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 IIP
111
:-■"   '*_. "■   .-■
February 2013
• Discorder Revisited
How That Magazine
From CiTR Began
• SHiNDiG! Part One
• Cameron Macleods!
• Babysitter      ,Jm
• Data Romanjilll
• Are You That DJ&i
Part One ,]lfi
ftw\
WA guideWDiTRfm 101.9
Supporting Vancouver's independent music oomnneviy for 30 years
''IMPV
9 '^ff JIT    1!51Il   <4& UPCOMING SHOWS
RQM^ON/CANnWUL& BEN ROGERS
UttySmr
mnsnL
wiftSpedal Guests H»inGG»JS
3 AFAREWEUTBTlff WALDORF
fwMHrtarWHdarfflntaclHBSUI
IMSMlENSSr
Diraimue
Comedians: Emma WHae,OaROfstc9Qft, aid Ssnonftng
HiliHAWULBOfiE
Jasper Staalfa Raleigh Ife/teFMrtMin. t&m
MPtfiYimsii-TiBiiiTBsraiairnsD
He Jofis, Use IJassnlfas, The Weaous Qfites, aid urate
iTHQKraCDEMONS
J MctadOailieRm.liWteMIIF
10TT AID THE ALL-SENG I
RAN6DA
I BLACKOUTBEACH, NURSE
WOCStiAW
254 East Hastings Street • 604.681.8915
mmm
MARCH HIGHLIGHTS
MAR 1   ANCI1ENTS WITCH MOUNTAIN, and awe
 SIQ+S/Cafr.  S15a*door.  DOORS8PM
MAR 2    NOMEANSNOfflEINVASfVES.^rmx,
$22+S/Cadv.   S25atdoor.   POORS 8PM
MAR 3 SWING1N'UTTERS plus guests
$15+S/Cadfc   DOORS8PM
MAR 5   MARDUK MOONSPBJU and more
 $30+S/CaoV.   S35atdoor.   P00RS6PM
MAR 29 TODAY IS THE DAY aodmcc
$20+S/CaoY   0OORS7PM
www.liveatrickshaw.com
Limited edition!
Only 100 copies printed!
3 '1   ucm
K>1.9Fw/CrTO.CA
DISCORDER, THAT MAGAZINE FROM CiTR,
CELEBRATES THIRTY YEARS IN PRINT.
UMiTED EDITION 15-MONTH CALENDARS
j AVAILABLE FOR ONLY $15.
i VJSTTDISCORDER.CATOBUYYOURS
j AND SUPPORT CiTR & DISCORDER! EDITOR'S NOTE: LIKE FINE WINE,
FINE CHEESE, AND ONE-LINERS FROM
ADAM MCKAY MOVIES
Happy 30th birthday, Disrordol Indeed, you do seem to just get better as time
passes. Ifyou were a person, I'd be showering you with gag gifts, bakingyou
the most delicious angel rood money cake imaginable, pub crawling with you
on Main Street, and getting the sickest Vancouver supergroup to wail the most
punk rock version of"Happy Birthday" you've ever heard. In string bikinis.
But, you are a beautiful and unique glossy-covered magazine, so instead
we'll fill your pages with fond memories and the people who made them since
you were conceived in that glorious February of 1983.
I'm humbled and honoured to be at the helm of this landmark issue of
Discorder, but at the same time I feel like a bit ofa fraud. Kmdoflike a kid taking
credit for her first-place exploding volcano science project that was actually
constructed by her dad. So to thwart any inklings of that and prove worthy,
weVededkatedaconsiderable amount ofcontenttottte seeds that made the
mag grow, some ofwhich you've already seen on the cover, where art director
extraordinaire Jaz HaUoran made a kick-ass tribute to issue one, volume one,
ofDiscordcr. Withconfetti. We also chat with founding editors Mike Mines and
Jennifer Fahrni about the conception of this magazine from CiTR, along with
a bunch ofother nostalgic tidbits throughout the pages.
While January was tough for Vancouver's creative commnnhy, we've done
our best th's month to highlight the positive stuffHmtriiis city has been, and
stiU is, the foundation for, and the positive stuff this city has grown into, and
is now. Keep your chins up, gang. There's stiU so much good here.
More proof you say?Then open your eardrums to the airwaves where well
have special programming for Black History Month and Fundrive, COTl's
annual fundraiser, now in its eighth year. CaU in to the staff and volunteers
from February a8 to March 8 to donate to the station and help keep the
75-year-old frequency going for at least another 75.
On that note...
Read on and stay rad,
Laurel Borrowman
FEATURES
REGULARS
9-Discorder Revisited Once upon a time, Discorder was just a glimmer in two
eager parents' eyes. Meet Mom and Dal 12-SHiNDiG Winners, Part 1
If CiTRs annual batrJe-of-the-bands curse lives on, then second-place punk-
and-rolters Greenback High are destined for stardom. 13 Cameron MacLeod
Meet the man that critics everywhere are hailing as the "comedic equivalent of a
fine burgundy, smashed across an alligator skin-upholstered Marshall amplifier
blasting Van Kalen, powered by a fusion reactor." 16 - Babysitter Victoria
grunge rock trio recently signed to Montreal's Psychic Handshake assures us there
is indeed quality to be found in large quantity. And they've got the releases to prove
it 18 Data Romance With their first full-length set for release on February 19,
the dynamic and easily Googleable duo talk touring, band names, and why Steve
Aoki is a huge jerk. 39-Are You That DJ, Part 1 There comes a time when
blasting your Club Hitz playlist at your house party gets old. So then what do you
do? 101.9s second and third place DJ competition winners give us the deets.
04 Here's The Thing Valentine's Day
20 Calendar Jonathan Dy
22 Program Glide
27 Real live Action
30 Under Review
33 Art Project White Swallows
38 Charts February 1983
^Sl™Scorder.caon
the regular for new
articles, photos, and all
things music related!
t Cower story To pay homage to the first issue of Discorder, model Sydney Gregoire poses as the announcer from the original cover, updated with snappy modern illustrations.
Co-founding editor Jennifer Fahrni, on the 1983 original: "For the first one, I was digging through the archives of the radio station and I found this photo of this announcer—
woman—from UBC Radio, probably from 1945 or 1950 or something like that, and put her on the cover. * Photographer Hana Pesut Illustrators Michael Shante glasses,
cat-eyes, radio microphone, lettering. Aaron Read: outermost border/frame. White Swallows: innermost border/frame. Anne Emberiine. Discorder logo/lettering.
Editor
Laurel Borrowman
Art Director
Jaz HaUoran
Copy Editors
Jordan Ardanaz,
Steve Louie, Claire
Maegan Thomas
Under Review Editor
Jordan Ardanaz
RU Editor
Steve Louie
Chirag Mahajan
Eagle     Calendar listings
Claire Eagle
Corey Ratch
Dorothy Keufeld
CiTR Stat
Brenda Grunau
Student Radio Society
of UBC
Zarah Cheng,
Dorothy Neufeid
Jordan Ardanaz, Evan Brow, Robert
Catherall, Tristan foster
Photographers ft innstrators
Britta Bacchus, Casey Bennett, Josefa
Cameron, Tyler Crich, Jonathan Dy, Anne
Emberiine, Alex Heilbron, Victoria Johnson,
Jade Jordancin, Dana Keariey. Ariel Kirk-
Gushowaty, Gina MacKay, Hana Pesut,
Janine Provost, Aaron Read, Michael Sharrtz,
White Swallows, skinny tim, Mel Zee
Sarah Berman, Evan Brow, Slavko Bucrfal,
Josefa Cameron, Robert Catherall, Penny
Clark, Alex De Boer, Fraser Dobbs, Jacey
Gibb, Coleman Ingram, Tristan Roster,
Monika Louvenmark, Mark PaulHus, Nathan
Pike, Shane Scott-Travis, Jordan Wade, Max
Wain, Bob Woolsey, Chris Yee
Ad space for upcoming issues
can be booked by calling (604)
822-3017 ext 3 or emailing
advertising@citr.ca. Rates
available upon request
To submit words to Discorder,
please contact editor.
discorder@citr.ca. To submit
images, contact artdirector.
discorder@citr.ca
Send in a cheque for $20
to #233-6138 SUB Blvd.,
Vancouver, BC,V6T1Z1 with
your address, and we will mail
each issue of Discorder right to
your doorstep for a year.
To distribute Discorder in
your business, email distro.
discorder@citr.ca We are
always looking for new friends.
We are part of CiTR, a
registered non-profit, and
accept donations so we can
provide you with the content
you love. To donate visit www.
citxea/donate.
©Disamfer 2013 If the States! Uaim Ssdsty of Jte Ow-swaBy if Bmfei fetasiisia. AH mgtfts reserve! Cirailatw 9,008. Oasaarifer is piaSislted ataast steaiiiijr by CiTR, wfiisi
caateheaniaU01.9%Q!iteatati^as«^
Cilirsalicert IBM) 822-3617, snails VALENTINE'S DAY
My Undying Fear of the Little Naked Kid
and His Bow and Arrow of Doom
by BOB
WOOLSEY
illlustration by
GINA MACKAY
This year, I'm taking back Valentine's Day.
We all know about what a lazy, miserable
excuse for a holiday this is. You don't even get
the day off work and yet you have to plan and
scheme and try and woo your significant o±er
who, if your relationship is based on any kind of
solid ground, gave up caring about large sweeping
gestures a long time ago. Right?
Okay, so maybe I'm a little anti-Valentine's
Day. Maybe I've lost that loving feeling. Maybe
it's gone, gone, gone, and I can't hold on. Oh,
whoa, oh. However, I will say that I have a good
excuse for this stance and that it's rooted deep
in my shriveled up queer little heart. Yes, I am a
homosexual.
This fact, coupled with the no-good holiday
that is Valentine's Day, has troubled me to no end
through my adolescence and into my young adult
years. I mean, let's face it, when you're out there
trying to convince people that you're "into" this
whole heterosexual thing, Valentine's Day takes
on a whole new level of stress. Look everyone;
I'm giving this ^trl a card. She's my valentine. Oh
yeah, this girl and me, we're a thing. Meanwhile,
1,200 people as well. I just didn't know that I had,
since all of those people were also closeted. The
idea of what a gay person was when I was growing
up resembled that fat goblin king from the Hobbit
way more than anything that I saw when I looked
in the mirror. I actually remember thinking that
everyone must have this problem. That everyone in
the world fantasizes about homosexual encounters
year are perhaps just as important as this single
day? If I had been born in the early '90s instead
of the early '80s, would I have had a shot with
any of the guys from One Direction? I suppose
not, otherwise I'd probably be dating one of the
Backstreet Boys right now.
In any event, while I do recognize the ridiculousness inherent in the very idea of Valentine's
IF I HAD BEEN BORN IN THE EARLY '90S INSTEAD OF THE EARLY '80S
WOULD I HAVE HAD A SHOT WITH ANY OF THE GUYS FROM ONE DIRECTION?
I'm sweating bullets and my internal monologue
can't stop repeating the phrase, "This is wrong,
this is wrong, this is wrong." It's a tough life being
a gay kid in central British Columbia. Especially
circa the late '90s. I'm not trying to say that my
life has been harder than yours; it's just coming
out that way.
I attribute the love I hold for my current home to
these troubling years. That, and the mountains. It
wasn't until I moved to Vancouver that I witnessed
people being gay and also totally normal. Needless
to say, I had observed that in my hometown of
and somehow just deals with it like they do with
the immense lameness of Valentine's Day. I may
have been incorrect on that one.
Needless to say, I've since come to terms with
my sexuality, but I've never come to terms with my
feelings about Valentine's Day. Somehow, over the
past six years of being out I've managed to hold
down a pretty successful relationship through
five of them without ever formally celebrating
Valentine's Day. Could I have possibly been placing
too much value on this arbitrary day to celebrate
love? Could it be that the other 364 days of the
Day, I don't want to waste a perfectly good opportunity to eat chocolate and shower the one I love
with, well, love. Here's the thing about holidays:
yes, they're overly commercialized, they're stressful, and they're extremely trite when compared
to what they're supposed to represent. But that's
only if you let society dictate what a holiday should
mean to you. And let me tell you, trying to live up
to society's expectations is way too hard. Just go
out there and do your thing. It's probably going
to be awkward, a little weird, and possibly even
kind of difficult. But it'll be you. Venue
WWW.VENUELIVE.CA
«L#CATEY#UmHNEH PARTY ANIMAL!
^^^Mm^mt, LIQUOR POUCY
CHANGE
by PENNY CLARK
illustration by
MICHAEL SHANTZ
In B.C., a business that holds a liquor-primary
license (such as a bar or nightclub) has one mam
purpose:to serve liquor. As ofjanuary 15, because
of a policy directive issued by the liquor Control
and Licensing Board (LCLB), hquor-primaries
may no longer apply for temporary de-licensing
of events consistentwith their usual programming
(eg. concerts and dance parties). Temporary de-
licensingmeans no liquor will be sold for the duration of an event held during licensed hours. The
reason these businesses may no longer host dry
aU-ageseventeisthatmey—aUegedfy—encourage
to under-age drinking.
Beyond a brief reference to the safety concern
identified by "police, LCLB, and communities," no
and under-age drinking. When Discorder contacted
the LCLB for a fuller explanation, the ministry
spokesperson echoed the reasons in the directive,
emphasizing, "growing public safety concerns...
about teenagers consuming alcohol before, after,
and during all-ages events hosted at de-licensed
bars and nightclubs.'' This concern compounds
with straying from the original purpose of de-
Ucensing, which the spokesperson says was to
provide "opportunities outside of their Iiquor-
primary license,'' like "community meetings, exercise classes, and school-run grad ceremonies," still
permitted under the change (as are dance parties
and concerts outside of licensed hours).
This means a bar am hold all-ages events, as
long as they have nothing to do with live music,
and are held in the middle of the day. Should
people wish to throw other kinds of all-ages
events, the spokesperson insists, There is no
shortage of alternative venues that can host all-
in Vancouver, the decision's impact is limited
enough that it hardly seems worthy of the resources
expended to address it or enough to assuage the
public safety concerns regarding under-age chinking. The government spokesperson stated, "Of
the 2,328 licensed liquor-primary establishments
in the province, approximately 20 applied last
year to de-licence and host all ages events." The
most notable consequence in Vancouver is at the
Rickshaw, avenue that has taken advantage of
temporary de-licensing in the past to offer all-
ages shows. The Commodore is exempt due to
a grandfathered license, and so are the Rio and
Vogue theatres, because of their "live-event theatre" classifications.
For Ryan McCormick, a director of the Safe
Amplification Society (Safe Amp), the policy
change is a step in the wrong direction for the
LCLB. Safe Amp, an organization dedicated to
establishing a permanent legal all-ages venue in
Vancouver and for promoting all-ages access and
exposure to music, brought the three-page directive to the attention of the Vancouver musk community. While McCormick does not think the
LCLB is lying about their reasons for the change,
he does find their response counter-productive in
a city with an already limited supply of all-ages
conceit venues.
He points out, "Kids are always going to want
to listen to music and if you take away the safe
venues, they're just going to go to the underground
venues."
Jarrett Evan Samson, a founding director of
Safe Amp, is similarly frustrated with a political
rationale that views music as "subservient to liquor
sales," and has written letters to the liquor board,
the mayor, and a host of MLAs on this subject. He
argues that the government put the policy in place
because they've misunderstood the importance of
music within communities.
In a statement to Discorder, Campaign for
Culture, a group working to modernize what they
call B.C.'s "archaic" liquor laws, criticized this
move as reflective of a disconnected and overly
bureaucratic government. Particularly concerning
is page one of me directive, where an "increased
workload" from the growing number of applications for temporary license changes is cited as
grounds for limiting these requests. The total
increase in applications is from 511 in 2007 to 740
in 2012, though the percentage for de-licensing
versus other types of applications (like extended
hours on long weekends) isn't stated.
The good news? Safe Amp also sees potential
for positive change in this controversial policy.
McCormick notes that this is the first time Safe
Amp has engaged with the government on the
provincial level and he is hopeful that this could be
the beginning of regular communication.
Frustrated by these archaic rule? Want to do something
about it? Write to your local MIA and the govemnunt
Visit Stye AmpJbr a helpful list erf contacts at sajeamp.
tumblr.com/post/39759488892/Idb HERE UES THE
WALDORF HOTEL
bvALEXDEBOER
illustration by
BRITTA BACCHUS
Now another tomb in Vancouver's cultural graveyard, art lovers will always remember where
they were when they first heard that the Waldorf
Hotel was closing.
Or maybe they won't. The city's slaughter of culture hubs is so bloody
that the Waldorf is only one grave among many. The Granville 7, the Ridge,
the Hollywood, the Vancouver Playhouse Theatre Company, W2, and many
other art venues and enterprises welcome the Waldorf to Donnellyville, a
suburb ofWhyhaven'twemovedtoMontjeatyet.
Earning its keep along an economically dusty stretch of East Hastings,
the Waldorf Hotel first opened in 1947. Polynesian tiki bar and all, this
venue eventually fell victim to urban decay. As me city's centre shifted
west, the Waldorf Hotel became just another eastside dive bar. Until it was
In the summer of 2010, a 15-year lease was signed by an assembly of partners headed by Thomas Ansdmi, Ernesto Gomez, Scott Cohen, and Daniel
Fazio. After investing a total of $1.6 million into the hotel's restoration, it
reopened on October 31,2010, as a Downtown Eastside cultural institution.
According to a January 13 press release by Waldorf Productions, "The
ipam at Ate Waldorf created a mmmiinity-driwn anil financially viahle hnsi-
ness that was thriving." The project hosted concerts, art shows, and community events like the food cart festival, while also running a prosperous
restaurant. Despite such successes, during the Waldorf s first year, earning
enough to pay rent was a challenge. Empathetic to their adversity at first,
landlord Marko Puharich later abandoned sentimentality and chose to sell
the hotel. It was put on me market last August and sold early this month to
a Delta-based condominium developer, the Solterra Group. As Discorder goes
to print, the City Council had approved a 120-day protection order for the
site and CEO of the Solterra Group, Gerry Nichele has commented that the
company has "no intention of demolishing the Waldorf Hotel" and that they
would like to work with the city to "improve the hotel."
Seemingly hopeful, these developments do little for Waldorf Productions,
as acts often need to be booked up to six months in advance. -*
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The building itself may be^ed, but without Waldorf Productions, the city
is left with one less art shelter.
Reactions to this closure have amassed as an army of statements,
articles, arlJImjOtions. Living in Vancouver JKow, more than ever, subject to scrutiny. Discussing rent, both for living and art spaces, Douglas
**S§Sipland surmises, "Everyone knows it's getting too expensive for a
creative class to live here any longer." Reviewing the city's cultural climate, Mayor Gregor Robertson laments, "The Waldorf closing is a big
loss to our growing creative community." Protesting art's diminishing
value, an online petition calls for the Solterra Group to allow Waldorf
Productions to continue operating at the Waldorf under a fair lease
agreement. Upwards of 21,700 people have already given their names to
#savethewa!dorf.
It is a shaking finger that points to the source of gentrification and
art abatement. There are grounds to vilify many forces; our federal government's dismal art funding, our city's weak zoning laws, self-serving
foreign investment, high-rent condo development, and our own pathetic
efforts to pull out our pocketbooks for local culture. Maybe there isn't
any one solution to saving Vancouver's art scene. Maybe places like the
Waldorf will keep closing. But there is solace in foreclosure, and that solace is art.
Art itself cannot be torn down or pushed out or destroyed. The creative minds that filled the Waldorf have only been displaced. Finding a
similar venue will likely be a struggle, though in a way, that makes the
cause more precious. In a way, art's beauty is its absolute difference from
the avarice and materialism and insecurity that fills so much of our lfaesf-.v-
Without these crude realities, art would have little to contrast with and
rebel against. Ironically, it is the existence of such greedy forces that first
inspired the Waldorf's opening and have now closed its doors.
Rather than spinning hopelessness, this cycle offers promise to all
those Vancouverites with heads hung low. The Waldorf's closure is a great
loss, but is a realistic result of market forces. Let us be inspired by the
bleakness it offers and use that pain creatively. The Waldorf Productions
team and all their collaborating artists will find somewhere to continue
their creativity. Be it living rooms, sidewalks, parks, workplaces; art is
wherever we put it.
♦•■■ The December 1984 issue featured
The Warehouse, No Fun, SHiNDiG, and
SNFU. The Ministry of Truth? Not so
much. Enjoy this cover and 29 more in
Discorder's 15-month wall calendar, by JORDAN
WADE
illustration by
TYLER CRICH
photo by
JONATHAN DY
Discorder Magazine is 30 years old this month,
and what better way to say, "Happy Birthday!"
and reconnect our present with our past than
to chat about the future with Mike Mines
and Jennifer Fahrni, the founding editors of
Discorder Magazine.
Three decades after co-editing the first issue,
Fahrni is now the PR manager for the folk group
Irish Rovers, and Mines is now a lawyer for Mines
& Company. I visited Mines at his downtown
Vancouver office and pulled out the February 1983
• issue of Discorder, Volume 1, Number 1—in all its
original black and white newsprint glory—for
him to peer over. "I must admit, not to pat myself
on the back too much, but for a kid who was just
barely hanging on at university, this is pretty well
written." It was the first time he had looked at the
magazine in about 30 years.
Mines was an Urban Geography undergrad
who got turned onto UBC's radio community
by his good friend and fellow CiTR alum Harry
Hertscheg, the station's resident jack-of-all-
trades in those days. Mines began as promotions
director in his second year at UBC (1980-81) and
subsequently hosted a show called Pajama Party
on Friday nights. On April 1,1982, Mines was in
the studio at noon Pacific time to witness the station's official switch to the FM dial. ••♦ I
4.
* La 9 Suddenly this sophomore promotions director had a
much larger audience to work with.
A few months later, in the summer of 1982
Mines was supposed to attend the 2nd National
Campus Radio Conference (NCRC) with a few
other CiTR folks in London Ontario. Although
according to Mines, he didn't spend much time
in London. Instead, he went to Ryerson's campus
radio station in Toronto to meet up with a cute
female DJ he'd met.
"I got a tour of CKLN and they seemed so much
more evolved than CiTR... they were light years
ahead of us." He was especially impressed when he
saw they had a program guide.
Mines humbly explains that it wasn't his genius
idea to start a similar publication for CiTR He sim-
pty replicated the CKLN concept and brought it up
at the CiTR exec meeting that fall. Up to this point
the station had printed a one pager called The Spin
List—a photocopied list of the station's top tracks
for the month—to circulate at the station and the
SUB. At the time, Siouxsie and the Banshees, Iggy
Pop, Big Country, DO. A., and Wall of Voodoo were
regulars on the list. While Mines originally thought
beefing up The Spin List by selling ads for it was the
way forward, Fahrni, who was the news director
at CiTR with a commercial radio background, had
more in mind.
"I came to the exec meeting with a prototype and
Jennifer said, 'What the hell are you doing? Go big
or go home!'"
The pair knew nothing about the technicalities of
magazine publishing, but over the next few months
they learned. During Fahrni's first call to a publisher
he asked her how many copies she wanted. "I don't
know, about 25,000? It sounded like an okay number
to me." She explains that it was tough trying to sell
a magazine that didn't even exist. But they pulled it
off and somehow managed to bring in over $2000
in advertising for that first issue. "Zulu Records,
Twizzle Hair Design, The Pit Pub, and all these local
business were going in right from the start and it
began to pay for itself," says Fahrni.
"Mel Brewer," the station's beer machine that
sold cans for a buck a piece kept the station running
in those days. This meant that many of brainstorming sessions embodied a lot of "general stupidness,"
as Mines says, but when it came to naming the
future magazine and incorporating the disc-spinning theme from The Spin List, they hit their target.
"I vaguely remember—how can I put this
nicely—the nerdiest guy at the station, a guy named
Ethan Minovitz, blurted out something like 'Order
Disc.'" They analyzed and tweaked it around, and
finally came up with something they could all agree
on in Discorder. "Originally it was pronounced 'DISC-
order', with the emphasis on the 'disc' compared to
today where the emphasis has shifted to the 'Order
(as in Dis-CORD-er) Mines continues. "Obviously
'disc' is in there and 'disorder' is in there and we
wanted to have order and yet no order. The name
just seemed perfect."
"Jennifer was instrumental for technically making this thing happen; technically in terms of offering space at her mom's house." Fahrni lived with her
parents on West 2nd Avenue and Blanca in a big old
house with a notoriously big dining room table. Her
mom would putter as Fahrni, Mines, and Hertscheg
would have "paste-up parties" to physically put
together those first few issues.
Mines chuckles in shock of how primitive it was
by today's standards, using mechanical typewriter
and X-acto knives instead of word processing programs and Adobe CS6.
"I remember the first day that we saw it in print,"
recalls Fahrni.-She remembers Hertscheg, who
was also the distribution manager, organized some
pickup trucks and with a few other guys, loaded
them up with copies of that first issue and drove
them all around town. Then he came upstairs to the
station with a huge pile of copies. "It was* the biggest
' high to be seeing this thing. It looked so great and,
you know, we did it!"
"The first article says what [the magazine] is all
about,'" says Mines as he re-reads what he wrote
30 years earlier like a proud parent: "We advise
that Discorder be cut with 100% pure CiTR. One part
Discorder to nine parts CITR Simple. But remember though, don't get carried away with Discorder.
It's purpose is not to curb your aural fixation but to
enhance it."
Mines sentimental side takes over. "Let me just
say this too,' because I don't want this to get lost in
the whole shuffle. The idea behind this—clearly
it's not about me or Jennifer—it's about providing another outlet, because the station is obviously
such a creative place for people to get their public
programming out there. And Discorder was really just
another form, another outlet for UBC students and
community members to express themselves and to
connect with the bigger community. If anything, I
am blown away that we are having this interview 30
years later."
Mines gives credit to all of the people that were
there at the time, those that picked up where him
and Fahrni left off, and all of the people who contributed over the years.
While both of them went onto new opportunities
in August, 1983, Mines finishes, "Without getting
all teary-eyed or sentimental I am really proud and
honored that my name happens to be there and that
I have had a small part in giving [the community]
that outlet."
Chris Dafoe, former editor
"I'm grateful that Mike and Jennifer started it; editing the magazine
was my first step in a journalism
career that took me some interesting places. I'm amazed that it's still
being printed three decades after its
birth, even as print media collapses
around it. I'm happy that it's been
so frequendy re-invented over the
years. Consistency may be a virtue
in some media, but this a little rag
that was meant to reflect the spirit
of CITR And CITR is ever-changing. I wonder if it will be around
in 10 years. But then I wonder that
about the Globe and Mail."
Mark Mushet, CiTR host
and former contributor
"Given the death of print, any kind
of print media that gets out there
in any kind of quantity is valuable
these days. That it's still there is
a testament to the dedication of
ongoing staff. I haven't been there
in so long that I'm not sure how it
functions, but I see the results on
the street, and those results look
really great I shouldn't say that I'm
surprised to see it still there, but
I'm glad its persevered. I was just a
contributor, but there were so many
people who knocked themselves
out to [pull it together]. And those
were the days when you had a little
razor blade and you were cutting it
and pasting it and physically put-   .
ting it together."
i The June 1985 issue featured Skinny
Puppy, Allen Ginsberg, and a lady who in
2013 likely resembles a leathery, albeit
perfectly bronzed, alligator. Feast your eyes
on this cover and 29 others in Discorder's
15-month wall calendar. SECOND PLACE WINNERS
GREENBACK HIGH
by COLEMAN
INGRAM
photo by SKINNY TIM
lettering by MEL ZEE
There is a superstition surrounding SHiNDiG
about a "curse" that befalls its winners whereby
they are banished to obscurity after some indeterminate amount of time following their triumph.
You could suppose that a person's opinions
about this curse would depend on the height of
the respective winners' podium, so it goes without saying that the boys in the power-pop, punk-
and-roll ensemble Greenback High, dodged it.
Mulling about in their Bast Van jam space, the
members—who go by the stage-names of Joshy
Atomic, Rob Beardo, FloorTom Jones, and latest
addition JJ Heathen—joke about their meteoric
rise to runner-updom as they set up for a day of
demoing. Joking aside, the band is legitimately
grateful for getting as far as they did, explaining
that they never thought they would make it past
the first round, let alone into the finals.
"We were just glad we got to play and people
liked it," says Beardo.
The group formed around a Hallowe'en show
in 2010 playing covers, but despite deciding to
continue on as a band, the band's other musical
commitments kept them fairly busy. Atomic and
former-guitarist Matt Snakes played for the Jolts,
Beardo with Vicious Cycles, and former D.O.A.
drummer Jones played with Beardo in the James
T. Kirks, amongst others. All this put Greenback
High on the bench for most of 2011, but with
the boys gearing up this past year, the SHiNDiG
competition ended up being a somewhat grand
finish. It did, however, present other challenges.
"Well, after the first round Matt had to leave
the band. He just had personal stuff and other
band stuffgoing on," says Atomic, with Beardo .
adding, "So we thought, [Jones] sings anyways  ■
and knows the material, so it just made sense for
him to move to guitar. We were recording stuff
at JJ's house and he's our friend, so we thought
we'd get him to take the drums. It all just fit
together very naturally."
"And he has a van," chimed in Atomic.
Despite the lineup changes—and much to the
bands surprise—they won the second round as
well. "Then you actually start to think you could
win this thing," laughs Atomic; which brings us
to the final.
"I injured myself falling off a ladder at work,"
Heathen admits with a smile and a shrug.
"So I moved back to drums and we were
down to a three piece," said FloorTom, making Greenback High possibly the only band in
SHiNDiG history to perform all three rounds
with a different lineup for each show.
Whether or not the odds were with or against
them at that point seemed irrelevant. Simply
making it to the finals was enough for the band.
"It's all free studio time," said Beardo. "The
only real difference between first and second is
driving to record in Port Coquitlam instead of
Burnaby, and we would have been just as happy
with getting third and going to Fader cause it's a
great studio too." The second prize studio time at
Vogville in P0C0 will, by the sounds of things, be
broken up into smaller sessions for what would
become a series of shorter releases. As for the
present, the Bombs Away digital single that they
released last November will have a physical seven-inch release in March. They are also contributing to a few forthcoming compilations including a Shake! Records compilation and a benefit
for the Devon RB. Clifford Memorial Foundation
called The Party Liues On, the latter of which will
have an album release show on February 21 at the
Rickshaw.
The jam they were preparing for during our
interview was to complete a demo before Jones
joined D.O.A. for their farewell tour, with the
goal of having a handful of songs ready for the
studio by the tour's end. Despite this brief outing—and even though Atomic still plays with the
Jolts and Beardo with Vicious Cylces —one thing
is certain: Greenback High isn't simply a side-
project anymore.
Missed SHiNDiG? No problem. Catch Greenback Hyh at
the Electric Owl on February 6, alongside Dead Ghosts. Cameron MacLeod and I sit in a booth at The Five Point, a lively pub on Main Street. He
orders us a pitcher of beer and two whiskey shots, initiating a discussion of our mutual
love of Scotch, kicking off a night of conversation and drinking.
MacLeod grew up an SNL kid, living in its second golden age when the likes of Mike
Myers, Adam Sandler, and Chris Farley graced the screen. "Chris Farley was a big one,"
he says. "I still feel he was my generation's John Belushi." MacLeod also admired Steve
Martin and Andy Kaufman, who showed him how absurd comedy can be, and how far
one could take it.
At 25, MacLeod co-created Man Hussy, his first sketch group, with an original lineup of
friends Daniel Code, Steve Nelson, and Brendan Fuss. "We just hung out all day and came
up with ridiculous ideas," he says. "That's pretty much how Man Hussy started, by us just
saying, 'Let's just make this sketch that no one else would make.'" Speaking of his work
as a whole, MacLeod emphasizes his desire to produce personal, unique projects. "I like to
think I instill a love of independent comedy and doing what you want to do for the reasons
you want to do them. If you think something's funny, I want to put that out there."
Through Man Hussy came Total Disappointment, a sketch show put on at the now-
closed Royal Unicorn (currently Fortune Sound Club). "At the intermission we had live video
filming from the balcony, down onto Pender Street, me in one mascot costume that was a
strawberry and Dan in a giant orange costume with sunglasses, and we had a full fight
in the street," says MacLeod. "We both grab fire extinguishers from under cars and start
shooting each other with fire extinguishers in the middle of Pender, and it just turns into
this huge cloud of fucking extinguisher smoke with us in the middle of it just coughing
horribly, because it's the worst. And it literally stopped traffic. Like a bus and a bunch of
cars stopped, because Pender Street was just a cloud of fucking extinguisher smoke. And
I think that, still to this day, was one of my favourite things I've done in comedy."
Besides Man Hussy, as well as other projects that have included writing for CTV's The
Party'co-w\tmg A Classic Comedy Roast ofMayor Gregor Robertson wVn Sean Devlin, and
acting as the Comedy Curator for the Olio Festival, MacLeod puts on The HERO SHOW, a
show he's been producing for almost four years.
'" The HERO SHOW'is a place for those misfit ideas that you'd love to do, but are kind
of too scared to do," says MacLeod. One of his favourite performances was from Nicole
Passmore, a fellow Instant Theatre Company performer, who went onstage and re-enacted
the suicide scene from The Royal Tenenbaums, cutting off her hair, pretending to slit her
wrists, and throwing starbursts into the crowd like it was blood.
"There was a chunk of my hair, a foot long in a ponytail," says Passmore, laughing. "Cam took a strand of it and pinned it onto a Man Hussy poster that he had, which
was the faces of two male porn stars, and he pinned it on so that each of them had a
rattail. And they were on there for over a year. And he would not let anyone take those
hairs down, until he gave up the office to Pump Trolley, who immediately took the hair
down and threw it out."
While The HERO SHOWaWom for some improvisation, MacLeod's work with Instant
Theatre has been his most improvisational project to date. AlistairCook, Instant Theatre's
artistic director, described MacLeod as, "Basically the comedic equivalent of a fine
burgundy, smashed across an alligator skin-upholstered Marshall amplifier blasting Van
Halen, powered by a fusion reactor."
"I find the improvthat Instant Theatre puts me in is very challenging," says MacLeod.
"And I like that about it, because it makes me a better improviser, and anybody who wants
to be a better improviser should get involved with Instant Theatre."
But MacLeod's biggest project has undoubtedly been Steel Viper Force, a feature-length
film he's working on that is an homage to '80s/'90s action movies with over-the-top, horrible
dialogue. "It's out of love that we're making it, but also out of comedy," says MacLeod,
explaining that everyone on the project works for free. While the feature-length film is on
the horizon, MacLeod has prpduced a short film, Steel Viper Force: Rise ofFiero, that cost
only $900. He's been touring it around short film festivals, including the 2012 interPLAY
Film Festival in Fort McMurray, where MacLeod won its Best Actor award.
As I thank him for the interview, shake his hand, and part ways, I understood the
fascination with Cameron MacLeod. As Nicole Passmore says, "Cam will show up to a night
where you think you're going to have a bad time and he will make it the best time."
photos by
HANAPESUf
lettering by
ALEXHEILBRON Cam, on his dream big-budget film: ,: ffi
"It'd probably be an over-the-top sci-fi action thriller, that involved a lot of CGI, with a giant monster. Actually, know
what I'd love to do? Remake Godzilla in a badass, straight-up way where a lot of people die and Godzilla's the main
character. Like you get to know Godzilla. You feel Godzilla's pain from him. Godzilla's had some cough times. He was
driven to the bottom of the sea, and now he's back for vengeance. He lost a kid in the past that we don't know about,
and his wife died, and now he's just been hunkering down in a cave, in the deepest trench of the ocean, marking lines on
the wall with a rock, just ready to come back and destroy everyone."  photo by
CASEY BENNETT
lettering by
JANINE PREVOST
BABYSITTER
by ALEX DE BOER
Contributing to a calm generational
clash, Babysitter front-man Kristian
North and I drink afternoon Caesars in
Logan's Pub, a Legion-esque establishment in Victoria. Forested by square
wooden tables and the slow climb of wall
panelling, the pub operates as both a
retirement hangout and a grungy music
venue for twenty-something crowds. In       |Bp
the bar's beardy dimness, local post- -4j$t
punk garage trio Babysitter has found v'-'
a welcoming stage. Even during the %4-
midday quiet, I can imagine how their • -'. '*'
cantankerous chants of rebellion and
mischief would echo with enticing irony; an
unconventional sound in an conventional bar.
Loud and gritty, Babysitter's music is tattooed with revolution. Made up of North
(vocals, lead guitar), Andy Vanier (bass) and
Aden Colligne (drums), the trio's first full-
length LP, Eye, explicitly uses the word "revolution" in nearly half of its 13 songs. Even a
casual listen to the album reveals Babysitter's
unabashed oath to rock-and-roll. Resistance to
death and old age is pledged in "Talkin' Bout
the New Generation" and "Angel of Death,"
while freedom and youth are celebrated in tunes
like "Crace Mountain" and "Prime of My Life."
Eye visits post-punk, psych rock, and folk.
This collage of sounds can be explained by
Babysitter's recent team-up with Montreal- •
based Psychic Handshake Records. The label
contacted them this summer and invited the
band to re-record a bunch of previously released
songs onto a new full-length. North explains,
"The album is kind of like a collection of 13
songs-from the last two years. The idea was
that we re-recorded the best ones." Produced
by Jordan Koop at The Noise Floor, Eye was
released on December 3. Unsurprisingly, the
album's most prominent punk escapades etch
the deepest impression.
Together since 2010 (Colligne joined as
drummer this March), Babysitter's ability
for leaving an impression goes hand in hand
with their prolific recording practice. With 15
releases of various lengths and formats already
out, Babysitter is no advocate of artistic self-
restraint. By "moving forward" and "not censoring" themselves, Babysitter keeps their creativity
sharp. As any artist knows, it's easy to be inhibited by self-criticism. Babysitter's defense is to
record and release nearly all the tunes they play.
"Momentum," North says, is what matters.
"Taking something out of the head and putting it into the hand." This pseudo-spiritual approach includes releasing experimental
efforts, such as a drum-absent, saxophone-
incorporating cassette (even though neither
North nor Vanier technically "play" sax), or a
collaborative long distance album with Montreal
singer JLK. North defines Babysitter's mindset
using terms like "first take" and "free spirit,"
and reasons that "you can try to make the best
album ever for a year. Or you can just make like
50 and one of them is going to be good."
With Babysitter's release-everything-we-play
mentality, the band has been faced with a ton of
home recording. Without professional training,
North and his bandmates have become accustomed to "using all the equipment we don't
know how to use." North even suggests that
these technical ineptitudes were what first drove
the band into the fuzzy land of low-fi. Smiling,
North jokes that as Babysitter improves on
home recording, "One day I think we'll sound
really hi-fi." The truth is that this band is after
"something pure" when it comes to sound.
They enjoy recording all their musical endeavours and they really enjoy recording them in analogue. Even after signing to Psychic Handshake,
North tells how Babysitter tries "to record in
analogue whenever we can."
The proof is in the pudding, or rather
the feast of low-fi served on Eye. It's a riot
of strings, sticks, and rough vocals. A fuzzy
shadow of vibration follows every note, humming with dirty resonance. In "io6aies" the guitar riffs warble, swinging back and forth almost
visibly. "Whole Hole" begins with a winding
blues riff and then entertains psychedelic musings about the duality of creation and destruction. "Angel of Death" aligns North's vocals
with guitar notes, building a gritty, enticing
punk pattern. Black sheep of the album, "Born
Superior" is a clamorous, anguished blast, thick
with shrieking noise. Eye's shape is edgy and
just melodious enough to be inviting.
Looking ahead, Babysitter are hoping to see
open road. "We did Eye and we did our triple
cassette 666, and we were working on both
of those things for a long time," North says,
"so now we're definitely switching to touring
mode." Besides a couple upcoming releases,
including a contribution to the next CiTR Pop
Alliance compilation record, Babysitter is done
with recording for a while. North, ambitious
for adventure, speaks promisingly about the
band's live chemistry with Colligne on drums,
as well his enthusiasm to travel the world (or
wherever the band takes him). It's definitely
time for Babysitter to transition from a studio
band into "road bandits." And is there a better
metaphor for punk-rock and rebellion than an
open highway?
Pop Alliance,.featuring Babysitter's "Be Cool" will be
available at Mint Records on March 5. For more tunes
and info, visitbabysitter.bandcamp.com. DATA
ROMANCE
byJACEY
GIBB
photos and composition by
VICTORIA JOHNSON
illustration by
ANNEEMBERLINE Looking to get into some synth-heavy jams, but
have too much self-respect to listen to Skrillex?
Then Data Romance is just what the musical
doctor ordered. Striking up a melodious mixture
of electronic beats with cinematic production
values, Ajay Bhattachayya and Amy Kirkpatrick
have spawned a fresh sound that borderlines
on club thrasher, laced with a certain gravity. In
V'preparation for the February 19 release of their
first full-length album, Other, I sat down with
the duo to talk about band name changes, the
creative disparities the new album benefited
from, and high-stake ice cream theft involving
Steve Aoki.-
Discorder: I read that Data Romance comes
from an Ellen Allien song by the same name. Do
you want to elaborate on why you chose to leave
ff$l|hind your old name, Names?
Ajay Bhattacharyya: We were Names when
we first started to collaborate with this kind of
sound and the label that we signed with said,
"We can't do that. We can't market something
that's completely ambiguous and not Google-
able." It's also confusing to talk to people
about.
Amy Kirkpatrick: It's like a "Who's On First"
skit and they say, "Names!" "What's the name?"
"Names!"
D: If you had to describe Data Romance's sound
to someone who has never listened to you
before, how would you describe it?
AB: Electronic is easy to say, but then as soon as
you say electronic-
AK: I get defensive when people say electronic.
AB: People think of EDM and Deadmau5 and
we're so far from that. It's singer/songwriter
stuff that just happens to use electronic means.
AK: I'd say Bjork, but to a movie soundtrack or '
something to that effect.
D: How is this album different than everything
else you've released?
AK: We've only released a couple of singles
and an EP of four songs that we loved, but they
were very detached. We just went, "Here's our
sound," and, "Here's another way we sound."
With this, we really wanted to show that the
songs connected.
AB: Sonically, I did a lot different than what
I used to do. I would just layer upon layer old
stuff and really build these grand things.
AK: We couldn't play it live, or it was harder to
play live.
AB: You'd end up going onstage [to perform]
and having 95 per cent of the track do its own
work and I'm only playing a tiny element of it.
I've only got two hands. I really tried to pare it
down and base things off of one synth instead
of a ton layered on each other. We tried to use a
lot more real instruments because we had time
to record and time to re-track. So I would write
string parts on a keyboard and we'd re-record
them with real string players and we'd get them
to play their own embellishments if we wanted.
I also tried to leave more room for the vocals.
D: How has working with Street Quality Entertainment been?
swtvuwx^
AB: With the new album, they let us have so
much free reign. We took all of the money that
we would've normally spent on a studio space
and fancy stuff and we spent it on mixing by
Michael Patterson. He did The Social Network and
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo soundtracks. He
totally got what we were going for. Any budget that would have normally gone to us sitting
around in a $1,000 a day studio went to him. I
like doing records like that because it gives you
a little bit more time. I don't feel the crunch or if
I write a shitty song one day, it doesn't feel like I
wasted the studio costs for that day.
D: How was touring with with Dragonette last
September/October?
AK:"It was a really dancey, fun tour. We'd play
our stuff and the response would either be people were into it or people just wanted to dance to
Dragonette.
AB: It was nice finally going through Canada
and finding little pockets where we actually have
kind of a following.
AK: Saskatoon really pops out. This guy came
up and I think he bought one album and wanted
us to sign it. Then he came back and bought a
few more, and eventually he bought seven. He
goes, "I'm going to sell them on eBay." In my
head, I said, "I hope he's from the future. He
knows something."
AB: That validated everything we do.
D: What are your touring plans for the year?
AB: We haven't gotten any final dates yet. If
touring plans happen, it'll be largely Canadian
and German focused.
D: What's your craziest tour story?
AB: Craziest story...
AK: God, we're so boring.
AB: I have a bad memory. That's my downfall.
D: Maybe something awful?
AB: There must have been something... At
IDentity Fest in Adanta, Steve Aoki stole my ice
cream.
AK: I glared at him and he called me on it. I
didn't mean to.
AB: He didn't like, take it out of my hand. There
was catering and there was a buffet thing and
there was one last ice cream. We were both
heading for it and he just cut me off. It was a hot
day, too.
D: So do you have a grudge against him now?
AB: Totally, huge grudge. If I ever thought that I
could one day work with him, I would probably
lie about the grudge and say it doesn't exist. But
I'm sure we won't, so I'll start a war.
D: The year is 2018. Where is Data Romance?
AB: Hopefully we have a couple more albums
under our belt. I've never had horribly ambitious
goals. I've always said I wanted to be able to do
music successfully enough that I don't have to
work a side job and this band allowed for that to
happen. I can't hope for much more.
AK: I've always dreamt big. I still want to keep .
some crazy goals. I want to win an Oscar. I don't
know how, but that would be pretty cool.
Other drops on'February ig and the duo play the Media
Club on February 28. Check out data-romance.com Jor
show details and more.  S ■£ "> -5 C3 CiTR 101.9 FM PROGRAM GUIDE
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SOSALAClbuS
(Electro/Hip Hop) 6-7pm
Skadz and Sprocket Doyle bring you
Electro Swing, Alternative Hip Hop,
Dubstep, Acid Jazz, Trip Hop, Local
and Canadian Content-good and
dirty beats.
MORiTHANHUMN
(Electronic/Experimental) 7-8pm
Strange and wonderful electronic
sounds from the past, present, and
future with host Gareth Moses. Music from parallel worlds.
RHYTHMSmDM
(World) 8-9pm
Alternating Sundays
Featuring a wide range of music
from India, including popular
music from the 1930s to the present; Ghazals and Bhajans, Qaw-
walis, pop and regional language
numbers.
■EMNiTPRdGRESSm
(Dance) 8-9pm
Alternating Sundays
A mix of the latest house music, tech-house, prog-house and
techno.
B60TLEGS& B-SIDES
(Dance/Electronic) 9-10pm
TRANCENDANCE
(Dance) 10pm-12am
Hosted by DJ Smiley Mike and
DJ Caddyshack, Trancendance
has been broadcasting from
Vancouver, B.C. since 2001. We
favour Psytrarrce, Hard Trance
and Epic Trance, but also play
Acid Trance, Deep Trance, Hard
Dance and even some Breakbeat.
We also love a good Classic Trance
Anthem, especially if it's remixed.
Current influences include Sander
van Doom, Gareth Emery, Nick Sentience, Ovnimoon, Ace Ventura, Save
the Robot, Liquid Soul and Astrix.
Older influences include Union Jack,
Carl Cox, Christopher Lawrence,
Whoop! Records, Tidy Trax, Plati-
pus Records and Nukleuz. Email:
djsmileymike ©trancendance.net.
Website: www.trancendance.net.
GOOD MORNING MY FRIENDS
(Upbeat Music) MO-Sam
BREAKFASTWITHI THE[BROWNS
(Eclectic) i-llam
Your   favourite    Brownsters,
James and Peter, offer a savoury
blend of the familiar and exotic
in a blend of aural delights.
breakfastwiththebrowns®
hotmail.com.
SKA-T'S SCENIC DRIVE
(Ska) llam-l^m-
SYNCHRONICITY
(Talk) 12-lpm
Join host Marie B and discuss spirituality, health and feeling*good.
Tune in and tap into good vibrations
that help you remember why you're
here: to have fun!
PARTS UNKNOWN
(Pop) l-3pm
An indie pop show since 1999, it's
like a marshmallow sandwich: soft
and sweet and best enjoyed when
poked with a stick and held close
to a fire.
ThYaLL"^
(Pop) 3-4pm
The All Canadian Farm Show cultivates new and old indie jams from
across genres and provinces. Tune
in to hear the a fresh crop of CiTR
volunteers take you on a musical
cross-country road trip!
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
(World) 4-5pm
The best of mix of Latin American
music, leoramirez@canada.com
NEWS 101   "
(Talk) 5-Spm
Vancouver's only live, volunteer-
produced, student and community
newscast. Every week, we take
a look back at the week's local,
national and international news,
as seen from a fully independent
media perspective.
S0RETHR0ATs7cLAPPi^
(Rogue Folk, Indie S/S) 6-7:30pm
Lyric Driven Campfire Inspired:
Playing Acoustic Punk, Anti-Folk,
Alt-Country, etc. Tune in for live
acts, ticket giveaways and interviews, but mostly it's just music.
Submit to: music@sorethroat-
sclappinghands.com. Find us on
Facebook!
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
(Cinematic) 7:30-9pm
Join gak as he explores music from
the movies, tunes from television
and any other cinematic source,
along with atmospheric pieces, cutting edge new tracks and strange
old goodies that could be used in
a soundtrack to be.
THE JAZZ SHOW
(Jazz) 9pm-12am
Vancouver's longest running
prime-time jazz program. Hosted
by Gavin Walker. Features at 11pm.
Feb. 4: In honour of Black History
Month, Gavin is presenting Jazz
music with social and political
overtones on the Jan feature. The
first is pianist/composer Herbie
Hancock and his Ensemble with
"The Prisoner." Feb.ll: Drummer
extraordinaire Max Roach'and
his Quartet at the Jazz Workshop
in San Francisco: "Speak Brother
Speak!." Feb.18: Duke Ellington's
Orchestra with Mahalia Jackson:
"Black, Brown and Beige". Feb.25:
Alto saxophonist Jackie McLean and
his masterpiece, "Let Freedom
Ring!"
CANADA POST-ROCK
(Rock) 12-lam
Formerly on CKXU, Canada Post-
Rock now resides on the west coast
but it's still committed to the best
in post-rock, drone, ambient, experimental, noise and basically
anything your host Pbone can put
the word "post" in front of.
MANTIS CABINET
(Eclectic) l-2pm
PACIFIC PICKIN'
(Roots) 6-8am
Bluegrass, old-time music, and
its derivatives with Arthur and
the lovely Andrea Berman.pa-
cificpickin@yahoo.com
QUEER FM
VANCOUVER: RELOADED
(Talk) 8-10:30am
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transexual communities of Vancouver. Lots of human
interest features, background on
current issues and great music.
queerfmradio@gmail.com
MIND VOYAGE
(Eclectic) 10:30-11:30am
Mind Voyage presents cosmic tones
of celestial counterpoint on CiTR!
Experience weekly encounters of
synth, ambient, witchy and new
classical items in a one-hour with
DJTallJamal.
MORNiNG AFTER SHOW
(Eclectic) ll:30am-lpm
An eclectic mix of Canadian indie
with rock, experimental, world, reggae, punk and ska from Canada,
Latin America and Europe. Hosted
by Oswaldo Perez Cabrera.
PROGRAMMING TRAINING
(Ta//y3-3:30pm
RAdTo FREE THINKER
(7y/?es;3:30-4:30pm
Promoting skepticism, critical
thinking and science, we examine
popular extraordinary claims and
subject them to critical analysis.
DISCORDER RADIO
(Tunes) 4:30-5pm
Alternating Wednesdays
Discorder Magazine now has its
own radio show! Join us to hear
excerpts of interviews, reviews
and more!
THE CITY
(TaW5-6pm
An alternative and critical look
at our changing urban spaces.
New website: www.thecityfm.org.
New twitter handle: @thecity_fm.
FLEX YOUR HEAD
(Hardcore) 6-8pm
Punk rock and hardcore since 1989.
Bands and guests from around the
world.
INsiDEOUT
(Dance) 8-9pm
CRiMES&TREASONS
OY/p-/?0p;9-llpm
crimesandtreasons@gmail.com
WEDNESDAY
TWEETS & TUNES
fc)6:30-8am
We practice what we Tweet!
Showcasing local indie music and
bringing bands, artists and fans
together through social media. Website: tweetsandtunes.com Twitter:
@tweetsandtunes.
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
f£c/ecf/c; 8-10am
Live from the Jungle Room, join radio
host Jack Velvet for an eclectic mix of
music, sound bites, information and
inanity, dj@jackvelvet.net.
POPDRONES
(Eclectic) 10-11:30am
STUDENT SPECIAL HOUR
(Eclectic) ll:30-lpm
Various members of the CiTR's student executive sit in and host this
blend of music and banter about
campus and community news,
arts, and pop culture. Drop-ins
welcome!
TERRY PROJECT PODCAST
(Talk) 1-2 pm
Alternating Wednesdays
There once was a project named
Terry, That wanted to make people
wary, Of things going on In the world
that are wrong without making it all
seem too scary.
bEMOGRACYNOW
(Talk) l-2pm
Alternating Wednesdays
EXTRAENVIRONMENTALIST
(Talk) 2-3pm
Exploring the mindset of an
outsider looking in on Earth.
Featuring interviews with leading
thinkers in the area of sustainable
economics and our global ecological crisis.
SIJEWLH
(New) 4-5pm
In many Coast Salish dialects,
"sne'waylh" is the word for
teachings or laws. The aboriginal language-learning program
begins with the teachings of the
skwxwu7mesh snichim (Squamish
language). Originally aired on Coop
Radio CFRO 100.5 FM in Vancouver,
Tuesdays 1-2 p.m.
ARTSREPbRT
(Ta//r;5-6pm
Reviews, interviews and coverage
of local arts (film, theatre, dance,
visual and performance art, comedy
and more) by host Maegan Thomas
and the Arts R
ARTS PROJECT
(TaW6-6:30pm
Alternating with UBC Arts On Air
Stay tuned after the Arts Report for
Arts Project Interviews, documentaries and artsy stuff that doesn't fit
into CiTR's original arts hour. .
UBC ARTS ON AIR
(7aW6-6:30pm
Alternating with Arts Extra!
Ira Nadel, UBC English, offers scintillating profiles and unusual interviews with members of the UBC Arts
world. Tune in for programs, people
and personalities in Arts.
SA^MSQUANTCHiHiDEAWAY
(£c/ecf/'c>6:30-8pm
Alternating Wednesdays
All-Canadian music with a focus
on indie-rock/pop. anitabinder®
hotmail.com
SUP WORLD?
(Eclectic) S:30-%pm
Alternating Wednesdays
Fuzzy and sweet, a total treat! Tune
in to hear the latest and greatest
tracks from independent and Vancouver bands.
FOLKOASTS
O?00te;8-lOpm
Two hours of eclectic folk/roots
music, with a big emphasis on our
local scene. C'mon in! A kumbaya-
free zone since 1997. folkoasis®
gmail.com
SEXY IN VAN CITY
(Talk) 10-1 lpm
Your weekly dose of education
and entertainment in the realm
of relationships and sexuality.
sexyinvancity.com/category/sexy-
in-vancity-radio
HANS VON KLOSS MISERY HOUR
(Hans VonKlo$s)ll\}m-hm
Pretty much the best thing on
radio. THURSDAY
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
(Mj8-10am
WcSTFROMRUSSiA
(?u/7/rJ10-llam
Punk rock, indie pop and whatever else I deem worthy. Hosted
by a closet nerd. http://www.
weallfalldowncitr.blogspot.ca
RELENTLESSLY AWESOME
llam-12pm
Vancouver's got a fever, and the only
prescription is CiTR's "Relentlessly
Awesome." Each and every week,
Jason attempts to offer adrenaline-
pumping, heart-stopping, hands-
over-the-eyes suspense. He is a fan
of various genres, and a supporter
of local music.
DUNCAN'SDONUTS
(Eclectic) 12-lpm
Sweet treats from the pop underground. Hosted by Duncan, sponsored by donuts. http://duncans
donuts.wordpress.com
bEFmmoN SOUNDWAVE
(Rock/Folk) l-2pm
The now of folk. The now of rock.
The now of alternative. Join Evan
as he explores what's new, what's
good, and what's so awesome it
fights dragons in its spare time. As
always, Evan ends the show with a
special Top 5 list that's always fun
and always entertaining.
iNK*STUDS
(Ta//f;2-3pm
Underground and indie comix. Each
week, we interview a different creator to get their unique perspective
on comix and discuss their upcoming works.
THUNDERBIRD EYE
(Sports) 3:30-tym
Your weekly roundup of UBC Thunderbird sports action from on campus and off with your host Wilson
Wong.
MANTRA
(Eclectic) 4-5 pm
Kirtan, Mantra, Chanting and
Culture. There's no place like Om.
Hosted by Raghunath with special
guests. Email: mantraradioshow®
gmail.com. Website: mantraradio.
co. Genre: World.
CAMPUSi LECTURES
(TaWb-Spm
Lectures on and around campus are
recorded all throughout the year,
bringing a wide array of topics and
disciplines to radio.
AREYOUAWARE
(Eclectic) Alternating Thursdays
6-7:30pm
Celebrating the message behind
the music: Profiling music and
musicians that take the route of
positive action over apathy.
PEANUT BUTTER ¥ JAMS
(Eclectic) Alternating Thursdays
6-7:30pm
Explore local music and food with
your hosts, Brenda and Jordie. You'll
hear interviews and reviews on eats
and tunes from your neighbourhood,
and a weekly pairing for your date
FUNK MY LIFE
(Soul/Dance) llpm-12am
Grooving out tunes with a bit of soul
and a lot of funk, from the birth of
rhythm and blues to the golden age
of motown, to contemporary dance
remixes of classic soul hits.
AURAL TENTACLES
(Eclectic) 12-6am
It could be global, trance, spoken
word, rock, the unusual and the
weird, or it could be something
different. Hosted by DJ Pierre.
auraltentacles@hotmail.com
SUBS'
STEREOSCOPIC REDOUBT
(Experimental) 7:30-9pm
LiviFWMTHUNbERBllRb
RADIO HELL
(Live Music) V-Upm
Featuring live band(s) every week
performing in the CiTR Lounge. Most
are from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country and
around the world.
RIBET
mm
FRIDAY SUNRISE
f£c/etf/c;7:30-9am
An eclectic mix of indie rock, hip-
hop, and reggae to bring you up
with the sun.
ALTERNATIVE RADIO
(7a//r/9-10am
Hosted by David Barsamian.
SOUNDS OF THE CITY
(Eclectic) 10-1 lam
Promoting upcoming live concerts
and shows in Vancouver, be they
local, national, or international
acts.
stere6blues
(Blues/Eclectic) 11 a m-12 pm
Every Friday host Dorothy Neufeld
sinks into blues, garage and rock
n' roll goodies!
iTAllNTEA^BE^
(£c/ecfr'c)12-lpm
CiTR has revived it's long-dormant
beginner's show It Ain't Easy Being
Green! With the support of experienced programmers; this show
offers fully-trained CiTR members,
especially students, the opportunity
to get their feet wet on the air.
I WOOLD LIKE:
Ijjto Dil|^^de|ll|ilne.  ,,
"{$20 for car^KfSt |2^
for US subscribers)
^^K^^pbri0iscor(Jer
* [ magazine with a        v '
I '', donatfon of;
Dj^rjdj«V^wer's longest running   ;
^Spehdll Ijjpmagazine. Show your ;
^5MJiEM/a^^^liiftependent
3ftNl^MMw^fcJttlwelopment of
Stsft writil, sdft^s.^signers sad arttefe.
Sign-up to hjve Piscoife ^'ft^^^^P
yourdpor! _ *
Fill-out this form and mail-in cash or a
cheque to:
Discorder Magazine
#233-6138 SUB Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C.
Canada, V6T121
SKALD'S HALL
(Drama/Poetry) l-2pm
Skald's Hall entertains with the
spoken word via story readings,
poetry recitals, and drama. Established and upcoming artists join
host Brian MacDonald. Interested
in performing on air? Contact us:
@Skalds_Hall.
RADIOZERO
(Dance) 2-3-30^
An international mix of super-
fresh weekend party jams from
New Wave to foreign electro, baile,
Bollywood, and whatever else.
www.radiozero.com
NARbwUAR
(Nardwuar)3:30-bpm
Join Nardwuar the Human Serviette for Clam Chowder flavoured
entertainment. Doot doola doot
doo...doot doo! nardwuar®
nardwuar.com
NEWS 101
(Talk) 5-6pm
See Monday for description.
sfRANOEb
(Eclectic) 6-7:30pm
Join your host Matthew for a weekly
mix of exciting sounds, past and
present, from his Australian homeland. And journey with him as he
features fresh tunes and explores
the alternative musical heritage
of Canada.
AFmCANRHYHMS
(World) 7:30-9pm
www.africanrhythmsradio.com
THEBASSMENT
(Dance/Electronic) 9-10:30pm
The Bassment is Vancouver's only
bass-driven radio show, playing
Glitch, Dubstep, Drum and Bass,
Ghetto Funk, Crunk, Breaks, and UK
Funky, while focusing on Canadian
talent and highlighting Vancouver
DJs, producers, and the parties
they throw.
iwWpTrpsImll
(Industrial) 12-4am
Industrial, electro, noise, experimental, and synth-based music.
thevampiresball@gmail.com the-
vampiresballoncitr.com
SATURDAY
RADIO NEZATE
(Eritrian) 7'-8am
THE SATURDAY EDGE
O?00tej8am-12pm
A personal guide to world and roots
music—with African, Latin, and
European music in the first half,
followed by Celtic, blues, songwriters, Cajun, and whatever else fits!
steveedge3@mac.com
GENERATIONlANNIHiuTiON
(Punk) 12-lpm
On the air since 2002,
playing old and new punk on
the non commercial side of the
spectrum. Hosts: Aaron Brown,
Jeff "The Foat" Kraft. Website:
www.generationannihilation.com.
Facebook: www.facebook.com/
generationannihilation".
POWERCHORD
(Metal) l-3pm
Vancouver's longest running metal
show. If you're into music that's
on the heavier/darker side of the
spectrum, then you'll like it. Sonic
assault provided by Geoff, Marcia,
and Andy.
CODE BLUE
(Roots) 3-bpm
From backwoods delta low-down
slide to urban harp honks, blues,
and blues roots with your hosts
Jim, Andy, and Paul, codeblue®
buddy-system.org
SIMORGH
(Education) 5-6pm
Simorgh Radio is devoted to the
education and literacy for the Persian speaking communities and
those interested in connecting to
Persian oral and written literature.
Simorgh takes you through a journey of ecological sustainability
evolving within cultural and social
literacy. Simorgh the mythological
multiplicity of tale-figures, lands-in
as your mythological narrator in the
storyland; the contingent space of
beings, connecting Persian peoples
within and to Indigenous peoples.
NASHAVbLNA
(World) 6-7pm
News, arts, entertainment and
music for the Russian community,
local and abroad, nashavolna.ca
LARESTA
(Worldll-ipm
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue, Latin
House, and Reggaeton with your
host GspotDJ.
SYNAPTIC ^
(Dance/Electronic)V-llpm fflU j
If you like everything from electro/
techno/trance/8-bit music/retro
'80s, this is the show for you!
www.synapticsandwich.net
RMNboPHONIC
(Eclectic) Upm-2am
Randophonic is best thought of as
an intraversal jukebox which has
no concept of genre, style, political
boundaries, or even space-time relevance. But it does know good sounds
from bad. Lately, the program has
been focused on Philip Random's All
Vinyl Countdown+Apocalypse (the
1,111 greatest records you probably
haven't heard). And we're not afraid
of noise.
THE ABSOLUTEivALUEOF INSOMNIA
(Generative) 2am-6am
Four solid hours of fresh generative
music c/o the Absolute Value of Noise
and its world famous Generator. Ideal
for enhancing your dreams or, if sleep
is not on your agenda, your reveries. for fiee for station membersl 1
(212) Productions
454 W Cordova St.
Baru Latino
Dunlevy Snack Bar
Neptoon Records
3561 Main Street
Scratch Records
2535 Alma St
433 Dunlevy Ave
shows at Interurban
25% off
10% off
10% off
10% off used, $1 off new
Art Gallery
1 East Hastings
Antisocial
Beatstreet Records
The Eatery
Pacific
20% entry discount
Skateboard Shop
439 W Hastings St.
3431 W Broadway
Cinematheque
1131 Howe St.
2337 Main St.
10% off used vinyl
10% off
Temple of the
15% off clothing
10% off everything else
1 free bag of popcorn
Modern Girl
BigMama Textbooks
1100-1200 West 73 Ave
The Fall Tattooing
2695 Main St.
644 Seymour St.
10% off
People's Co-op
Bookstore
15% off vintage, 20%
Australian Boot Co
10% off
off new
1968 West 4th Ave
1391 Commercial Dr.
$30 off Blundstones and
The Bike Kitchen
Fortune Sound Club
10% off
UBC Bookstore
RM Williams
6138 SUB Blvd.
147 East Pender St.
6200 University Blvd.
10% off new parts and
No cover Saturdays (excluding special events)
Perch
10% off clothing, gifts,
Audiopile
2016 Commercial Dr.
accessories
337 East Hastings
stationery
10% off
10% off LPs/CDs
Bonerattle Music
Fresh is Best Salsa
Vancouver Music
2012 Commercial Dr.
2972 W Broadway
Project Space
Gallery
BadBird Media
10% off
10% off
222 E Georgia St.
118 HanesAve, North Van
www.badbirdmedia.com
10% off
12% off
10% off
The Cove
Gargoyles Tap+Grill
335/ W Broadway
3681 West 4th Ave.
Prussin Music
Vinyl Records
The Baker &
10% off food
10%
3607 W Broadway
319 W Hastings St.
The Chef Sandwich
10% off
15% off
Cafe
Dentry's Pub
High life Records
1317 Commrecial Dr.
320 Cambie St.
4450 West 10th Ave.
Red Cat Records
The Wallflower
10% off
10% off regular priced
10% off
4332 Main St.
Modern Diner
items
10% off
2420 Main St.
Band Merch Canada
Hitz Boutique   .
316 W Cordova St.
10% off
www.bandmerch.ca
Devil May Wear
The Regional
Assembly of Text
20% off
3957 Main St.
15% off regular priced
Woo Vintage
10% off
clothing and shoes
3934 Main St.
Clothing
Bang-On T-Shirts
1 free mahe-your-own button with purchases over $5
4393 Main St.
Robson, Cherrybomb,
Displace Hashery
Limelight Video
2505ATmaSt.
10% off
Metrotown locations
3293 West 4th Ave.
10% off
10%
10% off
RAX Comics
2418 Main St.
Zoo Zhop
223 Main St.
Banyen Books
3608 W 4th Ave.
Dream Apparel +
Articles for People
311 W Cordova St.
Lucky's Comics
3972 Main St.
12% off
10% off used
10% off
10% off
Rufus' Guitar Shop
10% off
2621 Alma St.
10% off everything but
instruments and amps
A Friends of CITR Card scores
you sweet deals at Vancouver's
finest small merchants and
supports CiTR Radio 101.9 FM.
Show It when you shopl
www.citr.ca ft
EVENTS CALENDAR
FEBRUARY 2011
(AND NOT NECESSARILY IN THAT ORDER)
WEDNESDAY     THURSDAY
SATURDAY
FISH&
CHIPS - $10
STANLEY
PINTS - $5
FUKURO
BURGER
+ PINT - $10
CARIBOO-
$4.2$
DOUBLES -
$7.50
FUKURO SUB
+ PINT - $10
■ CARIBOO-
$4,50
FUKURO
BURGER
+ pint -$10
CARIBOO |
$4.25
DOUBLES -
$7.50
OSAKA
PANCAKE
BALLS r $5
HIGHBALLS - $4
DINE OUT
VANCOUVER
$18 - 3 COURSE
FUN FUN
FUNW/
GRIZZANDOLE
& FRIENDS
DINE OUT
VANCOUVER
$18 - 3 COURSE
NOSH*TW/ALI
B, VINYL RICHIE,
EVO
JOIN US FOR
DINNER
CHEAP THRILLS
KARAOKE
GEEKS VS
NERDS
W/ DJS KRAII &
LOUST
CARIBOO &
CROWSNEST
FREE SHOW
DEAD GHOSTS
W/GREENBACK
HIGH
JOIN US FOR
DINNER
LATE SHOW
TBA
MAGIK SPELLS,
NIXIE,
YES BEAR
FUN FUN
FUNW/
GRIZZANDOLE
& FRIENDS
SMASH BOOM
POW, THE
BICYCLISTS,
MILK
NORDIC TRAX
W/YOUSEF
JOIN US FOR
DINNER
CHEAP THRILLS
KARAOKE
HOUSEWARMING
W/ DJS KRAII &
LOUST
THE
GROWLERS,
NIGHT BEATS,
CHAINS OF
LOVE
WITH BUD
SNOW ART
SHOW
LOVERS
CABARET
VALENTINES
DINNER *
DESSERT
LATE NIGHT
DANCE PARTY
LOVERS OF
HENDRIX
FUN FUN FUN,
ME & YOU
INTIMATE/
BLUEPRINT -
GRAMATIK
JOIN US FOR
DINNER
CHEAP THRILLS
KARAOKE
INDIGO KIDS,
MURDERDOVE
HOUSEWARMING
W/ DJS KRAII &
LOUST
EEEK!,
NO, BOY,
THE FATALZ
CROWSNEST
PRESENTS/
BROKEN
WATER & LORI
GOLDSTON W/
DEADSOFT
BLUE MORRIS
BURLESQUE
FUN FUN
FUNW/
GRIZZANDOLE
& FRIENDS
INTIMATE
PRODUCTIONS
JUSTIN MARTIN
KINGFISHER
BLUEZ MOVIE
NIGHT
JOIN US FOR
DINNER
PERRYSCOPE
PRESENTS/
INDIANS &
NIGHTBEDS
VOTE ELECTRIC
OWL FOR BEST
POUTINE!
HOUSEWARMING
W/ DJS KRAII &
LOUST
LIVE NATION
PRESENTS/
CRYSTAL
SWELLS,
THE PSYCHIC
POUTINE
+ PINT - $10
CON BRO CHILL     ALLIANCE, TBA     STEAMWHISTLE
& WALLPAPER - W/JAMESON
TBA SHOT-$9
COCONUT
CURRY
DON-$10
REDBULL
BOMBS ~ $7
ELECTRICOWL.CA
926 MAIN STREET, VANCOUVER | reservationsfoelectricowl.ca i ONE LAST TIME!
DEPARTURE PARTY WITH MARIA IN THE
SHOWER / THE TAILOR / C.R. AVERY /
GEOFF BERNER / DR. T, JESS HILL /
SHANE KOYCZAN / HANNAH EPPERSON
January 16 @ The Waldorf
Vancouverites have dealt with plenty of loss in the
past several years, as one venue after another has
closed its doors for "progress." But, let's leave the
politics, anger, and sadness at the door and focus
on the good times.
Wednesday, January 16, at the Waldorf was
much more than a spark. In fact, several points
of effervescent light lit a wildfire unlikely to be
seen again. To call it a success would be a vast
understatement. This night may not have saved
the Waldorf from being sold and possibly toppled
in favour of yet another condo development. It
did create more awareness of the fact and gave a
sold-out room a proper send off.
Be it Hannah Epperson and her looping effect-
laden violin play, hair obscuring a face that such
beautiful words and tones flowed from, who
brought "We Will Host a Parjy" to new heights.
Or take the wholly authentic and heart-grabbing
words spit from the mouth of surprise guest Shane
Koyczan, who performed with both Epperson and
solo, and looked healthier and happier than I've
seen in years. "tM^jN
And let's give it up for the whiskey rabbi, Geoff
Berner, who at first stumbled out of the gate, but
by the end of his set, accompanied by Maria In
The Shower, had the crowd on their feet and in the
palm of his drunken hand, singing and swaying
along to favourites like "That's What Keeps the
Rent Down, Baby!"
There was whimsy in the magical tradition as
magician Dr. T threw in some of his astoundingly
clever sleight of hand magic tricks, going so far as
to crowd surf whilst doing a card trick, and doing
it well! But let's not overlook Jess Hill, who is a
songbird and magical in her own right
But if that weren't enough, C.R, Avery did a
wicked and rousing set that was gasoline on an
already steady fire. The beatboxer/spoken word
guru/singer-songwriter's passion and pure shameless love for this side of the city has always been
apparent, and on this night it reached new levels
as he dropped the names of several of his former gig spots, frustration and sweat dripping
from his mug, his three backup singers keeping
it smooth.
The Tailor wowed with his souped up banjo.
Imagine hip-hop flavoured folk tunes from the
depression era piped in through a rickety old time
speaker. Throw in a mushed up cover like Steve
Miller's "Abracadabra"and you've got the Tailor.
Finally, Maria In The Shower! This band of
gorgeous cats gets any party started and raging
out of control. Playinghost, MC, and multi-tasking
entertainer, Jack Garton (accordion/singer/horn
man) kept things rolling in between sets and even
during. The band didn't so much headline as they
did play off and on the entire night, invited on
stage numerous times to accompany their friends
through tunes brought out in the spirit of celebration and protest.
That's what made this night so fine: the celebratory nature of it Sure, there was sadness
among audience and performer alike, shaken by
the knowledge that a favourite venue is soon to be
history written. But in this spirit of celebration,
togetherness, and justplain fun, history was most
certainly set hi stone.
Good night sweet Waldorf. Thank you for
the memories!
—Sarah Berman
BURNING GHATS W/ NIGHT MOTHER /
DEAD AGAIN / BEAR MACE /
NIGHT TERRORS
January 18 @ the Astoria
This was a night that offered a clear sight in
many aspects, to the endless potential of up-
and-coming bands in the Vancouver hardcore/
post-hardcore scene.
Backed by a lineup of excellent company,
the five-piece band Night Terrors kicked off the
evening with their first show together and in an
already crowded venue they brought it back to
basics with hardcore in its simplest form. As with
any first show, there was room for improvement,
but the encouraging crowd and confidence in their
music, Night Terrots showed off their intentions
and grabbed some new fans in the process. Bear Mace did nothing less than charge the
room with excitement and energy. With a deadly
delivery of datchy heavy riffs, mean drumming,
and excellent vocals, they embarked on a heavy,
yet melodic and altering experience worthy of
attention. They ripped through their latest efforts
off Hobo Gold EP relentlessly to a very agreeable
crowd.
After Dead Again's rhythmic ecstasy, an unexpected intro of instrumental noise rock by Night
Mother reclaimed the energy and cleared a space
for Burning Ghats to headline. The continuation
of a dozen cameras flashing and photographers
fighting for the front line gave the evening a feeling of importance, as they illuminated tattoos and
patched vests. With jguitars raised high in the air,
Burning Ghats began an incredibly strong set of
brand new songs, playing their first song "Cold
People" with total confidence. Not any metal band
could hit the ground running after an instrumental
interlude. Through a high-powered performance,
the band displayed their dynamic abilities playing
"Shelter Skelter" and "Gold Sores." Burning Ghats
owned the evening grinding on the edge of crust-
punk and post-hardcore, and ended the show with
charged success that they rightly deserved.
—Monika Louvenmark
ELSETHINGS FESTIVAL
WITH RALEIGH/PROPHECY SUN;
WE ARE PHANTOMS AGAIN
January 19 @ Googly Eyes Collective
While East Vancouver celebrated the demise of a
beloved venue with abandon, a smaller gathering in the West End launched an unexpected new
haven for fun-having. Though it certainly wasn't
the first show hosted by Googly Eyes Collective,
Elsethings Arts Festival—a collage of performance,
film, art, and cozy hangouts—was charged with
expectation, light and new beginnings.
The sights and sounds on offer were part of
a nation-wide showcase strung together by an
Edmonton-based folk label called Cabin Songs.
Googly Eyes artists curated local talent rounding out a list of 70 acts in 15 cities from Victoria
to St John's.
We Are Phantoms Again opened to a packed
room. Artisanal torn kicks were met with call-
and-answer vocal hooks over a pattern of comfy
folk riffs. The happy couple vibes emanating from
singer/drummer Cali Travis and singer/guitarist
Jensen Gifford reached epic levels of adorable as
they cued lyrics with their eyeballs.
Sound artist PrOphecy Sun used a borrowed
boom box to loop organic feedback—filling the
room with a foreboding, ghostly atmosphere.
Her layered creations ranged from drone-y throat
singing to bright operatic dissonance. Crouching
over a spread of sequencers, effects pedals, and
crisscrossed XLR cable, Sun manipulated a homemade theremin with surgical acuity.
Next up, Calgary exports Raleigh performed
as a two-piece rather than a trio. The pair brought
together refined folk, pop, and classical sensibilities in equal measures, coupled with sparse
tongue-in-cheek lyrics.
At times pushing for harsh, discordant textures, Raleigh's guitar and cello arrangements
danced and mingled like Dirty Projectors' riffage.
Just as quickly as Clea Anai's prodded her electric
cello into gritty untraditional territory, a moment
later she'd snap back into effortless harmony.
"Savant" reeled through the crowd, washing a
satisfied nod through the front rows.
The bands wrapped up at about the same time
the beer ran out, but the crowd stayed and collectively sat cross-legged for a selection of National
Film Board shorts both old school and nearly-
finished. A swirl of animation set to Mozart harpsichord by Heidi Blomkvistwas followed up with a
locally-shot drama by Ariel Kirk-Gushowaty.
The evening was simultaneously a gift and a
love letter. Proceeds funded both Atira Women's
Centre and Terra Wildlife Awareness, while several
attendees walked away with free records and tees.
But the devotion of artists and organizers behind
the scenes sparkled just as much as the stage's
golden backdrop. Drawings and photographs
lining the walls quietly referenced a tight-knit
creative scene in bloom.
This reviewer's takeaway was the origin of the
festival's namesake: a thoughtful six-song EP by
Halifax folk artist Nick Everett & Everybody—
released on the same day. While so many venues
remain under threat of closure, it's refreshing to
see art finding a new home in Vancouver.
—Sarah Berman
WINTER WASTE WITH APOLLO GHOSTS
PEACE/ LIE/ CASCADIA/
NERVOUS TALK/THE PASSENGER/
HALF CHINESE
January 19 @ The Astoria
Vancouver saw a reprieve from the previous week's
encroaching freeze and despite the distractions
of the Waldorf closing and D.O.A. calling it quits
several blocks away, the Astoria filled up for Winter
Waste, a seven-band, two-stage, one-projectionist
(video artist Mairin Cooley) revue.
Half Chinese opened with the 9os-inflected
"You Are The Sun," Enzio Verster's vocals sounded
like Stephen Malkmus in hypothetical collaboration with the Dead C. An as-yet unfinished song
followed, which started off with delicate pickwork,
before turning into something ineffably chaotic,
its tempo rushing to the end of the set
Next was the Passenger, who sounded a little
like Cluster and felt like having too much to drink.
I love ambient noise wankery as much as the next
guy, but I didn't like the way this set made me feel
physically.
Fortunately, the rest of the night was filled
with more straightforward punk rock bands. Case
in point: Nervous Talk, who played a medley of
throwback punk tunes, veritable snapshots of
that heady, mythical time between 1977 and 1981.
As Nervous Talk chugged along at a steady clip,
the crowd pogoed steadily as light played off the
Astoria's fake grottoes.
Lie were next, sounding very much like Sonic
Youth covering Siouxsie and the Banshees, tearing
through their songs at a screaming pace. They
could easily have ended up sounding horribly
muddy and sloppy, but their set was none of those
things. It was the exact opposite, in fact.
Unfortunately, the Astoria's sound system
didn't do justice to the following act Cascadia. But
they made the best of it, and their Polvo-inspired
noise rock earned raves from the audience. The
crowd swayed and bounced off each other gently:
simultaneously aggressive and tender. Measured
and incisive on their recordings, here they are feral
and (admittedly) very sloppy, playing material
from their latest tape, Conditionally, as well as what
seemed to be new, more post-metal influenced
material. Sasha Langford (vocals/drums) amazed,
freed from the bounds of tape or bits and bytes.
Peace went second to last As they played post-
punk ballad "Your Hand In Mind," someone tried
to start a circle pit, to no avail. Too bad he couldn't
wait until the last act
Apparently, Apollo. Ghosts hadn't played a
show in four months,and their pent-up energy
translated to the audience. The crowd went nuts,
bouncing off each other and taking turns crowd
surfing. There was so much action that Ghosts'
front man, Adrian Teacher, had to warn the audience not to get hurt Musically, the Ghosts' whole
set was full of fan favourites from their last couple
of albums, plus their latest Kingfisher Bluez single,
"Nightwitch." Capping off the night was a brand
new song, a vaguely ACR or ESG-styled art-funk
number. Is a 2000s dance-punk revival around the
corner, perhaps?
And with that, it ended right on the nose, at 2
a.m. A tight end to a tight show.
-rChris Yee  UNDER REVIEW FEBRUARY 2013
CITYREAL + WES MACKEY
GOOD MORNING BLUES
(Independent)
HIDDEN TOWERS
(Defiled Under Music}
Normally, I'd call a modern hip-hop artist teaming
up with an old-time musical legend a money grab
or a vain attempt at prolonging each respective
party's time in the spotlight but Good Morning Blues
is, thankfully, neither. Despite being billed as a
"fusion side project," the io-track record doesn't
come off as anything other than a main effort and
minus my initial reservations at pairing Vancouver
local Cityreal (a.k.a. Remi Huot) with the mythical
west coast transplant Wes Mackey (who's been
playing with, well, everyone over the past 50 years),
there's an obviously shared joy between the two
artists in exploring the roots of their influences.
Good Morning Blues isn't a subtle album—it's
a mash-up of upbeat rap and the kind of dirty,
i920s-era southern blues that Jack White likes to
preach on about. Right from the opening notes
(sung by Mackey), the whole thing leaks with a
moth-eaten, tube-radio recording feel that pops,
probably due to FACTOR funding, with authenticity. Warm Hammond B-3 interludes give way to the
best kind of fuzzy, tweed-suit 12-bar guitar licks,
and vintage vocals courtesy of Mackey make an
interesting, and polarizing, contrast to Cityreal's
butter-smooth but heavy-handed lyrical delivery.
Good Morning Blues will make the most sense to
people like Cityreal, who has a real interest both
in '90s hip-hop and scratchy pre-war blues. The
eccentricities of both genres,, new and old, creep
into the record and almost serve to make Good
Morning Blues a narrow-focused affair, but to dismiss this album as a simple homage to bygone eras
would be a mistake-^-it's more like a celebration.
—Fraser Dobbs
It isn't a wild leap of the imagination to expect
expansive, spaced-out riffs of a psychedelic nature
from an album named after a gigantic volcano on
Mars. The debut album from Vancouver's own
prog-rock power-trio Hidden Towers delivers just
that in fine form. One of the earliest releases on the
new Defiled Under Music label, Olympus Mons is a
seven track journey through the complexities of
life and death carried on the wings of post-grunge
riffs and solos to spare.
With influences (stated on the band's bio) ranging from "bigger than life classic metal, '70s jazz
fusion, space-rock, and post-hardcore," there are
myriad styles at work throughout the album with
several time changes and movements occurring
in each song. "Gainsford, AB (Cup of Blood)"—a
song whose namesake references core members'
Chris Cantrell and Ben Holland's prairie roots—
has a slanky, almost country riff that moves into
a chugging stomper. Album closer "Drowning in
the Baptismal Font" drifts calmly over an Incubus-
sounding intro before abruptly switching into a
System of a Down tantrum. Hidden Towers employ
dynamics like this all over Olympus Mons.
This being the group's first outing since
their debut EP Great Conjunctions—a result of
their 2009 SHiNDiG victory—it also sees the
group moving away from the instrumental format that won them that competition in the first
place.
Although it has to be said that Cantrell is
without a doubt an extremely talented musician, the one detraction from the album is his
nasal, somewhat whiny voice. Perhaps it would
have been better to let his guitar do the talking,
but then again people say the same thing about
Geddy Lee; and Rush just landed in the Rock
and Roll Hall of Fame. Either way, if ambitious
prog-rock is your forte, Olympus Mons could be
the journey you've been waiting to take.
—Coleman Ingram
METE PILLS
(Independent)
"This is the sorry.sound of four grown men taking
one more spin around the block again," laments
Andrew Lee Barker on "Finding Emo," the third
track on Mete Pills' III Feet EP. It is true that the
members of Mete Pills have been kicking around as
long as the ratty pair of Converse pictured on their
album cover. However, unlike the trashed sneakers, the band is more worn in than worn out.
Aside from Barker, the rest of Mete Pills have
been playing in bands around Vancouver since the
'90s, and their experience shines through these six
tracks. The songs on III Feet are meticulously constructed: full of dissonant changes, breakdowns,
cool outs, and just the right amount of hollering
and gang vocals. Wearing little more than a bit
of reverb, Tim McGuinness's riffs are steeped in
character as they cascade from the speakers while
Denyss McKnight's deep, steady bass lines keep
everything in check, and Dave Marrow's dynamic
beats steer the ship.
New to the microphone, Barker is quickly
finding his swagger. Tracks like "Pills" showcase
his incredibly clever lyrics and find him settling
into his own vocal style. Subject to the production
wizardry of Jesse Gander, III Feet is tight, clean,
and built to play loud. What Mete Pills have created is far from sorry sound, it is a post-hardcore
manifesto composed by four grown men who
defiantly deserve to go around the block again
and again.
—MarkPaulHus Initially released under the moniker Ookpikk,
on a split with Adam Saikaley (of Ottawa's Place
Machine Collective), the C-20 chrome high-bias
BASF-grade cassette version of Light Limited/
Tropigogic was limited to a mere 50 copies. (Yep,
these two are that committed to quality). Digital
copies surfaced to moderate acclaim in North
American underground electronic circles as it
peaked at number six on Canadian college radio
electronic charts last March. Inspired by the
cassette's reception, the self-professed "BASF
pioneer" released Light Limited one year later,
simply as Okpk.
Dan Godlovitch (a.k.a. Okpk) has an undeniable passion for experimenting with sound manipulation, and his modified synch grants him some
unique capabilities. That passion, however, is also
his undoing. What Okpk merits in experimentation and innovation, he lacks in coherence. Like
a sugar-high child, Light Limited constantly tugs
at the palm of your hand, imploring you to join
Godlovitch's pursuit of whatever shiny object he
finds amusing. Sounds come and go at awkward
times, appearing out of context to interrupt a
song's sensible flow.
The opener, "Ascent" bodes well as simply
an eerie and unhurried dream, but Okpk's playfulness causes him to lose sight of the overall
piece in favour of sonic manipulations that simply
don't fit Next, take the uneasy "Flutter," whose
confusing array of sounds are not so unpleasant
that you would turn it off, but also don't make
you care about where the song is going; leaving
you with little more than some quirky, yet neutral,
background noise.
Nevertheless, to make accessible, narrative-
driven electronic music is no easy task, especially
at the helm of a personally refashioned modular synth. Deliberately preventing his electronic
manipulations from becoming "tracks" for club
mixes and moving toward affective and visionary
"songs" is an impressive pursuit. Despite Okpk's
ambition, his narration still needs work. That said,
this re-issue sheds promising light on the inventiveness of modular synch music in B.C. proving
that events like New Forms Festival are a worthwhile endeavour for our city and a reward for the
tireless creativity of local electro-geeks.
—Robert Catherall
SPECTRES
NOTHING TO NOWHERE
(Deranged Records)
Don't let the opening few seconds of Nothing to
Nowhere fool you. This is not a rock record. Sure,
it features manic guitars with cavernous reverb
and edgy percussions that are sure to keep chiropractors-employed. But Spectres are more closely
related to a post-punk outfit from the netherworld,
and ghost punks don't particularly believe in
opportunities for air guitar or subscribe to the
idea of using a chorus too often. Call Nothing to
Nowhere an exercise in genre gencrification; out
with the old and in with the new.
The odd time the Vancouver five-piece replicate
something, like a chorus on "Maison Gris," the
result is more of a fist pump than a sing-a-long,
and the effect is spine tingling to be sure. Even
though the album is void of any classic hooks,
and Brian Gustavson's vocals stay firmly rooted
in a particular pitch, there is something darkly
seductive about the whole affair. Every track comes
off as a raw, emotional outpouring of lyrics and
provides plenty of fuel to induce an adrenaline-
drenched experience. Songs like "Amnesia"
and "Decompensation" are highly contagious,
extremely danceable, and beg the question of
whether Spectres are even capable of a ballad.
For the first minute or so of "Slender Man,"
they do manage to slow things down a tad,
but any respite with the pace is fleeting and
the band keep churning out break-neck death-
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Vancouver Convention Centre rock with a deliberate attempt at overpowering
the senses, and once the addiction takes hold,
the urge to replay the record will be fierce and
relentless. The faint of heart have been warned.
—Slavko Bucifal
SUNSHINE
(Independent)
If an album mixed by Sune Rose Wagner (Raveo-
nettes), John Collins (NewPornographers), Woodie
Taylor (Morrissey), and Hayz Fisher (the New Values), doesn't convince you already, you might as
well stop reading here and now. Sunshine's debut
album, to be released everywhere on February 26, is
a bundle ofvibrance, summer, and everything but
rain. This is not a typical Vancouver band; although
there may be a glimpse of somberness in their lyrics, any melancholy that they carry is smothered by
bubbly guitar riffs and euphoric singing.
The Vancouver-based five-piece jumps into the
album with "Showering With Wine," a blend of
Dream Brother vocals and bouncy Steve Shelly
drums. A sound akin to Tennis is evident on the
third track, "French Exit," and if you can imagine
pastel-colored bikes, fresh Bellinis and tortoise-
shell shades, the song can be instantly turned into
something visually tangible. And the echoing guitar, surfy drum beat, harmonizing vocals, and killer
bass merge into a more punked out version of
this preceding song, as the distant voice of Trevor
Risk goes from the friendly boy-next-door to a
bored, Shadows on Stars/leather-clad fuzz sound
in "Arnprior."
After a number of milder, low-key tracks, drummer Sean Tyson (Top Less Gay Love Tekno Parry)
flutters along the hi-hatand bursts into an exciting
catchiness on the album's seventh track, "Sundays
Are For Cats," and the even more romantic, chirpy
dance-along, "Ice Cream Social."
All eleven tracks embody a distinct and unique
ambiance; a rare commodity for an "indie" branded
band. And with this feel-good debut, Sunshine
lives somewhere in the middle of indie rock and
a '50s inspired echo-trip. Think Radiation City
melodies, King Tuff vocals, and the Mamas &
the Papas California-inspired twang. In short,
Sunshine sums up in perfect haziness, the cherished aspects ofVancouver; the scanty streams of
sun, the summer waves, the pretty faces, and the
blurred nights.
—Josefa Cameron
I The May 1986 issue featured Einsturzende Neubauten,
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eyeliner. Check out this cover and 29 others in Discorder's
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i The May 1988 issue featured the New Scene
Dream Machines, What Do You Think The
Future Holds, and Bob's Your Uncle. They left
Doug out of it Peep discover and 29 others in
Discofdefs 15-month wall calendar.
t A tot shook down in Vancouver in 1983. The Vancouver Art Gallery moved to its current location in the Old
Courthouse. Adrian Carr and Paul George founded the Green Party. We got our first Earl's restaurant BC Place o
After three years of development and building, the team at UBC's TRIUMF did their first scan with a PET tomograph.
In the world of music, bands like Mission Of Burma, Siouxsie & The Banshees, and calling-it-quits punk vets D.OA
were topping the charts. Here's CiTR's top 40, taken from the February 1983 issue of the magazine.
+-- The March 1987 edition marked
Discorder's 50th issue! Little did they
know, the mag was just getting started.
«- The October 1989 issue featured Cosi Fanni
Tutti, Tough Asnails, and the CiTR Survey.
Survey says? Discorder is amazing. by JOSEFA
CAMERON
626 photo by
JOSBACAiMEROW
SQPJLL photo by
JADEJORDANCIN
DANAruEARLfY
Every year, CH R holds its
legendary 'Are You That DJ?"
competition. The event, conceived
by CiTR's Brad Winter, has been
the fire to heat the protostar
before shooting offfbr many
DJs. This edition was held at the
Pit Pab on November 23, where
eight DJs competed. The top three
won CiTR swag, slots on air, and
live sets at both fortune Sound
dub and TIC Wednesdays at the
fiiltmorc
In this issue, we chat with the
second place winner, Sqdl (aJca.
Kristian Voveris) and third place
winner, 626 (a.k.a. Jonathan Tan).
Come back next month when we'll
feature first place winner Noodl
(a.k.a. Jeff Frond).
D: When did you start DJing and
why?
KV: I didn't really grow up listening to electronic music I went
from watching MTV videos in the
*gos to getting into rock music
About two years ago and I came
across a few artists such as Mount
Kimbie, Gold Panda, and Nicholas Jaar that destroyed some of
my pie-conceptions about it so I
started messing around wMi Vir-
tualDJ. Going to New Forms Fes
tival really made me curious about
the culture of electronic music in
Vancouver, and I met some really
interesting people immersed in it.
StiU, DJing remained a thing that
I kept to my bedroom or the occasional house party.
D: Who got you interested in "Are
You That DJ?"
KV: UBC student and photographer,, Jade Jordancin, bugged me
to do it.
Be How did you pick your DJ
KV: My last name in Lithuanian
literally means "squirreL'*
D: What equipment do you use?
KV: Ahleton and, a borrowed
MPD32. It's not at all DJing in the
traditional sense, but Ableton lets
you treat tracks like samples.
D: Who are you listening to right
now?
KV: Grimes, Mount Kunbie, LCD
Soundsystem, Interpol, the Beta
Band, Joy Division, My Bloody Valentine Trust, LosdTs Sketches,
Gerry Read, and Japandroids.
D: What genre would you call your
KV: House
D: What advice do you have for fellow or beginner DJs?
KV: Listen to music you love, play
music you love, don't drop some
well-known banger just to please •
everyone take your time, and go
somewhere with k.
D: What is your part about being
aDJ?
KV: Getting friends together in
one place. Meeting people Free
drinks.
D: What is your part about playing
a set?
KV: There's something about getting into the flow of the music
you're playing, and it's a way of
listening to it that's uninterrupted
by other thoughts.
. D: How have Disorder and CiTR
played a role in your life as aDJ?
KV: I started writing for Discorder
in my first year and it exposed me
to a tot of what's happening in
Vancouver, put mem touch with
some great people, and got me
into shows for free I first went to
a Midnight City show to write a
review for Discorder, and that was
my first experience of a club that
I really enjoyed. No joke CrTR
changed my life.
D: Where do you see your future
as aDJ?
KV: Tdlove to play more shows. I
think playing atTLC should give
me a better idea of what to do
with it.
th When did you start DJing and
why?
JT: Two years ago, I was looking
for a hobby and I ended up really
enjoying iL It all started after how
amazing I felt when I DJed a house
party I realized how much fun
and communal of an experience
DJing can be
D: Who gotyou interested in "Are
You That DJ?"
JT: CiTR offered free DJing classes
and the instructor, Oker Chen, got
me interested.
D: How did you pick your DJ
name?
JT: Originally, it was meant to
be DJ Stitch, like Stitch from the
Disney cartoon. I switched to 626,
winch was the experiment number
assigned to Stitch in the cartoon. __
D: What equipment do you use?
JT: I use a NumarkMixdeck running offTraktor on my laptop.
D: What genre would you call your
JT: Electro-dubstep.
D: What advice do you have for fellow or beginner DJs?
JT: If something you mix sounds
weiid the first time it doesn't
mean it's all bad. It's worth trying
it until weird sounds awesome!
D: How have Discorder and CiTR
played a role in your life as aDJ?
JT: They have really motivated me
to develop new mixes and ideas. I
also cannot wait to do my set on
CiTRFM!
Ik Where do you see your future
asaDJ?
JT: I have been wanting to learn
more about bhangra music Til try
mybandatareggaeton/bhangra
mix. I also plan to start producing
musk using Ableton. MaW
n
¥§ %
11 TONS OF GREAT TBAKS HAVE COME IN-WE ARE OVER STKKEN f i
SO BUY YOURSELF SOME AMAZING TITLES FAST,
(KfrfifeM* twitter.com/zulurecords
facebook
facebook.com/people/
ZuluRecords-Store/680210042
tumblr.   zulurecords.tumblr.com
Zulu Records
1972-1976 W 4th Ave
Vancouver BC
tel 604738.3232
www.zulurecords.com
STORE HOURS

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