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Snapshots of Sasquatchrfvnder Covers | Pump Trolley | Discorder Revisited: I Was A Teenage Skunk | Discorder's Staff Sound-Off
July/August 20131 That Magazine From CiTR 101.9 FM | Free! | Supporting Vancouver's Independent Music Community For 30 Years £&£$S&
Isady <§>h££na "§hin" f>ig,
/or whom the Shindig Trophy
was named after.
nmnnon all daiids!
CITR MIMG 15 CELEDRATI11G 30 TEARS
OF DELIGHTFUL nUMCIAL COffllTITIOIl.
TOU ARE UNITED TO 5UDI1IT KH|
All EHTRTDT AUGUST 12 TO:
sninDiQ.suDni^ions®onniL.con
'Tor morz info pl£a§£ visit
shindig.eitr.ea"
f UPCOMING
SHOWS
DEAD ASYLUM A18UM RELEASE
Slagduster, Snaggletooth, Bushwhacker
MOULDYSOUL
■ POTATOH£ADPEOf«,SKULLFLOWER    j
lioBLIVIANS
Sex Church
TANYASTEPHENS
Tank Gyat. Li trie, Gisto and more
NEUTERHEAD: ACE OF SPAYS
Nwi-frofit! Cover bands by members of 3
Inches of Blood, Bison, Haggatha, & more
ft WITCH MOUNTAIN
EIGHT BELLS, O.S.S., HOPELEUS
PETER MURPHY
CELEBRATING 35 YEARS OF BAUHAUS
0000009
CARAVAN PALACE
Spry Bry
MMATAdIF"
Preying Saints, Nim Vlnd
JR. REID
with guests
KURT VILE & THE VIOLATORS
witt) special guests
wift guests
UNLEASH THEARCHES
BALMORHEA
THE HOOD INTERNET
MYIGAYIHUSBAND!
RADFEST2X13
DJ Caveman Lawyer and DJ Hot Tub
Reshgod Apocalypse, Arsis, Starkill
CISF10 YEAR ANNIVERSARY
DEERHUNTER
DOUG STANHOPE
with guests
IM00ND0GGIES
THE MALDIVES
254 East Hastings Street
604.681.8915
TYPHOON
with guests
WE HUNT BUFFALO
WAR BABY & LA CHINGA
THE LEGENDARY PINK DOTS
YEAR 33 TOUR
MIAMI DEVICE
with guests
IWAXTAILOR
| with guests
TWI2TID
Blaze Ya Dead Homie & Potluck
I ANATHEMA
| with guests
THE DREAD CREW OF
0DDW00D
BLACKBERRY WOOD, MOURNIR
WEST OF HELL
with guests
I THE HOOKERS
horess, Bear Mace, Warlock
sited
Additional show listings, ticket info, band bios, videos and more ar§|j|ne at: WWW. H VOHtfiCkShciW. COfTI
AUTHORITY ZERO
with guests EDITOR'S NOTE: WHEREIN I BID YOU FINE FOLKS FAREWELL
I've been pacing around my apartment and staring out the window and
typing and deleting words hoping to have an epiphany that will make this
the best editor's note the world has ever read. One that will encompass the
breadth of knowledge I've gained in my time at the helm of this beautiful
publication. One that will impart wisdom to inspire writers to write, musicians to jam, and eagles to soar. One that will make you laugh. One that
will make you cry. One that will make you hurl. It must! Because it's my
final editor's note for Discorder, and I have to show you everything I've done
and learned and sum it up in 500 words or less.
But that's not how life goes. Momentous events don't just come to an
epic climax then get wrapped up in a neat little package and tucked away.
I've learned that life is a series of one anti-climactic event after another. That
big moment comes and goes and sure enough you're standing there going,
"Huh. Well. I guess it's over then," wondering why so much emphasis was
placed on that one moment.
It's silly because every single thing you've done your entire life has been
leading up to that moment; it's the stuffin between that matters. So inevitably
there's an annoying cliche to illustrate my point: It's not the destination that
counts, it's the journey. Annoying but true. Or perhaps Ferris Bueller said
it best: "Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a
while, you might miss it."
My time here has indeed been a journey, and seeing writers grow, bands
explode, and artists flourish with Discorder as their vessel has been remarkable.
The opportunities I've had working here are countless; things that I dreamt
of as a writer, editor, and music-lover, became reality. I'm going to miss this
magic carpet ride of magazinery and the people behind it quite a bit.
Of course, I wouldn't leave on anything but the highest of notes, and if I
may say, this oh-so-summery issue is packed with butt-loads of awesome reads
and looks. From cover to cover, we're embracing the season like a kid with a
Slurpee and discussing music festivals galore in cover story "The Re-Explosion
of the Music Festival," in a trip to 'Merca in "Snapshots of Sasquatch,"
and in our preview of Vancouver's newest multi-day D.I.Y. music and arts
extravaganza, Shout Back! Festival. We also trot down to Secret Location to
chat with grunge-gloom trio DIANE in another edition of Jam Space, get the
giggles with Pump Trolley Comedy, and get Skunk-punk on-set in a flashback
to 1980 in the final edition of our odes-to-Discorder-past in "I Was A Teenage
Skunk." Just to name a few.
On that note, I bid you fine folks farewell. Have a happy summer, listen to
lots of music, go to all the live shows, dance yourself clean, eat, drink, nap,
and be as merry as you may. See ya at the beach.
Read on and stay rad,
Laurel Borrowman
Ps: Stay tuned to find out who the new editor is! I'll be co-editing with
him/her for a very special "slashie" September issue.
FEATURES
T Cover illustration by
BRITTA BACCHUS
8—Snapshots of Sasquatch
We trek south and dive face-first into the
debaucherous three-day fest, Discorder-
style. by Tracy Stefanucci
12—Under Covers From Bob Dylan to
Nirvana, cover nights are the perfect
platform for music collaboration. We go
behind the scenes of these popular events
to get the scoop, by Jordan Wade
13—The Re-Explosion of the Music
Festival Your parents still yammerin' on
about Woodstock '69? This is the summer
you formulate the perfect rebuttal. Stock
up on earplugs. Vancity's biggest music
fest season ever is blowin' up.
byJaceyGibb
REGULARS
16—Pump Trolley Comedy Find out how
this Vancouver sketch troupe is making
communism hilarious again.
by Evan Brow
18—Discorder Revisited: I Was a
Teenage Skunk In this tale from
Discorder's yesteryear, we visit 1980 on
set of what became Ladies & Gentlemen,
The Fabulous Stains, through the lens of an
eager 18-year-old extra, by Erica Leiren
38—Discorder's Staff Sound-Off
Remember that first album you paid your
own allowance for? We do. Here's our staff
and contributors' first-ever hard-copy
musical investments, and what they're
stoked for this summer.
Here's The Thing
Save B.C. Film? Make B.C. Film!
Jam Space DIANE
Tribute Tim McGuinness
Summer Fest Preview Shout Back! Fest
Calendar Sylvana D'Angelo
Program Guide
Art Project Andrew Nedimyer, Yu Su,
Andrew Volk, Katayoon Yousef bigloo
Under Review
Real Live Action
Charts
I CHECKDISCORDER.CAON
1 THE REGULAR FOR NEW
ARTICLES, PHOTOS, AND ALL
JjmSMUSIC RELATED!
Editor
Laurel Borrowman
Art Director
Jaz Halloran
Copy Editors
Robin Schroffel,
Steve Louie
Ad Coordinator
Maegan Thomas
Under Review Editor
Robin Schroffel
RLA Editor
Steve Louie
Web Editor
Chirag Mahajan
Calendar Listings
Claire Eagle
Accounts Manager
Corey Ratch
Official Tweeter
Dorothy Neufeld
CiTR Station Manager
Brenda Grunau
Publisher
Student Radio Society
of UBC
Student Liasons
Zarah Cheng,
Dorothy Neufeld
Photographers & Illustrators
Britta Bacchus, Tyler Crich, Sylvana
D'Angelo, Bev Davies, Anne Emberline,
Dana Kearley, Steve Louie, Moses Magee,
Andrew Nedimyer, EVIL Patrick Shannon,
Tracy Stefanucci, Yu Su, Eleanor Wearing,
Andrew Volk, Katayoon Yousefbigloo,
Proofreader
Gareth Moses
Writers
Evan Brow, Slavko Bucifal, Josefa
Cameron, Selina Crammond, Alex de Boer,
Fraser Dobbs, Jacey Gibb, Sam Hawkins,
Tristan Koster, Erical Leiren, James
Olson, Mark PaulHus, Will Pedley, Tracy
Stefanucci, Nathan Pike, Jordan Wade,
Max Wainwright, Justin White, Stephen
White, Bob Woolsey, Mathieu Youdan
Advertise
Ad space for upcoming issues
can be booked by calling (604)
822-3017 ext. 3 or emailing
advertising@citr.ca. Rates
available upon request.
Contribute
To submit words to Discorder,
please contact: editor.
discorder@citr.ca. To submit
images, contact: artdirector.
discorder@citr.ca
Subscribe
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Distribute
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er 2013 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 10,200. Discorder is published almost monthly by CiTR, which
can be heard at 101.9 FM, online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487,
CiTR's office at (604) 822-3017, email CiTR at stationmanager@citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write #233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T1Z1, Canada.
Editorial cutoff: June 21.2013 SAVE B.C. FILM?
MAKE B.C. FILM
by BOB
WOOLS EY
illustration by
DANA KEARLEY
The worst fears of many people in the film
industry (and arts in general) recently became
reality. The B.C. Liberals won another term as
our government. In the social media melee that
followed the election results, I noticed a number
of my independent filmmaker friends pointing
out that if you're relying on government money
as an indie filmmaker, you're basically shooting yourself in the foot right out of the gate.
Not that a film-friendly government wouldn't
have benefited them, but this win by the Liberals
hasn't really changed anything. It's true, but it's
also kind of the problem.
The loudest voice against the B.C. Liberal's
policies towards film has been the Save B.C.
Film movement. However, that organization is
really centered on the American film industry
that shoots here. With the B.C. Liberals refusing to match tax incentives of other provinces,
productions go elsewhere and their union paying jobs go with them. So, it's not really B.C.
film they're trying to hold on to; it's American
film made in B.C. . H^;;'-
Sure, these large productions have benefitted the B.C. film community in many ways.
Every indie producer I know has gotten a deal
on gear, facilities, or some other aspect of
production because of the infrastructure built
with American production money. Not to mention our talented workforce that's been trained
to work on sets funded by that same Uncle
Sam cash.
The issue of these jobs is an important
one, but the tide of "Save B.C. Film" seems to
assume that this workforce, assembled by and
sustained by American money, makes up the
entirety of B.C. filmmakers. It ignores the struggling independent writers, directors, and producers striving to make films here that actually
tell B.C. stories about B.C. characters in B.C.
situations. These filmmakers don't make any
money off of this so-called "B.C. Film." What's
the last film you saw that was shot in Vancouver
and actually set in Vancouver?
It took me a while to think of one too.
Unfortunate as it is, the reality of the situation has relegated anyone who wants to make
movies about Vancouver, or B.C. at large, to
hobby status. Despite the increasing ease
"WHAT'S THE LAST FILM YOU
SAW THAT WAS SHOT IN
VANCOUVER AND ACTUALLY
SET IN VANCOUVER?
IT TOOK ME A WHILE TO
THINK OF ONE TOO."
associated with low cost cameras and editing
software you can use at home, it still costs a
lot of money to make movies. So much money
that even if a young intrepid storyteller raises
enough funds to make a feature length film,
they almost certainly don't make another one.
Can you name any up-and-coming Canadian
directors?
Sarah Polley and...
If you can even still consider Sarah Polley an
up-and-coming director. Not to mention the
fact that she's based in Toronto. We have a serious lack of visible content about Vancouver and
British Columbia available to any kind of wide
audience. It's troubling. Not only because we
aren't seeing ourselves represented on screen,
but also because the problem is so systemic that
there can be no easy solutions. Even if B.C. had
elected a government that opened up the province's wallet and doled out cash for B.C. films, it
doesn't necessarily mean that anyone would see
them, largely due to the American stranglehold
on our theatres.
With such an ingrained system, tax credits
and Canadian content laws can only do so
much. At the end of the day the change has
to come from the filmmakers in the form
of great content. Indeed, the only thing that
ever changed the filmmaking business Was
outrageous profit and the desire to copy it.
Here's the thing: we have everything we need to
make world-class films right at our fingertips,
but we lack the success story that changed
everything. The only way to get to that point
is to keep making stuff. So keep on keeping
on, B.C. filmmakers. It's only a matter of time
before our voice is heard—unless we allow
defeats like the recent election to have any effect
on our ability to do what we love.  DIANE
SYLVANA D'ANGELO
by MATHIEU
YOUDAN
DIANE, the grungy, feedback-saturated
gloom queen, is on a first name basis
with East Vancouver's music community.
Featuring Mel Zee and Ben Goldberg of
Phonecalls, and Katie Gravestock who
played with Goldberg in Bad Fate, they
provide years of experience and unique
compositions to the Secret Location, one
of Vancouver's most unique underground
studios. Hosting Zee's art space, local
recording label Nite Prison, and the
rehearsal rooms of DIANE, Aquanaut,
Mormon Crosses, Ahna, and many
others, the Secret Location, once a
premiere after hours, now hosts the most
interesting collaborations in the city.
"[Secret Location] has really good
politics. They're an anarchist feminist
space," Zee says while describing the
initiation requirements for her collective.
"You have to sign a waiver (before
rehearsing here) saying 'I'm not a Nazi'
when you go in there. I really respect .
them for that." In addition to their
amplifiers, the space is cluttered with
keyboards, patch cables, and posters, as
well several feet of menacing razor wire
packed in to the skylight.
"We were broken into so many times.
Then [the thieves] got smart and realized
you could come in through the skylights,"
Zee remarks. "They broke into Jesse
[Taylor, Nite Prison's studio and put all
his stuff on craigslist. Jesse met up with
them and he got it all back," recalls
Zee before offering up a challenge to
would-be burglars. "Since we put razor
wire and bars on, we haven't had a
single break in."
Zee, Goldberg, and Gravestock
forged DIANE out of the remnants of
personal conflicts within previous
acts. After years of playing with their
respective bands, Phonecalls and Bad
Fate, they had a collective hiatus that
wouldn't last. "I was listening to Wire
every day and thinking I just want to
be in a punk band and [air drums],"
Goldberg reminisces. "So Mel and I
talked about who we wanted to play
with, and bounced a few names around
when she asked, 'What about Katie?'
I sent Katie a text and she replied 45
seconds later with, 'Yes absolutely!'"
This resulted in a gloomy and hectic
band, just as influenced by goth rockers
the Cure of the '80s as it was by
experimental no wave reformers, such as
Sonic Youth a decade later.
The newest product of their
creativity in the Secret Location is
a currently unreleased 12-inch with
Mormon Crosses. Recorded by Taylor at
Nite Prison underneath their own jam
space, it showcases a year worth of
honest communication and collaboration.
"We're all willing to tell each other if we
don't like what they're doing, to offer
suggestions," Gravestock says of their
creative process. "No one gets insulted
or offended and I think we end up writing
way better songs. We build ideas until
we're all really happy with our parts. We
do have fake fights though."
The Secret Location has been
DIANE's creative home for only six
months, a well decided solution to
their troubles with both of Renegade
rehearsal space's locations. "We barely
saw anyone at Renegade. They would
stay in their rooms," Zee contrasts of
her previous roommates, "This place is
more of a community. People are always
collaborating and talking about music,
art, whatever." These collaborations
include MT-40, Zee's debut on
synthesizer, and a new recording studio
set up by Reginald Bowls and Adam
Cathey. Yet there's little more reason to
stay than the simplest passions, as Zee
summarizes, "This is my second home,
I'm always here. You can just sit around
and hear amazing bands play."
Diane's EP Phantoms is out on Green
Burrito records now. Catch them at Pat's
Pub for their tour fundraiser
July 6, with Defektors, N213, Group
Visions, and Mormon Crosses. IN MEMORY OF
TIM MCGUINNESS
(1975-2013)
by MARK
PAULHUS
illustration by
BRITTA BACCHUS
The Vancouver music community recently said
goodbye to a great friend, Tim McGuinness (Mete
Pills, Allstate Champion, Last Plague, Cascabella,
Seismic). McGuinness passed away unexpectedly
on May 20, leaving behind a trail of heavy hearts.
McGuinness was well-known and loved, especially
in the punk and hardcore scenes; a jovial, friendly
character, who always seemed happy to see you and
seemed to know everybody. Music was McGuinness's
life; he was always a proud ambassador of Vancouver music
whether boasting the greatness of bands he grew up with, like
Sparkmarker and BNU, or eagerly checking out current local
favorites and upstarts.
The only thing he loved more than watching a good band
was being on stage with a guitar strapped to his shoulder.
As soon he began playing, he was a man happily possessed,
giving himself to every note, unable to stand still as he was
consumed by the riffs he created. McGuinness was a passionate musician, dedicated to whatever project he was a part of,
eager to create, and constantly striving for perfection. While
McGuinness unabashedly wore his influences on his sleeve,
over the years he managed to bring them together with his
own ideas to create a unique guitar sound that culminated
in his work with Mete Pills. His resonant, atmospheric riffs
became an extension of his being and though he may be gone,
he will live on in his music.
Goodbye Tim. Though we miss you dearly, we will always
have the terrific memories and your transcendent riffs. We
can find peace in knowing that if there is a rock 'n' roll heaven,
you have already started a band. SNAPSHOTS
byTRJCY
STEFANUCCI
Seattle-based Jherek Bischoff's orchestral arrangements are the perfect
way to begin a music festival—instrumental music that summons anticipation as well as indulgence in the open skies and the buzz of cheap
American (pre-drank) beers. He wears a suit and bow tie, and his stage
banter is endearingly self-conscious. When the drunk guy in short shorts
sitting next to us stops yelling, "You are beautiful!" at every hot girl that
walks by, I stretch out on my blanket to savour Bischoff's voice as it finally joins the swelling melodies.
We are surrounded by barely-21 girls in high-waisted denim shorts, plastic flower-covered headbands and face paint, posing with cigarettes and
tall cans of Rolling Rock.
We can see the rain coming down on the other side of the gorge as Timothy
Showaiter of the folk-infused indie rock act Strand of Oaks bellows against
a driving bass that makes my entire body vibrate.
Built to Spill's we-don't-give-a-shit-what-we-look-like vibe is refreshing
against the crowd's festival wear. I can't help but be reminded of a bobble head while watching Doug Martsch sing, but it is pretty incredible to
hear his iconic voice live.
The sky is pink when Youth Lagoon begins. From the hill across from the
Yeti stage we watch the crowd throw inflatable dalmatians and fire hydrants into the air. Trevor Powers addresses the audience as "Sasquatch."
Just by being here we are Sasquatch, one larger organism, a forest of trees
swaying to Powers' atmospheric music. The energy rises with "Cannons"
and those standing start to dance. When "17" begins, the audience becomes so still that its silence feels like an audible part of the performance. Each time the music builds, arms sway: "Don't stop imagining,
the day that you do is the day that you die..."
Youth Lagoon.
Devendra Banhart
at the Honda
(Bigfoot) stage.
Anonymous giri,
standing nearby the
Yeti stage.
It is not comfortable to watch any show at the Honda stage (I can never
remember the actual name for this stage, only the branded one—I am simultaneously impressed and disappointed by this marketing success). I
wish Venezuelan-American singer-songwriter Devendra Banhart had been
scheduled for the Yeti or Sasquatch stage, where his eclectic brand of folk
music could have been epic. Instead, I feel like I am watching a concert
at Rogers Arena: A tiny Banhart is visible in the distance through all of
the heads in the audience, the sound quality is pretty bad and I can't stop
watching the Jumbotron.
(opposite page,
bottom corner)
Edward Sharpe &
the Magnetic Zeros Backstage, Ben Shemie of Montreal's Suuns addresses the meaning of the
song they opened with "Music Won't Save You," which covers themes complementary to Dirty Projectors' "Irresponsible Tune": Keep playing music.
The music doesn't have to make a difference to the problem. It just has
to make a difference to you.
We make out to keep warm during Sigur Ros. It's so windy up on the hill,
looking out into the blackness of the Columbia River Gorge at night. The
Icelandic group's music is haunting, melancholic even, yet intricate and
beautiful. The 11 members are little dots amidst a green light show. Out-
of-focus camera work plays on the Jumbotron, reminding us that we are
here to listen.
At night, the El Chupacabra tent is my claustrophobic nightmare: white
plastic walls and ceiling encasing everything, flashing coloured lights,
hundreds of sweaty bodies writhing together. A tangle of limbs pulsing
with beats, booze, and party drugs. I feel 100 years old.
Vancouver-based, two-person guitar and drums act Japandroids play the
Honda stage and the guitar part is barely audible. Half of the sound is a
lot to lose, no matter how energetic Brian King and David Prowse's performance is.
We drink cans of Tecate through a beer bong before Edward Sharpe and the
Magnetic Zeros, whose last two albums—Up From Below and Here—have
endured as personal favourites. It is golden hour at the Sasquatch stage,
and we dance and sing amidst the crowd from the first song, "Janglin',"
to the last, "Home." Encouraged by the light-hearted music, I begin to enjoy being a part of something bigger than myself.
Despite Montreal-based and Vancouver-born Claire Boucher's well-crafted
songs, the sound is so bad at the Honda stage—her voice almost impossible to hear—that the crowd at Grimes' set starts chanting "Turn it up!
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Turn it up! Turn it up!" The tighter the crowd packs, the more my buzz
turns to nausea. I crouch to vomit, hoping not to hit any feet. Below waist
level is so quiet, peaceful even, a thicket of legs and feet as far as I can
see in every direction.
Postal Service—whose only album, Give Up, was released in 2003—is
the final act of Sasquatch. Their new songs are disappointing, glossy pop
tracks and Ben Gibbard seems to have gotten an image makeover: thinner,
cheesier stage banter. Thousands of people dotting the garbage-strewn
hill applaud as Gibbard thanks us for staying until the end of the festival.
I close my eyes and sing along to all the old songs, at once nostalgic
and disconnected from the person I must have been when these lyrics
resonated with me. bySELINA
CRAMMOND
illustration by
DANA KEARLEY
Last summer one of the most
exciting festivals happened
completely under-the-radar.
Shout Back! Festival took place
in punk houses and parks
throughout East Vancouver on
one August weekend. The all-
ages, pay-what-you can festival
showcased almost 50 indie bands,
including local acts Screaming
Queens, Lunch Lady, Dead Soft, and Cris
Derksen. This summer, from August 23 to
25, Shout Back! Fest enters its second year.
What exactly is driving this festival? In a nutshell, Shout
Back! is radical, queer, and D.I.Y. in spirit, and
celebrates anarcha-feminist and anti-capitalist
principles. The goal of Shout Back! is to /' «i|«,
bring the idea of inclusivity to the forefront of
music by showcasing musicians who may feel
underrepresented and left out of current indie and
popular culture.
"The intent is to connect different scenes,
and to connect music with politics, which maybe
doesn't happen that often in Vancouver," says
Shout Back! organizer and local musician Marita Michaelis.
In addition to live music, workshops and dialogues round
out the festival. Last year's workshops included "Safer Spaces
in Punk Communities,""Zine-making," "Anarchy is Queer,"
and "Capitalism and Patriarchy." This year's fest will see
similar sessions as well as a return of the bizarrely appetizing
"BECAUSE
WE AGREE THAT
PATRIARCHY MURTS
EVERYONE! BECIW^ WE
AGREE THAT MUSICS AND
NOISE-MAKING ARE A FORCE
FOR GENDER LIBERATION!"
—SHOUT BACK! FEST
WO/MANIFESTO.
"Waffles and Noise" breakfast show.
The Pacific Northwest has a strong
history of feminist response to the
male-dominated music industry,
starting with the Olympia-based-
Riot Grrrl movement made
popular in the '90s by bands
like Bikini Kill. Girls Rock
Camps have spread across the
world, with Girls Rock Camp
Vancouver now in its fifth
year. Over the last few years, a
number of D.I.Y. queer festivals
have sprung up. FOC Fest and
Not Enough Fest have their roots in
Portland, Oregon, and have inspired
other cities from Winnipeg to New Orleans
to host their own events. Most recently, MoWave,
Seattle's first annual queer music and arts festival, took place
in April, with a goal to "challenge the status quo, to push
cultural boundaries, to redefine and set global definitions of
art and music."
Like these festivals, Shout Back! Fest is going one step
beyond the "ladyfests" inspired by Riot Grrrl by not only
showcasing female artists, but rather by expanding feminist
principles to give voice to everyone who wishes to challenge
dominant heteronormative and patriarchal values. The aim of
Shout Back! is not to play identity politics as much as it is to
challenge mainstream gender binaries that perpetuate deep-
rooted stereotypes and inequality.
Shout Back! is on at various uenues throughout East Van from August
23 to 25. To volunteer, play a show, submit artwork, or help define its
mission, get in touch at shoutbackfest.tumblr.com or shoutbackfest@
3mail.c0m! Saturday July 20th and Sunday July 21 st.
ANNIVERSARY
AND
W%QiTCUSElD
JJJWW.AUDI0P1LE.1
CD'S & RECORDS by JORDAN
WADE
illustration by
MOSES MAGEE
When Juliana Moore returned to Vancouver from New rarKMlecembj^ ••
2010 she moved into the Waldorf Hotel. The condition, set byhef^rifls'
who had reopened it, was that she help with planning the venue's
creative programming.
Taking cues from New York's notorious underground party scene
and her eclectic network of performer .friends, Moore decided to initiate
a night of mish-mash performances from local musicians, magicians,
poets, and weirdos. It grew into an event that packed the Waldorf full
two Sunday nights per month throughout 2011. In 2012, Moore tweaked
the program to focus on collaborating musicians. The self-professed
"Bob Dylan nerd" decided they should do a Dylan covers night. The
response was overwhelming. "All kinds of weird and wonderful things
happened on this night," Moore says.
The success of the Dylan songbook, as it was called,
was soon followed by a Neil Young songbook and a Lou
Reed songbook. These cover nights united about a dozen
Vancouver musicians who each spent about 10 minutes
playing tributes to their favorite artists in front of a
packed room of their peers.
"Everyone got two songs and they selected them in
advance," explained Moore. "If two artists wanted the
same song, they have to fight it out. There was one time
when Rich Hope and Eric Campbell wanted to play the
same Neil Young song, 'Revolution Blues.' Hope ended up
giving the song to Campbell on the stipulation that he would mow his
lawn the following week."
Ian Browne, drummer in rock 'n' soul blues act No Sinner, played
all three nights at the Waldorf, as well as a Nirvana cover night at
Fortune on April 5, the anniversary of Kurt Cobain's death.
"One of the best things about these nights was that you could get
together with some other people, from a bunch of different
bands and say, yeah we're going to make this thing happen." According to Browne, "It shows a level of maturity
and openness in the scene that I'm really encouraged by; that we're
all collaborating and that we're all students of great music and
great songs."
Grunge-inspired three-piece War Baby also played three songs
jopthe Nirvana night, but despite their originals being compared to
the Seattle sound, they found the event a bit stressful. "I was honored to do it and am not opposed to a night like that once in a while,
JafHwerall I think covers are kind of lame. It's just not what I'm into
to," says Jon Redditt. Wffirr
Girls "Rock Camp, a non-profit society that helps-to builds self-
esteem in female youth through music creation, recently hosted a
special evening of covers. Qn International Women's Day, they invited
camp participants and established local artists to play covers for their
fundraiser at the Russian Hall. Sarah Buchanan, one of the organizers,
said they decided to do a more accessible covers night, despite
teaching girhf in their program be creative and original with their
performances.
"For a lot of musicians, it was a really liberating experience. Folks
had been playing in bands for a while, and then on this night, got to
play stuff they'd played around the campfire or around the piano with
their friends. And do something really interesting with it."
Browne hopes that despite the Waldorf's closing, the songbook
series will continue. "Learning great songs and playing them is maybe
the best way to actually learn how to write great songs... You actually
get down and figure the little nuances and how people are doing
something. It's like a light bulb goes on."
Moore appreciates both the educational and collaborative aspect of
these events, and has a few ideas for potential cover nights including
Tom Waits, Patti Smith, and Paul McCartney & Wings songbooks.
"I'd produce these nights again in a heartbeat if with a group as
enthusiastic and weird as the Waldorfians were."
While the songbook series is on permanent hiatus, there is an
obvious appetite for more tribute nights in the city. For Vancouver's
musicians, music fans, and producers like Moore, there are still a
myriad of musical influence left to explore.
Who would you like to cover most?
Ian Browne, No Sinner: "Graham Parsons. John Lennon would
be fucking awesome. Or Waylon Jennings."
John Nesbitt, War Baby: "Time Passages over and over again
by Al Stewart. Otherwise, don't call us."
Sarah Buchanan, Girls Rock Camp: "I once hosted a Dolly
Parton/Linda Ronstadt covers night in my shed, and I would happily
repeat that over and over again." ■wr   - .                                                        » tl^^^^^^™
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FROM TAN LINES
TO GOOD TIMES,
THE RISE OF
SUMMER MUSIC
FESTIVALS
ll     bvJACEY
GIBB
lettering & illustration by
BRITTA BACCHUS
photos by
RAZ DONG & JONATHAN EVANS
Summertime. It's the season for sun burns, getting drunk outside and
just-because temporary romances. For those with a few extra dollars in
the bank and a friend with a car, the summer months used to mean it was :
time to fill up a vehicle with tents and Frisbees and take in some music
festivals. But thanks to an increase in popularity, folks 16oking for a good
' time can now enjoy the merriment of music festivals—all while staying
inside the city limits.
Vancouver Folk Music Festival. Burnaby Blues + Roots Festival.
Uptown Live! Music Waste. Shout Back! Fest. Khatsahlano! Music + Art
Festival. The number of festivals taking place this summer throughout
the Lower Mainland is almost exhausting to keep track of—and that's not
even counting the special one-off events, like the upcoming two-day celebration of Stanley Park turning 125-years-old—but the growing numbers
aren't just a coincidence either.
Music festival attendances all over are on the incline, with old favourites like Coachella and Sasquatch now encompassing two weekends
each a year. Even in our own backyard, a shindig like the Squamish Valley
Music Festival saw its attendance increase 37 per cent between 2011 and
2012, going from 16,600 head-bangers to 22,700 lastyear.
So what's the reason behind this influx of music festivals? Where
does the desire to trade offhealthy ear drums for good times and good
music come from? SO WHAT'S THE REASON
BEHIND THIS INFLUX
OF MUSIC FESTIVALS?
WHERE DOES THE DESIRE
TO TRADE OFF HEALTHY
EAR DRUMS FOR GOOD
TIMES AND GOOD MUSIC
COME FROM?
The main driving force behind having so many music festivals during the
summer months is simple: there's a demand for it Festivals, even the daylong ones, bring with them an atmosphere and a je ne sais quoi unlike any
other musical experience. As Gwen Kallio, Public Relations Manager for the
Vancouver Folk Music Festival, tells Discorder in an email interview, "Music
festivals offer folks the chance to share in the joy of music performance
with other music lovers, have a live, authentic and immediate experience
of music-making that doesn't come to them through headphones or via a
YouTube video on a monitor. Put that together with the social factor, and a
kind of alchemy is created.
"I think the concept of'festival' is part of the fabric of social and cultural
life," Kallio continues. "Festivals bring people and communities together,
they provide a place for folks to gather and share an enjoyable, inspiring,
interesting live experience together."
The idea of a music festival fostering a sense of community is far from
a modern concept. A temporary unification of people under the guise of
hearing their favourite band, music festivals create the perfect opportunity to come together. Russ Davies is the founder of the Khatsahlano!
Music + Art Festival, a free annual event now in its third year on West 4th
Avenue in Kitsilano, and while the reason
why people enjoy the festival so much will
vary between each of the 80,000 attendees, Davies is confident that the communal aspect is essential. "To be present in
witnessing or sharing this unique experience with just a few or a few thousand
other people—connects each one of us,
and creates these great memories, to
remind us that 'we were there.'"
But while organizers like Davies see
these festivals as a "community-building
exercise," the people attending sometimes
have a different perspective. "The thing
about this smorgasbord of festivals going
on this summer, and especially the free
ones, is they're a great way to see a bunch
of rad bands share the same stage," says
Eric Wilkins, a frequenter of local festivals
come the summer time. "I don't always
have the money or the time to buy a festival ticket and set aside a weekend to
go somewhere. Events like these are my musical oasis in the urban desert."
Despite the waterfall of positive feedback that local festivals have been
enjoying, it isn't always crowd surfing and vitamin D for organizers.
With each passing year, the obvious next step for festivals is to get bigger
and better—a mentality that can cause a festival's undoing. The demise
of Vancouver's Olio Festival earlier this year came when the organizer's
decided to end the festival while going out on a high note. Run primarily by
volunteers and seen as a "passion project" by co-director Jason Sulyma, the
amount of time and energy needed to put on the festival had grown along
with the festival's popularity. Olio's passing is an unfortunate reminder that
while the number of local festivals has ballooned in recent years, we've lost
a few along the way.
On a brighter note: the Vancouver park board recently approved a handful of liquor licenses for several upcoming events throughout the city, with a
trio of first-time licenses being approved for day-long concerts at fan favourite Crab Park. One can assume that these licenses are a gesture of good
faith from the city and a sign that, at least for summer music festivals in the
Lower Mainland, the future is looking sunnier than ever.  ¥
by EVAN
BROW
illustration by
TYLER CRICH
photos by
EVIL PATRICK
Comedy has this image of being a lazy art form. It's all
catch phrases, fart jokes, and people who sleep in and
get day-drunk. But for Vancouver eight-piece Pump
Trolley Comedy, they approach humour from the other
end of the spectrum. They work hard. For the group,
who performs monthly sketch shows at the China Cloud
Theatre, a rigorous work schedule has always been
commonplace.
"We meet once a week. Week one is pitch meeting,
where we pitch the first round of sketches, read them,
give notes," says Tegan Verheul, the lone member I sit
down with. "Week two is where we pitch the second
round of sketches, read them, take notes. Week three we
meet, have all the rewrites done, read all the straggler
sketches, and then choose the lineup for the show, start
rehearsing, organizing dress rehearsal, and at the same
time we're also planning fringe shows, festival applications, stuff like that."
This routine means there can't be any egos
involved. The group, comprising Tom Hill, Nik
Bunting, Alex Hudson, Ember KonopaW, Devin
Mackenzie, Tegan Verheul, as well as members
Warren Bates and Nick Harvey-Cheetham currently on
"sabbatical," acts as a collective in every sense, from
changing lines to changing venues.
"We're essentially a bunch of comedy pinkos," says
Verheul, who goes on to state that the group, who has
been together for over three years now, acts as a "creative juggernaut machine." This semi-communistic
approach to comedy has led to all of the group's big
decisions, including what type of shows to put on as
well as how many shows they would do.
"We were originally a 12-piece and we did weekly
shows, which we call the 'dark years.' Not the best quality, but tons of fun and it really helped us get into the
groove of writing, writing, writing, writing, hammering stuffout, figuring out what our aesthetic theory was,
and shaping our own comedic taste," says Verheul, pinpointing the group's multi-faceted creative approach.
"I think we do, in the group, have really distinct voices,
and a lot of the time people will come up to me after the
show and say, 'Okay, you wrote that sketch, Devin wrote
that one, Ember wrote that one, Tom wrote that one.'"
•For the group, one of their biggest assets is their
venue, the much-adored (and seemingly rowdy) China
Cloud Theatre.
"We'll go there to hang out. Devin will use it as a
writing space. I'll use it to practice for my auditions.
It's our home now," says Verheul, grinning as she leads
into the venue's juicier aspects. "It's also a great place to party. On more than one occasion, I've watched the
sunrise from the roof just too wasted to stumble out and
go home. Sleeping over there, people have definitely
crashed, barfed in the hallways. It can get pretty crazy.
Especially in the summertime when it's hot out and
people go on the roof. It's a lot of fun. I don't want to
incriminate anyone. I've got a lot of stories."
Of course, at the heart of Pump Trolley are the
sketches. Usually about two to four minutes in length,
self-described as "weird but funny and hopefully charming," some sketches can strike in a brief half-minute.
"In our History of Canada show, Devin wrote a
sketch about Terry Fox where he walks on-stage and
says, 'And now a moment of silence for the fact that we
can never make fun of Terry Fox.' There's a moment of
silence, of course everyone's laughing, but then after
about thirty seconds, a fart noise plays over the P.A.
and he just walks off," says Verheul. "That's the whole
sketch. Thirty seconds long."
And as to how the name "Pump Trolley" came about?
Even the group had a hard time remembering. It took a
Facebook message to Tom Hill to finally figure it out.
"We settled on Pump Trolley because it's got that
old-timey fun, but also you can't operate a pump trolley
(the cart) with just one person," says Hill. "We were creating a leaderless, democratic comedy group so that idea
appealed to us."
But for the group, Pump Trolley is more-th'an a comedy group.
""I like to think we're all friends first," says Verheul.
"Pump Trolley are my friends."
Pump Trolley urill tour History of Canada at the
Vancouver and Victoria Fringe jestivqls.''
Visit pumptrolleycomedy. com for news about upcoming
shows.
EACH MEMBER OF PUMP TROLLEY,
AS DESCRIBED BY TEGAN VERHEUL:
Warren Bates: "Adorable. Kind of like the White Rabbit."
Nik Bunting: "Handsome and charming. I don't know why he doesn't have a wife yet.
The Robert Redford of the group."
Ember KonopakL "Sarcastic. Very passionate about what she does, but she can also
be very blunt and say something like, 'Guys, this is shit. We have to do this tomorrow.'"
Nick Harvey-Cheetham: "His nickname is DJ Kitten Who Loves Milk. He's a bit of a
lone wolf. He'll go off on solo camping trips with nothing but a canoe and a hatchet."
Tom Hill: "I hesitate, but I would say that he's kind of a Don Draper."
Alex Hudson: "Honestly; he belongs in the eighteenth century. Very erudite, intellectual, verbose, but at the same time loves sci-fi novels and Lord of the Rings."
Devin Mackenzie: "He's super handsome and a charmer and a ladies man, but he's
also just the biggest dork. I know the whole outside world sees him as 'Oh my god. So
handsome. What a catch,' but he sends me Snapchats of his poop."
Tegan Verheul (herself): "The weird one. Darker humour. Awkward. Loud." \
by ERICA
LEIREN
lettering by
DANA KEARLEY
photos by
BEV DAVIES
It was a big deal for us when the "Skunk Movie" was being filmed
here. Unlike now, movies were hardly ever filmed in Vancouver
in the early '80s. We heard about it on CFUN, announced by
one of our favourite radio DJs, Ellie O'Day, who said this movie
would be shot at the newly-opened Coquitlam Centre Mall, and
that there would be a band in the movie with several unnamed
members from the biggest and coolest groups at that time. And
they needed young extras. By keeping the celebrity identities quiet,
the casting crew ensured that the mind of every kid in the Lower
Mainland would run wild envisioning their ideal musical lineup,
guaranteeing an big turn out for extras. It worked.
Two of my sisters, my best friend Colleen, and I decided we
wanted to be a part of the excitement. Colleen and I were the
oldest at 18, while my younger sisters Annette and Michelle,
were 16 and 12 respectively.
We had a rough idea of how they wanted us to dress for the
movie. Since this was to be a "punk rock version of The Rocky
Horror Picture Show" with the same producer (Lou Adler) we felt
we were in good hands. We arrived in our own versions of the
punk rock uniform called for, in my case, construction worker
steel-toed boots, fishnets, ripped denim shorts, a white men's
shirt and an old fur coat on top of it all. My mom, an artist with
a bohemian streak, had wisely steered us towards the second
hand stores around town.
Inside the mall, at one end of the sparkling-new food court,
rumbled an imposing set of escalators. These gave the location a
metallic gleam-of-the-future, like the movie Metropolis. This was
the main staging area for the mall-filmed portion of the movie;
appropriate, since our costumes and make-up were meant to
look futuristic.
We extras were herded into the food court seats for our first
briefing by Adler. When the bearded dark-haired Los Angeles
director spoke, he was pretty showbiz to us young Vancouverites.
He told us the movie's working title, All Washed Up, was about the
adventures of the lead singer in a punk rock group (a young Diane
Lane, in her first lead role) and her rabid followers who emulate
her. The adoring teenage fans (us) all dress with the same colour
theme for hair, clothes, and makeup: black, white, and red. The
name of her band was the Stains and we were to be the Skunks.
The hair and makeup crew asked for volunteers to dye and
cut their hair into a skunk-punk style. I liked the idea, and asked
mom if she thought I should go for it To me it seemed somehow
appealing, but a bit scary.
She didn't really discourage me, she just said how nice my long golden auburn hair looked the way it was. In hindsight, it might
have been nice to be one of the main skunks. We would have been
in more scenes and close-ups and maybe even had a line or two,
but we had a lot of fun just being the lesser skunks that we were.
I think we earned two dollars an hour, but we were happy. That
was twice as much as babysitting at the time, for doing basically
nothing and getting to hang out with my sisters and friend. Plus,
we got White Spot hamburgers for lunch and the attention of the
makeup crew to apply our extreme red and black eye makeup and
dark red lips each morning. So exciting!
The Coquitlam Centre shoot lasted about a week before we were
to move on to filming the band performance scenes at the second
location in the PNE Gardens. However, mid-way thru the first location filming at the mall, we were suddenly in an exploitation film!
Not to exaggerate. It wasn't like we were being asked to behave
like Tura Satana as Varla, the biker girl in Faster Pussy Cat, Kill, Kill,
Kill! but it was definitely taking advantage of our youth and naivety.
Itwas part-way thru the rehearsals for the mall scenes. We were
riding the escalators up and down in a big Skunk crowd scene.
The direction we were given was to look surly and beautiful, ride
to the top of the up escalator, and then turn the corner and ride
the other one down again. So we oscillated by the cameras in a big
u-shape, trying to look louche, bored, and vaguely threatening all
at the same time.
Then the wardrobe people suddenly rolled out racks and racks of
these tops that they told us to put on. There were enough red shirts
on hangers for everyone, and they were being handed out quickly.
Someone had definitely thought this out beforehand. The blouses
were red and filmy, made from a single layer of chiffon. We were
instructed to replace whatever tops we'd brought from home with
the red blouses and we could see, as they were being distributed to
each of us, that they were very see-through. We were encouraged
not to wear anything underneath the tops, and to feel free to pose
on the escalator with our coats open or thrown over our shoulder.
All this was put to us as if it was fun and definitely no big deal.
We were surprised. There had been no mention by the movie
people of supplying us with any part of the costume before this.
Thinking back, they must have timed the request to allow us to
• settle in and be comfortable with the scene (and for our parents to
disperse) before they sprung this extra litde thing on us.
By this point, we still hadn't seen or heard details of the alleged
supergroup, and we were getting pretty excited to find out who
the musicians were that we would be screaming for at the next
location: the PNE Gardens.
We were supposed to be the audience at a gig where our favourite
band, the Stains, led by Diane Lane, were playing on a bill with
their rivals, the Looters. There were a lot of us, all dressed as Skunk
followers of the Stains, and we were instructed to boo and give the
finger to this other band while they tried to play a song called "We
are Professionals." They played one snippet over and over: "We
are professionals / Join the professionals / Join the professionals
today!" while we yelled on from the floor.
So who were the four Looters who we were doing this whole
thing for? Each contenders and individually, no doubt, very cool
people: Steve Jones and Paul Cook, the guitarist and drummer from
the Sex Pistols; Paul Simonon, the bass player for the Clash; and
actor Ray Winstone, who played the head Rocker in Quadrophenia.
But like most supergroups, they didn't live up to the expectations. They didn't "gel," the way a real band should. For us, it was
anti-climactic after the big build up from who we thought they
might be to who they actually turned out to be. We Vancouverites
were not impressed.
It wasn't a masterpiece, but we were still happy that we got
to say, "We were in the Skunk movie!" By the time it was finally
released in 1982, the name of the film became Ladies and Gentlemen,
The Fabulous Stains!
Did we learn anything? I'm not sure. We were just innocent kids,
for the moment confident, incorruptible, young, and beautiful. ■Ml «»
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Sa@ CiTR 101.9 FM PROGRAM GUIDE
DISCORDER SUGGESTS LISTENING TO CiTR ONLINE AT WWW.CiTR.CA EVERY DAY.
Sam
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WED
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FRI
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pi Crespan Presents..
(Difficult Music)
Classical Chaos
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Nasha Volna (World)
Stereoscopic Redoubt
J-__;,0prirnental)
African Rhythms
(World)
Student
Fill-in Slot
Bootlegs & B-Sides
(Dance/Electronic) i
■francendance
(Dance)
The Jazz Show
(Jazz)
Crimes And Treasons
(Hip-hop)
Sexy In Van City (Talk)
Live From Thunderbird
Radio Hell
(Live)
Student Fill-in Slot
Hans Von Kloss
Misery Hour
Student Fill-
in Slot
The Bassment
(Dance/Electronic)
Canada Post-Rock (Rock)
Synaptic Sandwich
(Dance/Electronic/
Eclectic}
Randophonic
(Eclectic)
Vampire's Ball
(Industrial)
Aurat Tentacles
(Eclectic)
The Absolute
Value of Insomnia
(Generative) BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS...
(Difficult Music) 7-9am
Bepi Crespan Presents... CiTR's
24 Hours Of Radio Art in a snack
size format! Difficult music,
harsh electronics, spoken word,
cut-up/collage and general
Crespan© weirdness. Twitter:
©bepicrespan Blog: bepicrespan.
blogspot.ca
CLASSVCAL CHAOS
(Classical) V-lOam
From the Ancient World to the 21st
century, join host Marguerite in exploring and celebrating classical
music from around the world.
SHOOKSHOOKTA
(Talk) 10am-12pm
A program targeted to Ethiopian
people that encourages education
and personal development.
THE MCKERS SHOW
(Reggae) 12-3pm
Reggae  inna  all styles and
fashion.
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
(Roots) 3-5 pm
Alternating Sundays
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-boots
country.
SHAKE A TAR FEATHER
(Soul/R&B) 3-5pm
Alternating Sundays
The finest in classic soul and
rhythm & blues from the late '50s
to the early 70s, including lesser
known artists, regional hits and lost
soul gems.
C^piw^EVERnHiNG
(Pop) 5-6pm
Alternating Sundays
British pop music from all decades.
International pop (Japanese, French,
Swedish, British, US, etc.), '60s
soundtracks and lounge.
SOSAlAClbuS
(Electro/Hip Hop) 6-7pm
Skadz and Sprocket Doyle bring you
Electro Swing, Alternative Hip Hop,
Dubstep, Acid Jazz, Trip Hop, Local
and Canadian Content - good and
dirty beats.
MORi™HlMAN
(Electronic/Experimental) 7-8pm
Strange and wonderful electronic
sounds from the past, present, and
future with host Gareth Moses. Music from parallel worlds.
RHYrMlNDM
(World) Mpm
Alternating Sundays
Featuring a wide range of music
from India, including popular music
from the 1930s to the present; Ghaz-
als and Bhajans, Qawwalis, pop and
regional language numbers.
TCMNO'PMGRESsivO
(Dance) 8-9 pm
Alternating Sundays
\ A mix of the latest house music,
| tech-house, prog-house and techno.
BOOTLEGS1 & B-SIDES
i (Dance/Electronic) 9-10pm
j Hosted by Doe-Ran, the show was
; a nominated finalist for "Canadian
; College Radio Show of the year 2012
\ in the Pioneer DJ Stylus Awards". A
! complete mixbag every week, cover-
; ing: Ghetto funk, Breakbeat, Hip-
j Hop, Funk & Soul, Chillout, Drum
\ & Bass, Mashups, Electro House
I and loads of other crackin' tunes.
| Search 'Doe Ran' at percussionlab.
i com and on facebook.com
I TMnWdANCE
; (Dance) 10pm-12am
■ Hosted by DJ Smiley Mike and DJ
; Caddyshack, Trancendance has
I been broadcasting from Vancou-
' ver, B.C. since 2001. We favour
1 Psytrance, Hard Trance and Epic
I Trance, but also play Acid Trance,
I Deep Trance, Hard Dance and even
! some Breakbeat. We also love
j a good Classic Trance Anthem,
| especially if it's remixed. Current
\ influences include Sander van
i Doom, Gareth Emery, Nick Sentience, Ovnimoon, Ace Ventura, Save
j the Robot, Liquid Soul and Astrix.
■ Older influences include Union Jack,
I Carl Cox, Christopher Lawrence,
Whoop! Records, Tidy Trax, Plati-
j pus Records and Nukleuz. Email:
\ djsmileymike ©trancendance.net.
; Website: www.trancendance.net.
cross-country road trip!
the"leora1[rezsh1jw
(World) A-bpm
The best of mix of Latin American
music, leoramirez@canada.com
GOOD MORNING MY FRIENDS
(Upbeat Music) ^M-Zm
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
(Eclectic) 8-1 lam
Your   favourite    Brownsters,
James and Peter, offer a savoury
blend of the familiar and exotic
in a blend of aural delights.
breakfastwiththebrowns©
hotmail.com.
SKA-t'S'SCENIC DRIVE
(S/ra;ilam-12pm
SYNCHRONiciTY
' (7a//yi2-lpm
■ Join host Marie B and discuss spirituality, health and feeling good.
Tune in and tap into good vibra-
I tions that help you remember why
i you're here: to have fun!
PARTSUNKNOWN
: (Pop) l-3pm
: An indie pop show since 1999, it's
\ like a marshmallow sandwich: soft
and sweet and best enjoyed when
poked with a stick and held close
I to a fire.
NEWS 101
(Ta//0)5-6pm
Vancouver's only live, volunteer-
produced, student and community
newscast. Every week, we take
a look back at the week's local,
national and international news,
as seen from a fully independent
media perspective.
NlFsliEarTMcis
(Korean Music) 6-7pm
Korea has had briliant indie musicians since the '80s. However, we
don't know who they are and what
music they play. Also they have had
no chance to be introduced overseas. With Korean DJ Neil Choi, on
every Monday 6 p.m., we can find
out many hidden musicians who are
really awesome like famous world
rock'n'roll stars.
EXPLOdTnGiHEADMOVIES
(CinematicJ7'-9pm
Join gak as he explores music from
the movies, tunes from television
and any other cinematic source,
along with atmospheric pieces, cutting edge new tracks and strange
old goodies that could be used in
a soundtrack to be.
fHEJAZZSHOW
(7a22^9pm-12am
Vancouver's longest running prime-
time Jazz program. Hosted by Gavin
Walker. Features at 11 p.m. July 1: A
classic meeting of two Jazz Masters:
vibist Milt Jackson and tenor saxophonist John Coltrane. "Bags and
Trane". July 8: Some great Jazz Funk
with alto saxophonist Lou Donaldson: "Everything I play is Funky!"
July 15: Tonight a Happy Birthday to
one of the greatest Jazz drummers,
PhillyJoe Jones. "Philly Joe's Beat".
July 22: One of the finest pianists on
the planet Dr. Denny Zeitlin. "Carnival". July 29: Tenor saxophonist
Booker Ervin with trumpeter Woody
Shaw. "Texbook Tenor". August 5:
Creative big band Jazz with trombone master J.J. Johnson. "J.J.!"
August 12: Multi-instrumentalist
Yusef Lateef and his Quintet. "Live
At Pep's". August 19: Trumpeter Lee
Morgan and his group. "The Last
Session". August 26: Legendary alto
saxophonist Art Pepper. "Art Pepper
in Japan 1981".
VANCOUVER:RELOADED
(7aW8-10:30am
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transexual communities of Vancouver. Lots of human
interest features, background on
current issues and great music.
queerfmradio@gmail.com
MiNDVOYAGE
(Eclectic) 10:30-11:30am
Mind Voyage presents cosmic tones
of celestial counterpoint on CiTR!
Experience weekly encounters of
synth, ambient, witchy and new
classical items in one-hour with
DJTall Jamal.
MORNINGAFTERISHOW
(Eclectic) ll:30am-l<pm
An eclectic mix of Canadian indie ,
with rock, experimental, world, reggae, punk and ska from Canada,
Latin America and Europe. Hosted
by Oswaldo Perez Cabrera.
MANTIS CABINET
(Eclectic) l-2pm
GIVE EM THE BOOT
(World) 2-3pm
Sample the various flavours
of Italian music from north to
south, traditional to modern on
this bilingual show. Folk, singer-
songwriter, jazz and much more. Un
programma bilingue che esplora
il mondo della musica italiana.
http://giveemtheboot.word press,
com
PROGRAMMING TRAINING
<7a//r;3-3:30pm
RADIO FREE THINKER
(Tunes) 3:30-4:30pm
Promoting skepticism, critical
thinking and science, we examine
popular extraordinary claims and
subject them to critical analysis.
DISCbWER RADIO
(7i//7es,)4:30-5pm
Discorder Magazine now has its own
radio show! Join us to hear excerpts
of interviews, reviews and more!
THECITY
(TaW5-6pm
An alternative and critical look
at our changing urban spaces.
New website: www.thecityfm.org.
New twitter handle: ©thecityjm.
FLEXYOURHCAD
(Hardcore) 6-8pm
Punk rock and hardcore since 1989.
Bands and guests from around the
world.
WStBEOOT   "
:-9pm
THE ALL CANADIAN FARM SHOW
; (Popj 3-4pm
\ The All Canadian Farm Show culti-
\ vates new and old indie jams from
i across genres and provinces. Tune
j in to hear the a fresh crop of CiTR
■ volunteers take you on a musical
PACIFIC PICKIN'
(Roots) 6-8am
Bluegrass,   old-time   music,
and its derivatives with Arthur
and the lovely Andrea Berman.
pacificpickin@yahoo.com
QUEERFM
CRIMES & TREASONS
(Hip-hop) B-llpm
dj@cri mesa ndtreasons.com
WEDNESDAY
TWEETS & TUNES
(New) S-.30-%am
We practice what we Tweet!
Showcasing local indie music and
bringing bands, artists and fans together through social media. Website: tweetsandtunes.com Twitter:
©tweetsandtunes.
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
r£c/ecf/c;8-10am
Live from the Jungle Room, join radio
host Jack Velvet for an eclectic mix of
music, sound bites, information and
inanity, dj@jackvelvet.net.
POP DRONES
(Eclectic) 10-11:30am
sfUDENT SPECIAL HOUR
(Eclectic) 11:30a m-1 pm
Various members of the CiTR's student executive sit in and host this
blend of music and banter about
campus and community news, arts,
and pop culture. Drop-ins welcome!
TERRY PROJECT PODCAST
(Talk) l-2pm
Alternating Wednesdays
There once was a project named
Terry, That wanted to make people
wary, Of things going on In the world
that are wrong without making it all
seem too scary.
DEMOCRACY NOW
(Talk) l-2pm
Alternating Wednesdays
EXTRAENVIRONMENTALIST
(Talk) 2-3pm
Exploring the mindset of an
outsider looking in on Earth.
Featuring interviews with leading
thinkers in the area of sustainable
economics and our global ecological crisis.
SNEWYLH
4-5pm
In many Coast Salish dialects,
"sne'waylh" is the word for
teachings or laws. The aboriginal language-learning program
begins with the teachings of the
skwxwu7mesh snichim (Squamish
language). Originally aired on Coop
Radio CFRO 100.5 FM in Vancouver,
Tuesdays 1-2 p.m.
ARTS REPORT
(Talk) 5-6pm
Reviews, interviews and coverage of
local arts (film, theatre, dance, visual and performance art, comedy,
and more) by host Maegan Thomas
and the Arts Reporters.
artsproTect
<7a//rj6-6:30pm
Alternating with UBC Arts On Air
Stay tuned after the Arts Report for
Arts Project Interviews, documentaries and artsy stuff that doesn't fit
into CiTR's original arts hour.
UBC ARTSON AIR
(TaW6-6:30pm
Alternating with Arts Extra!
On break from June-September
2013.
SAMSQUANTCH'S HlbEAWAY
f£c/ecr7c;6:30-8pm Alternating Wednesdays
All-Canadian music with a focus
on indie-rock/pop. anitabinder©
hotmail.com
SUPWORLD?
f£c/ecf7c;6:30-8pm
Alternating Wednesdays
Fuzzy and sweet, a total treat! Tune
in to hear the latest and greatest
tracks from independent and Vancouver bands.
FOLKOASis
(Roots) 8-10pm
Two hours of eclectic folk/roots
music, with a big emphasis on our
local scene. C'mon in! A kumbaya-
free zone since 1997. folkoasis®
gmail.com
SEXY IN VAN CITY
(Talk) 10-1 lpm
Your weekly dose of education
and entertainment in the realm
of relationships and sexuality.
sexyinvancity.com/category/sexy-
in-vancity-radio
HANSivON KLOSS' MISERY HOUR
(Hans Von Kloss) llpm-lam
Pretty much the best thing on
radio.
THE VAMPIRE'S BALL
(Industrial) l-5am
Industrial, electro, noise, experimental, and synth-based music.
thevampiresball@gmail.com the-
vampiresballoncitr.com
THURSDAY
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
(Talk) Z-lOam
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
(Punk Rock/Pop Punk) 10-11 a m
Hello hello hello! I interview bands
and play new, international and
local punk reck music. Great Success! PS. Broadcasted in brokenish
English. Hosted by Russian Tim.
; Website:'http://rocketfromrussia.
: tumblr.com. Email: rocketfrom
russiacitr@gmail.com. Facebook:
'. https://www.facebook.com/Rocket-
I FromRussia. Twitter: http://twitter.
I com/timajzar.
RELENTLESSLY AWESOME
\ llam-12pm
; Vancouver's got a fever, and the only
\ prescription is CiTR's "Relentlessly
; Awesome." Each and every week,
I Jason attempts to offer adrenaline-
; pumping, heart-stopping, hands-
; over-the-eyes suspense. He is a fan
of various genres, and a supporter
■ of local music.
j DUNCAN'S DONUTS
1 (Eclectic) 12-lpm
\ Sweet treats from the pop under-
: ground. Hosted by Duncan, spon-
■ sored by donuts. http://duncans
: donuts.wordpress.com
\ defTnition soundwave
: (Rock/Folk) l-2pm
1 The now of folk. The now of rock.
The now of alternative. Join Evan
as he explores what's new, what's
good, and what's so awesome it
fights dragons in its spare time. As
always, Evan ends the show with a
special Top 5 list that's always fun
and always entertaining.
iNKsfubs
(Talk) 2-3nm
Underground and indie comix. Each
week, we interview a different creator to get their unique perspective
on comix and discuss their upcoming works.
THUNbERBiRD EYE
(Sports) 3:30-4pm
Your weekly roundup of UBC Thunderbird sports action from on campus
and off with your host Wilson Wong.
SUBSCRIBE TO
DISCORDER! ■ t
^ II an annufll§i'3Scr'Pt'on
to Discorder magazine
{$20 for Canadians, $25
1 ^V^ subscribers)
■ to support Discorder
rfia^iri^wflcril
donation of:
total:
Discordenl Vancou^Tlongest
run^m|ependent music
maS^now your support for
, van|(Wfelndependent music
Mnw^md the development
> of rS writemeditors, designers
and■artists, slfn-up to have
Discorder delivered to your door!
Fill-out this form and mail-in
cash or a cheque to:
Discorder Magazine
#233-6138 SUB Blvd.
Vancouver, 9&$$&
Canada, V6T1Z1
MANTRA
(World) 4-5 pm
Kirtan, Mantra, Chanting and
Culture. There's no place like Om.
Hosted by Raghunath with special
guests. Email: mantraradioshow®
gmail.com. Website: mantraradio.
co.
siMORGH
; (Persian Litiracy) 5-6pm
I Simorgh Radio is devoted to the
\ education and literacy for the Per-
: sian speaking communities and
I those interested in connecting to
Persian oral and written literature.
Simorgh takes you through a journey
of ecological sustainability evolving
within cultural and social literacy.
Simorgh the mythological multiplicity of tale-figures, lands-in as
your mythological narrator in the
storyland; the contingent space of
beings, connecting Persian peoples
within and to Indigenous peoples.
AREYbuAWARE
(Eclectic) Alternating Thursdays
6-7:30pm
Celebrating the message behind the
music: Profiling music and musicians that take the route of positive
action over apathy.
PEANUT BUTTER^ JAMS
(Eclectic) Alternating Thursdays
6-7:30pm
Explore local music and food with
your hosts, Brenda andJordie. You'll
hear interviews and reviews on eats
and tunes from your neighbourhood,
and a weekly pairing for your date
calendar.
STEREOSCbPIC REDOUBT
(Experimental) 7:30-9pm
LIVE FROM[THUNDERBIRD'
RADIO HELL
(Live Music) $-llpm
Featuring live band(s) every week
performing in the CiTR Lounge: Most
are from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country and
around the world.
AURAL TENTACLES
(Eclectic) 12-6am
It could be global, trance, spoken
word, rock, the unusual and the
weird, or it could be something
different. Hosted by DJ Pierre.
auraltentacles@hotmail.com
IT AIN'T EASY BEING GREEN
(Eclectic) 12-1 pm
CiTR has revived it's long-dormant ;
beginner's show It Ain't Easy Being
GrjpenJ With the support of expe- l
rienced programmers, this show I
offers fully-trained CiTR members, ;
especially students, the opportunity ;
to get their feet wet on the air.
SKALD'SHALL
(Drama/Poetry) l-2pm
Skald's Hall entertains with the spoken word via story readings, poetry i
recitals, and drama. Established j
and upcoming artists join host Brian ;
MacDonald. Interested in performing '
on air? Contact us: @Skalds_Hall. ;
RADIO ZERO
0«?/Jce;2-3:3Opm
An international mix of super-
fresh weekend party jams from
New Wave to foreign electro, baile,
Bollywood, and whatever else.
www.radiozero.com
MOONGROK
7:30-10am
SOUNDS OF THE CITY
(Eclectic) 10-1 lam
'■■ Promoting upcoming live concerts
I and shows in Vancouver, be they lo-
\ cal, national, or international acts.
| STEREO BLUES
' (Blues/Eclectic) Ham-Upm
! Every Friday host Dorothy Neufeld
! sinks into blues, garage and rock
; n' roll goodies!
NARDWUAR
(Nardwuar) 3:30-5pm
Join Nardwuar the Human Serviette for Clam Chowder flavoured
entertainment. Doot doola doot
doo...doot doo! nardwuar©
nardwuar.com
NEWS; 101
(Talk) 5-6pm
See Monday for description.
STRANDED
(fr/ecf/c;6-7:30pm
Join your host Matthew for a weekly
mix of exciting sounds, past and
present, from his Australian homeland. And journey with him as he
features fresh tunes and explores
the alternative musical heritage
of Canada.
AFRICANRHYHMS
(World) 7:30-9pm
www.africanrhythmsradio.com
THEBASSMENT
(Dance/Electronic) 9-10:30pm
The Bassment is Vancouver's only
bass-driven radio show, playing
Glitch, Dubstep, Drum and Bass,
Ghetto Funk, Crunk, Breaks, and UK
Funky, while focusing on Canadian
talent and highlighting Vancouver
DJs, producers, and the parties
they throw.
CANADA POST-ROCK
(Rock) 10:30pm-12am
Formerly on CKXU, Canada Post-
Rock now resides on the west coast
but it's still committed to the best
in post-rock, drone, ambient, experimental, noise and basically
anything your host Pbone can put
the word "post" in front of.
SATURDAY
THE SATURDAY EDGE
(Roots) 8am-12pm
A personal guide to world and roots '
music—with African, Latin, and ;
European music in the first half, I
followed by Celtic, blues, songwriters, Cajun, and whatever else fits!
steveedge3@mac.com
eWMTmNllNWHiUTibN
(Punk) 12-lpm
On the air since 2002,
playing old and new punk on
the non-commercial side of the
spectrum. Hosts: Aaron Brown,
Jeff "The Foat" Kraft. Website:
www.generationannihilation.com.
Facebook: www.facebook.com/
generationannihilation".
POWERCHORD
(Metal) l-3pm
Vancouver's longest running metal
show. If you're into music that's
on the heavier/darker side of the
spectrum, then you'll like it. Sonic
assault provided by Geoff, Marcia,
and Andy.
CODEBLUE
(Roots) 3-5 pm
From backwoods delta low-down
slide to urban harp honks, blues,
and blues roots with your hosts
Jim, Andy, and Paul, codeblue©
buddy-system.org
MOONGROK
5-6pm
NASHAVOLNA
(World) S-7pm
News, arts, entertainment and music for the Russian community, local
and abroad, nashavolna.ca
LA FIESTA
(World)7-Spm
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue, Latin
House, and Reggaeton with your
host GspotDJ.
SYNAPTIC SANDwicH
(Dance/Electronic) 9-11 p m
If you like everything from electro/
techno/trance/8-bit music/retro
'80s, this is the show for you!
www.synapticsandwich.net
RANDOPHONIC
(Tc/ecfVc; llpm-2am
Randophonic is best thought of as
an intraversal jukebox which has
no concept of genre, style, political
boundaries, or even space-time
relevance. But it does know good
sounds from bad. Lately, the program
has been focused on Philip Random's
All Vinyl Countdown + Apocalypse
(the 1,111 greatest records you probably haven't heard). And we're not
afraid of noise.
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF INSOMNIA
(Generative) 2-6am
Four solid hours of fresh generative
music c/o the Absolute Value of Noise
and its world famous Generator. Ideal
for enhancing your dreams or, if sleep
is not on your agenda, your reveries. ii    [ORfnMiforsiaDxmmenibers] J
(212) Productions
Baru Latino
Dunlevy Snack Bar
Neptoon Records
Scratch Records
454 W Cordova St.
2535 Alma St
433 Dunlevy Ave
3561 Main Street
shows at Interurban
25% off
10% off
10% off
10% off used, $1 off new
Art Gallery
Antisocial
Beatstreet Records
The Eatery
Pacific
1 East Hastings
Skateboard Shop
439 W Hastings St.
3431 W Broadway
Cinematheque
20% entry discount
2337 Main St.
10% off used vinyl
10% off
1131 Howe St.
Temple of the
15% off clothing
Big Mama Textbooks
The Fall Tattooing
1 free bag of popcorn
Modern Girl
10% off everything else
1100-1200 West 73 Ave
644 Seymour St.
People's Co-op
2695 Main St.
Australian Boot Co
10% off
10% off
Bookstore
15% off vintage, 20%
1968 West 4th Ave
The Bike Kitchen
Fortune Sound Club
1391 Commercial Dr.
off new
$30 off Blundstones and
6138 SUB Blvd.
147 East Pender St.
10% off
UBC Bookstore
RM Williams
10% off new parts and
No cover Saturdays (ex
Perch
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Audiopile
accessories
cluding special events)
337 East Hastings
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2016 Commercial Dr.
Bonerattle Music
Fresh is Best Salsa
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2012 Commercial Dr.
2972 W Broadway
Project Space
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222 E Georgia St.
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The Cove
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118 HanesAve, North Van
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3357 W Broadway
Prussin Music
12% off
The Baker &
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3607 W Broadway
Vinyl Records
The Chef Sandwich
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Highlife Records
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319 W Hastings St.
Cafe
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1317Commrecial Dr.
Red Cat Records
15% off
320 Cambie St.
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The Wallflower
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items
Hitz Boutique
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Modern Diner
2420 Main St.
Band Merch Canada
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316 W Cordova St.
The Regional
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3957 Main St.
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Assembly of Text
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3934 Main St.
Woo Vintage
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R/X Comics
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Rufus' Guitar Shop
10% off used
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2621 Alma St.
10% off everything but
instruments and amps
A Friends of CiTR Card scores
you sweet deals at Vancouver's
finest small merchants and
supports CiTR Radio 101.9 FM.
Show it when you shopl
iwww.citr.ca ART PROJECT
Photos by
Andrew Volk
Sharona.
Nikon F4s, 50mm (expired).
LL I
Katayoon Yousefbigloo &
Andrew Nedimyer
Combined Landscapes I:
Sea Lions/Horizon.
Nokia FM2, Kodak Portra
400, double exposed.
Featured in Combined
Landscapes, June 27-July 17
at Rainbow Connection,
855 E Hastings St.
Andrew Volk
(top right, this page)
Gambling in Point Roberts.
Olympus XA, President's
Choice film.
(middle right, this page)
Yard in Strathcona.
Yashica T4.
(right)
Yellow flowers.
Olympus Pen F
<&&
%J|*J|k fmmmmmB^SS^^''/''''''^ ' ' '
Katayoon Yousefbigloo &
Andrew Nedimyer
Combined Landscapes II:
Melissa/Parachute.
Nokia FM2, Kodak Portra
400, double
Featured in Combined
s,June27-Julyl7
at Rainbow Connection,
855 E Hastings St.
(middle)
Whippet on Sidewalk
UC-1, fake XP2.
(bottom)
Limo Flasher.
Yashica T4, fake XP2. JAY ARNER
(Mint Records)
Without a doubt, the most impressive thing
about Jay Arner's self-titled solo LP is that it's
about as "solo" as you can get. With every
instrument played and recorded by the man
himself, each of the ten tracks on the album is a
testament to old-school D.I.Y.
Arner hasn't been known to stay rooted too
deeply in one vein - and his experience playing with
and recording a variety of projects has lent itself
tremendously to the rather broad strokes covered
on his new project. With an overarching fuzz-pop
vibe that dips sparingly into post-punk ("Midnight
On South Granville") and funk ("Broken Glass"),
Arner won't appeal to everyone, but pop junkies
and recording engineers alike will find plenty of
hooks to sink their teeth into. Lyrics deal with
standard pop tropes, sacrificing poeticism for
accessibility. The verses in each track are as ageless
as Arner's analog synths and pulsating basslines.
While this solo venture is a relatively wide-
sweeping bullet out of the Mint Records shotgun,
it's also a remarkably interesting collection of
songs. Working out each particular sound on a
track, and the reasons for them being included, is
the sort of fixation that's kept high-production pop
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records from yesteryear relevant today. Jay Arner
could be another one of those records tomorrow.
—Fraser Dobbs
THE BALLANTYNES
(La-Ti-Da Records)
The latest seven-inch from Vancouver's greatest
garage-soul-rock band (is there even any competition?) continues the precedent established by their
previous releases over the past fewyears: the tracks
burst with crazy, infectious energy.
Though the Ballantynes hail from our very
own raincoast, their music never dabbles with
depressive elements. Instead, they have no trouble
accomplishing their goal of rewinding the clocks
years to the great era of soul, all the while coercing
us to dust off our dancing digs. Even "Misery,"
a track off their previous seven-inch, does little
to appease its title and instead provides ample
opportunity for involuntary rhythm-based spasms.
That high-octane vibe continues with Faith/
Velvet, recorded once again with the familiar Phil
Spector-like ambience provided by the venerable
Felix Fung. "Faith" features an incredibly contagious chorus and an overall aesthetic that sounds
like a mutant cross between Aretha Franklin,' Sly
& The Family Stone, and a collection of east-side
punks. The B-side is only a term of reference and
not at all indicative of the role "Velvet" will play
on your psyche. The finish is brilliant on this one,
with rock 'n' roll lunacy destined to ignite what
would already be a frenzied crowd, should this be
heard in a live setting.
Faith/Velvet captures The Ballantynes' lively
spirit from their stage show, which is an experience not to be missed. Their unpretentious brand
of pick-me-up is destined to once again jingle and
jangle its way into our ears and hearts, and the
format they choose is perfect delivery. Faith/Velvet
is the third single from this sprlghtly-seven-piegp -
-band and it's a needed departure from Vancouver's
other more morose (but brilliant)-offerings.
—Slavko Bucifal ^^Plfe'L
that is too serious or cerebral, they instead play
from the gut.
Aside from a killer bunch of riffs and some very
BLACK WIZARD
(War On Music)
Whatever the band's original intention to title their
second album Young Wisdom, it seems befitting of
their musical approach: there's a youthful exuberance to their stoner rock/classic metal jams and a
feeling that rather than shooting for something
strong and succinct songwriting, one of the main
things that sets Black Wizard apart from the rest of
the pack is the voice of Adam Grant. Where many
singers in the genre are flat, characterless or just
shout a lot, Grant carries a tune with a gritty style
that recalls a more melodious Jonny Bell of Crystal
Antlers. He demonstrates his vocal ability to great
effect on standout track "Appetite," and shows
his versatility with an eerie quasi-falsetto on the
partially acoustic psychedelia of "Danger Dances."
That is not to say that Black Wizard is a one-
man show—far from it. The rhythm section holds
down some serious grooves with commendable
dexterity, while Kenny Cook (also of Anciients)
fleshes out the riffs with some expressive and
stylish lead guitar that goes well beyond stock
shredding.
• Retro bands such as Black Wizard are often
criticized for being overly derivative, but such a
criticism is really missing the point. It takes bravery to so closely emulate their influences (Black
Sabbath, Thin Lizzy, et al) as it unavoidably invites
comparison with the masters of the form, thereby
setting jhemselves a far greater challenge than
bands who attempt to eschew a direct relationship
to their antecedents. Fortunately for Black Wizard,
and their listeners, Young Wisdom stacks up very
favourably against the greats.
—WillPedley
DEAD GHOSTS
(Burger Records)
Fuzzed up, lo-fi, and loud, Vancouver's garage
junkies Dead Ghosts return with their second
LP having found a new home at Burger Records.
Some bands know how to chew up a record collection and spit it out in just the right way. On
Can't Get No, as the Stones-inspired title would
suggest, Dead Ghosts make no bones about it.
Invoking the spirit of the golden age of rock 'n' roll,
surf, doo-wop, girl-group pop, and psychedelia,
a raw enthusiasm bums through each of the 12
tracks. Saluting heroes along the way, from the
heartfelt ode to the 13* Floor Elevators' tragic
genius on "Roky Said," to the tongue-in-cheek
salute to Link Wray on explosive instrumental
"Tea Swamp Rumble," a lot of cornerstones of
'60s garage are touched upon.
The primal urgency of lead singer Bryan Nicol
leads the charge with infectious melodies over a
raw rockabilly stomp. By turns obnoxious and
frustrated ("I Want You Back"), nonchalant ("You
Don'tBelong"), heart-wrenching ("I Sleep Alone")
and downright ecstatic ("B.A.D.") the visceral
delivery of the vocals render the fact that the lyrics
are largely indecipherable beside the point. The
low fidelity nature of the recording captures the
energy of a band having too much of a good time
to care about such small matters. And the feeling
is contagious.
Recorded on an old eight-track tape machine,
the key here is in the performances. Relentless
freakbeat drums, chunky driving basslines, reverberating distorted guitars and the occasional bursts
of boogie-woogie piano and head-.trip organ—
delivered loud, energetic and ramshackle—drives
the wall of sound into the red.
Dead Ghosts don't attempt to disguise their
influences; they embrace their heroes with a cavernous howl on a bed of fuzz and show us £ rollicking good time in doing so.
—Stephen White
(Independent)
Galiano is a concept album that has been playfully misconceived. Its island motifs are location-
inspired (itwas recorded on Galiano), though the
rainforest they reference has never sounded so
dusty. Arid instrumentation contrasts with lush
lyrics, culminating in a pastel pop frontier tale
of B.C.'s west coast. The four-track EP has the
singe of a spaghetti western, albeit one that was
not shot on location.
Out of a darkling ambience, "The Weekend"
takes shape. A half minute into the tune, deep-
voiced guitar riffs bring distinct structure and
timely parallelism, while vocals strike syllables like
chords. Bouncy unity abounds. The exactness is
precise without being severe. Only in the end does
the song's spring turn to a saunter, with wandering
chords and electronic scorches providing a perfect
segue into the second track.
"In that Island Sun" is the boldest segment in
this tale. The scene opens with determined hands
Marlis Funk
Photographer
Contact Marlis for a
free consultation.
imagingbymarlisxom
t: 604-836-9209
©imagingbymarlisxom patting thick leather and fingers climbing acoustic
strings; a chivalrous figure enters the frame. Dark,
electric, he moves towards the desert sunrise. With
the click of a boot heel, the camera swoops. There
flies a hawk with glitching shriek. Its gaze finds,
again and again, a rattlesnake stirring up dust. The
hero walks forward in a landscape of fuzzy mirage,
his confidence compounded by a chorus wordlessly, non-diegetically championing his cause.
The second half of the album is especially light-
hearted. Pendulous strumming gives "Carnival
Talk" an open-ended intro which might have gone
a number of ways. Eventually, buoyant pop is the
path chosen. Blindingly sunny, the tune's warmth
is pleasant, but without much depth. "No Fun"
is really more of a skit than a song. The chanting
chorus is cute and so is the voice of everydad, trying to spread his appreciation of "another day in
paradise" to his kids.
These last two tracks prove Galiano is more
avocation than ardent application. The efforts
of Brent Freedman and Rolla Olak are, however,
impressively conceptual, and the result is well-
structured pop.
—Alex de Boer
GOLD & YOUTH
(Arts & Crafts)
Dance music and post-punk never really sat
together that easily. The dourness of the latter often
gets the better of any impulsiveness of the former.
That said, Gold & Youth's full-length debut,
Beyond Wilderness, splits the difference. It plays out
like a reluctant dance album, invoking imagery of
club dance floors in the woozy hours when few
remain. The mood is similar to the retro-nostalgia of Chromatics' Italo-disco or the movie
Drive's glossy aesthetic. It spurs a cathartic kind
of movement coming from a state of comfort and
weariness.
Musically, the focus of Beyond Wilderness is
texture. All of Gold & Youth's elements wash
together into a seamless stroke where foreground
is background and vice versa. Coruscating guitar
lines shine through thickets of synths while the
gothic croons of Louise Burns and Matthew Lyall
float just above the surface.
Occasionally the main vocals sink into the
glaze as means of concluding songs (see "Come
To Admire" and "Time To Kill"). Other standouts include the instrumental "Cut Lip" and the
single "Jewel," in which the beat works to surge
the dense layers of melody and texture forward.
Beyond Wilderness is successful because the mix
provides clarity and space for each element in the
finely crafted sonic tapestry.
Taken as a whole, Beyond Wilderness is a trial
of reconciling the disparate. It is equal parts pop
melody and ambiance, contemporary instrumentation and classic band form, optimism and resignation. Burns sums it up just before she soars into the
chorus of "Jewel": "I thought I saw a place I'd never
seen before / It opened up my arms and opened '
up my eyes / Once more." The song's speaker
then gives in to doubt: "Oh, God, will someone
tell me what am I to do? / Down on my knees,
nothing to lose."
As the title and cover art would suggest, Gold &
Youth are combing through the synthetic world for
something real. Even if they doubt they found what
they're looking for, it sure sounds like they did.
—Max Wainwright
THE MANDATES
(Mammoth Cave)
If the Mandates were a slice of pizza, they would
be a greasy slab of ham and pineapple: quality New
York deli meat and sweet, sundrenched pineapple
on top of a well-worked crust covered in a classic
sauce and all held together by just enough good
cheese.
The Mandates' self-titled debut is a hot, gooey
wedge of east coast-style power pop, and considering theirpedigree (Knucklehead, theThrowaways,
the Tension Slips, SIDS), it is not surprising that
the four leather-clad Calgary boys are able to pull
off such convincing swagger. Their vivacious,
guitar-driven style of punk rock is alludes to greats
like the New York Dolls, the Dictators, the Dead
Boys, and the Ramones.
Things get off to a running start on "Is She
Coming Back?" as a solitary riff builds into a roaring punk rock riot, setting the pace for the entire
record. Brady Kirchner and Matt Wickens provide a plethora of nonstop meaty riffs song after
song, while their saucy vocals spout sweet lyrics
about girls, video games and being a "Terminal
Teenager." All this is held together by Jimmy Sixx's
gooey basslines and Warren Oostlander's piping-
hot beats. As everyone knows, though, it would all
be just another drab piece of cheap cardboard if it
weren'tfor the carefully worked songs, crisp-yet-
pliable structures that make this record whole. The
Mandates have cooked up a genuine 12-inch slab of
fun, New York style punk rock that will definitely
leave you hungry for more!
—MarkPaulHus
Social networking sites
come and go.
LiveVan
continm
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hive  MUSIC WASTE KICKOFF
DIANE / BESTIE / JUVENILE HALL /
GIRLFRIENDS & BOYFRIENDS/
DIRTY SPELLS /
PHOENIX THUNDERBIRD / TOTAL ICE /
STORC
The Electric Owl /June 6
Fueled by only the tiniest bit of resentment for
those in charge of the Vancouver music scene, day
one of Music Waste Festival saw the Electric Owl
play host to a last minute bill that was double the
expected size. On account of city bylaws enforcing
various fire and electrical precepts, the Zoo Zhop
was promptly closed the week before, forcing
either a relocation or cancellation of all impending events. It was due to the magnanimity of the
Electric Owl that both shows could coincide under
the one roof.
Within the bounds of the Owl's asylum, it
appeared as if some of Vancouver's most notable
acts were cornered in one of the last remaining
musical refuges. Although nothing had been
noticeably altered, upon filing downstairs into
the basement, one would find the de facto Zoo
Zhop and the artists who had originally been commissioned to play there. On this evening, eight
bands played two stages simultaneously, and the
fire regulations that saw the Zoo Zhop suspended
would become all too real of an issue, as tempers
flared in moments of great expression.
St6rc, a three-piece punk rock outfit, stoked the
downstairs room into a violent sweat. Heaving out
darkened tunes with an attitude that suggested an
even darker place their city could go, Store let off
the steam that built since their decampment. They
were passionate and aggressive, and full of aroused
hostility. The audience responded appreciatively.
Back upstairs was an entirely different exhibition. At 10 p.m., on came Total Ice, a two-piece
band that could only be considered as an arranged
noise. Although both musicians showed flashes of
brilliance, proving to have an enigmatic cohesion,
their breed of sound at times was distasteful, if
not wholly unlistenable, as its discordant nature
became all too distracting.
But the following act, Dirty Spells, were ai:olli-
sion of post-rock and indie beauty, led by a whimsical electric-violin and a duo of bass guitars. While
many onlookers were caught up in the anecdotes
of their own lives, many turned, stunned by the
mellifluous sounds reminiscent of Mogwai and
Godspeed You! Black Emperor. -■♦
CHINATOWN. VANCOUVER
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M RATHE RUGGED MAN Meanwhile downstairs, Phoenix Thunderbird
pounded the audience with their beloved form of
thrash metal. GrantMinor (bass), who plays more
of a secondary role to Jordan Ardanaz (guitar/
vocals) in the intoxication that is Thunderbird,
graced the stage again right after as front man in
Girlfriends & Boyfriends. With their amalgamation
of guitar, bass, dual keyboards, and drums, the
group reminded us of new wave bands from the
early '80s, and why bass guitar kicks so much ass.
The final act in the basement set saw Juvenile
Hall deal with the most raucous crowd of the evening. It might not have been just their conventional
pop-punk sound that trashed the room, but the
combination of booze and power chords nearly
uprooted the subterranean crypt that housed more
live than dead.
The final two acts on the main stage could not
have been more different. BESTiE, a technically
stunning beach rock group with a flair for falsetto fit the season perfectly. With their somewhat
commercial edge, they made the audience swoon.
But as the nightwore on and the concluding act
DIANE took the stage, it was easy to tell that the
extended nature of that night's show had begun to
take its toll on both audience and musician alike.
While DIANE kicked into gear, the chugging bass
and voice of lead singer Mel Zee capturing all those
who remained, the room began to clear.
Despite the temporary demise of the Zoo Zhop,
no regulations could douse the fire of those present at the Electric Owl on the first night of Music
Waste.
—Sam Hawkins
KOKO / AARON READ / THE HIGH DROPS
Burrard Hotel /June 15
For one brief, ludicrous moment, the Burrard
Hotel wasn't simply a '60s deco motor inn in the
extra-sanitary heart of downtown Vancouver-it
was the Waldorf 2.0. For one night only, its giant
courtyard held two massive just-built skateboard
ramps, and its many empty hotel rooms had been
stripped bare and replaced with art installations.
The Burrard's parking garage turned into a sizable stage and every nook and cranny was packed
with apathetic hipsters looking in on the action in
considerable awe.
Kicking things off early were the High Drops,
who played to a tiny and extraordinarily unenthu-
siastic crowd. Even though the audience's focus
was intermittently focused on whoever was falling
off their skateboard at the moment, this quartet
played like dynamite. Sun-slicked surfer tones funnelled through "I Am The Walrus"-era psychedelic
revelry. Though no one realized it at the time,
the High Drops started the trend for the evening
of four-piece rock acts with one energetic, and
one studious, guitarist. While Alexi Baris tended
towards a mad-eyed stare and frantic chords, Mitch
Charron was bent over his instrument like a mathematician with a calculator.
Aaron Read and his energetic ensemble are a
summer band. This isn't to say that Read's excellent brand of fuzzy high-fructose pop is aimed
squarely at the beach crowd, but that it's impossible to imagine feeling quite the same way about
the foursome's melodies when dressed in jackets
and toques. The night marked the release of a split
seven-inch between Aaron Read and headliners
Koko, so it was interesting to see the markedly
quieter "Teeth Are All Somewhere" come up late
in the group's set. Read played the part of front-
man well, radiating a genuine humility that felt at
odds against the party atmosphere bubbling just
behind the first lines of the crowd.
It was a special treat to see Koko play, even if it
was a "one last time" sort of thing. Heavy-lidded
frontman Konner Whitney did the fashionable
thing and moved to Montreal, so getting to see his
Vancouver ensemble again wound the clock back a
few years at least. The ramshackle band could draw
parallels with the Strokes' Is This It, with biting
pop lyrics hiding right in front of punk-rock chord
progressions. Koko handled the surrounding party
the best of the three bands, poking casual fun at
everything around them while moving in and out of
a stream of material both new and old. For a band
who definitely didn't have a lot of time to practice
before this show, Koko handled themselves well
before quietly ending their set and letting the skateboarders take centre-stage once again.
—Fraser Dobbs
KETAMINES/WARM SODA/
THE BALLANTYNES / ZEBRASSIERES /
TOUGH AGE
Rickshaw Theatre /June 15
Ketamines and warm soda are great together.
The bands combine pretty well, too. This Saturday night show at the Rickshaw, headlined by
the Toronto/Lethbridge-based Ketamines with
their ever-in-flux lineup, was pretty fantastic all
the same. The theatre's setup was perfect: big
speakers and high ceilings made it feel bigger
than it was, and the entire lineup demanded that
big-rock-show type feeling. While the crowd was
thin—"Hello forty people!" was how Tough Age
put it—none of the bands slowed for a second.
Local foursome Tough Age kicked the night off
with some fuzzy rock, a lot of energy, and some
sort of quip about us being trees. The band, formed
by members of Sightlines and the now-defunct
Korean Gut, to name a few, is fairly new and already
have a six-track album and a digital single released
so far this year. They're definitely one to watch,
and complemented the sounds ofWarm Soda and
Ketamines nicely.
Zebrassieres was kind of like seeing the
Ketamines. Literally. The band share the same
members, but playing different instruments.
If you're not familiar, Zebrassieres is a plan for
the Ketamines founders Paul Lawton and James
Leroy to get paid twice for the same show. And it's
worth the price of admission. Zebrassieres have
a touch more mania, and played faster and more
frantic. Plus, you get to see Lawton lose his shit
on a keyboard.
If I had one criticism though, it would be don't
let the Ballantynes open for you, because they
will try and steal the whole show. It's an inescapable law of Vancouver music, even more evident
when their garage soul sound felt slightly out of
place—but not at all unwelcome—with the rest
of the lineup. They brought all the energy from
their recordings to the performance, and are just
so much damn fun to watch live. That's not to say
there was anything lackluster about the rest of the
show. Oakland quartet Warm Soda picked up the
pace with their softer, yet somehow louder, garage
pop and long interludes that had the crowd nodding their heads like people do when they don't
know how to dance.
Towards midnight, Ketamines got up to finish
the show, Lawton trading keys for guitar and the
mic. One of the nicest things about having the
stage and floor at the same height is that you get
a whole new level of audience interaction. The
sense of humour and fun ran high as they messed
around with friends in the crowd and each other
in between killer songs, ranging from garage to
punk to fuzz. It's always a great feeling to see a
band really enjoy what they're doing.
—Tristan Koster 1   %rp-riS
HAVE YOU TRIED?
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No Paper Waste       High Impact
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RIFFLANDIA
FESTIVAL
SEPTEMBER 12-15, 2013 • VICTORIA, BC
www.rifflandia.com WMSm
li    ill1  I'Mli  P"
mi DISCORDER STAFF
PICKS OF
THEN & SOON
Srzy\
illustration by
ANNE EMBERLiNE
There once was a time when, whether willingly or not, our toddler ears were filled with
nursery rhymes, sing-a-long songs, and Charlotte Diamond. Then we grew up a bit,
started doing chores, and earning allowance to spend on things like Pixy Stix, Pogs, and
most importantly, our own music. So this month, we take a stroll down Memory Lane and
ask our writers what the first album was that they shelled out their own bucks for. And
because we're in the thick of beach season, we pose the inevitable follow-up: what new
album are you psyched to drop dollars on this summer?
EVAN BROW, CONTRIBUTOR
FIRST EVER: Green Day, American Idiot, CD (2004, age 11)
While the radio filled my ears with Usher, 3 Doors Down, and Nickleback's "Someday," I
had yet to explore my own music. I was too busy watching Pokemon and buying penny
candy. But then Green Day released American Idiot, which set off a wave of pre-teen
angsty hysteria. It was my first taste of punk, of concept albums, of politically charged
lyrics. It was no more Top 40 radio for me. It was all about a well-crafted album.
GETTING PSYCHED FOR: The Civil Wars, The Civil Wars, CD (Aug. 6)
Amidst a slew of inter-band tension, a lot of confusion, and a hiatus announced only'
seven months ago, the Civil Wars are back with their sophomore album. I love a good,
pure folk album to sink into, so hopefully the band can help me achieve that same
acoustic purgatory.
SARAH CORDINGLEY, CITR MUSIC DIRECTOR
FIRST EVER: The Mini-Pops, The Mini-Pops, LP (1985, age 4)
Through an elaborate performance of pleading, tugging, whining, and tantruming in the
Vernon Canadian Tire, I somehow managed to convince my dad to purchase this LP. He
did not realize that it would become an instrument of his own torture for years to come. Or
perhaps he did, but it seemed like an endurable alternative to Alvin and the Chipmunks.
Plus, dad was pretty into disco. I was four years old and it was 1985.1 was irresistibly
drawn to the cover which featured children recreating famous album covers with an
awkward pinch of adult sexuality.
GETTING PSYCHED FOR: Pop. 1280, Imps of Perversion, LP, CD (Aug. 6)
Sparse, horrific, NYC goth rock seems like the perfect summer soundtrack to me.
JACEY GIBB, CONTRIBUTOR 7/J "'
FIRST EVER: Mortal Kom bat Original Motion Picture Soundtrack, CD (1995, age 5)
For a five-year-old, purchasing music to call my own was a bold new frontier. Regretfully,
it would be several years before I bought an actual CD that wasn't just a movie
soundtrack. Test your might, indeed.
GETTING PSYCHED FOR: The Love Language, Ruby Red, CD (July 23)
I'm a sucker for beach-rock, but teaser tracks from the LL's upcoming album showcases
a more refined, cinematic sound that I can't help but feel myself warming up to. CITR 101.9 FM CHARTS ™™
HITZ OF JUNE 2013
Hose marked (+) are local. Most of these excellent albums can be found at fine independent music stores across Vancouver. If y<
:an't find them, give CiTR's music coordinator a shout at (604) 822-8733. Her name is Sarah Cordingley. If you ask nicely she'll
ell you how to find them. Check out other great campus/community radio charts at www.earshot-online.com.
ARTIST
\LBUM
S$
LABEL
•M
Gold & Youth*+                 Beyond Wilderness
Arts & Crafts
2
Malcolm Jack*+                I'm My Own Bewitchment
Self-Released
3/
The Courtneys**               The Courtneys
Hockey Dad
4
Li6*+
Shawn
Lie
Function Operate
5
ArazekLh
es!*+
Toot
gftt
He
Was Bead'.'J
Self-Released
6     No Joy*
Wait To F
leasure
Mexican Summer
«Hf
Hooded
Fang**;
Gravez
Daps
8
A Tribe Called Red*            Nation II Nation
Tribal Spirit
;' f
Zeus*                            Cover Me
Arts & Crafts
10
Bleached                        Ride Your Heart
Dead Oceans
%
««*«*        KESST"
Constellation
12
RecCe
itre*+
Time
sa
3il
on
Self-Released
13    The Abramson Singers* +      Late Riser
14
Teen*
Carolina
Carpark
15
The Ketamines*
You Can't Serve
Two Masters
Mammoth Cave
16
Various*
Arts & Crafts: 2003-2013
Arts & Crafts
17
Digits*
Only Affection
Self-Released
18
Black Bug
Reflecting the Light
HoZac
19
Bead Ghosts**
Can't Get No
Burger
20
Moon King*
Obsession II
One Big Silence
21
Thee Oh Sees
Floating Coffin
Castle Face
22
Yeah Yeah Yeahs
Mosquito
Universal
23
Anciients*+
Heart of Oak
Season Of Mist
24
Dirty Beaches*
Drifters/Love Is The Devil
Zoo Music
25
Savages
Silence Yourself
Matador
26    Georgiana Starlington Paper Moon
30 Cold Warps*
31 The Highest Order*
32 Gypsophilia*
33 The Lazy MKs*
34 Cascadia*+
Don't Haunt Me, OK? b/w
Stuck on an Island
The Sunset Sessions
Big Deal
42    Mount Kimbie
June Gloom
The North Borders
Cold Spring Fault
Less Youth
Forward Music Group
Cruising Usa
Homeshake*
The Homeshake Tape
Fixture
Suuns*
Images Du Futur
Secret City
Ootheque*
Ootheque
Bonsound
Hayden*
Us Alone
Arts & Crafts
Born Ruffians*
Birthmarks
Paper Bag
Mute
Stanley Schumacher and
The Music Now Ensemble
Ninja Tune
Warp
Experimental Music Lab        Self-Released
Secondhand Rapture Columbia
46    David Bowie
47    We Found a Lovebird**       Let's Start the War
48    Laura Mvula
The Broadway To Boundary
50   The Lad Mags*
Lover b/w
You Dont Love Me Zulu Records Pop-Up Shop - w
we will have all your music neei
plus all the music from the 60+
artists performing that wee u
^^^to^^^^^^^H
MAVIS STAPLES
One True Vine CD/LP
iWHEART {f HO IT B E HE «
NOAH AND THE WHALE
Heart of Nowhere CD/LP
SOGOL BORDELLO THE COURTNEYS
Pure Vida Conspiracy s/t LP
CD/LP back In stock...
I twitter.com/zulurecoFds
iu   -    .     facebook.com/people/
TaceoooK    zuluRecords-Store/680210042
tumblr,  zulurecords.tumblr.com
Zulu Records
1972-1976 W 4th Ave
STORE HOURS
MontoWed   10:30-7:00
Vancouver, BC
Thurs and Fri 10:30-9:00
tel 604.738.3232
Sat              9:30-6:30
www.zulurecords.com
Sun         . 12:00-6:00

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