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 *% t^Vl W^s
IAN WILLIAM CRAIOI WATERMELON I THE SPEECHLESS RADIO I PORNOCATEI WRONG WAVE 20121 PERCH I ALLEGHENY BO UPCOMING SHOWS
THE FALL DOWN GET DOWN
DEATH, POINTED STICKS, AND MORE!
TYPHOON
LAURA GIBSON, LOST LANDER
THE DEEP END
FEAT MEMBERS OF NO SINNER
MUNICIPAL WASTE & NAPALM DEATH
EXHUMED, DAYGLO ABORTIONS
FIVE ALARM FUNK
BANANAFISH DANCE ORCHESTRA
LIMBS OF THE STARS ALBUM RELEASE
JUNG PEOPLE, IFWE ARE MACHINES, +GUESTS
LOOT-ATRIBUTETOM
GUESTS TBA
GALLOWS
BARN BURNER
$25 «I
*40&si
*I2« :
$30 at door
wI
*io i
$f2 at door
$15 |
^ DATING MYSELF $«
•J PREVIOUS TENANTS, ONE LIFE ANIMAL, +GUEST   $14 atdoor
tickets online: latidarecords.com
in store: Antisocial, La Ti Da Records,
Neptoon Records, Red Cat, Zulu
tickets online: rickshawtheatre.com,
northemtickets.com,
sceneinthedark.com
online: ticketweb.ca
e: Scrape
tickets online: eventbrite.com
in store: Highlife, Red Cat, Zulu
tickets online: rickshawtheatre.com
RfCfcSttAW
OOG0OOG
254 East Hastings Street • 604.681.8915
ie: rickshawtheatre.com
its online: northemtJckets.com
ore: Red Cat, Scrape, Zulu
ie: rickshawtheatre.com
DEC 2ND HARDCORE AGAINST HUNGER all ages
DEC 3RD  ELUVITE, WINTERSUN, VARG
DEC6TH&7TH DIECEMBER FEST
DEC8TH THE CAVE SINGERS, POOR MOON
DEC 22ND JAPANDROIDS
Additional show listings, ticket info, band bios, videos and more are online at
www. rickshawtheatre. com
shindig
Every Tuesday eveKlKg frorvt Sepfcervtber 11 to
December 4- ai fcke RatU>«XM Club*
Tkree ref resklKg baKds KtgkfclM, and Ookes for Seer,
Visit ktfep://srkLKdtcjxLfcrxa for full sckedlule*
thank you sponsors:
ams events
backline musician services
band merch Canada
discorder magazine
fader master studios
the hive creative labs
mint records
music waste
nxne
scratch records
vogville recording
zulu records EDITOR'S NOTE: HAPPY BIRTHDAY, CiTR!
Theyearwas 1937, butitfeels like itwas justyesterday. There we were, huddled
around the gramophone, preparing to broadcast our eager voices over the
radiowaves for the first time, to upwards of dozens of people, who knows
how far and wide. There we were, just a bunch of bored, musically enthusiastic students with an itch to play our tunes to the world. How could we have
known that our boredom and zeal on that day would evolve into the legacy
of CiTRioi.9? Here we are, 75 years later, and the station is still blooming
like a peony in May, reaching over two million listeners with student-run,
community-supported, nationally recognized broadcasting.
Okay, you got me. I'm not an octogenarian, nor was I even a glimmer in
my parents parents' eyes when Thunderbird Radio began. But heck if I'm
not uber-appreciative for CiTR and everything it does, from publishing the
magazine in your paws now for almost 30 years, to providing fertile training
ground, to playing the most diverse programming on the dial — punk, news,
rap, country, sports, talk— it's all here. And we're celebrating our Diamond
Radioversary this month at Chapel Arts on November 17 with a gangbusters
lineup of bands, alumni, staff, and general enthusiasts from present and
past. And you, we hope! November is surprisingly jam packed with other
fun events like the annual CiTRDJ Competition, more SHiNDiGgery at the
Railway Club, and a heap of local independent music, arts, and cultural
delights you are about to witness in the 37 pages ahead of you. Cover band
The New Values talks d.i.y. punk-rockin', we revisit the "CiTRPorn Incident,"
affectionally termed Pornogate by many around the station, and there's even
a brand new monthly column about Vancouver life and times by Bob Woolsey
called "Here's The Thing."
So there you have it Let's blow out some candles and cut some cake. We've
got a heap to celebrate this month.
Read on and stay rad,
Laurel Borrowman
PS—Come back next month to read our staff's top album picks of 2012,
more SHiNDiG highlights, and getting up close and personal with alt-folk
trio Raleigh.
FEATURES
REGULARS
10 Ian William Craig: Failure, decay, disintegration, deterioration, and chaos are alive and
well in the multi-talented solo act's unpredictable reel-to-reel sonic soundscapes.
12 Watermelon: Yeah, the three admit it. They play pop tunes. But it's not as easy as it
sounds. 15 The New Values: Deep in the bowels of Vancouver's Railtown comes a screen-
printing, punk-rocking, pie-baking trio who are about to knock your Buzzcock-loving socks off.
17 The Speechless Radio: Michael Elder is just like you: a down-to-earth Prince Georgian
lad singing about love and life. He's just got about 9,999 more Likes than you.
18 Pornogate: This one time, at CiTR, in the station here, some people decided to make a
porn movie. Discorder revisits the 1999 incident at 101.9.
04 Venews Perch
05 Here's The Thing The End Of An Era
06 Textually Active Allegheny, BC
20 Calendar Brennan Kelly
22 Program Guide
25 Art Project Wrong Wave 2012
28 Under Review
34 Real Live Action
38 On The Air So Salacious
39 Charts
EDITOR Laurel Borrowman
ART DIRECTOR Jaz Halloran
COPY EDITORS Jordan Ardanaz, Steve Louie
AD COORDINATOR Maegan Thomas
UNDER REVIEW EDITOR Jordan Ardanaz
RLA EDITOR Steve Louie
WEB EDITOR Chirag Mahajan
CALENDAR LISTINGS Claire Eagle
ACCOUNTS MANAGER Corey Ratch
OFFICIAL TWEETER Dorothy Neufeld
CITR STATION MANAGER Brenda Grunau
PUBLISHER Student Radio Society of UBC
STUDENT LIASONS Zarah Cheng, Dorothy Neufeld
COVER photo by Hana Pesut, lettering by Jonathan Dy
CHECK DISCORDER.CA
REGULARLY FOR NEW
ARTICLES, PHOTOS, AND
ALL THINGS MUSIC
RELATED!
WRITERS Jordan Ardanaz, Andrew Beason, Sarah
Christina Brown, Josefa Cameron, Robert Catherall,
Alex de Boer, Fraser Dobbs, Jacey Gibb, Coleman
Ingram, Jonathan Kew, Hugh Macdonald, Duncan
McHugh, Matt Meuse, James Olson, Mark Paulhus, Will
Pedley, Shane Scott-Travis, Nicola Storey, Chris Yee
PROOFREADERS Kim Pringle
©Discorder 2012 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British
Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 9,000. Discorder is published
almost monthly by CiTR. which can be heard at 101.9 FM, online at citr.ca,
as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except
Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487, CiTR's office
at (604) 822-3017, email CiTR at stationmanager@citr.ca. or pick up a pen
and write #233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T1Z1, Canada.
PHOTOGRAPHERS & ILLUSTRATORS
Britta Bacchus, Jonathan Dy, Anne Emberline, Alex
Heilbron, Victoria Johnson, Brennan Kelly, Steve Louie,
Hana Pesut, Michael Shantz, David Brock Stewart, Jade
Su, Andrew Topalov, Chris Yee
CORRECTION In the October issue, we made a
photo credit mistake. Our Art Project on Swarm & Olio,
credited the photo of Conversation Within Immanence
to Sylvana D'Angelo on a 35mm Minolta. We should
have credited photo by Sharona Franklin with an
Olympus Epic on Rossman 35mm film, and titled it
conversation:immanence. To see more of Franklin's work
this month, turn to page 25!
ADVERTISE Ad space for upcoming issues can be
booked by calling (604) 822-3017 ext. 3 or emailing
advertising@citr.ca. Rates available upon request.
CONTRIBUTE To submit words to Discorder, please
contact: editor.discorder@citr.ca. To submit images,
please contact: artdirector.discorder@citr.ca
SUBSCRIBE Send in a cheque for $20 to #233-6138
SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T 1Z1 with your address,
and we will mail each issue of Discorder right to your
doorstep for a year.
DISTRIBUTE To distribute Discorder in your business,
email distro.discorder@citr.ca We are always looking for
new friends.
DONATE We are part of CiTR, a registered non-profit,
and accept donations so we can provide you with the
content you love. To donate visit www.citr.ca/donate. PERCH
by COLEMAN
INGRAM
illustration by
BRITTA BACCHUS
Fresh from the purgatory of trading spaces,
East Van dining/hang-out staple, Perch is back.
Though it can't be considered a "live music"
venue, it is without a doubt musically inclined
and caters to people wi± similar inclinations.
Discorder spoke with manager Lu Lee about the
space and its recent move.
Touting itself as a "Rock & Roll Primary,"
Perch suggests folks stop by for "pre-show
eats" or to plug the antique Wurlitzer jukebox,
stocked with essential rock 45s. Its new location
adds weight to these suggestions, as the diner
now finds itself nesded in a cozy spot on East
Hastings within walking distance to venues like
the Rickshaw, Lanalou's, the Astoria, Zoo Zhop,
Funky Winkerbeans, and Fortune Sound Club.
For the show-going demographic of the area, a
place like Perch was severely lacking.
Formerly located at the intersection of
Powell and Commercial, the space was bordered by, among other things, a storage warehouse and a parking lot; not exactly a bustling
hub of activity.
Though it was popular for Powell/
Commercial area residents-privy to its location,
the move has indeed opened it up to a lot more
foot traffic that may be looking for a few pre-
show pints to warm things up or a post-show
snack to soak up the evening's excesses. Music
and cheap beer aside, it is actually the snacks
that make Perch stand apart, most notably their
selection of always-gluten-free pizzas, to which
Lee added, "One of the biggest challenges of the
THOUGH ITWAS POPULAR FOR POWELL/COMMERCIAL AREA
RESIDENTS PRIVY TO ITS LOCATION, THE MOVE HAS INDEED OPENED
IT UP TO A LOT MORE FOOT TRAFFIC THAT MAY BE LOOKING FOR A
FEW PRE-SHOW PINTS TO WARM THINGS UP OR A POST-SHOW SNACK
TO DILUTE THE EVENING'S EXCESSES.
"Our Powell street location had a lot
of charm, but like most places that can be
described as funky or unique it presented some
serious challenges. It was a very small and oddly
shaped space in an obscure part of the city. We
needed more space to grow and the ability to
reach a broader audience. We found the new
space on Hastings and we fell in love with it,"
says Lee.
old location was finding the space to make all
the food. We make everything from scratch, 60
having a much larger kitchen is amazing."
As far as music events go, Perch plans on
hosting weekly DJs, as well as rekindling their
old bingo night. Even the Wurlitzer will be getting some treatment. "[Owner] Matt [Hewlett]
is a total record fiend, so the jukebox has been
filled with records from his own collection, but
we are looking at switching it up a bi$S gays Lee.
Our very own campus and community radio station CiTRioi.9, who will spend part of their 75th
Radioversary at Perch this month, will be curating
a selection of 45s donated by the station, programmers, local bands, and record stores.
"We were approached by CiTR about them curating and we are super excited for that to happen! So
far there are no plans for anyone else to curate, but
we are happy to talk to anyone who may want to"
says Lee, adding "We are planning a grand opening party for
late November. It will feature performances by local drag and burlesque artists, killer drink specials,
and sick tunes provided by a local
vinyl DJ, so check our Facebook page
for updates."
With a fully stocked bar, a
soon to be re-stocked jukebox, a menu that would
appease vegan, vegetarian, and omnivore alike, a
kitchen that is open until midnight seven days a
week, and a new primo location, Perch may just be
what your local gig-night was missing.
Visit eatdrinkperch.com or/acebook.com/BKPerch jbr
updates on all happenings at Perch. THE END
OF AN ERA
by BOB
WOOLSEY
On November 4, the Granville 7 Theatre will
close its doors. It's that same old tale of the older,
smaller company having to downsize due to the
pressure being put on it by the bigger, flashier
more modern competitors. As much as I understand economics and the trend of the Granville
strip area towards this kind of modernization, I
still feel a twinge of pain deep down in my cold
consumer heart over it all.
When I first moved to Vancouver from the bustling metropolis of Prince George, I was extremely
excited to have so many options for movie nights.
Especially since the move was precipitated by my
trip to film school (a topic for a later date). Back
then, the Granville 7's biggest competitor was the
Capitol 6 right across the street. Granville street
was still the bar district that it is now, but there
were definite parts of it that retained that old, gritty
Vancouver of the past feel to it.
(Side bar- if you ever get the chance to see the
old Dennis Hopper directed "Out of the Blue" from
1980 or so, DO IT. Itwas shoton location here and
features beautiful images of Hastings Street right
near the end of its heyday as well as various other
landmarks around town.)
I remember lining up outside of the Granville
7 to see Attack of the Clones and Revenge ojthe Sith.
Maybe those memories aren't all roses, but I also
remember going to see many the odd film there
over the years by myself. It was the perfect place
to walk by and wander into whatever movie happened to be playing at that time just because you
had nowhere to be for a couple hours. Was. I'm
already referring to it in the past tense. Recently I
had the good fortune to shoot a web project there
about a small indie theatre that was being threatened by the big multiplex across the street. Art
imitating life, much?
As I sit here and think about all the times I've
been to the Granville 7, I'm struck that I can't
remember the last movie I saw there. Apart from
VIFF films, I'm at a loss to think of the last time
that I actually went down to the Granville 7 and
paid to see film. Which is, of course, the problem.
While I would bet money that most any film goer
in Vancouver has fond memories of this theatre,
they probably haven't been there in a while. The
neighbourhood has changed, the theatre's movie
content changed and everywhere else movie theatres got better.
The immediate reaction of anyone who loves
something is to hold on to it. When it comes to
things like this though, sometimes it's better just
to let it go. I mean, let's be honest here, if this place
was kept open and continued to limp along as it
had, it would soon fall into an increasing state of
disrepair. Even 10 years ago when you walked into
the place, your first thought was about how much
it needed a renovation.
My Grandfather passed away last month. He
was an amazing guy who immigrated to Canada
from Scotland in the '60s with my Grandma, my
Mum and her four sisters. He was one of the single
most influential people on my development into an
adult Of course, I'm saddened by his departure, but
more than anything, I'm just really, really thankful
that he was my Grandfather and that I have so many
memories and lessons from him to pass on to my
kids and grandkids.
It's exactly the same with the Granville 7. Yes,
itwas a great place to go watch movies. Yes, itwas
neat to see all the neon and puke green carpets in
the middle of a city made mosdy of glass. Yes, we'll
all miss it, but here's the thing: at the end of the day,
it's Granville 7's time to go and I, for one, think our
time would be better spent looking toward the future
so we can discover how to build new, sustainable
independent theatres in Vancouver, rather than crying over the loss of this old girl. ALLEGHENY, BC (2012)
written by
RODNEY DECROO
by JORDAN
ARDANAZ
illustration by
DAVID BROCK STEWART
Allegheny, Pennsylvania, has meant many
things to Rodney DeCroo through his life. The
Midwestern coal-mining town was the crater ofhis brooding childhood, and has since
become a dim muse for his idle thoughts; a
place where the Vancouver-based author/musician seems to anchor many ofhis experiences.
Though considering the abuse and unsavori-
ness DeCroo has endured in his lifetime, the
town of Allegheny seems more like a launching
pad for his reckless living and misadventure that
pockmarked the decades after his departure as
a child.. His early traumas quickly evolved into
alcoholism in a category beyond a casual affliction, and into the dangerous, waking-up-in-
strange-places, territory. However, now it's all
just become a part ofhis story.
Now firmly in his 40s, the soot-toned town
of DeCroo's past has become an allegory for all
his voice is often as dour as the
murky torrents of the Allegheny
River itself, but the melodramas
are beautifully placed within a
bubble of recollection, seeking out thin lines of beauty like
golden piping.
Poems like "Oil Drum" and "On the Night
of My First Breath," are irresistible in their
even-tempered tone, and were centerpieces in
the consuming album, Allegheny, released earlier this year by DeCroo and producer Robert
Malowany. The work was a triumph of carefully
laid textures that marry the spoken language
of the author with morphing soundscapes of
POEMS LIKE "OIL DRUM" AND "ON THE NIGHT OF MY FIRST
BREATH," ARE IRRESISTIBLE IN THEIR EVEN-TEMPERED TONE
WERE CENTREPIECES IN THE CONSUMING ALBUM, AliEGHENY,
RELEASED EARLIER THIS YEAR BY DECROO AND PRODUCER
ROBERT MALOWANY.
of these things, and with Allegheny, BC, the place
serves as a platform for redemption from a life
lived without recourse. The book, published by
Nightwood Editions, is a collection of 42 ofhis
poems divided into four chapters that loosely
trace the arch of the author's life with simple
and vivid strokes, following his journey from
Pennsylvania to British Columbia. The name
even serves this purpose, by drawing together
such disparate locations under the overarching themes that have followed DeCroo. In this,
strings, synths, and otherworldly pulses that
explode with unexpected richness, as DeCroo
draws a line that stalks the spectres ofhis
youth. Although, in his own words, the story arc
explored here is, "not a story in a typically linear narrative sense, but more like a collage, that
when pieced together gives the sense of something completed."
Allegheny, BC, works as a further exploration
of the feeling captured on the Malowany album.
Equally brutal, harrowing, and sweet, DeCroo's
workmanlike writing gives his
honesty and they are imbued with
confidence in their purpose as he
seems to find solace in painting
portraits of frozen slices of time.
A quiet moment hunting with
his grandfather in "Cherry Valley,
Pennsylvania," a beating taken by a headmaster in
"Mr. Steigel," or seeing true beauty in the visage
ofhis mother standing in the sunset, gripping a
.22 as she stalks along a tractor path in "Mother
(Northern British Columbia)." The angular prose
of Allegheny, BC, belies a world-weary stark realism, feeding gritty passages that read more like
vignettes that form small islands of experiences
in places as disparate as a Montreal
tenement, a Northern BC trapline, or a
boarding house in South Vancouver.
DeCroo is an indelible journeyman and Allegheny, BC is a love letter to
a life lived; acceptance that the present moment is the manifestation the
totality of past experiences. In this, it
warmly embraces the present moment
and serves as a penance paid to the past.
Even if he does state, "I can't recall a single
memory," DeCroo's re-envisioning his past seems
much like a personal incantation, as he peels
away the vice and torment that previously clouded
his vision, and restructures it to be a bedrock for
growth instead of fertile soil for desperation.
Allegheny, BC is meant to be savored, and within its
simple beauty lays a universal humanity.
AND THE BEST DEALS IN TOWN
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Show It when you shopl
hvww.citr.ca THE
"OH $?%!
I'M LATE TO CLASS "
Get to campus the quick and easy way. Just take a car2go when you need
it, and Leave it when you're done. No mandatory reservations, no late fees.
For a limited time, students get free registration and 30 minutes free
at car2goVancouver.com with student ID (promo code: STUDENT).
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unless otherwise noted; HISTORIC NIGHTCLUB + TIKI BAR F THE FUNNEST PLACE ON EARTH
SnmWOODWARD'S
EVENTS FROM
SFU'S VANCITY OFFICE OF
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT
UPCOMING FEATURE EVENTS
11/02     Orlando Voorn Legendary Detroit Techno
with Rennie Foster and Marc Gerrard
11/03     RUNIT! with Heatwave UK Dancehail
w/ Resident Djs Rhek + Arems
11/06     La Sera (Katy Goodman of the Vivian Girls)
w/ Chains of Love + The Courtneys
11/09     Midnight Magic - Live Disco Band from NYC
w/DJ sets from Miracles Club (Portland), Tyler Fedchuk + Z<
11/10     Blowfly "The Original Dirty Rapper"
w/Thee Goblins feat. Nardwuar the Human Serviette
11/14     Bleached L.A. Garage-Rock Dou
w/Eating Out(members of White Lung * Nu Sensae)
11/15     Slam Dunk Lp Release Party
11/16     Julie Doiron (Founder of Eric's Trip)
11/16     RUNIT! with Gappy Ranks Jamaican Dancehail
11/17     MSH Sessions presents Endless Summer
Featuring RAC, Classixx, JeromeLOL and more!
11/23     Rob Garza (Thievery Corporation)
11/24     Wax Romeo (Small town Romeo/Calgary)
11/25     The Lou Reed Songbook
Vancouver musician play Lou Reed + Velvet Underground
11/30     Turbo Fruits + White Lung
WEEKLY   Men Ice Cream Social Wed World Wednesdays
EVENTS   Fri + Sat Multiroom Dance Party — One Cover
For full event listings please visitwww.waldorfhotel.com
Q 1489 EAST HASTINGS ST Q /WALBORFNOTEL Q ^AtDQfflHft *
Talk by Sarah Schulman
Co-Presented with Cineworks
Nov. 3, Djavad Mowafaghian Cinema, 8pm
Talk by William Lindsay, Director of SFUs
Office of Aboriginal Peoples
Nov. 5, Djavad Mowafaghian World Art Centre, 7pm
Coast Salish Drumming Workshop
with Russell Wallace
Nov. 6, Djavad Mowafaghian World Art Centre, 7pm
Talk by Matt Hern:
In Defense-of an Urban Future' with Panelists
Nov. 7, Djavad Mowafaghian Cinema, 7pm
Opera Singing Performance by Opera Bravissima
on the Theme of War and Peace*
Nov. 8, Pigeon Park Savings, 7pm
Talk by Richard Rosenthal on the new
independent investigations Office with 8CCLA
and Pivot Legal Society - moderated by C8C
radio journalist Kathyryn Gretsinger
Nov. 13, Djavad Mowafaghian World Art Centre, 7pm
Talk by Allison Collins and Erdem Tasdelen -
A Conversation About Art and Unrequited Love
Nov. U, Djavad Mowafaghian World Art Centre, 7pm
Talk by Kirsten Sroekman - The Meaning of
Aesthetics Within the Field of Social Arts
Nov. 21, Djavad Mowafaghian World Art Centre, 7pm
World AIDS Day Screening of Sarah Schulman
Film with Cineworks
Nov. 29, Djavad Mowafaghian Cinema, 8pm
December U-U, 2012: BAH! HUMBUG!
Starring Jay Brazeau, Jim Byrnes & Margo Kane
A seasonal fundraiser for the community arts
GOLDCORP CENTRE FOR THE ARTS
SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY, H9 W, HASTINGS ST.,
VANCOUVER | WWW.SFUWOODWARDS.CA photo by
JADESU
lettering by
ANNEEMBERUNE
JAN
WILLIAM
CRAIG
bv FRASER
DOBBS
Ian William Craig is not your traditional musician. Blending analog synthesizers, operatic
singing, and years of artistic experience through
a series of hand-made tape echoes and loops,
Craig's rare performances are as much about
him struggling with the risk of unpredictable
reel-to-reels as they are about crafting articulate,
thematically-rich drone soundscapes. We met
at the Wise Lounge on a quiet autumn night to
talk about his latest records, Meaning Turns To
Whispers, Cloudmarks, and Heretic Surface, released
together but recorded years apart.
Craig is humble, optimistic, and amongst
the nicest people I've ever interviewed. An
award-winning print-maker, his music is a
natural extension of the same themes that won
him notoriety as a visual artist. "During school,
my own expression of music was peripheral,"    •
he said. "I was interested in notions of decay
and deterioration, because in print, you really
don't have that much to do with [the process]
beyond throwing the plates into an acid bath
every once in a while and seeing what comes
out. So it accrues memory and becomes a history of itself."
Inside of the experimental envelope, there's
something wonderful and mystifying in Craig's
body of musical work. Much like the rabbit hole
Alice stumbles down, the trilogy of "sculptures"
are full of the surreal and chaotically beautiful, as Craig attempts to mimic "what memory
might sound like, or what a body sounds like."
The result is a rich cascade of positive emotions,
cosmic accidents and faulty echoes, reminiscent
of early Brian Eno or Eluvium, with the warm
presence of old tape under each track.
"[These records] use imperfection to explore
the concepts of failure and decay that I was trying to make into beautiful things during my
time as a print-maker." Much of the ugliness
Craig hints at is the result ofhis manipulation
of old reel-to-reel machines and tape decks, all
of which he's modified himself. "Sitting in my
apartment and making absolutely crazy bat-shit
terrible things was actually really liberating, "he
notes. "I really enjoy the absurd aspect of tape
machines; I circuit-bend them, but I tweak a
thing and a strange noise happens—it's totally
unknown. The physical nature is very appealing
to me. I can touch the tapes. I can scrape them...
I don't feel like I'm alone on stage."
Of Craig's performances, no two could
ever really be compared by the same means.
Surrounded by his substantial tape equipment mhmhmI
and an analog synthesizer, the only constant
is Craig himself, and half the appeal is seeing him corral each machine into doing what
he wants; reel chirps, microphonic hum, and
magnetic distortion phase in and out of each set
like Christmas lights in between beautiful synth
arpeggios and ariatic singing, courtesy ofhis extensive opera and choir
training. He's humble; about the experiences, recalling: "Making music
seems a lot more improvisational to
me [than making visual art]. It can
be a happening, it can be just me getting up in front of people and fucking
around, I never know what's going
to happen." Perhaps what makes Craig's set so
much fun to watch is that the crowd seems to be
just as much in the dark as he himself is.
If s fitting that, despite the focus on decay
and the way art is affected by time and space,
Craig's music is always positive and calming
. instead of overbearing and sinister. Mangled
piano chords still retain a sense of beauty, even
amidst the chaos Craig has subjected them to,
which is surprising considering the way they
came into being. "I was living with my sister
in Edmonton, and during tile ridiculously cold
winter, I gutted her piano and mic'd it up in a
whole bunch of weird ways. I recorded probably
20 hours of material, and after listening to it I
was amazed at how much it sounded like sentimental crap. At that point I was really trying to
express something, and afterwards I thought
"I WAS LIVING WITH MY SISTER IN EDMONTON, AND DURING THE
RIDICULOUSLY COLD WINTER, I GUTTED HER PIANO AND MIC'D
IT UP IN A WHOLE BUNCH OF WEIRD WAYS. I RECORDED PROBABLY
20 HOURS OF MATERIAL, AND AFTER LISTENING TO IT I WAS
AMAZED AT HOW MUCH IT SOUNDED LIKE SENTIMENTAL CRAP."
the only way through would be to destroy the
recordings, and that's what Meaning Turns 7b
Whispers is. It's completely mangled to remove
that struggle for expression. I realized at the end '
of that album that I didn't want to express, I just
wanted to explore."
For more sights and sounds jrom Ian William Craig,
visit: ianunlliamcraig.com photos by
ANDREW TOPALOV
lettering by
ALEXHEILBRON
WATERMELON
by ALEX
DEBOER
^^^K'genre tag on Watermelon's Band-
^^^^^e is pop. Not low-fi, or dream pop, or
^^^^palthough those descriptions would
j|jj|||t as well. This trio defines itself with one
■Hfcthjree-letter word. It's an umbrella term
that shelters a wide range of musical qualities.
Under this arch of clever and crass tunes, Watermelon brings intelligence to musical accessibility. Their seemingly effortless sound reminds
listeners that the magic of good pop can be at
the same time simple, and filled with substance.
I sit in Milano Coffee on West 8th with
Akanee Yamaki (drummer) and Thom Lougheed
(guitar/vocals) of Watermelon. The cafe's wide
glass windows present John Rogers Parkas the
autumn backdrop to our conversation. With the
sun colouring a formerly dreary afternoon, conditions are ideal to discuss pop music's warm
charm with two experts on the subject.
Yamaki, Lougheed, and bassist Sophie
Sweetland (absent at the interview) have
earned Watermelon a pat-on-the-back reputation for performing exceptionally enjoyable
tunes over the past three years. Corresponding
with their self-imposed pop identity and
cheerful green and pink title, Watermelon has
a summery appeal, which is also overwhelmingly visual. In fact, most of Watermelon's
ocular tunes follow a formula that uses foggy
vocals, almost thick enough to see. Amidst the
words, Yamaki's drum beat flips like a picture
book, while guitar notes sketch riffs in animated sequence. Referencing one the band's
most celebrated songs, "How I Came," I ask
"MArUfelG SOMETHING
GOOfMTHW'S SIMPLE
IS HA&dpGAUSE
THERE'S Hi REALLY
MUCH THERETO
COWER UP WHAT'S BAD
ABOUT IT."
Lougheed of the pop paradox: is it difficult to
write something simple?
His immediate answer is yes. His more
gradual explanation is that, "A lot of well constructed pop music is not as simple as you
think." Yamaki adds. "Making something good
that's simple is hard, because there's not really
much there to cover up what's bad about it." For
Watermelon, the lesson is to avoid over analyzing songs while writing them. Lougheed gives
an example ofhis own song writing process.
"Sometimes I'll try to break a song down to
just four cords in a pleasing order." Although
once and a while, four cords can seem excessive. "How I Came" achieves perfection with
just two. An qde to the Spunky Onions song
"How I Lost My Virginity," this minimalist
tune is an example of just how alluring the
uncomplicated can sound. 1
Of course Watermelon has catalogued
many other tunes since forming in 2009. As a
live band, they are prolific in the city, although
there is little recorded evidence to back this up.
Yamaki confesses, "We haven't been on tour,
we have one split, we don't even have a proper
EP. It would be really nice to get something out
there." No longer limiting themselves to wishful thinking, Watermelon is now in the process of ticking off ±ose shortcomings. After a
brief hiatus, their goal now is to finish recording their first full length album. Working with
a friend at Nimbus, the album is partially complete, though frozen until their schedules align.
Once things get rolling, Watermelon will also
release a cassette with Green Burrito. "We're
just regrouping at the moment," Yamaki says.
In this case, regrouping will not mean reassembling Watermelon exactly as itwas. Recent
jam sessions with Bobby Siadat (drummer
in Weed) have taken on more serious connotations. As it stands, Yamaki and Lougheed
anticipate Siadat's inclusion as Watermelon's
fourth member, and second guitarist. Although
pleased with the current instrument arrangement, Lougheed is open to change. "When you
have more people it's a lot harder to be organized, but it also kind of frees you up musically." Yamaki agrees, "It's also nice to have
more people to bounce ideas off of. We're all
really good friends and we spend a lot of time
together, so it's good to have somebody else
who's outside of that."
Placing such value on objectivity makes
sense when you realize how close Watermelon
has become over the years. All three members
grew up in White Rock and have been close
friends since high school graduation. When
asked about their most memorable experiences with the band, there's a long pause. "We
all hang out a lot of the time, so things are
casual" Yamaki reasons. Lougheed laughs "if we
had toured more we might have road stories."
Almost a road story, Yamaki eventually recalls a
set they played at Sled Island this summer. "A
girl came up to us and was like 'it's so great that
you have girls in your band! I didn't know that
you were allowed to be in a band if you were a
girl!'" Lougheed comments, "I was pretty taken
aback by that."
We all laugh about Watermelon's feminist
crusade in Alberta. Hopefully when the album is
released, they'll send a few copies to Calgary.
Check out Watermelon's summery sounds and jree
downloads at iuatermelon.bandcamp.com txptm rnrooim ay-.      'm
GEOFF M'-CANN     ,     f
PAXTON8RUNET
& CHADWOODUY
?*3<2^
* CALL FOR ANAPPOIHTMENT:
(778) 3^5084
3377 rmsFiMnaT * Vancouver Canada vsv 4a * tomwmtimcrmoo.coi« OLD TRADITIONS,   by MARK
NEW VALUES        PAULHUS
photos by
HANA PESUT
lettering by
JONATHAN DY
On a crisp October night, I wander the haunted
streets of Railtown, guided by the ghosts of Vancouver punk rock past towards a mysterious
unmarked door where I meet one of the city's
most vital new bands, the New Values. Armed
with a pen, a notebook, and a six pack of honey
lager, I hope to pry some truth out of this mysterious group whose various conflicting social
media bios describe them as everything from
a manufactured boy band to a long lost '70s
American rock group. As I suspected, none of
these men are visibly related to Donnie Whal-
berg, and none of them remotely old enough to
have even been able to hold a guitar in the '70s
let alone record a cannon of albums.
Under the light of the bustling Port of
Vancouver we make our friendly introductions,
and within moments if s evident that we share a
passion for everything punk rock. The conversation turns to his majesty Iggy Pop when we
are drowned out by the rumble and whisde of a
passing train, prompting us to move inside and
start talking about the New Values. ™* iillllilllllilli
-Ryanll||l tdfi»?|Mam Sabla (guitar/
vocals), and Hayz Fisher (bass/vocals) are a
humble trio who proudly call Vancouver home.
Kicking around the scene for a number of.
years, they have all played in, "so many bands it
'doesn't matter," says Sabla, modestly forgetting
to mention that the three of them also round
out the current line up of Vancouver legends the
Modernettes. Joining forces casually as in the
summer of 2008, the trio were just a group of
guys who would get together on evenings, ride
their bikes, crack some beers, and play some
music for no one but themselves. Their only
goal was—and still is—to play the songs faster
than the last time. In this casual atmosphere,
they easily managed to compile a handful of
concise, tight, and mostimportandy, fast songs
they enjoy playing with not just because they are
friends, but because they genuinely like each
others music.
When it finally came time to make an album,
the New Values did it the same way they seem to
do everything: completely d.i.y. "The only thing
we didn't do is cut the grooves in that wax," says
Sabla (they enlisted John Golden (Dinosaur Jr.,
Sonic Youth) for vinyl mastering). They kept the
whole process close to home, commissioning
their friend, local artist, and filmmaker, Owen
Ellis to design the sleeve, and Adam Veenendaal,
sound wizard who worked with You Say Party!
and Adjective, to digitally master the album.
The band even has the periodical Sunday night
conjures up names like Bad Brains, the Stooges,
and the Buzzcocks all at once. Moreover, the
eleven breakneck tracks on their debut are
cinched together in an airtight production package that was noticeably inspired by the recordings early New York punks, Television.
,   According to the band, their songwriting process is painless. They have been playing together
for so long that when one member has an idea,
the others run with it almost immediately. The lyrics, however, have always been more of an afterthought. With songs that average 45 seconds to
a minute-and-a-half, there isn't much time to
dig into a subject, and the band's general spirit
doesn't lend to anything overly deep. There is a bit
of socio-political commentary here and there in
songs like "Straight Line" and even in their satirical look at social media "Facebook Breakup." For
the most part the New Values are pretty light-
hearted. They just play good, fast music, and have
a blast doing it.
The New Values are very proud of their city's
punk heritage, and are excited to carry on the tradition. They admire classic Vancouver bands like
THERE IS A BIT OF SOCIO-POLITICAL COMMENTARY HERE AND THERE IN SONGS LIKE
"STRAIGHT LINE" AND EVEN IN THEIR SATIRICAL LOOK AT SOCIAL MEDIA "FACEBOOK BREAKUP."
that reflect their ferocious appetite for classic
punk rock in all its diversity.
The New Values first and foremost play
music just for the sake of playing music and
hanging out. Booking shows has never been
their priority. Itwas Ryan Dyck, vocalist for the
B-Lines, who liking what he heard, first encouraged them to join in on a bill. Since then, the
New Values have been blasting out time triallike sets regularly in Vancouver's ever changing rotation of legitimate and not-so-legitimate
venues. They are genuinely excited and proud
to be a part of such a supportive and vibrant
scene that is full of like-minded bands like the
B-lines, the Defektors, and Juvenile Hall. Bands
craft circle whenever they need to screen print a
few more sleeves (and bake a few pies).
They began by recording a couple of demos,
but were unhappy with the result (the tempo
was too slow), so the band hit the jam space
and played a pile of shows before booking a studio. Seeing as Fisher is a hot commodity in the
recording scene in Vancouver these days (and
has access to some fantastic studios), it only
made sense for him to do triple duty playing the
bass, working the board, and mixing the album.
The band got to work, pounding out an LP in a
mere two days.
The record roots itself deeply in punk's
furious source. The New Values' sound
the Subhumans, U-J3RK5, the Pointed Sticks and,
of course, the Modernettes. Most of all, they're
truly informed by the Young Canadians; a similarly
talented powerhouse trio who were also very conscious of the possibilities of manipulating musical
space to create a richer sound and were also capable of blowing the roof off any live venue in town.
So far the New Values are on the right track,
and with a rock-solid album, a split seven-inch
with the Defektors hot on its heels, and a herd of
shows played, they won't be slowing down anytime soon.
The New Values play Nouember a at Funkt/'s and
Nouember 24 at the Astoria. Hold onto your hearts ladies and gentlemen,
because d.i.y. nerd-rocker Michael Elder is here
to steal them away. At 19, the Prince George import
already has a quintuplet of albums to his musical
alias, the Speechless Radio. What started out as
a solo—in his parents' basement—project has
flourished over the years and has more recentiy
begun steering towards becoming a full-fledged
group endeavour.
While nursing matching hangovers, I met with
Elder to share a pair of Cambie all-day breakfasts
and discuss the musical transition that followed
high school, collaborating with other musicians
on his upcoming album, and who his harshest,
or most valuable critics are.
"I came up with [the band name] during a
period when I was really into Radiohead," Elder
says between sips of morning beer. "I liked the
idea of contradictions and wanted a 'The' name."
The aforementioned time period was high school.
At the time, Elder was one part of a three-piece
band, but the ensemble fizzled out He continued
creating music independently.
"I would just write lyrics and make music,
but I wouldn't show anyone. It was mostly about
stuff like love, because that was around the
time that I started experiencing those, kinds of
relationships."
The first era of Elder tracks focused almost
exclusively on discovering the body's finer muscle
tissues, the heart, and what happens when those
tissues are torn apart. With that, a soundtrack of
solace was created: the Speechless Radio's first
album, 2010's Loue Songs in Stereo. But Elder had
enough leftover material to make More Spngs in
Mono, in the same month—both of which were
recorded and produced by Elder himself.
But after Loue Songs... and More Songs... were
released, Elder traded in the ballads about puppy
love for a beard and an emerging sense of maturity,
and chose to view end of relationships as opportunities for personal growth instead of self-pity.
With each project, Elder has become more musically fluent and complex. On this summer's Made of
Wood, you'll find mandolin, ukulele, and trumpet
added to the roster. "Both of my parents are musicians, so all of these instruments are just lying
around the house. I figured I might as well learn to
play them." The album shifts focus from romantic
relationships towards the concept of home and
where that is for some people.
And it looks like it's a focus that people are
enjoying. The Speechless Radio's Facebook page
alone has over 10,000 likes. "I'd send out my
songs to dozens of music blogs and get maybe
two responses. But the responses that I did get have
actually been good, so that's exciting!"
To Elder, making music is mostly about reciprocating what the art has done for him. "When I
think about all of the bands that I love and respect
and how they've inspired me, it just motivates me
even more. That's why all of my stuff is available
for free online. I want to have this music out there
for people to share and enjoy."
While influences include the Antlers, the
Magnetic Fields, Dan Mangan, and more recently,
Bruce Springsteen, Elder still cites Weezer as his
main muse because, "They do their best to put out
an album [every two years], but also because they're
not cool, you know? They're pretty big musicians,
but they're still kind of just nerds."
Next up is Care, due out at the beginning of 2013,
which marks the dawn of collaboratingwith other
musicians, including his twin brother, Jordan. "I
used to keep my music to myself, but then I felt
like I needed to push for something bigger, and I
started to share my music with my brother. Itwas
great because he'd just be viciously honest and
be-like, 'That sucks,' and we'd work from there
to make it better." The younger Elder was able to
provide the type of brutally honest feedback that
only a family member can.
But not everyone featured on Care shares a name
with Elder. Musicians like Indra Egan, Sarah Davy,
and Nathan Kelly, also contributed, and while adding other creative minds to a solo project can sometimes cause conflict, Elder felt the transition Was
seamless. Though Care hasn't even made its way
to the masses yet, Elder is making plans for what
the follow up will be. The focus at the moment is
to expand the ranks of the Speechless Radio into a
full-on band so that more songs can be performed
live instead just on Elder's bedroom floor via various
takes and over-dubbing. Until then though, he'll
just keep doing what he enjoys doing most: writing
music.
"It's funny," Elder says about the confusing
logistics behind songwriting, "I come up with all
of my best music when I have no time for music
It always comes to me when I'm busy cramming
for an exam or in class. When I'm home for the
summer and have all this free time, that's when
I come up with the crap. It might be because if s
forced, but I don't know."
Want more Speechless Radio?
Visit soundcloud.com/thespeechlessradio to listen and
download more! In 1983 Mike Mines and Jennifer
Fahrni published the jirst issue of
Discorder. In part three of our trip down
memory lane in eager anticipation of
Discorder's 30th birthday, we pay a
special tribute to CiTR's colourful history/or its 75th birthday this month.
Sex!
Drugs!
"Dead Air!"
Thirteen years after the Great
CiTR Porn Incident, DISCORDER
tries to find out what really
happened on that wild and crazy
night in the summer of 1999.
by DUNCAN
MCHUGH
illustration by
MICHAEL SHANTZ
"Don't worry. We've changed
the couches."
No matter who I heard tell the story of the Great
CiTR Porn Incident of'99, they always closed
with that line. Itwas a dubious reassurance
about the hygiene of the furniture in Radio Hell,
CiTR's lounge, where I had always been told the
incident took place.
And I had heard many people tell it. Shortly
after it happened in June 1999, landing on the
front page of UBC's student paper, the Ubyssey,
in August 1999, the incident began to take on
mythic status within CiTR folklore.
Like any myth, there are many variations on
a theme: live sex, broadcast on the airl Some
say a host had been involved, others say there
was an orgy in the lounge. Daliah Merzaban,
reporting for the Ubyssey, gives us the only official account of what took place. "Dead Air" was
a late night show co-hosted by Barb, Sarah, and
Katie, who also made up the band Full Sketch.
They began their June 12,1999, episode with
promises that they would be broadcasting
live sex. At 3:30 a.m. .they did just that, the act
reportedly being videotaped as well, for "documentary purposes," as one of the hosts put it
Although there were no complaints from
listeners, AMS Security complained to station
staff that a number of unauthorized people had
entered the studio. That led to an investigation,
which resulted in the cancellation of the show
and the indefinite suspension of the three hosts.
As there were no official complaints, the logger
tape of the broadcast was destroyed after the
mandatory 30-day period (a condition of CiTR's THOSE WHO HAVE SEEN IT SAY THAT
IT IS PRETTY UNSEXY. THE MALE
CO-STAR IS RUMORED TO HAVE DONE
ECSTASY BEFORE HIS MOMENT IN
THE SPOTLIGHT AND WAS UNABLE TO
PERFORM HIS ROLE.
FM license), and a shredded videotape, reportedly the only extant copy of the events of that I
night, was given to station staff.
The videotaping had not been merely archival. It was meant to be a part of a film. In an era
when even Hulk Hogan has a sex tape and the
Internet makes porn videos readily accessible, it
can be easy to forget how sensationalistic this
was 13 years ago. Filmed porn was mostly seen
on VHS tape and the means of film production
were not so easy to come by as they are now.
This production took a concerted effort.
This may not come as a surprise, but getting people to discuss their secret porn past
can be tricky. No one I spoke to wanted to
be on the record, if they got back to me at all.
The director, an aspiring would-be maven
who went by the pseudonym Dusty Chinook,
is—by all reports and a casual perusal ofhis
Facebook page—a happily married TV editor
living in eastern Canada. He did not reply to
multiple interview requests.
The hosts have gone on to success as an
artist, journalist, and lead singer in a moody
new wave band, respectively. Even those who
listened to the broadcast or have seen the tape
didn't really want their name involved. In an
age before Twitter and Facebook began indexing the minutiae of youthful indiscretion, those
who were involved are able to keep their hijinx
under wraps.
So what do we know?
Well, for one, the shoot didn't take place
in the lounge, so no need to have ever worried
about those couches. One CiTR old-timer tells
me that photos taken during the shoot place it
in the old record library, now Studio A, a.k.a.
fmbyssey
Porn incident hits CiTR radio
the on-air studio. The
source told me that he
had seen the photos when
they were used to illustrate an erotic story about
a San Francisco DJ and
his neurotic girlfriend. He
was sure that he had seen
it on About.com or Ask.com, an improbable
place and one that neither he nor I were able
to find again.
There's also the matter of the destroyed
master tape.
I've heard of secret screenings of the tape
that took place in the years after the shoot. I was
given a lead on a former CiTR member, a reclusive artist known for an interest in linguistics,
that some say may have a copy. He never replied
to my Facebook messages.
Those who have seen it say that it is pretty
unsexy. The male co-star is rumored to have
done ecstasy before his moment in the spotlight and was unable to perform his role. Some
say a cameraman gallantly stepped up to ensure
the show went on. The female co-star wore a
blonde wig with bangs, looking the very picture
of late '90s chic.
And I've heard that the videotape wasn't the
only record of the events of that night: CiTR's
station security camera also caught the action
and was used as evidence when the hosts tried
to pass off the stunt as having faked. As far as
anyone knows, those tapes were recorded over.
While I wasn't a part of CiTR back then, I
was a listener of the station and an active
reader of Discorder, and I certainly heard about
the Great CiTR Porn Incident. At the time, the
Student loans now subject to credit checks
T Ubyssey article, Tuesday, August 17,1999.
station was preparing for a referendum asking
students for more funding, and there's nothing
like the words "porn scandal" to throw administrators into fits of consternation.
Now, with that and subsequent referen-
dums successful, I think most people at the
station look back on what happened with
amusement While I certainly wouldn't say
the events of that night inspired me to get
involved in the station, it did instill in my
mind a notion that CiTR was a wild and unpredictable place; a place for misfits and weirdos;
a place where anything could happen, even
those things that really probably shouldn't
happen. Even at 3:30 a.m. in the morning. m
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o CiTR 101.9 FM PROGRAM GUIDE
DISCORDER SUGGESTS LISTENING TO CiTR ONLINE AT WWW.CiTR.CA EVERY DAY.
SUN
MON
TUES
WED
THURS
FRI
SAT
1111111111111
6am
7
CiTR Ghost Mix
Pacific Pickin' (Roots)
CiTR Ghost M
CiTR Ghost Mix
^^Sk Ghost Mix
Toss God
Some Donuts
Tweets & Tunes
| j    Friday Sunrise
(Eclectic)
8
Breakfast With The Browns
(Eclectic)
Queer FM Vancouver-s"
Reloaded
(Talk)
Suburban jungle
(Eclectic)
End of the World News
(Talk)
Radio Nezate
(Eritrian)
9
Classical Chaos
(Classical)
Alternative Radio
I
The Saturday Edge
(RootsF
iBIillllll
10
Shookshookta (Talk)
Pop Drones
(Eclectic).'
Rocket from Russia
(Punk)
Sounds of the Cjff
(Eclectic)
Sup World?
(Eclectic)
11
Ska-T's Scenic Drive
Relentlessly Awesome
Stereo Blues
(Blues/Eclectic)
Morning After Show
(Eclectic)
Student Special Hour
(Eclectic)
12
Synch r^ifcity (Talk)
Duncan's Donuts .
(Eclectic)
It Ain't Easy Bemg Green
||      (Eclectic)
Generation
Annihilation (Punk)
1
The Rockers Show
(Reggae)
Parts Unknown (Pop)
Mantis Cabinet
Terry Project
Podcast (Talk)
Democracy
*Mm (Talk)
Student Fill-in Slot
Student Fill-in Slot
Power Chord (Metal)
2
Mind Voyage (Eclectic)
Extraenvironmentalist
(Talk)
Ink Studs (Talk)
Radio Zero (Dance)
3
Blood On
The Saddle
(Roots)
Shake A
Tail Feather
'{ggiiffi&B)
The All Canadian
Farm Show
Programming Training
Butta on
the Bread
Programming Training
Cade Blue (Roots)	
Discorder Radio
Thunderbird Eye
Nardwuar Presents
(Nardwuar)
4
The Leo Ramirez Show
(World)
Sne!waylti
Mantra
(Eclectic) ~
Programming Training
5
Chips
(Pop)
Student
Fill-in Slot
News 101 (Talk)
The City
Arts Report (Talk)
Campus Lectures
(Talk)
News 101 (Talk)
Simorgh
6
So Salauatis
(Electro/Hip Hop)
Sore Throats, Clapping
Hands (Rogue Folk,
Indie S/S)
Flex Your Head
(Hardcore)
Arts Report Extra
UBC Arts Report
Are You
Aware
(Eclectic)
Peanut Butter 'n' Jams
(Eclectic)
Stranded
(Eclectic)
Nasha Volna (World)
Sam-
squantch
(Eel)
Student
Fill-in Slot
7
More Than Human
(Electronic/Experimental)
La fiesta (World)
Exploding Head Movies
(Cinematic)
Stereoscopic Redoubt
(Experimental)
African Rhythms
'-'(Staid)
8
Rhythms
(World)
Techno
Progressive
• Inside Out-
(Dane<$-
Folk Oasis (Roots)
Student
fitl-mSlot
9
Bootlegs & B-Sides
(Dance/Electronic)
,,C,times And Treasons
(Hip-hop)
Live From Thunderbird
Radio Hell {\miy;
The Bassment
(Dance/Electronic)
Synaptic Sandwich
(Dance/E!ectromc/;«|g
Eclectic)
'10
Transcendance
(Dance)
£
The Jazz Show (Jazz)
Sexy In MjD% (Talk)
Student Fill-in Slot
11
Student Fill-in Slot
Hans Kloss Misery Hour
(HansHioss)
Funk My Life
(Soul/Dance)
Randophonic (Eclectic)
12
CiTR Ghost Mix
Canada Post-Rock (Rock)
Siifal Tentacles
(Eclectic)
The Vampire's Ball
(Industrial)
CiTR Ghost Mix
1
CiTR Ghost Mix
CiTR Ghost Mix
2
The Absolute Value of
Insomnia (Generative)
3
5
CiTR Ghost Mix
6am
7
8
9
mm
10
11
12
1
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
1
mm
2
3
4
5
22 SUNDAY
CLASSICAL CHAOS
(Classical) S-lQam
From the Ancient World to the 21st
century, join host Marguerite in
exploring and celebrating classical
music from around the world.
SHOOKSHOOKTA
(Talk) 10am-12pm
A program targeted to Ethiopian
people that encourages education
and personal development.
iTOoHsHOw
(Reggae) 12-3pm
Reggae inna all styles and
fashion.
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
(Roots) 3-5pm
Alternating Sundays
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-boots
country.
iKIStli|8BB
(Soul/R&B)3-5pm
Alternating Sundays
The finest in classic soul and
rhythm & blues from the late '50s
to the early 70s, including lesser
known artists, regional hits and
lost soul gems.
{Pop) 5-6pm
Alternating Sundays
British pop music from all decades.
International   pop  (Japanese,
French, Swedish, British, US, etc.),
'60s soundtracks and lounge.
(World)8-9pm
Alternating Sundays
Featuring a wide range of music
from India, including popular
music from the 1930s to the present; Ghazals and Bhajans, Qaw-
walis, pop and regional language
numbers.
(Dance) 8-9pm
Alternating Sundays
A mix of the latest house music,
tech-house,   prog-house   and
techno.
BOOTLEGS & B-SIDES
(Dance/Electronic) 9-10pm
TRANCENDANCE
(Dance) 10pm-12am
Hosted by DJ Smiley Mike and DJ
Caddyshack, Trancendance has
been broadcasting from Vancouver, B.C. since 2001. We favour
Psytrance, Hard Trance and Epic
Trance, but also play Acid Trance,
Deep Trance, Hard Dance and even
some Breakbeat. We also love a
good Classic Trance Anthem, especially if it's remixed. Current influences include Sander van Doom,
Gareth Emery, Nick Sentience,
Ovnimoon, Ace Ventura, Save the
Robot, Liquid Soul and Astrix. Older
influences include Union Jack,
Carl Cox, Christopher Lawrence,
Whoop! Records, Tidy Trax, Plati-
pus Records and Nukleuz. Email:
djsmileymike ©trancendance.net.
Website: www.trancendance.net.
MONDAY
TOSS GOD SOME DONUTS
(Talk& Tunes) kZO-tam
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROW
(Eclectic) 8-1 lam
Your   favourite   Brownsters,
James and Peter, offer a savoury
blend sf the familiar and exotic
in a blend of aural delights.
breakfastwiththebrowns®
hotmail.com.
SKA-T'SSCENIC! DRIVE
fSteJllam-12pm
SYNCHRONTciTY
(Talk) 12-lpm
Join host Marie B and discuss spirituality, health and feeling good.
Tune in and tap into good vibrations
that help you remember why you're
here: to have fun!
PARTS UNKNOWN
(Pop) l-3pm
An indie pop show since 1999, it's
like a marshmallow sandwich: soft
and sweet and best enjoyed when
poked with a stick and held close
to a fire.
MAacmoiANFARMl;¥ow''''
(Po/j;3-4pm
The All Canadian Farm Show cultivates new and old indie jams from
across genres and provinces. Tune
in to hear the' a fresh crop of CiTR
volunteers take you on a musical
cross-country road trip!
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
(World) ^m
The best of mix of Latin American
music, leoramirez@canada.com
NEWS i 01
(Talk)S-fym
Vancouver's only live, volunteer-
produced, student and community
newscast. Every week, we take
a look back at the week's local,
national and international news,
as seen from a fully independent
media perspective.
SORETHROArs! CLAPPING HANDS
(Rogue Folk, Indie S/S) 6-7:30pm
Lyric Driven Campfire Inspired:
Playing Acoustic Punk, Anti-Folk,
Alt-Country, etc. Tune in for live
acts, ticket giveaways and interviews, but mostly it's just music.
Submit to: music@sorethroat-
sclappinghands.com. Find us on
Facebook!
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
(Cinematic) 7:30-9pm
Join gak as he explores music from
the movies, tunes from television
and any other cinematic source,
along with atmospheric pieces, cut
ting edge new tracks and strange
old goodies that could be used in
a soundtrack to be.
fHrjAZZSHOW
(Jazz) 9pm-12am
Vancouver's longest running
prime-time jazz program. Hosted
by Gavin Walker. Features at 11pm.
Nov. 5: Cannonball Adderley and Bill
Evans:"Know What I Mean?" Nov
12: Rahsaan Roland Kirk with Elvin
Jones and Jaki Byard: "Rip, Rig and
Panic!" Nov 19: The Stan Kenton
Orchestra:"Cuban Fire". Kenton's
Best! Nov.26: The Toshiko Mariano
Quartet with alto saxophone master
Charlie Mariano.
CANADA POST-ROCK
(Rock) 12-lam
Formerly on CKXU, Canada Post-
Rock now resides on the west coast
but it's still committed to the best
in post-rock, drone, ambient,
experimental, noise and basically
anything your host Pbone can put
the word "post" in front of.
TUESDAY
PACIFIC PICKIN'
(Roots) b-Zam
Bluegrass,   old-time   music,
and its derivatives with Arthur
and the lovely Andrea Berman.
pacificpickin@yahoo.com
QUEERFM
VANCOUVER: RELOADED
(7a//rJ8-10:30am
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian,
bisexual and transexual communities of Vancouver. Lots of human
interest features, background on
current issues and great music.
queerfmradib@gmail.com
SUPWORLD?
ffc/ecf/c;i0:30-ll:30am
Fuzzy and sweet, a total treat! Tune
in to hear the latest and greatest
tracks from independent and Vancouver bands.
MORNING AFTER SHOW
(Eclectic) ll:30am-lpm
An eclectic mix of Canadian indie
with rock, experimental, world, reggae, punk and ska from Canada,
Latin America and Europe. Hosted
by Oswaldo Perez Cabrera.
MANflSMBiNET
(Eclectic) l-2pm
MINDVOYAGE
(Eclectic) 2-3pm
Mind Voyage presents cosmic tones
of celestial counterpoint on CiTR!
Experience weekly encounters of
synth, ambient, witchy and new
classical items in a one-hour with
DJ Tall Jamal.
PROGRAMMING TRAINING
(Talk) 3-3:30pm
DISCORDER RADIO
(Junes) 3:30-4pm
Alternating Wednesdays
Discorder Magazine now has its
own radio show! Join us to hear
excerpts of interviews, reviews
and more!
THECITY
(Ta/W5-6pm
An alternative and critical look
at our changing urban spaces.
New website: www.thecityfm.org.
New twitter handle: @thecity_fm.
FLEX YOUR HEAD
(Hardcore) 6-8 pm
Punk rock and hardcore since 1989.
Bands and guests from around the
world.
INSIDE OUT
(Dance) 8-9pm
CRIMES & TREASONS
(Hip-hop) S-llpm
crimesandtreasons@gmail.com
WEDNESDAY
TWEETS & TUNES
(Weiv;6:30-8am
We practice what we Tweet!
Showcasing local indie music and
bringing bands, artists and fans
together through social media. Website: tweetsandtunes.com Twitter-,
©tweetsandtunes.
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
(Tc/ecf/c; 8-10am
Live from the Jungle Room, join radio
host Jack Velvet for an eclectic mix of
music, sound bites, information and
inanity, dj@jackvelvet.net.
POPDRONES
(£c/ecf/c; 10-ll:30am
STUDENT SPECIAL HOW
(Eclectic) 11:30- lpm
Various members of the CiTR's
student executive sit in and host
this blend of music and banter
about campus and community
news, arts and pop culture. Drop
ins welcome!
Tiiilrii^EiliiH^TI
(Talk) 1-2 pm
Alternating Wednesdays
There once was a project named
Terry, That wanted to make people
wary, Of things going on In the world
that are wrong without making it all
seem too scary.
DEMOCRACY NOW
(TaWl-2pm
Alternating Wednesdays
extraenS
(Talk) 2-tym
Exploring the mindset of an
outsider looking in on Earth.
Featuring interviews with leading
thinkers in the area of sustainable
economics and our global ecological crisis.
SO SALACIOUS
(Electro/Hip Hop) 3-4pm
Skadz and Sprocket Doyle bring you
Electro Swing, Alternative Hip Hop,
Dubstep, Acid Jazz, Trip Hop, Local
and Canadian Content-good and
dirty beats,
SNE'WAYLH
(New) 4-5pm
In many Coast Salish dialects,
"sne'waylh" is the word for
teachings or laws. The aboriginal language-learning program
begins with the teachings of the
skwxwu7mesh snichim (Squamish
language). Originally aired on Coop
Radio CFRO 100.5 FM in Vancouver,
Tuesdays 1-2 p.m.
ARTS REPORT
(Talk)S-Bpm
Reviews, interviews and coverage
of local arts (film, theatre, dance,
visual and performance art, comedy
and more) by host Maegan Thomas
and the Arts Reporters.
ARTSREmfB{lRfr
(TaW6-6:30pm
Alternating with UBC Arts Report
Stay tuned after the Arts Report for
Arts Extra! Interviews, documentaries and artsy stuff that doesn't fit
into CiTR's original arts hour.
UBC ARTS REPORT
r7aW6-6:30pm
Alternating with Arts Report Extra
Ira Nadel, UBC English, offers scintillating profiles and unusual interviews with members of the UBC Arts
world. Tune in for programs, people
and personalities in Arts.
SAMSQUANTCH'S HIDEA^WW
(Eclectic) 6:30-8pm
Alternating Wednesdays
All-Canadian music with a focus
on indie-rock/pop. anitabinder®
hotmaii.com
FOLK OASIS
(Roots) %-\0\>m
Two hours of eclectic folk/roots
music, with a big emphasis on our
local scene. C'mon in! Akumbaya-
free zone since 1997. folkoasis®
gmail.com
sixlriNVAFcir?"
(Talk) lQ-Upm
Your weekly dose of education
and entertainment in the realm
of relationships and sexuality.
sexyinvancity.com/category/sexy-
in-vancity-radio
HANS KLOSS'MISERY HOUR
(Hans Kloss) llpm-lam.
Pretty much the best thing on
radio.
THURSDAY
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
(Talk) 8- 10am
23 ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
(Punk) 10-llam
Punk rock, indie pop and whatever else I deem worthy. Hosted
by a closet nerd. http=//www.
weallfalldowncitr.blogspot.ca
RELENTLESSLY AWESOME
llam-12pm
Vancouver's got a fever, and the only
prescription is CiTR's "Relentlessly
Awesome." Each and every week,
Jason attempts to offer adrenaline-
pumping, heart-stopping, hands-
over-the-eyes suspense. He is a fan
of various genres, and a supporter
of local music.
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
Eclectic) 12-lpm
Sweet treats from the pop underground. Hosted by Duncan, sponsored by donuts. http://duncans
donuts.wordpress.com
iNKsYubs
(Talk) 2-3pm
Underground and indie comix. Each!
week, we interview a different cre-
atorto get their unique perspective
on comix and discuss their upcoming works.
THUNDERBIRD EYE
(Sports/3:30-4pm
Your weekly roundup of UBC Thunderbird sports action from on campus and off with your host Wilson
Wong.
MANTRA
(Eclectic) 4-5 pm
Kirtan, Mantra, Chanting and
Culture. There's no place like Om.
Hosted by Raghunath with special
guests. Email: mantraradioshow®
gmail.com. Website: mantraradio.
co. Genre: World.
CMPls LECTURES
(TaW 5-6 pm
Lectures on and around campus are
recorded all throughout the year,
bringing a wide array of topics and
disciplines to radio.
AREYOUAWARE
(Eclectic) Alternating Thursdays
6-7:30pm
Celebrating the message behind
the music: Profiling music and
musicians that take the route of
positive action over apathy.
PEANUT BUTTER'N' JAMS
(Eclectic) Alternating Thursdays
6-7:30pm
Explore local music and food with
your hosts, Brenda and Jordie. You'll
hear interviews and reviews on eats
and tunes from your neighbourhood,
and a weekly pairing for your date
calendar.
STEREOSCOPIC REDOUBT
(Experimental) 7:30-9pm
LiVEFROM™^
RADIO HELL
(Live Music) 9-\l<pm
Featuring live band(s) every week
performing in the CiTR Lounge.
Most are from Vancouver, but
sometimes bands from across
the country and around the world.
September 6: Movieland. September
20: Pleasure Cruise.
FUNKMYLIFE
(Soul/Dance) llpm-12am
Grooving out tunes with a bit of soul
and a lot of funk, from the birth of
rhythm and blues to the golden age
of motown, to contemporary dance
remixes of classic soul hits.
AURAL TENTACLES
(Eclectic) 12-6am
It could be global, trance, spoken
jWKrd^vopk, the unusual and the
weird, or it could be something
different. Hosted by DJ Pierre.
auraltentacles@hotmail.com
FRIDAY SUNRISE
f£c/ecf/c; 7:30-9am
An eclectic mix of indie rock, hip-
hop and reggae to bring you up with
the sun.
ALTERNATIVE RADIO
(Talk) 9-lOam
Hosted by David Barsamian.
SOUNDS OF THE CITY
(Eclectic) 10-11 am
Promoting upcoming live concerts
and shows in Vancouver, be they
local, national, or international
acts.
STEREOBLUES
(Blues/Eclectic) llam-12pm
Every Friday host Dorothy Neufeld"
sinks into blues, garage and rock
n' roll goodies!
IT AIN'T EASY BEING GREEN
(Eclectic)12-lpm
CiTR has revived it's long-dormant
beginner's show It Ain't Easy Being
Green! With the support of experienced programmers, this show
offers funy-trained CiTR members,
especially students, the opportunity
to get their feet wet on the air.
RADIO ZERO
(Dance) 2-3-.ZQpm
An international mix of super-
fresh weekend party jams from
New Wave to foreign electro, baile,
Bollywood and whatever else.
www.radiozero.com
NARDWUAR
(Nardwuar) 3:30-5pm
Join Nardwuar the Human Serviette for Clam Chowder flavoured
entertainment. Doot doola doot
doo...doot doo! nardwuar®
nardwuar.com
NEWS101
(TaW5-6pm
See Monday for description.
mix of exciting sounds, past and
present, from his Australian homeland. And journey with him as he
features fresh tunes and explores
the alternative musical heritage
of Canada.
AFRICAN RHYHMS
(World) 7:3Q-%m
www.africanrhythmsradio.com
THEBASSMENT
(Dance/Electronic) 9-10:30pm
The Bassment is Vancouver's only
bass-driven radio show, playing
Glitch, Dubstep, Drum and Bass,
Ghetto Funk, Crunk, Breaks and UK
Funky, while focusing on Canadian
talent and highlighting Vancouver
DJs, producers and the parties they
throw.
THE VAMPIRE'S BALL
(Industrial) 12-4am
Industrial, electro, noise, experimental and synth-based music.
thevampiresball@gmail.com the-
vampiresballoncitr.com
SATURDAY
RADIO NEZATE
(Eritrian) 7-8am
STRANDED
(Eclectic) 6-7:30pm
Join your host Matthew for a weekly.
THE SATURDAY EDGE
(/?oote>>8am-12pm
A personal guide to world and roots
music—with African, Latin and
European music in the first half,
followed by Celtic, blues, songwriters, Cajun and whatever else fits!
steveedge3@mac.com
G^ENERATION ANNIHILA^
(Punk) 12-lpm
On the air since 2002,
playing old and new punk on
the non commercial side of the
spectrum. Hosts: Aaron Brown,
Jeff "The Foat" Kraft. Website:
www.generationannihilation.com.
Facebook: www.facebook.com/
generationannihilation".
POWERCHORD
(Metal) l-3pm
Vancouver's longest running metal
show. If you're into .music that's
on the heavier/darker side of the
spectrum, then you'll like it. Sonic
assault provided by Geoff, Marcia
and Andy.
CODEBLUE
(Roots) 3-5pm
From backwoods delta low-down
slide to urban harp honks, blues
and blues roots with your hosts
Jim, Andy and Paul, codeblue®
buddy-system.org
SIMORGH
(Education) 5-6pm
Simorgh Radio is devoted to the
education and literacy for the Persian speaking communities and
those interested in connecting to
Persian oral and written literature.
Simorgh takes you through a journey of ecological sustainability
evolving within cultural and social
literacy. Simorgh the mythological
multiplicity of tale-figures, lands-in
as your mythological narrator in the
storyland; the contingent space of
beings, connecting Persian peoples
within and to Indigenous peoples.
NASHAVOLNA
(World) %-lw
News, arts, entertainment and
music for the Russian community,
local and abroad, nashavolna.ca
lafTesta
(World)l-Spm
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue, Latin
House and Reggaeton with your
host GspotDJ.
MORE THAN HUMAN
(Electronic/Experimental) 8-9pm
Strange and wonderful electronic
sounds from the past, present and
future with host Gareth Moses.
Music from parallel worlds.
(Dance/Electronic) 9-11 pm
If you like everything from electro/
techno/trance/8-bit music/retro
'80s this is the show for you!
www.synapticsandwich.net
RANDOPHONIC
(£c/ec/-/cjllpm-2am
Randophonic is best thought of as
an intraversal jukebox which has
no concept of genre, style, political boundaries or even space-time
relevance. But it does know good
sounds from bad. Lately, the program has been focused on Philip
Random's All Vinyl Countdown
+ Apocalypse (the 1,111 greatest records you probably haven't
heard). And we're not afraid of
noise.
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF INSOMnTa
(Generative) 2am-6am
4 solid hours of fresh generative
music c/o the Absolute Value of
Noise and its world famous Generator. Ideal for enhancing your
dreams or, if sleep is not on your
agenda, your reveries. 2w ^^^^f^-'.kf-^./^K
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IPi                  ';f^ 7kS*&f4fi^ %;1!P             lit
Merlyn Chipman, Wrong Wave visuals
Sharona Franklin and Tanner Matt, Peace Library
mm
ART PROJECT
WRONG WAVE 2012
Wrong Wave 2012: Art Rock Believes in Reincarnation
revisits the tradition of art rock as an arena for the
creative engagement of music and visual art. This year,
the Wrong Wave program assembles a variety of
performances that exhibit the intersections in art and
music practices indicative of the collaborative and
discursive spirit of contemporary art and music. From
November 7-11, Wrong Wave 2012 will enact that
collaborative spirit through auditory and visual
experiences, conversations with artists and tapes. ••■♦ Merlyn Chipman, Wrong Wave visu;
^^^^^^^
Neu Balance, Wrong Wave visuals
Ronan Nanning-Watson and Stefana Fratila, Wrong Wave visuals
ART PROJECT
WRONG WAVE 2012
Aquarian Foundation, IX: C Sharona Franklin and Tanner Matt, Peace Library
Sharona Franklin and Tanner Matt, Peace Library UNDER REVIEW NOVEMBER 2012
JOHNNY DE COURCY
(Independent)
Think back to the years that filled
this early century and the music that
grazed the glossy pages of SPIN and
Q Magazine. Contemporary British
bands with matching haircuts and
men with the voices of lovely ladies,
that somehow made teenage girls
swoon. On Johnny De Courcy's self-
released Masters, my instinct is to
remember the days when I listened
to an identical sound by the Kooks
on repeat, five years ago.
I haven't heard a" band like this
since, and with good reason. De
Courcy's voice looms like a bored,
gloomier version ofLuke Pritchard's,
with an almost parallel accent The
tracks, mastered by Paul Gold
at Salt Mastering and recorded at
Bully's Studios, are flooded with
depressing lyrics, heavy pop-guitar, and theatrical drumbeats,
all flawlessly crisp and perfectly
mastered.
"Fade Away" gives the album
a sentimental, coastal, and
almost Celtic texture with wallowing lyrics and '70s inspired,
lingering guitar notes. The next
track, "Hello Goodbye," coinciden-
tally enough begins with a riffakin to
"Blackbird" by the Beatles. I actually
thought it was a bad cover with the
wrong name for the first few seconds.
Instead, it rolls into an irritatingly
bouncy and marginally tacky jumble
of a ditty.
However, when the redeeming
"Andreas Song" comes in, I can
imagine this track would take the
reins at a show and snap a drowsy-
eyed crowd into some ecstatic bobbing. But next, De Courcy's
winsome vocals meander back
in "Old Glass" with naked lyrics
and '90s pop-rock drums.
Each track mimics its predecessor, following the same
pattern with a sluggish beginning while flushing its way into
either a psychedelic trance or
a teen-angst rock out. It's difficult to determine what sound
the quartet were aiming for.
'90s MTV pop-rock? Washed-up
nu-metal? Pretty much anything but
solid, rooted, or good.
Overall, Masters is like a 12-tracked
mosaic of self-indulgent boy-next-
door pop, impeccably performed
instruments,jiatehy melodies, and
Brit-band influenced heartache. If
you're into the Kooks, give the album
a listen and you may just thoroughly
enjoy it. If not, save your ears the
trouble.
—Josefa Cameron
HAGGATHA
If the bands of Vancouver could be
personified as the residents of this
city, Destroyer is the fancy coffee
table and dinner party emptiness of
the Yaletown businessmen; ApoUo
Ghosts is the bright-eyed, ragged
exuberance of Commercial Drive
hipsters; and Nickelback, the Valium-
dulled, quiet desperation of Shaugh-
nessy soccer moms, then Haggatha is
the harrowed, bleak nihilism of the  I
downtown eastside.
The opener of the band's sec-  j
ond full-length, "Precession of the  ;
Equinox," and ±e following track,   j
"Codependence" share a similarly  i
grisly aesthetic to that of Coffinworm   I
or Lord Mantis, mapping the queasy,   !
churning discordance of black metal
onto the weighty stomp of sludge.
The rest of the album's first half delivers two more brutal, but relatively
concise tracks that seem to serve as
a primer for its centrepiece: the monstrous, almost twenty minute long
"Epoch."
Slowly building on a single clean
riff, the band wrings out every last
drop of sorrow from each chord
before finally crashing into distorted
oblivion. The track's strength is not
just in being loud and angry but in
translating a sense of despair, or
maybe even grief, into something that
is as poignant as it is powerful.
Although they've shown themselves to be fine purveyors of filth
since their debut, Haggatha hasn't
displayed a great deal of stylistic
development over their five years of
existence. But with each new release,
they've gradually honed their craft,
becoming more adept at using
both light and shade, abandon and
restraint.
Any band can sound heavy so
long^as they tune down low enough
and play slow enough, but on
Haggatha's latest release, through
gnarled riffs and tortured screams,
they have evoked such an ominous
atmosphere and a depth of drama
that they truly epitomize the notion
of heavy music.
—WillPedley
RATCHET ORCHESTRA
(Drip Audio)
Ratchet Orchestra's latest release
Hemlock, like its namesake, can be difficult to ingest. This Montreal based
collective of over 30 musicians present the listener with a fascinating yet
puzzling set of free form orchestra
jazz numbers. Recorded by Godspeed
You! Black Emperor bassist Thierry
Amar and produced by Nicolas
Caloia, Ratchet Orchestra blends a
variety of incongruent musical elements together with mixed results
as a listening experience.
"Winnow" eases the listener into
the album with its dreamy introduction, punctuated by a pair of masterfully executed saxophone and
trombone solos respectively. This
slow-burning cut is easily one of the
most sonically relaxed of the album.
The arrival of a jarring string movement is the track's only moment of
unease. Ratchet Orchestra generally
come off stronger on their shorter
compositions, particularly on "Yield,"
which bounces along in a stately manner on a rhythm infusing both elements of swing and waltz.
The longer, more improvisational
selections from Hemlock will likely be
the sticking point for many listeners
in terms of appreciating this album
as a complete experience. The loose
arrangements on tracks like "Dusty"
and "Safety" highlight different sections of the orchestra and to showcase
the undeniably impressive musical
talent at play here. What gets lost
in translation is a sense of purpose.
At their best, these free form sound
experiments can be mystifying in their
absurdity. At their worst, these tracks
can sound aimless, meandering, and
unnecessarily cacophonous.
Hemlock is an interesting listen to
be sure. There's enough going on to
keep one attentive to all the different
HEMLOCK instruments, moods, and rhythms
at play here. Its indulgences do add
up after a while, resulting in a somewhat uneven album as a whole. It's
not everyone's cup of tea, but it can
be said that Ratchet Orchestra are
definitely stretching and playing with
the boundaries and taboos of jazz and
orchestrated music.
—James Olson
DYLAN RYSSTAD
(Sakamano)
Dylan Rysstad, who was formerly
known as Dylan Danger from 2004
to 2010 during his time in Vancou
ver punk band the Jolts, and until
recently, as Dylan Thomas (his first
and middle names), has now released
solo album number five: Halfway
Houses. From his years spent living
and performing in Prince Rupert,
Vancouver, and Ontario, Rysstad has
accumulated some skilled musician
friends and contacts that perform on
and help record his albums. Halfway
Houses was recorded and mixed during
two sessions—in Welland, Ontario,
at Tapes and Plates, and in Vancouver
at Little Red Sounds studios.
Much of the album has a distinct country and folk-rock feel
to it. The pedal steel, organ, harmonica, mandolin, and banjo all
make appearances and Rysstad's
signature acoustic guitar work
lays a solid foundation. Opener
"The Great Wall" fits right in
with recordings by Blue Rodeo
or Tom Petty and influences like
Bob Dylan and Neil Young are
evident on slower songs like
"The Last Time You Looked," "Bora
Dyin'," and "Screaming Bloody
Murder" with its stripped-down six-
string and harmonica.
"Lennon Etc." has introspective
lyrics and guitar/piano parts that
sound in debt to classics like "Let It
Be," "Hey Jude," or "Karma Police."
Things get downright cheery
and jangly with "Tender Love (Turns
Tough)" and Rysstad's rock/punk
past life is hinted at with his own
Stooges-like electric guitar solo
and harmonica played by someone
simply named Burger on "If Only
for Tonight." "When in Rome" has
fuzzed bass and "whoah-oh-oh's,"
and hand-claps might be the only
missing thing. Although there are
often some obviously sad minor-
chord arrangements and country's
usual lyrical suspects—broken hearts,
broken-down vehicles, alcohol, rejection, self-pity, and general bad luck,
most of the songs still have an infectious youthful charm that doesn't
leave a listener feeling depressed.
Rysstad acknowledges personal woes
such as being lonely, stubborn, broke,
hard to love, and aimless while trying
to fit in somewhere, but he also gives
the impression that he has the ability
to escape (or change) if and when
things get worse.
Halfway Houses embraces those
times in life when there are feelings of
uncertainty and doubt and with a little
help from his friends, Rysstad has
successfully captured this in the form
of yet another good solo album.
—Andrew Beason
VBLANK ENTERTAINMENT
THE MUSIC OF RETRO CITY RAMPAGE
(Lotus Audio Corporation)
Chip music has an interesting
It's something we don't think much
about, but we all share an intrinsic
familiarity with it We grew up with
BROKEN PENCIL PRESENTS
CANZINE
WEST
2012   I
Vancover's largest zine fair and
festival of independent culture.
November 17,2012
l-7pm
$5 admission comes with the
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VY2 Community Media Arts   100's of Zines and more!
Ill West Hastings Street,    Complete lineup at
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Isrtlff
'^RN/fes^H*? these old computers and gaming
machines generating live sounds with
crude chips, so it is interesting to wit-
ness the unveiling of such an encom-   j
passing work using chiptunes.
In this, Vancouver-made Retro
City Rampage is the perfect vessel: a  ;
modem video game in an 8-bit uni-
verse. Within it, local producer Freaky  |
DNA (Leonard J. Paul), Surrey native  I
Norrin Radd (Matt Creamer) and  |
well-known video game composer,  j
virt (Jake Kaufman) combined efforts  j
to build a rich and comprehensive
body of music that celebrates the
art of chiptune while sustaining the  j
demands of a gaming experience.
The soundtrack follows the game j
well by combining modern concepts !
with strictly NES-era aesthetics,
sprinkled with pop culture nostalgia.
After an initial heave of traditional ;
rock and metal songs, the catchy j
"Half Steppin'" signals a slide for- .,
ward in time through hip-hop, dance, j
dubstep, and funk, before throwing j
in some wonderful electro and New \
Wave. The bouncy "Toadstool Om j
Norn" pays an essential tribute to :
Mario Bros, while "Not Mega..." ;
begins with a nod to the Mega Man
2 intro song (one of the best in NES ';
history). There's even a standout pop j
single in "Bit Happy." Tell me you j
wouldn't want to hear this song per- j
formed by LCD Soundsystem.
As this music was actually made J
for a real video game, it also contains \
music for things like cave exploration,
driving around looking for stuff, and i
dialogue. These, importantly, allow !
the record to breathe, but as a whole ;
add to the stylistic epicness of the ;
album, anchoring the traditional :
video game elements of the music.
The Music of Retro City Rampage is :
available in mp3 as well as, amaz- j
ingly, 12-inch vinyl (there is even a j
game-over style song at the end bf j
each side). As one of the largest ■
coherent works of chiptunes in recent j
memory, attached to a game that is j
poised to carry it far and wide, this ;
album may just have the makings of '
a cult classic.
—Hugh Macdonald
Local indie-pop darlings Village have
surfaced from the relatively raucous
Vancouver underground with a dull,
yet distinct, roar. Let that be read
in the most admirable tone, for the
Vancouver quintet brings a welcome
respite to the contrived indie-
rock bands you're likely to find
five nights a week at the Biltmore
Cabaret. Neither psych/garage
knockoffs nor art school dropouts with alt-punk tendencies,
the brazen and earnest vocals of
Jessica Chau easily convince you
that Village is not just another
bratty band with witticisms that
barely incite a sedated chuckle.
Adorning Noumere's cover
is a hazy magenta kaleidoscope
that alludes to the opaque dream
sequence listeners experience. While
^the A-side, "Nowhere," focuses on
the group's pop sensibilities with a
snare drum marching along to Alex
Smith's sedated fingers as they weave
guitar fines through Chau's ethereal
observations. The song emphasizes
simplicity with two short verses that
lament, "We're goin' nowhere /1 had
something rare / We're goin' nowhere
/ But I wish you were there," before
closing with crescendos.
Meanwhile, the lethargy of
"Claustro" makes for a brooding
B-side that plods along at a careless
pace. True to its shoegazejroots, that
carelessness becomes ever more poignant once the lines "I live in a small
room / Share my love in a small room
/ My place is small, there's room for
two / My heart is small, there's room
for you," are realized. However, when
the song ends on Chau's haunting
invitation, the tone seems spiteful
rather than excited, as if sending for
an unrequited love.
Likened to local contemporaries White Poppy, Village have
successfully merged the essences
of shoegaze and dream-pop.
However, where White Poppy
is captivating through their
emptiness—a gloomy haze that
reflects the heart ofVancouver's
winter—Village is similar to
autumn's charming breeze and
colourful leaves that serve as a
reminder of music's often inexplicable ability to captivate Us.
—Robert Catherall
SHRED KELLY
(Independent)
Mumford and Sons may have brought
the banjo to the mainstream, but from
the opening chords of "New Black,"
it's clear that Shred Kelly haven't
hopped on the bandwagon — this
is just what they do. In the Hills, the
Fernie-based band's second album,
is a whirlwind of folk-punk fury from
start to finish. These tunes aren't toe-
tappers. They are boot-stompers.
The band's two singers compliment each other wonderfully. Sage
McBride's airy harmonies are the perfect counterpoint to Tim Newton's
impassioned, gravelly tenor.
And McBride is no slouch herself
on the songs on which she sings lead
— the two are able to trade off in a
way that feels effortless and natural,
. and it keeps the album from staying
in any one place for too long.
Indeed, the whole album has a
real sense of movement to it The
aforementioned "New Black" kicks
the album off with a barn>-burner, but
slower jams like "Jewel of the North"
never feel out of place—they're just
stops along the way.
Don't let the folk-punk descriptor
turn you off if the idea of a bunch
of guys with their dads' old acoustic guitars doesn't excite you. The
instrumentation on In the Hills is
rich and varied, and avoids the lo-fi
conceits that can make some folk-
punk records tiring to listen to.
"Rowed Away" is a particular
standout in this regard, a heartfelt
ballad with a lush string arrangement
that builds to a climactic full-band
crescendo, and a horn section accents
the chorus of "Leaving Town" beautifully. The bluesy "Cabin Fever" adds
an organ part toward the end that
nicely fleshes out the song without
feeling forced.
All of this energy and variety
means that just about anyone should
be able to find something to like on In
the Hills. Give the ol' banjo one more
try. You'll be glad you did.
—MattMeuse
Vancouver witch-wave duo Kristen
Roos and Prophecy Sun, collectively
known as Spell, conjure sensations
like Rorschach tests, with which we
can only grope at meanings, and frisk
with postmodernism that brims with
fragmentation and prior truths, while
eschewing pretension. And they do it
all in five tracks on Lull, their spacey
sophomore EP, a sparkling follow up
to last year's hypnotic Hex.
Refining their reflective ephemera,
Lull's aural collages use elements of
ambient, psychedelia, found sounds,
and other choppy oddball items with art-damaged audacity. If any of this
seems self-important, rest assured,
it isn't. Mashing the sublime with
the recognizable, Spell is eclectic and
art-chic. It's smart, but has incoherence and like a lot of music in this
vein it begets a certain trainspotting
mindset (recalling empyrean acts like
Delirium, His Name Is Alive, and
Ida), but more than that Lull gently
tugs at ideas while fitting pieces in a
dissonant fantasia.
Sun's soft whispers on "Don't
Resist," coupled with Roos' glitches
and tweaks are a revelation of home
recording genius, both stylish and
stable. "Guided Highways" expands
on the aesthetic, driving down eerie,
nocturnal spaces rescuing lost souls
by placing auditory oddities into a
new context in a fashion like avant-
garde Beat Generation collaborators
and "cut-up" popularizers William S.
Burroughs and Brion Gysin. In fact, it
was Burroughs who once suggested
that, "You have to cut up the past
to find the future," and this may be
a maxim close to Spell's generous
Roos' sacrosanct sound collage
constructions and Sun's haunting
cries are very free-form, and this
may be a blatantly non-commercial
manoeuvre. Sure, it's also intriguing
and helps to broaden one's palette.
Like emerging from a musty-smelling
labyrinth to midnight radiance in a
winter garden glimpsed only by a
select and adventurous few.
Lull ascends through ironies, hallucinations, despair and renewal, to
make an EP that's easy to listen to,
yet full of challenges. In this mosaic
of bleakness and beauty, Spell
mesmerizes.
—Shane Scott-Travis
TWO FINGERS
(Paper Bag)
Two Fingers is the hip hop alter ego
of Brazilian beatsmith Amon Tobin,
and Stunt Rhythms is his second offering under the Two Fingers banner.
Although there's a lot to like about
this album: it's inventive, cheeky,
and heavy as all hell, it lacks focus.
It doesn't feel like an album so much
as just a collection of songs.
From the get-go, Stunt Rhythms
makes it clear that it will not be taking any prisoners. "Stripe Rhythm" is
the sound of the mothership landing,
an alien ray gun invasion where the
phasers are definitely not set to stun.
However, the album starts to drag its
feet after a few tracks. Things begin
to run together, because with a few
exceptions, most songs are the exact
same tempo. Although this makes
for great beats and excellent DJ
tools, particularly since that tempo
is perfect for use in drum and bass
sets. Unfortunately, as a result Stunt
Rhythms is not the most compelling
listen in the context of an album.
There are definite highlights:
"Crunch Rhythm," "Elmer Rhythm,"
and "Rock Scissors" spring to mind
— but you have to dig for them. This
is particularly disappointing coming
from Tobin, a man whose solo work
has produced albums so distinct and
indissoluble, albums where the whole
is greater than the sum of its parts.
Stunt Rhythms has nice parts, certainly,
but they've been approached as standalone elements. There doesn't seem
to be much thought given to how they
work together.
For these reasons, the album is
hard to recommend to anyone who
doesn't already have an appreciation for big, bass-heavy beats.
Even existing Tobin fans may
be put off by the lack of cohesion and production that is, by
Tobin's standards, somewhat
conventional. It's hard to deny,
though, that on their own, these
tunes do pack a serious wallop.
—MattMeuse
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REDROOM
likTRAIAD CHANNELS 3X4 /
TERROR BIRD/DIANE
October 5 @ Zoo Zhop
The promise of live music was enough
for many to trade eerie autumnal
warmth for the grungy intimacy of Zoo
Zhop. As a first-timer to the record
store/music venue, I could see how
one could feel alienated as a stranger
stumbling upon an acquainted circle
of music lovers. But there was something primal-relativistic transpiring
in the three trios who played that
made it hard to feel separate from
the audience's bristling lattice. Save
for some minor technical squabbles,
it was a fine night.
Openers Diane were a treat.
Without their admission, they played
with precision that could've belied a
debut live performance. As first performances portend, Diane was unani-
mated. But given studious intensity
and laconic no-wave vocals, perhaps
it was style. Intimidating bass at the
forefront guided songs with a percussive tunnel of riffs, complemented
by frenzied drums and guitar melodies. Their foreboding garage rock
worked well within the confines of
Zoo Zhop.
After a long wait, Nikki Never's
electronic project, Terror Bird, was
up, which offered two synths and,
anachronistically, a cello. Whatever
incredulous auspices this produced,
. the war paint-decorated Never sung
new wave eulogies that shattered any
crowd apa±y. Barring an unfortunately low volume from the cello,
the hearty drum loops and snappy
synths got people moving. Live,
Never's powerful, sombre voice can't
be understated, and it lent heart to
the post-punk melodies. Despite the
possible camp of a biker's cap that
Never erected halfway through, the
band's music was nothing short of
affective.
The crowd's enthusiasm peaked
when Channels 3x4 took the stage,
writhing with kineticism excited by
singer Sarah Cordingley's bodily
ebb and flow between the stage and
crowd. With the acerbity of true
punks, they played to aggressive
synth hooks on repetitive overload,
slogan-esque screams rising to a fever
pitch. Their no-wave aggression plays
with the irony of an inane television
program set to auto-critical self-
destruct. It was a deliriously infectious performance.
After Diane's tight debut and
an emotive set from Terror Bird,
Channels 3X4's musical tirade against
the recursive vapidity of popular culture was an elemental finish fit for
music lovers willing to be packed like
sardines. Of the myriad Dionysian
ventures available on a Friday night
downtown, I'm glad to know that if
I chose to get crammed in and tossed
around it was for love of music.
—Jonathan Kew
RELIC / GRHYMES / SHORT
October 5 @ The Facility
If you're a white male rapper in Vancouver and haven't found your niche,
check yourself into The Facility. It's a
chill spot with a tattoo shop, recording studios, and a space for concerts,
though the concert space felt a little
like my community centre craftroom.
The crowd was an awkward sample of
people: about 90 per centwhite male
rappers, and about 10 per cent rap
fans who clearly didn't grow up surrounded by the culture. There wasn't
a female in sight.
The show featured white Canadian
male rapper after white Canadian
male rapper, and each performer
had the same awkward flow, mostly
too fast. Though they did seem to
have some lyrical talent when they
rapped about how hard it was to be
a white M.C., they didn't have much
else to say. My advice to these hopeful bros is to give slam poetry a try,
as they don't seem to be gaining a
huge following.
One of the opening acts, Short,
played sick beats sampled from the
likes of Mat The Alien. But while his
beats were dope, he laid down rhyth-
mless rhymes and spit his lyrics out
so fast I thought he would choke on
his tongue.
Next up was Grhymes, who surprisingly had never heard of thetruly
talented Grimes. He was another
rhythmless, beatless, tiresome rapper; or maybe M.C.? which I now
interpret as Massive Clusterfuck, is a more accurate moniker.
Finally, the Extremities (Fresh Kils
and Uncle Fester) were up with Relic.
Fresh Kils, who played on an MPC,
gave me something to get grimey to.
Most ofhis songs actually had flow
compared to the o±ers. Relic threw
down lyrics, somewhat off-beat,
creating a strange flow. Playing well-
produced tunes that mixed hip-hop
and blues with a dash of reggae vibe,
Relic brought a chill atmosphere to
his tracks.
The essence of hip-hop is based
on marginalization within society.
What does a white male, often a
demographic with the highest ranking privilege, have to complain about?
Though most of the acts of the night
had nothing to say, Relic seemed to
break through ±is. His lyrics were
intellectual and had depth. Having
worked with the likes of Shad, this
up-and-coming fellow is making
some strides in the Canadian hip-hop
game. Unfortunately his talent didn't
fully show in the live show. Maybe it
was the venue, lacking a stage, but his
performance didn't leave me wanting more.
In summary, this night at The
Facility was like a bland vanilla
milkshake with a dash of cinnamon
reggae spice.
—Nicola Storey
WOODS/NIGHT BEATS/
HALLOW MOON
October 13 @ The Media Club
You couldn't ask for a more autumn-
appropriate lineup. A light October
rain drizzling continuously, the Media
Club beckoned all eager wanderers
inside. Burnt-orange paper lanterns
lined the ceiling, guests cozying up
sardine-tight as Simon & Garfunkel's
"Bleecker Street" ran through the
speakers. "Fog's rolling in off the East
River bank," the duo sighed, a timely
reminder of summer's end.
Hallow Moon took the stage soon
after. The Vancouver-based four-piece
echoed psychedelic '70s bands of
yore, from their long, trancelike
instrumentals to equally long hair.
Many songs laid high, whistling guitar solos over husky vocals. They were
a good band to warm up to, and even
closed their set with a gastronomical  j
warning. "Free hot dogs are always   j
a bad idea," their lead guitarist said
ominously. No one disputed this.
Night Beats set up next, and
soon sent the venue's temperature  \
skyrocketing. Crashing in with a  j
killer drum/slide guitar solo, the  I
Seattle trio's energy never ceased.   !
Their influences seemed vast and \
varied: a little San Francisco noise  \
punk, some King Khan & BBQ Show-  j
esque blues. Drummer James Traeger  I
began pounding the floor torn with
a tambourine at one point, while Lee
Blackwell and TarekWegner swapped  I
bass and guitar duties once or twice.  I
By the end of their set, people were
definitely sweating.
Woods' long-awaited set started
around midnight, beginning with
lead singer-guitarist Jeremy Earl's
unassuming, "Hello." They launched
into "Sun and Shade," treating the
audience to a glimpse of tree-lined
beaches somewhere on a sunnier
coast. Bassist Kevin Morby took
on some harmonica duties, giving
a folksy feel to their first couple of
songs. Soon, though, Earl traded his
acoustic for electric, and a frantic
jam session following "Find Them
Empty" began. When playing, Earl
looked a tad like a marionette, with
seized muscles and jerky movements,
as though possessed by his guitar. It's
always intriguing to witness a musician become utterly consumed by his
or her instrument. His fellow guitarist
played some interesting sounds as
well, using a 12-string for unique,
wavering accompaniments.
Their set flew by, too quickly for
most. A quick nod between the band-
mates determined they were game
for an encore, and Earl's acoustic
returned once more for the enchanting, slightly melancholic "Rain On."
What could be more fitting?
—Sarah Christina Brown
FAUST/MIDDAY VEIL/
VON BINGEN
October 17 @ The Waldorf
Even though the over-hyped and
somewhat warmed-over hipster
heroine Grimes was needling away
across town to a sold out Commodore
mob, Faust still managed to draw a
bustling crowd of the curious and the
converted. In fact, it's been awhile
since I've seen such a wide cross-
section of fans crammed contentedly
in one place. There were old school
Faust fans in tye-dyed shirts, mammoth grins splitting their fine-lined
faces, smiling, youngish scenest-
ers, and giddy baby-faced tadpoles
(probably sent by Thom Yorke, a
famous fan always dropping their
name). But regardless the reasons,
the with-it Waldorf was braced and
bumping. Local experimental auteurs
Von Bingen not only christened the
event fittingly, they also Svengalied
the evening, making and shaping
what would be an unforgettable
night. Second came Seattle's Midday Veil embarking on an energetic
set, their first in Vancouver. A showy
sextet reared on psychedelia, New Age
artistry, jazz-infused jockeying and
multi-media zigzags, their bop fusion
tickled a bit too much. At best, they
echoed Jefferson Airplane, a band I've
always had ambivalence towards. At
worse? Well, they had a bongo player
who was a dead ringer for Howard Moon, the fictional jazz freak
from ±e Mighty Boosh. It's my
own fault, but I chuckled about
it the whole time.
Later, after attending my split-
sides, the red curtain draping
the stage raised to reveal Faust,
brandishing their instruments
like weapons. There they were,
experimental Krautrock pioneers,
making music and knocking off
noises that snapped synapses
with their energetic eruptions;
at times so intense, like all things
were up for grabs. Backed by the
bizarro rhythm section of original
Faust founders Werner "Zappi"
Diermaier (drums/cement mixer/
angle grinder) and Jean-Herve'
Peron (bass/chainsaw/vocals)
that left no space unfilled in it's
unstopping propulsion, including the sometimes startling
silences.
There were instances, as in
the self-referential 1973 classic
"Krautrock", where auditory
space was expanded and dilated
as the German five-piece stood, soni-
cally poised between perfection and
flight. I may never get to see Neu! or
Can, but these avant-garde artists are
embrocation enough.
Midst the striking "Mamie is
Blue," as noises tumbled downward from lightning-flecked storm
clouds and burning sparks quite literally threatened the audience, Faust
reigned at the opposing poles of certainty and mystery. Like characters in
a dream whose desires and actions go
unexplained, they elevated the shared
experience to stratospheric summits
and unheard-of heights.
Rapt, my ears ringing and my
mind blown to ribbons after "It's a
Rainy Day (Sunshine Girl)," I teetered
with feelings of deficit but also with
the promise of fulfilment. Is that not
what keeps love alive? It's certainly
what keeps Faust, now in its 4istyear,
alive. Or so I thought, crawling home
after an exquisite evening in a red-hot
blast-furnace of intense artistic proving grounds.
—Shane Scott Travis
Heme of die
Vancouver
Poster
Gallery
"   for comprehensive
event information Presented by the Georgia Straight, Crowmest Productions & NightHeat
RASPUTINA
with guest Nim Vinci
SUN OCT 28
8 pm
THE WALDORF CABARET 1489 East Hastings S
Tickets also available @ Highlife, Red Cat Records & Zulu Recorc
ESENTED BY THE GEORGIA STRAIGHT & NIGHTHEAT
JULIE DOIRON
with guests
FRI NOV 16
7:30 SHOW 8:30 PM
*EARLY SHOW, 19 +, NO MINORS*
THE WALDORF CABARET
TCMWFUN
ORCHESTRA
with special guests
the Strumbellas
FRI NOV 23
THE ELECTRIC OWL 928 Main St
Tickets available @ nightheat.ca, Zulu, Red
Cat & Highlife
*!r •.
W'A
wwwPnjghtheat.ca
rhe Georgia Straight & NightHeat Entertainment present
MOON DUO
with guests
Life Coach (member of Trans Am)
& Mirror Lake
FRI DEC 7 8Pm
|   BILTMORE CABARET 395 KSngsway
Zulu, Red Cat, Highlife Records
PRESENTED BY THE GEORGIA STRAIGHT, NIGHTHEAT & THE
RIO THEATRE
AN EVENING WITH
EMILIE AUTUMN
TUES FEB 5, 2013
8:00 PM
THE RIO THEATRE 1660 E. Broadway,
19 * No Minors Zulu, Red Cat, Highlife Records
Visit straighicom To Win Tickets ■ill -psas? *>-iBi So Salacious
with Scads & Sprocket Doyle
interview & photo
by CHRIS YEE
photo composition
by CORY TAYLOR
lettering by
MICHAEL
A year ago, Nathan Doyle, a.k.a Sprocket Doyle,
was managing a Bang-On T-Shirts on Davie Street,
bored with the contents ofhis iPod. He decided to
listen to the radio—something he hadn't done for
years as he was disillusioned with all its "poppy,
Top 40."
Luckily, he found CiTR's captivating mix of
programming. "I discovered it while flipping
through stations. Bada boom bada bing, I was
hooked," Doyle said. Within the year Doyle was
volunteering at the station, playing electro-swing
and hip-hop on So Salacious (first aired in March)
with fellow newcomer (and hip-hopper in Smear
Camp) Cory Taylor, a.k.a. Scads.
What sort of music did you grow up listening to?
Nathan Doyle: The first time I actually listened
to my own music and not the stuff my parents
listened to was [with] hip-hop, definitely... my
whole personal experience with music started
off with hip-hop.
Cory Taylor: I remember one of the first
records I ever listened to by myself was my dad's
Phil Collins records... but I actually listened to
the first Batman soundtrack that Prince did [and]
the Ninja Turtles soundtrack when I was a kid... I
grew up watching MuchMusic in the mid-to-late
'80s... [then] a lot of'90s stuff, Pharcyde is one
of my favourite groups.
How did the show come to be?
Doyle: I started dating this girl who goes to UBC
and I thought, "Cool, I'll check out CiTR," and they
just happened to have a tour. Sol stuck around and
they really showed me how easy it was to have a
radio show. I decided to go through the training,
and that's actually how I met Cory. We started off
our training at the exact same time.
What's the meaning behind the name "So
Salacious?"
Taylor: I think that's because music is in a sense
a kind of sexual energy and "So Salacious" means
kind of seductive, and it's good alliteration to
have "Sundays at six, So Salacious with Scads and
Sprocket Doyle on CiTR.."
Doyle:... [but] we didn't have this idea to
name it So Salacious when we first started training.
I didn't know we would have a show together...
I was thinking of different genres of music, just
an eclectic show, calling it Intunicated (laughs), like
"intoxication of tunes."
Taylor: I suggested Of/the Notes... itwas going
to be the Suunfl Set or Off the Notes, but we actually
came to agreement on So Salacious.
How was getting the tattoo?
Doyle: It was quite the experience... I was
kind of nervous, kind of excited. It got postponed
a couple weeks and I ended up getting Al [Gibbs]
in the studio, our sponsoring artist, I guess. I was
on my knees most of the time [and] the blood
stopped flowing to my legs, so I stood up [and my]
knees smashed into the floor, but at the same time
I had a sweet tattoo... It was lots of fun, I'd do it
again if I could... [TJ definitely suggest Al Gibbs,
he actually gave ODB his "01' Dirty Bastard" tattoo
on his chest before he died.
Can you describe the tattoo that you got on air
this summer?
The tattoo I got this summer from Al while in
the station, live on air, is a grenade with a daisy.
They both are more like cartoon characters than
anything. They have little smiley faces on them
and it makes me happy.
All music is banned. What album/mixtape/song
would you hide from the authorities?
Taylor: I would say Pharcyde... or anything off
Ninja Tune, or one of my CiTR mixes (laughs.)
Doyle: I'd probably go back to a Tom Waits
album, I'd keep Swordfish Trombone, that's my favourite album of his...
What's your favourite CiTR show, other than your
own?
Taylor: That's a good question. I like RellyRel$'s
show Crimes & Treasons, Gareth Moses's new show,
More than Human... Bootless and B-Sides, there are
so many good shows. Sounds of the City, and the
Nardwuar show's pretty awesome too.
Doyle: ...My favourite show would [definitely]
be Bootless and B-Sides with Doe Ran... he plays a
lot of cool retro remixes and ghetto funk, a lot of
stuff I like to play [now] too.
Taylor: I'd add in Rhett Ohlsen's show, The
Bassment... I was really impressed with his show.
What does the future hold for So Salacious?
Taylor: We're going to keep going, we've
decided we love doing radio and volunteering at
CiTR It's a just a nice opportunity to meet new
people, to get creative, to spend some time doing
stuff we love... it's nice to be there.
Doyle: Bright future ahead. Expect So Salacious
on your billboards in 10 years, it's going to be on
your kid's clothing (everyone lauahs)... [so] keep
your eyes open...
So Salacious airs Sundays jrom 6 to 7 p.m. Mention
So Salacious to tattoo artist Al Gibbs at The Fall at 644
Seymour Street/or 25 per cent ojftattooinfl! CiTR 101.9 FM CHARTS
STRICTLY THE DOPEST HITZ OF OCTOBER
#
ARTIST
ALBUM	
LABEL
#
ARTIST
ALBUM
LABEL
ISI
Carolyn Mark*+
The Queen of
Vancouver Island
Mint
26
Fist City*
Buried b/w Cryptic
Transmissions
La Ti Da
2
Calamalka*+
All the Way Up
Hybridity
27
Nu Sensae*+
Sundowning
Suicide Squeeze
3
Needles//Pins*+
Getting On Home b/w
Picture My Face
LaTiDa
28
Man Your Horse*+
Shorts
Self-Released
4
Fine Times*+
Fine Times
Light Organ
29
Mother Mother*+
The Sticks
Last Gang
5
Tame Impala
Lonerism
Modular
30
Old Man Luedecke*
Tender Is The Night
True North
6
Crystal Swells*+
Harshside/Sludgefreaks
Self-Released
31
Tyranahorse*+
Garbage Bears
Self-Released
kIIi
Slim Twig*
Sof Sike
Paper Bag
32
Ry Cooder
Election Special
Nonesuch
8
Calexico
Algiers
Anti-
33
We Need Surgery*+
We Need Surgery
Light Organ
9
Gang Signs*+
Gang Signs
Self-Released
34
The Population
Drops*+
Enough
Self-Released
10
Holograms
Holograms
Captured Tracks
35
Animal Collective
Centipede Hz
Domino
11
Deerhoof
Breakup Song
Polyvinyl
36
Ariel Pink's
Haunted Graffiti
Mature Themes
4AD
12
Moon Duo
Circles
Sacred Bones
37
Blackberry Wood*+
Strong Man vs.
Russian Bears
Self-Released
13
Los Furios*+
Never Look Back
Self-Released
38
D.0.A.*+
We Come In Peace
Sudden Death
14
Whitehorse*
The Fate Of The World
Depends On This Kiss
Six Shooter
39
Hot Panda*+
Go Outside
Mint
15
Hannah Georgas*
Hannah Georgas
Dine Alone
40
Juvenile Hall*+
Magazine Collage
Dental Records
16
Open Relationship*
Born Weird
Self-Released
41
Owls by Nature*
Everything Is Hunted
Self-Released
17
Ford Pier
Vengeance Trio*+
Huzzah!
Self-Released
42
Peace*+
The World Is Too Much
With Us
Suicide Squeeze
18
Jenny Ritter*+
Bright Mainland
Self-Released
43
The React*+
Sounds That I've Heard
b/w Only Living For You
LaTiDa
19
Jay Arner*+
Bad Friend b/w
Black Horse
Self-Released
44
Village*+
Nowhere b/w Claustro
Kingfisher Bluez
20
METZ*
METZ
Sub Pop
45
The Tranzmitors*+
Concrete Depression b/w
A Little Bit Close
La Ti Da
21
Thee Oh Sees
Putrifiers II
In The Red
46
Seapony
Falling
Hardly Art
22
The Ballantynes*+
Misery b/w Stay
LaTiDa
47
Selkies*+
Tall Grass
Self-Released
23
Flying Lotus
Until The Quiet Comes
Warp
48
Fergus & Geronimo
Funky Was The State
Of Affairs
Hardly Art
24
Dylan Rysstad*
Halfway Houses
Sakamano
49
Grizzly Bear
Shields
Warp
25
Dinosaur Jr.
1 Bet on Sky
Jagjaguwar
50
Dan Deacon
America
Domino
CiTR's charts reflect what's been played on the air by CiTR's lovely DJs last month. Records with asterisks (*) are Canadian and those marked (+) are local.
Most of these excellent albums can be found at fine independent music stores across Vancouver. If you can't find them, give CiTR's music coordinator a shout
at (604) 822-8733. Her name is Sarah Cordingley. If you ask nicely she'll tell you how to find them. Check out other great campus/community radio charts at
www.earshot-online.com. RECORD COLLECTING IS A FOLL TIME JOB
Now in stock at Zulu Records - Your Source For Vinyl and CDs!
TYSEGALL
TWINS
NEIL YOUNG
PSYCHEDELIC PILL
I
I
Phis.... November's Coupon! Up and save
20% OFF I
all regular priced new, used and collector ODs, LPs, 7"
twHter.com/zulurecords
facebook.com/people/
ZuluRecords-Store/680210042
tllltltltt**  iulurecords.tumblr.com
K£ca7?s&\
Zulu Records
1972-1976 W 4th Ave
Vancouver. BC
tet 604738.3232
www.zuturecords.com
STORE HOURS
MontoWed   10:30-7:00
Thurs and Fri 10:30—900

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