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 BEAR MOUNTAIN | THE MOUTHS | ERIC CAMPBELL & THE DIRT | WHITE LUNG J JONATHAN DY | THE RYAN & AMY SHOW | TERRACE
NOVEMBER 201M?hat^i^^p From.CiTR l$l.9 Fte£Free! | %f porting Vancouver's Impendent Mt$c Community For 30 Years
HP   Wmm\
1 ¥m!m
vo
f
i
H 1 shindig
Shindig starts Tuesday, September 17 and rims until December 10 at the Railway dub.
Visit wwwxftrxa/slUndig for full schedule.
THANK-YOUT0OURSTONSORS
AMS EVENTS
Backllne Musician Services
Band Merch Canada
Canadian Musk Week
Discorder Magazine
Fader Master Studios
Rain City Recorders
Long&McQuade
Mint Records
Musk Waste
Nimbus School of Recording Arts
NXNE
VbgvWIe Recording
Zulu Records
UPCOMING
SHOWS
L
tUCKSIJAW
DEATH
Before Bad Brains, the Sex Pistols or even the Ramones, there was a band called Death. Punk before
punk existed! Death are finally receiving their long overdue recognition as true rock pioneers, (from Detroit)
254 East Hastings Street
604.681.8915
With Tough Age and Hag Face
Tickets at LiveAtRickshaw.com
NERD FEST III: A NIGHT OF
EPIC FANTASY
KREATOR AND OVERKILL
WithWarbringer
DESERT DWELLERS AND
KAMINANDA
CATURDAYCREW:8BIT
ADVENTURE RELOADED
B9 MONSTER MAGNET
[jjjj With Zodiac and Royal Thunder
M SLEIGH'R FEST WITH
BRIAN POSEHN
With Expain, Atomis and Anchoress
LAUGHY0URASS0FF20     E3 CHURCH OF MISERY *
Scott Patey with Ed Wrtty.Dino Archie.       K*9 With Saviours, Baptists and Wizard Rifle
Featuring Andrew Barber and more ^"^"
rr? A TU/ICTCn YMAQ A night of comedy with Dylan Reimer
IK] M I If 101 LU AIYIMO and Simon King. Hosted by Patrick Maliha
Additional show listings, ticket sale info and locations, band
bios, videos and more are online at:
www.liveatrickshaw.com
HELLCHAMBER ALBUM RELEASE
With JAR, Nihilate, Deveined
RED FANG
With Bison and Sandrider
LO0T:ATRIBUTETOTOOL    1333 THE PHIL KEAGGY GUITAR
ss™^   ^™*NDFAMEXPt^
UONSINTHESTREET        B33 BLACKJOELEWIS
With Oh No Yoko, Amble Greene, k*1*I  WithRadkey
Factories and Alleyways
WHITE RAVEN REVUE "     EE3 DIECEMBERFEST
Lucitera's Winter Fusion Bellydance HX£] With Archspire, Burning Ghats, Sinned,
Student Showcase ^m^ Anion, Nihilate, Ogroem, and more
ONE NIGHT STAND
Now on its 6th year, One Night Stand is coming to the Rickshaw
with some of the best musicians in the city.
With members of MOTHER MOTHER, SAID THE WHALE, YUKON
BLONDE, DOMINIQUE FRICOT, THE BELLE GAME,
BRASSTRONAUT, ADALINE, and ROCOCODE
Get your tickets at LiveAtRickshaw.com
Like us on Facebook: facebook.com/RickshawTheatre   Follow us on Twitter: @rickshawtheatre    Add us on Instagram: ©rickshawtheatre EDITOR'S NOTE: A KIND YOUNG MAN NAMED JC
Have I ever told you the story ofhow I first got involved with Discorder? Apologies
if you're already familiar with this tale, but I think it's important to mention
before I get into the thesis of my Editor's Note.
I can't remember exactly when or where I was the first time I read Discorder. It's
more than likely that I was just drunk at the Biltmore one night and picked up a
copy, but my memory, like most nights spent at the Cabaret, is blurry. I must've
found the magazine afterwards on Facebook because I ended up reading about the
monthly proofing party happening in the CiTRlounge that Sunday. At this point
I didn't even know what a "CiTR" was but I thought the magazine was rad and I
didn't have a job at the time, so I hauled ass out to UBC to check it out. After 20
minutes of me asking strangers where I could find Discorder, I eventually found my
way into the Students' Union Building and into the wonderful world that is CiTR.
The proofing party was a goddamn disaster. The Editor-in-chief at the time,
Gregory Adams, was a pleasant, friendly guy and I was an anxious, sweatywreck.
I remember trying to avoid eye contact, afraid that at any moment someone would
realize I had no idea what I was doing and boot me from the room. Everyone in
the room had some kind of musical trivia to contribute to the light bantering and
I was keeping busy trying to put a cap on my self consciousness.
At one point someone offered me a fresh strawberry to snack on and I accidentally told them that I was allergic—I meant to say that they sometimes gave
me hives but my anxiety muddled my words. I remember the person apologizing
and me trying to assure the group that I wouldn't be dying from anaphylactic
shock at any given moment, but I couldn't recover from the weird mix-up. I'm
pretty sure I just went to the bathroom and never came back. If you look at our
archives online and find the April 2011 issue, I was credited under Proofreaders as
"A kind young man name [d] JC whom we know is very allergic to strawberries."
The issue marked the first time I ever appeared in Discorder.
So what do my bumbling personal encounters have to do with anything?
Withoutvolunteers and people contributing to Discorder, this magazine wouldn't
exist. Two and a half years ago, I was just some awkward guy wandering into
CiTR, unsure of what I was even doing there. Now, I have weekly office hours
and my own polaroid on the door. You never know where these kinds of things
might take you and I encourage everyone reading this, whether you're a writer,
photographer, illustrator, or even just someone who loves music, to get involved.
Come out to one of our meetings, join us for a proofing party, or just drop by the
office and come say hi. There's something at this magazine for everyone—and
you don't even have to be allergic to strawberries.
So it goes,
Jacey Gibb
FEATURES
REGULARS
t Cover photo by      logo lettering by
JONATHAN DY JUSTIN LONGOZ
Tough Age lettering by MOSES MAGEE
8—Bear Mountain Leave your bear spray
and climbing gear at home, 'cause all
you need to enjoy this Bear Mountain is
two ears and a love for great music. After
the re-release of XO earlier this year, the
Vancouver-based group are back to play the
Vogue Theatre, by Max Wainwright
13—The Mouths Pull up a bar stool and join
Discorder as we talk to Black Vinyl Project's
featured band, the Mouths. Don't worry; we've
already made a couple puns about the band's
name to help get you started.
by Keefer Pelech
14—Eric Campbell & The Dirt Discorder
talks to Eric Campbell about his band, the
Dirt, and tells us all about haunted music
video shoots and why you won't find the
outlaw rockers on the road this winter.
by Curtis AuCoin
16—Tough Age While not even a year old
yet, Vancouver's Tough Age already have a
label to call home and a self-titled debut on
the way. Read on to find out more about the
band's relationship with the Ketamines and
Jarrett Samson's obsession with Mac Tonight.
by Julie Colero
19—White Lung Vancouver mainstays White
Lung have a new seven-inch out on November
5 via Deranged Records. We talk with front-
woman Mish Way about the release, Songs
about the South, and the recurring fear of
finality, by Joshua Gabert-Doyon
Here's The Thing Winter Reading List
Textually Active CanzineWest
I'm With The Band Terrace
In Good Humour The Ryan & Amy Show
Calendar Kitsum Cheng
Program Guide
Art Project Jonathan Dy
Discorder Staff Sound-off
Under Review
Real Live Action
On The Air The Shakespeare Show
Charts
I NOTICE OF DIGITAUZATION
I Dear readers, writers, photographers and past contributors of Discorder,
I Let it be known that CiTR is currently working to digitalize the entirety if
I Discorder's archives. Soon, all of the past issues you know and love will be I
I availableforviewing online. Thanks, computers!
I If you have any questions or concerns, please contact Brenda at
I stationmanager@citr.ca
Editor
Jacey Gibb
Art Director
Jaz Halloran
Copy Editors
Robin Schroffel,
Steve Louie
Ad Coordinator
TBD
Under Review Editor
Robin Schroffel
RLA Editor
Steve Louie
Web Editor
Chirag Mahajan
Calendar Listings
Sarah Cordingley
Accounts Manager
Corey Ratch
Official Tweeter
Evan Brow
CiTR Station Manager
Brenda Grunau
Publisher
Student Radio Society
of UBC
Student Liasons
Evan Brow,
Josefa Cameron
Photographers & Illustrators
Curtis AuCoin, Maria Asselin-Roy, Britta
Bacchus, Kate Brown, Tyler Crich, Jonathan
Dy, Gordon Halloran, Dana Kearley, Justin
Longoz, Steve Louie, Gina MacKay, Moses
Magee, Tierney Milne, Rob Ondzik, Kim
Pringle, Alison Sadler, Yu Su, Eleanor Wearing
Writers
Mariko Adams, Curtis AuCoin, Willa Bao,
Alison Braid, Evan Brow, Robert Catherall,
Erik Coates, Julie Colero, Natalie Dee, Fraser
Dobbs, Joshua Gabert-Doyon, Sam Hawkins,
Ibrahim Itani, Kami! Krawczyk, Erica Leiren,
Luan Li, Monika Loevenmark, James Olson,
Keefer Pelech, Nathan Pike, Karlijn Profijt,
Shane Scott-Travis, Lindsay Stewart, Duncan
Vieira, Jordan Wade, Max Wainwright, Zach
Weiss, Bob Woolsey, Justin White
Advertise
Ad space for upcoming issues
can be booked by calling (604)
822-3017 ext. 3 or emailing
advertising@citr.ca. Rates
available upon request.
Contribute
To submit words to Discorder,
please contact: editor.
discorder@citr.ca. To submit
images, contact: artdirector.
discorder@citr.ca
Subscribe
Send in a cheque for $20
to #233-6138 SUB Blvd.,
Vancouver, B.C., V6T 1Z1 with
your address, and we will mail
each issue of Discorder right to
your doorstep for a year.
Distribute
To distribute Discorder in
your business, email distro.
discorder@citr.ca We are
always looking for new friends.
Donate
We are part of CiTR, a
registered non-profit, and
accept donations so we can
provide you with the content
you love. To donate visit
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©Discorder 2013 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 10,200. Discorder is published almost monthly by CiTR, which
can be heard at 101.9 FM, online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487,
CiTR's office at (604) 822-3017, email CiTR at stationmanager@citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write #233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T1Z1, Canada.
Editorial cutoff: October 20,2013 WINTER.
REAQ1NG LIST
byfOB
wooR?
Books' are the endless frontier. I feel constant guilt over how
much reading I accomplish, always thinking it should be more.
At some point I got it in my head that intelligent people keep
up on their reading and because I've always considered myself
an intelligent person, you can see the vicious circle I've created.
That said, I do make it a point to come back to a book every now
and then. My reading, if not streaky, has remained an important
part of my life despite competition from other more alluring
media. Plus, they read books on Star Trek. If they're still doing it
in the 24th century, you know it's important.
Whoever decided that summer was the time for reading
made a mistake. I don't know about you, but I like to spend my
summer out and about, enjoying the city of Vancouver. The
time for reading is winter. It's rainy, dark, and generally more
depressing than summer. What better time to escape into a
good read? I like to think that my crotchety anti-conformity is
shared by more people than it probably is but if you agree with
me about this coming time of year and its perfect conditions
for curling up with a good book, then read on! I have gathered a
few of my favourite reads as well as some I'm looking forward to
diving into this winter.
Personally, I tend towards genres like historical non-fiction, classic literature, and biographical/memoir-type stuff. Of
course, my fascination with classic literature stems from my
earlier fear that I don't read enough—an area I feel behind in, so
there's a constant desire to catch up.
The first book on my winter reading list is one that I'm characteristically behind on. Telegraph Avenue was given to me as a
birthday gift last year and I'm still not really into it yet. It's by
Michael Chabon, who wrote other great novels like The Yiddish
Policemen's Union and The Amazing Adventures ofKaualier & Clay.
In the category of more modern/guilty pleasure reading,
Bobby Orr has a book, Orr, My Story coming out for Christmas
that I'm really looking forward to. For background: I grew up
in a house with a signed picture of Bobby Orr above the fireplace. He's something of a Woolsey family hero and a very .
interesting figure. I'm also very much looking forward to Still
Foolin' 'Em by Billy Crystal, another Woolsey
family favourite.       ft&f $§!&,'j
To round this list out, a couple of my all-
time great reads from past winter reading
spells. Firstly, The Secret Voyage of Sir Francis
Drake by UBC professor Samuel Bawlf. In the
book, Bawlf posits a theory that Francis Drake
was the first European to circumnavigate
Vancouver Island while on a secret mission
from the Queen to look for a backdoor to the
Northwest Passage. It's hard history that reads
like a swashbuckling adventure. I know we've
all been on the Cormac McCarthy train since the Coen brothers
adapted No Country/or Old Men but I do have to mention his
masterpiece Blood Meridian. It's an extremely violent book that
has haunted me since the day I read it, but in a good way.
And that's my list, folks. Please don't let it make you feel
more behind in your reading. You see, here's the thing about
books: they're important but not in any obligatory way. If you
read, books will make you smarter, but that's not why you
should read. You should read because it's fun—LeVar Burton
says so! There's no other form of entertainment that fires up
your imagination quite like the written word.
PLUS, THEY READ
BOOKS ON STAR TREK.
IF THEY'RE STILL
DOING IT IN THE 24™
CENTURY, YOU KNOW
IT'S IMPORTANT.  WELCOME
TO THE
ZINE SCENE
by ALISON
BRAID
illustrations by
MOSES MAGEE
Ever wondered how to get involved with the underground world
of zines and independent culture? Still hung up on wondering what a zine is? Ponder no longer, as Canzine West is back
this year with a one-day festival that will knockyour hand-knit
socks off.
Canzine West is an offshoot of Canzine Toronto, which first
began in 1995, and has had a hugely successful history. The
event, organized by Broken Pencil: the Magazine 0/Zine Culture and
the Independent Arts, features a wide array of artists, writers, and
performers specializing in zines and independent publishing.
For those who've never dipped their big toes into the waters
of alternative culture, coordinator Laura Trethewey says the
biggest reason to visit Canzine West is that "you're just not
going to see this stuff anywhere else." And she's right. In a
world where online publishing is becoming more and more
prominent, the focus of Canzine West is on artists who know
it's not all fun 'n' games. They know it's worth it to create
something unique by hand.
The variety of talent you will see at Canzine West is also
unparalleled. "You get...indie publishers, artists, and creators...
people who create artwork and zines in their basements or at
home, people who run micropresses on the side, Emily Carr
artist collective, [and] high school students," says Trethewey.
The list goes on and on.
And for attendees working on their first piece, Trethewey
encourages them to bring them along. "[For] anyone who
[does] not have a mainstream way to get it out there...this is
their chance to showcase their work to the world."
This year, Canzine West will feature a couple of its tried and
true events as well as some exciting new additions. Back again
is the popular 1-2 Punch Book Pitch, where participants are
given two minutes to convince the judges why their manuscript
is a must-read.
The day will also include an artist panel covering the
challenges and craft of using the graphic art to portray
real life, a Vancouver writers series, and four eight-minute
hyperspeed talks.
A few well known presenters from Vancouver's publishing scene include Brian Kaufman, Kevin Chong, Sarah Leavitt,
Colin Upton, Geoff Mann, Catherine Owen, Catherine Busby,
and more.
Due to its incredible lineup and impressive turnout each year, Canzine West is also a fantastic place to Canzine West uull runfrom
make connections. Trethewey recalls an example from       1-7 p.m. on November 2
Canzine Toronto, where comedians Amy Lam and Jon at Ukrainian Hall (805
McCurley met. They now run the improv comedy group       Pender St. E.) Tickets are $5
"Life of a Craphead," and host a popular monthly com-        at the door and will include
edy night at the Art Gallery of Ontario. So no matter a Jail edition ofBroken
your experience, niche, or particular talent, Canzine           Pencil. For any one hoping
West has something for you.                                            to participate in the 1-2
Before November 2 rolls around, go home, get Punch Book Pitch, it's run
inspired, and try your hand at being a zinester. There on a jtrst-come, Jirst-serued
are no limits: you can create whatever tickles your fancy,      basis. Sign up by emailing
be it a zine about the dangers of umbrella spokes, the canzine@brokenpencil.com
perils of the jungle, or the 103 uses of garden gnomes. uuth your name, email,
So pull up those socks, drag that dusty craft box out of        phone number, and two or
the attic, and get creating. In the time it takes you to do       three lines describing the
that, I'll have thought of garden gnome use #87. project you'd like to pitch. I arrive early at the Media Club on October 3 to speak with local indie electro
pop band, Terrace. They released their first full-length, As Far As the Nyht Can
See, back in June, a versatile soundtrack for shoes-off dancing at a house party,
taking flight over the Atlantic, and every occasion in-between. Preparing for
the show tonight, lead singer/guitarist Simon Lock bounces around on stage,
adjusting stage lights and pedals, chatting to everyone thatwalks in the room.
To each side of Lock stand the band's keyboardists, Chris Brewer and Jodi Kane
Hoesing. Terrace begin their soundcheck and Lock's guitar breaks high above
the thrum of synthesized bass. Everyone taps their feet, wanting to dance, as
he sings the first lines of "Kane Garden Bay." After the soundcheck I follow
them outside the club to talk before the show.
Discorder: You just put out your first full-length album in Tune and have
been touring over the summer. How has that been?
Lock: It's good—as good as it could go for a band independently releasing
an album.
We're starting to break the Top 10s in the college charts and that's really
cool because that's our audience. That's the people we want to listen to us.
Ultimately, they like the same music as us.
I've been trying to place your music—the feeling it imparts—and it came
to me that it's really that feeling of travelling, of leaving somewhere.
Hoesing: We love that type of music that makes you feel good when you're
travelling or just hanging out on a beach. So it's going to come out in our
songs for sure.
Lock: It took an EP and an album to get our sound, but we're finally getting
it. It's somewhere far away and warm. There's a drink on special, and there's
probably not a lot of people around. We keep saying a beach in France...or a
terrace in France.
Are there any go-to bands you listen to when you're travelling?
Lock: In the Caribbean, I thinkit's got to be early, early Bob Marley. Anything
that Phoenix has done is awesome for going away; travelling has a way of making you listen to music you wouldn't normally listen to.
Hoesing: Air France, every time I went anywhere for about six months they
were on my playlist.
"WE DEFINITELY LIKE TO HAVE FUN.
WE TAKE THE BAND SERIOUSLY,
BUT WE NEVER TAKE OURSELVES
TOO SERIOUSLY."
What are your favourites that stand out on the album?
Lock: Our favourite song is "Kane Garden Bay," just because it happened
in about three hours. We hadn't written anything for months, and we were
rehearsing for a show at the Electric Owl; someone started in on a keyboard lick,
and then another... I went home that night and arranged it. It was recorded in
two days. That song is hot, summer, desperation, and longing—still fun—but
heavy. That was the first time we all sparked on the spot.
Are you working on anything new?
Lock: Yeah, we've got some new stuff. We have skeletons lying all over the
place. We're going to start writing again in January, and go away somewhere;
we're looking at San Diego at the moment, somewhere near the beach. The
three new songs we have are decidedly "speedo." Very summery, very dark-tan.
What are your big influences?
Lock: Early '90s techno, acid house, post-punk, Joy Division, and the
Buzzcocks. That kind of stuff. All the way up to bands like Interpol, Cut
Copy, and Friendly Fires. Chris is really into hip-hop. Jodi likes a lot of polka,
Oktoberfest stuff [laughs].
Hoesing: We come from different places, but we also have bands that we
all love; we're all going to agree Arcade Fire is awesome.
Lock: We meet in the middle with musical tastes, and where we meet is
the sound of the band.
I think we generally take ourselves too seriously in Vancouver. It's nice to
you guys having some fun.
Hoesing: We definitely like to have fun. We take the band seriously, but we
never take ourselves too seriously. I think as individuals, we didn't before this
band either. It's all so dreary [in Vancouver] anyway. We just want to play some
shows, write an album, work together, and put something out that doesn't
sound like everything everyone else is playing. iflo^rmojuru
by MAX
WAINWRIGHT
lettering & illustration by
JUSTIN LONGOZ
photo by
JOANNA AMBROSIO
Upon hearing the words "Bear Mountain," you might conjure a tableau of fantastical
imagery, marked by dark ominous woods and severe landscapes. More than likely
though, "Bear Mountain" evokes the fantastical sound-scapes crafted by the electro-
pop band of the same name.
Since 2011, Bear Mountain have steadily made their presence heard (and felt) by
touring behind their indomitable EP XO. Released independently in 2012, and then
re-released by Last Gang Records in May, XO is a collection of bold indie-dance and
synthpop. Featuring a mix of eclectic textures, each song soars higher than the last,
making XO a careening listen. Bear Mountain's versatile and confident sound allows
them to fit snugly on bills alongside Bloc Party, Hot Chip, and Islands. Discorder recently
caught up with band architect, Ian Bevis, via phone during some downtime of his
immersive touring schedule between Los Angeles and Austin. Bear Mountain have become renowned for their ambitious
live show, one that seems to outstrip the small venues a young
touring band typically inhabits. When I caught Bear Mountain's
opening set for Islands in late September, the humble Media Club
was bursting at the seams. The band, with Bevis on bass, twin
brother Greg on drums, Kyle Statham slinging the guitar, and
Kenji Rodriguez providing the light show and synth textures,
projected an arena-sized expansiveness with energy to match. Not
surprisingly, Bevis tells me the band has always had big plans for
his music in the live setting: "Ultimately, that's the kind of show
we want to create. Something you can take to an arena and have
a massive production."
It'snptthatbigger is necessarily better, butBevis wants theBear
Mountain experience to be "much larger than [them]." It stems
from the project's modest compositional origins on Bevis' laptop.
"The songs come first definitely.. .a song is not a one-dimensional
thing. Music is very three-dimensional. It can be very all encom-
passing...you can listen to a song and live in that world for three
and a half minutes. So, by having this visual component and by
bringing that alive in a show, really brings it to life."
Bear Mountain's live visual componentis a natural extension of
how Bevis views his songwriting. It has the same sort of function
as a sample or synth part. Each Bear Mountain song is "almostlike
a painting in a way" with its own sensory territories. It starts with
a feeling or emotion and is realized by the exploration of sound
and vision. Bevis' goal with songwriting is to be that explorer and
relay to the listener as much sensory experience as possible: "I
would hope we'd done a good enough job that the feeling, or the
emotion or the imagery is there."
There is definitely a strong theme of exploration running
through Bear Mountain. As much as composition is an emotional
and sensory peregrination, for Bear Mountain, it's also a ramble in
sound itself. "Ifyou can think of a sound, you can use itin a song,"
says Bevis, "that search for those sounds is what keeps it going.
That's the mostexcitingpartaboutwritingmusicformerightnow."
As Bevis and I talk about sounds and samples, I can't help but
recall the band's elaborate live gear and instrument setup. Bevis
laughs, "Yeah, we each have our own little battle stations...We
were playing in LA on Monday night and some dude, right before
the show, he's like, 'Oh man, these guys have way too much stuff.
It's kind of overkill.' And then we played the show and that same
guy was like 'Holy shit! Okay, I take it back.' We use it. Nothing's
for show."
It all leads back to the hunt for sounds, as Bevis admits: "I
actually brought a USB turntable and a bunch of records with
me on this tour so I can pull samples on the road, and I've never
done that before. It seems a bit extravagant to be hauling around
a fucking turntable and a bunch of records...but, for me, when I
don't have any ideas, the best thing to do is to go through a bunch
of samples and see if something jumps out"
As Bevis and I conclude our discussion, a thought comes to
me. "The name [Bear Mountain] comes from The Dharma Bums
from Kerouac... I was thinking ofwhat the connection might be."
After a pause, Bevis remembers a partofthe novel that remains
significant for him. "There's this part where [the characters] go
and climb the mountain and they have this amazing, euphoric
experience. They get to the top and are over the moon—elated
that they hiked the mountain. And then on the way back down, it
turns to nightfall and they lose their way, and they start getting so
angry." Much like all Kerouacian stories, Bear Mountain is about
the whole journey, both highs and lows.
Though their journey has just begun, I'm sure itwon't be ending anytime soon. As long as Bevis and company continue to push
boundaries, I'm sure the Bear Mountain experience will grow even
grander and more nuanced.
Bear Mountain play the Vogue Theatre on November g alongside the Belle
Game and the Dary's.
"ULTIMATELY, THAT'S
THE KIND OF SHOW
WE WANT TO CREATE.
SOMETHING YOU CAN
TAKE TO AN ARENA
AND HAVE A MASSIVE
PRODUCTION." When they're not dressing up as lesbians in trench coats, middle-
aged moms, or serial killer Aileen Wuornos from Monster, Ryan
Steele and Amy Goodmurphy are bubbly, sociable people. The type
you wantto talk to atparties, who suckyou into their conversation
and don't let go.
Steele and Goodmurphy are the titular members ofThe Ryan
and Amy Show, a sketch-comedy duo known for pushing boundaries with a wide-range of material. Who else would do a "monster-
in-the-closet" horror parody sketch featuring soft Japanese pop
and call it "Asian Crooner"? And while Steele and Goodmurphy
share a similar sense of humour, their paths to comedy certainly
contrast. For Goodmurphy, being funny and different was always
something she wanted to do.
"I got caUed weird a lot when I was younger because I was
always trying to make people laugh. And they'd laugh or call me
weird or laugh while calling me weird, but I realized then that I
always wanted to be goofy," says Goodmurphy.
But for Steele, comedy only came as a recent pursuit in
adulthood.
"I was 29 and I did a speech at my best friend's wedding and
the room was in heavy laughter. That was the first time I believed
that, you know, I'm funny," says Steele. GOODMURPHY, ON A SKETCH SHE WANTS TO DO:
"Any time there's a sunny day, Vancouver freaks, the fuck out to English Bay. And I live in
North Van. So I want to do this video where people are in different situations, like they're
.sitting at work or they're sitting in their house, and then they see one sunbeam shoot
down and the city goes crazy and everyone gets in their car and rushes to English Bay,
'cause it's always just a fucking zoo on a sunny day. People go nuts."
«,.
Coming together in 2007, the two have been producing
live shows and YouTube sketches ever since, with a number of
their sketches boasting over 100,000 views. Their latest sketch,
"Undertaker Goes On A Date," features WWE wrestler The
Undertaker, played by Vancouver comedian Cam MacLeod, enjoying drinks with a girl.
"I've been a fan of pro wrestling since I was seven or eight. And
I was from the days of Hulk Hogan and Macho Man and Razor
Ramon," says Steele. "I had this idea...to explore if we tookthese
wrestlers and put them in real situations. And going on a date just
seemed like the natural thing."
The video might even be the first in a number of fake WWE
wrestling sketches.
"What came for me in the mail recently was a gold bodysuit that
I ordered for Goldust, which was kind of mid-'gos," says Steele.
"And we're hoping Amy can do a Chyna one. I definitely want this
to be a continuing thing."
The wrestling theme would join a growing list of the group's
recurring characters, which includes their most-played characters,
Moms Over Miami, a fictional pop duo made up of middle-aged
moms Judy Campbell and Susan Derulo, who perform songs like
"Tiny Victories" and "YOLOT."
"They're fun," says Goodmurphy, describing Moms Over
Miami. "They love having fun. They're happy. They want to be
"I GOT CALLED WEIRD A LOT WHEN I WAS
YOUNGER BECAUSE I WAS ALWAYS TRYING
TO MAKE PEOPLE LAUGH. AND THEY'D
LAUGH OR CALL ME WEIRD OR LAUGH WHILE
CALLING ME WEIRD, BUT I REALIZED THEN
THAT I ALWAYS WANTED TO BE GOOFY"
famous. They're best friends, but they get into tiffs, but they love
each other to death."
The characters, recognizable by their excessive eye shadow,
"mom haircuts," and noticeable "frontbutts," got their look from
a close source.
"I went into my mother's closet, and she hates me for this, but
I steal all of her old clothes, and her clothes now, and put them in
the videos," says Goodmurphy.
Another of the group's well-known characters is Monster, the
character of Aileen Wuornos Charlize Theron plays in Monster.
Goodmurphy, who plays the character, loves Monster's mannerisms and the immersion of playing such a unique character.
"I justwhite outmy eyebrows, wipe off my makeup, slickmy hair
back, and put teeth in," says Goodmurphy. "But I hate myself now.
Lately, the video's been getting around, so I'll be in random places,
parties, whatever, and someone will say, 'Hey, you're Monster!'
Don't know my name. And I've got full makeup on."
For the group, sketch comedy is all they want to do. From their
live shows to their video sketches to everything they want for the
future, sketch comedy is their goal.
"I'd love to go on tour one day," says Steele. "I'd love to travel
with this woman... and go to every singlestate in America, across
Canada, and stay in cheap hotels and do the same show every
single night, in front ofdifferentaudiences and watch the sketches
grow even more."
While the group continues to produce their YouTube sketches
and their live shows—put on at the Junction on Davie Street—the
group is currently writing a pilot with a production company in
Los Angeles. So the next time you see a middle-aged mom music
video or the interesting mannerisms of a serial killer on TV, it
might just be Ryan Steele and Amy Goodmurphy.
Catch The Ryan and Amy Show performing live at thejunction on November
26 and November 28. Both shows start at 8 p.m. I    UKfree for siadon menHNsrsi
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citr.ca MOUTHING
OFF
by KEEFER
PELECH
lettering by
KIM PR1NGLE
photo by
ELEANOR WEARING
It's a Wednesday night at the Wolf & Hound Pub, on the
corner ofWestBroadwayandDunbar Street. Pmsittingwith
guitarist/vocalist James Leung and drummer Ross Sheppard,
two thirds of the local rock-outfit the Mouths (the bassist
Kett Panther is unable to make it tonight). Between talks of
Britney Spears related warm-ups and mouth-based puns, we
discuss the group's evolution, their relationship with Blank
Vinyl Project, and impending plans for the future.
The Mouths have a sound reminiscent of Arctic
Monkeys and Is This It-era Strokes, but with a rougher finish. Complementing the driving quality of the band, Leung
provides catchy vocals, at times with a well-delivered rasp.
Living up to their namesake, the Mouths engage with articulate energy.
"I think the mouth is a good body part," says Leung
when asked about the band's name. "It's a really expressive
body part and that's important for music. It should be expressive."
"It also has a little sexual innuendo," Sheppard quickly adds.
The Mouths trace their history back to October in 2011, though
they'd been jamming together before then.
"That was our fist gig," Leung recalls. Their debut had the
Mouths opening for Oh No! Yoko and Said the Whale, something
arranged by the latter after they listened to the Mouths' early recordings. "They did us a huge favour by letting us open. We started off
right.. .and then we didn't play another gig like that for two years."
Since then, the band has managed to string together other
milestone shows, graduating from playing locations like youth
centres to more recognizable venues. "We played the Pit a lot last
year," says Leung. "Those were the first gigs where people came out
and knew the lyrics and stuff. That was really nice." The Mouths
have also had the pleasure of playing at Fortune Sound Club, the
Railway Club, and Zoo Zhop, among others.
Another milestone for the band involved the departure of
founding member Justin Sheppard, Ross' brother. Without their
lead guitarist, the remaining members had to pick up the slack.
"We've readjusted all of the songs so that it works without two
different guitars," says Leung.
"We've been playing a lot so we've gotten a lot tighter since
then." Sheppard agrees. The departure has led to a more experienced band.
Many of the Mouths' recent opportunities have resulted from
their relationship with Blank Vinyl Project (BVP), UBC's campus
record label. The trio submitted a video audition to the label and
were asked to perform a subsequent live audition. "[BVP] weren't
sure if we sucked or not 'cause they couldn't hear me singing."
Leung reflects on the experience. The audition paid off and the
Mouths were picked up as a BVP Featured Artist for the 2013/14
period.
"Fortune was through them. They've hooked us up with
people. Gig's, promo stuff, and a fun weekend in Chilliwack."
says Sheppard
"Its really important that they're just there poking us every
once in a while. It's really easy to shut off your brain and forget to
do music when you're busy with school and stuff," adds Leung.
Over the summer, the Mouths have been busy recording songs
with Curtis Buckoll from Rain City Recorders. Their plan is to
release a series of3-4 song EPs in lieu of a full-length, with the first
launch on November 9 and a release gig on November 15 to follow. EMpELL byCURTjS
MHEJRI       AUCOIN
photos by
CURTISAUCO!N
lettering by
JONATHAN DY Sundays are typically made for hangovers and sleeping in. But
one blue-bird morning I find myself driving out to North Van
for an interview with Eric Campbell, frontman of the outlaw
rock and roll outfit the Dirt As I walk up to his home, a decaying
boat looms amongst the bushes of the frontyard, guarding
the residence. Avoiding ashtrays and empty beer cans up the
stairs, his flustered roommate meets me at the front door.
Barely poking her head out into the morning sunlight, she tells
me that Campbell is still sleeping. Unsure what to do, I follow
her through the unfamiliar halls and open a door adjacent to
a dirty dish-filled kitchen. Glancing around at the stacks of
books filling the room, I meet the eyes of a complete stranger
awakening to the warm newness of day. Without delay, we
casually slap hands and introduce one another. The nonchalance
and confusion of the scene isn't entirely odd though because
after etching the Dirt's recent release Kill Your Love into my skull
over the past few weeks, I expected nothing less.
Eric Campbell & the Dirt's music is a beautiful summation
of human depravity. Kill Your Loue somehow conjoins the sadistic and the satirical into this great big catharsis of rock and roll.
The album drags you through mud and squalor, spits in your
face, and will make a misfit out of the most morally conscious.
With sounds alluding to the Deep South and rock pioneers like
Eddie Cochran, Hank Williams, Little Richard, and Hendrix,
each song plunges you deep into the dark depths of the human
psyche, complete with lyrical mortification fronting twangy guitar lines and thunderous drum beats. Inspirations like the Gun
Club are immortalized on the album's cover of "For The Love of
Ivy" and Gene Vincent's precious sock hop tune "Who Slapped
John?" is transformed into a murderous bloodbath on "Who
Stabbed John?" Kill Your Loue was something that Campbell had
to logically create as an artist, with its development traced back
through the 10 years he has spent playing and performing music.
As Campbell sprawls out on the couch, with hands
clasped behind his head, he reflects upon his first experiences
performing at open mic nights. "Every weekend I went wearing
the same wide-brimmed hat, tweed jacket, flared jeans, and
these white cowboy boots with inverted crosses on them."
Laughing, he speaks of how "they gave you three songs and I
only played Bob Dylan."
Like most musicians, Campbell began to feel a "lack of
inspiration in performing other people's songs" and needed to
"espouse the shit building up inside." He then started to write
and compose songs, all the while performing with bands like
Dirty Spells and No Sinner. Eventually Campbell developed a collection of songs that needed to be recorded, so he met up with
long-time friends John Mulder (bass) and Louis Edward (drums),
and started jamming out the melodies inside his head.
"AT THE KILL YOUR LOVE RELEASE SHOW,
THEY WERE ABLE TO TRANSFORM
ELECTRIC OWL INTO A FULLY-FLEDGED
WAR ZONE WITH BODIES AND BIRTHDAY
CAKE FLYING ACROSS THE ROOM."
"For our first show we were booked for a 40-minute slot and
ended up stretching out Hendrix's 'Manic Depression' for about
half an hour. Our songs were pretty much just a verse then some
sort of an instrumental freak-out, then back to the verse again. It
was all about trashing our instruments."
Now the Dirt's set has evolved into a well-polished musical
massacre. Their setlist inevitably starts a dance-mosh and at the
Kill Your Loue release show, they were able to transform Electric
Owl into a fully-fledged war zone with bodies and birthday cake
flying across the room.
At this point in the interview, I was dying to unveil the ghouls
lurking behind the Dirt's "Ropes and Chains" music video—
though I never suspected to learn about a legitimate ghost story.
"The house was haunted, no doubt about it. It looked like a
bomb went off inside. The floors were caving in, endless water
dripped from the ceilings, and the rancorous smell ofblack
mould definitely placed our health at risk. We spent the entire
day filming in silence until the cops showed up and it became a
pretty heated affair. Their biggest concern was that the place was
infested with black mould and that it had once been quarantined
off as a biohazard. Eventually, we heard through the grapevine
that a man named Gottfried Plank had hung himself within the
home's very walls and its good knowing our video gave his ghost
one hell of a send off."
As we take photos in the ruins of Eric's backyard, I ask him if
the Dirt has an upcoming tour for the album. "I don't think we'll
have time. Besides, Canadian winters are insane. I was involved
in a sketchy accident years ago where our tour van flipped and
since then I've kind of sworn against touring in the winter."
Lucky for us the Dirt, now a four-piece with the joining of Colby
Morgan on guitar, will be unleashing their rock and roll doom
all over the city for these depressing few months. So instead of
melancholically awaiting the sunshine, seek out the Dirt and awe
at their malicious tunes spuming across a haze-filled bar. ■■
/*!
TOUGH
AGE
by JULIE
COLERO
lettering by
MOSES MAGEE
photos by
JONATHAN DY
Tough Age is a Vancouver success story in the making.
The band—JarrettEvan Samson on guitar and vocals,
Penny Clark on guitar, Lauren Smith on bass, and Chris
Martell on drums—was birthed out of the ashes of
Korean Gut, and has ties to Collapsing Opposites and
Apollo Ghosts. My opportunity to chat with the band
presented itself on the night they gathered on the floor
of the Mint offices, stuffing 500 vinyl sleeves and eating
cheesy bread and soggy shrimp pizza. As we all stuffed,
sealed, and stacked, the band caught me up on their brief
but action-packed history together.
The band played their first show in January, and was
signed to Mint Records by summer's start. The self
titled album is out in early November, and Samson says
there are already four new recordings slated for release
on a seven-inch in the new year. "I'm just going for it,"
says Samson, "Just doing it. Committing to the idea and
getting stuff done. There's no point waiting around for the
perfect time for things. There's something more interesting
to me in the immediacy of just getting it down and moving on.
And I guess, clearly, it sort of worked."
Two of the record's tracks are remnants from Korean Gut
days, and Smith says it's "a huge compliment" when I compare
one, "Cocaine Vouchers," to Apollo Ghosts. Samson played
guitar in the Ghosts, and says he wrote it when he was joining the band, and that "maybe it was subliminal." I ask if the
band's folding was a good thing for Tough Age, but Samson
denies ever feeling held back. "I only ever, felt supported by
Apollo Ghosts in every way. Those people are my family and I
love them all to pieces."
Samson claims to have a long history of being in at least
three bands at any 6ne time, but is happy to focus his energy
on Tough Age, where he has the chance to take his frontman
duties and varied influences and channel them into a good-
time, all-out rock-and-roll band. The band's gritty, garage-
rock sound is transformed on the album into something far
cleaner, and at times almost bubble gum-esque, courtesy
of label-mate Jay Arner. Songs like "Open It Up" and "Sea of
White" are anthemic gems, while others like "The Heart of
Juliet Jones" and "Seahorse" offer up jangly, almost shoe-gazey
romantic musings.
The band's debut album cover is a comic collage by
Samson, composed of images from old Romance and DC
100 Comics and the strange back-page ads. He's woven a few "TOURING MAKES YOU BETTER. YOU'RE OUT PLAYING FOR PEOPLE YOU DON'T KNOW. YOU
DON'T HAVE THE FRIEND CUSHION. YOU'RE PLAYING FOR PEOPLE WHO ARE ONLY GOING TO LIKE
YOU BASED OFF WHAT YOU ARE DOING. THEY DON'T CARE THAT YOU HAD A BAD DAY OR HOW
STRESSFUL WORK'S BEEN. THEY JUST KNOW WHAT THEY HEAR, SO YOU HAVE TO SINK OR SWIM."
inside jokes into the collage, including a saucy trompe-l'oeil in
the bottom corner (happy hunting!). He feels the collage is a fair
Use of the images, much like the band's now legendary "Make It
Tough Age" T-shirt, featuring a parody image of McDonalds '80s
spokesman Mac Tonight, which garnered the band a few mysterious emails asking them to contact a law firm.
"It's pretty small potatoes," says Samson, as they're not out
to make money off of McDonalds. "Pm absolutely obsessed
with Mac Tonight. He's my Reagan. To me, he represents this
horrible, bloated corporate indifference...As a kid, I loved him
because he was so terrible. There's a perverse, sincere love for the
■ worst mascot in history."
The band had their controversial T-shirts in tow as they set
out earlier this year on two short tours, touring Western Canada
in June and Ontario later in the summer.
"Tour is really hard because you're always
around people. It's hard to find alone
time," says Samson.
"Remember how handy that sage
spray was, though?" asks Smith. Everyone
agrees that Smith's "beautiful, green-
tinted chill-out smell" was a lifesaver in
combating smelly feet in the tour van during a hot Toronto tour with the Ketamines.
The Ketamines are Tough Age's best
tour buds in the universe, as the two
bands shared a van and a watery Sled
Island festival adventure. "I've known Paul [Lawton] for over a
•  decade," says Samson. "He's one of my best friends in the world.
He is a very high strung individual, but so am I." Clark laughingly describes the two as "co-conspirators." Touring with the
Ketamines was an eye-opener for Samson, and a positive experience for everyone. Martell insists that touring has made the
band "grittier," and Samson puts it thusly: "Touring makes you
better. You're out playing for people you don't know. You don't
have the friend cushion. You're playing for people who are only
going to like you based off what you are doing. They don't care
thatyou had a bad day or how stressful work's been. They just
know what they hear, so you have to sink or swim."
Tough Age's ability to swim is what drew my attention to
them in the first place—during a show at Champion Jack's in
Abbotsford in June, the mic stopped working. Tough Age, however, didn't stop. Samson just pushed his way into the crowd and
yelled his lyrics at the top of his lungs. It was awesome, and the
crowd ate it up. That's what the band, and the biz, calls "tour-
tight", and Tough Age had it by Day Two of their first tour.
While Tough Age are rocking most aspects of music busi-
ness-ing, they still have a few hurdles to leap; for instance, none
of them knows how to drive. That's rough for a band with a
desire to tour. The band enlisted two friends to take them to
Alberta in June, and "When we were out east, the Ketamines
chauffeured us around like a bunch of chumps," says Samson.
"The Ketamines have offered us $100 from their band fund,
and I have vowed to be the first to learn," declares Martell
proudly. Clark chimes in with the caveat that the licensee will
"have to wear a Ketamines shirt in their license photo" to get the
cash prize, though.
Tough Age's self-titled debut album comes out Nouember 12, with a release
party at the Biltmore Cabaret on Nouember 16. :•
!sB WHITE
LUNG
by JOSHUA
GABERT-
DOYON
illustration by
ALISON SADLER
"I don't like to think too hard about 'punk* or what that word
even means. Basically, if you try to analyze it down to some±ing
tangible it's just ridiculous. It's like a dog chasing its tail," Mish
Way explains to me over email.
"You ever watch a bunch of music nerds argue over what it
means to be punkwhile they're coked at4 a.m.? Spare me. What's
the point in this argument? The definition of punk is decided by
the individual."
Way is the lead vocalist for White Lung, a Vancouver-based
group with a skittish, heated sound. Alongside guitarist Kenny
William, drummer Anne-Marie Vassiliou, and bassist Grady
Mackintosh, the group has recorded two full-length albums since
they formed in 2006. With a new seven-inch, Songs about the South,
due for release in early November, the four-piece is quickly carving
out a niche for themselves.
Songs for the seven-inch were written in the early summer
while the band was between tours, but it isn't some sort of hard-
rock Southern gothika. "I wasn't trying to create an image about
the South and share it with people who buy the record. It's
more like we were on tour, I was writing a lot of lyrics in the
van because I was bored and inspired by things that were
really bothering me," says Way.
She adds thatlyrical contenton Songs aboutthe South deals
with complex issues related to "sexual dynamics" and "desperation" in drug abuse.
The paste of White Lung's sound is Kenny William's
guitar work. It's a grinding, cranking sort of paste that
brings everything together. "Kenny is like one part metal,
one part Johnny Marr, and one part smoking-speed-out-of-
a-light-bulb-at-5 a.m.-craziness, but it's what makes him
so genius" says Way. "I would be a real waste without him."
"Blow it South", Songs about the South's A-side, has an up-
close feel, without sacrificing the high-speed aggression
that evokes images of decaying, expansive warehouses. There's
a sense that the song is a move towards darker content, but it's
a hard call to make. Touring has certainly had an effect on the
band's music—and with White Lung on the festival circuit, the
touring has become more frequent.
"I'm learning how to do the festival thing slowly," says Way,
before making a quip aboutthe festival scene. "I mean, [Pitchfork
Music Festivalin Chicago] was weird. Itwas like everyone on Twitter
in one place drinking shitty wine and taking MDMA and kind of
losing it because suddenly they all had more than 140 characters
to communicate."
Jesse Gander is the band's recording "guru," according to
Way—he recorded Songs aboutthe South as well as the band's other
LPs. In addition to White Lung, Gander has worked with an impressive list of artists such as the Subhumans, Japandroids, and the
Pack AD.
"I get stressed out even thinking about recording," says Way,
afraid of the finality it brings. "Knowing that the song is coming
to its final completion and with that, will become an expectation
for our audience, intimidates me." Way agreed to our interview on
the condition thatitwas over email because of the same concern.
Aside from her role as frontwoman for White Lung, Way is also
a freelance journalist for the likes ofVice, Noisey, the National Post,
and others. In the past, reporters have typified the band and Way
because of her support of feminist ideas in lyrics and in articles.
The fact that White Lung is a hardcore band consisting of several
females has led many to clump it together with Riot grrrl, and it
often overshadows the music. An inability to describe a band with
a strong female member as anything but "feminist" supports
stereotypes and norms that often turn females away from the
punk and hardcore scene. Way's lyrics touch on feminist themes,
but the band is a lot more than that; it's not a "gendered" band.
White Lung is just a kick-ass four-piece making good, fast music. Jilt
<? iff*§§ f
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Tail Feather
(Soul/R&B)
The All Canadian
Farm Show
Radio Free Thinker
Moon
Grok
Programming Training
Code Blue
(Roots)
3
Thunderbird Eye
Nardwuar Presents
(Nardwuar)
The Leo Ramirez Show
(World)
Discorder Radio
Sne'waylh
Twofold
(Eclectic/Mandarin & English)
4
4
5
Moon
Grok
Chthonic
Boom!
(Rock)
News 101 (Talk)
The City
Arts Report (Talk)
Simorgh
(Persian Literacy)
News 101 (Talk)
Mantra
(Eclectic)
5
1U9W
So Salacious
g|||jta/rlip Hop)
4*33"
(Contemporary Classical
and Experimental)
Flex Your Head
(Hardcore)
'Arts Project   { UBC Arts On Air
Are You
Aware
(Eclectic)
Peanut
Butter 'n'
Jams -
(Eclectic)
Stranded
(Eclectic)
Nasha Volna (World)
6
6
KewltUp!
(Punk/Experimental)
7
More Than Human
(Electronic/Experimental)
Exploding Head Movies
(Cinematic)
La Fiesta (World)
7
Stereoscopic Redoubt
(Experimental)
African Rhythms
(World)
8
Rhythms
(World)
Techno
Progressive
Inside Out
(Danee)
Folk Oasis (Roots)
A Deeper f&s^t)-' *^r
(Heavy Reverb)
8
9
Bootlegs & B-Sides
(Dance/Electronic)
The Jazz Show
(Jazz)
Crimes And Treasons
(Hip-hop)
Live From Thunderbird
Radio Hell
(Live)
The Bassment
(Dance/Electronic)
Synaptic Sandwich
(Dance/Electronic/
Eclectic)
9
Trancend#li$., -
(Dance)
Sexy In Van City (Talk)
10
,w .
Canada Post-Rock (Rock)
11
Beaver Hour aka Rossin
(World Ghetto)
The Copyright Experiment
(Talk & Underground Electronic)
Randophonic
(Eclectic)
11
12
1
CiTR Ghost Mix
CiTR Ghost Mix
G4E
(Reggae/House/Hip
Hop/Experimental)
G4E
(Reggae/House/Hip
Hop/Experimental)
Aural Tentacles
(Eclectic)
The Late Night Show
(Drum + Etess> Afip&lL
industriJilll
12
1
2
2
r*Bi
The Absolute
Value of Insomnia
(Generative)
WWtsWs
3
CiTR Ghost Mix
3
5
111
lilill
'■?f^':.V-Or::-
4
5
SUBSCRIBE TO
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\ Discorder Magazine #233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., Canada, V6T 1Z1 BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS...
(Difficult Music) 7-9am
Bepi Crespan Presents... CiTR's
24 Hours Of Radio Art in a snack
size format! Difficult music,
harsh electronics, spoken word,
cut-up/collage and general
Crespan© weirdness. Twitter:
©bepicrespan Blog: bepicrespan.
blogspot.ca
CLASSICAL CHAOS
(Classical) 9-10am
From the Ancient World to the 21st
century, join host Marguerite in exploring and celebrating classical
music from around the world.
SH00KSH00KTA
(Talk) 10am-12pm
A program targeted to Ethiopian
people that encourages education
and personal development.
THiROCKERSSHOW
) 12-3pm
inna   all   styles  and
fashion.
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
(Roots) 3-5pm
Alternating Sundays
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-boots
country.
SHAKEA"TAILFEATHER
(Soul/R&B) 3-5pm
Alternating Sundays
The finest in classic soul and rhythm
& blues from the late '50s to the early
70s, including lesser known artists,
regional hits and lost soul gems.
MOONGROK
(Eclectic) 5-6pm
Alternating Sundays
CHTHONIC BOOM!
{Pop) 5-6pm
Alternating Sundays
A show dedicated to playing psychedelic music from parts of the
spectrum (rock, pop, electronic) as
well as garage and noise rock.
sbsALACIOUS
(Electro/Hip Hop) 6-7'pm
Skadz and Sprocket Doyle bring you
Electro Swing, Alternative Hip Hop,
Dubstep, Acid Jazz, Trip Hop, Local
and Canadian Content - good and
dirty beats.
MORE THAN HUMAN
(Electronic/Experimental) 7-8pm
Strange and wonderful electronic
sounds from the past, present, and
future with host Gareth Moses. Music
from parallel worlds.
RH\THMSINDIA
(World) 8-9pm
Alternating Sundays
Featuring a wide range of music from
India, including popular music from
the 1930s to the present; Ghazals
and Bhajans, Qawwalis, pop and
regional language numbers.
i TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
■ (Dance) 8-9pm
! Alternating Sundays
A mix of the latest house music,
i tech-house, prog-house and techno.
I BOdTLEGS&B-sVbES
I (Dance/Electronic) 9-10pm
| Hosted by Doe-Ran, the show was
: a nominated finalist for "Canadian
I College Radio Show of the year 2012
| in the Pioneer DJ Stylus Awards". A
j complete mixbag every week, cover-
I ing: Ghetto funk, Breakbeat, Hip-
| Hop, Funk & Soul, Chillout, Drum &
! Bass, Mashups, Electro House and
■ loads of other crackin' tunes. Search
' 'Doe Ran' at percussionlab.com and
\ on facebook.com
; TRA^ENDWICE
\ (Dance) 10pm-12am
: Hosted by DJ Smiley Mike and DJ
Caddyshack, Trancendance has been
broadcasting from Vancouver, B.C.
j since 2001. We favour Psytrance,
I Hard Trance and Epic Trance, but
: also play Acid Trance, Deep Trance,
! Hard Dance and even some Break-
\ beat. We also love a good Classic
Trance Anthem, especially if it's
remixed. Current influences include
Sander van Doom, Gareth Emery,
Nick Sentience, Ovnimoon, Ace Ventura, Save the Robot, Liquid Soul
and Astrix. Older influences include
Union Jack, Carl Cox, Christopher
Lawrence, Whoop! Records, Tidy Trax,
Platipus Records and Nukleuz. Email:
djsmileymike ©trancendance.net.
Website: www.trancendance.net.
! GOOD MORNING MY FRIENDS
; (Upbeat Music) MQ-tam
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
: (Eclectic) S-Uam
\ Your favourite Brownsters,
: James and Peter, offer a savoury
! blend of the familiar and exotic
' in a blend of aural delights.
\ breakfastwiththebrowns®
hotmail.com.
volunteers take you on a musical : issues and great music.queerfmra-
cross-country road trip! ; dio@gmail.com
WEDNESDAY
SKA-T'S SCENIC DRIVE
fS/jra;llam-12pm
SYNCHRONICS
(Talk) 12-lpm.
Join host Marie B and discuss spirituality, health and feeling good. Tune
in and tap into good vibrations that
help you remember why you're here:
to have fun!
PARTS UNKNOWN
(Pop) l-3pm
An indie pop show since 1999, it's
like a marshmallow sandwich: soft
and sweet and best enjoyed when
poked with a stick and held close
to a fire.
THE ALL CANADIAN FARM SHOW
(Pop) 3-4pm
The All Canadian Farm Show cultivates new and old indie jams from
across genres and provinces. Tune
"in to hear the a fresh crop of CiTR
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
(World) l-bpm
The best of mix of Latin American
music, leoramirez@canada.com
NEWsioi
(7a//cJ5-6pm
Vancouver's only live, volunteer-
produced, student and community
newscast. Every week, we take a
look back at the week's local, national and international news, as
seen from a fully independent media
perspective.
4'33"
(Contemporary Classical and
Experimental) 6-7pm
This program showcases "new music" - contemporary classical and
experimental music, especially highlighting Vancouver's local performers and composers of new music,
to uncover a new musical niche to
the broader public in a friendly and
accessible manner.
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
(Cinematic) 7-9pm
Join gak as he explores music from
the movies, tunes from television
and any other cinematic source,
along with atmospheric pieces, cutting edge new tracks and strange
old goodies that could be used in a
soundtrack to be.
THE JAZZ SHOW
(VazzJ 9pm-12am
Vancouver's longest running prime-
time Jazz program. Hosted by Gavin
Walker. Features at 11 p.m. Nov.4:
The month opens with, four musical giants together: Lionel Hampton (vibes), Oscar Peterson (piano),
Ray Brown (bass) and Buddy Rich
(drums)..saynomore! Nov.ll: Tenor
saxophone pioneer Dexter Gordon
came home to the USA in 1976.
"Homecoming!" celebrates his arrival with trumpeter Woody Shaw.
Nov. 18: One of the most swinging
and elegant pianists was Wynton
Kelly. Here he- is with bassist Paul
Chambers and drummer Philly Joe
Jones. "Kelly at Midnight". Nov.25:
Roland Kirk ("Rahsaan") blew 3
saxophones at once and also played
amazing flute. Here is his first album
for a major label. "We Free Kings"
is a stunner.
BUTTA ON THE BREAD
ffc/ecf/c;i0:30-ll:30am
MORNiNG AFTER SHOW
(£c/ecf/cj ll:30am-lpm
An eclectic mix of Canadian indie
with rock, experimental, world, reggae, punk and ska from Canada,
Latin America and Europe. Hosted
by Oswaldo Perez Cabrera.
STUDENTSPECIALHOUR
(Eclectic) l-2pm
Students play music.
GWEEMTHEBObf
(World) 2-2pm
Sample the various flavours of
Italian music from north to south,
traditional to modern on this bilingual show. Folk, singer-songwriter, jazz and much more. Un
programma bilingue che esplora
il mondo delta musica italiana.
http://giveemtheboot.wordpress.
com
PROi^MFN?fRAn^NG'
(TaW 3-3:30pm
RADIO FREE THINKER
(Skepticism) 3-4pm
Promoting skepticism, critical thinking and science, we examine popular
extraordinary claims and subject
them to critical analysts.
DISCORDER RADIO
(On-air version of Discorder) 4-5pm
Discorder Magazine now has its own
radio show! Join us to hear excerpts
of interviews, reviews and more!
THECITY
(7aW5-6pm
An alternative and critical look
at our changing urban spaces.
New website: www.thecityfm.org.
New twitter handle: @thecity_fm.
FLEX YOUR HEAD
(Hardcore) 6-8pm
Punk rock and hardcore since 1989.
Bands and guests from around the
world.
INSIDEOUT
(Dance) 8-9pm
CRIMES &TREASONS
f/7/p-/?0/?;9-llpm
dj@crimesandtreasons.com
PACIFIC PICKIN'
; (Roots)S-Zam
j Bluegrass,    old-time    music,
; and its derivatives with Arthur
j and the lovely Andrea Berman. !
! pacificpickin@yahoo.com
QUEER FM
VANCOUVER:RELOADED
(TaW8-10:30am
; Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bi-
] sexual and transexual communities j
! of Vancouver Lots of human inter- \
I est features, background on current \
TWEETS & TUNES
<M6:30-8am
We practice what we Tweet! Showcasing local indie music and
bringing bands, artists and fans
together through social media. Website: tweetsandtunes.com Twitter:
©tweetsandtunes.
; BEAVER HOUR AKA ROSSIN
(World Ghetto) llpm-Ham
\ Emma vs music.
j G4E
(Reggae/House/Hip Hop/Experimental)
■ 12am-3am
Vinyl mixes, exclusive local tunes,
good vibes from around the world,
a thought and a dream or two with
your host Logan. Reggae, House,
Techno, Ambient, Dance Hall, Hip
Hop, African, Psychedelic, Noise,
Experimental, Eclectic
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
(Ec/ecf/cJ 8-10am
Live from the Jungle Room, join radio
host Jack Velvet for an eclectic mix of
music, sound bites, information and
inanity, dj@jackvelvet.net.
POP DRONES
(Eclectic) 10-11:30am
CREATORS; & CONTmBUTORS
Alternates with "Smart People"
(TaWll:30am-12pm
Talking to artists, entrepreneurs,
founders, and innovators about their
work, their process, and why they do
what they do. Individuals who make
positive contributions to the world in
the hopes of inspiring and helping
others to act on their own vision of
contribution.
SMART PEOPLE
Alternates with
"Creators & Contributors"
(7a//r;il:30am-12pm
Interviewing people we think are
smart. This program features weekly
guests who have something intelligent to say. Tune in to hear researchers, professors, writers, activists,
scientists, etc.
i THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
j (OldSkool)\2-l\)m
. Dan Shakespeare is here with music
: for your ear. Kick back with gems of
! the previous years.
I TERRY PROJECT PODCAST
(Talk) l-2pm
! Alternating Wednesdays
: There once was a project named
j Terry, That wanted to make people
i wary, Ofthings going on In the world
i that are wrong without making it all
! seem too scary.
! dIemocr^now
! (7aWl-2pm
| Alternating Wednesdays
\ EXTRAENVIRONMENTALIST
(7aW2-3pm
Exploring the mindset of an
outsider looking in on Earth.
I Featuring interviews with leading
i thinkers in the area of sustainable
! economics and our global ecological crisis.
MOONIGROCK
(Eclectic) 3-4pm SNE'WAYLH
4-5pm
In many Coast Salish dialects,
"sne'waylh" is the word for
teachings or laws. The aboriginal language-learning program
begins with the teachings of the
skwxwu7mesh snichim (Squamish
language). Originally aired on Coop
Radio CFRO 100.5 FM in Vancouver,
Tuesdays 1-2 pm
ARTSREPORT
(Talk) b-Bpm
Reviews, interviews and coverage of
local arts (film, theatre, dance, visual and performance art, comedy,
and more) by host Maegan Thomas
and the Arts Reporters.
ARTSPROJECT
(Ta//r;6-6:30pm
Alternating with UBC Arts On Air
Stay tuned after the Arts Report for
Arts Project Interviews, documentaries and artsy stuff that doesn't fit
into CiTR's original arts hour.
UBC ARTS ON AIR
(7a//rJ6-6:30pm
Alternating with Arts Extra!
On break from June-September
2013.
NEW"lTUP!
(Punk/Experimental) 6:30-8pm
abrasive fight-or-flight music
played at hot loud volumes, uncooperative songs for things that
are not alright. Punk, Noise-Rock,
Post-Punk, Experimental, Industrial,
Noisy, ad nauseum
FOLKOASis
(Roots) Z-lOprn
Two hours of eclectic folk/roots
music, with a big emphasis on our
local scene. C'mon in! A kumbaya-
free zone since 1997. folkoasis®
gmail.com
SEXYIN VAN CITY
(Talk) 10-1 lpm
Your weekly dose of education
and entertainment in the realm
of relationships and sexuality. sexyinvancity.com/category/
sexy-in-vancity-radio
__
12am-3am
Vinyl mixes, exclusive local tunes,
good vibes from around the world,
a thought and a dream or two with
your host Logan. Reggae, House,
Techno, Ambient, Dance Hall, Hip
Hop, African, Psychedelic, Noise,
Experimental, Eclectic
THURSDAY
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
(MJ8-10am
English. Hosted by Russian Tim.
Website: http://rocketfromrussia.
tumblr.com. Email-, rocketfrom
russiacitr@gmail.com. Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/Rocket-
FromRussia. Twitter: http://twitter.
com/tima_tzar.
IfAIN'TEASYBEiNGiGREEN
llam-12pm
This is CiTR's flagship beginner's
show. With the support of experienced programmers, this show
offers fully-trained CiTR members,
especially students, the opportunity to get their feet wet on the air.
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
(Eclectic) 12-lpm
Sweet treats from the pop underground. Hosted by Duncan, sponsored by donuts. http=//duncans
donuts.wordpress.com
CHiPSNOip
(Underground Pop, Garage, Lo-Fi)
l-2pm
Dip in every Thursday afternoon with
host Hanna Fazio for the freshest
local indie pop tracks and upcoming shows.
INKStubs
(Talk) 2-3pm
Underground and indie comix. Each
week, we interview a different creator to get their unique perspective
on comix and discuss their upcoming works.
f HUNDERBiRD EYE
fSjWVftJ3:30-4pm
Your weekly roundup of UBC Thunderbird sports action from on campus
and off with your host Wilson Wong.
TWOFOLD
(Eclectic/Mandarin & English)
A Mandarin/English radio program
featuring people and music from the
community. Hosted by Sandy.
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
(Punk Rock/Pop Punk) 10-11 a m
Hello hello hello! I interview bands
and play new, international and
local punk rock music. Great Success! PS. Broadcasted in brokenish
SIMORGH
(Persian Literacy) 5-6pm
Simorgh Radio is devoted to the
education and literacy for the Persian speaking communities and
those interested in connecting to
Persian oral and written literature.
Simorgh takes you through a journey
of ecological sustainability evolving
within cultural and social literacy.
Simorgh the mythological multiplicity of tale-figures, lands-in as
your mythological narrator in the
storyland; the contingent space of
beings, connecting Persian peoples
within and to Indigenous peoples.
AREYOUAWARE
(Eclectic) Alternating Thursdays
6-7:30pm
Celebrating the message behind the
music: Profiling music and musicians that take the route of positive
action over apathy.
PEANUT BUTTER ¥ JAMS
(Eclectic) Alternating Thursdays
6-7:30pm
Explore local music and food with
your hosts, Brenda and Jordie. You'll
hear interviews and reviews on eats
and tunes from your neighbourhood,
and a weekly pairing for your date
calendar.
STEREOSCOPICi REDOUBT
(Experimental) 7:30-9pm
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
(Live Music) S-llpm
Featuring live band(s) every week
performing in the CiTR Lounge. Most
are from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country and
around the world.
THE COPYRiGHT EXPERIMENT
(Talk & Underground Electronic)
llpm-12am
Discussing music copyright topics
and issues and mixing freely available music.
NARDWUAR
(Nardwuar) ZAQ-Spm
Join Nardwuar the Human Servi- l
ette for Clam Chowder flavoured !
entertainment. Doot doola doot \
doo...doot   doo!   nardwuar® j
nardwuar.com
NEWsToi
(7a//o>5-6pm
See Monday for description.
AURAL TENTACLES
(Eclectic) 12-6am
It could be global, trance, spoken
word, rock, the unusual and the
weird, or it could be something
different. Hosted by DJ Pierre.
auraltentacles@hotmail.com
STRANDED
(Eclectic) 6-7:30pm
Join your host Matthew for a weekly I
mix of exciting sounds, past and i
present, from his Australian home- '
land. And journey with him as he '
features fresh tunes and explores !
the alternative musical heritage j
of Canada.
AFRICAN RHYHMS
(World) 7:3Q-$vm
www.africanrhythmsradio.com
spectrum, then you'll like it. Sonic
assault provided by Geoff, Marcia,
and Andy.
CODEBLUE
(Roots) 3-5pm
From backwoods delta low-down
slide to urban harp honks, blues,
and blues roots with your hosts
Jim, Andy, and Paul, codeblue®
buddy-system.org
MANTRA
(World) 5-fym
Kirtan, Mantra, Chanting and
Culture. There's no place like Om.
Hosted by Raghunath with special
guests. Email: mantraradioshow®
gmail.com. Website: mantraradio.
co.
MOON GROK
7:30-10am
THE CAT'S PAJAMS
(hidiePop, Garage Rock) 10-11 am
The cat's pajamas: a phrase to describe something/someone super
awesome or cool. The Cat's Pajams:
a super awesome and cool radio
show featuring the latest and greatest indie pop, rock, lofi and more
from Vancouver and beyond!
sfEREOBLUES
(Blues/Eclectic) llam-12pm
Every Friday host Dorothy Neufeld
sinks into blues, garage and rock
n' roll goodies!
definTtTonI soundwave
(Folk/Rock)\2-\nm
The now of folk. The now of rock.
The now of alternative. Join Evan
as he explores what's new, what's
good, and what's so awesome it
fights dragons in its spare time. As
always, Evan ends the show with a
special Top 5 list that's always fun
and always entertaining.
SKALD'S HALL
[Drama/Poetry) l-2pm
Skald's Hall entertains with the spoken word via story readings, poetry
recitals, and drama. Established
and upcoming artists join host Brian
MacDonald. Interested in performing
on air? Contact us: @Skalds_Hall.
RADIO ZERO
(Dance) 2-3:30pm
An international mix of super-
fresh weekend party jams from
New Wave to foreign electro, baile,
Bollywood, and whatever else.
www.radiozero.com
THE BASSMENT
(Dance/Electronic) 9-10:30pm
The Bassment is Vancouver's only
bass-driven radio show, playing
Glitch, Dubstep, Drum and Bass,
Ghetto Funk, Crunk, Breaks, and UK
Funky, while focusing on Canadian
talent and highlighting Vancouver
DJs, producers, and the parties
they throw.
CANADA POST-ROCK
(Rock) 10:30pm-12am
Formerly on CKXU, Canada Post-
Rock now resides on the west coast
but it's still committed to the best
in post-rock, drone, ambient, experimental, noise and basically
anything your host Pbone can put
the word "post" in front of.
THE LATE NIGHT SHOW
(Drum+Bass, Ambient, Industrial...)
12-6am
Drum+Bass, Ambient, Industrial,
Noise, artist profiles with DJ Rea.
SATURDAY
THE SATURDAY EDGE
(Roots) 8am-12pm
A personal guide to world and roots
music—with African, Latin, and
European music in the first half,
followed by Celtic, blues, songwriters, Cajun, and whatever else fits!
steveedge3@mac.com
GENERATIoYS
(Punk) 12-lpm
On the air since 2002,
playing old and new punk on
the non-commercial side of the
spectrum. Hosts: Aaron Brown,
Jeff "The Foat" Kraft. Website:
www.generationannihilation.com.
Facebook: www.facebook.com/ :
generationannihilation".
POWER CHORD
(Metal) l-3pm
Vancouver's longest running metal I
show. If you're into music that's ;
on the heavier/darker side of the \
NASHAVOLNA
(HW6-7pm
News, arts, entertainment and music for the Russian community, local
and abroad, nashavolna.ca
LAFiESTA
(World) 7-Zpm
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue, Latin
House, and Reggaeton with your
host GspotDJ.
JUBIE£PERREiiinBRtt
(Heavy Reverb) Z-%m
"Bringing you the chillout world
of the heavy reverb genres: shoe-
gaze, post rock, dream pop, space
rock, trip hop and everything in
between, including new tracks
and old favorites. Facebook: face-
book.com/adeeperreverb. Email:
adeeperreverb [a] gmail.com"
SYNAPf IC SANDwicH
(Dance/Electronic) 9-11 pm
If you like everything from electro/
techno/trance/8-bit music/retro
'80s, this is the show for you!
www.synapticsandwich.net
RANbOPHONIC
(Eclectic) ll\}m-2am
Randophonic is best thought of as
an intraversal jukebox which has
no concept of genre, style, political
boundaries, or even space-time
relevance. But it does know good
sounds from bad. Lately, the program
has been focused on Philip Random's
All Vinyl Countdown + Apocalypse
(the 1,111 greatest records you probably haven't heard). And we're not
afraid of noise.
THE ABSOLUTE! VALUE OF INSOMNIA
(Generative) 2-Bam
Four solid hours of fresh generative
music c/o the Absolute Value of Noise
and its world famous Generator. Ideal
for enhancing your dreams or, if sleep
is not on your agenda, your reveries. ART PROJECT
JONATHAN DY
Based in Vancouver since 2005, Jonathan Dy
is a primarily self-taught photographer.
People are the subject of his first limited
edition book, I Need To See You, focussing on
Vancouver's music, theater, and visual artists.
The book launch (November 20th at The Cobalt)
will coincide with the one year anniversary of
SNAG, a live painting raffle event held every
Wednesday at the Cobalt. Andrew Young
(hedrew.blogspot.ca), founder/curator of SNAG
has gathered over 120 artists to participate
thus far, while Jonathan has documented the
event from its conception.
Photos taken with an Olympus E-500.
NIENKE, 2013 ■% iH «» ^*^ * /.  DISCORDER STAFF SOUND-OFF
illustration by KIM PRINGLE
Hey there, readers. How'reyou all doing? Miss the sweetness of summer yet? While October
gave us a few solid weeks of sun, it wasn't enough to defer the rainy-time blues. One of winter's most notable features is the resurgence of Seasonal Affective Disorder (S.A.D.), where
individuals have a negative emotional reaction to the changes outside. More time spent indoors; shorter days; they're all ingredients for the stew of S.A.D. That's why we asked the
Discorderstaii for this month's Sound-off: what's your favourite "sad" album?
ALISON BRAID, CONTRIBUTOR
Strangeways, Here We Come (The Smiths)
I remember being 10-years-old, sitting in front of our speakers, listening to the Smiths'
Strangeways, Here We Come. I loved putting my hands against the black mesh, and pretending I felt sadness vibrating through. The album's smooth ability to draw you in and then trip
you up like a dog winding its leash around unsuspecting legs is beautiful, and an experience
I seem to keep returning for. As the light dims, I can't think of anything better to listen to until it's socially acceptable to play Christmas carols. It'll make the holidays feel doubly as jolly.
EVAN BROW, COLUMNIST & STUDENT LIAISON
Pink Moon (Nick Drake)
Pink Moon is the third and final album by Nick Drake before his death in 74 at the age of 26.
The bare and stark acoustic music Drake produced emanated his vulnerability, his pain, and
hardship amidst the world, an acceptance of every failure. And in that despair of his, he created beauty. What became of this beauty? Nothing but death in obscurity. It always leaves
sullen and quiet to hear Drake, the Van Gogh of folk, bare his soul, knowing this album was
the last mark he made before his death.
JULIE COLERO, CONTRIBUTOR
Knock Knock (Smog)
Bill Callahan is the downer king, even when he's trying to be upbeat. Knock Knock, my favourite Smog album, manages to deliver a punch to the ovaries every time. Part of the sadness come from the hopefulness of the first track, when he sings "Let's move to the country / let's start a... /let's have a...", which progresses to the moment, a few songs down the
road, when he doesn't know where he's going, but knows he has to "hit the ground runnin'."
The album closes with a wish for the narrator's lover: "I hope you find your husband / and a
father to your children." Heart-fucking-breaking.
FRASER DOBBS, CONTRIBUTOR
Transatlanticism (Death Cab for Cutie)
The answer that came most quickly to mind, and also the record I'm most reticent to write
about, is Death Cab For Cutie's Transatlanticism. I was at a ripe teen age listening to this
vaguely conceptual record about separation, change, and familiarity to let each note seep
into my pores. Not only is it the best album Gibbard has ever written, it's also still, all these
years later, just as potent an emotional sponge. Sad never sounded so good.
JOSHUA GABERT-DOYON, CONTRIBUTOR
World of Echo (Arthur Russell)
It's not really a depressing album, but (4^/-/^ o/£c/70 has that calm, ethereal aspect
embedded in it that I associate with this time of the year. Arthur Russell is great, and
also very weird—most of his stuff is either disco or crooning country—but he always
plays the electric cello. In World of Echo, he gets super experimental and minimalist. He messes with the cello in all sorts of ways to create percussion and these ghostly
effects that work really well with his voice.
KAMIL KRAWCZYK, CONTRIBUTOR
Wind and Wuthering (Genesis)
Just looking at the album art for this 1976 progressive album invokes the feeling of a cold,
wet, overcast day, slowly eating away at the spirits of all. As depressing as even a first
glance may be, this album holds a special place in my heart as it is, for some reason, the
go-to album for typical post-September Vancouver days. With swirling, hollow synths and
pianos muddled with subtle drumming, guitar, and sorrowful singing, Collins and company
deliver a wholly remarkable experience that is as bleak as the weather we are just starting to experience.
ERICA LEIREN, CONTRIBUTOR
/1fZasf(TheTouch&Go's)
The Touch & Go's were a late '80s/early '90s staple on CiTR and their cassette release At
Lastls a masterpiece. They always had great songwriting, with the most beautiful female
voices in all of Vancouver. Songs so gorgeously sad, they plumb a deep well of tristesse that
is unfathomable, yet all the more lovely for it. Listen to "Beaver Inn, Bellingham," a cool-
weather love song that will make you cry it's so pretty; "Christopher" is another favourite,
like autumn itself, evoking the beauty and sadness of perfection and its inevitable decay.
Then there's "Pauline," a sinister black hole of a song with a guitar part that evokes terrifying angst. They do have light-hearted songs but since it's S.A.D. we're talking about, the
. talented foursome in the Touch & Go's do it like no one else can. Now be a dear won't you,
and pass me a hankie?
LUAN LI, CONTRIBUTOR
Cowboy Bebop Original Soundtrack (The Seatbelts)
Cowboy Bebop is an anime about five bounty hunters in the year 2071 who traverse inter-
galactic space in order to solve crimes and arrest criminals. Along the ride, they confront
old enemies, lost loves, and come to terms with themselves. I chose this album because
the studio composer, Yoko Kanno, did an amazing job in creating music that resonates perfectly with the scenes. Even after watching, the soundtracks can immediately teleport you
into the Bebop world, one that's psychedelic and nostalgic and futuristic all at the same time.
and lost love, of living with depression, and of political fallacies, each delivered with painful intimacy. For me, HospitalMusic'will always be associated with personal failings and ongoing struggles, but also with tragic optimism. The album finishes with the perfectly haunting cover of Daniel Johnston's "True Love Will Find You in the End."
LINDSAY STEWART, CONTRIBUTOR
Strange Cacti (Angel Olsen)
There's just something about a beautifully haunting voice serenading you from beneath layers of reverberation that effortlessly puts the tear ducts into action. Angel Olsen's debut EP
Strange Cacti is so drenched in emotion that it can actually be uncomfortable to listen to.
But if you're in a state of heartache, headache or toothache, this bewitching record is the
ultimate companion. Her vibrato-laden voice is not of this world, and paired with her dark,
intimate lyrics fosters the perfect sobbing environment.
JORDAN WADE, CONTRIBUTOR & HOST OF DISCORDER RADIO
Meat is Murder (The Smiths)
The magical combination of Johnny Marr's happy guitar riffs and Morrissey's sad, poignant
lyrics invokes a feeling of melancholy, empathy, and quiet contentment; perfect for this time
of year. This no-frills band from Manchester was only around for five years, yet produced an
international cult-like following—most notably from their 1985 sophomore release, Meat
is Murder. Even for fans like me, who discovered them long after they broke up, are left with
a strange sense of nostalgia for the hardships of the UK's industrial society of yesteryear.
Nothing gives me the warm fuzzies on a grey autumn day like walking into a pub and suddenly hearing "The Headmaster Ritual" or "I Want the One I Can't Have."
MAX WAINWRIGHT, CONTRIBUTOR
0/? fire (Galaxie 500)
There are a lot of great sad albums out there, but for me, Galaxie 500's On Fire\loats to the
surface. Dean Wareham's impressionistic narratives leave just enough for the lonely imagination on tracks like "Blue Thunder" and "Strange." Closing the album with a cover of George
Harrison's "Isn't It a Pity" sums the mood clearly. However, it's Wareham's drifting guitar
lines, Damon Krukowski's resonant shuffles and Naomi Yang's bobbling bass that make On
Fire a great sad sack album.
JAMES OLSON, CONTRIBUTOR
Pinkerton (Geezer)
Pinkerton by Weezer is so fraught with tension and anxiety, it's sometimes hard to listen to. The album rocks but
it's wrapped in an claustrophobic atmosphere of despair.
The listener shares in Rivers Cuomo's pain through his
self-loathing, sexually frustrated lyrics. Even on a bounder, "happier" tune like "Why Bother?" the listener is
confronted by such starkly downcast lines such as "Why
bother? / It's gonna hurt me/ It's gonna kill when you desert me." Weezer's most emotionally frank album is a cathartic, painful, yet tuneful and memorable experience.
Not recommended listening after a bad breakup though.
KEEFER PELECH, CONTRIBUTOR
Hospital Music (Matthew Good)
Hospital Music swings with brutal honesty. The album was
released in the wake of Good's crumbling marriage, Ativan
overdose, and diagnosis with bipolar disorder—themes
that stood out when I first listened to the album, but
Hospital Music resonates deeper. It speaks of heartache COREY ABELL
(Independent)
BABYSITTER/
MONSTER TREASURE
BURNING GHATS
SOMETHING OTHER THAN YOURSELF
(Independent)
While the tried-and-true pairing of soft vocals over
inoffensive acoustic guitar strums will coax you
into listening to Rainwater Youth, Corey AbelPs
incorporation of unexpected musical elements and
influences are what keep you listening.
Throughout the album, Abell's voice fluctuates
between genres with a self-conscious croon akin
to Sondre Lerche or Kurt Vile, a confident country
twang, and a pensive shoegazer. Exemplified by
the album's opener, "Kids First," Abell's voice
shifts from an innocent warble to a powerfully
assured and almost powerpop howl. On their own,
Abell's voice and guitar are a powerfully pleasant
combination on such tracks as the paired down
yet catchy "Salene" and the quietly thoughtful
"Re: Geography." Some of the album's highlights,
however, break away from the typical folk sound. A
standout, "Georgie, Where Are You Georgie?,"
is a stirring country-blues duet that features the
raw vocal stylings of Sabrina Robson, singer of
local favourites this is THE SHOES. Another highlight is the album's title track, which, through its
expansive shoegaze-meets-folk sound, evokes the
central theme of the album—the tension between
responsibility and youthful recklessness.
The nostalgia that soaks through Abell's
Rainwater Youth feels as familiar as a rainy day in
Vancouver. His collection of country blues and
shoegaze-inspired folk songs are perfect for dodging puddles, pulling on a cable-knit sweater, and
pouring too much Baileys into your coffee.
—Mariko Adams
Victoria's Babysitter kick things off with a couple
of fast, somewhat-sloppy, somewhat-hooky but
not-actually-that-melodic songs. The production
values on the split aren't really the best (which I
suspect is by design) and the vocals are a bit shouty
and too gravelly. I'm not wowed by much except
the hi-hatwork, which unfortunately only betrays
the sloppiness of the off-meter snare rolls. The
third song, "Cemetary House," starts out with a
very melodic guitar line which is catchy as heck
until you realise it's actually the Cure's "Just Like
Heaven" guitar hook played backwards. The rest
of the song then breaks down into annoying noise,
which ruins it until the Cure hook resurfaces. The
last song by Babysitter is a sort-of "Louie Louie"
in the Black Flag sense, and then we get into the
second half of the split.
Sacramento's Monster Treasure is a bit of a
contrast, using dark melody, good harmonies, and
a consistent tempo. There is something Washed
out and distant about the production, especially
in the vocals, as if the band and the listener are at
opposite ends of a long storm drain. A sound reminiscent of Vivian Girls, but not as good. Neither
band is bringing anything new or groundbreaking
to the table, and no one song stands out enough
for me to recommend.
—Justin White
In early September, Vancouver hardcore band
Burning Ghats released their fourth album,
Something Other Than Yourself. The release follows
the band's first tour through the States where
they got Brad Boatright, who also worked with
Vancouver band Baptists, to master the album in
Portland, Oregon, and had the opportunity to play
the Punk is Dead Festival in Lancaster, California.
Following two years' worth of writing, this
release marks the band's first full-length, coming in under 20 minutes. In doing so, they have
produced a successfully dynamic hardcore album
that gives the Vancouver scene great representation. The album marks a significant transition
period for the band as many of the songs included
input from previous members. The album shows
a band finding their sound and appearing a lot
more confident in their songwriting.
The transitions on the album flow effortlessly,
as the tracks seamlessly work their way into a fantastic pinnacle, as first hinted on the third track,
"All Night Vigils," thanks to the building lead
guitar parts. As the album moves forward, it's
carried forward by the intensity of "Grief Ritual,"
a song that is largely one long grind-crust riff. By
the seventh track, the album finds its darkest and
heaviest moment in "Carry the Head." The 10th and
last track on the LP, "Gold Sores," is a bold and
significant departure from the rest of the album,
starting with an extended 50-second pause and
comes in at just under seven minutes. It stands
confidendy on its own with a quiet gap enabling
the listener a moment to change gears and ready
themselves for a longer, slower song that features
guest artist Night Mother's instrumental noises. Burning Ghats will be celebrating this hard-hitting
release with a show on November 22nd at the Astoria.
—Monika Loevenmark
CONCORD DRUMM
(Independent)
Allow yourself to be entranced by the dream-like ambiance of Concord Drumm's first EP and I assure you,
disappointment will not ensue. It's a conglomeration of
fluidity, bathed in reverbed vocals, synths, and moments
of sporadic hip-hop. Emanating from the various hotel
rooms in which the EP was produced in, each track personifies the ambiance of the city of its production. "Only
three songs long" is a statement that doesn't give justice
to the lasting impression that this almost 13-minute
arrangement of composed electronic music has on us.
A distinct murmur opens the EP, bringing to life a
medley of reverbed vocals and synths in the opening
track, "Alone." Before you succumb to the soothing
norm established by the track, the tempo hastens and
a glimpse of hip-hop only to return to the calming lull
that had initially mesmerized us. An upbeat arrangement
of synths immediately sets the tone of the second track,
"Run (Somebody)." At this point, our minds already
in a daydream of ambient electronic music, we enjoy
Chris Brewer's mesmerizing vocals and lyricism that
emphasize the heterogeneous nature of this mix. As
the second track fades away, a mimicking undertone
blends neatly behind the crescendo of a single sound.
At its peak, however, our hearts empty like the sudden
drop in the track, only to remerge with an indelible
rhythm and entrancing vocals.
The Hotels EP mirrors the journey of a blissful hallucination, numbing the mind of worry and leading it
on a wonderfully synthetized adventure.
—Ibrahim Itani
THE CYRILLIC TYPEWRITER
(Jaz Records)
tTT
i
Art-pop and spaced-out Moogs rarely cross
paths, and, given the common fare of the Cyrillic
Typewriter's previous recordings, it would be
humble to say Custodian is a conceptual leap for
composer Jason Zumpano. On his third full-
length under the Cyrillic Typewriter moniker,
Zumpano entertains this crossover on the opening "Somewhere" before the layers of introspective chiming on "Lament 1" and "Doorway" culminate in nearly 10 minutes of obtuse, seemingly
disconnected compositions. Based on lastyear's
The French Door, it will take about three songs for
most (who haven't read this spoiler) to get up and
investigate whether the needle has truly been dropped
on Custodian before the words "Original Soundtrack
Recording" jump off the record sleeve.
By the fourth track, Zumpano has interposed piano
chords with the omniscient tubas of a regal procession
that strike with a surprisingly familiarity to his earlier
works. Lyricless and abstract, Zumpano has cleverly set
up art-pop and choose-your-own-adventure on a blind
date, and by the end of Side A, they're already at third
base. Flip the record and songs like the ethereal "Steps"
or feverish "Hands" illustrate how Zumpano seamlessly
mixes instrumental conversation with subtle pop playfulness to encourage interpretation of the otherwise
mysterious Custodian.
An unprecedented testament to the breadth of his
composing, the record sculpts seemingly synthetic
abstractions that could just as easily be the score to an
existential thriller as a B-rate acid drenched sci-fi. More
accurately, Zumpano has given listeners a score to a
movie that in fact doesn't exist. Being caught off-guard
with this record is part of his plan, though, as Zumpano
admittedly created a composition that forces itself into
subjective caprice—a score with no film; an accompaniment to the immaterial. Recall the straightforward
poeticism of last year's release and it should come as
no surprise that Custodian's playful complexity is The
French Door's logical conclusion.
—Robert Catherall
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KEN MODE
with FULL OF HELL
SAT. NOV. 9
The Bitmore Cabaret
THE BELLE GAME &
BEAR MOUNTAIN
with THE DARCYS
SAX NOV! 9
Vogue Theatre
THE PEAK PRESENTS
PROTESTTHEHERO
I withARCHITECTS
I and THE KINDRED, AFFIANCE
SHAD
with WE ARE THE CITY
AIDAN KNIGHT      JULYTALK
with JUSTIN RUTLEDGE      with SPECIAL GUESTS
FRI. NOV. .15
The Rio Theatre
ESCONDIDO
with SPECIAL GUESTS
FRI. NOV. 15
The Media Club
102.7 THE PEAK PRESENTS
GOOD FOR GRAPES DERRIVAL
(Independent)
Compared to Derrival's previous work, Youth
Captured is less immediate-sounding than Where
There's Smoke and not as light and bouncy as The
Autumn Game/Modern Age Kids. They have blended
the upbeat and heavy while also incorporating
some new sounds, such as swells, guitar effects,
and other percussion techniques.
Despite the album's theme of youth, it simultaneously has a mature feel to it. The only hint
of teenage awkwardness is in the opening track
"Camera Lens": "Oh now love / Would you care
to dance / Even though I / Well you know I can't."
Their single, "Victoria Day" has an epic quality,
featuring a galloping rhythm, dancing bassline,
and sustained vocals (side note: the music videojs
definitely worth checking out). The instrumentals
in "Flood Gates" are as lulling as lounge music;
very chill and pairs well with a craft beer or 50-50.
Interestingly, the album ends with "Camera LeUs
(Part 2)," the first track's chorus set to some heavier
chords and electric guitar noise. It's similar to what
Mother Mother did on The Sticks, where they had
repeating motives for opening and closing tracks.
The musicality of this young band is superb:
their sound is controlled and has variations in
dynamics. Each song has well-balanced vocal harmony and pulsing chords that provide energy without needing a pounding beat. The textured vocals
(think a younger Aidan Knight) and somewhat
ambiguous lyrics draw the listener in and emphasize the reflective nature of the album. The rolling
percussion gives songs forward motion, creating
momentum to counteract the mellow vocals while
basslines are varied and work well with the percussion. In "Young Bodies," for example, the bass
and percussion play off of each other under the
grinding sound of the guitars. Lead guitar doesn't
neglect higher up the fret board to produce catchy
4-5 note, retro-sounding riffs that add brightness
to the mix. The keyboard contributes to the fullness of the overall sound, as well as ties the other
instruments' sounds together.
Having so: much to say about a seven-track
album is a testament to how well-composed it is.
If you don't believe me, go to Derrival's Bandcamp
page and have a listen for yourself!
—Willa Bao
The long-awaited follow-up to the acclaimed debut
album from Vancouver two-piece Hermetic doesn't
disappoint. Though Heartbreakoloflij is only half
the length of a regular LP, it's better than most.
Between Heartbreakolo^i) and their last recording,
Hermetic have not only gained focus and coherence as songwriters, but also the willingness to
branch out. "Company You Keep," with its whistled intro arid catchy drumbeat, almost comes
across as, dare I say, happy? But being chipper
isn't Hermetic's forte, as demonstrated by the
dark harmonies and depressing harmonica in
"Goodness Greatness/Murder Ballad," probably
the best sOng on the release. This is the perfect
rainy-weather driving music, and it even comes
in a cassette, so you know you're rocking it in
your rusty Civic.
—Justin White
PRAIRIE CAT
(Triple Crown Audio Recordings)
Succinct and breezy, the first release from Prairie
. Cat in four years is just n-miriutes long, but the
effort by Vancouverrbased musician Cary Pratt
shows that he hasn't forgotten how to create a pop
EP worth listening to. Having recently performed
at Rifflandia, Pratt shows that he can hold his own
when he's not working with other local bands
(including SHiNDiG alums Pineapple).
With sharp, honest-lyrics and a catchy keyboard
tune, the titular track has a direct message: "If
I've got nothing nice to say /1 just say nothing
at all." The simplicity of the track compliments
the downhearted lyrics, effectively tying the song
together.'After that is "Beautiful Baby" a notably
upbeat track in comparison, with crooning vocals
and cheery guitar overlaid onto a rhythmic keyboard track, upholding the minimalistic feel of
the release. The final full-length song on the EP,
"Some Friends May Go," is a return to melancholy,
making the most of Pratt's percussion talents. He
takes the emphasis off of the lyrics and onto the
instrumental, the utilization of sweeping strings
and slow builds setting this song apart from the
rest The 19-secondoutro, "Music Box," is exactly
what the title promises, a simple tinkling melody,
which fits perfecdy into the refreshing less-is-more
feel found throughout Got Nothin'.
—Natalie Dee ^f^^g I NO JOY/DIANE
October 2/TheMedia Club
With the clouds finally parted and a pluvial lull setting over the city, Wednesday night's No Joy show
seemed to be rain checked by many a potential
attendee. So sparsely populated as to arouse some
disappointment, the porosity of the Media Club left
a more substantial and developed atmosphere to
be sought after. However, without the usual clutter of a shoulder-to-shoulder audience, the opposing candors of the two performances were easily
distinguishable.
Opening band, local rockers Diane, reflected the
pedestrian atmosphere one could expect on a lonely
street, or in an empty auditorium. While playing a
few tunes that might normally incite some sort of
flurry or fervor, Diane's trio fell short of inspiring
much excitement. Exhibiting their usual penchant
for chugging riffs and monotonous melodies, what
was heard in their brief bit of banter, and could be
seen on the still of their faces, was a certain degree
of disillusion. Even in the concluding moments of
their set, which included one of their stompers,
"Religion," a seemingly indifferent crowd perfunctorily reciprocated their inhibited tenor.
Luckily enough, No Joy's cross-country trek
didn't go entirely unappreciated. Livelier than it
had been only moments before, the ballroom began
to instantiate its familiar feeling of welcomed belligerence. Their set, which included a slew of songs
off their new album, Wait to Pleasure, seemed to go
unaffected by the modestassembly, and truly shone
with all sorts of dynamic colours. Having mastered
the implementation ofvocal loops and effect-laden
melodies, songs like "HareTarotLies" and "Hawaii"
involved an intricacy worth marveling at.
Any sort of reticence expected was completely
and utterly curtailed. And although relying on
tropes pervasively employed throughout many of
their songs, there was never a lack of interest or
visible commitment seen in the musicians themselves. Ending offthe night with their new album's
introductory song, "E," No Joy showcased their tacit
conviction that both professionalism and passion
are essential to even the smallest show.
—Sam Hawkins
B.A. JOHNSTON / NEEDLES//PINS /
I BABYSITTER
October 4 / The Astoria
B. A. Johnston is partly responsible for the ache in my
head and the sketchy memory I had the morning of
October 5. To be fair, this is just part of the deal when
Hamilton, Ontario's favourite son drives his mom's
minivan into town with a new album to promote
and a few new bad sweaters to shed.
This time around, the Astoria played host to B.A.
Johnston's antics and it seemed to work out well for
him. I unfortunately missed openers Babysitter, but
when I arrived the place was encouragingly teeming with an amped-up crowd. It wasn't long before
Johnston hit the stage.
Favouring material from his ninth album,
Mission Accomplished, the chubby lovable song-and-
dance man was in top form and had the crowd in the
palm ofhis clammy hand. When the man spoke, the
entire audience responded; when he told a crappy
joke, they happily forgave him.
Johnston was already half in the bag when he
ambled onto the stage. Pulling out his trusted "iPad
touch MP3 player with all the latest apps" (actually,
an old discman) Johnston opened with "Deep Fryer
in my Bedroom," givingitthatspecial well-lubricated
touch that he's loved for. From there it was a dizzying run through a set that made everyone happy,
especially when he pulled out "Douchestorm" and
"GST Cheque," both torn into with a beer-soaked
vengeance.
Of course, no B.A. Johnston show is complete
without a bathroom encore. For the uninitiated,
this is where the entire crowd packs into the guys
or girls can while Johnston stands on the sink and
belts outa couple of guitar ditties. These are usually
the haziest parts of the show for all involved but also
the most fun. It's what everyone is waiting for before
beingvomited out the frontdoors and into the night.
B.A. Johnston definitely has a shtick that he
sticks to and it doesn't necessarily change from
show to show, but that isn't to his detriment because
he's just so damn entertaining. There's something
oddly endearing about an overweight skid getting
hammered on the countless drinks bought for him
by fans, singing songs about hot dogs, paltry GST
cheques, and fanboy crushes on '80s TV starlets.
The themes are simple but relatable. This slacker
everyman performer has a talent for making music
thatyou can't help but kind of fall for, and apparently
I'm not the only one who thinks so.
—Nathan Pike
JACCO GARDNER /THE ROYAL 001/
VILLAGE
October 8/The Biltmore
The audience was sparse even for a Tuesday night
as local rockers Village, featured in the October
issue of Discorder, opened at the Biltmore Cabaret.
The group's music has recently taken on a generally
louder sound, forced by their currentrehearsal space neighbours, and it suits them well.
The band's setlist sounded heavier than the shoe-
gazey dream pop posted on their Bandcamp, though
it still seemed like they were holding their volume
back a bit. Regardless, the songs were varied, layered,
and highly enjoyable.
Nextupwas singer-songwriter husband and wife
duo, the Royal Oui. The show played a dual role for
them: itwas their firstlive performance and also the
release of their seven-inch When You Lose Your Mind.
But throughout the set I found myself wondering
why tonight and why at the Biltmore? Their soft,
sensible, and stereotypical love songs, obviously
written for each other, didn't match the excitement
of the other bands. The Royal Oui might suit a cozy
living room where newfound couples snuggle up to
a Nick Cave cover, but the Biltmore is much larger
than a living room.
Twenty-five-year-old Dutch baroque pop multi-
instrumentalist Jacco Gardner, accompanied by
drummer Jos van Tol, bassist Jasper Verhulst, guitarist Keez Groenteman, and '60s black and white
visuals, finally started their set at 11:15 P-m- By then,
a third of the audience had already left, missing out
on a great Canadian premiere.
Organ and harpsichord sounds originating from
Gardner's keyboard were the centre of the evening,
accountable for taking the night's attendees back
to the psychedelic '60s. Lyrics about forgotten tales
and personal journeys from his debut album Cabinet
0/Curiosities left a haunting but warm sound for the
listener. Though Gardner is viewed as the front-
man, his experienced companions' translation of
the studio produced sound into a live set were not
to be overlooked.
One of the highlights was the brand new single
"End of August," which Gardner introduced as a celebration ofhis favourite season and a perfect example of the clever atmospheric pop songs Gardner is
capable of writing.
The 45-minute set proved Gardner to be well-
worth checking out the next time he and his band
visit North America in the (hopefully near) future.
—Karlijn Profijt
THE PASSENGER / CLOUDLAND CANYON
/ NAM SHUB / HIGH SCHOOL HEROIN
ADDICTS
October 14 / The Cobalt
In hindsight, I shouldn't have been surprised to see
so few heads turn out on Thanksgiving Monday to
the Cobalt. Still, itwas disappointing that not more
orphans wanted to see touring actCloudland Canyon
supported by a chill collection of local bands.
"I hope you like count-ins because our drummer
loves them," giggled High School Heroin Addicts
guitarist Pete Moss before hitting the play button on
his iDevice. The charm inherent in a pair of musicians making slick lo-fi sad pop to a drum machine
living on a phone is an easy tale to tell: a mix of minimalist Flaming Lips and Casiotone for the Painfully
Alone. Moss had his own name stenciled on the
side ofhis guitar, and his synth bandmate "Savage"
Sam spent most of the time staring down into his
keyboard. Songs were quiet, catchy, and simple, but
the bestpartwas the duo flailing knobs and making
noise to wash their set away.
Nam Shub's music won't make complete sense
to anyone who isn'ta member ofNam Shub. There's
a little something of everything in the quasi-jam,
quasi-structured quartet: drone fills, psychedelic
rumbling and prepared guitar segues, and post-
rock-ish crescendos. A band thatis best experienced
repeatedly in different live contexts, their set was a
joyous jam session accented by a tight like-minded-
ness and mutual musical understanding. Admittedly,
the group took their time warming into each other,
but managing to find and then ride a peak of awesome riffs for 10 minutes was an excellent feat—considering the sound guy had no idea how to balance
what was going on onstage.
The touring partners ofCloudland Canyon aren't
really afraid to wear their influence, singular, on their
sleeves. Ifyou like kraut, and you like synths, there's
a ton of room for you to enjoy the duo's contemporary take on the sounds of 1960s Germany's rotund
experimentation with electronica. The San Francisco
natives, who've released records on Kranky Records
and Not Not Fun Records, among others, cranked
out a solid set of undulating synthetic voices and a
surprisingly heavy drum machine kick, but their lack
of dramaticism on-stage made their performance
seem more one-dimensional than it ought to have
been. Even though Kip & Kelly Uhlhorn were perched
over monster synths and analog drum machines,
it felt eerily similar to a DJ hunched over a laptop.
The Passenger is such a pleasure to catch live
because you never know what artist Jesse Creed is
going to whip out. It's a moniker that has, at times,
been the platform for dancey techo sets and, at others, a seriously spaced-out drone bed. On this night,
Creed went the quiet route, building his characteristic warm chirps on top of layers of bass-heavy,
beatless waters. That Creed is a synth nerd is apparent
(even to a non-synth nerd), but his kineticism is what
keeps the Passenger interesting — whether Creed
was moving back and forth between his various
apparatus, changing a patch, or checking the connections on the back of something, his constant
attentiveness paints a wonderful overlay to his live
performances.
—Fraser Dobbs
KING KHAN & THE SHRINES/
HELLSHOVEL / INDIAN WARS
October 15 / The Rickshaw Theatre
King Khan is notorious for having more charisma
and drive than mostpeople could muster in a lifetime
of trying. From what I was assured beforehand, I
had little doubt that this freak-funk garage party
from Mars would be a blast of energy—and for the
most part, itwas.
Opening up for such a riotous affair mightweigh
on the side of intimidating, but local gypsy jangle
folk-rockers Indian Wars managed to bring on the
country fuzz and get the growing crowd going.
Montreal's Hellshovel was up nextand although their
warped brand of rock from the garage is probably
better suited to a smaller venue, they still played hard
and undoubtedly brought a few new fans onboard.
With little time wasted between sets, the Shrines
were already on stage when I returned from replenishing my beverage. The buzz in the building was
mounting and most assuredly the die-hard fans in
attendance were ready and willing for anything; what
we got was a band on top of their game. The Shrines
7-piece brass and tacks orchestra were massive and of
inexhaustible energy, sweating, rolling, and jumping
through a set that spanned their 13-year existence.
They hit old favourites like "I Wanna Be a Girl" and
"Land of the Freak" in the way only a crack funk R
& Brock band can.
While the Shrines are great, people come to see
the enigmatic frontman, King Khan: a crazy, pudgy
East-Indian man, who lets loose with howling vocal
tricks and a sparkle in his eye. But time and life have
taken their toll on Khan and the assured insanity was
most definitely at a lesser volume.
While the band picked up and delivered intensity
at the halfway point, Khan kept it tame, relying on
belting out the words to songs that clearly mean a
lot to him as opposed to acting a fool. That's all well
and fine as long as you're not just going through the
motions, but that's how it felt at times.
Maybe the hype got expectations running into
overdrive and maybe expectations are too explosive for my own good, but to see a band give it their
everything—even when their everything might be
the obligatory stage dive, keyboards lofted over the
head, and big smiles all around—there's still the
feeling that there could have been more.
Khan and company definitely delivered to the
faithful. Sound and quality of music alike, they were
awesome. With a rip-roar through funkfrom the past
melded with futuristic garage-rock from another
planet, they bring fun music with a current message,
and at the end of the night, shakingyour tail feathers
and having fun is all that's really important
—Nathan Pike ■■■1 I
a^iiii
i THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
with Dan Shakespeare
interviewed by ERIK COATES
lettering & illustration by BRITTA BACCHUS
I first met Dan Shakespeare almost two years
ago when I started volunteering at CiTR and we
were both young, starry-eyed music lovers. Now,
I'm a slightly older, starry-eyed music lover and
Shakespeare is a bonafide radio DJ, with his own
show: The Shakespeare Show. On the air since last
April, The Shakespeare Show is an hour full of great
tunes—mostly old, but some new—handpicked
by Shakespeare himself, as he adds insightful
commentary and interesting stories throughout.
Listening to the show is a bit like hanging out
with Shakespeare for an hour, which is certainly
an hour well spent.
[Interview has been condensed and edited]
Discorder: What is The Shakespeare Show about?
Shakespeare: Well, it's basically just a lot of
songs from all over. It's just a bunch of non-hits
that I know.
On the CiTR program guide, your show is classified under the genre "Oldies," but you play more
than just that, right?
Yeah, I play some new indie-rock songs, some
'80s, '90s, 2000s stuff. It just depends on the day.
How did your show get started? When you first
started at CiTR, did you know you wanted to
start a show?
I was sort of planning on having a show, but I
didn't know that was going to be the second part
of the production training. After reading the
CRTC regulations, the second part of the training
was getting my own show. It was a big surprise,
I didn't know that was going to be a part of it. I
thought I was done for the summer last year.
How do you enjoy having your own show
at CiTR?
When I broadcast on-air, it's a bit nerveracking
sometimes because it's public. I'm more used to
it now that it's been 25 episodes.
Do you get lots of calls coming in while you're
on-air?
I've had quite a few calls come in. They're kind
of annoying sometimes. I can handle it, but if a
song's really short, then I can't talk for too long
on the phone. Audience participation can be
good, but sometimes I just want to do my show
and not be disturbed.
Do you think you'll expand or change the show?
I'm going to do both. It's slightly different now
from when I started. I ran out of Canadian hard
to find stuff or Canadian hits, because you can't
play the really popular Canadian stuff.
Who's your favourite Canadian artist and why?
To tell you the truth, I don't have a favourite
Canadian artist. If I did have one, I'd have to
say Gordon Lightfoot is definitely up there. He
plays folk music and he's from around the '60s
and '70s.
How long do you think you'll do The Shakespeare
Show for?
It could be years. For quite a while at least, until I
have, you know, a career.
Do you want to hit 100 shows?
Oh, at least!
What can we expect from future shows?
You can pick all the songs for a party someday.
Have you done any collaborations on your show?
Would you like to have a guest DJ come on The
Shakespeare Show?
Yes actually, I'd love for that to happen. It hasn't
yet, but anybody's welcome.
Do you know anyone in particular that you'd like
to share the stage with?
It could be anybody here at the station that I see
on a regular basis.
The Shakespeare Show blesses the airwaves of CiTR every
Wednesday jrom 12:00 p.m. until 1:00 p.m. CITR 101.9 FM CHARTS
HITZ OF OCTOBER 2013
CiTR's charts reflect what's been played on the air by CiTR's lovely DJs last mon
those marked (+) are local. Most of these excellent albums can be found at fim
can't find them, give CiTR's music coordinator a shout at (604) 822-8733. Her
tell you how to find them. Check out other great campus/community radio chari
ti. Records with asterisks (*) are Canadian a
independent music stores across Vancouver,
ame is Sarah Cordingley. If you ask nicely sh
; at www.earshot-online.com.
ARTIST
ALBUM
LABEL
1
Weed*+
Deserve
Couple Skate
2
Braids*
Flourish//Perish
Flemish Eye
$.
Neko Case
The Worse Things Get,
The Harder t Fight,.The Harder
1 Fight..
Anti-
?*i
The Albertans*+
Dangerous Anything
Ernest Jenning
Recording Co.
V
White Poppy*+
White Poppy
Not Not Fun
£
The Pack A.D.*+
Some Sssongs
Nettwerk
?'
King Krule
6 Feet Beneath The Moon
True Panther
8
Rae Spoon*
My Prairie Home
Saved By Radio
Pi
The Passenger**
Negative Object
More Than Human
10
Washed Out
Paracosm
Sub Pop
11
B.A. Johnston*
Mission Accomplished
Mammoth Cave
LABEL
In The Red
Monkeytown
The Paper Kites
States
Nettwerk
Jay Arner*+
Jay Arner
Mint
The Courtneys*+
The Courtneys
Hockey Dad
Jessy Lanza*
Pull My Hair Back
Geej Recordings
Frog Eyes*+
Carey's Cold Spring
Self-Released
CFCF*
Music For Objects
Paper Bag
Grand Analog*
Modern Thunder
The Shadow Cabinet
The Blind Shake
Key to a False Door
Castleface
Austra*
Olympia
Paper Bag
Said The Whale*+
Hawaiti
Hidden Pony
13
Mazzy Star
Seasons Of Your Day
Rhymes of an Hour
14
Hermetic*+
Heartbreakology
Alarum
15
Lindi Ortega*
Tin Star
Last Gang
16
No Age
An Object
Sub Pop
lK
Solar Year*
Waverly
Arbutus
18
The Deep Dark Woods*
Jubilee
Six Shooter
19
Drawn Ship*+
Ghost Weight
Scratch
20
DIANA*
Perpetual Surrender
Paper Bag
21
Loiiise Burns*+
The Midnight Mass
Light Organ
22
Lightning Dust*+
Fantasy
Jagjaguwar
23
No Joy*
Wait To Pleasure
Mexican Summer
24
Primal Scream
More Light
Ignition
25
Ladyfrnd*
Ladyfrnd
Hybridity Music
The Cyrillic Typewriter**      Custodian
40    Monomyth*
King Khan And The
Shrines*
43    Kristi Lane Sinclair*-!
Free Advice Column
King, Does This Not Please
You?
Idle No More
Open Relationship*
Poochy
Miesha & The Spanks*
Girls, Like Wolves
Moka Only*+
Doctor Do Much
Plays:Four*+
Lay Doe
Slutever
1994 b/w Spit
49    Gauntlet Hair
50    Dinosaur Bones*
Saved By Vinyl ^f?
*^§—^m'-^m -j^,- ^^ «^^>^=
us
$CORE
UNBOX OFF
ALL SECOND
HAND
.CDs/u*/*"
fctufcterjfr     twitter
l»n«iiMb focibook.com/pages/
TaceDOOK    Zulu-Records/326a8267757
zulurecords,tumblrxom
i?a2£8H2?
ZCilq Records
1972-W6'W4rthAvS~
Vancouver. 8C
;teU04.73a323i   '
www.zulurecoFds.com
STORE HOURS
Man to Wed mSB-fcllfl
Thttrs and hi 10:30-9:60
$8* 9:30-6:30

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