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 THS HISTOW OF SWNDielUTTW VI W|SABOTA|TOAHTOM$ AGAIN IllTUE INDIA
BlftJ0yfE6T|SUHEEpHrUlWAi|KINQ0FP0rWCTrAlHM6KS Nor. 19
Hooves
Binz
Skinny Kids
shindig
NOV, 26
Dream Baby
Pineapple
Zen Mystery Fogg
DecS
War Baby
Candela Farm
42
BmL$mom:MteTmmi)imcim
UPCOMING
SHOWS
RtCKSttAW
254 East Hastings Street
604.681.8915
THE REBIRTH STARRING: FATAL INSTINCT
Caulk, The Furniture and Bloody Betty
MRS
Baptists and Wizard Rifle
CITY OF GLASS
Girlfriends and Boyfriends
CO-OP RADIO REGGAE FUNDRAISER
With Chuckle Berry, Mr. Metro and the East Van All-Stars Band
ONE NIGHT STAND 2013
With members of MOTHER MOTHER, SAID THE WHALE,
YUKON BLONDE, DOMINIQUE FRICOT, THE BELLE
GAME, BRASSTRONAUT, ADALINE, and ROCOCODE
THE PACK A.D.
With Guests
Additional show listings, ticket sale info and locations, band
bios, videos and more are online at:
www.liveatrickshaw.com
LAUGH YOUR ASS OFF 20 HOSTED BY DINQ ARCHIE
Scott Patey, Ed Witty, Andrew Barber, Alex Sparling and Kyle Bottom
WHITE RAVEN REVUE
Lucitera's Winter Fusion Bellydance Student Showcase
DIECEMDERFEST, FEATURING ARCHSPIRE
Burning Ghats, Sinned, Anion, Nihilate, Ogroem, Dungeons, Nautilus
A TWISTED XMAS HOSTED BY PATRICK MALIHA
A night of comedy with Dylan Reimer and Simon King.
I LOVERS CABARET
DM WELCOME TO CHINATOWN UVE ALBUM
RELEASE PARTY
BISON
Grass City and Sumner Brothers
Like us on Facebook: facebook.com/RickshawTheatre
Follow us on Twitter: @rickshawtheatre
Add us on Instagram: ©rickshawtheatre EDITOR'S NOTE: THE ARTISTS FORMERLY KNOWN AS DECEMBER & JANUARY-
While the beginning of December acts as a starting pistol of sorts for things
like advent calendar chocolate decimation, it's also a special time for the magazine. Contradictory to the traditional 12-months-in-a-year model, December
and January are one and the same for us. You're currently reading what we at
Discorder affectionately dub the Jancember issue. Like most months throughout
the year, everyone toils away throughout November and then a nirvana befalls
the month of December—aptly so, because I can't even imagine having to organize deadlines for volunteers around the festive behemoth called Christmas.
So what makes the Jancember issue so different than our regular installments of Discorder? Total transparency here: nothing that'll blow your mind.
We have the same amount of pages, maybe a couple more ads than usual, and
it's full of awesome content. We just push the best-before date back another
month and let the issue sit on the shelves for double the time.
One notable aspect of the 2013/14 Jancember issue that's different from
Jancembers past is the absence of a year-end wrap-up article highlighting the
year's best music. I actually had quite a few people ask me why the issue was
going to be list-less, considering it's been such a favourable tradition in the
past. Heck, last year the "Best Music of 2013" mindset not only dominated
the Staff Sound-off but also scored a feature, with the picks coming from
local musicians who'd been featured throughout the year. And to be fair, the
accompanying family portrait-style picture still melts my heart in a gingerbread
cookies and milk kinda way.
So why didn't I include a roundup list this year? As unsatisfying as this
answer may be, I ±ink I'm just projecting my own viewpoints here. Not
surprisingly, I really fucking love music—heck, if I didn't then I probably
wouldn't be writing the "Editor's Note" of Discorder for y' all—but I love it so
much that even the thought of picking a single favourite album from the year
gets my cranium throbbing. How other people manage to dissolve an entire
365 days' worth of great music into one solid recommendation is beyond me.
In any case, you won't find a cheat sheet to the year's music anywhere
within these pages. However, what you will find is a ton of other stuff about
said music. Filling our size-related band name quota, we have pieces on both
Little India and Little Wild, as well as features on Sabota, Phantoms Again,
the up-coming Big Joy festival, and more. As for the month's cover story, join
us as we look back on 30-years' worth of Shindig, interview current organizer
Ben Lai, and catch up with former Shindig participants on some of their
experiences. Try to savour all of this fantastic content because you won't be
getting any more of it until February comes along.
What do I plan to do with my time off from Discorder in December? I'm going
to gorge myself shamelessly on pomegranates, go to a bunch of shows, maybe
spend some time with my friends and family, and I'll more than likely get a
head start working on the February issue. The funny thing about great music
in Vancouver is it never takes a holiday; and in a sense, neither does Discorder.
So it goes,
Jacey Gibb
T Cover illustration by
JUSTIN LONGOZ
FEATURES
REGULARS
if    19
8 Little Wild Coming to you from Abbotsford, BC, the four-piece formerly known as Rags
to Radio released their debut album, Victories, back in November. Deep in the heart of
Neptoon Records' basement, we caught up with the band to talk about the new LP and
why they decided to leave their old band name behind. By Keefer Pelech
13 Little India On an atypically beautiful October day, Discorder met with the members of
up-and-coming indie rockers Little India to talk about band origin's and staying Up All
Night. By Natalie Hoy
14 Phantoms Again Forget what you knew about the local duo We Are Phantoms Again. For
starters, they've dropped the "We Are" and added a third member, but now they're moving
full-speed ahead with a brand new album out later this month. By Luan Li
18   Big Joy Get ready, Vancouver. With the first-ever Big Joy festival right around the corner,
Discorderhad a chance to talk with organizers Shaunn Watt and JP Doucet about what to
expect. By Fraser Dobbs
King of the Dot Rap battlers from King of the Dot are one of Toronto's biggest cultural
exports. But is the training ground for young rappers simultaneously fostering homophobic
behaviour? By Emma Gregory
26 Shindig CiTR's annual battle of the bands, Shindig, turned the big 3-0 this year. Join us
as we take a look back over the last three decades, talk to previous finalists, and interview
current Shindig host, Ben Lai. By Julie Colero & Jonathan Kew
4 Here's The Thing That Old Time Feeling
6 Textually Active NaNoWriMo
7 Filmstripped Tito On Ice
10 In Good Humour Sunee Dhaliwal
20 Calendar Jimmy Liang
22 Program Guide
25 Discorder Staff Sound-off
30 Under Review
34 Real Live Action
38 On The Air ChthonicBoom!
39 Charts
§ NOTICE OF DIGITALIZATION
I Dear readers, writers, photographers and past contributors jj
1 of Discorder,
§ Let it be known that CiTR is currently working to digitalize \
I the entirety if Discorder's archives. Soon, all of the past I
§ issuesyou knowand love will beavaiiableforviewingoniine. \
I Thanks, computers!
I If you have any questions or concerns, please contact Brenda I
I at stationmanager@citr.ca |
Editor
Jacey Gibb
Art Director
Jaz Halloran
Copy Editors
Robin Schroffel,
Steve Louie
Ad Coordinator
Maegan Thomas
Under Review Editor
Robin Schroffel
RLA Editor
Steve Louie
Web Editor
Chirag Mahajan
Calendar Listings
Sarah Cordingley
Accounts Manager
Corey Ratch
Official Tweeter
Evan Brow
CiTR Station Manager
Brenda Grunau
Publisher
Student Radio Society
of UBC
Student Liasons
Evan Brow,
Josefa Cameron
Photographers & Illustrators
Curtis AuCoin, John C. Barry, Britta Bacchus,
Kate Brown, Sitji Chou, Tyler Crich, Sylvana
D'Angelo, Aiiz Horvath, Dana Kearley, Ben Lai,
Steve Louie, Justin Longoz, Steve Louie, Gina
MacKay, Rob Ondzik, Kim Pringle, Sam Tudor,
Jon Vincent, Kameko Walker, Eleanor Wearing
Proofreaders
Natalie Hoy, Curtis AuCoin, Joshua Gabert-
Doyon, Jacey Gibb, Linda Givetash
Writers
Curtis AuCoin, Mariko Adams, Willa Bao,
Alison Braid, Evan Brow, Slavko Bucifal, Julie
Colero, Selina Crammond, Natalie Dee, Fraser
Dobbs, Joshua Gabert-Doyon, Emma Gregory,
Natalie Hoy, Coleman Ingram, Ibrahim Itani,
Jonathan Kew, Luan Li, James Olson, Mark
PaulHus, Will Pedley, Keefer Pelech, Andy
Resto, Shane Scott-Travis, Elijah Teed, Sam
Tudor, Duncan Vieira, Max Wainwright, Zach
Weiss, Bob Woolsey
Advertise
Ad space for upcoming issues
can be booked by calling (604)
822-3017 ext 3 or emailing
advertising@citr.ca. Rates
available upon request.
Contribute
To submit words to Discorder,
please contact: editor.
discorder@citr.ca. To submit
images, contact: artdirector.
discorder@citr.ca
Subscribe
Send in a cheque for $20
to #233-6138 SUB Blvd.,
Vancouver, B.C., V6T1Z1 with
your address, and we will mail
each issue of Discorder right to
your doorstep for a year.
Distribute
To distribute Discorder in
your business, email distro.
discorder@citr.ca We are
always looking for new friends.
Donate
We are part of CiTR, a
registered non-profit, and
accept donations so we can
provide you with the content
you love. To donate visit
www.citr.ca/donate.
©Discorder 2013 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 10,200. Discorder is published almost monthly by CiTR, which
can be heard at 101.9 FM, online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487
CiTR's office at (604) 822-3017, email CiTR at stationmanager@citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write #233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T1Z1, Canada.
Editorial cutoff: November 29,2013 by BOB m
illustration by
ROBQNDZ1K   , m
/«PW8PP%
,4SSlIlIilIIls*<
THAT OLD
TIME FEELING
I never liked my Grade Three teacher, Mrs. Lang. She was a conservative woman
with a seemingly chinless face who showed us Bible story reenactment videos
in class. Even then, in my still very much maturing Atheist brain, I was put
offby the whole thing. It felt strange to be watching dogma from a system of
beliefs that had nothing to do with my family's own. We didn't have a formal
beliefsystemofanykind, but it was still weird being presented to such young
minds as factual. [Full disclosure: my dislike for Mrs. Lang may have also come
from an incident where she yelled at me over a presentation about dolphins.]
As Christmas approaches, I know that many people feel the same way
about the holiday as I did watching those Jesus videos back in Grade Three.
They aren't Christian, they don't care, or they might even be of another
religious faith with its own ceremonies centered on this time of year. In any
case, December is unique for a number of reasons. First off, it's winter and
the weather generally sucks. Educationally, it's the middle of the year with
semesters ending and studies changing over. It's the end of the calendar year
and we're about to start anew with a bunch of promises to ourselves that we
probably won't keep. Lastly, regardless of whose birthday it is, we get three
statutory holidays almost in a row—something that doesn't happen any other
month of the year.
The specialness isn't by accident. In fact, this time of year has been held
in high regard as far back as people have been gathering and eating large
meals together—or if you're a stickler for your ages, the Neolithic Age. The
reason is simple: Christmas falls on the winter solstice, which has been an
important cultural event across the globe, not just in Christian parts of the
world. The rocks at Stonehenge were even placed in a way to commemorate
the sunset on the day ofthe solstice (orwere theyjustpredicting Jesus' birthday
all along?). Although historians can't go back and ask those folks why they
did what they did, given that those rocks are pretty heavy, it's easy to assume
they felt strongly about what they were doing.
Maybe Jesus was born on December 25, or maybe he wasn't, but when the
Christians came to power and decided that this was the time they were going
to celebrate that event, they made sure everyone else knew what they were
supposed to be celebrating as well. So when Cardinal so-and-so saw Pagan
Sally having a feast with her family on the winter solstice, he wished her a
Merry Christmas and Sally just went with it. Because that's how the world
works; those with the power make the rules.
"IF YOU BELIEVE IN CHRIST, IT'S
CHRISTMAS; IF NOT, THAT'S COOL TOO.
JUST DO YOUR OWN THING AND CALL IT
WHATEVER YOU WANT."
Luckily, we've come a long way since the third and fourth centuries when
they first started celebrating December 25 as Jesus' birthday. We live in a
country where multiculturalism reigns supreme and our mosaic state of mind
allows people of all faiths (or no faith) to celebrate whatever they damn well
please to—which is really the point in the first place. So here's the thing about
Christmas: if you believe in Christ, it's Christmas; if not, that's cool too. Just
do your own thing and call it whatever you want. December is really about
taking a pause to look back at the previous 12 months and forward to the next
12, all while stuffing your face and spending time with the people who mean
the most to you in this world.
Merry Christmas and happy holidays! SIN CITY FETISH NIGHT
1 "EVENT OF THE YEAR" 211 WMVi 11
«FXY STAGE CAGE, DANCEFLOOR
S AND MAY DUNGEON ACTION
AT EACH AND EVERY PARTY!
indulge] the exhibitionist or voyeur in you!
ffiHSHHAU.
Mm city, "^SUS&Xi&wi
W^ themes encouraged!
The (ted Room*WW*wdi
(DEC 31
THIS EVENT WILL
SELL OUT SO GET       t^js
TICKETS EARLY! ^
GET READY TO KISS
IN THE CITY! |   ^
#2Zz>;
FmSHBALl-THFMPEIflAL
2ROOMSOFDJS&
DECOR, VISUALS f
STRICT FETISH DRESS CODE-
AT ALL PARTIES. NO EFFORT = NO ENTRtt«
Full dress code info, online ticket purchasing,
outtit suggestions, photo galleries ana
outrageous videos from previous parties at :
WWW.SINCITYPiTISHNIGHT.COM
THE SHAPE OF
CHRISTMAS TO COME
#f^||
SALE ON NOW!
UP TO 50% OFF
Select Fall/Winter 2013
Footwear, Clothing & Accessories
Shop from home at
www.gravitypope.com
Sign up for our email newsletter and enter our
monthly draw to win a $50 gift certificate!
gravitypope
2203 And 2205 West 4TH Avenue A$f !~
www.gravitypope.com' NANOWRIMO
by ALISON
BRAID
illustration by
DANA KEARLEY
Listen closely. Do you hear that? It's the collective sighing of half a million writers worldwide slumping into
basement couches, collapsing in backyard hammocks,
and fainting in coffee shops. To some of us, December
marks the start of advent calendar chocolate consumption. But for those dedicated, driven writers, it's the end
of National Novel Writing Month.
Abbreviated to NaNoWriMo, the event takes place all
November-long, during which an estimated 500,000 writers
attempt to write 50,000 words. Let's do some quick number crunching. If you wrote every day without fail, that's
1,667 words a day. You want to take Sundays off? Make it
1,923. And let's say you're an average typist, doing around
40 words per minute. At that rate—without taking time to
tap the drumbeat to your music or contemplate the correct
spelling of saccharine—you'd have an astounding 2,400
words in your first hour. If only it was that easy.
Now, the fastest recorded typist in the Guinness Book of
World Records is author Barbara Blackburn, who can maintain 150 w.p.m. for 50 minutes. Aim to be Blackburn, and
you'll be finished before the morning coffee has finished
dripping. At the other end of the spectrum, if you're a young
R.L. Stine and type with only one index finger, well, I wish
you luck.
No matter how you approach the word count, the experience is what three-time NaNoWriMo participant Laura
Cuthbert terms an "exceptional exercise." Cuthbert is a
22-year-old lyricist and short story writer whose approach
to NaNoWriMo is "to just be stuck with [herself]."
However, NaNoWriMo can also be about community. The
project organizes local events for writers to communicate
with each other, as well as online forums, communal write-
ins, and pep talks.
At the time of our interview on November 19, Cuthbert
was nearing the finish with an amazing 37,562 words and
n days to go. In November, her main goal is to "practice,
and dedicate more time to [her] craft." The target of reaching 50,000 words allows Cuthbert to "more effectively write
the absurd, abnormal, and definitely unconventional storylines [her] inner-editor prevents" when there's more time
to spare. If you're someone who too-often overthinks something, the pressure will force you to get the material on the
"LET'S DO SOME QUICK NUMBER CRUNCHING. IF
YOU WROTE EVERY DAY WITHOUT FAIL,
THAT'S 1,667 WORDS A DAY. YOU WANT TO TAKE
SUNDAYS OFF? MAKE IT 1,923."
page and ready for editing December through October.
Cuthbert finds herself shaking her head during read-
throughs in the months after NaNoWriMo, but says those
moments are combined "with moments of shock, and
beauty" that surface because of the inability to overthink.
But here's the downside: don't delude yourself at the
end of the month, because as Cuthbert warns, "you're
still not a pro." But it's at least a start, and if you have any
stamina left, many writers argue the fun is in the rewrites—
something even Hemingway would agree with, after he
himself rewrote the final words of Farewell To Arms a total of
39 times. Are you up for.it? Good, because National Novel
Editing Month, orNaNoEdMo, starts on March 1.
If you want my suggestion: find your own writing
groove, and settle into it for when November comes. For
Cuthbert, that's "waking up to chilly mornings, having a
tea, [and] hopping in a sleeping bag." Whatever it is, mildly
eccentric or not, we all have a story to tell, and NaNoWriMo
bullies you like a boot camp leader to get it out there. So
whip out that blue pen, or that R,L. Stine index finger, and
get practicing. TITO ON ICE
(2012)
DIRECTED BY MAX ANDERSSON
AND HELENA AHONEN
bySEUNA
CRAMMOND
illustration by
KIMPRINGLE
Tito on Ice is a punk-rock political road documentary
that follows comic book creators Max Andersson
and Lars Sjunnesson as they travel throughout former Yugoslavia in promotion of their new book,
Bosnian Flat Dog. Before embarking on their journey,
Andersson and Sjunnesson create a creepy corpselike sculpture of Marshal Tito, the benevolent dictator
that ruled ex-Yugoslavia for nearly three decades. The
mummified Tito, made of paper m^che and other
waste materials, is a sort of Dadaist assemblage that
accompanies the duo on their quest to uncover the
regions' communist past by interviewing local artists.
Their journey is captured using a low-resolution video camera and the live
footage is intercut with animation made from cardboard scraps. The cardboard
cut-outs are shot on black and white 8mm film, resulting in choppy animation that is, at first, uncomfortable to watch. But as the strange and upbeat
Balkan soundtrack enhances the frenetic pacing, the film begins to take on
a pulse of its own. The jarring jump cuts between live action and animation,
combined with the obscure '60s surf-rock, '70s post-punk, and '80s newwave,
is so satisfyingly bizarre, it begins to feel like a graphic novel come to life.
Local writers, artists, and musicians act as historians to provide an illuminating account what life was like under Tito, as well as the current struggles
facing those living in the former republic. Although interviewees are quick to
explain how Tito cleverly subverted democracy in favour of strict authoritative
measures, the former leader is often venerated. In a region that has been stained
by civil war in recent years, you can't help but admire Titoism for maintaining economic and cultural stability for upwards of 30 years. The sentiment is
evident when Andersson and Sjunnesson attempt to cross the Croatia-Bosnia
border with the Tito sculpture. Surprisingly, the guards are not offended by
the grotesque mummy, but laugh and ask to have their photo taken with it.
Onward to Mostar, Bosnia, where two local poets started an "Alternative
Institute." In recent years, the Institute hosted lectures, concerts, and art
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shows. As one of the founders explains, the Institute became the only place in
post-war Bosnia that encouraged real reconciliation between Serbs and Croats.
Due to threats of violence and a lack of support from local authorities, the
Institute is no longer operating. With this, it is clear that socialist revolution
is not a historical fact in ex-Yugoslavia's past, but rather something creative
communities are still fighting for. It's a struggle that has been initiated, but
has yet to actualize.
Overall, Tito on Ice is weird, informative, and does something only great
films do: it harmonizes form and content into a perfect cinematic rhythm.
Surrealist absurdity, constructivist montage, and good old-fashioned cinema
vente oscillate to open up the complex realities of a tried and failed version
of socialism. Such aesthetic interplay evokes the political dichotomies that
ex-Yugoslavia, and arguably all nations, continue to be confronted with
(capitalism vs. socialism, nationalism vs. communism). The DIY animation,
jarring edits, and punk soundtrack, juxtaposed against the quiet despondent
post-war townships Andersson and Sjunnesson visit, acts as a call to action.
It wakes and shakes the viewer out of our Hollywood slumber and forces us
to consider who the true revolutionaries are (hint: they aren't the politicians).
UPCOMING DOCUMENTARY SCREENINGS
-+ doxaf estiva I.ca for more information.
Far from Vietnam, directed by Chris Marker
December 10th, DjavadMowafaghian Cinema (SFU Woodward's Vancouver)
Alcan Highway, directed by Aleksi Salmenpera
January 21st, Ray Meek Centre (West Vancouver)
Hi-Ho Mistahey!, directed by Alanis Obomsawin
January 18th, The Theatre (SFU Surrey)
In Real Life, directed by Beeban Kidron
January 30th, Capilano University Bosa Theatre (North Vancouver) mti
^^^B
by KEEFER
PELECH
lettering & illustration by
JUSTIN LONGOZ
photos by
KAMEKO WALKER
Nestled in the basement of Neptoon Records, I meet up with the members of
Abbotsford-based rockers Little Wild for an interview. Between road shenanigans
and the milestone events leading up to their debut album Victories, there'.s a lot to
talk about—and for this band of storytellers, that's no problem.
Inspired by '90s garage acts like the White Stripes and the Hives, Little Wild are
known for their upbeat, riff-heavy tracks and energetic live shows. Conga lines have
also become a mainstay in their set, a trend that started with the band but has since
grown beyond their control. Within Little Wild's lineup, the Keely Brothers Layton
and Zack, share guitar duties, with the former also providing vocals. Josh Erickson
is responsible for holding everything down with solid bass groove and drummer Jake Holmes shows range and talent switching from go-to rock
backbeats to Latin standards perfectly suited for Little Wild's
hodgepodge of gunslinger showdown singles.
The band came together in 2008 when Layton asked Erickson
about starting a new group, after having weathered several
high school bands together in the past. Kicking around with
different members and rotating instruments, the band began
to take shape under the moniker Princess Says, before switching to another former name, Rags to Radio. Layton took vocal
duties, while Erickson experimented with bass to cover the low
end. Younger brother Zack was enlisted on trombone and keys,
before switching to a heavier guitar role—a switch that had a
dramatic effect on the band's style.
"It added a whole new level to our sound." Erickson remarks.
The band's previous outings had dabbled in swing-rock, but
feeling the songs were dated, the inclusion of Zack's guitar lines
added depth and life into their older catalogue. "When you add
a second guitar [the songs], for a lack of a better word, sound
more modern. It's more true to what we actually listen to."
Holmes was the final member to join, after the group juggled
through a few previous drummers. Holmes' inclusion in 2010
finalized the band's current lineup and solidified their driven,
climactic sound.
Since 2011, Little Wild have managed to tour across Western
Canada, win an illustrious spot playing at POP Montreal, and
perform a series of shows in LA that would result in them meeting their future producer. When listing Litde Wild's recent string
of successes, it's easy to write it off as a lucky streak. However,
with five years of development under their belt, Little Wild have
"WE LIKE TO BRING A
SHOWTO PEOPLE. WE
LIKE TO BRING ENERGY.
AND WE LIKE NOTHING
MORE THAN TO SEE
PEOPLE DANCING AND
GOING CRAZY."
earned their following with every solid set and new release. The
energy and conga lines didn't hurt either.
"We like to bring a show to people. We like to bring energy.
And we like nothing more than to see people dancing and going
crazy," Erickson remarks about their live shows.
Right from the start, Little Wild took an aggressive approach,
agreeing to as many gigs as they could in the Lower Mainland
before embarking on a Western Canada tour in 2011. Playing
nine shows in almost as many days, the band made it all the
way to Saskatchewan before returning with new experiences
and countless road stories under their belt. They travelled with
tourmates and fellow Abbotsfordians GSTS, growing their fan
base and gaining experience that can only be earned on the road.
In 2012, at the suggestion of Aaron Levy for CrVL Radio in
Abbotsford, the band entered a contest where the winners would
be flown in all expenses paid to play at the POP Montreal Music
Festival. Over 200 bands submitted entries, and after fan voting
landed them in the top two, a panel of judges declared Little
Wild—still playing under the moniker of Rags to Radio—the
winners.
"They put us up in a hotel in Montreal, all expenses paid, we
got passes for the festival, and they set us up with two gigs" says
Erickson, recalling the experience fondly. Itwas in Montreal that
the band ultimately decided to change their name.
"After a while of playing and doing bigger things, we had a
litde bit of amateur airplay and so it almost all became somewhat
superficial. Rags to Radio had become what we were doing."
says Holmes.
"We wanted a name that people could just take more seriously," adds Erickson.
Three months after the stint in Montreal, a fan
invited Little Wild to play in a series of shows for
Indie Music Cares in LA. The band played three
shows, including one at the legendary Whiskey A
Go-Go, and also made plans with Scott Coslett to
record their debut album, Victories.
Released on November 26 via Neptoon Records
(and with the support of store owner, Rob Frith),
Victories was recorded over a two-week period,
"In so many different kinds of places," Holmes
remarks. "We recorded at the creative shop in
Aldergrove. We did drums and bass there and a little bit of
guitar." Other recording locations included a dojo that the Keely
brothers attend, Neptoon Records, and Layton's own closet,
which was used for vocal tracks. The closet is credited on the
album as "The Cupboard."
"Itwas very guerilla-style." adds Layton.
The album boasts 11 tracks, offering a broad listening
experience from the up tempo single "Steep," to the closing
track, "Ride Off... Really Dramatic Like"—the band's take on
a spaghetti western theme. For extra credit, listen closely to
"Cockatiel" to hear Holmes play makeshift steel drums on a
set of repurposed oil drums.
The band will soon embark on a tour of the United States in
promotion of their new album, culminating in a coveted spot
at SXS W 2014. Many victories still await Little Wild in the years
to come, as they turn every live show into a new opportunity. "I WENT TO A BIRTHDAY PARTY IN THE THIRD
GRADE, AND A GIRL ASKED IF MY MOM
COOKS, BECAUSE SHE LIKED EAST INDIAN
FOOD, AND I SAID, 'YEAH, MY MOM COOKS..
THAT'S WHY WE EAT OUT.'"
SUNEE
DHALIWAL
by EVAN
BROW
photos by
JON VINCENT
V
lettering by
KIMPRINGLE Vancouver stand-up Sunee Dhaliwal has four passions: basketball, coaching basketball, rap music, and comedy. For the
first two, it helps that he's 6's". But for comedy, it helps that
Dhaliwal has a fluid energy to him, to be sparked by something, to declare a good side note to what's going on, or to
treat you like a friend and say, "Hey, I shouldn't talk about
this, but I'll tell you anyway. This is for you." And as a comic,
that's how Dhaliwal got his roots, as the friend who told a
good bit.
"The first time I saw comedy, I was watching a Chris Rock
special," says Dhaliwal. "Chris Rock was talking about a 'Get
Dick Free Card,' that if you cheat on your girlfriend and you
stay with her, you essentially gave her a 'Get Dick Free Card,'
because she has the right to cheat now. I remember that and
I remember doing it back at school. I would always do that. I
would always be influenced by him and then go back and do
the bit to my friends at elementary school. Oh, and then get in
trouble for saying it."
Growing up, Dhaliwal strove to find the joke, wherever it
was and however he could tell it. It was exciting to evolve his
sense of humour, discovering rhythm, a quick wit, and timing.
"I went to a birthday party in the third grade, and a girl
asked if my mom cooks, because she liked East Indian food,
DHALIWAL, ON THE NICKNAME "SUNEE D"
"It was a quick and easy way for people to identify me. I think I started to do it subconsciously for
comedy competitions. Comedy competitions are the worst thing ever. There's like 15 comics on a
show and all the people just bring their friends and say, 'Hey, vote for me.' It's just who can bring
the most friends. But it's so many people during the night. I mean, 15 comics, you don't remember who's who, so you can do a quick joke like, 'Oh, I can't be a rapper because my name is Sunee
Dhaliwal. Sunee D,' and people laugh at that. And then they put down their friend, obviously, and
then "that Sunee D guy" as second. So it's a cheap way to get noticed."
and I said, 'Yeah, my mom cooks... that's why we eat out,' and
I got a laugh for that and I thought, 'Okay, I get timing.'"
It's this kind of humour that Dhaliwal specializes in: real
humour and real moments. Dhaliwal isn't the type to labour
at a joke, racking his brain for hours thinking, "What's
funny? Come on, dammit, think of something funny." He'll
tell real-life stories, moments, and experiences that come
naturally to him. Even his first stand-up joke was taken
straight from real life.
"I was taking criminology in university and a professor
said, 'Tell us a little about yourselves, so let's go around the
room.' And it got to me and I said, 'I'm Sunee Dhaliwal... I'm
East Indian but I can't grow facial hair. I mean, I can grow it
but it comes in all patchy. I don't know how my sisters did
it.' The class loved it, so I did it the first time I went up for
stand-up."
One of Dhaliwal's signature bits is about his name and
how "Sunee Dhaliwal" could be shortened to "Sunee D." I
asked Dhaliwal how he realized his name was also a popular
orange-flavoured beverage.
"I didn't have that moment because people had that
moment for me. Itwas the sixth grade. SunnyD came out. In
Abbotsford, they gave samples with the newspaper to launch
the product. So the name "Sunee D" hit the ground running.
Everyone was saying, 'Hey, SunnyD! Get it?' And I was like,
'Uh, yeah. I do.'"
Even now, as an established comic, Dhaliwal still finds
moments to put into his set. It helps when you go on the road
and see how diverse being a road comic is.
"I start one of my jokes with, 'When you start touring, you
don't get to pick where you get to go.' I didn't know that," says
Dhaliwal. "You know, when Jay-Z gets to do a tour, he gets
to pick. So I thought, yeah, let's do a tour. Toronto, LA, New
York, yeah! And it's like, nope, you're doing Prince George,
Williams Lake, and Castlegar. And I thought, 'What is this,
the broken dreams tour?' So me and my friend are driving to
Prince George for a show, eight-hour drive. We pull up into
this hotel. It's called the PG Hotel. Worst hotel I've ever been
to in my life... We go to check in and the hotel is attached to
a cold beer and wine store. And that's where we had to check
in. It's weird to go to a cold beer and wine store and say, 'Hi,
Sunee Dhaliwal, here pursuing my dream.'"
From the third grade to life on the
road, Sunee Dhaliwal is still mining his
experiences for material. Maybe it comes
easy to a man who initiates conversation so well, treating you like a friend he
spent months on the road with, a man
who just loves b-ball, Eazy-E, and a good
laugh.
Dhaliwal will be headlining the Comedy Mix
jrom December 19 to 21. He will also be emcee-
ing a New Year's Eue stand-up show at the
Comedy Mix on December 31, featuring Dino
Archie, luan Decker, and Ben McGinnis. fotfreefor station intos)
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It's difficult to describe Little India without noting the youth brimming at their seams.
The three-piece indie-rock band, consisting of Conan Karpinski (vocals/guitar), Andrew
Dixon (bass), and Dallyn Hunt (drums), have just wrapped a short photo shoot in conjunction with this article; one that consisted of spur-of-the-moment jumping shots
with passersby, and casually sitting in trees. Graduating frorrrhigrLschool in 2011,
the trio have a lot to celebrate as of late: their debut EP, Up All Night, was released in
November—almost to the date of their one-year anniversary as a band. It is barely a
minute into our chat on the outskirts of the Metrotown SkyTrain station and the band
has already made ample use of their charismatic laughs—and the word "fun." But
as the group divulges into their band's origin, it becomes evident that, although the
term youth relates to the group in some aspects, life experience is not one of them.
"I've been playing music for as long as I can remember," recounts Karpinski. The
frontman moved to Canada from South Africa six years ago, meeting Dixon and Hunt
at a Langley high school. Though friends, the three never considered forming a band.
"We did jam one time, or a couple times. But made nothing of it," Karpinski explains.
Hunt reiterates the statement, adding "We were just playing covers for fun."
Two years after graduation, Karpinski had the urge to play music with other people. Calling up the only bassist he knew in town, along with a drummer who was soaking up the sun on an Australian beach at the time, proved to be a good fit; after a
couple months of jamming together in Hunt's basement, the trio realized there may
be some good chemistry in the mix after all. In the end, all it took was a little push to
get the ball rolling. "Some friends [fellow Langley indie-rockers Derrival] asked us to
open for them at a show, so we did," Karpinski says. "[We put] ourselves out there.
After that, we liked it."
When discussing their debut EP, Up All Night, Little India can't help but express relief at the fact that it's now available and in the hands of the public. "We've never recorded or released anything together, so the entire thing was a learning process," notes
Karpinski. "The first time Dallyn [Hunt] and I ever played on a stage was last January,"
Dixon chimes in. "So in the studio process I was like, 'What?'"
Self-described as "indie-rock, with a tint of electronic-ness," the group started with
several demos and electronic songs written by Karpinski, and converted them into the
band-friendly, indie-rock tracks they were aiming for.
On top of the process being their first, there were numerous setbacks to the release..
The band wasn't completely happy with the outcome of where the EP was first mixed.
Instead of settling for the subpar product, they kept their options open and looked elsewhere. "You only get to release [a debut album] once," Karpinski noted. "We decided we
might as well just dig deep into the pockets, and go where we should go."
Where Little India should go turned out to be Michael Brauer, a New York mix
engineer who has worked with artists ranging from Bob Dylan to Coldplay. "When we
decided who we wanted to get [the EP] mixed by, we decided that we should listen to
what we already listen to," explains Dixon"! After stumbling across Brauer through an
Atlas Genius album, the band decided to shoot him an email. As the old sayiji&goes, it
never hurts to ask; Brauer, along with his assistant, Will HehSety, enjoyed their tracks
and wanted to work with them. "Itwas the coolest news ever," Dixon says with a smile.
"We were like, 'Oh, [the EP] will sound good!'"
Even so, it takes more than a mix engineer to make arralbum sound good. Up All
Night is an impressive compilation of tracks from a band that only had one to their
name (the demo "Oola") prior to the release. Opener "Sleep" Is an upbeat, guitar-
driven number that one can't help but dance along to. "Carry On," though equally as
catchy, is slightly more solemn with Karpinski reciting lines like "This is not my sin /
to sink till you can swim."
"The way I constructed the lyrics is that they mean something personally to me, but
the listener can find what they like inside the songs as well," says Kacpinski. Sound-
wise, it was more of a group collaboration, inspired by music the trio have listened.to
all throughout their lives. "You'll have a lot of my electronic influence", but-then you'll
have a lot of Andrew's 'funky,' and Dallyn's old school rock," Karpinski explains. "It's
all new age stuff too, so we like it."
With the first release under their belt, Little India shows no signs otsjpwing down;
they're already working on new material. "We've been working on these songs for a long
time," Karpinski explains. "We have a lot of new ideas that we want to get out there as
well that we're really excited about."
The trio also express their gratitude at being part of such a tight-knit, flourishing
arts community as Vancouver. "Everyone is so friendly," gushes Hunt. "It's like having a really awesome hobby," Dixon agrees, "'because at the end of the day, everyone's doing it for fun."
If the trio's debut release is any indication as to how much they enjoy making music together, listeners have a lot to look forward to.
You can find Little India's debut £/Hlp All Night, available online through iTunes and
Amazon MP3.
by NATALIE
HOY
lettering by
GINAMACKAY
photo by
KAMEKO WALKER by LUAN LI
photos by
SYLVANA D'ANGELO
lettering by
ALIZHORVATH
L. It's a chilly November night as I make my way to The
Templeton in downtown to interview an up-and-coming band,
Phantoms Again. While waiting for a booth at the vintage
diner, I dig up a single Bandcamp track they released back in
2012 and a scribbled band description. Needless to say, I was
curious to bridge the gap between the Phantoms Again from
then and the band they've become. Between sharing pies,
fries, and banging on the vintage
jukebox, the band fills me in on their
future plans.
Phantoms Again started out in
2010 as a duo, with Cali Travis providing lead vocals and Jensen Giffbrd
on guitar/backing vocals. The idea
came to the couple while they were
travelling/hitchhiking through the
maritime provinces earlier that same
year. Casual jams evolved into songs,
and by the time Giffbrd and Travis
found their way to Vancouver, they
had already agreed to form a band
together. This past September, drummer Travis Lacroix joined to complete
Phantom Again's sound. Like many
indie startups, evolving into a band
is an organic matter; collecting funding, playing gigs, and balancing other
commitments is another ordeal.
"Originally we were called We
Are Phantoms Again, but the name
was too long and people never got it
right," says Travis, who also came up
with the name, using a line from one of her original poems. A
lot more—sonically—has changed for Phantoms Again this
year as they transition from a softer, whimsical sound to driving garage-rock. Influences are diverse but one thing is common; support for Canadian talent. Giffbrd names Quebec
band Wolf Parade as a key influence to his music, while Travis
cites Chad VanGaalen as hers. Moonface (featuring B.C. native
Spencer Krug) and Cousins also tops the band's collective list.
1 What draws me to the band is the sensitivity they display for their audiences. The indie music scene in Vancouver
is flourishing for adults, but for those under 19, there are
very few shows available. Phantoms Again recently played
an all-ages Halloween Show at Astorino's—definitely a treat
for local underage music lovers. Giffbrd and Travis also co-
founded a Vancouver artist/musician's network called Googly
Eyes Collective, which allows musicians to jam (sometimes in
each other's garages) without having to pay hefty fees to book
venues.
The band's newest seven-track EP, Half Dog, will be released
digitally in December and as a vinyl in early 2014. Half Dog
is fast-paced and catchy, yet still captures a nostalgic feel.
Nonetheless, some of the band's unique ethereal, playful
sound still resonates in the garage-rock record.
The band initially planned to book studio time for recording, but instead opted for a TEAC A-2340SX analog tape
machine—an interesting alternative to going digital. This
happy incident is accredited for the crackly, fuzzy lo-fi sound
in all of the tracks on the EP.
"We want our sound to be abrasive, but in a good way,"
Lacroix adds. The record, though abrasive at times, is still
strikingly haunting and sentimental and is reminiscent of a
long-ago teenage summer, upbeat but static, like old negatives
from a film.
Recording for the EP began in July earlier this year at
Googly Eyes Studio (a.k.a. Giffbrd and Travis' living room).
The band recently finished putting the final touches on the
record. In early November, Phantoms Again played for a
full crowd at the Prophouse with Daisy Blue to fundraise for
Half Dog's prospective vinyl release party ("We're pushing
for February," Giffbrd encourages). With a new album to be
released, the band also sees a full itinerary coming their way.
The time and place for Half Dog's official digital release party
is already set, while Phantoms Again are also headlining an
upcoming show at the Media Club—all before the year's end.
The band also plans to send the new EP to local record labels
and to continue experimenting with new sounds.
With a new and improved sound and a third member to
the ensemble, Phantoms Again is headed off to a great start.
Expect to see some smashing shows full of pizza, dogs and
crunchy slacker-rock coming your way.
Join Phantoms Again at The Rickshaw Theatre on December 8/or their
digital release party. You can also catch them the jbllouring night,
December g, at The Media Club performing with Scottie P. & the Virgins
and Death Goldbloom.
THE BAND INITIALLY PLANNED TO BOOK STUDIO TIME FOR
RECORDING, BUT INSTEAD OPTED FOR A TEAC A-2340SX ANALOG
TAPE MACHINE—AN INTERESTING ALTERNATIVE TO GOING
DIGITAL THIS HAPPY INCIDENT IS AGCREDITED FOR THE CRACKLY,
FUZZY LO-FI SOUND IN ALL OF THE TRACKS ON THE EP.
"WE WANT OUR SOUND TO BE ABRASIVE, BUT IN A GOOD WAY,"
LACROIX ADDS. Trudging through deserted midday streets beneath a dubious grey sky, I arrive before a building resembling more
h of a makeshift auto body shop than a studio, but double-
checking the address spray-painted across the front, I know
I have the right place. In most cases, I would be a little sceptical entering into what could possibly be the squatting
grounds of crack heads, but for some reason I have a good
feeling about this one.
After first listening to Sabota, the local DJ collaboration
between Robbie Slade and Max Ulis, I struggled with how I
would even describe their music in writing. Labeling them
as indie-electronica or under any of its infinite subgenres
felt apathetic and would serve little purpose. Walking up
the stairs into their construction zone-esque studio space, I
meet Slade quiedy sipping a coffee in an office chair, looking depleted. He flew in overnight from Toronto on his way
home after performing in Bogota, Colombia with his other
group HUMANS. Waiting for Ulis, an accomplished solo
DJ in his own right, we begin moving furniture in prep to
take photos. Walking around the chilly open space, I smell
a vague stench of mouldy beer, but Slade assures me of the
plan to spruce the place up with a mini-bar. Ulis eventually
shows up and we cram into his closet-sized personal studio
space to talk about the development of their collaboration
and their self-titled debut LP being released January 27 on
Hybridity Music.
Sabota came together about a year ago after Malcolm
Levy, the director of Hybridity, suggested the idea of them
working together. Using sequencers and synthesizers such
as the Yamaha CS-60, xoxbox, Roland SH-101, Nord Electro,
and an Acidlab Miami, they started to write trance-like
tracks with a feel for constructing an early morning aesthetic. Even though most of the composition is done alone,
the main ideas for their music are hashed out together. By
continually going back and forth between one another,
each guy's personal musical elements enter into the songs.
Ulis' background as an underground DJ introduces dub and
house influences, which are then met with Slade's knack
for melody. Slade describes how he originally envisioned
Sabota as being solely beats, while Ulis came in laughing,
"Yeah right, there was no way I would just let your golden
voice go to waste. C'mon." They eventually developed a live
set and everything started snowballing from there. Sabota
released their first single, "October," back in April and now
their buzz-worthy self-titled LP comes out January 27.
Sabota's record was originally set to be released as an EP on November 12th, but after much consideration and
enthusiasm on the side of the label, they postponed its
release to include three remixes by Grenier, Heartbeats),
and Sanctums. The album's first single, "Stumble," came
out on the EP's original release date and when I ask about
the track, they feel uneasy about the song.
"I don't think we'll ever go that far out with a song
again," says Ulis. "It was a pretty big struggle trying to
make it not seem too fromagey." Slade expresses similar
mixed feelings. "We were pretty unsure about it altogether,
but once we started showing the album to our friends, they
were like no that's the single."
The track stands out in comparison to the rest of the
album, but in no way is it incohesive with their sound. It
pushes along, not exhausting itself, but reminding the listener of that last drunken moment spent in the club once
the lights come on. Consciously avoiding the lonely walk
home and holding onto the temporary euphoria of the
dance party. When asked about the creative process that led
to the album, Ulis and Slade have differing responses.
"Developing an album was generally a very new process,
since I was pretty much just blindly working underground
for so long," says Ulis.
"This is definitely the
first time I've ever actually wanted to listen to
what I've made."
"The Sabota record
was quite streamlined
and straightforward,"
adds Slade, on the
recording process. "I
guess I've gotten better
now that I've been doing
this for awhile."
Constandy challenging each other to toy
with the unconformable, they found a way to
create an album that euphorically shuffles along as though
it were finding its way through the fog at sunrise. Rather
than reminding the listener of a dark sweaty club, it causes
them to remember the first emotions they felt waking up in
the morning. Both of them seemed rather captivated by this
time of day, or as Slade puts it: "It would be so rad to play
morning sets at festivals. I feel as though our songs would
just put everyone in the best frame of mind."
One of the most unique components of Sabota's music
is how it approaches the use of vocals. I ask Slade about
the lyrics and he tells me that "like all art in general, writing is so hard. There's definitely a fine line between making something too personal or entirely devoid of soul.
Attempting to not remain completely beige is something
I really struggle with." The dichotomy is evident in their
music both in terms of lyrics and rhythm. The vocals sometime stray to the almost unintelligible at times; while others remain perfectly comprehensible, stuck on repeat until
they're etched in the listener's skull. Their music ignores
the party anthem and rather than forcing the listener to
dance and shout with youthful excitement, it enchains them
in a slow tranquil movement.
With the album now complete, Slade and Ulis are ready
to start working on a well-polished live performance. They
plan to put on a proper live show by bringing out all of their
gear and developing the beats and loops on stage, no matter
how nerve-wracking it might be.
"Its pretty easy for analog gear to go out of tune or to
have your mixer crap out," says Slade. "It's completely
unlike breaking a guitar string, where you can easily keep
going. There's no way to actually find out the problem
unless you take everything apart. [But] crowds seem to
be far more forgiving if they can tell you're performing a
live set."
While there are no ojpcial plans to tour, Slade and Ulis are
looking/orward to playing plenty of shows in support of the new
album, available jbr download through whatpeopleplay.com on
January 27. BIG JOY
FESTIVAL
by FRASER
DOBBS
illustration by
SITJ1CHOU
It has been postulated in the past that Vancouver's healthy relationship with
experimental music is in part due to its unhealthy one with music venues
and liquor licensing. As No Fun City has forced music spaces to become
more varied and deeper underground, so too has a rich, varied underground
community formed to support them. With events like the legendary Fake
Jazz, Destroy Vancouver, Noise Fest, Square Wave, and New Forms bringing
together a hive of talented sonic, visual, and ethereal artists, the inclusive and
thriving community has never felt more comfortable. In December, Shaunn
Watt and JP Doucet will be launching a new festival, Big Joy, with more than
just said community in mind.
"There are a lot of people that aren't into this kind of music," says Doucet,
"but it's not because they've heard it and decided they didn't like it. It's
because they haven't been exposed to it! A lot more people can get into this
kind of music than you'd think." We're sitting in Kokopelli, a hair salon on
Commercial Drive, and it's more than a little difficult taking him seriously
from behind a bib. His co-organizer, Watt, works here, and the two are conducting the interview while Watt gives him a trim. Even from around a pair of
scissors, it's hard not to agree with his interpretation: experimental music in
Vancouver is still largely below the radar of many mainstream concert-goers,
a problem these two are intensely motivated to tackle.
"We're trying to be inclusive, but not alienating." Shaunn is fishing for
a comb but gesturing wildly. "And I don't think [experimental music] is as
alienating as people think it is. They just imagine someone on the floor, making terrifying sounds. But as soon as you're there, witnessing it, it's such a
different thing. There are people around you, and the way people experience
that is much different than in a traditional pop or rock setting."
Big Joy will run over the course of three days—December 5 to 7—with
two shows at the Remington Gallery, a daytime lineup at the new Red Gate,
and a kickoff show at Kokopelli. The bill features a diverse lineup of 30 local
artists performing everything from electronica to drone, ambient, noise, and
free-jazz. Headliners include reel-to-reel operatic maestro Ian William Craig,
synth-wizard the Passenger, pop-drone darling White Poppy, and ex-Yellow
Swans/In Flux collaboration Diadem. With so many acts to choose from, it
was intensely important to the organizers to not only focus on local material,
but also curate artists who rarely showcase their work.
With so many talented artists and rare performances, Big Joy could have
been a jumble, but Watt and Doucet are doing everything they can to make
sure it's as comfortable to enjoy as possible. "Big Joy is a listener's festival,"
says Watt. "It's not a sexy, hang-out-with-your-buddy-and-talk-over-each-
band thing. It's really valuable that people are there to listen to, and to be
involved in, the music. But it's also important that it should be inclusive, so
that people feel comfortable coming in and experiencing a different type of
music." Contrary to popular belief about avant-garde art snobs, the noise and
drone shows can be some of the friendliest nights of the week, and Big Joy
aims to encourage that sort of behaviour.
Doucet is nearly done his trim (gotta get that beard lined up), but even in
the middle of a haircut the pair's motivation and passion is tenable. Watt's
sweeping hair off the floor when he says at the end of the night, "When people
take time on how each performance is going to affect each other, and reflect
off each other, and inform each other... that's important." When asked to
elaborate on our way out the door, he responds: "Just because you've contacted an artist because you love a certain piece of theirs, that doesn't mean
they're going to play anything remotely close to it for you. Your favourite drone
musician might really be into acid-house at the moment, so that's what he
wants to play for Big Joy." The air of unpredictability swirling around such a
heavy lineup means you really won't know what you're missing until you let
yourself be included in December.
Big Joy runs December 5 through 7 at Kokopelli Salon, the Remington Gallery, and
the Red Gate. Tickets are between $5 and $10, with festival passes for $20 available at
Audiopile, Red Cat, Neptoon, and Kokopelli. During the first rap battle I ever saw, Cody the Catch said these two lines:
"He's a pathetic waste of skin with a troubled past of lies. He takes transit
ride to bubble baths with guys."
Thanks to an organization called King of the Dot, people like Cody the
Catch have a place to go.
King of the Dot (KOTD), the Toronto-based competitive league of rap
battlers, works like this: two opponents face off, each with three rounds of
pre-written, acapella verses of rap intended to verbally bitch slap the opponent
into submission. The verses are made up of a combination of bars, personals, one-liners, and gimmicks. Bars are lines of poetry employing rhythm
and rhyme, usually intended to big up the spitter; personals are personal
disses generated from the opponents idiosyncrasies; one-liners are your
basic jokes; and while gimmicks are less common, a dope rap battler can use
them effectively and frequendy. They're all tools employed by battle rappers
to cut the other down.
I really enjoy watching rap battles, but I also really dislike hearing men
yell the word "faggot" at each other. To any rap battler—and anyone in general—employing the word: using faggot even once as an insult is once too
many. You think you're being clever but we see through you. Using the word
in place ofa "like" or "um," you try to buy time and use it to get an immediate
crowd response. Say you're afraid you haven't gotten enough laughs or you're
stumbling towards your next line; you slip a faggot in and buy yourself that
cheap laugh or that cheap time. You have just used the word in fear. You relate
by EMMA
GREGORY
illustration by
JOHN C.BARRY
your fear to homosexuals and you're now acting
homophobically.
There are people who argue that rap battling
is just words and has no greater consequences.
Before you tell me about the "No rules" nature of
rap battling, allow me to refer to a study from 1995
called "Children's Judgements about Psychological
Harm in Social Context." In the study, "children
were presented with a series of stories involving
psychological harm (name-calling) in a game context." What the researchers found could easily be
applied to the world of rap battling:
"Younger children were more likely to ignore
intentions and consequences or the recipient's
perspective and to focus on contextual features
(e.g. game rules). Older children were more likely to base their evaluations
on intentions, or both intentions and consequences, and to take into account
the recipients perspective."
In regards to battle rapping, lesser rappers are like the younger children.
You understand your actions based solely on the rules of the rap game with the
inability to place them into the larger context, that being the world-at-large
with its subsequent complexities.
The act of calling another rapper a homosexual reflects a gap in understanding between you and someone who is more enlightened sexually. Sexual
preference does not exist purely in binary. You are out of touch with the more
sexually progressive members of society and out of touch, it appears, with
yourself.
I speculate that a lesser rap battler would employ this particular poetic device
because they were brainwashed into believing a hypermasculine, hyper-heterosexual and mentally inflexible attitude was the only way to approach poetry.
There's a lot going on in the world of rap battling. As one of Canada's
main entertainment industries, I would say it has a resounding effect on our
society. While some rap battlers use the spotlight to sling slurs, other rappers are using the scene to hone their craft and spread a message. Give the
right ones your attention, stop hating on celebrity rappers, and support your
local rap scene today.
Peace.
"KING OF THE DOT, THE TORONTO-BASED COMPETITIVE LEAGUE OF RAP
BATTLERS, WORKS LIKE THIS: TWO OPPONENTS FACE OFF, EACH WITH
THREE ROUNDS OF PRE-WRITTEN, ACAPELLA VERSES OF RAP INTENDED TO
VERBALLY BITCH SLAP THE OPPONENT INTO SUBMISSION."  00 jo
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CO CiTR 101.9 FM PROGRAM GUIDE
DISCORDER SUGGESTS LISTENING TO CiTR ONLINE AT WWW.CiTR.CA EVERY DAY.
SUN
MON
TUES
WED
THURS
FRI
SAT
12
*
pi Crespan Presents..
{Difficult Music)
Classical Chaos
(Classical)
Shookshookta (Talk)
The Rockers Show
(Reggae)
Blood On        Moon
The Saddle      Grok
(Roots) (Alt)
ChthonicBoom!
(Rock)
Good Morning
My Friends
Breakfast With The Browns
(Eclectic)
Ska-T's Scenic Drive
Parts Unknown (Pop)
Moon Grok
(Alt)
The Leo Ramirez Show
(World)
Pacific Pickm' (Roots)
(toeerFMVancouve
Reloaded
(Talk)
Moon Grok
(Eclectic)
Morning After Show
(Eclectic)
Student Special Hour
(Eclectic)
GtveEm The Boot
Radio Free Thinker
Discorder Radio
Suburban Jungle
(Eclectic)
ERd of the World News
(Talk)
Pop Drones
(Eclectic)
ICieatas&C
(Ta:
The Shakespeare Show
(Old Stoai)
Terry Project    Democracy
Podcast (Talk)   Now (Talk)
JMrtraerwireRraeniaust
(Talk)
Moon
Grok
' Srte'waylh
It Ain't Easy Being Green
Duncan's Domits
Chips n Dip
(Underground Pop,
Language tolanguage
ffaife)
Programming Training
Simorgh
(Persian Literacy)
Stitaent-fBMitStot
Up on the Roof
(Eclectic)
The Cat's Pajams {indie
Pop, Oarage RocJO--
Stereo Blues
(Blues/Eclectic)
Definition Soundwave
.folk/Rock)
Skald's Hall
(Drama/Poetry)
Radio Zero {Dance)
Nardwuar Parents
iMriviW}'
CiTR Ghost Mix
Radio Nezate
(Eritrian)
The Saturday Edge
{Roots}
Generation
Annihilation ffsok)
n
Power Chord (Metal)
1
111
Code Blue
' {Sods}.
Mantra
(Eclectic)
1
IBl
3
I
5
Crescendo
(Chill to Metal)
4'33"
(Contemporary Classical
and Experimental)
More Than Human
(Electronic/Experimental)
Flex Your Head
(Hardcore)
JExptoding Head Movies
g|ffV|P
(Punk/
Experimental)
Samsquantch's
Hideaway
(Eclectic)
'Are You      Peanut
mm   j BBtter'n'
Rhythms      Ischno
'{World).   Pragtessivo
Inside Out
(Dance)
Stereoscopic Redoubt
{Experimental)
African Rh
A Deeper Revert
:.(«eavy Revert) -
Bootlegs & B-Sides
(Dance/Electronic)
11
Trancendance
(Dance)
The Jazz Show
•  (Jazz)
Crimes And Treasons,
Beaver Hour aka Rossin
(World Ghetto)
So Salacious
(Electro/Hip Hop)
G4E
{Reggae/House/Hip
Hop/Experimental)
Alternating Tuesdays
Sexy to Van Citsi Haiti}
Live From Thunderbird
Radio Hett
(live)
The Bassment
(Dance/Electronic)
Synaptic Sandwich
ft
9
■HHI
7
9
Eclectic)
Hans Von Kloss
Misery Hour -
The Copyright Experiment
(Talk & Underground Electronic)
Randophonic
-{Eclectic)
Vampire's Ball
(Rock/Eclectic)
Aarsj Tentacles
-    (Eclectic)
The Late Night Show
(Drum + Bass, Ambient,
industrial.}
The Absolute
Value of Insomnia
W/m
SUBSCRIBE TO
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Discorder Magazine #233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., Canada, V6T 111 BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS...
(Difficult Music) 7'-9am
Bepi Crespan Presents... CiTR's 24
Hours Of Radio Art in a snack size
format! Difficult music, harsh electronics, spoken word, cut-up/collage and
general Crespan© weirdness. Twitter:
©bepicrespan Blog: bepicrespan.
blogspot.ca
CLASSICAL CHAOS
(Classical) 9-10am
From the Ancient World to the 21st century, join host Marguerite in exploring
and celebrating classical music from
around the world.
SH00KSH00KTA
(Ta/A;i0am-12pm
A program targeted to Ethiopian people
that encourages education and personal
development.
THE ROCKERS SHOW
(Reggae) 12-3pm
Reggae   inna    all   styles   and
fashion.
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
(Roots) 3-5pm
Alternating Sundays
Real   cowshit-caught-in-yer-boots
country.
MOON GROK
0W03-5pm
CHTHONIC BOOM!
{Pop) 5-6pm
A show dedicated to playing psychedelic
music from parts of the spectrum (rock,
pop, electronic) as well as garage and
noise rock.
CRESCENDO
(Chill to Metal) Worn
Starting with some serene chill tracks
at the beginning and building to the IN-
SANEST FACE MELTERS OF ALL TIMEEE,
Crescendo will take you on a musical
magic carpet ride that you couldn't imagine in your wildest dreams. Besides
overselling his show, Jed will play an
eclectic set list that builds throughout
the hour and features both old classics,
and all the greatest new tracks that the
hipsters think they know about before
anyone else does.
MORE THAN HUMAN
(Electronic/Experimental) 7-8pm
Strange and wonderful electronic sounds
from the past, present, and future with
host Gareth Moses. Music from parallel
worlds.
RHYTHMSINDIA
(World) %-$pm
BOOTLEGS & B-SIDES
(Dance/Electronic) 9-10pm
Hosted by Doe-Ran, the show was a
nominated finalist for "Canadian College Radio Show of the year 2012 in the
Pioneer DJ Stylus Awards". A complete
mixbag every week, covering: Ghetto
funk, Breakbeat, Hip-Hop, Funk & Soul,
Chillout, Drum & Bass, Mashups, Electro
House and loads of other crackin' tunes.
Search 'Doe Ran' at percussionlab.com
andonfacebook.com
TRANCENOANCE
(Dance) 10pm-12am
Hosted by DJ Smiley Mike and DJ Cad-
dyshack, Trancendance has been broadcasting from Vancouver, B.C. since 2001.
We favour Psytrance, Hard Trance and
Epic Trance, but also play Acid Trance,
Deep Trance, Hard Dance and even
some Breakbeat. We also love a good
Classic Trance Anthem, especially if
it's remixed. Current influences include
Sander van Doom, Gareth Emery, Nick
Sentience, Ovnimoon, Ace Ventura, Save
the Robot, Liquid Soul and Astrix. Older
influences include Union Jack, Carl Cox,
Christopher Lawrence, Whoop! Records,
TidyTrax, Platipus Records and Nukleuz.
Email: djsmileymike ©trancendance.net.
Website: www.trancendance.net.
SO SALACIOUS
(Electro/Hip Hop) 12am-lam
A program targeted to Ethiopian people
that encourages education and personal
development.
Featuring a wide range of music from
India, including popular music from
the 1930s to the present; Ghazals and
Bhajans, Qawwalis, pop and regional
language numbers.
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
(Dance) 8-9pm
Alternating Sundays
A mix of the latest house music, tech-
house, prog-house and techno.
GOOD MORNING MY FRIENDS
(Upbeat Music) 6:30-8am
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
f£c/ectfc; 8-1 lam
Your favourite Brownsters, James and
Peter, offer a savoury blend of the familiar and exotic in a blend of aural delights,
breakfastwiththebrowns®
hotmail.com.
SKA-T'S SCENIC DRIVE
(Ska) llam-12pm
SYNCHRONICS
(Talk) 12-lpm
Join host Marie B and discuss spirituality,
health and feeling good. Tune in and
tap into good vibrations that help you
remember why you're here: to have fun!
PARTS UNKNOWN
(Pop) l-3pm
An indie pop show since 1999, it's like a
marshmallow sandwich: soft and sweet
and best enjoyed when poked with a stick
and held close to a fire.
MOON GROK
(Pop}3-4pm
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
(World) 4-Spm
The best of mix of Latin American music.
leoramirez@canada.com
week's local, national and international STUDENT SPECIAL HOUR CREATORS & CONTRIBUTORS
news, as seen from a fully independent (Eclectic) l-2pm Alternates with "Smart People"
media perspective. Students play music. (Talk) ll:30am-12pm
4;33" ". " GIVE EM THE BOOT  Talking to artists, entrepreneurs, found-
.„   . '„.        .    '.* .... .... „ ers, and innovators abouttheirwork, their
(Contemporary Classical and Expert- (World) 2-3pm ...     .    .....
. „», j o     , ii.      •     xi t u i- process, and why they do what they do.
mental) 6-7pm Sample the various flavours of Italian ,....,    .      ,       •.
.  . ...       ...   '        , Individuals who make positive contnbu-
This program showcases new music - music from north to south, traditional '     . ...-'J? z-    .".
/ .    .   ,    . , . ,      .        ... ....      '        ZL; tions to the world in the hopes of inspiring
contemporaryclassical and experimental to modern on this bilingual show. Folk,        ....     ... ...
■■ •„ u- u,- ux-    w • j        J and helping others to act on their own
music, especia y high ightmg Vancou- singer-songwriter, jazz and much
,.,^1 x ., V-i-        u vision of contribution,
vers local performers and composers of more. Un programma bmngue che es-  _	
new music, to uncover a new musical plora il mondo della musica italiana. VTR
niche to the broader public in a friendly http://giveemtheboot.wordpress.com Alternates with
an^accessibtemanner  PROGRAMMING TRAINING"  *ea ^ Con;ft0fS
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES f7a/«3-3:30pm W l:3Uam-Upm
„       f- i7 q  -  The Vancouver Technology Report is a
(Unematic) /-9pm RAD|0 FRE£ imm news and m^ show about techno|.
Join gak as he explores music from the ...   .. .   .. . . . ;,
. .• <i      x     x,   •■ (Skepticism}3-4pm ogy and entrepreneurship in Vancouver,
movies, tunes from television and any n      ..      ,     . . .   .   .    ,    ,.   .
.       mx Promoting skepticism, critical think- featuring local tech news, interviews
other cinematic source, along with atmo- s,    .  > • .,        x-    , x  x JJU
.   .   . ",     . ing and science, we examine popular and promotional features produced by
spheric pieces, cutting edge new tracks      ,   ■',-.       ,.        ,-.. [JZ 11D_ , .   . .. .      '
j x m     j    Tu x extraordinary claims and subject them UBC students as well as members of
and strange old goodies that could be .    ...   ,     ,  . .. , .   . .,   .      ...
.. ..    , .  , to critical analysis. Vancouver s tech community along with
used in a soundtrack to be.  _.  5 ..   .   x.    ,     .-".
  _,„,,„__;._ „.».« syndicated mstructiona content.
THE JAZZ SHOW DISCORDER RADIO
',   ™T    , " (On-air version of Discorder) 4-5pm THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
(jazz)9pm-12am _.      .   ,. .     & .„,,„,   .... .
.    '  , ,   „, Discorder Magazine now has its own (OldSkool) 12-lpm
Dec 2: Jazz Show pre-emption for 24       ,.   .    . . .      •   . .    , 1    „.  . .  .        ...
xcxjxn       nno-x radio show! Join us to hear excerpts of Dan Shakespeare is here with music
Hours of Student Power. Dec.9: Baritone , , „. , .   . ...
.   .    ,. „.    ,„ interviews, reviews and more! for your ear. Kick back with gems of the
saxophone master Gerry Mulligan s Quar- 	
tet with trumpeter Art Farmer. "What Is THE CITY f8^^ _	
There To Say?" Dec.16: Pianist/composer (Talk) b-bpm TERRY PROJECT PODCAST    .
Mai Waldron's Trio with "Impressions". An   alternative  and  critical   look (Talk)l-2pm
Dec.23: A special Christmas Jazz Show at  our  changing  urban   spaces. Alternating Wednesdays
with lots of Yuletide goodies and the fa- New   website:   www.thecityfm.org. There once was a project named Terry,
mous De. 24,1954 Miles Davis session New twitter handle: @thecity_fm. That wanted to make people wary, Of
that produced "Bags' Groove". Dec.30: "_:_""""""._;""™  things going on In the world that are
An infrequently heard John Coltrane date .„   ,     ... wrong without making it all seem too
■xu      -xl., x    ., „     a xl (Hardcore) S-Spm 6 6
with pianist Wynton Kelly and others n   ,    .... inon „   . scary.
„ ^„. a      ,    „ ,     . „x _1. Punk rock and hardcore since 1989. Bands  	
called Coltrane Jazz Jan. 6: Starting .. ...       ,, nrunomwunui
..   ,.    „     ■ ux n      x/ and guests from around the world. DEMOCRACY NOW
the New Year right. Bassist/composer  „  . „
Charles Mingus and his Jazz Workshop INSIDE OUT Alt     f   W d
Ensemble. "Mingus Dynasty" Jan.13: (Dance) 8-9pm	
The Modern Jazz Quartet in 1974. "The oniV,c"c"„"™c"llcn"u"c  EXTRAENVIRONMENTALIST
i    x r>       _x„ ix ,x •. x xl.    x UKInlEb & TREAaONS _ „. „ „
Last Concert It wasn t but they took a ... (Talk) 2-3pm
hiatus for 5 years. Jan.20: An amazingly     ..£ . .. Exploring   the   mindset   of   an
x-   u-  u   j i a u n u n dj@cnmesandtreasons.com \ ..      ,   .. r  ..
creative big band led by Bob Florence.  outsider   looking   in   on   Earth.
"Serendipity" Jan.27: The creative styl- BEAVER HOUR AKA ROSSIN Featuring interviews with leading thinkings of alto saxophonist Lee Konitz with (World Ghetto) llpm-12am ers in the area of sustainable economics
bassist Sonny Dallas and drummer Elvin Emma vs music. and our global ecological crisis.
Jones ■"Motlon" G4E" moon^rock"
iia'^h ■ Alternating Tuesdays (Eclectic) 3-4pm
SNE'WAYLH
4-5pm
In many Coast Salish dialects,
"sne'waylh" is the word for teachings or
laws. The aboriginal language-learning
program begins with the teachings of
the skwxwu7mesh snichim (Squamish
language). Originally aired on Coop Radio
CFRO 100.5 FM in Vancouver, Tuesdays
1-2 pm
PACIFIC PICKIN'
(Roots) 6-8am
Bluegrass,      old-time      music,
and   its  derivatives  with  Arthur
and  the   lovely  Andrea   Berman.
pacificpickin@yahoo.com
NEWS 101
(Talk) 5-6pm
Vancouver's only live, volunteer-produced, student and community newscast.
Every week, we take a look back at the
QUEER FM
VANCOUVER: RELOADED
(TaW8-10:30am
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bisexual
and transexual communities of Vancouver. Lots of human interest features,
background on current issues and great
music.queerfmradio@gmail.com
MOOKGROK
(Eclectic) 10:30-11:30am
MORNING AFTER SHOW
(Eclectic) ll:30am-lpm
An eclectic mix of Canadian indie with
rock, experimental, world, reggae, punk
and ska from Canada, Latin America
and Europe. Hosted by Oswaldo Perez
Cabrera.
12am-2am
Vinyl mixes, exclusive local tunes, good
vibes from around the world, a thought
and a dream or two with your host Logan.
Reggae, House, Techno, Ambient, Dance
Hall, Hip Hop, African, Psychedelic, Noise,
Experimental, Eclectic.
WEDNESDAY
TWEETS & TUNES
//Ve^6:30-8am
We practice what we Tweet! Showcasing
local indie music and bringing bands, artists and fans together through social media. Website: tweetsandtunes.com Twitter:
@tweetsandtunes.
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
(Eclectic) i-lOam
Live from the Jungle Room, join radio host
Jack Velvet for an eclectic mix of music,
sound bites, information and inanity. dj@
jackvelvet.net.
ARTS REPORT
(Ta/«5-6pm
Reviews, interviews and coverage of local
arts (film, theatre, dance, visual and performance art, comedy, and more) by host
Maegan Thomas and the Arts Reporters.
ARTS PROJECT
(Ta//y6-6:30pm
Alternating with UBC Arts On Air
Stay tuned after the Arts Report for Arts
Project Interviews, documentaries and
artsy stuff that doesn't fit into CiTR's
original arts hour.
POP DRONES
(Eclectic) 10-11:30am UBC ARTS ON AIR
(T3//r76-6:30pm
Alternating with Arts Extra!
On break from June-September 2013.
SAMSQUANTCH'S HIDEAWAY
Alternates with Kew It Up!
(Eclectic) 6:30-8pm
All-Canadian music with a focus on
indie-rock/pop. anitabinder@hotmail.
com.
KEW IT UP!
Alternating with
Samsquantch's Hideaway
(Punk/Experimental) 6:30-8pm
Abrasivefight-or-flight music played at
hot loud volumes, uncooperative songs
for things that are not alright. Punk,
Noise-Rock, Post-Punk, Experimental,
Industrial, Noisy, ad nauseum.
FOLK OASIS
(Roots) 8-10pm
Two hours of eclectic folk/roots
music, with a big emphasis on our local scene. C'mon in! A kumbaya-free
zone since 1997. folkoasis@gmail.com
SEXY IN VAN CITY
(Talk) 10-1 lpm
Your weekly dose of education and entertainment in the realm of relationships and sexuality, sexyinvancity.com/
category/sexy-in-vancity-radio
HANS VON KLOSS MISERY HOUR
(Rock/Eclectic) 1 lpm-lam
Pretty much the best thing on radio.
G4E
(Reggae/House/Hip Hop/Experimental)
12am-3am
Vinyl mixes, exclusive local tunes, good
vibes from around the world, a thought
and a dream or two with your host Logan. Reggae, House, Techno, Ambient,
Dance Hall, Hip Hop, African, Psychedelic, Noise, Experimental, Eclectic
THURSDAY
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
(7aW8-10am
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
(PunkRock/Pop Punk) 10-llam
Hello hello hello! I interview bands
and play new, international and
local punk rock music. Great Success! P.S. Broadcasted in broken-
ish English. Hosted by Russian Tim.
Website: http://rocketfromrussia.
tumblr.com. Email: rocketfrom
russiacitr@gmail.com. Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/Rocket-
FromRussia. Twitter: http://twitter.
com/tima_tzar.
IT AIN'T EASY BEING GREEN
llam-12pm
This is CiTR's flagship beginner's show.
With the support of experienced programmers, this show offers fully-
trained CiTR members, especially students, the opportunity to get their feet
wet on the air.
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
(Eclectic) 12-lpm
Sweet treats from the pop underground. Hosted by Duncan, sponsored by donuts. http://duncans
donuts.wordpress.com
CHIPS N DIP
(Underground Pop, Garage, Lo-Fi)
l-2pm
Dip in every Thursday afternoon with
host Hanna Fazio for the freshest local
indie pop tracks and upcoming shows.
LANGUAGE TO LANGUAGE
(Talk) 2-3pm
Encouraging language fluency and
cultural awareness.
THUNDERBIRD EYE
(Sports) 3:30-4pm
Your weekly roundup of UBC Thunderbird
sports action from on campus and off
with your host Wilson Wong.
TWOFOLD
(Eclectic/Mandarin & English)
A Mandarin/English radio program
featuring people and music from the
community. Hosted by Sandy.
SIMORGH
(Persian Literacy) 5-6pm
Simorgh Radio is devoted to the education and literacy for the Persian speaking communities and those interested
in connecting to Persian oral and
written literature. Simorgh takes you
through a journey of ecological sus-
tainability evolving within cultural and
social literacy. Simorgh the mythological multiplicity of tale-figures, lands-in
as your mythological narrator in the
storyland; the contingent space of beings, connecting Persian peoples within
and to Indigenous peoples.
ARE YOU AWARE
(Eclectic) Alternating  Thursdays
6-7:30pm
Celebrating the message behind the
music: Profiling music and musicians
that take the route of positive action
over apathy.
AURAL TENTACLES
(Eclectic) 12-6am
It could be global, trance, spoken
word, rock, the unusual and the
weird, or it could be something
different.  Hosted  by DJ  Pierre.
auraltentacles@hotmaii.com
VAMPIRE'S BALL
(Rock/Eclectic) l-4am
Eclectic audio alchemy; the soundtrack
for your transmutation. Rock, electro,
weird stuff, dark stuff, and whatever's
banging around in the mind of maQLu
this week.
NARDWUAR
(Nardwuar) 3:Z0-Spm
Join Nardwuar the Human Serviette for Clam Chowder flavoured
entertainment. Doot doola doot
doo...doot doo! nardwuar®
nardwuar.com
MOON GROK
7:30-10am
PEANUT BUTTER'N' JAMS
(Eclectic) Alternating Thursdays
6-7:30pm
Explore local music and food with your
hosts, Brenda and Jordie. You'll hear
interviews and reviews on eats and
tunes from your neighbourhood, and a
weekly pairing for your date calendar.
STEREOSCOPIC REDOUBT
(Experimental) 7:30-9pm
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
(l/VeAfus/c;9-llpm
Featuring live band(s) every week performing in the CiTR Lounge. Most are
from Vancouver, but sometimes bands
from across the country and around
the world.
THE COPYRIGHT EXPERIMENT
(Talk & Underground Electronic)
llpm-12am
Discussing music copyright topics and
issues and mixing freely available music.
UP ON THE ROOF
(Eclectic) 9-10am
Friday Mornings got you down? Climb
Up On the Roof and wake up with Robin
and Jake! Weekly segments include
improvised crime-noir radio dramas,
trivia contents, on-air calls to Jake's
older brother and MORE! We'll be spinning old classics, new favourites, and
lots of ultra-fresh local bands!
THE CAT'S PAJAMS
(Indie Pop, Garage Rock) 10-llam
The cat's pajamas: a phrase to describe
something/someone super awesome or
cool. The Cat's Pajams: a super awesome and cool radio show featuring the
latest and greatest indie pop, rock, lofi
and more from Vancouver and beyond!
NEWS 101
<TaW5-6pm
See Monday for description.
STRANDED
f£c/ecf/c; 6-7:30pm
Join your host Matthew for a weekly m ix
of exciting sounds, past and present,
from his Australian homeland. And
journey with him as he features fresh
tunes and explores the alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
AFRICAN RHYHMS
(Wor/fl!;7:30-9pm
www.africanrhythmsradio.com
THE BASSMENT
(Dance/Electronic) 9-10:30pm
The Bassment is Vancouver's only
bass-driven radio show, playing Glitch,
Dubstep, Drum and Bass, Ghetto Funk,
Crunk, Breaks, and UK Funky, while
focusing on Canadian talent and highlighting Vancouver DJs, producers, and
the parties they throw.
STEREO BLUES
(Blues/Eclectic) llam-12pm
Every Friday host Dorothy Neufeld
sinks into blues, garage and rock n'
roll goodies!
DEFINITION SOUNDWAVE
(Folk/Rock)12-lW
The now of folk. The now of rock. The
. now of alternative. Join Evan as he
explores what's new, what's good, and
what's so awesome it fights dragons in
its spare time. As always, Evan ends
the show with a special Top 5 list that's
always fun and always entertaining.
SKALD'S HALL
(Drama/Poetty) l-2pm
Skald's Hall entertains with the spoken
word via story readings, poetry recitals,
and drama. Established and upcoming artists join host Brian MacDonald.
Interested in performing on air? Contact
us: @Skalds_Hall.
RADIO ZERO
(Dance) 2-3:30pm
An international mix of super-
fresh weekend party jams from
New Wave to foreign electro, baile,
Bollywood, and whatever else.
www.radiozero.com
BPM VIBE
(Club/Talk) 10:30pm-12am
Every week, tune in to BMP Vibe for the
latest and hottest tracks from various
genres and BMP. We also discuss various artists from the tracks we play and
bring up funny news-related topics.
DJ Crave will be bringing you genres
from Hip Hop, Trip Hop, Trap, Dubstep,
Drum & Bass, Glitch, House, Electro,
and Moombahton. Tune in for a good
laugh, to learn new facts, and to discover new tunes, mash-ups, bootlegs,
and remixes.
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
(Drum+Bass, Ambient, Industrial...)
12-6am
Drum+Bass, Ambient, Industrial, Noise, -
artist profiles with DJRea.
SATURDAY
THE SATURDAY EDGE
(Roots) 8am-12pm
A personal guide to world and roots
music—with African, Latin, and European music in the first half, followed
by Celtic, blues, songwriters, Cajun,
and whatever else fits! steveedge3@
mac.com
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
(Punk) 12-lpm
On the air since 2002,
playing old and new punk on
the non-commercial side of the
spectrum. Hosts: Aaron Brown,
Jeff "The Foat" Kraft. Website:
www.generationannihilation.com.
Facebook: www.facebook.com/
generationannihilation".
POWER CHORD
(Metal) l-3pm
Vancouver's longest running metal
show. If you're into music that's on
the heavier/darker side of the spectrum, then you'll like it. Sonic assault
provided by Geoff, Marcia, and Andy.
CODE BLUE
(floors,) 3-5pm
From backwoods delta low-down
slide to urban harp honks, blues,
and blues roots with your hosts
Jim, Andy, and Paul, codeblue®
buddy-system.org
MANTRA
(World) 5-6pm
Kirtan, Mantra, Chanting and Culture.
There's no place like Om. Hosted by
Raghunath with special guests. Email:
mantraradioshow@gmail.com. Website: mantraradio.co.
NASHAVOLNA
(World) Wpm
News, arts, entertainment and music
for the Russian community, local and
abroad, nashavolna.ca
HAPPY HOUR
(Afrobeat, Old School, Hip hop) 7-8pm
A rotating weekly focus on various
genres and subgenres; particularly
Afrobeat, Jazz, Soul, Funk, Motown,
Old School, Hip Hop, R&B and more!
A DEEPER REVERB
(Heavy Reverb) %-%m
"Bringing you the chillout world of the
heavy reverb genres: shoegaze, post
rack, dream pop, space rock, trip hop
and everything in between, including
new tracks and old favorites. Facebook:
facebook.com/adeeperreverb. Email:
adeeperreverb [a] gmail.com"
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
(Dance/Electronic) 9-11 pm
If you like everything from elec-
tro/techno/trance/8-bit    music/
retro '80s, this is the show for you!
www.synapticsandwich.net
RANDOPHONIC
f£c/ecr7c,)llpm-2am
Randophonic is best thought of as an
intraversal jukebox which has no concept of genre, style, political boundaries, or even space-time relevance. But
it does know good sounds from bad.
Lately, the program has been focused on
Philip Random's All Vinyl Countdown +
Apocalypse (the 1,111 greatest records
you probably haven't heard). And we're
not afraid of noise.
THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF INSOMNIA
(Generative) 2-6am
Four solid hours of fresh generative music
c/o the Absolute Value of Noise and its
world famous Generator. Ideal for enhancing your dreams or, if sleep is not on your
agenda, your reveries. DISCORDER STAFF SOUND-OFF
\ / s
Wishing you a happy holidays, folks. The Discorder stockings have all been hung with
care, turntables at CiTR have been spinning your favourite hip hop Christmas albums,
and the hallways smell like a mixture of nutmeg, spiced rum, and wet umbrellas.
Instead of forcing our staff and volunteers to pick their favourite album of 2013—seriously, it's impossible to pick just one—we decided to give 'em a break and ask something different for the year-end issue. Sure, the holidays are a time for family and other
loved ones, but which band/musician would you most like to spend Christmas with?
Mariko Adams, Contributor
Every Christmas, us grandkids have to belt out a carol together before we're given
our presents. Apart from being coerced into wearing some awful combination of red
and green, this is my least favourite part of the holidays. That's why I would like Ozzy
Osborne and Jessica Simpson to perform their duet of "Walking in a Winter Wonderland"
at my family gathering. Not only would I be spared from having to hear my family's
lacking vocal talents, but, if it were still the early 2000s, Ozzy and Jessica could film
holiday specials for their reality TV shows too.
Willa Bao, Contributor
Brit and Germaine—I mean, Bret and Jemaine of Flight of the Conchords are the perfect guys to hang out with during the holidays. Their deadpan humour could put a musical, comedic twist on the otherwise pretty sucky situation of my birthday always being overshadowed by Christmas. Lyrics could be along the lines of: "No one has time
for you when they've got Jesus to pay attention to," except a thousand times better
written (I'm no songwriter).
illustration by BRITTA BACCHUS
(Illustration top to bottom, left to right: Bjork, Wilco's Jeff Tweedy, Andrew WK, Japandroids)
Jacey Gibb, Editor-in-chief
I'm snowed in at my parents' house in rural Alberta. It's Christmas Eve and the rest
of my family were away at church when the storm hit—but I'm not worried. There's a
knock at the front door and it's everyone's favourite party guy, Andrew W.K., with a 40
of Biscotti Baileys and a thermos of egg nog. We embark on a Cat in the Hat styled adventure; jumping on the bed, lighting the Christmas tree on fire, slamming shots of
spiced rum. Then, just as the clock's about to strike midnight, he hands me a gift and
says "Merry Christmas, Jacey." It's MortalKombat Trilogyior Nintendo 64. When I look
up to thank him, he's gone, as if by magic. But the tree's still on fire.
Coleman Ingram, Contributor
I think it would be pretty badass to chill (ha!) with Bjork in Iceland for the holidays.
We could listen to her sing Icelandic carols, eat smoked lamb, drink Brennivin and
GaerJingur Stout, maybe jam around a campfire, then go have a snowball fight in
Viti (a volcanic hot spring, the name of which translates to hell). Sounds jolly to me!
Keefer Pelech, Contributor
The holiday season can be a lonely time as the nights get longer and the air grows
colder. There's no better way to snap this Yuletide funk than through music, company,
and a few open bottles of wine. For me, there would be no greater Christmas gift than
to have Hey Rosetta over to my house for a home-show. With a fireplace crackling and
their intimate songs to set the mood, the Newfoundlanders would be perfect for a
night of revelry. Impromptu jam sessions and drunken singalongs would abound. Alas,
I have yet to receive a RSVP from the St. John's locals. At least I'll have 2012's A Cup
of Kindness Yetto fill me with spirit and company over the break.
Elijah Teed, Contributor
Ah, the holidays. A joyous time of year, filled with gift-giving, warm wishes, fatty
foods, and some good ol' fashioned Yuletide. However, nothing says Christmas like
the garage-rocking genius of Japandroids. Just picture it: chestnuts roasting on an
open fire as you headbang to the "Whoa!"s and "Yeah!"s of David Prowse and Brian
King; decking the halls with boughs of holly while the sweat-drenched duo shred on
some three-chord jams; a sleigh ride in the park made better by the three of you collectively belting out "Young Hearts Spark Fire." Moshing around the Christmas tree
has never felt so good.
Sam Tudor, Contributor
I'd share some eggnog with Leon Redbone anytime—especially at Christmas. It can't
get much better than huge snowdrifts outside while Leon and I sit inside, cross-legged
in front of the fire, him getting fancy on the bar chords while I power through a mean
mouth trumpet solo, hot chocolate in one hand and some sort of hard liquor in the
other. We'd be real cool cats, Leon and me. Carolers would knock at the door hoping
to do another rendition of "Silent Night" but there's no time for those folk when you've
got real tunes to play.
Max Wainwright, Contributor
I always spend Christmas with my family in town and we've developed our own traditions over the years (the aggressively competitive table hockey is a mainstay). Jeff
Tweedy of Wilco would probably fit right in with our eclectic holiday season. A family
man himself, Tweedy is ever classy but knows a thing or two about dry humour. I could
see a Tweedy Christmas as being all brandies and baking—and that's just fine by me.
Also, those vivid suits of his would sit nicely next to my aunt's infamous Christmas vest. by JULIE
COLERO
lettering &
illustration by
ROBONDZIK
photos by
BEN LAI, STEVE LOUIE
L
The history of CiTR's illustrious battle of the bands, Shindig, is shrouded
in mystery—appropriate, considering it's an event that has taken place
in dimly-lit rooms, populated by slightly-tipsy patrons, judges and
bands for 30 years now. Most everyone who claims involvement at one
point in time or another is excited to share memories, but almost all
begin with the caveat that they can't quite remember all of the details.
Some are even bold enough to admit that they can't remember any of
the details, but they know they had a good time.
I can include myself in the former category, having organized the
event in 1998,1999, and 2000. Shindig has passed through many capable hands over the course of its wild life, and continues to thrive.
Who came up with the idea for a battle of the bands? Good question.
Who named it? Well, that's less of a good question, but at least it's one
I have an answer for.
For a time, CiTR hosted a battle of the bands called "The Hot Air
Show" at the Pit Pub on the UBC campus. Fuzzy photos, and memories,
still exist to prove this. Gord Badanic is willing to claim ownership of
the name change, and had these insights to share: "I started Shindig
in the autumn of 1983.1 was, I think, the president at that time. Prior to
Shindig, the station ran a battle of the bands [the Hot Air Show] at the
Pit Pub every Monday night, which the Pit financed and CiTR organized.
Out of the blue, after many successful years of packing the room
every Monday night, the Pit cancelled the battle at the end of the
1982-83 school year. We were sad." According to CiTR alum Chris
Dafoe, the Pit's decision to cancel may have had a little something to do with a band called the Gargoyles, who, in '82, "played
two songs, dropped trou, and urinated all over the dance floor."
"CiTR was very reliant on the Hot Air Show," continues
Badanic, "not only for the money, but also the profile on and off
campus and the goodwill and outreach it developed for newer
bands. I spoke to Janet Forsyth [who ran the Railway Club for 25
years], and suggested a move. She thought it was a great idea,
and looked after the advertising. The station vice-president of the
time [Dave Ball] was also the main advertising rep for the newly
formed Discorder, so we had no difficulty leaning on music-industry
type businesses for prizes: recording time at Mushroom Studios was the
first prize for that first year. I don't think very much has changed with
Shindig since it began.The timeline, the prizes, format, even Jokes for
Beer we set up that first year." Badanic's assertion that not much has
changed is eerily correct—while there have been a few small adjustments to the organization of the night, components like Jokes for Beer
were hits from the very beginning and form a large part of what keeps
patrons coming back year after year.
Over the years, Shindig has offered stage time to some of
Vancouver's best bands, only occasionally rewarding them with a victory. According to Bill Mullen, former production manager, Discorder editor, and programming coordinator, two of the best bands to ever come
out of Vancouver, Slow and Sons of Freedom, lost. There have been
mighty upsets over the years, and there is a rumoured curse that goes
with the competition—many participants see winning the event as the
kiss of death for a band. That said, bands like Maow (featuring a young
Neko Case on drums) came out victorious, as did the Organ, the Cinch,
and Three Inches of Blood. Many young musicians have cut their teeth
on the stages at the Savoy and the Railway, and many seasoned musicians have used the competition as, well, an excuse to fuck around.
Badanic, who by the second year of the competition was running the
Zulu Records label, released a record of that year's finalists, including
two songs each by Death Sentence, NG3, Nerve Tubes, My 3 Sons, and
Rhythm Mission. According to Janis McKenzie, Nerve Tubes, consisting
of members of the Odds, had a gimmick where they came on stage in
nothing but clear plastic raincoats and, ahem, "strategically-placed
instruments." This record is still to be found in used bins across the
Northwest, and is one of the few artifacts of long-forgotten Savoy days.
The Shindig judging process has evolved from having three CiTR
members fill out questionnaire-style ballots, where they had to answer
questions like "Do you think this band would make good use of studio
time?" to the current five-judge free-form style, where judges comment
on the bands and the comments are given to the bands at the end of JAPANDROIDS, 2007
photo by STEVE LOUIE
the night. Many bands claim to remember these comments more vividly
than the performances themselves, as the judges, a motley assortment
of CiTR members, record store employees, journalists, and record label
owners, were often more cruel than constructive. Perhaps that's what
comes of the free drink tickets. Mullen remembers a night in the early
'80s when, of the three judges present, he was deemed the only one fit
to decide on a winner, and his choice made the loser have a minor nervous breakdown—it's cool, they're friends now.
The build-up to announcing a winner was always former host Bryce
Dunn's favourite part of the night: "I had to go through the obligatory thank-yous and talk about the sponsors and judges. I would
draw it out so4png that I had people throwing drinks at me on more
who remembers what classes they took in university anyways? I remember seeing jaw-droppingly fantastic, and terrible, bands and hanging
out with my station buddies. "Sadly," Harry reminisces, "as we've all
become older and gotten real jobs outside of radio we see each other
much less—if at all. People get married, have kids, move away, get
jobs in exotic locales, go to jail, die." And so, for organizers, judges,
and bands alike, Shindig was a very special part of a particular time
in their lives. Here's to another 30 years of the best little battle of the
bands in town. And to that one band, that one time, just for the record:
don't ask me again, you're not getting paid tonight.
I DON'T THINK VERY MUCH HAS CHANGED WITH SHINDIG SINCE IT BEGAN. THE TIMELINE,
THE PRIZES, FORMAT, EVEN JOKES FOR BEER WE SET UP THAT FIRST YEAR.
than one occasion and I would sit at people's tables and ask them
about their night and Stan [the old Railway doorman] and I would
have conversations about events in the club—all to build the anticipation of announcing the winner." The crowds often came as
much for the host as for the bands themselves, and I'm pretty sure
the hosts kept coming because they loved the crowds. Garnet Harry,
another former host, remembers how "Joey Meatrack would sit in
the front almost every Monday at the Savoy for a very long time. He
was only slightly off his rocker at that time and would swear at me
and yell and I would sometimes stop what I was doing and tell the
crowd, ladies and gentlemen, please put your hands together for Joey
Meatrack!' I was always a little disappointed when he wasn't there."
There have been many familiar faces come and go over Shindig's 30
years. I personally miss Stan the doorman immensely. It used to be cool
to see Mint Records' Randy Iwata hiding in the back, scouting the label's next possible signing. Everyone who has been involved in organizing and running Shindig over the years has done so out of a love for
the station and a desire to help foster the Vancouver music community.
"It was a lot of fun," says Dunn, "and it's good to see some of those
folks who were in bands that played Shindig in the past still playing in
bands today and recognizing that Shindig is an integral part of how it
shapes (for better or worse) the music community here in Vancouver."
Shindig has always been a great place to see new bands and to spend
time with good people. I slept through many a Wednesday morning class
after enjoying my night out at the Railway a tad too much, but seriously,
4P*Wty?4p interview
with  MtkMamy
BEN LAI
interview by
JONATHAN KEW
photo by
STEVE LOUIE
This September marked the 30th anniversary of Shindig, CiTR's annual battle of the
bands. Over the span of four months, 27 bands compete for one of three grand prizes,
including a sizable amount of professional studio time. As host for over a decade, Ben
Lai is a veritable fount of Shindig trivia and recently sat down with Discorderto shed
some light on the three-decade-old event.
Ben Lai! Yourself and Shindig?
The first time I actually hosted was unfortunately September 11, 2001... and given
the context, the band that won was 3 Inches of Blood, unfortunate given the name. I
mostly just hosted in 2001, while Katrina McGee did the organization. From 2002 onwards, I host, schedule, contact bands... the only thing I don't really have a part in
is the sponsorship.
Can you give us your perspective on Shindig's origins?
I believe it started off at UBC's Pit Pub, a battle of the
bands. [From the Pit to the Savoy to Railway]... I feel
that's the order, but some of the past is so thick, people move around.
Some years there were way less bands. I believe it
wasn't even called Shindig originally. They started calling it Shindig after '83. It happened once or twice before that.
For rules... five judges is a system I've maintained
because the music is so diverse. Ideally, you want more
than five but that makes it harder to have all judges
with no ties to the bands.
Shindig has a history with—in a sense—large bands
such as Japandroids, who didn't win.
The joke has always been that the band that wins never
goes big. I don't buy that theory because it's hard. It's
not just if you're good or not, there's so much chance
in it.
What about regulars? 42 are an infamous Shindig duo.
42 played in 1998 and then got into heckling. Bryce Dunn hosted Shindig for four years
before I did. So that was the peak of the heckling... Dunn might've gotten a bit irritated [with 42].
For regulars, Stuart Derdeyn writes for the Province and always seems to be in on
Tuesdays. There are regulars throughout the years but it goes in cycles.
For you, is there an infamous Shindig Night?
Last year there were a lot of joke bands and we had Classic Rick. Their schtick was
they were an '80s arena rock band. Each member ran on stage playing the same riff,
then ran off playing the same riff. They won and next round they did a different thing.
Classic Rick had died trying to make it over a gorge, so instead they found his long
lost cousin, Classical Richard. All the same members came on but they were all wearing velvet and Victorian wigs. photo by BEN LAI
It didn't go over as well? ; W=v-V <"~7v':f,}\7?y -J'*yj}-X''/'':*?**;[■< ■ <f^M
It was amazing! After two songs they revealed it was a ruse, ripped off their clothing
and underneath they were wearing the original costumes. They didn't win the semis
because once you get to that point, people start thinking about which bands deserve
studio time.
It's the 30-year anniversary and this year people who have competed could compete again?
I hoped more joke bands would return but maybe Classic Rick did it too well.
Pineapple returned and we had a few return from Shindig 2012. Other than that,
it's mostly individuals who have done Shindig in other bands.
Do you think Shindig is an accessible starting point for people not
already entrenched in the music scene because it's at the Railway?
Well, it's a good spot. It's central, well-known, and it's been around for
a long time. It's Vancouver. If we went to another venue who knows how
long it'd be there.
How is the continuum of experience among bands?
It's totally all over the place. We have so many entries, like Deaf
Chords—first show ever. We have bands that don't need a lot of help
getting shows. It's good having suburbs bands at Shindig because they
do need the help..
How are judges typically chosen?
I contact people who have played Shindig before: musicians, people who
go to shows, CiTR people, journalists.
Sometimes I'm hoping the bands get together with the judges,
maybe play together, and have Shindig help build a community. If we
could actually do Shindig without the competition, it would be great.
Sometimes it just feels like a band showcase; it should be fun.
How long do you plan on hosting for?
Not that much longer... we'll see how it goes. My biggest gripe is that
in all my years of hosting it, we haven't had one holiday that was scheduled on a Wednesday after Shindig. I want Shindig to be on a night
where people don't have to work the next day. There's one of those coming up in two years, maybe I'll wait 'til then.
*Answers have been edited and condensed
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604.637.5789 UNDER   REVIEW     JANCEMBER
APE WAR
TEMPLAR
(Independent)
Recorded with Jesse Gander at The
Hive Creative Labs shortly before
its untimely demise earlier this
fall, Ape War gift us their second
EP, Templar. With typical skill,
Gander lends a clarity and heft to the band's sound without compromising
their raw power.
Opener "Corgy" begins with the kind of skewed punk-jazz awkwardness
of local legends Nomeansno, before careering headlong into 40 seconds of
frenzied hardcore abandon. Before you know it, Ape War have blitzed through
three tracks in barely two minutes but because of the sheer speed and ferocity
of their attack they almost risk sounding a little monotonous.
Fourth track, "Voyager," comes just at the right time by slowing things
down and drawing out just one lurching riff over two-and-a-half minutes.
It's this contrast of approaches that makes the band so effective; without the
relendess fury of the preceding tracks, the idea of hammering one riff into
the ground for so long just wouldn't work as brilliandy as it does.
"Born of Sodom" strays further still from the often restrictive hardcore
template into visceral metal riffage before switching into a tense and discordant passage that soundsiike it's only going to last for a few seconds
but instead remains for the rest of the song. It's unexpected, it's punishing,
and it's bloody brutal. Kinda like a large primate in some kind of conflict.
—WillPedley
THE BALLANTYNES
LIQUOR STORE GUN STORE
PAWN SHOP CHURCH
(La-Ti-Da Records)
After a string of enjoyable singles,
East Vancouver's titular "Garage
Gospel" act the Ballantynes keep
the good times rolling with their
first EP, Liquor Store Gun Store Pawn Shop Church.
"No Love" gets the party rocking with a swinging beat, groovy bass, and
ragged soulful vocals. The proceeding tracks showcase the Ballantynes for all
their strengths. One would be hard-pressed to find a record, local or otherwise,
that captures the spirit of classic R&B and Motown with such reverence and
enthusiasm. "Black Magic" is a smouldering ballad of a bygone era while
"Morning" recalls the best of Aretha Franklin.
The "Garage Gospel" moniker fits the Ballantynes in more than just their
songs. Felix Fung's production is decidedly rough around the edges, adding
a retro vibe to the mix. The vocals and the instrumentation are balanced and
clear in the mix without being too polished or clean. The gritty aspects to the
mix give even greater character to the Ballantynes' songs and artistic identity.
The Ballantyne's soul/gospel sound is catchy, energetic, and above all just
plain fun. Liquor Store Gun Store Paum Shop Church can be enjoyed in all these
places and more. —James Olson
RICHARD
CATWRANGLEUR
RAISE RAVENS
(Independent)
Richard Catwrangleur has come
a long way since his streamlined
locomotive of a rock debut, House
Of The Spirit-Wrestler!, a record so
pure in its pursuits of lo-fi fun thatyou'd never guess it came out ofVancouver.
Raise Ravens, Catwrangleur's first record released from his new home
in Victoria, is a distinctly less rough-and-tumble album from his previous
ventures, but retains the exact same stripped-down charm of its predecessors. Recorded and produced all by his lonesome, Catwrangleur's Ravens
feels very much like what it is—a record with a singular creative mind at its
helm. It ditches the catchy, Sonics-inspired garage-rock for a much more
contemplative approach steeped in '6os and '70s pop references.
The beautiful thing about Catwrangleur, and Ravens in particular, is the
decidedly stark instrumentation brought about by home recording. No
instrument, whether it's calling up the Beach Boys, the Velvet Underground,
or the Brian Jonestown Massacre, is out of place or overused, and the psych
influences that have shaped Raise Ravens' most interesting songs—like opener
"Crazy Ways" or the crazy, spaghetti western-tinged jam "Ukrainski"—are
a welcome addition.
There is such a remarkable strength to Catwrangleur's songwriting that
it's hard to imagine Raise Ravens ever being put into the context of a proper
band. The weird slapbacks, tremolo vocals, and fuzzy guitar twang are all as
much a signature of Catwrangleur as a person as his oddly endearing yowl.
Fear the day when he gets a band together with nearly so much gumption
as Raise Ravens yields.
—Fraser Dobbs i^i'   i
DAYS OF HEAVEN
S/T
(Independent)
After only a year or so as a band,
Vancouver's Days of Heaven have
already managed to put together an
EP's worth of solid songs. A mix of
shoegaze, British pop, and a bit of
'80s post-punk, the five tracks on their self-tided EP are pulled off quite honesdy.
Driven by a typical shoegaze tempo, "Karma to Burn" drifts through the
speakers as Dave Perry's airy vocals glide on top of Matthew MacDonald-Bains
simple, pleasant riff. "Tonight" begins with a light, jangling riff that fades to the background as Luke Camilleri (who has since left the band) takes up
lead vocals. His voice is somewhere in between Morrissey and Paul Banks,
the deeper vocals creating a darker tone than the opening track. The light
pop returns on "Type II" as Perry returns to the mike, this spacious love song
gendy floats along. "The Imposition" showcases Jay Lang's deep bass line
and Barnabi Luna's locked beats. Camilleri picks up the vocals on this on
this one, making the track reminiscent of the minimalist side ofjoy Division.
These are rounded offwith the brief, bright "Walk Home," a more up-tempo
track that closes things out well.
With a genre like shoegaze, the production is equally as important as the
songwriting and Felix Fung does a fantastic job of catching the sound just
right and adding to the legitimacy of the EP. All in all, Days Of Heaven have
compiled a great bunch of songs for a first outing and have proved themselves
a band to keep an ear out for!
—MarkPaulHus
DEVONIAN GARDENS
SOLAR SHIFTING
(Beyond Beyond is Beyond)
It's been two years since Devonian
Gardens (at the time known as
Deadhorse) holed up in the wilds
of Nova Scotia and recorded most
of their second LP. Now, after recording a couple of more songs for the album in their hometown of Calgary,
they've finally released Solar Shifting under their new name, a psychedelic-rock
pop effort that strikes a perfect balance between the three.
After the first few notes of the premiere track, it's apparent that Devonian
Gardens will take the listener back to another era with a fuzzy far-out sound
that is immediately reminiscent of the late '60s. But the band takes that sound
and'makes it their own by holding back on heavy riffs that would otherwise
overpower the psychedelic element to their music, with well-executed vocal
harmonies throughout the album that showcase their vocal talent.
Standout tracks include "Swallow Sun," a strong opener with a summery vibe that would go perfecdy with a sunny day and a cold beer. After
a few strong tracks, the band takes a step back and builds tension over a
couple of tracks in an interlude in a slow and steady build of fuzziness that
takes the listener up into space before snatching them back down to earth
with the rowdy "People's Fight Song," the strong guitar and loud vocals an
abrupt but welcome change. On "Cat Music" they take full advantage of
their female vocal talent, allowing the ladies to take the lead on this mellow,
simplistic song with impressive harmonies. Vocals are also on display on
the penultimate track "Night Beams," with memorable lines like "So they
don't see it now but it'll show / That it's better to slow down than go go go
/ How to shake our souls out of this indifference" that are more prominent
compared to elsewhere on the album.
Even if you think you're not a fan of the psychedelic, Solar Shifting is worth
a listen and will more than likely change your opinion, with its masterful
layering, playful harmonies and trippy sound.
—Natalie Dee
DEVOURS
DIGNITY
(Independent)
"Hipsters / Stay cool / Unite." A
minute or so after an arpeggiated
keys intro, these lines, sung in
the unmistakable voice of Billy
Corgan, introduce the knotty
electronica of Jeff Cancade, aka Devours. It's a bold intro indeed, but the
Vancouver-based composer's subsequent journey through Dignity proves
the reconstructed lines of "Cherub Rock" to be just the starting point of a
dense, sample-heavy sound collage.
Devours' debut EP is self-described by Cancade as being "influenced by
every pop culture trend known to man." And though this is a pretty bold
statement as well, each piece is built upon recognizable fragments of music.
"Keepsake" obviously borrows from the Beach Boys' "Caroline, No" but it
takes a while to notice the bites of "Hotel California" seeping in and out of
the background.
Despite being an eclectic patchwork of older sounds, Dignity feels very
current. Cancade's music reaches in all directions at once. At times, it can
feel sporadic, though this is the point The classics are warped often beyond
recognition and placed alongside dubby beats to be reappropriated for our
contemporary context On Dignity, the nostalgia that once brought a sense
of comfort and ease is now part of Devours' reaction to the neurotic, postmodern listening experience. A different pop culture reference apdy sums
it up: "Here I'm allowed / Everything all of the time."
—Max Wainwright
KINETIC DICTION
MAKE OUT SESSION
(Independent)
Local hip hop band, Kinetic Diction, brings all of their creativity
and energy to the table with the
release of their debut album, Make
Out Session. The crew, consisting of
hip hop and electronic veterans T Pick and Mister Staal, creates a short, but
powerful album consisting of five very diverse tracks.
The album begins with the song "Get Some," which acts as an excellent
warm-up for things to come. As the album progresses, mesmerizing effects
and interesting lyrics establish the bands presence and set the stage for a
great finale. The album's last track, "The Truth," is when the lyrics get truly
meaningful. "This Rap Game" is no joke to these guys, and the song clearly
and forcibly states the fact The confidence displayed in this track and throughout the entire album is enthralling, and leaves the listener wanting more.
To quote, Kinetic Diction is "the crew." Their album entrances the listener
with powerful lyrics, synths, and other electronic effects. So allow yourself
to be surrounded by the immense energy this crew delivers, and I promise,
you will not be disappointed.
—Zach Weiss — 9%e —
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32 MODERN CHARMS
S/T 12-INCH/CASSETTE
(Clue 2)
Modern Charms' self-tided debut
starts strong, with a set of well-
arranged tracks which let the
listener get a sense of this very
foggy six-track dreamscape. But
the bliss-pop aura starts to feel cookie cutter as it continues: provocative and
meaningful in the way that cigarette smoke might seem emotionally charged
when in the right lighting.
There's no doubt that the three-piece had a clear vision of their sound for
this album—one crafted in the mist of San Francisco and the wet forests of
the Northwest—but they fail to fill their airy pop with texture. Doing litde
to move past golden-age shoegaze, the 12-inch ends up as an exercise of
fill-in-the-blank-space-with-your-own-emotions. The vocals are excellent,
the layering is pleasant, the drums are sublime, but it gets dull.
That said, brief guitar solos on the album, which often seem to carry a blues
influence, give a glimpse of the band's potential to move beyond shoegaze
fuzz. Passionate and piercing, the lead guitar (especially on "Falling Sun" and
"Epsilon") manages to give other elements of their sound some substance
as well. Transitions from dreamy to the shoegaze sections make this album
a worthwhile listen and add weight to the more earnest guitar playing. If the
band can drop the attempt at being evocative through ambiguity, their next
album could be killer. —Joshua Gabert-Doyon
KASHKA
The new project from Kat Burns of Forest City Lovers!
New album BOUND available now in LP/CD/MP3
"a collection of cheery and pseudo-brooding songs,
emphasized by smart and imaginative songwritingj
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MIKE DOUGHTY/MOON HOOCH
B November 1 / The Biltmore Cabaret
|jf When Brooklyn three-piece Moon Hooch stormed
I the stage with deep-pocket drumming from James
■ Muschler and duelling star saxophones (brought
B to you by Wenzl McGowen and Mike Wilbur) they
■ touched down like a multiple-vortex tornado.
■ Their contagious enthusiasm and virtuoso play-
jpftl ing got the steadily filling Biltmore bouncing,
I with a Lounge Lizards-esque vibe simultaneously
obliging, energizing, and endearing in turns—
especially when McGowen explained to the rabble
thatthey were justa trio of buskers 18 months ago.
Mike Doughty saw the group performing at a subway station and they've since signed to Doughty's
label and begun touring with him.
And while Moon Hooch's lip service was warranted, there's been a bit of scuttlebutt in certain
circles of late, apropos ofMike Doughty, formerly
of'gos-era NYC alternative rock combatants Soul
Coughing. Having been an admirer back in the
day (it's been almost 15 years since I last saw him
perform), I'd been looking forward to catching
up with Doughty for some time. His somewhat
scathing memoir from 2012, The Book ofDrugs, and
his recent release, Circles, Super Bon Bon, and The Very
Best Of Soul Coughing, all spoke ill and somewhat
hostile ofhis former bandmates. Any concerns of
a curmudgeon bludgeoning the stage were dashed
as soon as the personable luminary arose before
his fans.
"You all look fantastic," Doughty announced
to the crowd before launching straight into "Is
Chicago, Is Not Chicago" affably. Obviously elated,
he then led his tight trio—drums and a stand-
up bass—into a searing rendition of "Sugar Free
Jazz" and then a boisterous "Bus to Beelzebub."
As the set continued, it became apparent that
Doughty and company were rewarding their longtime devotees open handedly. Tracks like "Lazy
Bones," "Unmarked Helicopters," and "Soft Serve"
curlicued the room, as some seriously sweltering
pogoing on the dance floor made it feel like itwas
the summer of'97 all over again.
Allowing his crackerjack band a brief breather,
Doughty turned keen turntablist, laying some
rhymes over top some fabulously phat beats. His
beat poet satiated the band came back and, as the
set wound down "Super Bon Bon" and "Circles"
gave ginormous grins to the thrilled and beaming throng. Mike Doughty certainly brought a
lot of miscellany and refurbishing to his mosdy
recognizable song cycle, and his hunky-dory
demeanour hinted at a contented and revived
performer. Judging by the smiling mugs of folks
filing out after the show, the night was an indelible knockout.
—Shane Scott-Travis
SECRET PYRAMID/ NO UFO'S/
SARAH DAVACHI / SCANT INTONE
Nouember 7 / The Remington Gallery
It was a frigid Thursday night that saw me trekking across town to the Remington Gallery on
Main and Hastings, butyouwouldn'tknowitfrom
inside. Body heat, big sweaters, and the warm glow
of old incandescent bulbs kept the Remington's
performance space prenatal in anticipation of a
calm evening of heavy drones.
Scant Intone, the solo project of experimental
musician Constantine Katsiris, began the night
with a warble that quickly matured into cosmic
resonance. Some faint samples and looped phrases
chirped an intro before transforming into a tex-
tureless, repeating sonic boom of low frequency
oscillation that lasted the remainder of the set.
Katsiris nearly managed to find the resonant frequency of people, as bones vibrated and walls
shook throughout the meat ofhis performance.
After a brief intermission, necessary to recover
from the internalized bass hum, Sarah Davachi
took meek position behind a synthesizer. Carefully
sculpted synth drones followed, slowly and meticulously evolving over time. Nothing aboutDavachi's
performance was abrupt or unnatural—her continuous, unfurling piece consisted of the patient j
unwrapping of new and more complex layers of I
synthesized notes and tones.
Konrad Jandavs' No UFO's turned out to be the I
most digital act of the evening. Far from being a
pure laptop performance, itwas Jandavs' unique
combination of minimalist beats, repeated sam- j
pies, and heavy industrial drones that lent space
between his, and the preceding, performances. |
The first set of the evening to feature noticeable f
"songs," No UFO's rich, beautiful compositions ?
saw more than one audience member lying down
on the floor, eyes closed and mind adrift.
The culmination of the night was in celebration of Secret Pyramid's recently-released album,
Movements Of Night. The man behind the project,
Amir Abbey, looked remarkably at home hunched
over table crammed with mixers, pedals, a reel-to-
reel, and akeyboard. In past performances, Abbey
had been know to gradually bring in cascading
walls of amplified guitar cacophony, but his set
at the end of the evening played a litde closer to
the chest.
Performing the pieces from his freshly-
christened 12-inch, Abbey's beautiful collection
of quiet sounds fell into focus lighdy, and each
washed away in waves of sublime tones. Abbey's
true strengths as an experimental performer come
in his ability to curate his performance to natural
apsides—each song had a destination, often awash
in overdrive, reverb, and static, and the brilliant
points where things got truly loud and monstrous
were by far the highlights ofhis set.
—Fraser Dobbs
EROSION/MOLTEN LAVA/
DEAD AGAIN/WAINGRO
Nouember 9 / 333
No Fun City strikes again. Though I usually disagree with the idea that Vancouver is a city with no
fun (try living in rural Alberta), it was a massive
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RECORD^ bummer at 333 on November 9 when local punk-
metal ragers Erosion got cut from their headlining set. Thankfully the show wasn't a total bust,
as the attendees managed to see killer sets from
Regina's Molten Lava, as well as local lads Dead
Again and Waingro.
Itwas my first experience at 333 and the mysterious venue had an appropriately low-key vibe
with a single lamp shining against a wall and one
smaller red lamp behind a table with cocktails for
sale and a small merch table beside it. Waingro—
who are a relatively new band formed by members
of Rotting Hills and Inhaler—got started around
10 p.m. to a decendy sized crowd who obligingly
banged their heads to the trio's bluesy metal
jams. The drumming was a bit reminiscent of
Reed Mullin which matched the rest of the groups
C.O.C. style and did not go unappreciated by the
black-clad beer-swillers in attendance.
Dead Again was up next and shifted the tone
to a more aggressive sound, dominated by doom-
laden riffs alternating with grind blast beats and
carried along by guttural growls. As the number
of people in the room increased, the four-piece
shrank together on the floor with the vocalist
periodically running into the crowd and thrashing around, sending beer spilling and hair flying.
By the time Molten !Lava set up their gear, the
room was packed to the gills. People gathered on
the stage behind the drumkit for a better view,
essentially surrounding the Saskatchewan-based
duo. They kicked things off with a cover of the
Melvins' "A History of Bad Men," which served as
a perfect introduction to what this band is about.
Having made.a shout out to Nomeansno during
their set, they basically explained two pillars of
their sound; progressive punk/metal/rock, which
is both a great time to listen to and awesome to
watch. The crowd fully reciprocated this energy
but unfortunately, as their set was wrapping up
and prior to Erosion's set, one of the promoters
grabbed the microphone and said the police were
outside and had shut down the show on a fire code
violation. He apologized, asked everyone to please
leave quiedy, and that was that. Molten Lava quickly
announced a 2:30 a.m. gigatlron Road and then it
was all over. Hopefully the people involved with the
show didn't get too much flak from the cops and
333 isn't lost already because judging by the mob
of people in attendance, there is a clear interest in
venues like it in our city.
—Coleman Ingram
TEEN DAZE/CAMP COUNSELORS
The Electric Oiul / Nouember 9
Fresh back at the Electric Owl after a six-week
tour of Eastern Canada and the USA, November
9, marked the return of companion acts Teen Daze
and Camp Counselors to Vancouver.
Camp Counselors, a.k.a. the drummer of Teen
Daze, grooved with his shoes offbehind a keyboard
and synth-kit, at ease in a plaid shirt, Docksiders
unlaced on stage beside him. People began to file
in through the doors, forming a line in front of
the stage, swaying softly to the undercut of bass
and haunting melody of synthesized xylophone.
After Camp Counselors' set, Jamison took
the stage, wearing a worn-in pastel T-shirt, an
orange blown-out Polaroid ofhis cat perched on a
windowsill cello-taped to his SG. They open with
"Tundra," off their October release, Glacier. The
melody is reminiscent of eight-bit video games—
afternoons spent in the basement of childhood
friends. Jamison's voice cut above, relaxed against
the spaceship rhythm. "By Love" came after, an
instrumental track calling to mind past summer
afternoons and the scent of fresh-cut lawns.
The crowd swayed close to the stage, drawn
together as "By Love" blended into "Listen,"
an upbeat anthem like the slow buildup of June
humidity. Jamison's voice filled in the gaps
between the guitar and synth, a wistful legato
high over the laid-back percussion. The band took
a reprieve for the next three songs, slowing it down
with an introspective, dewy track, "New Life," the
first off their album, The Inner Mansions.
Jamison asked the audience, "How do I get
closer? / What do I disappear?" We listened and
felt the rain gather on a misted window. The song
ended, vocals looped over themselves, and language faded to phonetic snapshots. Teen Daze
closed with "Ice On the Windowsill," a light-blue
track of the spring thaw. The band left the stage
after a brief thanks to friends and family, tired and
glad to be home.
The crowd cheered, and after a few minutes
they came back onstage for a final time. Jamison
smiled, thanking the crowd again for, "literally
the second encore we've ever been asked to do."
Thrilled for one more song, everyone moved in
closer. Like tie-dye stains on brown sun-tanned
hands, Kodachrome snapshots of backyard hammocks, sun-drunk in Adirondack chairs as the sun
drops; firstloves never kissed and broken flip-flops
walking home from the beach.
Teen Daze is everything great and faded and
gone that we carry with us—the colour that keeps
the damp of November at bay. The sound is immediate; it strikes close to our northwest hearts.
Remembering, we walked out onto Main Street
and met the blustery wind.
—Duncan Vieira
POP. 1280/SEX CHURCH/
CHANNELS 3x4/COWARDS
Nouember 14 / Astorino's
The issues that inevitably come with a Thursday
night all-ages (and alcohol-free) show were evident
early on, as the clock moved slowly towards 9 p.m.
and a sparse crowd listlessly trickled in—an unfortunate outcome, because the line-up at Astorino's
was more than promising of a spastic, energetic
night of noise.
Cowards were the first band to play, cranking
out tracks I'd be tempted to label "goth-punk";
pardy because of the band's all-black wardrobe,
and pardy because of a tendency for frontman/
bassist Spencer Davis to occasionally emit vocals
reminiscent of Peter Murphy. The set was sufficient, certainly as an opener, but overall seemed to
be a slight disconnect between image and impact;
Cowards come up just short of making the leap
from the common frenzied thrash of a few guys
in their garage to the vicious shock value found on
their T-shirts, which infamously read "Catholic
priests fuck children."
Next was Channels 3x4, reuniting for their
annual performance.The rarity of the show immediately grants an aura of intrigue, which is elevated
by the efforts of vocalist Sarah Cordingley—her
constant motion never confined to the stage, flailing around in the crowd along with consistent
banter in-between songs gave a personality to the
group absent in some of the other acts. Maybe the
desired moshpit never formed itself, but the sheer
physical energy, coupled with the effective use of
keys that hit like a guitar forced you in the very
least to give in to slight twitching.
Sex Church followed after, cranking up the
distortion and proceeding to drone. Inhibited by
weak sounding vocals, their doom rock didn't
quite translate well from their polished recorded
versions, sounding instead like one relendess
static wave. Their set did, however, inspired the
most consistent streams of consciousness, and
left me with that beautiful, warm ringing in my
ears—the sign of a job (at least pardy) well done.
Headliners Pop. 1280 stole the show, with
frontman Chris Bug's sexual thrusting and gyrations going quickly from discomfiting to compelling; his passion was evident, belting out tracks in
a Birthday Party-era Nick Cave kind of growl while
their heavy keys freed up space for the guitarist
to squeal and shriek. A Thursday night, all-ages
show in a small hall was as perfect a place as any
to release those pent-up lusts. A great closer to a
generally satisfying night, a display of why ugly-
rock can be so beautiful. —Andy Resto  CHTHONICBOOM!
with Aaron Giesbrecht and Gray Reich!
interview by SAM TUDOR
lettering by SITJICHOU
If you're a psychedelic person looking for your
place in the world, look no further than Chthonic
Boom! Aaron Giesbrecht and Gray Reichl play
tunes across the whole spectrum of psychedelic
music, from noisy garage stuff to ambient techno
classics. It's also worth mentioning they cur-
rendy hold the "Youngest DJs on the air" status
between the two of them, if only to accentuate
the breadth of their musical knowledge. When
asked how their age affects the show, Giesbrecht
and Reichl told me that a shared love of music at
CiTR can transcend age—certainly a more profound answer than I would've given when I was
13-years-old.
How did Chthonic Boom! first come to be?
Reichl: My Dad is a big fan of CiTR—he's been
listening to it for maybe 20 years. He brought
me here last year and I got to be on the air with
Ryan Rosell from Butta On The Bread. He was
really friendly and ever since then I've wanted to
do a show. Aaron and I were always talking about
doing a radio show, so we did the [CiTR] training sessions and sat in on Nardwuar's show a few
times. Nardwuar has been really supportive of
us throughout this entire process. We submitted
a demo, which got accepted, and that's how the
show started.
What's it like sharing a show between the two
ofyou?
Giesbrecht: Usually when we're deciding what
to play we'll both suggest stuff and I don't really
think there's ever been a time when one of us has
wanted to play something and the other hasn't.
We usually come to a consensus pretty easily.
Reichl: And it's nice when there's two of us. It's
less boring. We can converse when we are playing music and we pass the time easily.
If you had to host a brand new show with a
completely new angle, what genre would you be
playing?
Giesbrecht: Hip hop for sure. There's been so
many good hip hop releases this year.
Reichl: Yeah. I don't really listen to hip hop,
although there's this stuff that's just on the border of being hip hop yet it's still not really. It'd be
cool to have a show about that.
What kind of music did you grow up listening to
and how does it influence the show?
Giesbrecht: I'm not sure how it influences the
show, but the first thing I can remember listening
to when I was really litde was Stan Rogers in the
car with my mom.
Reichl: I went through a phase where I only listened to classic rock when I was like, six. And
then I went through another phase of listening
to only pop-rap. The first band I really got into
though was Gorillaz, and then later Massive
Attack. My Dad was introducing me to bands
like Boards of Canada, and that got me into a lot
more underground music. We play a lot of psychedelic-rock on the show, and the first psychedelic band I really liked was Animal Collective. I
don't listen to them as much as I used to, but they
still have a big influence on what I listen to now.
How are you finding new music to listen to
these days?
Reichl: I used to have these narrow indie tastes,
but one thing that helps expand those is going to
a bunch of concerts. The opening acts help me
listen to new music. I saw this band that opened
for My Bloody Valentine called Lumerians and
they played some really cool space-rock. I like
going to a concert and getting more than you
expected.
If there's one local Vancouver band that deserves
more attention, who is it?
Giesbrecht: We recendy went to a seven-inch
release party for the band Village. They're definitely one of my favorite local bands. Or maybe
Shearing Pinx.
Reichl: Yeah, Village is really good. They've got
this dream-pop sound and "Nowhere" is one of
my favourite songs of all the music I've heard
in the last while. And Shearing Pinx. One of the
guys from Audio Pop Records is in that band.
They've been doing music for a long time and it's
this really noisy punk and its really good.
What can you see yourselves doing a few years
from now?
Reichl: Well, my mom is an educational psychology professor here, so if I get in here I get free
tuition. I don't know what I'd major in but I think
I'd still want to be doing the show. It's really
fun to just sit in there even if no one is listening,
because you're just listening to music and having
a good time.
Giesbrecht: I'm in a program at school that is
pre-International Baccalaureate, so I'd like to go
into that and from there probably do some computer science or chemistry here at UBC. I'd still
want to be doing the show for sure.
Tune in to Chthonic Boom! euery SundayJrom 5:00
to 5:oo p.m. STRICTLY THE DOPEST
01
ir\ iui.:
1 NVIUIMMC
)    HITZ OF 2013
can't find them, give CiTR's mus
tell you how to find them. Check
c coordinator a shout at (604) 822-8733. Her name is Sarah Cordingley. If you ask nic
ut other great campus/community radio charts at vvww.earshot-online.com.
ARTIST
ALBUM
LABEL
ARTIST
ALBUM
LABEL
,'-$*{
The Courtneys*+
The Courtneys
Hockey Dad
51
A Tribe Called Red*
Nation II Nation
Tribal Spirit
2
Thee Ahs*+
Future Without Her
Self-Released
52
Bear Mountain*
XO
Last Gang
*3'
Jay Arner*+
Jay Arner
Mint
53
Various*
Rat King II
Killer Haze
" i<
Weed*+
Deserve
Couple Skate Records
54
Monomyth*
King, Does This Not Please You?
Self-Released
5
Doldrums*
Lesser Evil
Arbutus
55
Hermetic*+
Heartbreakology
Alarum
*r?":i
Boats*
A Fairway Full of Miners
Kill Rock Stars
56
Jessy Lanza*
Pull My Hair Back
Geej Recordings
. 7 -:
Various*+
Vancouver Pop Alliance Volume 3
Mint/CiTR 101.9 FM
57
Various*
Psych Pop From Toronto
Optical Sounds
. J*'£
The Passenger*+
Negative Object
More Than Human
58
Sean Nicholas Savage*
Other Life
Arbutus
9
Slow Learners*+
Habit b/w Party Police
Perfect Master
59
Wax Idols
Discipline & Desire
Slumberland
10
Louise Burns*+
The Midnight Mass
Light Organ
60
My Bloody Valentine
mbv
MBV Records
yj||
U.S. Girls*
Gem
FatCat
61
Psychic Ills*
One Track Mind
Sacred Bones
12
Suuns*
Suuns*
Suuns*
62
Ladyfrnd*
Ladyfrnd
Hybridity Music
13
Renny Wilson*
Sugarglider
Mint
63
Rae Spoon*
My Prairie Home
Aiberta Foundation Arts
14
Neko Case
Anti-
64
The Burning Hell*
People
Headless Owl
15
Lightning Dust*+
Fantasy
Jagjaguwar
65
Slutever
1994 b/w Spit
Jade Tree
16
Dead Ghosts*+
Can't Get No
Burger
66
Washed Out
Paracosm
Sub Pop
"■?$$!
Braids*
In Kind // Amends
Flemish Eye
67
Lisa's Hotcakes*+
Love Hz
Self-Released
18
Austra*
Olympia
Paper Bag
68
Chelsea Light Moving
Chelsea Light Moving
Matador
19
Bleached
Ride Your Heart
Dead Oceans
69
Fuzz
Fuzz
In The Red
20
Babysitter*
Eye
Psychic Handshake
70
Shawn Mrazek Lives!*+
Thought He Was Dead
Self-Released
21
No Joy*
Wait To Pleasure
Mexican Summer
71,
Gold & Youth*+
Beyond Wilderness
Arts & Crafts
22
CFCF*
Music For Objects
Paper Bag
72
Glass Armonica*+
Glass Armonica
Unit Structure
23
Koban*+
Null
The Broadway To Boundary
73
Savages
Silence Yourself
Matador
24
The Pack A.D.*+
Some Sssongs
Nettwerk
74
HSY*
HSY
Buzz
25
White Poppy*+
White Poppy
Not Not Fun
75
Krist! Lane Sinclair*+
The Sea Alone
Self-Released
26
War Baby*+
Jesus Horse
Self-Released
76
The Cyrillic Typewriter*+
Custodian
Jaz
27
TheShilohs*+
So Wild
Light Organ
77
Rose Windows
The Sun Dogs
Sub Pop
28
Drawn Ship*+
Ghost Weight
Scratch
78
Tim Hecker*
Virgins
Paper Bag
29
Various*
Weird Pop from the Peace Country
Peace Country Diaspora
79
Diane*+
Phantoms
Green Burrito
30
Ponctuation*
27 Club
Bonsound
80
Frog Eyes*+
Carey's Cold Spring
Self-Released
31
Lee Harvey Osmond*
The Folk Sinner
Latent
81
B.A.Johnston*
Mission Accomplished
Mammoth Cave
32
Homeshake*
Homeshake*
Homeshake*
82
Colin Stetson*
New History Warfare Vol. 3
Constellation
"    33
Open Relationship*
Poochy
Self-Refeased
83
Devendra Banhart
Mala
Nonesuch
34
Rec Centre*+
Times a Billion
Self-Released
84
Lindi Ortega*
Tin Star
Last Gang
35
The Beep Dark Woods*
Jubilee
Six Shooter
85
Mazzy Star
Seasons Of Your Day
Rhymes of an Hour
36
The Albertans*+
Dangerous Anythings
Ernest Jenning Record Co
86
maQLu*+
Malfeasance
Self-Released
37
Said The Whale*+
Hawaiii
Hidden Pony
87
Minotaurs*
New Believers
Static Clang
38
Cascadia*+
Cascadia*+
Cascadia*+
88
Tough Age*+
Tough Age
Mint
39
Plays:Four*+
Lay Doe
MoreThan Human
89
Pop. 1280
Imps of Perversion
Sacred Bones
40
Pissed Jeans
Honeys
Sub Pop
90
TheAbramsonSingers*+
Late Riser
Copperspine
41
The Ketamines*
You Can't Serve Two Masters
Mammoth Cave
91
DearSuzy*+
Die Holle Orchestra
Hive Creative Labs
42
Hooded Fang*
Gravez
Daps
92
Indian Wars*+
Songs from the North
Bachelor
43
Pick A Piper*
Gauntlet Hair
Pick A Piper
Stills
Mint
Dead Oceans
93
94
MalcolmJack*+
Lost Animal
I'm My Own Bewitchment
Ex-Tropical
Self-Released
44
Hardly Art
45
Grand Analog*
Modern Thunder
The Shadow Cabinet
95
TheBallantynes*+
Faith b/w Velvet
LaTiDa
46
Solar Year*
Waverly
Arbutus
96
King Krule
6 Feet Beneath The Moon
True Panther
C;: 47
Thee Oh Sees
Floating Coffin
Castle Face
97
The Belle Game*+
Ritual Tradition Habit
Boom pa
48
Zeus*
Cover Me
Arts & Crafts
98
Bonobo
The North Border
Ninja Tunes
49
ur+
Lie
Function Operate
99
Scott Walker
Bish Bosch
4AD
50
DIANA*
Perpetual Surrender
Paper Bag
100
Data Romance**
Other
Dine Alone STAFF PICKS OF 2013
A recap of our favourite listens from 2013.
All titles on sale 10% OFF until January 31** 2014.
NIC
JoelR.L
Phelps-The
Nashville
Sound
BIN Callahan- |
Dream River
Tim Hecker -
Virgins - '~:fn7ii <»[mmmt
Loscll - Sketches From New Brighton
Deerhunter - Monomania
TV Segall - Sleeper
Frog Eyes - Carey's Cold Spring
Lightning Oust - Fantasy
The Shilohs-So Wild
Kurt Vile - Wakin' On A Pretty Daze
ERIN
^/4-Mutagens: Italian
Ilectronlo
& New Wave
Underground
1980-1988
Colin Stetson
-New History
Warfare Vol.   .
2: Judges
Bill Callahan - Dream River
Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds - Push
the Sky Away
David Lynch - The Big Dream
Julia Hotter - Loud City Song
Kanye West - Yeezus
Destroyer - Five Spanish Songs
David Bowie - Next Day
Lightning Dust - Fantasy
MARK
The Knife -
Shaking the
Habitual
Plastic Ono
Band-Take
Me to the Land
Of Hell
Mazzy Star
- Seasons of
Your Day
Nick Cave - Push the Sky Away
Various - Spring Breakers
MBV-MBV
Wild Nothing - Empty Estate
OMD - English Electric
Bill Callahan - Dream River
Various - Mutazione: Italian Electronic
& New Wave Underground 1980-1986
JEREMY
Unknown ' *
*Merta*  /*
Orchestra-li
Devendra
Banhart-
Mala
Earl Sweat- " j
shirt-So Wild
The Knife - Shaking the Habitual1
Black Sabbath -13
Laura Marling - Once I was an Eagle
David Bowie - The Next Day
Justin Timberlake - The 20/20
Experience
SAM
Laurel Halo -
Chance of Rain
Julia Hotter -
Loud City Song
Dirty Beaches
- Drifters/Love
Is the Devil
Rhye - Woman
Colin Stetson - New History Warfare
Vol. 3: To See More Light
The Albertans - Dangerous Anything
Perfume Advert - Tulpa
Pender Street Steppers - Life in the
Zone
Huerco S. - Colonial Patterns
William Onyeabor - Who Is William
Onyeabor
JOHNNY
Bob Dylan -
Another Self -
Portrait
CassMcCombs
-Big Wheel
and Others
Destroyer -
Five Spanish
Songs
Plays:Four - Lay Doe 12"
Asap Rocky - Long Live ASAP
The Beatles - Live at the BBC Vol. 2
Bill Callahan - Dream River
Ducktails - The Flower Lane
Malcolm Jack - I'm My Own
Bewitchment
Weed - Deserve
If
facebook.
twitterxom/zulurecords
facebook.com/pages/
Zulu-Records/32698267757
zulurecords.tumblr.com
Zulu Records
1972-1976 W 4th Ave
Vancouver, BC
tel 604.738.3232
www.zulurecords.com
STORE HOURS
Monte Wed   10:30-7:00
Thurs and Fri 10:30-9:00

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