
take it? There was a tonic buzz in my mouth.
When was that from? Fruitless anxiety rolled
through my mind as Jane interjected.
What's that guy doing?
She didn't specify who she was referring
to, but my head tilted left as if the ground to
my right had raised.
With a tinge of cheap cinematics, a middle-aged man with middle parted grey hair
motioned us to come towards him. My immediate response was skepticism and mild
annoyance.
Jane was gliding towards him before I had
fully processed my thoughts. Through the
low-laying smoke, her long skirt billowed. In
the dimness her figure seemed curvier than
before and her hair longer, with coiling ends.
When she arrived at the seated man, her
back bent and she put her hand to her ear,
connecting with the man's turned face. Between them bridged a mysterious exchange,
for which I could not interpret in murmur
or smirk. The back of Jane's head betrayed
nothing.
As the man's face turned forward again,
Jane raised her back, lowered her hand, and
returned to me from across the room.
There's a very secret meeting happening
downstairs.
Now? At the Charles?
Apparently. That guy told me a password.
I started to laugh at the vagueness of this
information, but Jane was already up and
moving towards the exit. We need your feedback!
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WIN GFT CERTIFICATES TO VINYL RECORDS, THE UDO, b THE RICKSHAW!  On the way down it felt like the stairs met
my feet and not vice versa. The stairwell added structure but no support as I disorientedly
ventured into the Charles, to some confidential event.
A large man in a navy suit and a blue-
hued tie greeted us. His welcome involved
standing menacingly in front of a black curtain. Jane leaned in and said something that
sounded a lot like "Save-On-Foods."
The bouncer moved as if on a hinge; the
curtain was pulled open and I followed Jane
inside.
My eyes had been adjusted to the inky interior of the bar above, so the beams of light
that suddenly hit my face were assaulting, at
the least.
What is this?
But Jane couldn't respond. She was gone.
Replaced by silhouettes that grew thinner and
thicker in front of pendulating orange flashes.
These figures, my new companions, gradually took human form as my eyes adjusted.
What I saw was perplexing. Men, almost
all men, white men, older men, wearing Hawaiian collared shirts. They were swaying
and cheersing one another, sloshing beer onto
their open-toed shoes.
As my eyes adapted, so did my ears. The
music was like nothing I had ever heard at the
Charles. Some form of miami retiree reggae/
rock 'n' rock. The room was drunk on bouncy, tropical melodies and syrupy refrains.
Riffs hit the walls and poured back down into
half full beer glasses.
I turned to the stage, preparing for something hauntingly optimistic, something really
blindly sunny. The drums yelled in cursive
font: JIMMY P & THE BILLIONAIRES!
Like their audience, the band wore bright,
floral button-up shirts. The lead singer was
elderly. He sported a pink sunvisor and ca-
pris. Around his neck hung a string of plastic
tequila shot glasses.
This next song's called "Overwaitea in
Paradise!"
As the bass player threw some sort of green
paper out into the audience I waded frantically through the flooding brightness back
the way I had come. The black curtain wiped
against my back as I stumbled under it and
the Caribbean tune that sprung after me halted exactly as the heavy curtain hit the ground.
Jane stood there.
The man in Avanti's told me that was going
to be a condo developers meeting.
NO FUN FICTION  RECIPE FOR DEBAUCHERY
by Christopher Lennox- Aasen II Photography by Konstantin Prodanovic
II Illustrations by Tara Bigdeli
"I thought I was going to get kicked out of
the band," admits BRASS frontman Devon
Motz.
We're sitting in Motz's apartment on a
blustery January evening, along with guitarist Tristan Milne and bass player Zak Garrett.
It's difficult to nail down an evening with all
members in town, a running theme with the
band, so drummer Rory Troughton isn't present. He is mercilessly made fun of.
A year ago the future of BRASS was in serious doubt when Motz announced he was
going away for several months to Australia.
"It's hard to be a band when a member isn't
there," says Milne, on Motz's departure, "it's
hard to make the same commitment."
BRASS was faced with a tough decision:
bum out, or fade away. But even though it
was a tough choice, it wasn't really a choice
at all.
"Those four months before Devon left, we
just went for broke," says Milne. "We overplayed the shit out of Vancouver." BRASS
released their self-titled four-song EP in January to get something (anything) out there.
With the fire lit under their asses, they made
a name for themselves as reckless and rowdy
performers. During their last show before
Motz's departure, Milne smashed his guitar
to pieces on a concrete floor; Motz claims it
was "the best guitar smash" he'd ever seen.
"We had less than six months of last year
to actually do stuff like jam, write, or play
shows," says Milne.
With their vocalist on a different continent,
the other BRASS members made the choice
to dig in their heels. They wrote songs and
sent demo recordings to Motz, who then
wrote most of the lyrics while rambling and
rolling around Down Under.
As soon as Motz returned from his walkabout, the band began playing shows again,
the very first being a last-second Music Waste
appearance.
"It was weird. It wasn't the crowd we were
used to y'know? They didn't throw beer cans
and stuff at us," says Garrett.
RASS Motz adds,"Yeah, a friend said it was the
most precise they'd seen us play, and the
most boring!"
This is in stark contrast to BRASS'S official return show, not a week later. On a weekend night at the Astoria and promoted by Art
Signified, the roster was stacked. It was a
recipe for debauchery.
"I feared for my life," says Garrett. It was
an auspicious night.
"That first show back really made me
think," says Milne, "we're there to entertain.
I want to fly around, and enjoy the songs.
Everyone is there to have the most fun they
can have in a short amount of time. A lot of
people have the attitude of 'Well, I can't go
too wild' and no, man. You literally can't go
too wild at a BRASS show."
Motz sips his beer and thinks for a moment. "That's the thing, I don't want to sound
pompous. People know we are fun to watch
live, but I know lots of people doubted that
we'd be able to make a good record."
Despite all the complications along the
way, BRASS'S debut album No Soap Radio
is exactly that: a damn good record. One that
shows growth and maturity from the band,
without sacrificing any of the punk-rock
sneer found on their EP. And thanks to producer Jesse Gander, it sounds amazing. "IT WAS THE BEST RECORDING EXPERIENCE OF MY LIFE.
THE RECORD SOUNDS LIKE EXCESS. IT'S ALL HIGH VELOCITY AND UNSUSTAINABLE."
"It was the best recording experience of
my life," says Milne. "The record sounds like
excess. It's all high velocity and unsustainable."
"My favourite track is 'Steal of a Deal.' I
wrote the riff when I was in a weird head-
space, not working, living off a meagre
amount of money, I was all fucked up," says
Garrett. "That song basically sums up how I
felt at the time."
"There's a song called 'Talking Like a
Idiot,'" says Motz, "it's about cops, but it's
also about keyboard warriors. That fucking 'I
know everything about everything because I
read it on a BuzzFeed article' attitude. Just
because people have opposing opinions,
doesn't mean either of them is right."
I ask what memory stood out the most from
their recording session, and Garrett bursts out
laughing immediately.
"On the way to the studio, we were going
to listen to a CD, and I was rooting through
this booklet and I found what I thought was
the White Stripes," Garrett explains, "you
know that red and white swirl album? Well, I
put it on, and it was Katy Perry. We laughed
so hard and just blasted it the whole way
there. That sort of set the precedent to the
recording: if it's poppy but rad, then fuck it,
y'know?" The other guys are in stitches at the
memory.
I'm sorry to say that there isn't much Katy
Perry influence shining through on the album,
but it is catchy, hooky, fun, and shit-kickingly
rad. I ask if they have any final thoughts on
the record.
"It leaves people with a feeling that there
is going to be more," says Milne, "more
BRASS records coming down the pipeline."
Make sure to keep an eye out for No Soap
Radio, out on vinyl and digital download this
spring.
63
BRASS  n
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Bepi Crespan Presents... SUN 7am
Bepi Crespan Presents... CiTR's 24 Hours Of Radio Art in a snack
size format! Difficult music, harsh electronics, spoken word, cut-
up/collage and general Crespan© weirdness. Twitter: @bepicre-
span. Blog: bepicrespan.blogspot.ca
CLASSICAL
Classical Chaos SUN 9am
From the Ancient World to the 21 st century, join host Marguerite
in exploring and celebrating classical music from around the
world.
TALK
Alphabet Soup Alternating Wednesdays 6pm
Alphabet Soup is a talk show which focuses on the writing of
MFA Creative Writing students at UBC. Topics include events happening in the program and the Vancouver art scene while promoting the writers and the genre which they are working in.
Aloud Alternating Thursdays 1pm
Aloud features authors and literary critics reading, analyzing and
discussing their favourite short stories. Every month we invite a
prominent Vancouver-based author or critic to share one of their
favourite pieces of short fiction on air. The show—one hour in
length—begins with the guest reading selections from the story
and ends with an engaging discussion of the work with Aloud
host, David Gaertner—a UBC postdoctoral fellow with a PhD in
Literature. Theme and interstitial music provided by Vancouver
musician Jason Starnes with support from UBC's First Nations
Studies Program. Read more at aloudliterature.tumblr.com and
follow us on Twitter @Aloud_Lit.
AstroTalk THU 3pm
Space is an interesting place. Marco slices up the night sky with
a new topic every week. Death Stars, Black Holes, Big Bangs, Red
Giants, the Milky Way, G-Bands, Syzygy's, Pulsars, Super Stars...
The Sector FRI 8am
Discussing the world of social justice, non-profits, charities and
activism. Join Ethan for in-depth interviews, examinations of
nonprofit missions and causes, and discussions of everything
from philanthropy to progressive politics.
Synchronicity MON 12pm
Join host Marie B and discuss spirituality, health and feeling
good. Tune in and tap into good vibrations that help you remember why you're here: to have fun!
News 101 FRI 5pm
Vancouver's only live, volunteer-produced, student and community newscast. Every week, we take a look back at the week's local, national and international news, as seen from a fully independent media perspective.
Queer FM Vancouver: Reloaded TUE 8am
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transexual communities of Vancouver. Lots of human interest features, background
on current issues and great music.queerfmradio@gmail.com
Radio Free Thinker TUE 3pm
Promoting skepticism, critical thinking and science, we examine popular extraordinary claims and subject them to critical
analysis.
Terry Project Podcast WED 11:30am
There once was a project named Terry, That wanted to make
people wary, Of things going on In the world that are wrong
without making it all seem too scary.
All Ears Alternating Wednesdays 1pm
(Alternating with UBC Arts On Air.) All Ears is an advice radio program targetted to the UBC community. We try to answer your
questions and address topics sent via social media and over the
phone. Interviews and segments relating to campus life will be
featured, all in our attempt to better our community and supply positive feedback.
Extraenvironmentalist WED 2pm
Exploring the mindset of an outsider looking in on Earth.
Featuring interviews with leading thinkers in the area of sustainable economics and our global ecological crisis.
Arts Report WED 5pm
Reviews, interviews and coverage of local arts (film, theatre,
dance, visual and performance art, comedy, and more) by host
Jake Costello and the Arts Reporters.
UBC Arts On Air Alternating Wednesdays 6pm
Ira Nadel, UBC English, offers scintillating profiles and unusual interviews with members of UBC Arts world. Tune in for programs,
people and personalities in Art
Sexy In Van City WED 10pm
Your weekly dose of education and entertainment in the realm
of relationships and sexuality, sexyinvancity.com/category/
sexy-i n-va ncity-radio.
The Social Focus Alternating Thursdays 6pm
An interview-based show about how students, past and present, have come up with creative ways to overcome social challenges in the community. Each episode will invite individuals
to share their stories of success and failure, along with actionable advice on how to start an innovative initiative that serves
the community. Hear from UBC students, alumni and others involved in the community!
The Matt & Ryan Show Alternating Thursdays 7:30pm
the Matt and Ryan show featuring Ryan and Matt. An hour and
a half of pure fun and good music. Matt and Ryan take calls,
give advice, and generally tell you what's up. The phone lines
are open.
Language to Language MON 11am
Encouraging language fluency and cultural awareness.
REGGAE
The Rockers Show
Reggae inna all styles and fashion.
SUN 12pm New Era                                      Alternating Thursdays 7:30pm
ROOTS / FOLK /  BLUES Showcases up and coming artists who are considered "under-
 !  dogs" in the music industry. The show will provide a platform
Blood On The Saddle                      Alternating Sundays 3pm for new artists who are looking to get radio play.
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-boots country. Hip-Hop music from all over the world along with features of
  multi-genre artists.
Pacific Pickin' TUE 6am       -—- - — -
Bluegrass, old-time music, and its derivatives with Arthur and EXPERIMEN TA L
the lovely Andrea Berman. Email: pacificpickin@yahoo.com - -	
  More Than Human                                                      SUN 7pm
Folk Oasis                                                                 WED 8pm Strange and wonderful electronic sounds from the past, present,
Two hours of eclectic folk/roots music, with a big emphasis on and future with host Gareth Moses. Music from parallel worlds,
our local scene. C'mon in! A kumbaya-free zone since 1997.
Email: folkoasis@gmail.com Pop Drones                                                            WED 10am
Unearthing the depths of contemporary cassette and vinyl un-
The Saturday Edge                                                     SAT 8am derground. Ranging from DIY bedroom pop and garage rock all
A personal guide to world and roots music—with African, Latin, the way to harsh noise and, of course, drone.
and European music in the first half, followed by Celtic, blues,	
songwriters, Cajun, and whatever else fits! Email: steveedge3@ LATIN AMERICAN
mac.com. 	
  La Fiesta                                          Alternating Sundays 3pm
Code Blue                                                                  SAT 3pm Salsa, Bachata, Merengue, Latin House, and Reggaeton with your
From backwoods delta low-down slide to urban harp honks, host Gspot DJ.
blues, and blues roots with your hosts Jim, Andy, and Paul.
Email: codeblue@paulnorton.ca
SOUL/R&B
The Leo Ramirez Show MON 5pm
The best of mix of Latin American music. Email: leoramirez@can-
ada.com
Soulship Enterprise SAT 7pm
A thematically oriented blend of classic funk, soul, r&b, jazz, and
afrobeat tunes, The Happy Hour has received great renown as
the world's foremost funky, jazzy, soulful, and delightfully awkward radio show hosted by people named Robert Gorwa and/
or Christopher Mylett Gordon Patrick Hunter III.
ETHIOPIAN
African Rhyhms
Website: www.africanrhythmsradio.com
FRI 7:30pm
HIP HOP
Nod on the List TUE 11pm
"Nod on the List is a program featuring new urban and alternative music, sounds of beats, hip hop, dancehail, bass, interviews, guest hosts and more every Tuesday at 11pm.
scads_international@yahoo.com
facebook-So Salacious"
Crimes & Treasons , TUE 9pm
Uncensored Hip-Hop & Trill ish. Hosted by
Jamal Steeles, Trinidad Jules & DJ Relly Rels.
Website: http://crimesandtreasons.blogspot.ca.
Email: dj@crimesandtreasons.com.
Vibes & Stuff TUE 4pm
Feeling nostalgic? Vibes and Stuff has you covered bringing
you some of the best 90s to early 2000s hip-hop artist all in
one segment. All the way from New Jersey and New York City,
DJ Bmatt and DJ Jewels will be bringing the east coast to the
west coast throughout the show. We will have you reminiscing
about the good ol' times with Vibes and Stuff every Wednesday
afternoon from 1:00pm-2:00pm PST.
E-mail: vibesandstuffhiphop@gmail.com
Shookshookta SUN 10am
A program targeted to Ethiopian people that encourages education and personal development.
CHINESE /KOREAN
Asian Wave WED 4pm
Tune in to Asian Wave 101 to listen to some of the best music from the Chinese language and Korean music industries, as
well the latest news coming from the two entertainment powerhouses of the Asian pop scene. The latest hits from established
artists, rookies only just debuted, independent artists and classic
songs from both industries, can all be heard on Asian Wave 101,
as well as commentary, talk and artist spotlights of unsigned
Canadian talent. Only on CiTR 101.9 FM.
RUSSIAN
NashaVolna SAT 6pm
News, arts, entertainment and music for the Russian community,
local and abroad. Website: nashavolna.ca.
INDIAN
Rhythmsindia Alternating Sundays 8pm
Featuring a wide range of music from India, including popular music from
the 1930s to the present; Ghazals and Bhajans, Qawwalis, pop
and regional language numbers. ITALIAN
else.
Website: www.radiozero.com[
Give Em The Boot TUE 2pm
Sample the various flavours of Italian music from north
to south, traditional to modern on this bilingual show.
Folk, singer-songwriter, jazz and much more. Un pro-
gramma bilingue che esplora il mondo della musica italiana.
Website: http://giveemtheboot.wordpress.com. facebook.com/
givetheboot.
PERSIAN
Simorgh THU 5pm
Simorgh Radio is devoted to the education and literacy for the
Persian speaking communities and those interested in connecting to Persian oral and written literature. Simorgh takes you
through a journey of ecological sustainability evolving within
cultural and social literacy. Simorgh the mythological multiplicity of tale-figures, lands-in as your mythological narrator in the
storyland; the contingent space of beings, connecting Persian
peoples within and to Indigenous peoples.
SACRED
Mantra SAT 5pm
An electic mix of electronic and acoustic beats and layers, chants
and medicine song. Exploring the diversity of the worlds sacred
sounds - traditional, contemporary and futuristic. Email: man-
traradioshow@gmail.com
DANCE /ELECTRONIC
Synaptic Sandwich . SAT 9pm
If you like everything from electro/techno/trance/8-bit music/
retro '80s, this is the show for you! Website: synapticsandwich.
net
The Late Night Show FRI 1230am
The Late Night Show features music from the underground
Jungle and Drum & Bass scene, which progresses to Industrial,
Noise and Alternative No Beat into the early morning. Following
the music, we then play TZM broadcasts, beginning at 6 a.m.
Inner Space Alternating Wednesdays 6:30pm
Dedicated to underground electronic music, both experimental
and dance-oriented. Live DJ sets and guests throughout.
Bootlegs & B-Sides SUN 9pm
Hosted by Doe Ran, tune in for the finest remixes from soul to
dubstep and ghetto funk to electro swing. Nominated finalist
for 'Canadian college radio show of the year 2012' Pioneer DJ
Stylus Awards. Soundcloud.com/doe-ran and search "Doe-Ran"
on Facebook.
ROCK /POP /INDIE
Canada Post-Rock FRI 10pm
Formerly on CKXU, Canada-Post Rock now resides on the west
coast but it's still committed to the best in ppst-rock, drone,
ambient, experimental, noise and basically anything your host
Pbone can put the word "post" infront of.
Copy/Paste THU 11pm Crescendo SUN 6pm
If it makes you move your feet (or nod your head), it'll be heard Starting with some serene chill tracks at the beginning and
on copy/paste. Tune in every week for a full hour DJ mix by building to the INSANEST FACE MELTERS OF ALL TIMEEE,
Autonomy, running the gamut from cloud rap to new jack Crescendo will take you on a musical magic carpet ride that
techno and everything in between. you couldn't imagine in your wildest dreams. Besides oversell-
  ing his show, Jed will play an eclectic set list that builds through-
Techno Progressivo Alternating Sundays 8pm out the hour and features both old classics, and all the greatest
A mix of the latest house music, tech-house, prog-house and new tracks that the hipsters think they know about before any-
techno. one else does.
Trancendance SUN 10pm Dave Radio with Radio Dave FRI 12pm
Hosted by DJ Smiley Mike and DJ Caddyshack, Trancendance Your noon-hour guide to what's happening in Music and Theatre
has been broadcasting from Vancouver, B.C. since 2001. We fa- in Vancouver. Lots of tunes and talk.
vour Psytrance, Hard Trance and Epic Trance, but also play Acid
Trance, Deep Trance, Hard Dance and even some Breakbeat. Discorder Radio TUE 5pm
We also love a good Classic Trance Anthem, especially if it's re- Discorder Magazine now has its own radio show! Join us to hear
mixed. Current influences include Sander van Doom, Gareth excerpts of interviews, reviews and more!
Emery, Nick Sentience, Ovnimoon, Ace Ventura, Save the Robot,
Liquid Soul and Astrix. Older influences include Union Jack, Carl Duncan's Donuts THU 12pm
Cox, Christopher Lawrence, Whoop! Records, Tidy Trax, Platipus Sweet treats from the pop underground. Hosted by Duncan,
Records and Nukleuz. Email: djsmileymike @trancendance.net. sponsored by donuts. http://duncansdonuts.wordpress.com.
Website: www.trancendance.net. 	
 ;  Spice of Life THU 2pm
Inside Out TUE8pm The spice extends life. The spice expands consciousness. The
  Spice of Life brings you a variety of Post-Rock, Shoegaze, Math
Radio Zero FRI 2pm Rock and anything that else that progresses. Join host Ben Life
An international mix of super-fresh weekend party jams from as he meanders whimsically through whatever comes to mind
New Wave to foreign electro, baile, Bollywood, and whatever on the walk to CITR. Breakfast With The Browns MON 8am
Samsquantch's Hideaway             Alternating Wednesdays 630pm Your favourite Brownsters, James and Peter, offer a savoury
All-Canadian music with a focus on indie-rock/pop. blend of the familiar and exotic in a blend of aural delights.
Email: anitabinder@hotmail.com. Email: breakfastwiththebrowns@hotmail.com.
Parts Unknown                                                          MON 1pm Chthonic Boom!                                                          SUN 5pm
An indie pop show since 1999, it's like a marshmallow sandwich: A show dedicated to playing psychedelic music from parts of the
soft and sweet and best enjoyed when poked with a stick and spectrum (rock, pop, electronic) as well as garage and noise rock.
held close to a fire. 	
The Morning After Show TUE 11:30am
The Cat's Pajams                                                        FRI 11am The Morning After Show with Oswaldo Perez every Tuesday at
The cat's pajamas: a phrase to describe something/someone su- 11:30a.m. Playing your favourite songs for 13 years. The morn-
per awesome or cool. The Cat's Pajams: a super awesome and ing after what? The morning after whatever you did last night,
cool radio show featuring the latest and greatest indie pop, rock. Eclectic show with live music, local talent and music you won't
lofi and more from Vancouver and beyond! hear anywhere else.
The Burrow MON 3pm
Noise Rock, Alternative, Post-Rock, with a nice blend of old
'classics' and newer releases. Interviews and live performances
The Permanent Rain Radio Alternating Thursdays 1pm
Music-based, pop culture-spanning program with a focus on
the local scene. Join co-hosts Chloe and Natalie for an hour of
lighthearted twin talk and rad tunes from a variety of artists
who have been featured on our website. What website? theper-
manentrainpress.com
ECLECTIC
Transition State THU 11am
High quality music with a special guest interview from the
Pharmaceutical Sciences. Frank discussions and music that
can save the world
Shine On TUE 1pm
An eclectic mix of the latest, greatest tunes from the Vancouver
underground and beyond, connected through a different theme
each week. Join your host Shea every Tuesday for a groovy musical experience!
Soul Sandwich THU 4pm
A myriad of your favourite music tastes all cooked into one show.
From Hip Hop to Indie rock to African jams, Ola will play through
a whirlwind of different genres, each sandwiched between another. This perfect layering of yummy goodness will blow your
mind. AND, it beats subway.
The Shakespeare Show , WED 12pm
Dan Shakespeare is here with music for your ear. Kick back with
gems of the previous years.
Up on the Roof FRI 9am
Friday Mornings got you down? Climb Up On the Roof and wake
up with Robin and Jake! Weekly segments include improvised
crime-noir radio dramas, trivia contents, on-air calls to Jake's
older brother and MORE! We'll be spinning old classics, new favourites, and lots of ultra-fresh local bands!
Hans Von Kloss' Misery Hour
Pretty much the best thing on radio.
WED 11pm
Suburban Jungle WED 8am
Live from the Jungle Room, join radio host Jack Velvet for an
eclectic mix of music, sound bites, information and inanity.
Email: dj@jackvelvet.net.
Are You Aware Alternating Thursdays 6pm
Celebrating the message behind the music: Profiling music and
musicians that take the route of positive action over apathy.
Peanut Butter'n'jams Alternating Thursdays 6:30pm
Explore local music and food with your hosts, Brenda and Jordie.
You'll hear interviews and reviews on eats and tunes from your
neighbourhood, and a weekly pairing for your date calendar.
Live From Thunderbird Radio Hell THU 9pm
Featuring live band(s) every week performing in the CiTR Lounge.
Most are from Vancouver, but sometimes bands from across the
country and around the world.
Aural Tentacles THU 12am
It could be global, trance, spoken word, rock, the unusual and
the weird, or it could be something different. Hosted by DJ
Pierre.
Email: auraltentacles@hotmail.com
FemConcept FRI 1pm
Entirely Femcon music as well as spoken word content relevant
to women's issues (interviews with campus groups such as the
Women's Center, SASC, etc.). Musical genres include indie-rock,
electronic, punk, with an emphasis on local and Canadian Artists.
Nardwuar FRI 3:30pm
Join Nardwuar the Human Serviette for Clam Chowder flavoured
entertainment. Doot doola doot doo...doot doo! Email: nard-
wuar@nardwuar.com
The Medicine Show FRI 11PM
"A variety show, featuring musicians, poets and entertainment industry guests whose material is considered to be therapeutic. We encourage and promote independent original, local live music and art. Randophonic SAT 11pm
Ra ndophonic is best thought of as an intraversal jukebox which
has no concept of genre, style, political boundaries, or even
space-time relevance. But It does know good sounds from bad.
Lately, the program has been focused on Philip Random's All
Vinyl Countdown + Apocalypse (the 1,111 greatest records you
probably haven't heard). And we're not afraid of noise.
great Terry dark, for Kenny Wheeler'ls a latter day classic.
Stranded FRI 6pm
Join your host Matthew for a weekly mix of exciting sounds, past
and present, from his Australian homeland. And journey with
Mm as he features fresh tunes and explores the alternative musical heritage of Canada.
The Vampire's Ball WED 1am
Eclectic audio alchemy; the soundtrack for your transmutation.
Rock, weird stuff, dark stuff, and whatever's banging around in
the mind of maQLu this week, thevampiresball@gmail.com the-
vampiresballoncitr.com
Kew It Up WED 3pm
Abrasive fight-or-flight music played at hot loud volumes, uncooperative songs for things that are not alright Punk, Noise-Rock,
Post-Punk, Experimental, Industrial, Noisy, ad nauseum
Wize Men MON 6pm
Join your hosts Dan and Austin for an exuberant adventure filled
with drama, suspense, action, romance and most importantly
wisdom. Our musical tastes span across genres and each week
there is a new theme!
G4E Alternating Tuesdays l2-2am
Vinyl mixes, exclusive local tunes, good vibes from a round the
world, a thought and a dream or two. Reggae, House, Techno,
Ambient, Dance Hall, Hip Hop, African, Psychedelic, Noise,
Experimental, Eclectic.
CINEMATIC
little Bit of Soul MON 4pm
Little Bit of Soul plays, primarily, old recordings of jazz, swing,
big band, blues, oldies and motown.
DRAMA/POETRY
Skald's Hall FRI 9pm
Skald's Hall entertains with the spoken word via story
readings, poetry recitals, and drama. Established
and upcoming artists join host Brian MacDonald.
Interested in performing on air? Contact us on Twitter:
@Skalds_Hall.
SPORTS
Thunderbird Eye THU 3:30pm
Your weekly roundup of UBC Thunderbird sports action from on
campus and off with your host Wilson Wong.
PUNK
Rocket from Russia THU 10am
Hello hello hello! I interview bands and play new, international
and local punk rock music Great Success! P.S.. Broadcasted in
brokenish English. Hosted by Russian Tim. Website: http://rock-
etfromrussla.tumblr.com. Email: rocketfrom russiacitr@gmail.
com. Facebook: https://www.facebook.comRocketFromRussia.
Twitter httpy/twitter.com/tima_t2ar.
Generation Annihilation SAT 12pm
On the air since 2002, playing old and new punk on the noncommercial side of the spectrum. Hosts: Aaron Brown, Jeff "The
Foat" Kraft. Website: generationannihilation.com. Facebook:
facebook.com/generationannHiilation.
Exploding Head Movies MON 7pm
Join gak as he explores music from the movies, tunes from television and any other cinematic source, along with atmospheric
pieces, cutting edge new tracks and strange old goodies that
could be used In a soundtrack to be.
JAZZ
The Jazz Show MON 9pm
Feb. 2: A celebration of the birthday of one of the finest saxophonists ever to pick up the horn. Alto and tenor saxophonist
Sonny Stitt and the album "Personal Appearance"
Feb.9: Ace trumpeter and teacher Louis Smith with his sophomore album for Blue Note with Monk's tenor saxophonist Charlie
Rouse. "SmithviHe" is burner!
Feb.16:Tonight the album the made The Dave Brubeck Quartet
a household word and put him on the cover of Time Magazine.
"Jazz Goes To College". Brubeck's piano and Paul Desmond's alto
saxophone was music magic.
Feb.23: A Canadian treasure born here in Powell River B.C.
Pianist/composer Don Thompson with a group of stellar
Canadian players like saxophonist/pianist Phil Dwyer and drum
Power Chord SAT 1pm
Vancouver's longest running metal show. If you're Into music
that's on the heavier/darker side of the spectrum, then you'll like
it. Sonic assault provided by Geoff, Marcia, and Andy.
Flex Your Head TUE 6pm
Punk rock and hardcore since 1989. Bands and guests from
around the world.
The Absolute Value of Insomnia SAT 2am
Four solid hours of fresh generative music do the Absolute Value
of Noise and its world famous Generator. Ideal for enhancing
your dreams or, if sleep is not on your agenda, your reveries.  .
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