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Submissions due August 2013.
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Send 3 original songs to:
shindlg.sufaiaissions@gmail.com
WEBSITE/INFO/SPONSORS i http;//shindig.citr.ca
UPCOMING
SHOWS
NEW FOUND 6UKY
with guests Cartel & Living with Lions
RDDJAMEHU
with guests
INTRONAOT
S| Scale the Summit, Mouth of the
Architect, Seven Nines &Tens, & more
MUSIC WASTE FESTIVAL
Featuring: Hemogoblin, Needs, Dead
Again, Womankind & WATERS &
RICKSHAW
ooooooo
254 East Hastings Street
604.681.8915
tickets online: ticketfly.COm
entry by donation to
WISH Drop-in Centre
A WILHELM SCREAM, $fl
THE FLATL1NERS
Such Gold, The Grave lite
BLACK WIZARD ALBUM RiLEA^T $10 -s/cadv   $13*to      doors8PM
HoopSnake& Wiser Fool \  Mck6tsontin8: iiveatrickshaw.com
-sycadv doors 8PM
online: liveatrickshaw.com, northertickets.com
e: Red Cat, Highlife, Zulu, Neptoon, Scrape
*20 +s/c adv doors &PM
tickets oniina: iiveatrtckshaw.com, mrthertickets.com
n UNLEASHTHEARCHERS       $10
doors 7:30PM
K<tSl Scythia, Omega Crom, Iron Kingdom,
Buliys.GastownTattoo.Neptoon.Scrape     #SS- Aeina, Mournir tickets available at door oniy
KINNIE STARR
Kytami and Kieran Strange
ANDREW WEATHERS
£jm Radere, Jacob Peck, Sarah Davchi
KETAMINES
Warm Soda, The Ballantynes,
$15 +S/C adv Festival Pass     doors 8:30PM
$5 for individua! show
in ste: Audlophlle, Red Cat and Zulu
$1(}+S/Cadv doors 8PM
tickets online: iiveatrickshaw.com, northertickets.com
in store: Red Cat, Highlife, Zulu, Neptoon, Little Sisters j
Sg atdoor doors 8PM
tickets available at door oniy
DEADASVUIM album reli^se |W<*m«* $12***    doorsspm
Slagduster, Snaggletooth, Bushwhacker       flcket8 mm. !iveatrickshaw,COm
THE OBLIVIANS
Sex Church
TANYA STEPHENS
Tank Gyal, Lt. irie, Gisto and more
+S/Cadv doors 8PM
tickets online: ticketweb.ca, ticketmaster.ca
in store: Red Cat, Zulu
I before June 15   ''Oil afterwards        gpy
e: ticketweb.ca
at Street, Zulu, Highlife
: $«1|J +S/Cadv        Sm+sa
A,a  before June 15     Oil ate
in store:!
; $io$
online: f
andDc
$25+
Additional show listings, ticket info, band bios, videos and more are online at; WWW. II VS&tfiCkShclW. COITI
SNOWDEN
5J| with guests
$1(| +S/Cadv doors 8PI
tikets online: liveatrickshaw.com
$10+SftOadv doors 8PI
tickets online: lrtfeatrickshaw.com, north8rttekets.ee
in store: Red Cat, Highlife, Zulu, Neptoon
s-S/C online}
Non-profit launch! Cover bands by members   online: neuterhead,com  in store: Long Live
of 3 Inches of Blood, Bison, Haggatha, & more   and Dogs, Far Out Coffee Post, Zulu
doors 8PM
PETER MURPHY
Al  CELEBRATING 35 YEARS OF BAUHAUS
miine: liveatrickshaw.com,
Red Cat, Highlife, Zulu, Neptoon EDITOR'S NOTE: ON NOSTALGIA, CLUTTER, AND MY 6RAD DRESS
I've been on a mission to reduce clutter in my life over the past fewyears. Trying to pare down and minimalize, if you will. This mission has taken the form
of purging clothes, books, CDs, and other useless material things collecting
dust in my home that in turn collect mental dust. I'm also trying to reduce
intangible clutter, like declining a Tuesday night concert in favour for sleep (so
trendy right now). Paring down materially is an odd one. I'd like to think that,
"I'm not my rucking khakis," but it's hard to separate the artefact from the
memories and emotions that can get tied to it. Case in point: sifting through
boxes of my junk on a mission to purge inevitably means taking a trip down
memory lane, whether it be choosing to keep or chuck my dated oversized
grad dress, claiming the photo album from my parents wedding, or taking
on a bunch of ceramic 78s from the '20s passed to my dad from his dad. I'll
never wear my grad dress again, yet I'll probably let it take up space for years to
come. I have more photos accumulated on my phone from the past year than
I have in boxes from the previous 28. It's easy to delete photos, but throwing
them in the garbage is more difficult. I think it's because my generation is
one of the last that will have experience two ends of the technology spectrum
that are so opposite. My parents wedding album weighs about seven pounds
and takes up about a square foot of space, while 1 can scroll through a digital
retrospective of the past year on a 2.5 inch screen in less than a minute.
While reading the content for this issue, I realized how central nostalgia
is to so much of what we are covering. The Courtneys, our cover artists this
month, are an example of the not-so-long-gone '90s and the paraphernalia
of Gen Y's teenage years; Discorder Revisited flashes back to Expo '86 and a
bygone era of live music in Vancouver's history; Here's the Thing pays homage to the delicious history of beer; and Young Braised outright embraces our
iPhone era via hologram, and then some. The polarity we're experiencing right
now is overwhelming and intriguing.
If you want to witness some of this in music and art form with your own
ears and eyes, I will gently persuade you to hit the streets of Vancouver for
Music Waste this month. It hosts heaps of local music, art, and comedy, and
we've got the official guide nesded in here. And on that note...
Read on and stay rad,
Laurel Borrowman
FEATURES
7—Young Braised The solo Vancouver
emcee chats raps and holographs in a
post-iPhone era. By Robert Catherall
9—Ketamines The part-Lethbridgian,
part-Torontonian grunge punk-pop
sextet get on the horn about their new LP,
upcoming tour, and the crap state of big
music in Canada. ByJaceyGibb
11—Instant Theatre If you thought
improv was all interruptions and arm
flailing acted by a bunch of loudmouths,
you're wrong! Mostly. The local school of
spontaneity shows us there's a whole lot
more to improv. By Evan Brow
13—The Courtneys Admit it. Deep down,
you miss the Spice Girls, 90210, and Club
Monaco. Patch up that gaping '90s void
with these three Keanu-loving, slack-
poppers about to release their debut
full-length. By Alexandra De Boer
16—Discorder Revisited, Young
Vancouverites, Part 2 In this month's
trip down magazine-memory lane, we
flashback to Expo '86 in the conclusion to
last month's tale of rowdy punkers Slow,
and their imminent unravelling.
By Erica Leiren
REGULARS
Here's The Thing An Ode to Craft Beer
Jam Space Keep Tidy
18  Art Waste Guide
Calendar Monika Loevenmark
Program Guide
Music Waste Guide
Under Review
31   Real Live Action
Discorder's Summer Fest Freakout!
Charts
CHECK DISCORDER.CA ON
THE REGULAR FOR NEW
ARTICLES, PHOTOS, AND ALL
THINGS MUSIC RELATED!
t Cover photo by Andrew Volk. The Courtneys lettering/logo by Dana Kearley.
Discorder logo-lettering by Moses Magee.
Corrections: Last month we reviewed Cascadia's Level Trust, and citing it as an
independent release. It was actually released through Cruising USA. Our apologies.
Editor
Laurel Borrowman
Art Director
Jaz Halloran
Copy Editors
Jordan Ardanaz,
Steve Louie
Ad Coordinator
Maegan Thomas
Under Review Editor
Jordan Ardanaz
RLA Editor
Steve Louie
Web Editor
Chirag Mahajan
Calendar Listings
Claire Eagle
Accounts Manager
Corey Ratch
Official Tweeter
Dorothy Neufeld
CiTR Station Manager
Brenda Grunau
Publisher
Student Radio Society
of UBC
Student Liasons
Zarah Cheng,
Dorothy Neufeld
Photographers & Illustrators
Andrew Volk, Britta Bacchus, Tyler
Crich, Sylvana D'Angeio, Jonathan Dy,
Anne Emberiine, Dana Kearley, Monika
Loevenmark, Steve Louie, Neil Lucente, Gina
MacKay, Moses Magee, Rico Moran, Kim
Pringle, Katayoon Yousefbigloo
Writers
Evan Brow, Josefa Cameron, Robert
Catherall, Alex De Boer, Fraser Dobbs,
Adam Johannesson, Steve Louie, Dorothy
Neufeld, Mark PaulHus, Jeremy Stothers,
Jordan Wade, Stephen White, Bob Woolsey,
Chris Yee
Advertise
Ad space for upcoming issues
can be booked by calling (604)
822-3017 ext. 3 or emailing
advertising@citr.ca. Rates
available upon request.
Contribute
To submit words to Discorder,
please contact: editor.
discorder@citr.ca. To submit
images, contact: artdirector.
discorder@citr.ca
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©Discorder 2013 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 10,200. Discorder is published almost monthly by CiTR, which
can be heard at 101.9 FM, online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487,
CiTR's office at (604) 822-3017, email CiTR at stationmanager@citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write #233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T 1Z1, Canada.
Editorial cutoff: May 18,2013 AN ODE TO
CRAFT BEER
by BOB
WOOLSEY
i I (lustration by
TYLER CRICH
About 10,000 years ago there was a guy who left
his cereal in some water. The natural processes
of fermentation took over and BOOM! He had
beer. Kind of. It probably tasted like shit, but it
did the trick. Some of the earliest known writings
refer to beer, like the Code of Hammurabi, which
included laws that governed beer consumption.
Today beer is the third most consumed drink in
the world after water and tea/coffee.
I'm willing to bet that the farmer who first
discovered this wonderful beverage probably
spat it out and hated it. But the second or third
guy probably gathered his buddies around and
shared the beer. I can see them now, after a hard
day of cereal farming. They sit down and their
old pal, let's call him Ezekiel, hands them a
strange brew that they're not too sure about. He
encourages them to continue drinking. They're
about to head home to their respective huts when
Ezekiel passes out one more round. The night
is filled with stories and songs and shenanigans
galore. The ensuing headaches the next day take
a heavy toll on their farming. Thus was invented
the weekend: A time to unwind with a pint and
then sleep off your hangover.
For the following 9,500 years or so beer was
largely a mom and pop operation. There are
records of monasteries selling beer, but for the
most part was made in small operations, limited to local establishments. It wasn't until the
industrial revolution that beer was mass-produced under brands that would become trusted
purveyors of crisp smooth tastes. So basically,
one could say that for about 95 per cent of beer's
existence, it's been a craft beer dominated world.
The industrial revolution was a bit of a double-
edged sword. On one hand it made beer available in large quantities across vast expanses of
land. On the other hand, global warming. Also,
the beer that was made was a bit, how should we
say... boring.
Like any mass produced item, homogeneous
products seemed to preva.ft|$&e they offended
the least amount of sensibilities. You've got your
stout lovers and ypu've got your pilsner lovers, but it seems that in the end, more people
will drink a light flavoured beer than any kind
of heavily flavoured beer. And that's a shame
because good beer is a wonderful thing and we
all know that when you find^kvonderful thing
you should enjoy it responsibly. And repeat^&jp V
Luckily, :$r$?re now enjoyinging a renaiss|&ffi&J!'
of craft beers across North America34llph:M,;<'
pretty unprecedented. For years there's been craft
brewers here and there but nothing like what's
happened over the past few years. In Vancouver
last year we saw Coal Harbour Brewing, Parallel 49 Brewing, and the Powell Street Brewery
all come along. Over the next year four more are
planned to open. It's a goddamn beer lover's
dream world out there, folks!
In addition to our very own craft breweries,
there is a number of places in town where you
can pick from craft brews originating all over
the place. The beer belly paunch has become as
much a stereotype of hipster culture as the tattoo
sleeve and ironic moustache. Far from being anywhere near as elitist and opaque as hipster music
culture, craft beer makes the whole experience of
sharing a beverage with friends that much more
enjoyable. Instead of guarding the beer they discovered before anyone else knew it was popular,
craft beer enthusiasts are on a mission to share
what they've discovered with the masses.
When it comes right down to it, that's what
beer culture is all about. It's why Canada is a beer
country and why beer is one of the oldest drinks
known to humankind. It's a social activity. It's
culture in motion. Had a long week at work? Go
for beers with your colleagues. Sunny day on the
patio? Invite some friends over for a brew. Here's
the thing about beer and especially craft beer:
when you enjoy it correctly, it enhances the social
experience. Craft beer has opened up an infinite
number of ways to do this. And because of that,
I salute it.  I arrive at an industrial back alley door next to a busy Clark Drive. In between workshop
garages and bikes, hardcore quartet Keep Tidy—Shmoo Tidy (vocals), Kyle Huck
(guitar), Brett Threats (bass), and Dustin Bromley (drums)—lead me into their newly
acquired noise chamber on Clark and 2nd to share some wisdom. In a room crammed
with tons of gear and three drum sets, I move an oversize plastic ice cream cone to sit
down and chat about their jam space.
Discorder: Last time I met you all,
you had a jam space on Abbot and
Hastings. When did you move here?
DUSTIN BROMLEY: December? Or was
it November?
SHMOO TIDY: Something like that.
So you stayed in that space until you
moved here?
DB: Yeah, I rented that room for six
years, so if I have any permanent
respiratory problems that would be why.
BRETT THREATS: That is why we named
the first Keep tidy EP Basement Mold.
DB: So many bands we know had rooms
in that space like...
ST.: Black Mountain, Hot Hot Heat, the
Organ, Neverland...
BJ: The Jolts where playing there for a
bit, White Lung, Bessy, Sun Wizard.
DB: It was a moldy shit-hole. It was
called whatever people wanted to call
it. Everyone had different names for
it, but all names had something to do
with mold.
How is this place different? Is it in a
good or bad way?
ST: We are not a block and a half away
from a liquor store or 7/11 anymore.
KYLE HUCK: Nobody bums smokes off
you here though.
BJ: We are closer to our houses.
SJ: Yeah, closer to home. We can sit in
the parking lot and drink here without
worrying about the cops.
SJ: It's not roomier. It's a bit smaller
than the old one, but I like it better.
DB: It's kind of the same, but the
atmosphere is better. Hanging around
outside and seeing all the other bands
because there are three sections [here]
that are all full of jam spaces... From
a renters perspective, these landlords
are amazing.
BJ: They aren't slumlords!
Does the writing process
happen in the space? Is it
intense and to the point, like
your songs?
SJ: Yes, I would say so.
Basically someone writes a riff
then someone else says, that
sounds cool. Then someone else writes
another riff that adds on to that riff and
then we play it back and forth a couple
of times and then we go, "Done!"
DB: Just after we wrote the second EP
Budsbuds, we tried to evolve the sound
a bit. I think we tried adding too many
parts to the songs, and we didn't finish
a song for like six months because we
just...
BJ: Over thought it.
DB: We were over-thinking way too
much and then we...
SJ: Came back to our roots.
DB: We realized what we are: just a
simple hardcore band.
BJ: Just three parts, for every song.
That's it. That is all it needs to be.
KH: Sometimes two!
BJ: Yeah sometimes two! Most of the
songs just have two parts now I guess.
We got rid of the third part all together.
DB: Cut the fat.
BJ: No more bridges, just verse chorus,
verse chorus, verse...
DB: Keep it tidy.
STjEw.
Do you share this space with other
bands?
DB: Bitch Moves, Pleasure Cruise,
B-Lines, and Mode Modern.
So last question, how does the group
dynamic come together in rehearsal
compared to playing live? Who takes
up the most space?
KH: Brett! Brett! I can't invade his
zone. He's got a bubble, live and in
rehearsals. I am not allowed near him.
Sometimes at practice I try to get a
little closer, just to see how close I
can get.
BJ: If we're live, having two people on
one side always looks super awkward
to me. Kyle keeps following me though,
just because he knows it bugs me.
Keep Tidy play their first show in nearly
six months on May 24 at Zoo Zhop. For
more tunes/vkit keeptidybandcamp.
com. Their shit is free! BBW5ED
■■■■i
YOUNG BRAISED
B   by ROBERT
CATHERALL
photos by
SYLVANAD'ANGELO
lettering/illustration by
MOSES MAGEE
Attending the Music Waste listening party is all about bragging rights. It's an afternoon of critiquing more than 300 aspiring musicians while drinking tall cans of PBRat
what White Lung's Mish Way called "the cheerleading squad headquarters of'cool
music,"' in her VICE column last year. Taking a humble backseat to those with a more
discerning ear, I approached the local tastemakers to find out which bands they were
most excited to see this year.
Peering over the shortlist they gave fne, I was surprised to see Young Braised, the lyrical
half of self-professed "post-iPhone" rap group Hyperlinx. Solo rappers are a rare sight on
the Music Waste lineup. It's been a primarily rock <n' roll affair for the past 19 years and
expanding the variety of genres has been an uphill battle for the festival. I was intrigued.
The Kootenay-born, Christian-raised Jaymes Bowman has lead a short musical career
that boasts three solo mixtapes, a full length release, and an additional full length under
the Hyperlinx moniker with producer Full Function. Add a slot at this year's Sled Island
and you'll understand why I got lost in his back catalogue. For someone who released these
five recordings in a single year, Young Braised's digital presence looks like a well lived in
mansion where 64-bit chandeliers hang from browser toolbars as roaring Mediafireplaces
illuminate iPhone 5s. Like many internet-based rappers, Bandcamp, Soundcloud, and a handful; of social media sites have been integral
to Young Braised's networking and exposure, "I
just hit up people on the internet a lot. Pm on
Soundclbud, following any producer I like and just
trying to make genuine relationships," he explains.
Looking to gain respect from his idols, Young
Braised decided to take music seriously after
his summer job as a door-to-door salesman in
Baltimore ended in 2009. He grew his musical
repertoire for three years in Victoria before his
debut, Drunk Muzik, was released via Bandcamp in
March of 2012. It was a tireless year for the rapper
as he dropped three more releases, including his
first solo full-length, the retrospective 2012, by
the year's end.
Constantly seeking out new producers, Young
Braised also indirectly collaborated with Babe
Rainbow (a.k.a. Cameron Reed) at the end of last
year for "Snack City," a fast-food satire of Mac
Miller's "Rack City." It was a tie-dye drenched
YouTube mini-sensation facilitated by social
media. "I actually didn't know Cameron at all
and I just rapped over [Cam's] beat. Then I tweeted
at him and he liked it."
Reflective of his relationship with social media
and the internet, Young Braised's fascination with
technology has come to the forefront of his music.
The classic hip-hop themes of his early releases
(weed, money, food, weed, basketball... weed)
still resonate. But 2012's "Tingri" saw the emcee
pairing with prolific vapourwave artist Laserdisc
Visions, while the effortless cadence of lines like
"I come through with the euphemisms / Pm the
voice that the youth was missing / Coolin' like New
Edition" that collide with spaced-out synths on his
latest single "Hotel Lobby," illustrate a thematic
shift. "Pm a heavy user of technology and people
look at that as a negative thing sometimes, but
it's a part of our lives. It's the world we live in,"
he reasons.
Challenging rap's limits doesn't end there for
Young Braised. At last month's Emily Carr Grad
Party local multimedia artist Paul Wong helped
project his performance onto a narrow mylar sheet
hanging in front of the audience as Bowman performed from behind a secluded cubicle, distanced
from his fans. Acknowledging that it's a struggle
for rappers to have an interesting live show, he
hinted that this wouldn't be his last holograph
show. "I'm going to try to get a wider sheet so I can
have a full stage presence next time," he says coolly
between sips of beer. Defending a performance
style that could easily be pegged as ostentatious,
he leaves me with the question: "What's the point
of pursuing an entertainment-based endeavour if
you're not going to entertain?"
Youna Braised headlines the Astoria for Music Waste on
Saturday, June 8 before projecting himself upon Canary's
Sled Island Festival (June 19 to 22).
The first and third Thursday
DJs & Live electronic artists
playing left of centre    mfht
underground electronicwms.
Headfinefplays @TfcPMffl
4MriMi: a "supper club" wfta
laid back atmosphere where
you hang out and unite with
others who share a passion for
electronic music & art!
Hours
9;PM •1:AM
LanaLou's
facebook.cpn
>well st.
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n
e word ketamine refers to two things: one is the name of an anesthetic substance
famous for being a recreational sedative. The other refers to a five-piece acid-wash pop
band famous for their 2012 release, Spaced Out. Both are highly addictive.
Formed in 2010 by Paul Lawton and James Leroy, the former Lethbridge band has
1 found a new home in the culture capital of Toronto, where all of the members except for
Leroy now reside. Despite having only released their debut album a year ago, the group
has amassed an assortment of seven-inches, as well as an EP, 11:11, and their second
LP, You Can't Serve Two Masters, both due out this year. Discorder recently had the chance to
catch up with Lawton over the phone to discuss dual band identities, "dumbing down"
their new album, and what happens when you tell Canadian music how you really feel.
The molecular structure of the Ketamines' band is a unique one; while Leroy and
J Lawton formed the band and write most of the music, Leroy still calls Lethbridge home.
Lawton is the go-to member for things like promoting the band and touring, along with
I Alexander Hamlyn (guitar), Andrew Payne (vocals/guitar), Jesse Locke (drums), M
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lettering/illustration by BRfTTABACCHUS
Photos by RICO MORAN and Sara Ford (keyboard). But Lawton denies
that having the creative hives of Ketamines separated by a whole country has impacted the way
they create music.
"I talk to him as much as I did in
Lethbridge. I also think the distance allows
for difference, adds more to the plot." Even
when Lawton and Leroy shared a postal code,
they would turn to the Internet as a way to send
music back and forth for collaboration. Adding
3,000-plus kilometres between them hardly
affected the creativity.
By the time you're reading this, Lawton and
the rest of the Ketamines band (sans Ford) will
already be in the throes of their June tour with
Zebrassieres. But don't be alarmed if you think
you're seeing doppelgangers when you attend
their show; the two bands are made up of the
same people, but with a bit of instrumental
musical chairs. Bars will pay for each band
playing, and so the touring yields twice the
profit for the members.
"Isn't that exhausting playing twice in a
row?" I ask.
"One of the first concerts I went to was
Guns & Roses and they played for three
hours. I'd rather be on stage than be bored
or waiting to get paid." The two bands
also have noticeably different sounds, with
Ketamines emitting more of a psychedelic-
pop vibe than the Zebrassieres' punk sound.
Where there's a band touring, there's a
new album to promote. Lawton's philosophy behind the band's more recent music was
"dumbing things down in a way that there's
still intelligence behind it." Instead of adding
layer upon layer during recording or injecting things like spacey sound effects, the band
chose to focus on a more simple song structure, adopting the mentality of "just because
you can add something, doesn't mean you
should." The result on You Can't Serve Two
Masters is a tighter, rawer, but as catchy-as-ever
sound that seems like a natural progression for
the band.
Aside from the splatter of upcoming new
music from Ketamines, you may recognize
Lawton's name from somewhere else: the
Slagging Off blog. The group was asked to play
Canadian Music Week in Toronto and were
to receive wristbands as payment. The deal
seemed fine until Lawton started to browse the
lineup of over 1,000 artists; he didn't recognize any of the bands playing, despite co-owning a record label and having toured Canada
extensively over the past several years. Lawton
chose to start a blog reviewing the bands
alphabetically and after 200 bands, had found
"maybe three" that he "wouldn't mind seeing." Though initial response to Slagging Off
was slow, once it took off, it really took off. "On
Tuesday it started popping up on my friend's
Facebook feed. By Thursday, someone had .
hacked my computer."
It's not like Lawton was personally attacking the bands he reviewed, but rather the state
of Canadian music in general. "The music
industry is fucked right now and no one knows
how to fix it It just keeps getting worse and
worse," says Lawton. Instead of adopting the
"If you don't have anything nice to say, don't
say anything at all" mentality, he decided to
take the opposite route.
"I believe that this [keeping quiet about criticism] is damaging Canadian music. Instead of
pretending that you don't exist, Pm'going to let
you know and confront this head on." Spoken
like someone who actually gives a shit about
what happens to music in Canada.
Just like the drug, Ketamines are a fast-acting, powerful force who, with their explosive
blend of psych-pop, will leave you craving for
another hit.
You Can't Serve Two Masters gets released on
July 15. Ketamines will be playing in Vancouver at
the Rickshaw Theatre on June 15 with Zebrassieres,
Warm Soda, and Tough Age. 4 ii
1W
l^f _,-,■**» """"H, -        - .
flgw photo by
JONATHAN DY
lettering/illustration by
KIM PRINGLE
When you ask many people around town about improv, Instant Theatre is bound to come
up. While the company's-been through many incarnations, helming itself at the Globe
Theatre in its infancy (now a Milano Coffee), its "fifth generation" is represented at this
quaint dinner of ours, by artistic director Alistair Cook and Instant instructor Nicole
Passmore. We dine and drink at the Rumpus Room, and while Cook and Passmore act as
the de facto company reps, the entire atmosphere of the place screams Instant. Different
improvisers are walking in, we bump into someone who's taking an Instant program, and,
lo and behold, Instant Company performer Cam MacLeod ends up buying us all shots.
Reasonably liquored, we chat.
Instant Theatre prides itself on being at the alternative edge ofVancouver improv. While
Vancouver TheatreSports League will always perform a more mainstream improv show,
Instant focuses on the essence of improv and how to produce a show that not only rnakes
you laugh, but makes you think, makes you feel, even makes you cry from time to time.
"Our primary goal isn't just to be funny," says Passmore. "It's to do theatre. It's to do
art. To do comedy. To prove that not every art form that is comedy has to be focused on
doing set-up, punchline, set-up, punchline. So we focus on doing great characters and
narratives that people actually give a shit about." Instant is also set apart by the number of people involved. "We have a
community of improvisers that train with us, with our cast, our faculty, and
that's about 150 people on a regular basis," says Cook, himself an instructor. At times, it seems like Instant can feel more like a school than a theatre
society, especially as the company has recently added a standup class and a
sketch class with plans to add more.
"I think that film is a very important part of improvisational performance
and comedic performance," says Cook. "So I can see us adding that when we
move on to a new facility in a year to a year-and-a-half. I think that also physical
theatre is something that we should probably be doing."
"Yeah, most improvisers are bad at physical stuff," says Passmore. "We
tend to stand around and talk."
"Also, producing musicals, stage productions, so not just sketch shows,
would be something we would like to experiment in," says Cook. "Mostly
because I really want to do Ghostbusters: The Musical."
And while Cook and Passmore teach at Instant, both facilitating the company's Conservatory program, they also both perform with Instant.
"Any performance where Nicole ends up saying, 'Because Pm a strong,
independent woman' is normally a good show, which is most of the shows
she's done," says Cook.
"Recently we did a show on a stage that had three levels that we weren't
ready for. And I bailed and fell in the first three seconds and the audience
thought it was an amazing pratfall. And I let them believe that, because the
second time I fell made me even more embarrassed," says Passmore.
AN INTERESTING FACT ABOUT EACH OF THE
INSTANT THEATRE FACULTY:
AUSTAiR COOK: Former Spray H Wash RESOLVE spokesperson. Built his own backyard.
NICOLE PASSMORE: Almost got kidnapped at Expo '86. BRAD MACNEIL Guy at Ottawa Senators games
known for singing on the jumbotron, lip-syncing such hits as "Eye of the Tiger," "Dancing In The Dark,"
and "Friday." SHAWN NORMAN: Knows how to dispatch cabs. KYLE BOTTOM-. Had appendicitis for a
year before knowing it. Apparently his appendix was too strong to burst. PETER CARLONE: Really loves
guns. "He owns one and I think its name is Martha," says Passmore.
T Alistair Cook on the above photo: "We may do a Scooby [Doo] style show this Halloween, with
Cam [Macleod] as Shaggy." In the photo, left to right: Brad MacNeil, Nicole Passmore, Warren
Bates, and Shawn Norman. Photo by Dylan Maher.
One of Instant's flagship shows is STREETFIGHT, an improv battle royale
where individuals compete for votes from an audience and a guest judge.
"At the end of the show, there's only one winner, like Highlander. There can
only be one," says Passmore. "And that winner takes home, not only glory,
but the most ridiculous gift card we can find. Like La Senza... or Buy-Low."
In the spirit of improv, we flashback to MacLeod. This time, the shots he
gives us aren't your standard affair. He gets us pickle-
backs: a shot of whiskey chased with a shot of pickle
brine. With a collective understanding of "saying yes,"
we down it, the pickle brine oddly compliments the
smooth whiskey. As the unique mix of flavours set in
our mouths, Passmore delivers her best improvised
mission statement: "Instant is a fucking party."
The next STREETFIGHT is June 16 at the Hauanna Theatre.
Visit instanttheatre.com/or more information regarding
classes, programs, and upcoming shows. by ALEX
DE BOER
photos by
ANDREW VOLK
lettering/illustration by
DANA KEARLEY
With Spice Girls stickers pasted decoratively on mirrors, '90s reflections
were mired in pop sensationalism. The decade shrieked for girl power and
the response came in song. Initially earning wealth and fame for anthe-
mic pop, skillful mass marketing molded the Spice Girls into icons. The
five women moved transiently between band and brand. At the foot of their
empire, children clawed for collectibles. Magazine quizzes gauged personality by "spice" and a feature film monopolized cinemas. Spice Girl random moved beyond music. In the '90s, the rumbles of pop melody were the
movements of behemoth celebrity culture.
Twenty years later, Vancouver garage punk trio the Courtneys ask,
"Which Courtney Are You?" (You can take their quiz.) Tie dye aside, this
group's nostalgia for the '90s extends beyond lyrics and fashion. Authoring workout videos, a wide selection of merchandise, online quizzes, and
more, the Courtneys delve deeper into a not-so-distant decade. They toy
with fame using social media and retail products. Imitating the marketing strategies of groups like the Spice Girls, the Courtneys have fun while
. allowing their audience to consider the complications of pop culture. ■■•* A bird's unbroken chirp threads through the evening as the Courtneys
and I sit on the Burrard Street YMCA patio. Often holding band meetings
in the YMCA hot tub, Jen Twynn Payne (drums), Courtney Loove (guitar),
Sydney Koke (bass), and I chat outside in the warmth of May.
Even glancing research confirms these girls are prolific self-promoters. During our interview, Payne sports one of the band's new Courtneys
snap-backs. Front and centre is the official Courtneys' signature, a rare
font blend of the logos from 90210, Fraser, and Club Monaco. These hats
have the upcoming Courtneys album info printed on them, though they
fit more snug on your head than inside the record sleeve. A significant
addition to their line of merchandise, Koke comments, "It's really exciting to just make things in all different contexts." Their non-purchasable
promotions are another example. These include How-To videos for working out, cooking, and catching a snake. "It's fun to experiment with pop
culture," Koke explains. "Pm really intrigued by the way that people have
advertised themselves in the past and the way that celebrity culture has
worked in the past versus now."
Experimenting with the notion of celebrity is always done with playful
intention. Referencing the '90s is more serious. Despite certain song titles
("90210," "K.C. Reeves"), the Courtneys claim irony is absent in their
music. Payne dismisses assumptions of mocking and
says, "I just do things that I think are cool and that I like.
Pm not trying to be ironic."
"I didn't realize how '90s we were until I saw our
merch table," Loove adds. Hesitant to be swayed, visions
of their Keanu Reeves cassette cover come to mind
before Koke points out that the issue is really about
"how irony and nostalgia are related." She offers her
recently confessed love of Sheryl Crow as example, and
explains, "The nostalgia is real. It's a real appreciation
of stuff. It's not because it's a joke. It's because it's really
awesome." In a final pledge to prove the band's sincerity,
Payne announces, "I like Justin Bieber's music." Now I
definitely believe them.
Originally from Calgary, Payne and Koke once
bookended a band called Puberty. When Payne moved
to Vancouver in 2010 as the drummer in Mac DeMarco's
Makeout Videotape, she chose to restart the band and
invited Loove in as an added guitarist. Their .first show
took place at Pat's Pub in 2011, almost a year after they
-   had initially formed.
Crediting Pavement, the Clean, Dinosaur Jr.,
New Order, and Eddy Current Suppression Ring as
influences, it took the poignancy of Koke's own bass riff
for the Courtneys to realize that they were also heavily
influenced by the French electronic band Air. Trying to
pair a bass line with Loove's guitar part, Loove heard
Koke's creation and announced, "That's Air!"
"Then we realized that we're basically the punk
version of a smooth, sexy electronic band," Koke laughs
in reflection.
And naturally capturing that sound has become the
Courtneys' next step. Their self-titled debut full-length
album is set for release on June 7. Hockey Dad Records
is releasing the vinyl (clear blue) and Gnar Tapes
(Portland) will be dropping the cassette. The album's
eight songs capture the first era of the Courtneys, and it was recorded,
mastered, and mixed with Jordan Koop at Noise Floor in a snappy three
days. Although admitting their songwriting process has since become more
deliberate and selective, the girls felt they couldn't go forward without
releasing the best of what they'd already achieved. The collection is filled
with instrumental introductions to jolting two to three minute songs.
Climbing chords separate and synchronize with pace-setting drums. The
reverb-shadowed notes always find Payne's voice, as she offers prosaic lyrics
in chanting pitch. The two charming standouts, "K.C. Reeves" (doubling on
their Green Burrito cassette) and "90210," wink with pop arrangement and
impassive three-person phrasing.
Maybe it's the low-fi, maybe it's the minimalism, but the Courtneys have
a definite summer-laden aesthetic to their garage punk sound. With the
'90s splashed on their shirts and in their tunes, these girls' light-hearted
confrontations with celebrity push them beyond dynamic musicianship and
dub them thoughtful and culturally conscious artists.
Snatch up a copy of the Courtneys new album at the Astoria on June 7 jbr their
album release at Music Waste! Visit thecourtneys.bandcamp.com jbr merch and
track downloads. ELEANOR FRIEDBERGER
Personal Record
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AVAILABLE AT YOUR LOCAL RECORD STORE   [MERGE] www,mergereeords,oom by ERICA
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\T
<N
ANCOUVEMTE5
Continued from the May issue, here's part two of Erica Leiren's tale of Slow
at Expo '86, and the aftermath of the controversial event.
While Slow's roadie made sure the on-stage equipment was ready, the audience's anticipation combined with the energy exuding from the stage to build
the air of an electrical storm. Crackling. The musicians sauntered on from
back stage, and each took his place: Russell at his drums, Hamm, Ziggy,
and Thorvaldson behind their guitars. No Anselmi yet. Then suddenly, the
storm broke.
Slow played like their lives depended on it Like they didn't care. The way
they played best Tom's guttural, growling delivery was more intense and
tormented than ever. And the band matched their energy and power to his.
Part way through one of the songs—maybe "In Deep," or "Have Not Been
the Same," or "Against the Glass," or "Bad Man," or "Looking for Something
Clean"—Anselmi reached down and started to undo his pants. We watched
in disbelief as he let them fall around his ankles and gave the audience and
the great big night sky a good look at his boxers. Then he turned around and
half-mooned the gathered fans.
*-■• The Hip Type, 1987.
Photo by Neil Lucente.
Tracy Brooks (left, lead vocals)
and Erica Leiren (right, bass and ,
backup vocals).
Russell lit up and pounded out the drum roll from Hogan's Heroes. Tom
lurched onto the stage, goose-stepping, giving the straight-arm salute, and
with his finger held under his nose mimicking a military mustache. Saluting
the audience and yelling, "Sig Heil, Sig Heil, Bill Bennett Sig Heil!" as he
marched around the stage. With that, the band blazed into their first song
and the audience crowded up closer to the stage, some standing at the front,
and others ringed around on the risers. It was the gloaming. The time of
evening neither still light, nor yet totally dark. The sky glowed dark blue.
To be honest, it wasn't really that big a deal. The audience and the band
both handled it. But after Anselmi dropped his pants, the organizers got
skittish and pulled the power. Right after that, Hamm let his down and gave
everyone a good show. Maybe a few passersby were shocked, butwe'd all seen
rowdier behaviour at any hall gig you could care to mention. And besides, this
is what you hoped for when you went to see a Slow show, wasn't it? Something
exciting and unexpected was supposed to happen. The boys had delivered,
and somehow given us just what they knew we wanted. ■■•> Slow/Green River/The Hip Type
Gig Poster, 1986.
Poster design by Gord B
Photo in poster by Liane Hentscher.
Pictured on the poster is Tom Anselmi of
Slow in performance at Expo '86.
The post-Expo gig at The Town Pump
was Slow's last show.
But this time was different This was Expo '86, and
there was a wider audience. I think what really started
the riot rumour was when Rob Elliott [vocalist from
the Soreheads] ran up to the TV broadcast booth's
window and began pounding on them and yelling.
But that was just Elliott. Everyone who knew him
knew he was a fun, harmless, and excitable guy. But
the TV crew didn't know him. The cameras focused
on him, and the image of the ranting hooligan on the
news that night blew everything way out of proportion. He got arrested.
"Hey Dad, I'm in jail... Ha Ha Ha!" Suddenly,
there had been a riot at Expo that night. Unthinkable
antics and nudity had occurred. The audience had
gone berserk!
The rest of the music series got cancelled after that.
I played once more with Slow, in my third band the
Hip Type. Our singer, Tracy Brooks, was fabulous, a
show-stopper like Anselmi. The kind of lead singer
you could always feel confident on stage with, because
even if you broke all your strings or had to stand through twenty minutes
of dead air, they made the show go on. They could fill the space. They were
that charismatic.
Brooks was the Hip Type's punk rock princess. She combined Jean
Harlow's striking glamour and Mae West's bawdy wit and sense of humour.
She was a superb lyricist and singer, with a taste for provocative song titles:
"Glass Pussy," HoneyTrap," "Love for Everyman," "Jaguar Princess, "Wilder
Shores of Love" and "Bluebottle Flies" were a few of the hits she wrote with
our brilliant guitarist Patrick Findler. Our single on Life After Bed Records
(produced by CBC Radio personality, Garnett Timothy Harry) pictured the
cartoon kitty of the song title, with a big red heart pumping in his chest
The Hip Type were booked for the Zulu-sponsored bill at the Town Pump,
along with a band from Seattle called Green River and headliners Slow. During
our soundcheck, I was playing my usual bass riff for the soundman to set
■HELP CELEBRATE THE LAST DAY OF EXPO WITH"
AND FROM SEATTLE
GREEN RIVER
WITH SPECIAL GUESTS
THE HIP TYPE
Monday, Ocf. 73
TOWN PUMP
66 Water Street   Gastown • 683-6695
Tickets $6.00 at the Door
THE WORLD-
levels: "No Lip," by The Sex Pistols. I heard from my boyfriend later (present
for soundcheck), that I got some kudos from Green River.
"Hey, listen. She's playing the bass line from that Pistols song we couldn't
nail." It felt good to hear that—a few years later, Green River split and some
of the members formed Pearl Jam, some Mudhoney.
Green River opened the concert, and warmed things up nicely for our
band. We played a great set excited to be sandwiched between two superlative
acts. We played exhilarated by the atmosphere that always swirled around
every Slow show.
Slow closed and were astonishing, as usual. We watched from the floor,
slavish fans just like everyone else in the audience that night What we didn't
know at the time was that this was Slow's last show. Soon after, they broke
up, reformed, and signed to a major record label to conquer the world.
But by then, I think they had already done that I1 1
If I  I
FRIDAY IIINF 7
855 E HASTINGS
855 E Hastings St
Double Happiness
Alex Stursberg and Brennan Kelly
ART BANK
lettering by TYLER CRICH
THURSDAY
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436 Columbia Street
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UNIT/PITT
236 East Pender Street
I.O.U.
Steven Brekelmans, Colleen Heslin, Devon
Knowles, Ben Raymer, Ian Robert Sandilands,
and Frieda-raye Green
Curated by Haiti Niedoba
f^4*
ALEX HEILBRON & SYDNEY KOKE
-■^m
1897 Powell St
Felisha Ledesma
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2028 Clark Drive
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HUNT/CAPTURE
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Wastelands
Natasha Broad, Alex M.F. Quicho, and
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IAN ROBERT SANDILANDS /  /  7
*4<2£fy, &p£?f asu/ ««».
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JUNE 9
ANZA CLUB
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The Christa Dahl Media Library and Archive
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Assembled by Alan Kollins
LUCKY'S GALLERY
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Object of Affection
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The Light In This Room Covers
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Kane Hopkins, Daniel Williams
MAIL ART
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Mini Paper Pavillion Club
NDSEY HAMPTON H7
T.
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"£ ° E .2>      co CiTR 101.9 FM PROGRAM GUIDE
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Electro Swing, Alternative Hip Hop,
Dubstep, Acid Jazz, Trip Hop, Local
and Canadian Content - good and
dirty beats.
MORE THAN HUMAN
(Electronic/Experimental) 7-8pm
Strange and wonderful electronic
sounds from the past, present, and
future with host Gareth Moses. Music from parallel worlds.
rhythmsinoTa
(World) 8-9pm
Alternating Sundays
Featuring a wide range of music
from India, including popular music
from the 1930s to the present; Ghaz-
als and Bhajans, Qawwalis, pop and
regional language numbers.
TECHNO PROGRESSivb |
(7?a/?ce;8-9pm
Alternating Sundays
BOOTLEGS & B-SIDES
\ (Dance/Electronic) 9-10pm
■■ Hosted by Doe-Ran, the show was
! a nominated finalist for "Canadian
■ College Radio Show of the year 2012
I in the Pioneer DJ Stylus Awards". A
complete mixbag every week, covering: Ghetto funk, Breakbeat, Hip-
Hop, Funk & Soul, Chillout, Drum
& Bass, Mashups, Electro House
\ and loads of other crackin" tunes.
Search'Doe Ran'at percussionlab.
: com and on facebook.com
TRANCENDANCE
j (Dance) 10pm-12am
Hosted by DJ Smiley Mike and DJ
! Caddyshack, Trancendance has
been broadcasting from Vancouver, B.C. since 2001. We favour
Psytrance, Hard Trance and Epic
I Trance, but also play Acid Trance,
j Deep Trance, Hard Dance and even
! some Breakbeat. We also love
i a good Classic Trance Anthem,
especially if it's remixed. Current
influences include Sander van
! Doom, Gareth Emery, Nick Sentience, Ovnimoon, Ace Ventura, Save
i the Robot, Liquid Soul and Astrix.
Older influences include Union Jack,
j carl Cox, Christopher Lawrence,
j Whoop! Records, Tidy.Trax, Plati-
; pus Records and Nukleuz. .Email:
■ djsmileymike ©trancendance.net.
| Website: www.trancendance.net.
M
GOOD MORNING MY FRIENDS
(Upbeat Music) 6:30-8a m
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
■ (Eclectic) i-Uam
j Your favourite Brownsters,
James and Peter, offer a savoury
blend of the familiar and exotic
\ in a blend of aural delights.
j breakfastwiththebrowns®
', hotmail.com.
SKA^SCENic DRIVE
| (Sfc?;ilam-12pm
SYNCHRONICS
; <73W12-lpm
j Join host Marie B and discuss spiri-
' tuality, health and feeling good.
\ Tune in and tap into good vibra-
\ tions that help you remember why
| you're here: to have fun!
PARTSUNKNOWN
(Pop) l-3pm
; An indie pop show since 1999, it's
; like a marshmallow sandwich: soft
\ and sweet and best enjoyed when
' poked with a stick and held close
i to a fire.
THE ALL CANMHANIFARM SHOW
(Pop) 3-4pm
I The All Canadian Farm Show culti-
! vates new and old indie jams from
I across genres and provinces. Tune
| in to hear the a fresh crop of CiTR
I volunteers take you on a musical
cross-country road trip!
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
(World) H-$w
The best of mix of Latin American
music, leoramirez@canada.com
NEWS 101
\ (Talk)b-Spm
\ Vancouver's only live, volunteer-
| produced, student and community
: newscast. Every week, we take
| a look back at the week's local,
| national and international news,
; as seen from a fully independent
\ media perspective.
: NEIL'S HIDDEN TRACKS
I (Korean Music) 6-7pm
\ Korea has had briliant indie musi-
I cians since the '80s. However, we
\ don't know who they are and what
; music they play. Also they have had
; no chance to be introduced over-
| seas. With Korean DJ Neil Choi, on
every Monday 6 p.m., we can find
I out many hidden musicians who are
j really awesome like famous world
. rock'n'roll stars.
' EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
j (Cinematic) 7-9pm
\ Join gak as he explores music from
; the movies, tunes from television
| and any other cinematic source,
| along with atmospheric pieces, cut-
\ ting edge new tracks and strange
old goodies that could be used in
\ a soundtrack to be.
THE JAZZ SHOW
; (7az?j9pm-12am
| Vancouver's longest running prime-
! timeJazz program. Hosted by Gavin
I Walker Features at 11 p.m. June 3:
! One of the legends of Jazz guitar:
j Talmadge "Tal" Farlow. "The Swing-
| ing Guitar of Tal Farlow". June 10: A
3 hour look at this year's Vancouver
\ International Jazz Festival. Gavin
I and Jazz Fest Media Director John
\ Orysik give you the goods for 2013.
; June 17: A hot and rare session
i with pianist/composer Sonny Clark.
! "My Conception". June 24: One of
j the major voices of the tenor and
\ soprano saxophones: Eli "Lucky"
\ Thompson with pianist Tommy Fla-
i nagan and bass and drums. "Lucky
; Meets Tommy".
PACIFIC PICKIN'
(Roots) 6-8am
Bluegrass,   old-time   music,
and its derivatives with Arthur
and the lovely Andrea Berman.
pacificpickin@yahoo.com
QUEER FM
VANCOUVER: RELOADED
(7aW8-10:30am
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transexual communities of Vancouver. Lots of human
interest features, background on
current issues and great music.
queerfmradio@gmail.com
MIND VOYAGE
(Eclectic) 10:30-11:30am
Mind Voyage presents cosmic tones ]
of celestial counterpoint on CiTR! \
Experience weekly encounters of ;
synth, ambient, witchy and new ,
classical items in one-hour with I
DJTall Jamal.
MORNING AFTER SHOW
(Eclectic) 11:30am- lpm
An eclectic mix of Canadian indie '
with rock, experimental, world, reg- \
gae, punk and ska from Canada, :
Latin America and Europe. Hosted
by Oswaldo Perez Cabrera.
MANTISCABINET
(Eclectic) l-2pm
GIVE EM THE BOOT
(World) 2-3pm
Sample the various flavours
of Italian music from north to
south, traditional to modern on
this bilingual show. Folk, singer-
songwriter, jazz and much more. Un
programma bilingue che esplora
il mondo delta musica italiana.
http://giveemtheboot.wordpress.
com
PROGRAMMING TRAINING
«)3-3:30pm
RADIO FREE THiNKER
(Tunes) 3:30-4-.30pm
Promoting skepticism, critical
thinking and science, we examine
popular extraordinary claims and
subject them to critical analysis.
DISCORDER RADIO
(Tunes) 4:30-5pm
Discorder Magazine now has its own
radio show! Join us to hear excerpts
of interviews, reviews and more!
THECITY
(Talk) 5-6pm
An alternative and critical look
at our changing urban spaces.
New website: www.thecityfm.org.
New twitter handle: @thecity_fm.
FLEXYOURHEAD
(Hardcore) 6-8pm
Punk rock and hardcore since 1989.
Bands and guests from around the
world.
INSlbEbUT
(Dance) 8-9pm
CRIMES & TREASONS
(Hip-hop) 9-llpm
dj@crirrtesandtreasons.com
WEDNESDAY
TWEETS & TUNES
(7M6:30-8am
We practice what we Tweet! Showcasing local indie music and bringing bands, artists and fans together
through social media. Website:
tweetsandtunes.com Twitter:
©tweetsandtunes.
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
(Eclectic) i-lOam
Live from the Jungle Room, join radio
host Jack Velvet for an eclectic mix of
music, sound bites, information and
inanity, dj@jackvelvet.net.
POPDRONES
(Eclectic) 10-11:30am
STUDENT SPECIAL HOUR
(£c/ecf7cVll:30am-lpm
Various members of the CiTR's student executive sit in and host this
blend of music and banter about
campus and community news, arts,
and pop culture. Drop-ins welcome!
TERRY PROJECT PODCAST
(Talk) l-2pm
Alternating Wednesdays
There once was a project named
Terry, That wanted to make people
wary, Of things going on In the world
that are wrong without making#jtH
seem too scary.
DEMOCRACYNOW
(Talk) l-2pm
Alternating Wednesdays
EXTRAEN^
(Talk) 2-3pm
Exploring the mindset of an
outsider looking in on Earth.
Featuring interviews with leading
thinkers in the area of sustainable
economics and our global ecological crisis.
SNE'WAYLH
4-5pm
In many Coast Salish dialects,
"sne'waylh" is the word for
teachings or laws. The aboriginal language-learning program
begins with the teachings of the
skwxwu7mesh snichim (Squamish
language). Originally aired on Coop
Radio CFRO 100.5 FM in Vancouver,
Tuesdays 1-2 p.m.
ARTS REPORT
(TaW5-6pm "
Reviews, interviews and coverage of
local arts (film, theatre, dance, visual and performance art, comedy,
and more) by host Maegan Thomas
and the Arts Reporters.
ARTSPRbjECT
Y7a//r76-6:30pm
Alternating with UBC Arts On Air
Stay tuned after the Arts Report for
Arts Project Interviews, documentaries and artsy stuff that doesn't fit
into CiTR's original arts hour.
UBCARTSONAiR
.fTaW6-6:30pm
Alternating with Arts Extra!
On break from June-September
2013.
SAMSQUAN^
f£c/ecfaJ6:30-8pm
Alternating Wednesdays
All-Canadian music with a focus
on indie-rock/pop. anitabinder®
hotmail.com
SUPWORLD?
fWetf/<?J6:30-8pm
Alternating Wednesdays Fuzzy and sweet, a total treat! Tune
in to hear the latest and greatest
tracks from independent and Vancouver bands.
FOLKOASis
(7?00te;8-lOpm
Two hours of eclectic folk/roots
music, with a big emphasis on our
local scene. C'mon in! A kumbaya-
free zone since 1997. folkoasis®
gmail.com
sexYmWcity
(Talk) 10-Upm
Your weekly dose of education
and entertainment in the realm
of relationships and sexuality.
sexyinvancity.com/category/sexy-
in-vancity-radio
HANSIVONlOLO^S^lour
(Hans VonKloss) llpm-lam
Pretty much the best thing on
radio.
THE VAMPmE'S BALL
(Industrial) l-5am
Industrial, electro, noise, experimental, and synth-based music.
thevampiresball@gmail.com the-
vampiresballoncitr.com
THURSDAY
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
(Talk) 8-10am
ROCKET FROM RUSSJA
(Punk) 10-1 lam
Punk rock, indie pop and whatever else I deem worthy. Hosted
by a closet nerd. http://www.
weallfalldowncitr.blogspot.ca
MIENl^
llam-12pm
Vancouver's got a fever, and the only
prescription is CiTR's "Relentlessly
Awesome." Each and every week,
Jason attempts to offer adrenaline-
pumping, heart-stopping, hands-
over-the-eyes suspense. He is a fan
of various genres, and a supporter
of local music.
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
f£c/ecte;i2-lpm
Sweet treats from the pop underground. Hosted by Duncan, sponsored by donuts. http://duncans
donuts.wordpress.com
DEFINlirTdN^SOUNDWAVE
(Rock/Folk) l-2pm
The now of folk. The now of rock.
The now of alternative. Join Evan
as he explores what's new, what's
good, and what's so awesome it
fights dragons in its spare time. As
always, Evan ends the show with a
special Top 5 list that's always fun
and always entertaining.
INK STUDS
(Talk) 2-3pm
Underground and indie comix. Each
week, we interview a different creator to get their unique perspective
on comix and discuss their upcoming works.
THUNDERBiRD EYE
(Sports; 3:30-4pm
Your weekly roundup of UBC Thunderbird sports action from on campus
and off with your host Wilson Wong.
MANTRA
(World) 4-5 pm
Kirtan, Mantra, Chanting and
Culture. There's no place like Om.
Hosted by Raghunath with special
guests. Email: mantraradioshow®
gmail.com. Website: mantraradio.
SIMORGH
(Persian Literacy) 5-6pm
Simorgh Radio is devoted to the
education and literacy for the
SUBSCRIBE TO
llSfcORDERr i
. ^,annua|gwbscription
I WjPiscorder magazine!:
! jjjfb for Canadians, $25
tot US subscribers)
to ligpcliilpsfcorclai^g.^
magfzinlrTlp$$" --"
donation of:
totah
Discordefts Vancouver^ longest
runi|ip|ependent music
^maS^ftow your support for
van&^S independent music
conBuft^mpd the development
of r|fp writemeditors, designers
1i«^M§. ^mw to have
Discorder delivered to your door!
Fill-out this form and mail-in
cash or a cheque to:
Discorder Magazine
#233-6138 SUB Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C.
Canada, V6T1Z1
! Persian speaking communities and
I those interested in connecting to
I Persian oral and written literature.
\ Simorgh takes you through a journey
of ecological sustainability evolving
; within cultural and social literacy.
j Simorgh the mythological multi-
I plicity of tale-figures, lands-in as
| your mythological narrator in the
storyland; the contingent space of
\ beings, connecting Persian peoples
within and to Indigenous peoples.
ARE YCMJI AWARE
(Eclectic) Alternating Thursdays
6-7:30pm
Celebrating the message behi nd the
music: Profiling music and musicians that take the route of positive
action over apathy.
PEANUT BUTTER^ JAMS
(Eclectic) Alternating Thursdays j
6-7:30pm
Explore local music and food with
your hosts, Brenda and Jordie. You'll ;
hear interviews and reviews on eats I
and tunes from your neighbourhood, \
and a weekly pairing for your date ;
calendar.
S^EREOSCbpic^REDOUBT
(Experimental) 7:30-9pm
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
(Live Music) S-Upm
Featuring live band(s) every week
performing in the CiTR Lounge. Most
are from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country and
around the world.
AURAL TENTACLES
(Eclectic) 12-6am
It could be global, trance, spoken
word, rock, the unusual and the
weird, or it could be something
different. Hosted by DJ Pierre.
auraltentacles@hotmail.com
MOONGROK
7:30-10am
SOUNDS OF THE CITY
■ (Eclectic) 10-11 am
Promoting upcoming live concerts
i and shows in Vancouver, be they local, national, or international acts.
STEREO BLUES
(Blues/Eclectic) llam-12pm
Every Friday host Dorothy Neufeld
sinks into blues, garage and rock
n' roll goodies!
IT AIN'T EASY^ BEING GREEN
(£c/ert/c)12-lpm
CiTR has revived it's long-dormant
i beginner's show It Ain't Easy Being
Green! With the support of experienced programmers, this show
offers fully-trained CiTR members,
especially students, the opportunity
to get their feet wet on the air.
SKALD'S HALL
(Drama/Poetry) l-2pm
Skald's Hall entertains with the
spoken word via story readings, i
poetry recitals, and drama. Established and upcoming artists join
host Brian MacDonald. Interested
in performing on air? Contact us: !
@Skalds_Hall.
RADioZERO
(Dance) 2-3:30pm
An international mix of super- I
fresh weekend party jams from
New Wave to foreign electro, baile, j
Bollywood, and whatever else. I
www.radiozero.com
NARDWUAR
f/Varoty*/3/-;3:30-5pm
Join Nardwuar the Human Serviette for Clam Chowder flavoured
entertainment. Doot doola doot
doo...doot doo! nardwuar®
nardwuar.com
NEWSIoi
(Talk) 5-6pm
See Monday for description.
sfRANDEb
(Eclectic) 6-7:30pm
Join your host Matthew for a weekly
mix of exciting sounds, past and
present, from his Australian homeland. And journey with him as he
features fresh tunes and explores
the alternative musical heritage
of Canada.
AFRICAN RHYHMS
(World) 7:30-Bpm
www.africanrhythmsradio.com
THEBASSMENT
(Dance/Electronic) 9-10:30pm
The Bassment is Vancouver's only
bass-driven radio show, playing
Glitch, Dubstep, Drum and Bass,
Ghetto Funk, Crunk, Breaks, and UK
Funky, while focusing on Canadian
talent and highlighting Vancouver
DJs, producers, and the parties
they throw.
CANADA POST-ROCK
(Rock) 10:30pm-12am
Formerly on CKXU, Canada Post-
Rock now resides on the west coast
but it's still committed to the best
in post-rock, drone, ambient, experimental, noise and basically
anything your host Pbone can put
the word "post" in front of.
SATURDAY
THE SATURDAY EDGE
(Roots) 8am-12pm
A personal guide to world and roots ;
music—with African, Latin, and '
European music in the first half, :
followed by Celtic, blues, songwrit- ;
ers, Cajun, and whatever else fits! '
steveedge3@mac.com
GENERATlbN ANNIHILATION
(Punk) 12-lpm
On   the   air   since   2002,
playing old and new punk on
the non-commercial side of the
spectrum. Hosts: Aaron Brown,
Jeff "The Foat" Kraft. Website:
www.generationannihilation.com.
Facebook: www.facebook.com/
generationannihilation".
POWERCHORD
(Metal) l-3pm
Vancouver's longest running metal
show. If you're into music that's
on the heavier/darker side of the
spectrum, then you'll like it. Sonic
assault provided by Geoff, Marcia,
and Andy.
CObEBLUE
(Roots) 3-5pm
From backwoods delta low-down
slide to urban harp honks, blues,
and blues roots with your hosts
Jim, Andy, and Paul, codeblue®
buddy-system.org
MbONGROK
5-6pm
NASHAvbLNA
(World) 6-7pm
News, arts, entertainment and music for the Russian community, local
and abroad, nashavolna.ca
iIfTesta
(World) 7-8pm
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue, Latin
House, and Reggaeton with your
host GspotDJ.
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
(Dance/Electronic) 9-11pm
If you like everything from electro/
techno/trance/8-bit mirsic/retro
'80s, this is the show for you!
www.synapticsandwich.net
RANboPHONIC
(Eclectic) Upm-2am
Randophonic is best thought of as
an intraversal jukebox which has
no concept of genre, style, political
boundaries, or even space-time
relevance. But it does know good
sounds from bad. Lately, the program
has been focused on Philip Random's
All Vinyl Countdown + Apocalypse
(the 1,111 greatest recordsyou probably haven't heard). And we're not
afraid of noise.
THE ABSOLUTEivALUEOFINS^OMNIA
(Generative) 2-Sam
Four solid hours of fresh generative
music c/o the Absolute Value of Noise
and its world famous Generator. Ideal
for enhancing your dreams or, if sleep
is not on your agenda, your reveries. I     lorfwairsiJionnieiiiteisl
(212) Productions
Baru Latino
Dunlevy Snack Bar
Neptoon Records
Scratch Records
454 W Cordova St.
2535 Alma St
433 Dunlevy Ave
3561 Main Street
shows at Interurban
25% off
10% off
10% off
10% off used, $1 off new
Art Gallery
Antisocial
Beatstreet Records
The Eatery
Pacific
1 East Hastings
Skateboard Shop
439 W Hastings St.
3431 W Broadway
Cinematheque
20% entry discount
2337 Main St.
10% off used vinyl
10% off
1131 Howe St.
Temple of the
15% off clothing
BigMama Textbooks
The Fall Tattooing
1 free bag of popcorn
Modern Girl
10% off everything else
1100-1200 West 73 Ave
644 Seymour St.
People's Co-op
2695 Main St.
Australian Boot Co
10% off
10% off
Bookstore
15% off vintage, 20%
1968 West 4th Ave
The Bike Kitchen
Fortune Sound Club
1391 Commercial Dr.
off new
$30 off Blundstones and
6138 SUB Blvd.
147 East Pender St.
10% off
UBC Bookstore
RM Williams
10% off new parts and
No cover Saturdays (ex
Perch
6200 University Blvd.
Audiopile
accessories
cluding special events)
337 East Hastings
10% off clothing, gifts,
2016 Commercial Dr.
Bonerattle Music
Fresh is Best Saisa
10% off
stationery
10% off LPs/CDs
2012 Commercial Dr.
2972 W Broadway
Project Space
Vancouver Music
BadBird Media
10% off
10% off
222 E Georgia St.
Gallery
www.badbirdmedia.com
The Cove
Gargoyles Tap+Grill
10% off
118 Hanes Ave, North Van
10% off
3681 West 4th Ave.
3357 W Broadway
Prussin Music
. 12% off
The Baker &
10% off food
10%
3607 W Broadway
Vinyl Records
The Chef Sandwich
Den try's Pub
Highlife Records
10% off
319 W Hastings St.
Cafe
4450 West 10th Ave.
1317 Commrecial Dr.
Red Cat Records
15% off
320 Cambie St.
10% off regular priced
10% off
4332 Main St.
The Wallflower
10% off
items
Hitz Boutique
10% off
Modern Diner
Band Merch Canada
Devil May Wear
316 W Cordova St.
The Regional
2420 Main St.
www.bandmerch.ca
3957 Main St.
15% off regular priced
Assembly of Text
10% off
20% off
10% off
clothing and shoes
3934 Main St.
Woo Vintage
Bang-On T-Shirts
Displace Hashery
Limelight Video
1 free make-your-own but
Clothing
Robson, Cherrybomb,
3293 West 4th Ave.
2505 Alma St.
ton with purchases over $5
4393 Main St.
Metrotown locations
10%
10% off
R/X Comics
10% off
10% off
Dream Apparel +
Lucky's Comics
2418 Main St.
Zoo Zhop
Banyen Books
Articles for People
3972 Main St.
12% off
223 Main St.
3608 W 4th Ave.
311 W Cordova St.
10% off
Rufus' Guitar Shop
10% off used
10% off
10% off
2621 Alma St.
10% off everything but
instruments and amps
A Friends of CiTR Card scores
you sweet deals at Vancouver's
finest small merchants and
supports CITR Radio 101.9 FM.
Show It when you shopl
www.citr.ca Juvenile Hall 11:30pm
Girlfriends and Boyfriends 10:45pm
Phoenix Thunderbird 10:00pm
Store 9:15pm
ANZACLUB 3 W 8th Ave
Defektors 12:15am
Slim Fathers 11:30pm
Failing 10:45pm
NamShub 10:00pm
THE ELECTRIC OWL 926 Main
DIANE 12:15am
Bestie 11:30pm
Dirty Spells 10:45pm
Total Ice 10:00pm
FRIDAY JUNE 7
THE ELECTRIC OWL 926 Main st
Tough Age 11:00pm
Collapsing Opposites 10:00pm
The New Values 9:00pm
ARTBANK 1897 PowellSt
Johnny de Courcy 11:15pm
Soft Serve 10:30pm
JayAmer 9:45pm
LANA LOU'S 362 Powell St
Crystal Swells 11:15pm
Bad News Babysitters 10:30pm
Stress Eating 9:45pm
COBALT 917 Main St
B-Lines 11:00pm
Mi'ens 10:15pm
Dead Soft 9:30pm
PAT'S PUB 403 E Hastings St
Snit 12:30am
Lesser Pissers 11:45pm
Ann 11:00pm
Night Detective 10:00pm
THE RICKSHAW THEATRE
254 E Hastings St
Hemogoblin 12:30 am
NEEDS 11:45
Dead Again 11:15
Womankind 10:30pm
WATERS 9:30pm
ASTORIA 769 E Hastings St
The Courtneys 1:15am
Woolworm 12:30am
The Greater Wall 11:45pm
La Chinga 11:00pm
Bertha Cool 10:15pm
855 EAST HASTINGS
855 E Hastings St
Freak Heat Waves 2:15am
Nervous Talk 1:30am
Spring Break 12:45am
The Passenger 12:00am
LITTLE MOUNTAIN GALLERY
195 E 26th Ave
Comedy Laugh 9:00pm
The China Cloud Ten Speed 9:00pm
THE CHINA CLOUD 524 Main st
The Hero Show 9:00pm illustrations and lettering by
TYLER CRICH
JUNE 9
ANZACLUB 3 W 8th Ave
Malcolm & the Moonlight 11:15 pm
Christopher Smith 10:30pm
Malcolm Jack 9:45pm
Rec Centre 9:00pm
HAVANA 1212 Commercial Dr
Instant Theatre Presents:
Light Fuse & Run 8:00pm
SATURDAY
JUNE 8
RED CAT RECORDS
4332 Main St
Knut 4:00pm
Percheron 3:00pm
Pups 2 00pm
THEY LIVE VIDEO
4340 Main St
Garbage Mountain 4:30pm
Nfl.213 3:30pm
Magneticring 2:30pm
NEPTOON RECORDS
3511 Mate St
Lunchlady 630pm
Hole In My Head 5 30pm
Colin Cowan and
The Elastic Stars 4:30pm
No 1 Bad 3:30pm
White Poppy 2:30pm
OUR TOWN CAFE
245 E Broadway
- ftsafing for Greater Portland 5:30pm
' Imaginary Pants 4:45pm
,t#ai»Forrister 4:00pm
SIMPLY DELICIOUS
4318 Main St
Mormon Crosses 9:15
Watermelon 8:30
Waters 7 45
Sontag 7:00
ZQO ZHOP 223MatoSt
The Silver Skeleton Band 8:30
*;$to8 and White Van. 7:00
FLW 7:45
PATS PUB 4031 Hastings St
,: Viage 12.15am
Twin River 1130pm
Skinny Kids 10:45pm
Half Chinese 10:00pm
BgtE MOUNTAIN GALLERY
185128th Ave
LUCYS YAYEO 7:30pm
olav 6:30pm
ASTORINO'S imvw»Mw$t      REMINGTON GALLERY
Shearing Pinx 12:15am
Love Cuts 11:30pm
Capitol 6 10:45pm
Tim The Mute 10:00pm
LANA LOU'S mhmMU
Koban 11:30pm
Industrial Priest Overcoats 10:30pm
Aerosol Constellations 9:30pm
ASTORIA 788 E Hastings St
Young Braised 1:30am
Open Relationship 1:00am
Masahiro Takahashi with
Half Chinese 12:30am
Fake Tears 12:00am
War Baby 11:30pm
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DOLDRUMS
(Arbutus)
How many artists does it take in one city to make
a scene? Eastern Canada has had so much great
electro music coming out of it in the last few years.
Let's take stock. Toronto's Crystal Castles, formed
in 2004, are perhaps the longest running, but
lastyear saw the release of amazing albums from
Montreal's Purity Ring and Grimes (while the
latter spent enough time out east to be considered
part of it, we can also claim her here in Vancouver.)
Now that brings us to Doldrums, a.k.a. Airick
Woodhead, the latest and possibly strangest of
the eastern Canada electro scene.
Doldrums' debut LP Lesser Evil is a thrill ride.
After a short intro, the listener is given a catchy
dance number that would fit right into a decent
club scene, but then said listener is hit by a barrage
of genres and rhythms with little more than a distorted voice to lead the way. This is a very modern
kind of music. At first blush it's confusing, but it
rewards a short attention span. A few more listens
reveal a deeper musical theme that runs through
the album-it's one of those albums that grows on
you. After a while it feels more like art than chaos.
Lesser Euil is a bit like a well-curated trip through
the Internet, with a catchy vocalist to lead the way.
This is a promising artist making a strong
statement in his debut, and it will be exciting to
see where he goes next.
—Jeremy Stothers
JUVENILE HALL
(Independent)
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Juvenile Hall's first full length is far from a collection of bubble gum pop punk. Magazine Collate is a legitimate piece of west coast punk rock.
Compiling a few favorites from their previous two
EPs with a fistful of new songs, these brash ladies
have pasted together a ferociously fun 13-track
album that owes as much to Black Flag as it does
Cub. Tin can snares and crashing cymbals steadily
drive buzzing guitars as all three girls pitch in on
vocals, creating harmonies that sound like Exene
Cervenka jamming with Bikini Kill.
At the end of "Waste of Time," the girls proclaim "there are no rules," a punk rock mantra
that is very evident throughout the entire record.
Wide-eyed songs like "Sugar Rush" and "Pizza
Party" imply a certain innocence, while "No Cops"
and "Eat Shit and Die" go beyond implicating
this cunning trio, they put them at the scene of
the crime with backpacks full of spray paint and
kerosene. There is no arty pretense here and no
feigning irony. Magazine Collage is a straightforward
collection of timeless, scrappy, fun-loving punk
rock songs that are sure to get any party going.
—Mark PaulHus
LIGHTNING DUST
(Jagjaguwar)
On their third haunted outing, Amber Webber
(guitar, vocals) and Joshua Wells (synths) reel in
their tempos to a barbiturate-induced crawl as
the former's trembling vibrato showers swirling
paisley vines over the latter's atmospheric synths.
Where the duo's first two releases peered into the
darkness, Lightning Dust's third has no problem
finding comfort in it as Webber's new-wave lyrical
lulls resonate within Wells' new synthetic palate.
Slow and ominous, Fantasy is the duo's most anxious—and adventurous—outing yet
Aside from the closing "Never Again," Wells
has traded in his Wultizer for a digital sampler to
exhume his darker aural tendencies. The chosen
MPC 2000 ominously pulsates at nearly half the
BPM of their four-year-old debut. The result is an
unexpected, yet logical, turn for the duo whose previous two albums Webber claimed were exploring
her "goth" side. Don't worry though, Fantasy isn't
some kind of mid-side-project-crisis. The striking
resemblance of Webber's delicate and confident
vibrato to Stevie Nicks' remains just as capable of
seducing the most intrepid interstellar voyager.
Fantasy's negative space emphasizes their synthetic experimentations as female vocals waver
while reciting post-apocalyptic art school anxieties
laced with minimalist electro beats and sombre
violin solos on songs like "In The City Tonight".
Meanwhile fervent electronic overtones accentuate
the sci-fi space goddess vibe on "Loaded Gun" as
Wells' Wulitzer pulses along, heavy on the phaser,
guiding Webber's perplexion as she monologues
an inconclusive debate on power struggle.
A far cry from the jovial accessibility of early
anthems like "Give It Up" or the sultry cabaret duet
"Jump In", Fantasy teems with sombre and often
anxious lyrics that see Lightning Dust at their most
shrouded and mystical thus far. But it's mystery
that makes Fantasy worth paying attention to, a
reminder of the pleasure that comes from craning
your ear, to hear beyond the atmospheric din, and
unveil another story with each listen.
—Robert Catherall
(Independent)
Maqlu takes no prisoners. Her third offering Mal-
jeasance picks up right where 2012's Futureghosts left
off. Self-produced, engineered and mixed, this
is over forty minutes of staring into an electro-
industrial abyss with a masochistic grin.
Opener "Counterfeit" sets the tone; a venomous tongue beneath a wall of electronic fuzz makes it known that somebody has been caught, and that
somebody is going to pay dearly. Space-age psychosis and paranoia set to abrasive feedback and
distortion, a relentless and militant beat emphasises the lyrical tenacity. And it works beautifully.
A lot of ground is covered across nine tracks.
From the haunted-carnival-ride organ sounds of
"Lucky Paw," the deep dubby groove of "Fur ■+•
Flesh," the instrumental punk-funk of "Say My
Name," to the druggy machine rock of "I Like You
Better When You're High," this is an eclectic mix
of electronic styles held together by a menacing
and foreboding atmosphere. Lyrics of obsession,
revenge, and betrayal are delivered with detached
malevolence, sometimes buried beneath the chaos,
and sometimes harsh and abrasive.
Standout track, "Disco Disgorge" is severt-
minutes of electronic dystopia. Its twisting and
growling industrial synth makes way for a glitchy
outro with a militant krautrock beat.
Nearing the end, a glimmer of redemption
is offered with the narcotic vulnerability of
"Sapphire" and the blissed-out dubby comedown
of "Alabaster," the Creep remix of the opening
track from Futureghosts.
A punch in the face with a velvet glove, this is
an uncompromising and very enjoyable journey
to the centre of the head.
—Stephen White
MAN YOUR HORSE
(Independent)
Capturing the intensity and spontaneity of a "live
band" on record is a tough and rare feat, especially
in the age of overproduction and lengthy recording
sessions. Marrel Of Bonkeys, then, is as refreshing as it is exhilarating. The album's eight songs
capture the furious, sweaty math-rock goodness
of any Man Your Horse house party in deliciously
overdriven detail. The duo benefit immensely from
the time invested in working out the perfect fuzz
tones, et al.
The chirps and clicks that open "Jamma Ray"
don't accurately prepare the listener for the cascades of looped guitar jamming or machine-gun
drumming, but a sense of comfort will sink in by
the third or fourth tempo change. While some
songs are so manic they border on stretched-out
jam sessions, Man Your Horse are at their best
when weird effects pedals and blissed-out upbeat
melodies provide a natural narrative structure to
cling to. There are so many brilliant sounds to
watch out for on this record~the 8-bit echo intro
to "Donkey Hotey", or the epic melody in (the
ridiculously named) "May The Horse Be With
You"~that audiophiles are going to be dancing
to the tracks on repeat all summer.
—Fraser Dobbs
RED MASS /CINDY LEE
(Mongrel Zine)
For those not in the know, Mongrel Zine might
not be a big deal—there are, after all, thousands
of zine-slash-record-labels floating around the
blogosphere. What sets Mongrel apart from the
rest is their unwavering enthusiasm and thoughtful
output That this is their first vinyl release in their
five-year history speaks volumes about the artists
highlighted on each side. For the most part, it's
praise that the bands well deserve.
Side A is Red Mass' "Candy", a psychedelic
single dripping with globe-trodden cool. Like
a star-studded version of the Brian Jonestown
Massacre, minus Anton Newcombe, Red Mass is
a wriggling collaboration between ringleader Roy
Vucino and anyone that wants to play with him.
"Candy" enjoys its wide palette of instrumentation, on a back-bone of garage-rock violin and
coasting on the many toys and gadgets supplied
by Mark Sultan and Arish Khan (a.k.a. the King
Khan &BBQ Show).
Side B is a more mellow affair, featuring the
first vinyl release oflocals Cindy Lee. "Holding The
Devil's Hand" channels Nico through lo-fi dirty
blues; sparse guitar caked in abandbned-adobe-
church echo leads the charge. Patrick FlegePs
(ex-Women) angelic upper-register vocals churn
up dust all over each verse, drawing a bleak picture
against pretty words. "Polished" isn't the right
word here—drums and bass are thinly painted
over the background to cover up cracks in the
walls of the song, but the chance to peek past the
curtains into Flegel's monologue is well worth
the lack of decor.
—Fraser Dobbs
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APOLLO GHOSTS / B-LINES /
WATERMELON / DIANE
May 10 / the Rickshaw Theatre
Death is a hard subject to prepare for, even when
you know it's a long way away. When Apollo
Ghosts frontman Adrian Teacher announced
in December that ±e band weren't going to be
around forever, it never really sunk in that the
day when the band wouldn't play sold-out shows
for grinning pop junkies might come. And, even
though their final show at the Rickshaw was more
wake than funeral, it was still tough to see one of
Vancouver's brightest call it quits.
Diane played a strong collection of post-punk
goodness to start the night. Discordant guitar licks
and some startlingly crunchy bass tones backed up
alternating vocal duties. Drummer Ben Goldberg's
habit of reassuring his band mates between songs
was endearing, and the trio found their confidence
again towards the end of their set.
Watermelon were a more cohesive ensemble
than I remember, and a lot more fun as a result
Songs definitely leaned on the pop side of rock 'n'
roll, but unique influences and interesting sound
choices made for a surprise hit. A little bit shoegaze
guitar waves, a little bit '80s stadium rock, their
songs clicked just right on the Rickshaw's stage.
While some in the crowd were still apprehensive about dancing along to a loud, fast punk
band, everyone else started jumping around at
the sound of the first power chord coming from
B-Lines. With all of the energy of 1980s hardcore, but none of the pessimism, frontman Ryan
Dyck flopped around like a human balloon. While
Dyck was hardly at his most offensive, B-Lines still
managed to pull off a tight and raucously positive
performance.
Tides of Saturday night optimism came against
pools of quiet introspection and reverence as the
crowd prepared themselves for headliners Apollo
Ghosts. While smiles.adorned every face in the
audience, there was an unspoken weight on everyone's shoulders as they gathered to celebrate one
of Vancouver's most admired bands for the last
time. And the group didn't fail to deliver.
To the theme song from the A-Team, the
band—Amanda Panda on drums, Jarrett K. on
bass, and Jason Oliver on guitar—triumphantly
took the stage like game-show contestants, starting a slow-bum towards the goofy but energetic
"Day Of Glory." When Adrian Teacher finally
arrived on stage, waving a makeshift flag and brandishing a cape, the entire venue lit up in joy, and
that lightbulb of euphoria didn't flicker the entire
night. The first half of their set leaned heavily on
tracks from lastyear's Landmark before veering off
into the vault to deliver old fan favourites from the
criminally under-recognized Mount Benson and
Hastings Sunrise. For a band only five years young,
the nostalgia factor on songs like "Land Of The
Morning Calm" was astounding, and the sound of
some 500 people singing along to every tune was
beautiful and chilling. Between two extraordinarily
enthusiastic encore requests, half the crowd onstage dancing to "Angel Acres," and Teacher's
heartfelt and humble goodbye through the words
of "Dobermans," there wasn't a single dry face in
the room at the end of the night.
For a lot of people, Apollo Ghosts weren't
just a band. The quartet were a symbol for everything Vancouver's music community had to offer.
Somehow, a quirky and energetic four-chord pop
band fronted by a kindergarten teacher just clicked,
bringing together friends, family, and joyously
happy memories. While their send-off more than
did justice to their legacy of sweaty, packed, crowd-
surfing late-nightshows, italsomarkeS the end of
one of the most entertaining and heartfelt musical
projects this city has ever seen. Tears have been
shed over far less.
—Fraser Dobbs
NIETZ/WHITE LUNG/CINDY LEE
May 3 / the Biltmore
Rock is dead, long five rock. Despite whatever
downtrend good, loud music has been on over the
last few years, you wouldn't know it stepping into
the Biltmore on this Friday night In a crowd where
"chillwave" was a dirty word, every Vancouverite
with tinnitus and a closet obsession with over- W/VE/l
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33 I driven amplifiers was eagerly waiting for METZ.
Cindy Lee was not, perhaps, the most obvious
choice to start off the evening. While normally a
full-on band, ex-Women guitarist Patrick Flegel
was alone on stage playing no-wave alt-blues,
dressed in drag and owning it. The problem was
coherency: Cindy Lee might have made sense with
a drummer, but the lone guitar felt disjointed, mov-
ingjarringly from riff to riff like a jam session just
getting started. Given FlegePs songwriting history,
it'd be easy to write his setoff as an out-of-place art
piece, but what's more likely is simply that Cindy
Lee is out of its element as a solo affair.
Exactly what kind of feline Mish Way's yowl
emulates is open to debate, but I'm going to go
with panther. Her commanding and predatory
presence on-stage is fascinating to watch and,
along with the rest of White Lung, hers was the
symbol that erupted an audience eager to jump
around. While Way was definitely the centre of
attention, guitarist Kenneth William is the reason
I keep going to see this band. His humble stance
coupled with the massive number of notes he can
play per song is a pretty astounding thing to see.
The poor guy managed to break two strings during
his set - one on his own guitar, and another one
borrowed from METZ's Alex Edkins - but then,
that's the price you pay for shredding so hard.
METZ are not a complicated band. They play
Icftid, noisy music for loud, noisy people, but the
* beauty is in just how good they are at it. Out of
Toronto, the trio is basically the antithesis of what
the rest of the world views as Toronto's music
scene: no horn sections, no ensembles, no crescen-
dos. A smattering of the Jesus Lizard, Death From
Above 1979, and A Place To Bury Strangers were
heard overtop of blistering, face-melting, soul-
drenching fuzz tones, but METZ really weren't a
band carved from blocks of influences.
Their set was a treat to gearheads as it was
obvious a lot of thought and consideration were
invested in the boutique sounds coming from their
amps. Hayden Menzies deserves extra credit for
being one of the loudest drummers the Biltmore's
ever hosted. A vicious assault on the ears, METZ
ended their set sweaty and victorious, not unlike
the audience that was left to wander home caked
in a healthy rock 'n' roll glow.
SAFE AMP'S GRAND OPENING
FUNDRAISER W/ CASCADIA / VILLAGE /
CHRIS-A-RIFF1C / FAKE TEARS /
CHUNG ANTIQUE/PUPS/
COLLAPSING OPPOSITES
April 27 / SASStorino's
It's been four long years of scrounging and cajoling, but all-ages advocates Safe Amplification Site
Society (Safe Amp or S.A.S.S.) now has a place to
call home, physically. Astorino's has been hosting
Safe Amp's programming since March, after the
organization signed a rental agreement entitling it
to the space up to nine days out of every month. It
was only on April 27, though, that Safe Amp threw
an official opening party for their new — albeit
temporary — venue.
Appropriately enough, Collapsing Opposites
kicked off the night's festivities; frontman Ryan
McCormick is also a Safe Amp co-founder.
Collapsing Opposites made the best of a muffled
P.A., and McCormick conveyed a muted excitement on stage, admitting he was feeling under
the weather.
Next, one-man spoken word and keyboard
sensation Chris-a-Riffic, was even more excited
about the new venue. "Utopia is here, where the
grass grows inside," he remarked gushingly, pointing out a vine growing through a crack in the wall.
Chris-a-Riffic was more than a spectacle. His set
was a marvel of participation, be it bantering with
the audience or leading call-and-response clapping
sessions. Alas, the exuberant family man had to
bid farewell fairly quickly, along with most of the
tot-toting folks in attendance.
When PUPS came on stage, Rose Melberg
remarked, "I've been told I play too hard."
She was talking about her drumming, but
she could easily have talked about PUPS'
material, which chugged more than it
chimed. That wasn't a bad thing. Sharing
vocal duties, PUPS did hew closer to their
pop roots towards the end of their set, the
jangly numbers made all the more sweeter
in contrast to the grinding ones.
Chasing PUPS was Fake Tears, which
featured Larissa Loyva (Kellarissa) and Elisha
Rembold (Lost Lovers Brigade). Fake Tears's
pulsing synth-pop was a somewhat of a
departure from their usual material, though
Loyva's ethereal sensibilities were still very
much evident in her vocals.
Village dealt in similarly gauzy music,
playing reverb-drenched dream-pop. Despite
being a bit nervous about their sound on
stage and their (lack of a) set list, they still
played a pretty sexy bunch of songs.
Chung Antique, from Seattle, played
competent, even-tempered math rock. Not
that there's anything wrong with loping,
elliptical riffs, and jazzy drumming, but this
reviewer likes to rock out. Thankfully, Chung
Antique closed their set with more energy
than they started with. The gently swaying
crowd took things up a notch and formed a
conga line, seeing the band off.
In contrast, Cascadia closed with a convulsive, cathartic set right from the get-go. Cam
Borthwick's extremely sloppy guitar work seems
to have become a recurring theme of Cascadia's live
show, but don't mistake this for incompetence or
apathy. Coming across increasingly like a thrashy
My Bloody Valentine, Cascadia are as murky as the
mighty Fraser and possessed of an equally relentless undertow. To top it all off, the end of their set
segued perfectly into the music on the P.A. What
a way to close a show!
—Chris Yee
THE THERMALS / PEACE
April 2 61 Fortune Sound Club
It was a testament to Fortune Sound Club that, over
the course of the night, the space transformed into
whatever it needed to be. At first it was your typical
dimly lit nightclub, a place for beer, friends, and
the potential of an unexpected hook-up. Then it
had the buzz of something big, a few more people
around, a band with solid talent flooding your eardrums. Then it felt like the height of the late-'70S
British punk scene, your London dive bar where
noise, flesh, and electricity dominate your body.
Peace played their part as the very subdued
opening band. No big introduction. No crazed
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604.637.5789 energy. The band was definitely up against a "win
'em over" crowd, a collection of people standing
as if in the middle of an alien abduction. At the
end of each song, a simple "thanks" by lead singer
Dan Geddes acted in lieu of a transition, at which
point the band members would, in odd synchronization, each drink from their Stella Artois rested
somewhere on the ground. A simple "that's it" by
Geddes signified their set was over. And like that,
they were gone. Peace knew their role in tickling
the crowd with the taste of punk rock, leaving
electricity lingering in the air for the Thermals to
grasp and make sweet love to. Their set was at its
peak when the band played "Tattoo" off their latest album The World Is Too Much With Us, a lengthy,
build-up kind of song that displayed the band's
stellar handiwork and collective, contained chaos.
If only the crowd was more into it.
Then came the Thermals. The crowd was into
it. The band was into it. The whole set was a huge
stimulating love-fest between the happiest-looking
mosh pit I've ever seen and a band that looked like
they play every show at no per cent. Opening with
"Born To Kill" off Desperate Ground, an album just
released on April 15, heads were already banging.
No foreplay for this punk band. And while Peace
were the detached edge of the punk rock spectrum,
the Thermals were the all-powerful unifier of stage
and audience. Lead singer and guitarist Hutch
Harris jumped into the crowd to play "Returning To
The Fold," thrilling many fans, including myself,
who got to feel the gleam of his guitar or the edge
of his thin camo T-shirt.
While the band played songs from their other
albums, it was The Body, The Blood, The Machine
that received the most acclaim from the excited
crowd. "St. Rosa and the Swallows" ushered in
a floor-shaking madness of appreciation and led
into "A Pillar of Salt," which saw the most joyous
moment of all as drummer Westin Glass ran from
the back and leapt into the crowd, crowd surfing
over a squished mosh pit that was happy to hold
him. As a punk rock show goes, the Thermals
were a loud, fun-filled explosion of sweat and
i times.
—Evan Brow HOLLEFfADO
SW#kT^MP IJNION
FESTIVAL
>ORT RENFREW
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lettering by
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EVAN BROW. CONTRIBUTOR
THEN: Sasquatch! Music Festival, 2011,
Gorge Amphitheater. I was but a wee high
schooler back then. Full of dreams, hope,
and Red Vines from Target. We skipped
school to rock to the Foo Fighters, jam with
Modest Mouse, and talk about how "the
Canucks are really going to win it this
year." The stars were aligned. Everything
was perfect.
NOW: The Vancouver Folk Music Festival,
July 19 to 21, Jericho Beach Park. Can you
go wrong with the folk fest? Even though
perennial headliner (and trimmed-beard
idol) Dan Mangan won't be performing
this year, other greats like Aidan Knight,
Hannah Georgas, Kathleen Edwards, and
Whitehorse should be able to blanket us
with the comfy fabric of folk.
JOSEFA CAMERON. CONTRIBUTOR
THEN: Arctic Monkeys, 2009, Malkin Bowl.
I missed the first week of grade 12 to drive
from Calgary to Vancouver with my sisters
Welcome back to the season of more sun, no school, and seawall bike rides. It's almost officially summer
and along with planning road trips and camp outs, you're probably scheduling your musical events, too.
Wondering what there is to look forward to? Look no further. Discorder's staff sounds off about their
favourite events from the past, and what they're getting jazzed about this year.
if I drink enough warm beer and get really
sunburnt beforehand, it just might cause
some flashbacks.
STEVE LOUIE. RLA EDITOR
THEN & NOW: Smmr Bmmr August 2 to
3, Portland, OR. Only been once (2012),
but it's a full decadent dollop of the
best garage-y, punk bands around. The
venue is part outside and part inside, so
you can bask all day in the beer garden
atmosphere with bands playing around
the clock. When the sun goes down, it's a
move to a sweaty, raucous mayhem of a
time on the indoor stage. Best time to be
in Portland in the summer.
DOROTHY NEUFELD. OFFICIAL TWEETER
THEN: Salmon Arm Roots and Blues
Festival, 2006, Salmon Arm. This fest
has a knack for creating a lineup of
undiscovered gems. Really. I love how they
bring in blues acts. I saw Buddy Guy late
at night on the main stage in 2006 and it
was killer.
NOW: Winnipeg Jazz Festival, June 13 to
23, Winnipeg. I'm heading to Winnipeg
for the first time in June an have heard
that the Jazz Festival is bar-none. Bettye
LaVette ("Let Me Down Easy" is a
heartache), Cannon Bros, and a ton of
other good stuff will be happening.
JORDAN WADE. CONTRIBUTOR AND HOST
OF DISCORDER RADIO
THEN: Canada Day 2011, Downsview
Park, Toronto. An epic Canadian lineup of
Broken Social Scene, Buck 65, and Hey
Rosetta joined Weezer, and local favourites,
the Tragically Hip, who played to 30,000
red-and-white-clad patriots on the most
perfect summer day.
NOW: Keloha Music and Arts Festival,
July 5 to 7, Kelowna. An eclectic lineup of
performers will play Kelowna's picturesque
waterfront park, with dozens of B.C. acts
including Gold and Youth, Rococode, Yukon
Blonde, and the Zolas sharing the stage
with headlines, Matt & Kim and MGMT.
for that stop on the Humbugtour. It was
the best show I ever attended. I remember
thinking that if I was trampled to death
there and then, I would die a happy girl.
And we hung out with Alex Turner before
the show.
NOW: Sled Island Festival, June 19 to
22, Calgary. This is greatly anticipated
because: 1.1 always go, 2. The line up is
fresh, and 3.1 am playing it this year.
ROBERT CATHERALL. CONTRIBUTOR
THEN: Two years ago I crammed into a
car with some friends and we drove six
hours north from Copenhagen into the
Danish countryside. I had no idea what
I was getting into until I was let out in
the middle of a field with nothing but
500 metres between the stage and a
farmhouse. It was a weekend drenched in
Danish acid-rock and communal meals. I
still haven't come down.
NOW: Music Waste, June 6 to 9, Vancouver.
Undoubtedly. Without Olio this year, it's the
biggest worthwhile fest in the city. Plus
there is some seriously radioactive bile in
that trophy, which is really badass.
JACEY GIBB. CONTRIBUTOR
THEN: Pemberton Valley Music Festival,
2008, Pemberton Valley. This took my
music festival virginity in the most memorable of fashions: by being an unexpected,
disorganized whirlwind of intoxication. I
was fresh out of high school (still a minor),
went with someone I barely knew, lived
off of sandwiches and beer the whole
time, and we spent the last quarter of the
car ride home on an empty tank of gas. I
wouldn't have changed a thing.
THEN: Smith Westerns, August 17, the
Electric Owl. I had to sell my Sasquatch
ticket to pay for my stupid rent, but I
decided to get psyched about something
a bit closer to home. The first time I saw
Smith Westerns was at Sasquatch two
years ago and while I doubt this time
around will be a life-changing experience, CITR 101.9 FM CHARTS
HITZ OF MAY 2013
R's charts reflect what's been played on the air by CiTR's lovely DJs last month. Records with asterisks (*) are Canadian and
se marked (+) are local. Most of these excellent albums can be found at fine independent music stores across Vancouver. If yoi
" '" m, give CiTR's music.coordinator a shout at (604) 822-8733. Her name is Sarah Cordingley. If you ask nicely she'll
'   '' atwww.earshot-online.com.
ARTIST
1     Cascadia*+
ALBUM
Level Trust
2     Abramson Singers, The*+     Late Riser
LABEL
Cruising USA
Copperspine
3     Thee Oh Sees
5     Rec Centre*+
Shotgun Jimmie*
13    The Belle Game*+
14    Hayden*
16    The Flaming Lips
Greenback High* +
20    Zeus*
21
Fake Shark,
Real Zombie*+
22 Gianna Lauren*
23 Savages
24 The Highest Order*
Floating Coffin
Rat King II
Times a Billion
Weird Pop from the
Peace Country
Everything Everything
Ride Your Heart
Null
Wakin On A Pretty Daze
Images Du Futur
Bonsound
Peace Country Diaspora
You've Changed
Dead Oceans
The Broadway To Boundary
Matador
Secret City
Ritual Tradition Habit Boompa
Psych Pop From Toronto Optical Sounds
Bombs Away b/w
Allot Us or None
Ninja Tune
Light Organ
Forward Music Group
ARTIST
26 Pick A Piper*
27 The Burning Hell*
28 The Besnard Lakes*
29 Thee Ahs*+
31    Hooded Fang*
32   A Tribe Called Red*
33    Colin Stetson*
m. Check out other great campus/communi
ALBUM
LABEL
Mint
People
Until In Excess,
Imperceptible UFO
Future Without Her Self-
New Believers Static Clang
Gravez Daps
Nation II Nation Tribal Spirit
New History Warfare Vol. 3 Constellation
Vancouver Pop Alliance Min{/CiTR 101.9 FM
Volume 3
Chelsea Light Moving Chelsea Light Moving Matador
Bill Baird Spring Break of the Soul        Pau Wau
Various* Psych Pop From Toronto Optical Sounds
38 Kate Nash
39 The Crackling* +
40 Mudhoney
41 Devendra Banhart
42 Born Ruffians*
43 Cold War Kids
45    Yeah Yeah Yeahs
Girl Talk
Mary Magdalene
Vanishing Point
Mala
Dine Alone
File Under: Music (FU:M)
Sub Pop
Nonesuch
Birthmarks Paper Bag
Dear Miss Lonelyhearts Downtown
Chimp Blood Urbnet
Mosquito
Young Galaxy* Ultramarine
Akron/Family Sub Verses
Apparat Organ Quartet Polyfonia
Universal
Paper Bag
49    Data Romance*+
Other
25    Homeshake*
The Homeshake Tape
Cruise Your Illusion woijman anRAIur I
SOURCE FOR ALlShE frlT#;
twitter.com/zulurecords
^ZT^^T    focebook.com/people/
lacBDOOK    ZuluRecords-Store/680210042
tumblr.   zuiurecords.tumblr.com
Zulu Records
1972-1976 W 4th Ave
Vancouver, BC
tel 604.738.3232
www.zulurecords.com
STORE HOURS
MontoWed   10:30-7:00

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