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 THE BALLANTYNES | LACHINSA | PHILOCERAPTOR | ZINE COUNTERCULTURE | THE ROBOT ATE ME | CHARLIE DEMERS | BISCQRDER'% TOP TANNINS TUNES | ERICA LAPADAT-1ANZEN
IV
I
MAY 2013 >jm MAGAZIfORJJfpR 10>9TM- FRE#.*"
SUPPORTING VANCOUVER'S INDMlfOENT MUSIC COMMUNITY FOR 30 YEARS Limited edition!
Only 100 copies printed!
WTR
1QT.9pm/CITR.ca
DISCORDER, THAT MAGAZINE FROM CiTR,    ■ LIMITED EDITION 15-MONTH CALENDARS    i VISIT DISCORDER.CA TO BUY YOURS
CELEBRATES THIRTY YEARS IN PRINT. %    AVAILABLE FOR ONLY $15. I AND SUPPORT CiTR & DISCORDER!
I UPCOMING
SHOWS
RtCKSttAW
0000900
254 East Hastings Street
604.681.8915
KIUINGIOK
CZAR
SUDDEN DEATH THREAT
bum Hollywood bum, Stand Down,
Death City Scandal
SINNED
ZUCKUSS, EXCRUCIATING PAIN, ENTITY
KVELERTiT"
Black Tusk, Burning Ghats
OLD DEATH WHISPER
Cornshed
THE0AY90S
■S"M Atom Atom, Mete PHls
$20«rcadv doors 8PM ACT HYPOCRISY
tickets online: ticketw6b.ca f§| fCm Kirisiun, Aborted, Arsis, Starkill
in store: Red Cat, Scrape, Zulu, Highlife mm»m
Sflhs/caav doors8pm |B3 R0CK4CHILD BENEWf
tickets onHne: northemticketS.com KF«B JESUS KRYSLER with CAUSE4DRAMA tickets online: ticketweb.ca
m store: Neptoon, Red Cat, Scrape "        DANNY ECHO, SONIC OUTCAST in store: Red Cat Scrape, Zulu, Highlife
H) ♦ac-v doors 8 3opm E51 NEW MUSIC FROM TOKYO      %"•* $15^    *»»7pm
tickets online: liveatrickshaw.com y^Kt Vol.5 feat: mouse on tne keys, Kinoko
*30+s/Cadv    ^35att,wr        doors 7PM
tickets online: ticketweb.ca
in store: Scrape
*5   +S/Cadv    *|Q at*x)r doors 8PM
$16.50 *s/eadv
tickets online: ticketfly.com
in store: Scrape, Zulu
doors 8PM
Teikoku, Chi-na, Haraf romhell
THE LIVING
Pugs & Crows, esl
e: ticketweb.ca
in store: Red Cat, Neptoon, Zulu, Highlife
H
APOLLO GHOSTS
their RNAL SHOW! with B-Unes,
Watermelon, Diane
ROFFLED FEATHERS
Sad Little Men, Young Pacific
Additional show listings, ticket Info
5g atctoor doors 8PM
tickets available at door only
tickets available at door only
$8   +S/Cadv doors 8PM
online: nofthemtJckets.com, iiveatrickshaw.com
in store: Red Cat, Neptoon, Zulu, Highlife
doors 8PM
I $J|   +SCadv    $|2 ^^ doors 8PM
;   tickets online: liveatrickshaw.com
l   in stare: Red Cat, Highlife, Neptoon, Zulu
NYUTHIA Tiatte doo.8PM
Witch oftheWest,Outofthe Ruins, Dig        tickets available atdooronly
Your Graves, Baryon
| $12 *S/Cativ    $15 atdoor doors8PM  1
I online: northerntickets.com, liveatrickshaw.com I
in store: Bully's, Gastown Tattoo, Neptoon, Scrape
FEARFACM^ m™«» m*«*    ^7pm
Hate Eternal, Kobra and the Lotus, This online: northemtJckets.com, liveatrickshaw.com
is War, Hidden Towers m store: Millenium, Neptoon, Red Cat, Scrape, Zulu
MAONUSRl^T™ $10 ataoor doors8PM
ALBUM RELEASE with Titan's Eve, Over        tickets available at door only
the Coals, Altered Throne
Depressing, Hopelus, Astrakhan
tickets available at door only
band bios, videos and more are online at: WWW. H VeatfJCkshaW. COm ON OPEN-MINDEDNESS, CHEAP CDS, & OPTICAL ILLUSIONS
Lean on cash but eager to invest in some new tunes, I was perusing the CD sale
rack at Audiopile four years ago. This area of the store fit the two-point criteria of a
section destined for C-List music (cheap and nearly obsolete), so my expectations
were low. But spending four dollars on a band I'd never heard of could also lead
to an entirely new discovery. Or at least a slick frisbee and some creative fodder.
I kneeled on the floor scanning dozens of spines and stopped on one with
promise. Not a mega-fan of the Black Keys, but a enough to drop a few toonies
on a used CD, I plucked this album out and said to myself, "Self, decent score.
Let's call it a day." So I paid and went home to deploy the compact disc technology necessary to listen to it.
A few days later I transferred the new-to-me album to my computer and then
my mp3 thingy and listened to it en route to wherever I was off to. My ears were
flooded with high-pitched screeching guitar, marching drums, and pulsing bass.
I was pleased with the edginess of the album so far, and could understand why I
hadn't heard it on the radio. But when the strained vocals came in after the 1:30
mark, it only took another thirty seconds to realize I wasn't listening to Dan
Auerbach. Turns out my eyes had processed Black Keys, but it was actually the
Black Eyes. Since hearing "Someone's Had His Fingers Broken" by accident for
the first time, I've grown to like that 2003 self-tided album quite a lot.
It's not a very interesting story, butit's a reminder that exploration and open
mindedness can be fruitful. Also, four bucks can go a long way.
Whether you approach May with apathy, reckless abandon, or vitality, vim,
and vigour, know that there are a dump truck-load of happenings to take that
attitude to. In the pages ahead, we talk about the local indie press movement,
discuss local trio Philoceraptor's Stop Ruining Fun, and revisit the infamous Slow
concert at Expo '86, along with heaps of other great news and reviews. Finally,
if you missed our first-ever issue launch party at the Cobalt in April, we hope
to see you at the May launch on the third. If we don't see you there, then come
to Discorder's 30th birthday party and annual fundraiser at the Biltmore on May
31! There will be tons of great local bands who have graced these pages over
the past three decades and all proceeds will go toward keeping this magazine
motoring for at least another 30 years.
Read on and stay rad,
Laurel Borrowman
P. S. May is the final issue with Under Review Editor and high-kicker extraordinaire, Jordan Ardanaz, at the helm. After over a year of running a stellar section,
he's moving on and we're wishing him all the best. We'll miss you, sir! Stay tuned
to see who steps in next month.
FEATURES
REGULARS
9 - Zine Counterculture Think the printed
word is a dying artform? Think again.
By Alex De Boer
12 • The Robot Ate Me Discorder
travels slightly south for a chat with
experimentalist extraordinaire to talk shop
with Rylan Bouchard, mastermind of The
Robot Ate Me. By Cali Travis
14-Philoceraptor Don't let the title of
their new LP fool you. The trio who began
as a basement-bound, heavy-drinking rock
gang have grown up, but they haven't grown
boring. By Fraser Dobbs
16-Discorder Revisited: Young
Vancouverites, Part 11n this month's trip
down memory lane, Erica Leiren recounts
the infamous Slow concert at Expo '86
through her own rock 'n' roll lens.
By Erica Leiren
18-La Chinga The 70s-swathed, desert-
scorched, hard rockin' local are hot off their
debut self-titled LP and happy as heck to
tell us about it. By Josef a Cameron
29-Charlie Demers A Professor, a debate
team captain, and an author walk into
Vancouver's hottest nerd bar...
By Evan Brow
38 • Discorder's Top Tanning Tunes Our
staff and contributor sound off on their
favourite sunny summer songs from then
and now.
04 Venews SASStorino's
06 Here's The Thing The Great Divide
07 Filmstripped Still Alive
11 Jam Space The Ballantynes
20 Calendar Moses Magee
22 Program Guide
26 Art Project Erica Lapadat-Janzen
27 Real Live Action
30 Under Review
38 Charts
Correction: We misspelled the name of the
talented artist responsible for the April
cover. Her name is Ola Volo, not Ola Vola.
Sorry, Ola!
T Word to the man who painted this month's cover, Mark Hall-Patch. His watercolour of Vancouver punk band Slow is based on this photo, taken on Gore Street (Chinatown)
in '86. Photo by June Boe. Read more about their stage days in Erica Leiren's Young Vancouverites on page 16.
Editor
Laurel Borrowman
Art Director
Jaz Halloran
Copy Editors
Jordan Ardanaz,
Steve Louie
Ad Coordinator
Maegan Thomas
Under Review Editor
Jordan Ardanaz
RLA Editor
Steve Louie
Web Editor
Chirag Mahajan
Calendar Listings
Claire Eagle
Accounts Manager
Corey Ratch
Official Tweeter
Dorothy Neufeld
CiTR Station Manager
Brenda Grunau
Publisher
Student Radio Society
ofUBC
Student Liasons
Zarah Cheng,
Dorothy Neufeld
Proofreaders
Jordan Ardanaz, Robert Catherall
Photographers & Illustrators
Britta Bacchus, Tyler Crich, Sylvana
D'Angelo, Anne Emberline, Rommy
Ghaly, Mark Hall-Patch, Colin Jones,
Erica Lapadat-Janzen, Steve Louie, Gina
MacKay, Moses Magee, Tierney Milne, Kim
Pringle, Lisa Vironda, Ola Volo, Katayoon
Yousefbigloo,
Writers
Evan Brow, Slavko Bufical, Josefa
Cameron, Robert Catherall, Alex De Boer,
Arnaud De Grave, Fraser Dobbs, Angela .
Espinoza, Coleman Ingram, Jonathan Kew,
Erica Leiren, Monika LoevenmarkJames
Olson, Cali Travis, Bob Woolsey, Chris Yee,
Angela Yen
Cover
Mark Hall-Patch
Advertise
Ad space for upcoming issues
can be booked by calling (604)
822-3017 ext. 3 or emailing
advertising@citr.ca. Rates
available upon request.
Contribute
To submit words to Discorder,
please contact: editor.
discorder@citr.ca. To submit
images, contact: artdirector.
discorder@citr.ca
Subscribe
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to #233-6138 SUB Blvd.,
Vancouver, B.C., V6T1Z1 with
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©Discorder 2013 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 9.000. Discorder is published almost monthly by CiTR, which
can be heard at 101.9 FM, online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487,
CiTR's office at (604) 822-3017, email CiTR at stationmanager@citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write #233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T1Z1, Canada.
Editorial Cutoff: April 24,2013 . SASStorino's
by COLEMAN
INGRAM
illlustratiori by
BRITTA BACCHUS
The people of Vancouver, be they
minors, adults, or seniors, finally have a live
music venue they can all enjoy together. The Safe
Amplification Site Society (a.k.a. SASS or Safe
Amp) began talks last fall to lease the former
Astorino's, a ballroom and multi-purpose event
space at the corner of Commercial Drive and
Venables, to use it as a legal all-ages venue. Discorder joined one of the society's directors, Sean
Travis Ramsay, for coffee in the new neighbourhood to chat about the exciting opportunity and
Safe Amp's road to get here.
Safe Amp is a local non-profit organization founded to establish a permanent, legal,
affordable, and sustainable all-ages venue in
Vancouver, open to all genres of music, with
the core values of community, inclusivity, and
positivity. Since the society's inception, it has
hosted events, like S.P.A.C.E. Camp, at different
venues around the city that match all but two of
these descriptions: permanent and in turn, sustainable. However, past events did both raised
money and spread awareness of the gaping cultural void in Vancouver's all-ages music and arts
scene. After nearly four years, the society found
themselves in a financial position where leasing
became feasible; Astorino's marks the first time
in the group's history that they could make this
dream a reality.
The former Astorino's was a community hub
in the Commercial Drive area for almost thirty
years. Owned and operated by brothers Leo and
Tony Astorino, the space hosted everything from
weddings, baptisms, and bingo nights. When
faced with a number of remodelling needs, the
brothers opted for retirement and sold the business to a development company. A step or two
later, Safe Amp came in. Working in conjunction with a few other non-profits, Astorino's has
become a shared space for community events
including all-ages shows. According to Ramsay,
that's not all.
"The potential for Astorino's to act as a way
to increase [Safe Amp's] member involvement is
awesome, not only through attending or volunteering at shows, but through proposed workshops and tutorial sessions."
Unfortunately, the arrangement at Astorino's
isn't permanent. The lease is for one year. "We
discussed that issue and our membership voted
to go ahead with the space. It's basically an
experiment and a chance to prove to the city that
we know what we're doing. Hopefully if or when
this space is no longer available we will have set
some kind of precedent to find our ideal, permanent space. In the meantime, Astorino's will be
great for shows. The few we've put on so far have
been well attended, and by a lot of kids." says
Ramsay.
Their enthusiasm about the space is not surprising: it suits their needs in almost every way.
The RA.Q. area of Safe Amp's website states they
are seeking a place that is zoned for live music,
would not violate noise control bylaws, is located
"probably east of Cambie, west of Renfrew, and
north of about King Edward," is accessible by
bike and transit routes, and has a capacity of
between 80 and 200 people. Astorino's, with
its prime location on the Drive, isolation from
residential housing, and capacity of about 300,
seems almost too good to be true. Luckily for
Vancouver, SASStorino's is as real as it gets.
For more information on Safe Amp and the calendar of
events at SASStorinos, uisit safeamp.org
"THE POTENTIAL FOR ASTORINO'S TO ACT AS A WAY
TO INCREASE [SAFE AMP'S] MEMBER INVOLVEMENT
IS AWESOME, NOT ONLY THROUGH ATTENDING OR
VOLUNTEERING AT SHOWS, BUT THROUGH PROPOSED
WORKSHOPS AND TUTORIAL SESSIONS." EVENTS CALENDAR
Mil
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EAT. DRINK. DANCE. PARTY.
(AND NOT NECESSARILY IN THAT ORDER)
TUESDAY   WEDNESDAY THURSDAY       FRIDAY       SATURDAY
CARIBOO &
CROWSNEST
FREE SHOW
JUNGLE DANCE     LONELY FOREST
PARTY WITH DJS      NOW, NOW
BKHKMft CA    ELECTRIC OWL     ELECTRICOWL CA ™M!?§N     W!i«S
SOCIAL CLUB
DUSTY BONES
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FUPOUT
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FUN FUN FUN
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MARIA IN THE
SHOWER
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BRAIN PULSE
MUSIC
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CHEAP THRILLS
KARAOKE
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COMEDY            CROWSNEST PRESENTS FACTS
GEEKS VS NERDS    ALEXMARUSYK THE FORTUNATE
JASPER SLOAN YIP ISLES
HOUSEWARMING        & GUESTS THEE OH WELL!
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& GUESTS         THEE OH WELLS JAMAICAN QUEENS Saturdays
HELADO NEGRO SIMON BAKER
BLACK HEN
CONCERT SERIES
PRESENTS
JOHN HAMMOND
QUIET LIFE
PING PONG
CHEAP THRILLS
KARAOKE
KATE NASH
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926 MAIN STREET, VANCOUVER // RESERVATIONS c* ELECTRICOWLXA CROSSING THE
GREAT DIVIDE
by BOB
WOOLSEY
[Illustration by
OLA VOLO
When I was 16,1 got a tattoo of a maple
leaf on my left shoulder. It was in the in the basement of some guy's house in Prince George and
the tattoo turned out horribly. Prison quality bad.
I have yet to get it fixed, but I still wear it with
pride. My 16-year-old self's decision, ill planned
as it was, is forgivable by my 29-year-old self.
I'm still just as proud to be from this country as
ever. Despite this deeply held pride, I've only visited a very small percentage of our country. My
travel resume begins here on the coast and ends
around the badlands of Alberta.
My upbringing has always been one of an
egalitarian praise for both sides of our great
land called Canada (which we all know means
" "nation"). Of course, on the nights the Toronto
Maple Leafs were playing, things changed in
our house. My dad is from Toronto. I'm born
and raised a British Columbian. Which basically
makes me a Canadian version of Mr. Spock. I'm
a western guy through and through but I've chosen to follow the ways of my father's culture and
cheer for the Leafs.
My father's roots have connected me to the
eastern side of our country. That connection
seems lacking for some who, like me, have never
travelled east but who, unlike me, don't have any
way to relate to it. As a Vancouverite, I'm constantly reminded of this. I feel like I'm supposed
to have some deep hatred for all things Toronto
because other Vancouverites say so. It seems to
stem from a belief that Torontonians hate us
somehow. More likely, it's probably due to our
feeling that Torontonians don't think of us at
all. Which is also kind of funny to me. Growing
up in northern B.C., everyone thought the same
thing about the Lower Mainland: they make all
the decisions, but they never think of us.
Perhaps wherever the population is higher
and/or wherever the government is located, there
will be a certain amount of self-importance at
work. We're a species that's been programmed
to form tribes and fight all other tribes on the
basis that our tribe is superior the other tribes,
regardless of fact or reason. Which is exactly why
the Leafs are better than the Canucks. It's also
the reason Canada is such an amazing place. It's
moved beyond all that nonsense. Well, at least
it's trying. Lets just say that.
From May 3 to 9, I'll be in the belly of the
eastern whale that is Toronto, Ontario. I'm
excited for the trip, but also interested to see if all
the animosity across the continent is warranted.
I imagine this is much how Louis Riel must have
felt back in his Red River Rebellion days. Or not
(my Riel history is a little rusty). If my column
doesn't return next month, you'll know that the
Torontonian's have been right all along—it's
way better there and I stayed. My expectations
for the trip, however, are much less epic. I imagine I'll probably find a bunch of great new places
and things and people that merely add to my love
of our great country rather ±an supersede any
other part of it. Cue the patriotic Shane Koyczan
beat poetry!
Here's the thing: for all our various genuine
problems I've conveniently glossed over here, I
think we have an important thing going in this
country. When you consider the myriad points
along the way where events could have gone differently, our idealism has persisted. Despite our
prejudice, we choose to embrace one another.
Nationalism is a twentieth century idea. I know
this because when I was 16 it was still the twentieth century. Multiculturalism is the only way I
see for everyone to move forward. No matter who
we are or who we have been we're all stuck here.
Together.
Unless you're a Montreal Canadiens fan.
Then you're dead to me. PAUL WILLIAMS:
STILL ALIVE .on,
directed by STEPHEN KESSLER
by ANGELA M
ESPINOZA
illustration by
KIM PRINGLE
Prior to Paul Williams.- Still Alive,
Stephen Kessler had directed two feature-length
films (1997's Vegas Vacation and 2000's The Independent) and dozens of commercials. The release
of his latest film came 12 years after the last, and
to compare this work to earlier works would be
crime—at least, that seems to be how he sees it.
At a glance, Still Aliue is a documentary,
about the life of Songwriter Hall of Famer,
Grammy- and Academy Award-winner, and
composer Paul Williams, whom Kessler
spent his teen years obsessing over. Many
are familiar with Williams' work through the
Carpenters ("We've Only Just Begun"), Barbara
Streisand ("Evergreen" from A Star is Born),
and Kermit the Frog ("Rainbow Connection"
from the Muppet Movie). As Still Aliue starts, we
"THERE'S A BIG DIFFERENCE BETWEEN BEING SPECIAL
AND BEING DIFFERENT ... TO BE DIFFERENT IS DIFFICULT,
TO BE SPECIAL IS ADDICTING." —PAUL WILLIAMS
quickly learn the gist of things; Williams won
his awards, succumbed to alcoholism, and
died—until Kessler finds out on a whim one
day that Williams is very much "still alive" (any
similarities to Searching/or Siyjarman end there).
In 2006, Kessler discovers that Williams
will be performing a concert in Winnipeg. One
ticket and a substantial amount of pestering
later, Williams allows Kessler to make a film
about his life, assuming Kessler will keep a
respectable distance. Kessler of course doesn't
keep any distance, and ultimately it's Williams'
and Kessler's celebrity-fan chemistry that makes
this video biography absolutely engrossing.
Still Aliue is a touching, honest film about
finding peace in one's life. Kessler finds peace
in both making a film he is proud of and in
meeting his idol. As for Williams, he finds
peace in something his younger self would
have never dreamed could satisfy him: support.
Williams, then and now, often speaks at events
for recovering alcoholics, because he understands the pain of addiction.
Around the first half hour mark, Williams
says something that resonates throughout the
rest of the film:
"There's a big difference between being special and being different... To be different is difficult, to be special is addicting."
As Kessler shows us, the older, profoundly
sincere Williams overcame his addiction to
feeling "special," along with beating both
alcoholism and cocaine addictions. Williams
opens up to Kessler and the camera, oftentimes irritated, but every so often teary-eyed
as he acknowledges just how much he has
accomplished in life.
But for every moving moment in Still Aliue,
there is usually something quirky to go with hit.
The film is subtly hilarious, and often the silliest
things that Williams says and does (Kessler's
wit helps) will get you laughing more than it
probably should.
Paul Williams: Still Aliue is a beautiful film
that tells the story of a good man and reminds
its audience that although life can be difficult,
there will always be time to find peace. Don't
miss this one DOCUMENTARY FILM FESTIVAL
IUNilf-22,2013
CALGARY, ALBERTA
MAY 3-121
www.doxafestivaLca
© © ® ! DOXAfestival
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COUNTERCULTURE
..^    I by ALEX
DE BOER
photos by
SYLVANAD'ANGELO
lettering/illustration by
AARON READ
Art morphs in a tumble, more rapid every year. Its formats fall with
technology's forward lean. Amidst iTunes, eBooks, and Netflix, preserving the tangible
what-was, is a run against the wind. Yet demand for mediums with shape and texture still
stands, shrouded by Apple-spangled standards. In fact, if there exists a counterculture
insignia today, the desire to hold art as physical might be that badge.
In Vancouver, print culture is a poster child for this peaceful backlash. Two indie arts
and culture publications worth pocketing have emerged in the last six months. Implicitly,
these papers challenge how we want to receive arts and information.
Available in black and white since October 2012, Will Anderson's free newspaper Dunk,
was originally imagined as a sort of newsletter for Lucky's Comics, his place of employment. With one thousand copies printed monthly, Dunk is crammed with music- and
comic-focused content The articles range, "from historical fiction, to food columns and
weird short stories," Anderson explains.
Of course for readers to hold something in their hands, somebody has to pay for it -* T Will Anderson, Dunk
Advertising has been that somebody for Dunk.
"We keep the ads as cheap as possible," Anderson
reasons, citing rates as low as ten dollars per
month. "I'm on the street scrounging up ads
and we're barely making the printing costs, if
we make them." So far though, this editor/publisher/distributor/contributor, has managed to
keep things afloat
From its four page first-step to its current
twelve page stride, this indie paper has survived
with a balanced practice of inclusion and exclusion. The latter best describes Dunk's insular creative process, which most blundy means, "we don't
take submissions." An admittedly controversial
policy, Anderson explains, "I hope it doesn't come
off that we're fascists, but we just want to present
the paper in a specific way." He continues, "We
want to have a staple of artists who we really like
and trust and curate." So far this has meant Dunk
has afewregularwriters, including Anderson and
the owner of Lucky's Comics.
Addressing the former, Dunk's policies of
inclusion are less about by-lines and more about
morals. One fourth of a band who resolved to play
exclusively all-ages shows, Anderson is passionate
that art be available to all. "Everyone who wants to
enjoy Dunk should be able to. Everyone who wants
to go to a show should be able to go. No one should
be restricted because they're underage, or broke,
or a person of colour, or whatever."
And so Dunk will remain free, with its content
in print forever evading the World Wide Web.
Print culture's importance in today's world is
also a motivating factor, and Anderson considers,
"maybe ... we won't last long. Maybe eventually
it'll all be iPads and readers and
maybe that's fine, but I just think
holding something and touching it
is different."
Meanwhile, parallel thinking hits
the press over at John Studios. Ryan
Smith (Green Burrito Records) talks
type, amidst a room of publishing
equipment. The guillotine stack
cutter, page sorter, and folding/stapling machine now sitting idle, all
amassed to assemble a trial, issue of
Vancouver's newest monthly arts and
culture zine, John,
Founded by Andrew Volk, Ryan
Smith, and Daniel Rincon, John is
designed to emulate the sandpaper
sheen of a photocopy. The March preview issue is monochrome literature.
All in blue, the letter-sized magazine
layout is non-glossy and photograph-
filled. After collecting publishing
equipment over the years, this project finally gives
Smith an excuse to call it all into action.
The zine is just one section of Smith's endeavors at John Studios. This recently leased DTES
warehouse space has been divided into different
rooms by Smith's carpentry-sawy friend, Johnny
Burgess. There now exists a print shop, event
space, and a dozen artist studios. Smith regards
John Studios as a reaction to Vancouver's dwindling venue scene and the magazine a retort against
digital culture.
"The lack of print publications and physical
documentation is totally prevalent and of course
that's why we'd want to be doing it" Smith can
comprehend the Internet's advantages, but also
its faults. He is disinterested in the impersonal,
and when it comes to the web, "it's all behind a
screen." Smith laments the extinction of physical
information mediums. The floppy disk, he says,
"we saw that come and go. We're going to see so
many major things we know today, go."
With photographs, poetry, comics, and music
reviews, Smith sees no decided limit on what will
live between John's covers. In contrast with Dunk,
Smith's curatorial process is open-minded and
welcomes even "102-year-olds writing about crocheting." This doesn't mean John is a scrapbook
of the mediocre; they are seeking awesome art
and, "There shouldn't be a limit to what that is."
Smith also sees this publication as a means for
art's immortalization. Discussing the photographs
he hopes to hang in John, Smith explains, "There
are 500 people who are going to have that photo
forever." Then he continues, "Provided the book
rippers don't break into your house and rip all
your books to pieces." Smith recounts how some
libraries are having their books destroyed after
being scanned on to digital versions. He half jokes
about our post-apocalyptic reality: "It's 2013! Let's
rip all the books apart!"
Although the flammable quality of books,
newspapers, and letters may not face a world quite
as fiery as Smith's Fahrenheit 45l-style depictions,
these arts and communication mediums are still
jarringly endangered. Hopefully John and Dunkwill
renew the love of paper in this quickly digitalizing
city. And may the counterculture grow.
I Left to right: Daniel Rincon, Andrew Volk, Ryan Smith, John Who: Tambo-shakin', Harrimond-poundin', soul-rattling septet, the Ballantynes.
Where: East Van, Jackson Ave. @ Railway St.
Discorder crashes a Wednesday night jam session with Vancouver gospel rock
septet the Ballantynes to chat about their music and the roof it's made under. As
jam spaces go, the blue-walled "Carriage House," complete with sexy dimmer-
controlled chandelier and one lonely piece of artwork, could be considered big; but
with Jarrod O'Dell, Vanessa Dandurand, Jennifer Wilks, Corey Poluk, Max Sample, Mick
McDiarmid, and Trevor Racz packed inside together, it's plain cozy.
byMONlKA
LOEVENMIR&
Discorder: How do you not
get sick of each other in
here?
McDiarmid: This space is
bigger than our last space by
twice as much so it probably
helps a little bit, but I think
everybody here wants to say
that we do still hate each
other [laughter]. We still miss
each other after the tours
though.
Dandurand: We don't spend
that much time in here realistically and it's not the smallest
space that we have crammed
into as a unit.
Poluk: We are also on really
small stages throughout most
of tour and we still somehow
like each other, so I think this
room is fine.
How is it practising with
seven people?
Racz: I hide all my mistakes
behind Mick. [Laughter]
Sample: I think we still can't
hide mistakes very easily. We
try to lock in together.
Dandurand: If we do it a
second time, it's on purpose.
Sample: Playing with seven
people is challenging but I
think with the right seven
people it can work.
Do you have any pet names
for the space?
Poluk: Jam Space. [Laughter]
Racz: Large Marge.
O'Dell: Sure, why not. I guess
we do now!
Poluk: Don't we call it Rail-
town Abbey?
Dandurand: We never called it
that though! Never. It's called
the Carriage House.
Do you share the space with
other bands?
Wilks: We do, New Values.
Vapid, Dirty Spells... lots of
other bands [the Radii] have
been in and out with a lot of
the same people in them.
How long have you been
here?
Wilks: As a complete seven
piece we've been here for
about a year.
How does practicing here
relate to your recording
process?
Poluk: It's pretty similar. We
literally do record live off the
floor.
Racz: The only difference is
we don't have [Producer and
Engineer at Little Red Sounds]
Felix nodding with a thumbs
up at our practices.
Do your songs come to the
jam space completed or are
they crafted here?
O'Dell: It's totally patch-work
between the writers. I've come
in with skeletons or a hook,
or Vanessa and I will hit one
note on the organ and go 'OK,
now we're making a song
with this so it is pretty much
all over the map. Everything
is completed here in the jam
space though. It's not like we
are handing out music sheets.
That doesn't exist.
Racz: What's a music sheet?
[Laughs]
Dandurand: The thing is that
I don't play bass and I don't
play drums, so we don't write
each other's parts. We bring
it in and everyone writes their
part. That's the only way it
works.
Sample: The most pressure of
anything I've done in my life is
to come up with bass lines in
this band. I feel like it works
most of the time, but I'm still
not completely satisfied. Ever.
What is it like playing with
two drummers in the jam
space?
O'Dell: It's very loud; Trevor is
a bit of a brute. When we're
fleshing out a song it can be
a painful, painful experience.
When people are playing
around trying to find their
parts and two full drum kits
are trying to find their parts
it's a lot of... sounds, a lot of
painful sounds.
Racz: I like to hit.
McDiarmid: I always thought
that it would be way harder to
play with two kits than it ever
has been, and for whatever
lucky reason it happens to be
that it just works out right
away.
Racz: The first time I came to
the jam space I was pissed
that there were two drummers.
I didn't know. But now I prefer
to play with Mick-and we gel
as one drum kit.
McDiarmid: Brothers!
Listen to their latest at
theballantynes.bandcamp.com. THE ROBOT
ATE ME
byCALJ
TRAVIS
lettering/illustration by
OLA VOLO
photos by
USAVIRONDA
His musical project is called The Robot Ate Me, and after
speaking with founder and frontman Ryland Bouchard, I wonder just what this
robot left; a quiet, honest artist. A weirdo whi#^s strikingly sane.
In 2002, Bouchard's debut album They Ate Themselves was released on Swim
Slowly—the Washington-based, Bouchard-founded label—and submerged
the mental passages of those fortunate enough to flounder through it with
multi-instrumental experimental folk/pop songs, rattling of apocalyptic-
themed dreams, as poetic and stirring as they were grizzly. "Our Bones Were
Chalk," "Everyone Was Still," "Goodnight (I Almost Died!)"—it was bizarre
and captivating, it still is.
They Ate Themselves garnered some impressive attention and critical acclaim,
though remained (most contently) below the volatile mainstream radar.
Bouchard, with collaborative efforts, presented a mystifying array of haunting songs, some accessible and danceable, others challenging and obscure.
For fans and for Bouchard, it's hard to believe that was n years, and u releases
ago. "It's been a long time. It's weird thinking back now. When you start
working on music, you don't think it's something that's going to last a long
time," muses Bouchard, on the line from his home in a small community on
^MS^^uemes Island, two hours north of Seattle.
^^^^turally and stylistically, Bouchard's songwriting technique suggests
^Btt^ice of context, thereby freeing each piece from constrictive accepted
^^^fe^^I never really listened to music when I was a kid, not till I was 14 or
HH|n? started playing music and didn't ever really stop," Bouchard recalls. "I think that really shaped me; when you approach things without context
you have a better grasp of yourself. A lot of people end up making music just
to copy what others have made. It's easy to fall into that and it's an artistic
struggle for many."
Copying what others have made is a non-issue for Bouchard, whose dis-
cography waxes and wanes through distinct, and palpable personal phases.
"It's all natural. I've never been able to sit down and consciously conceive a
phase to enter. I could never record [2006's] Good World again."
In this way, Bouchard entered an engrossing and ultimately energy-
vamping phase with the solo album/art endeavour Seeds in 2008. The handcrafted box set consists of an A-sides collection on CD and vinyl, a B-sides
CD, a DVD of Super 8 videos (Bouchard is also a talented filmmaker), four
seven-inch vinyl records, letterpressed lyrics, a hand silkscreened shirt, bag,
poster, and a set of illustrations.
Bouchard made 500 of these box sets.
THE HAND-CRAFTED BOX SET
CONSISTS OF AN A-SIDES COLLECTION
ON CD AND VINYL, A B-SIDES CD, A
DVD OF SUPER 8 VIDEOS (BOUCHARD
IS ALSO A TALENTED FILMMAKER),
FOUR SEVEN-INCH VINYL RECORDS,
LETTERPRESSED LYRICS, A HAND
SILKSCREENED SHIRT, BAG, POSTER,
AND A SET OF ILLUSTRATIONS.
BOUCHARD MADE 500 OF THESE
BOX SETS.
"The albums represent different personal phases that I've been honest
to without regard to commercial success. Most people would repeat what
was successful, but I've never been interested in that"
After years on the road, Bouchard has traded relentless touring as The
Robot Ate Me to focus on songwriting, recording and filmmaking projects
on lovely Guemes Island.
In January, Bouchard released the full-length Bridge by Bridge, followed just
five days later by the EP Circumstance, both strictly digitally. To some this may
seem inconsistent with the uncompromising battle to keep art legit since
critics like to poke holes through any potential weak spot in artistic values.
Bouchard offers, "If you're self-releasing, digital is a nice opportunity.
The physical aspects of a release are appealing aesthetically, but the practical
applications aren't positive. Compared to a tangible release, the cost is just
so high and all that plastic sitting out in the world... It's infinitely simpler
when you remove the physical aspect and focus on the art itself. Getting
caught up in the physical aesthetic is a kind of vanity."
Bridge by Bridge is a very personal album for Bouchard, who has reoriented
himself spatially and matured thematically. What was bizarre is not banal,
but contemplative. What was spooky is serene. Some tracks are still ethereally layered, with Bouchard's lace-like falsetto draped throughout simply
structured tracks about love and loneliness, while others feel stripped down
and bare to the soft marrow. The simplicity is magical.
As for live shows now, Bouchard has shied away from extensive touring,
but a performance at Googly Eyes Studio here in Vancouver this summer is
an exciting possibility.
Nearing the end of our conversation, Bouchard fancies, "There's an
important difference between an art project and one being produced for your
own gratification. I've seen the difference." Seen the difference, and shown it photos by ROMMY GHALY
illustration by TYLER CR1CH
«It had to happen now. Had to.» Philocerap-
tor's Steve Mann is answering a question on why
now was the right time to release a full-length
album, and I wasn't expecting such a clear-cut
response. "Our lives are heaping with responsibilities now." Together with William Justin (guitar) and Phil Jette (drums), we're talking in their
downtown storage-turned-jam-space about the
songs they've just finished recording, and the
conversation isn't all elation and placebo effect
like I'd thought it would be.
Philoceraptor really aren't the same band they
were two years ago, even though their components
are still familiar. The trio that started their tenure
in Vancouver by staying up late on weeknights
and drinking to excess is barely recognizable in
the adults that are now across from me discussing chorus vocals and fatherhood. "Literally five
minutes after we finished [the last take of the
record] was when Phil sat us down and said, 'Hey
guys, I'm going to be a dad,'" recounts Justin.
"That was an awesome exclamation point to the recording process, but it definitely underlined
that yes, there are bigger things to life and much
bigger accomplishments than this band stuff. It's a
lesson in perspective." Now, with marriages, kids,
and jobs taking precedence over gigs and guitars,
the focus inside of the band has never been higher
when they're actually together. "Five years ago, the
band was a third of what we thought about. Now ,
it's maybe 50 percent of what we think about but
we only have five percent of the time to do it in."
Their new LP is all about that five percent
The band that used to only write songs from
the perspective of a fictitious, Patrick-Bateman-
read-by-Brett-Easton-EUis character, has shifted
gears. Stop Ruining Fun is cut from the same cloth
as Bellingham's Police Teeth, firmly rooted in
self-referential "music about being in a band"
territory and the realization that the idea of "making it" probably doesn't exist for a bunch of dudes
PHILOCERAPTOR
byFRASER
DOBBS
jamming in a basement, nor does it have to. Mann
explains, "It's about late-twentysomething egoists
who are confronted with trying to become an awesome band and knowing they're bound to fail."
Compared to their earlier material, it's a huge step
forward, and one that came at the end of a long year
S|?e"n,t "yvriting, reflecting, and sitting on material
until it felt right, a technique that would have felt
foreign to them just a few years ago.
Stop Ruining Fun sounds better for the time
invested. A large helping of'70s punk glazed with
'90s pop, and no annoying bass to worry about, the
so that any news crews coming in would have to see
it that was the background to any news coverage."
That the phrase is now the background to a
rock record about growing old hasn't been lost
on them. The Justin that used to only play shows
dressed in all white may be retired, but according
to the band it's a step in the right direction. Luckily
for Philoceraptor, growing up can still sound fun.
record is much more polished than Philoceraptor
are used to presenting to the public. The songs
are still just as catchy as they used to be, but tunes
like the anthemic "One Of These Days" and the
colossal four-minute outro to "Song From A Little
Room" benefit immensely from the time spent
on them. "When we recorded 'PYT,' I still didn't
know what I was playing to," Jette mentions. "We
wrote all the songs [for the EP Deepest V] in one day
and recorded them all the next" The extra love on
Stop Ruining Fun shows itself in gratuitous gang
harmonies, beautiful guitar tones and steadier
pacing throughout.
The record might be self-referential, but the
title of the album doesn't come directly from the
band poking fun at their own busy schedules:
it's named after a dumpster. Bishops University,
where Mann and Justin first met, "had a very bad
reputation," according to the latter. "Forwhatever
reason, the CBC loved showing how depraved we
were... We'd always have parties in a particular alley
there, and someone took it upon themselves to
paint STOP RUINING FUN on the dumpster there
ON THE BEACH BOYS
AND FRANCHISING:
Growing older and not being able to tour
doesn't have to be the end of a band, according
. to William Justin. "I want to do what the Beach
Boys did in the '60s. Brian Wilson hung back
in California with a whole bunch of session
musicians writing Pet Sounds while the rest of
the Beach Boys toured around America, not giving a fuck, playing their hits. They came back
[from tour] and Wilson said, 'Okay, we've got
a record! Just add some harmonies and we'll
put it out next week.' We need to start auditions
and franchise out the Philoceraptor sound." IISC1IER
REVISITED
by ERICA
LEIREN
images courtesy of
ERICA LEIREN
lettering by
KIMPRINGLE
J
wu
run i
ANCOUVERITES
"We're looking for a band to play with us who
aren't the usual punk double-bill. Are you guys
interested?" Tom Anselmi, the lead singer of Slow,
asked me after one of our gigs.
"Sure. That'd be fun!" I told him. I played
bass in the Dilettantes. We were sweet and poppy
with three girl singers and two boys on guitar
and drums. '}* *■-'
It was 1985 and Slow were already slightly
notorious around Vancouver for their teen-power-
fuelled shows and Anselmi's intimidating growl.
Slow were bigger than us on the scene and had a
very loyal following—my friends and I included—
who tried to never miss a show.
Like all truly great bands, Slow were unpredictable and that made them really exciting. Would a
fist fight break out? Would a girl leap up on stage
and hang off of Anselmi's neck? Would Stephen
Hamm, the mountain-of a bass player, crush a
beer bottle with his bare hands? Would drummer
Terry Russell slip off his stool from the sweat
dripping down his naked chest? Could Christian
Thorvaldson duck-walk across the stage while
playing his fabulous solo and wink at the girls all
at the same time?
At a Slow show, the atmosphere was always
ripe with the feeling that something exciting
might, could, would happen at any moment. Most
of Slow's shows featured real genius, a sublime
synthesis of their four distinct cartoon-like personalities, distilled into the raw power of music.
Slow were Vancouver's Nirvana before anyone ever
heard "Teen Spirit."
I remember buying their first single, "I
Broke the Circle," at Zulu Records in '85.  I
walked into that small friendly place, and saw
the little box full of singles propped up against
the cash register. The cover sleeve was a powder-
puff pink and baby blue cartoon of a girl on the
telephone with Slow rushing by right above the
song title. Flip it over, and there were cartoon drawings of each band member with their first names
underneath: Tom, Christian, Terry, Hamm. Grant
McDonagh played it for me. The song was pure,
compressed energy. It had everything: moaning,
heavy breathing, breaking glass, cow bells, and
big drums, big bass, and big guitars. It speeds
The first Slow release:
single "I Broke The Circle"
on Zulu Records (1985).
up and slows down, does absolutely
everything right. It was the sound
of four newly-minted young men at
the edge of a precipice, ready to fling
themselves off, with a cry to invoke
the god of music.
So when Anselmi asked me if we'd like to play
with Slow, of course the answer was "Yes!"
The first gig we played together was, at The
Savoy on Water Street in Gastown. To get in, you
humped your gear up a set of narrow stairs, redo-
lentwith the fragrance of delicious curries cooking
in the Indian restaurant below. The room was
comfortable. Also, familiar to us; it was the scene
of the Dilettantes maiden performance. Once we'd
scraped together seven songs, we figured we had
enough material to play live, and entered CiTR's
SHiNDiG '85 at the Savoy. While our frontline of
three pretty girls plus the band's light airy harmonies and sweet melodies parlayed us to the finals,
we then met our nemesis—Death Sentence—a
straight-ahead punk rock outfit with a stacked
fan base in attendance. We lost.
Fade to our Savoy gig with Slow...
Anselmi took over the room during their set. The Dilettantes, 1985, ontstage
at the Luv A Fair. Photo by Stan
Kwok.
Left to right: Erica Leiren,
Sheilagh Badanic, Paul
MacKenzie (of the Enigmas, now
in the Real MacKenzies), Lora
Rempel, Ryan Volberg, Laurie
McGuiness.
Erica Leiren, on the photo:
"[My] arm muscles developed
by crewing for UBC Rowing
previous two years! And those
are my rowing tights I'm sporting
onstage."
He ran over table tops like an acrobat, hanging
from the rafters while he sang. He held a beam
in the ceiling in one hand and the microphone in
the other. Leaning down towards the audience,
hanging from the roof, he balanced lopsidedly
on a table and the top of a chair. From there, he
bellowed out the songs, peering at his audience
with an intense gaze, just one eye visible from
underneath his wild corkscrew curls. No matter
what size venue, Anselmi and the band always gave
the audience more than it came for.
"I Broke the Circle" was their first single. Not
long after, in '86, they released the EP Against the
Glass. By then, Slow were huge. So big that they
were asked to open for one of the city's main musical events of the coming year, Expo 86's Festival
of Independent Recording Artists.
All the local bands were excited about the
opportunity to play for such a large international
audience, even if ambivalent about the venue. Expo
'86 was viewed by the indie scene as a corporate
mega monster, but the chance to play was just
too good to resist. A separate evening each was
slated for many popular local indie acts: Poisoned,
Brilliant Orange, Bolero Lava, and others.
Contrasting to the locals were some international groups, like Einsturdenze Neuibauten, an
experimental and extremely loud German industrial noise band. They unleashed their set on the
Vancouver audience. To be charitable, they were
virtually unbearable, but absolutely fascinating.
They took chainsaws and sledge hammers to their
instruments. The best part was the astonished and
appalled reaction of the unsuspecting families,
innocently waiting to be entertained by the next
act Many with young children fled like lemmings
before the unexpected aural assault, moms and
dads gripping their hastily packed fast-food meals
and kids with their fingers in their ears. This was
not pop music. Even my boyfriend, Gord, and
I, who knew what to expect endured only ten
minutes before we too had to leave.
Whether the variety of bands who played Expo
was a credit to the open-mindedness or the naivety
of the organizers, it made for an entertaining spectacle. We young Vancouverites were loving it
So here we were the evening of Slow's Expo
concert, an evening when the expectations of the
crowd no doubt weighed heavily on the shoulders
of the four boys who were just about to come on
stage. It was a beautiful summer evening. Just
darkening, soft and warm with the caress of the
nearby ocean's waves scenting the air. I snuggled
close to Gord, anticipating the show.
The venue was a semi-circular open air amphitheater ringed with wide-set continuous aluminum
bench seating. There was a narrow strip in front of
the stage, where we could see many of our friends
and the band's fans gathering. The local TV station
had their studio set up on site. Just behind the
concert bowl it perched, with big glass windows
allowing a view of the newscasts happening inside.
From where we sat, the local celebrity anchorman
and woman were in plain view: "Live from the Expo
'86 Fairgrounds!"
The excitement you always felt at a Slow gig
was hanging there that night, but there was something more. A slight unease. This was our very
own Slow, and they were playing at Expo. What
did it mean? The band must have been fighting
with thesame question. Was the this a chance to
play well and impress the people who needed to be
impressed to advance their career? Or was it the
opportunity to seize the monster by the throat and
shout right into its face: "We don't give a d#@*n!?"
I don't think they'd decided which it was within
moments of stepping onstage. But by the time they
did, there was no doubt
Slow would shout in the monster's face.
Come back in June to read part two ofErica Leiren's stprg. LA CHINGA
bvJOSEFA
CAMERON
photo by
COLIN JONES
lettering/illustration by
MOSES MAGEE
Vancouver's musical landscape is painted
with everything from shoegaze to hip-hop. Its
rock 'n' roll culture isn't always quite as visible though. Discorder sat down at Perch with La
Chinga, one of the West Coast's loudest rock
bands, to talk about their self-produced, self-
titled debut album [released April 19] with a
big party at the Rickshaw. Carl Spackler (bass/
vocals), Jay Solyom (drums), and Ben Yardley
(guitar/vocals) make up the three-piece, who
lace together a sound so rooted in the '70s that
visions of motorcycles and desert leather are
evoked the second you press play.
Discorder: A lot of your reviews and press compare you to metal, but personally I would not
consider it metal. How do you classify your
music?
Ben Yardley: Rock! We play 70's-inspired hard
rock.
Your album release was last Friday [April 19].
How did that go? Did people receive it the way
you were expecting?
All: It was great! Went really well.
Carl Spackler: Yeah, it was awesome!
Yardley: It was the biggest room we ever had to
play on our own, so I thought it was going to be
pretty lonely, but we had a great turnout
I read on a blog that La Chinga formed almost
accidentally. Is this true? What is a brief history
of your formation?
Yardley: It started in fall 2011. That was the first
time that we played. Carl had a gig, but his band
members were out of town and so he asked
Jay and I to fill in. We had all been buddies for
a really long time so we didn't want to say no.
We'd never played before as a three-piece, but
yeah, it was just awesome.
Spackler: There was a lot of really really good
music chemistry. We played in different bands before, but with these guys, it's different. Our
first show was at a festival in Langley, all the
other bands were nice folk bands, and when we
played, a police helicopter came. That was pretty
much it
Yardley: Yeah that was the moment like, 'Yeah
okay. Lets do this.'
I listened to your new album, La Chinga.
Jay Solyom: Yeah we couldn't think of a name...
Well, it was great anyway. In Spanish it literally
means, 'the fuck'?
Yardley: If you translate it literally, it means,
'the fuck.' But how it's actually used, it's like an
expression of excitement.
Spackler: It also depends on which country you
are in. In some, it means naked lady or woman.
Yardley: Yeah, someone came up to me in
Kelowna and said, 'Your name is so wonderful!
It means, naked lady!' Great.
Spackler: The one we based it on means, 'heavy
duty,'in a positive way. We love the Mexican culture ... There is something kind of sun baked
about our sound. We really love that stuff. I love
going to Mexico.
What is your recording process like? Do you
mix and produce yourselves?
Spackler: (pointing to Solymon) He does in his
basement. We all do the producing.
Yardley: It's nice running on your own time and
being comfortable in the setting.
Spackler: Yeah being polished is not our thing.
It's nice forgetting the mics are on and just
going with it, instead of being in some fancy
place that makes the whole process a stressful thing.
Solymon: We recorded everything live, in one
take. Except the vocals were done separately.
Yardley: And we added some spaceship noises!
Discorder: I hear some Stooges and Jimmy Page
in the vocals. Are they major influences?
Yardley: Oh yeah!
Spackler: Yeah, when I was a kid, the first record
I ever bought was by Led Zeppelin. Lots of hard
rock vocals influenced me, I was always into
that high screaming sort of thing, but still trying
to sing. The bands that influenced me the most
were the ones that never made it, but had a similar sound to the big ones.
Solymon: We grew up on different kinds of
music too, like jazz, punk rock, blues. But the
heavy ones got us a lot more into music.
Ride on, dudes.
Saddle thejuck up urith this head-bangin' trio over
on the rock! La Chinga plays Lucky Bar in Victoria on
May 4.
Pick up La Chinga on lachinga.bandcamp.com.  ilea
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CM CiTR 101.9 FM PROGRAM GUIDE
DISCORDER SOGGESTS LISTENING TO CiTR ONLINE AT WWW.CiTR.CA EVERY DAY.
SUN
MON
Good Morning
My Friends
Breakfast With The Browns
(Eclectic)
Ska-T's Scenic Drive
TUES
Pacific Prckin' (Roots)
WED
Tweets & Tunes
THURS
FRI
'.CiTR Ghost Met
Student filMn Slot
SAT
6am
HMHPnNI
CiTR Ghost Mix
CiTR Ghost Mix
6am
7
Bepi Crespan Presents
{Difficult Music)
Radio Nezate
(Eritrian)
7
8
Queer FM Vancouver:
Reloaded
(Talk)
Suburban Jungle
(Eclectic)
End of the World News
(Talk)
The Saturday Edge
(Roots)
8
9
Classical Chaos
(Classical)
9
10
Shookshookta (Talk)
The Rockers Show
(Reggae)
Pop. Drones
(Eclectic)
Rocket from Russia
(Punk)
Sounds of the City
(Eclectic)
10
Mind Voyage
(Ambient)
11
Relentlessly Awesome
Stereo Blues
(Blues/Eclectic)
11
Morning After Show
(Eclectic)
Student Special Hour
(Eclectic)
12
SyBchronicity (Talk)
Parts Unknown (Pop)
Duncan's Domits
(Eclectic)
It Ain't Easy Being Green
(Eclectic)
Annihilation (Punk)
19
1
Mantis Cabinet
Terry Project
PodcastOalk)
Democracy
Now (Talk)
Definition Soundwave
(Rock/Folk)
Skald's Hall
(Drama/Poetry)
, ,sPower,Chord,(Metal) ,
1
■■■ill
Give Em The Boot
Extraenvironmentalist
(Talk)
Ink Studs (Talk)
Radio Zero (Dance)
HI
3
Blood On
The Saddle
(Roots)
Shake A
Tail Feather
(Soul/R&B)
The All Canadian
Farm Show
Programming Training
Buttaon
the Bread
Programming Training
Code Blue
(Roots)
3
 RjadioF^eThinker,,...,	
Thunderbird Eye
Nardwuar Presents
(Nardwuar)
■
The Leo Ramirez Show
(World)
Soe'waylh
(Eclectic)
111
Discorder Radio
5
Chips
(Pop)
Student
Fill-in Slot
News 101 (Talk)
The City
Arts Report (Talk)
Simorgh
(Persian Literacy)
News 101 (Talk)
Moon Grok
5
R
So Salacious
(Electro/Hip Hop)
Neil's Hidden Tracks
(Korean Music)
Flex Your Head
(Hardcore)
Arts Project
U8C Arts On Air
Are You   1   Peanut
Aware    1 &"«*'*'
Stranded
(Eclectic)
NashaVofna (World)
6
Q
squantch
Sup
World?
7
More Than Human
(Electronic/Experimental)
Exploding Head Movies
(Cinematic)
La Fiesta (World)
7
Stereoscopic Redoubt
(Experimental)
African Rhythms
(World}
Rhythms
(World)
Techno
Progressive
Inside Out
(Dance)
(Hip-hop)
Student
FKMriSlot
8
9
Bootlegs & B-Sides
(Dance/Electronic)
The Jazz Show
(Jazz);
L_
Live From Thunderbird
Radio Hell
(Live)
The Bassment
(Dance/Electronic)
Synaptic Sandwich
(Dance/Electronic/
Eclectic)
9
in
Trancendance
(Dance)
IB
IV
Canada Post-Rock (Rock)
11
Student Fill-in Slot
Hans Von K)oss
Misery Hour
Student Fill-
in Slot
Randophonic
(Eclectic)
11
(A
CiTR Ghost Mix
CFTR Ghost Mix
Aural Tentacles
(Eclectic)
„ ^iTRGJoit Mix,
12
'MSi^'W'i
^^^^p^M^^
1
1
3
sum
M
5
Van pi
(Indu
■e'sBail
stria!)
1
The Absolute
Value of Insomnia
(Generative)
3
5 I A mix of the latest house music,
; tech-house, prog-house and techno.
BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS...
(Difficult Music)!'-9am
Bepi Crespan Presents... CiTR's
24 Hours Of Radio Art in a snack
size format! Difficult music,
harsh electronics, spoken word,
cut-up/collage and general
Crespan© weirdness. Twitter:
©bepicrespan Blog: bepicrespan.
blogspot.ca
CLASSICAL CHAOS
(Classical) 9-10am
From the Ancient World to the 21st
century, join host Marguerite in exploring and celebrating classical
music from around the world.
SH00KSH00KTA
(Talk) 10am-12pm
A program targeted to Ethiopian
people that encourages education
and personal development.
THE ROCKERS SHOW
112-3pm
inna  all  styles  and
fashion.
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
(Roots) 3-5pm
Alternating Sundays
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-boots
country.
SH^ATaYfEATWER
(Soul/R&B) 3-5pm
Alternating Sundays
The finest in classic soul and
rhythm & blues from the late '50s
to the early 70s, including lesser
known artists, regional hits and lost
soul gems.
CHIPS WITH EVERYTHiNG
(Pop) 5-6pm
Alternating Sundays
British pop music from all decades.
International pop (Japanese, French,
Swedish, British, US, etc.), '60s
soundtracks and lounge.
SO SALACIOUS
(Electro/Hip Hop) 6-7pm
Skadz and Sprocket Doyle bring you
Electro Swing, Alternative Hip Hop,
Dubstep, Acid Jazz, Trip Hop, Local
and Canadian Content - good and
dirty beats.
MORE THAN HUMAN
(Electronic/Experimental) 7-8 pm
Strange and wonderful electronic
sounds from the past, present, and
future with host Gareth Moses. Music from parallel worlds.
rhythmsindIa
(World) 8-9pm
Alternating Sundays
Featuring a wide range of music
from India, including popular music
from the 1930s to the present; Ghaz-
als and Bhajans, Qawwalis, pop and
regional language numbers.
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
(0c?/?Cc?;8-9pm
Alternating Sundays
BOOTLEGS & B-SIDES
(Dance/Electronic) 9-10pm
Hosted by Doe-Ran, the show was
a nominated finalist for "Canadian
College Radio Show of the year 2012
in the Pioneer DJ Stylus Awards". A
complete mixbag every week, covering: Ghetto funk, Breakbeat, Hip-
Hop, Funk & Soul, Chillout, Drum
& Bass, Mashups, Electro House
and loads of other crackin' tunes.
Search 'Doe Ran' at percussionlab.
com and on facebook.com
cross-country road trip!
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
(World) 4-5pm
The best of mix of Latin American
music, leoramirez@canada.com
TRANCENDANCE
(Dance) 10pm-12am
Hosted by DJ Smiley Mike and DJ
Caddyshack, Trancendance has
been broadcasting from Vancouver, B.C. since 2001. We favour
Psytrance, Hard Trance and Epic
Trance, but also play Acid Trance,
Deep Trance, Hard Dance and even
some Breakbeat. We also love
a good Classic Trance Anthem,
especially if it's remixed. Current
influences include Sander van
Doom, Gareth Emery, Nick Sentience, Ovnimoon, Ace Ventura, Save
the Robot, Liquid Soul and Astrix.
Older influences include Union Jack,
Carl Cox, Christopher Lawrence,
Whoop! Records, Tidy Trax, Plati-
pus Records and Nukleuz. Email:
djsmileymike ©trancendance.net.
Website: www.trancendance.net.
GOOD MORNING MY FRIENDS
(Upbeat Music) 6:30-8am
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
; (Eclectic) 8-1 lam
Your    favourite    Brownsters,
James and Peter, offer a savoury
: blend of the familiar and exotic
j in a blend of aural delights.
i breakfastwiththebrowns©
i hotmail.com.
SKATS SCENIC! DRIVE
C5/ra;ilam-12pm
SYNCHRONICS
(Talk) \2-\pm
\ Join host Marie B and discuss spiri-
! tualfty, health and feeling good.
; Tune in and tap into good vibra-
, tions that help you remember why
you're here: to have fun!
PARTS UNKNOWN
(Pop) l-3pm
An indie pop show since 1999, it's
like a marshmallow sandwich: soft
and sweet and best enjoyed when
; poked with a stick and held close
to a fire.
THE ALL CANADIAN FARM SHOW
(Pop) 3-Hpm
The All Canadian Farm Show cultivates new and old indie jams from
across genres and provinces. Tune
in to hear the a fresh crop of CiTR
volunteers take you on a musical
NEWS 101
(Talk) 5-Spm
Vancouver's only live, volunteer-
produced, student and community
newscast. Every week, we take
a look back at the week's local,
national and international news,
as seen from a fully independent
media perspective.
NEIL'S'HIDDENI TRACKS
(Korean Music) 6-7 pm
Korea has had briliant indie musicians since the '80s. However, we
don't know who they are and what
music they play. Also they have had
no chance to be introduced overseas. With Korean DJ Neil Choi, on
every Monday 6 p.m., we can find
out many hidden musicians who are
really awesome like famous world
rock'n'roll stars.
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
(Cinematic) 7-9pm
Join gak as he explores music from
the movies, tunes from television
and any other cinematic source,
along with atmospheric pieces, cutting edge new tracks and strange
old goodies that could be used in
a soundtrack to be.
THEJAZZSHOW
£/922)9pm-12am
Undercurrent May 6: A classic partnership with guitarist Jim Hall and
pianist Bill Evans. Out Of The Afternoon May 13: One of the best loved
dates led by drummer Roy Haynes
and featuring Rahsaan Roland Kirk
and all his horns. Shades of Redd
May 20: Legendary pianist Freddie Redd, his Quintet with Jackie
McLean and Tina Brooks plus his
compositions. The Jazz Skyline May
27: Elegant sounds with vibist Milt
Jackson and tenor saxophone giant
Lucky Thompson.
PACIFIC PICKIN'
(Roots) 6-8am
Bluegrass,   old-time   music,
and its derivatives with Arthur
and the lovely Andrea Berman.
pacificpickin@yahob.com
oiUEERFM
VANCOUVER:RELOADED
(7"3W8-10:30am
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transexual communities of Vancouver. Lots of human
interest features, background on
current issues and great music.
queerfmradio@gmail.com
MiNDVOYAGE
(Eclectic) 10:30-11:30am
Mind Voyage presents cosmic tones
of celestial counterpoint on CiTR!
Experience weekly encounters of
synth, ambient, witchy and new ]
classical items in one-hour with j
DJTall Jamal.
MORNING AFTER SHOW
(Eclectic) ll:30am-lpm
An eclectic mix of Canadian indie
with rock, experimental, world, reggae, punk and ska from Canada,
Latin America and Europe. Hosted
by Oswaldo Perez C
(Eclectic) 11:30am- lpm
Various members of the CiTR's student executive sit in and host this
blend of music and banter about
campus and community news, arts,
and pop culture. Drop-ins welcome!
MANTIS CABINET
(Eclectic) l-2pm
GIVE EM THE BOOT
(World) 2-3pm
Sample the various flavours of :
Italian folk music from north to :
south, traditional to modern on
this bilingual show, givetheboot®
gmail.com • http://giveemtheboot.
wordpress.com
i^GMMNli'iMMINrNi
<7aW3-3:30pm
RADIO FREE THINKER
(Tunes)3:3Q-WQm, ^
Promoting skepticism, critical
thinking and science, we examine
popular extraordinary claims and
subject them to critical analysis.
bTsCORDER RADIO
(7i//?t?sj4:30-5pm
Discorder Magazine now has its own
radio show! Join us to hear excerpts
of interviews, reviews and more!
THECITY
(TaW5-6pm
An alternative and critical look
at our changing urban spaces.
New website: www.thecityfm.org.
New twitter handle: ©thecityjm.
FLEX YOUR HEAD
(Hardcore) 6-8pm
Punk rock and hardcore since 1989.
Bands and guests from around the
world.
iNsibEoufT
(Dance) %-fym
CRIMES & TREASONS
(Hip-hop) 9- 11pm
dj@crimesandtreasons.com
WEDNESDAY
TWEETS & TUNES
(7Vew;6:30-8am
We practice what we Tweet! Showcasing local indie music and bringing bands, artists and fans together
through social media. Website:
tweetsandtunes.com Twitter:
©tweetsandtunes.
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
(Eclectic) i-lOzm
Live from the Jungle Room, join radio
host Jack Velvet for an eclectic mix of
music, sound bites, information and
inanity, dj@jackvelvet.net.
POPDRONES"
(Eclectic) 10-11:30am
STUDENT SPEcVaL HOUR
TERRY PROJECT PODCAST
(Talk) l-2pm
Alternating Wednesdays
There once was a project named
Terry, That wanted to make people
wary, Of things going on In the world
that are wrong without making it all
seem too scary.   n
DEMOCRACY NOW
(Talk) l-2pm
Alternating Wednesdays
EXTRAENVIRO NMENTALIST
(Talk) 2-3pm
Exploring the mindset of an
outsider looking in on Earth.
Featuring interviews with leading
thinkers in the area of sustainable
economics and our global ecological crisis.
SNE-WAYLH
4-5pm
In many Coast Salish dialects,
"sne'waylh" is the word for
teachings or laws. The aboriginal language-learning program
begins with the teachings of the
skwxwu7mesh snichim (Squamish
language). Originally aired on Coop
Radio CFRO 100.5 FM in Vancouver,
Tuesdays 1-2 p.m.
ARTSREPORT
(Talk)b-bpm
Reviews, interviews and coverage of
local arts (film, theatre, dance, visual and performance art, comedy,
and more) by host Maegan Thomas
and the Arts Reporters.
ARtIpROJECT
(Talk) S-MOpm
Alternating with UBC Arts On Air
Stay tuned after the Arts Report for
Arts Project Interviews, documentaries and artsy stuff that doesn't fit
into CiTR's original arts hour.
UBC ARTS ON AIR
(Talk) 6-6:30pm
Alternating with Arts Extra!
Ira Nadel, UBC English, offers scintillating profiles and unusual interviews with mem bers of the UBC Arts
world. Tune in for programs, people
and personalities in Arts.
SAMSQUANTCH'SHIDEAWAY
(Eclectic) S:30-&pm
Alternating Wednesdays
All-Canadian music with a focus
on indie-rock/pop. anitabinder®
hotmail.com
SUPWORLD?
(Eclectic) MO-Spm
Alternating Wednesdays
Fuzzy and sweet, a total Ireat! Tune
in to hear the latest and greatest
tracks from independent and Vancouver bands.
23 FOLK OASIS
(Roots) B-lQpm
Two hours of eclectic folk/roots
music, with a big emphasis on our
local scene. C'mon in! Akumbaya-
free zone since 1997. folkoasis©
gmail.com,
SEXY IN VAN CITY
(Talk) IQ-llpm
Your weekly dose of education
and entertainment in the realm
of relationships and sexuality.
sexyinvancity.com/category/sexy-
in-vancity-radio
HANS VON KLOSS'MISERY HOUR
(Hans Von Kloss) llpm-lam
Pretty much the best thing on
radio.
THE VAMpTrE'S BALL
(Industrial) l-5am
Industrial, electro, noise, experimental, and synth-based music.
thevampiresball@gmail.com the-
vampiresballoncitr.com
THURSDAY
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
(7aW8-10am
ROCKET FROM RUSSIA
(Punk)lO-llam
Punk rock, indie pop and whatever else I deem worthy. Hosted
by a closet nerd. http://www.
weallfalldowncitr.blogspot.ca
RELENTLESSLY AWESOME
llam-12pm
Vancouver's got a fever, and the only
prescription is CiTR's "Relentlessly
Awesome." Each and every week,
Jason attempts to offer adrenaline-
pumping, heart-stopping, hands-
over-the-eyes suspense. He is a fan
of various genres, and a supporter
of local music.
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
(Eclectic) \2-\pm
Sweet treats from the pop underground. Hosted by Duncan, sponsored by donuts. http://duncans
donuts.wordpress.com
bEFmlfio^sbulNDWAVE
(Rock/Folk) l-2pm
The now of folk. The now of rock.
The now of alternative. Join Evan
as he explores what's new, what's
good, and what's so awesome it
fights dragons in its spare time. As
always, Evan ends the show with a
special Top 5 list that's always fun
and always entertaining.
INK STUDS
(Talk) 2-3pm
Underground and indie comix. Each
week, we interview a different creator to get their unique perspective
on comix and 'discuss their upcoming works.
THUNbERBIRD EYE
(Sports; 3:30-4pm
Your weekly roundup of UBC Thunderbird sports action from on campus
and off with your host Wilson Wong.
MANTRA
(World) 4-5 pm
Kirtan, Mantra, Chanting and
Culture. There's no place like Om.
Hosted by Raghunath with special
guests. Email: mantraradioshow®
gmail.com. Website: mantraradio.
co.
SIMORGH
(Persian Literacy) 5-6pm
Simorgh Radio is devoted to the
education and literacy for the Persian speaking communities and
those interested in connecting to
Persian oral and written literature.
Simorgh takes you through a journey
of ecological sustainability evolving
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AREYOUAWARE
(Eclectic) Alternating Thursdays
6-7:30pm
Celebrating the message behind the
music: Profiling music and musicians that take the route of positive
action over apathy.
PEANUTBUTTEFI'N'JAMS
(Eclectic) Alternating Thursdays
6-7:30pm
Explore local music and food with
your hosts, Brenda and Jordie. You'll
hear interviews and reviews on eats
and tunes from your neighbourhood,
and a weekly pairing for your date
calendar.
STEREOSCOPIC REDOUBT
(Experimental) 7:30-9pm
LivEFROMTHUNDERBIRb
RADIO HELL
(Live Music) $-Upm
Featuring live band(s) every week
performing in the CiTR Lounge. Most
are from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country and
around the world.
aIraltentaIdTes
(Eclectic) 12-6am
It could be global, trance, spoken
word, rock, the unusual and the
weird, or it could be something
different. Hosted by DJ Pierre.
auraltentacles@hotmail.com
MOON GROK
7:30-10am
SOUNDS OF THE CITY
(Eclectic) 10-11 am
Promoting upcoming live concerts
; and shows in Vancouver, be they lo-
I cal, national, or international acts.
STEREOiBLUES
i (Blues/Eclectic) \lam-12pm
Every Friday host Dorothy Neufeld
sinks into blues, garage and rock
\ n'roll goodies!
IT AIN'T EASY BEING GREEN
(£c/ecr7c)12-lpm
CiTR has revived it's long-dormant
beginner's show It Ain't Easy Being
Green! With the support of experienced programmers, this show
offers fully-trained CiTR members,
especially students, the opportunity
to get their feet wet on the air.
SKALD'S HALL
(Drama/Poetry) l-2pm
Skald's Hall entertains with the spoken word via story readings, poetry
recitals, and drama. Established
and upcoming artists join host Brian
MacDonald. Interested in performing
on air? Contact us: @Skalds_Hall.
RADIO ZERO
f0a/7cej2-3:3Opm
An international mix of super-
fresh weekend party jams from
New Wave to foreign electro, baile,
' Bollywood, and whatever else.
www.radiozero.com
NARDWUAR
(Nardwuar) 3:30-5pm
Join Nardwuar the Human Serviette for Clam Chowder flavoured
entertainment. Doot doola doot
. «fp#V..doot doo! ' lirdwuar®
nardwuar.com
NEwsYoi
(Talk) 5-6pm
See Monday for description.
STRANDED
(Tc/ecf7c;6-7:30pm
Join your host Matthew for a weekly
mix of exciting sounds, past and
present, from his Australian homeland. And journey with him as he
features fresh tunes and explores
the alternative musical heritage
of Canada.
AFRICANRHYHMS* -
»/;7:30-9pm
www.africanrhythmsradio.com
THEBAS^MENT
(Dance/Electronic) 9-10:30pm
The Bassment is Vancouver's only
bass-driven radio show, playing
Glitch, Dubstep, Drum and Bass,
Ghetto Funk, Crunk, Breaks, and UK
Funky, while focusing on Canadian
talent and highlighting Vancouver
DJs, producers, and the parties
they throw.
CAimpim-ROCK
(Rock) 10:30pm-12am
Formerly on CKXU, Canada Post-
Rock now resides on the west coast
but it's still committed to the best
in post-rock, drone, ambient, experimental, noise and basically
anything your host Pbone can put
the word "post" in front of.
SATURDAY
THE SATURDAY EDGE
(7?00fcJ8am-12pm
A personal guide to world and roots
music—with African, Latin, and
European music in the first half,
followed by Celtic, blues, songwriters, Cajun, and whatever else fits!
steveedge3@mac.com
GlENERATibNANNIHiiSN
(Punk) 12-lpm
On the air since 2002,
playing old and new punk on
the non-commercial side of the
spectrum. Hosts: Aaron Brown,
Jeff "The Foat" Kraft. Website:
www.generationannihilation.com.
Facebook: www.facebook.com/
generationannihilation".
mwerchord
(Metal) l-lpm
Vancouver's longest running metal
show. If you're into music that's
on the heavier/darker side of the
spectrum, then you'll like it. Sonic
assault provided by Geoff, Marcia,
and Andy.
CODEBLUE
f/?00f$/3-5pm
From backwoods delta low-down
slide to urban harp honks, blues,
and blues roots with your hosts
Jim, Andy, and Paul, codeblue®
buddy-system.org
MOONGROK
5-6pm
NASHAvbLNA
(World) 6-7pm
News, arts, entertainment and music for the Russian community, local
and abroad, nashavolna.ca
LAFIESTA
(World) Mpm
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue, Latin
House, and Reggaeton with your
host GspotDJ.
SYNAPTICiSANDWiCH
(Dance/Electronic) 9-11 pm
If you like everything from electro/
techno/trance/8-bit music/retro
'80s, this is the show for you!
www.synapticsandwich.net
RANboPHONlC
(£t7ecf/c;ilpm-2am
Randophonic is best thought of as
an intraversal jukebox which has
no concept of genre, style, political
boundaries, or even space-time
relevance. But it does know good
sounds from bad. Lately, the program
has been focused on Philip Random's
All Vinyl Countdown + Apocalypse
(the 1,111 greatest records you probably haven't heard). And we're not
afraid of noise.
THEABSOLUTE;VaTuEOfTnSoE|A
(Generative) 2-6am
Four solid hours of fresh generative
music c/o the Absolute Value of Noise
and its world famous Generator. Ideal
for enhancing your dreams or, if sleep
is not on your agenda, your reveries. m    [«freeforstaiwnmen*ers) f
(212) Productions
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439 W Hastings St.
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15% off clothing
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7 free bag of popcorn
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10% off everything else
1100-1200 West 73 Ave
644 Seymour St.
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2695 Main St.
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Show it when you shop!
www.citr.ca * Photo by Scott Loudoun, courtesy Fast Food Apparel. Background and model: Erica Lapadat-Janzen. Clothing by Jaqui Kars.
ART PROJECT   ERICA LAPADAT-JANZEN
Erica Lapadat-Janzen is a Vancouver-based media/net
artist. Her work is shown internationally, both on and
offline. She is currently working on being more tangible
and encourages everyone to Google her.
Fast Food Apparel is brand loyalty taken to a whole new
level with an urban streetwear influence.
Created by Jaqui Kars.
••» http://fastfoodapparel.bigcartel.com
She will be representing Vancouver in KEIN THEMA 23 No.3
(international) Glitchart Festival, Nilrnberg, Germany,
May 9th, 2013.
•••»http://goo.gl/ZxQvi ••»ericalapadat-ianzen.com r Pages from #screenshots, book, 2012, digital collage, 10" x 10".
27 vmcmn to ine imsmer m m vwr gwq I^iFl^
!>*    Thinking outside the box ' JH
0000 infinity rebloo coao
1   f^j*!!—-
f°pPi|Mf Mm* m.--   m»\m ISWH-Jk
iiuThitail K i
f Pages from #screenshots, book, 2012, digital collage, 10" x 10".
ART PROJECT   ERICA LAPADAT-JANZEN A UBC PROFESSOR. A PUBLISHED AUTHOR OF FICTION AND NON-
fiction. The 1998 team captain for the Canadian high school world debate
team. All of these are things comedian Charlie Demers is (or has been) when
he's not doing stand-up in Vancouver. I meet up with Demers for an early
dinner at his chosen location, the Storm Crow Tavern, described online as
"Vancouver's Hottest Nerd Bar!" It's a homey space with masses of signed
Firefly posters and Doctor Who gadgetry coating the walls, as well as an abundance of obscure board games nestled in a corner. Demers seems to be a
regular, shaking hands and spurting brief inside jokes with various patrons.
He orders a beer, the beef stew, and we're off.
A versatile force in comedy, Demers has been a stand-up for nearly nine
years now, but his mindset for the business was set at a very early age. "I've
always been interested in being funny, and I'm sure that had a lot to do with
the household I was born in, the things that were valued in my family," says
Demers. "My mom, in a baby journal when I was about two weeks old, for
the first time in my life, referred to me as a comedian because I had peed on
a doctor. That's something a lot of babies do, but not every mother puts a
comic frame on it"
Already seen with a talent for humour, Demers was cracking jokes as
a young boy. "I remember doing my first bit when I was six or seven years
old," says Demers, chuckling as he sets down his beer and prepares his brief
story. "My parents were talking about a couple who had gotten pregnant by
accident and I did a whole bit on how that could have happened. Like a lot
of observational comedy, it came from a place of ignorance. I didn't realize
that people had sex for pleasure. I thought that if you had sex, it was for a
baby. So my bit was based on if they accidentally got pregnant, then they
accidentally had sex, and how did that happen?"
As it remains today, politics emerged as a large part of Demers' life at 15.
by EVAN
BROW
illustration by
TIERNEY MILNE
^"When I was a teenager, I was in a Trotskyist sect, which was very bizarre," says
I Demers. "I certainly would no longer describe myself as a worker-Bolshevik."
B)emers is of a rare breed, one in which his only memory of the Cold War was
jjlhe Head of the Class episode where they went to the Soviet Union and Arvid and
Dennis tried to sneak in a bunch of blue jeans. As to how his politics affects
his work today? Well, as Demers puts it, there's one very clear benefit. "I'm
kind of the in-house emcee for 98 per cent of the labour and left events that
happen in Vancouver. I'm exaggerating, but only slightly."
; It's at this point that Demers stops me. "Am I being funny enough?" he
asks, wondering exacdy what type of piece I'll be writing. It's a testament
to Demers' many roles (stand-up, writer, activist, professor) that he wants
to tailor his demeanor to my article. As we're about to move on, he adds,
"Will this be scathing? I deserve to be taken down a notch. It's about time
somebody wrote that expose."
Over the course of his career, Demers has become known as a man of large
side projects, writing both the darkly comic novel The Prescription Errors and the
crisp and observational Vancouver Special, a non-fiction account ofVancouver
as a whole, as well as appearing many times on CBC's the Debaters, a radio
debate show that combines "laughs and logic," a gig in which his debating
experience serves him well. a&-&isi&
"When I hit adulthood and there was this show that was half comedy and
half debate, it was a real 'you got chocolate on my peanut butter' situation,"
says Demers.
And while these projects have been near and dear to him over his life,
Demers has moved into another realm in his professional career, today as a
professor for UBC's Writing For New Media course. "Unless there's some
dramatic, unforeseeable change in circumstances for me, I do plan for teaching to be something that I continue to do," says Demers, adding that they're
hoping to add Writing For Comedic Forms, which he would be teach. "It'd
basically be comedy writing in the Creative Writing Program. And that's
very close to being official. That would hopefully be starting next January."
For other parts of Demers' future, well, it's simple to predict what he'll
keep striving for. "I love comedy, I love writing, and I love politics. In my
professional life, I'm happiest when those things are overlapping."
Demers is headlining the Comedy Mix jrom June 27 to June 29. Download Demers'
stand-up special at thestandupcomedians.com
ON THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN
STAND-UP AND PRINT:
"You can be a bit more of a self-indulgent douche in prose than you can on
stage, because the author really is an authoritarian figure in terms of their
work. You get absolutely unlimited time and space to make your case in the
way you want to. And the only thing readers can do is buy it or not buy it,
or take it out from the library or not take it out from the library, read it or
not read. Comedy audiences are incredibly empowered in terms of shaping what material survives. The audience exerts almost a geological force
on the shape of a bit. When a joke is naked and you're taking it out on
stage, no matter what's funny about it, the audience will tell you ruthlessly
whether you're off-base or not or how that joke should go." CASCADIA
(Independent)
CAaCABMA'
I    30
Cascadia's sound is a beautiful paradox of noisy,
chaotic sludge rock counterbalanced by wistful if
melancholic dream pop. Their latest release Level
Trust plays with these contradictions throughout
its four tracks, showcasing the strengths of the
band's multi-faceted sound.
"Josie" showcases their tight grip on dynamics
as a charging punky intro gives way to light, understated verses complemented by Sasha Langford's
airy vocals. A seesawing outro concludes this track,
highlighting aggressive buzzsaw guitar work.
Track two, "Yours," speeds along with throbbing,
thick-as-a-brick bass lines and rapid fire high-hat
rattling on an up tempo verse. Langford's vocals
soar over the instrumental ruckus, deftly contrasting melody with madness.
The fury of the first half of the EP gives way
to a pair of slower, more atmospheric tracks that
emphasize the group's shoegaze influences a la My
Bloody Valentine. "Deny" features echoey guitar
work, which plays well off of the pulsating, low-
end heavy bass, as they meet together to create
the mostanthemic and memorable chorus on the
release. The concluding number "Ever" shrouds
the listener in a cloud of despair as the bass
anchors the doom and gloom melody throughout
the verse while Langford's vocals produce a sense
of desperation in the refrain "You said."
Level Trust is a picture of a band working well
with every aspect of their sound. If you're willing
to wade through the mire, Cascadia have plenty to
offer the discerning alternative rock fan.
—James Olson
Malcolm Jack's '70s-inspired folk-pop first solo
effort is by no means a debut for the songwriter.
Jack has been a major part of the Vancouver indie
music scene over the past few years, playing in
Capitol 6, Twin River, and Sun Wizard (all on Light
Organ Records). But his solo effort, I'm My Oum
Bewitchment, might just be his finest 31-and-a-half
minutes to date. Even if the record is shrouded
in mystery.
Released independendy, Vm My Oum Bewitchment
comes with an illustrated book of sketches and
lyrics—a limited edition 'zine-though trying to
find one online has proven unsuccessful (and likely
intentional). Be that as it may, the journey-to obtain
this gem is well worth the investment. Almost
immediately after ultra psychedelic dream-like
opener "Violet Tiger" peaks the senses, the album
becomes familiar and comfortable, sort of like an
old pair of jeans.
Jack's unpretentious jangle and super sticky
melodies are cemented in the humming centre
of the brain, while the introspective lyrics touch
the heart with twist of sadness. There is a certain
communal campfire sentiment echoed with the
loose hand drums and tambourines guiding the
instantly memorable chorus of "Can't Be Prayed
To." "Going Nowhere" continues the '70s analogue revival aided by the interplay of acoustic
elements and a monophonic, organic electric
guitar drenched in minor tones, accompanied
by revered vocals.
The highlight of the record, though there are
many, is the catchy "Moon Sees the Night." Right
from the opening riff and the quickened pace of
the rhythm, it is clear this track is destined to be
an indie classic. As with Jack's other projects,
there is nothing fancy here, which is part of its
overall allure. I'm My Own Bewitchment is straight
ahead goodness steeped in an honest '70s folk
vibe that is extremely accessible. It is yet another
testament to the already accomplished catalogue
of Malcolm Jack.
—Slavko Bucifal
OK VANCOUVER OK
FOOD. SHELTER. WATER.
(Kingfisher Bluez)
No less than sixty faces stare back at you from
the cover of tireless local mainstay OK Vancouver
OK's Food. Shelter. Water., a lo-fi hymn of social
change and sleepy introspection that, stripped of
its instrumental embellishments, reads like an
urban Gary Snyder for our times. His charming
renditions of escaping to the wilderness, blended
with overtones of anti-capitalism shine through
in the outspoken yet optimistic conviction of his
songwriting. But don't expect the usual one man
and a 4-track affair you've come to love Jeff Johnson
for on his tenth release.
Drummer Laura House and bassist Liza Moser
were enlisted to help Johnson record the album
with K Records' Eli Moore on Whidbey Island. It's
an evolution that results in ten songs riddled with
emancipated moral convictions that, as the title
alludes to, focus on the essentials: fresh healthy
food, a place to call home, and unrestricted access
to clean water. An outspoken collection of ideas
your parents would have blown off as childish
fantasies before telling you "It's time to grow up,"
Food. Shelter. Water, is a reminder of what's truly
important.
Thematically, Johnson hasn't wavered from a
stripped-bare no-wave aesthetic that easily jumps from the eco-friendly refrains of "I Want Children
to Swim in A River They Can Drink From" to the
playful sing-along "Snowman in The Sun." Words
are used sparingly throughout the album and are
rarely eloquent when they come to the forefront.
Instead their power comes from the negative lyrical
space that highlights their poignancy. Lines like,
"In my mind I'm going mad / Still get black out
even though I'm happier now / What else to dojbut
keep the planet clean / Food growing all around,"
from the reflective "At Home in The Garden," are
sung with such ease that the album's wide selection
of topics become digestible. Johnson's determination to live by his beliefs give his songwriting
integrity and authenticity, which along with Food.
Shelter. Water's increased production quality, has
resulted in his most accessible effort to date.
—Robert Catherall
SIGHTLINES
(Alarum Records)
Remember the burble and murk of Internet music
streams back in the RealPlayer days? Remember cramming into tiny rooms to see folks play
cramped, grotty music? Sightlines do.
To wit, Sighdines recendy put out a cover of the
New Fever's "Our Demands" as a digital single -
on floppy disk. The New Fever was a short lived
project of then-d.b.s. frontman and future Hive
Creative Labs founder Jesse Gander. Beyond that
pedigree, it had a personal resonance for Sightlines
guitarist and vocalist Eric Axen, who chose "Our
Demands" as Sighdines' contribution to a compilation album of local band covers.
"I chose this song because The New Fever
were one of the first bands I saw upon moving to
Vancouver. They played a great show with Hot Hot
Heat, the Red Light Sting, and Reserve 34 in the
fall of 2000," he writes in the single's liner notes.
That project was not to be, but at least
Sightlines have gotten a nice little track out of it.
And it is little. At a cool minute and a half, it's just
the right size to fit on a floppy given a low enough
bit rate. The song itself moves from an unruly,
claustrophobic opening to something a little more
melodic and spacious, even as the cymbals' clan-
gourous sibilance threaten to overwhelm it.
Will the floppy disk single be anything more
than a novelty? Despite some precedent, such as
releases in the format by New Jersey pop-punkers
the Ergs! and local synch wizard Tom Whalen (as
GR8-2000), probably not But still, there's always
a niche for tracks like this latest Sightlines release;
tracks that embrace the trash, physical release or
no physical release.
—Chris Yee
If Vancouver group Brasstronaut had a control
panel, one switch would be for ambient synth, a
knob for rhythmic acoustic guitars and a dial for
pulsating bass. On Brasstronaut guitarist Tariq
Hussain's solo EP, Moonwalker, he employs that
same control panel, but cranks down the keyboards and echo, and tunes-in a more stripped
down folky arrangement. The result is a crafty
blend of spaced-out synthesizers hovering in
the background with some knee slapping beats,
acoustic picking guitars and vocals hanging on
the folk-pop side of things.
Opening track, "Annalee" is a classic ode about
a girl with country storytelling lyrics with a twist
of synths fluttering around. A nice moment in the
track is the little call-in-response outro between
Hussain's wooing, and the responding keyboard
mimicking his vocals. In second track, "Leaving
Song" there's another touch of Hussain's clever
songwriting as he sings, "Howling at the moon"
while the tender howls of the backup vocals,
provided by Leah Abramson and Jody Glenham,
respond. On the track Hussain's voice enters the
atmosphere like it's calling down to ground control
before breaking down to a moody hitchhiker's
anthem.
The last three tracks on Moonwalker gradually
move away from the otherworldly-atmosphere and
are straight acoustic folk-pop. Though a slight
disjoint from the instrumentation of the first two
tracks, they still feature enjoyable arrangements
within the perimeters of their genre tradition.
"Cold Lake Waters" features a lovely galloping
clarinet as the song reaches a thumping finish.
"Front Row Seat" is most out of place by not carrying out the rest of the EP's themes of departure and
goodbyes, but it stands alone as a sweet old-time
country love song with gushing and witty lyrics
like, "I'm not giving up thisjront row seat/ I'm calling
shotaun on your heart." How cute is that.
Closing track, "Moonwalker" is the same track
on Brasstronaut's Mean Sun, but given the stripped
down country-folk treatment. Hussain's voice on
the EP sounds thin, especially compared to the
lush and ethereal echoes of its previous version.
However, it is an appropriate ending that perfectly
captures the EP's intriguing mix of genres, leaving this listener with the distinct image of a beat
down, cowboy hat-clad traveler, hitchhiking his
way from the hot empty deserts of earth to the cold
and barren surface of the moon.
—Angela Yen
Social networking sites
come and go.
LiveVan.com is a
'continuous living archive
, of music in Vancouver.    I
t'sldpen to everyone,
hire to stay. DISCORDER'S 30TH
BIRTHDAY PA*XV A AWMUftt Funojums**.
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<|f>M TIILUW;* TICKETS AT IN* DoftR MORE INFO + TICKETS   + SEE FLYERS + GUEST LIST AT
FORTUNESOUNDCLUB.COM | TWITTER/FACEBOOK.COM;a>FORTUNESOUND
147 E.PENDER ST. CHINATOWN. VANCOUVER
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HIFHOP KARAOKE
KflSTLE HOUL,
RIlYIRnNflM 'GHQM*
BPRNXBllKiHSION DOOM / RAPID LOSS / KOSZMAR / E.O.P.
the Astoria /April 2
It was a 19-plus show, which kind of defeats the
whole idea of a punk show. What would happen if
I was 40 with a 16-year-old who wants to immerse
him or her the good stuff? Nonetheless, the sold-
out Doom-headlined night at the Astoria was full
with an array of ages, sporting an array of punk
gear. Punk is not dead after all.
Openers E.O.P. pretty much annihilated the
pub, with two singers sharing mic duty from the
moshpit. Everybody had a high level of energy and
the drummer was pounding his kit like his life
depended on it. It might have. He later commented
that they were not metal, but punk-grindcore, a
common misconception.
Next, punk-hardcore trio Koszmar took to
the stage and also played without reservation.
Their act was tight, powerful, and goddamned
fast. The last band before Doom was Rapid Loss
from Vancouver and Edmonton. They delivered a
rather energetic show which culminated with a
punch-in-the-face to a front row crowd member
from the lead singer. Granted he was not really
trying to stay safe himself, as he spent a significant
amount of time yelling from the moshpit. Pretty
much straight punk.
However, people were here for Doom, the legendary crust punk grindcore Brits. This was the
first time the band played in Canada, on part of a
tour which began in Mexico City and skipped the
United States to play 12 shows from Vancouver
to Montreal.
Suddenly, someone big in the audience pushed
the crowd aside and climbed on stage, a little early
for stage diving. It was the singer and Doom did
not waste anytime, assaulting the audience relentlessly for a while before some audience interaction. Then it was an anthology of wisdom: "This
song is about the right for people to have sex with
whomever they want. Fuck homophobia!" and,
"Women have the right to chose." There was also
something about animal experiments, but it got
lost in the yelling.
It was exactly what should be expected from
the quartet. They played a hell of alot of songs and
encored back for four more. Everybody knew the
lyrics and the whole operation was a blast.
—Arnaud De Grave
SECRET PYRAMID/WATERS/
ANJU SINGH
the Remington Gallery / April 6
For the last of its three-show tenure as a temporary
hub for drone and noise, the Remington art gallery was a shelter for those escaping a rainy night
and the persecution of having missed out on Nick
Cave tickets. Even with a phenomenal lineup, it
was disheartening to see so few new faces at an
event that should have been at the centre of every
experimental music fan's calendar. Maybe Nick
Cave tickets weren't as rare as we thought.
Anju Singh is nothing if not prolific. The curator of the recent re-launch of the Vancouver Noise
Fest has never played the same show twice, preferring instead to keep her audience off-guard
and uncomfortable. This time, with longtime
collaborator Graham Christofferson, the two
unleashed a torrent of white noise and not much
else. Despite an impressive rig with two massive
amp cabs behind them, the bass and guitar combo
didn't prove to be much more than the sum of their
parts: unlimited distortion, the occasional tangible
chord change, and static. It might have been just
what the noise nerds in the audience were after,
but caught the rest of the mellow space off-kilter.
Waters is such a mesmerizing project that it
has been difficult to notice Lindsey Hampton and
Andrew Lee's gradual cocoon-and-curl into something brilliant and new in the past year. Together,
the pair's music chimed crystalline, the sound of
mermaids singing to lure sailors into the depths.
Comparisons to Grouper can't be avoided, but
the heavy layering of chasmic guitar tremolo and
electronic wizardry pushed Waters toward breathtaking and original territory. Hampton's swirling
siren song vocals were equal parts glacial and
haunting.
It's a crime that Secret Pyramid (Amir Abbey)
only appears on a bill twice ayear or so, but maybe that's the point. His rare performances are that
much more rewarding. The start of Abbey's performance saw him manipulating a sample pad
and a handful of pedals to create pulsating space-
drone ebb and flow with a distinct cassette tape
feel familiar to fans of Boards Of Canada, albeit
on a much slower setting. Secret Pyramid was a
captivating but anti-social performance. Abbey's
back faced the crowd much of the time, leaving
plenty of room for those assembled to find their
own way to enjoy the heavy drone orbiting. Some
were content to sit, observe, and ponder while
others lay down, closed their eyes, and seemed to
fall off the edge of their own consciousness. Secret
Pyramid was a ladder of continual sonic bliss as
Abbey traded off gadgets for a guitar, amplifier,
waves of tonal shifts, and rainy, room-filling major
chords that added to, then enveloped, his previous
loops. His performance stopped with a final crash
of harmonically overloaded echo and wash that
soaked the gallery in unseen electricity.
Even though the incredible Aerosol
Constellations were just getting set up to close,
Abbey's set was as fatiguing as it was fulfilling
to my droned-out bones. With remorse, I parted
ways with the awesome Remington before my
system gave out.
—Fraser Dobbs
TOUGH LOVERS / WE NEED SURGERY /
ELIZABETH
the Biltmore / April 11
There's something about combining summer,
beer, and rock 'n' roll that makes for a perfect day.
Maybe I was wishing more for summer, but the
beer and music were covered at the Vancouver stop
of Unsigned, a series of five dollar shows taking
place across Canada that support indie musicians
as well as various local charities. In this case all
profits went to Music B.C. and many a beer were
consumed for charity. A feel good-vibe pervaded
the night and enthusiastic, though not overly-
abundant, crowd.
Elizabeth opened the night with their intense
old school punk styling and grungy-good looks.
They've been fairly quiet since their 2011 album
Hazards, Horrors and Liabilities, but snuck in some
new material, which got me excited for their future.
The crowd was having fun, but there was a lot
of awkward head nodding and feet shuffling. It
culminated in a painfully contrived stage rush,
but they still got points for featuring a melodica,
and playing with a lot of heart.
Formed in South Korea and based Vancouver,
We Need Surgery impressed with their energy
and synth-laced party rock, unfazed after being
introduced as "We Are Surgery." They rolled with
it and busted out some new songs, which you can
anticipate on a forthcoming EP. By their final song
"Go, Go, Go," the crowd had their hands in the air.
The night really belonged to Tough Lovers
though, perhaps because it was guitarist Graham
Madden's last hurrah with the band. They are
seasoned pros now and this incarnation of the
band played an incredible final show. It was bittersweet, but they sent Madden off to new things
with some sweet extended solos and a fantastic
encore of "Before the Sun Sets."
Wishful thinking or not, I'm calling this the
kickoff show for summer. And I'm looking forward to the upcoming season of beer, sunshine,
and great tunes.
—Tristan Koster
THE PASSENGER / VON BINGEN /
AEROSOL CONSTELLATIONS / C. DIAB
the New Red Gate / April icj
Although it's still below the radar for many, the
new Red Gate has quickly become a vibrant gallery,
studio, and venue, even if all the trimmings aren't
quite in place yet. Though the namesake red gates
are gone from the front of their new home on the
East Side, the experimental show put together
late-late on a Friday night had all of the collective's
charm at full brightness.
A room full of slightly-drunk music nerds sat
down to C.Diab's set, but a room full of quiet
explorers stood up at the end of it. Caton Diab's
sonorous exploration of solitude, tranquility, and
natural beauty was as brilliantly optimistic as it
was haunting. Relying solely on a bowed acoustic
guitar, a loop pedal, and a few basic effects, Diab
cultivated a rich and deeply emotional experience
from massive legato chord changes and cavernous,
reverb-slicked sustain.
Aerosol Constellations have never catered to
the same crowd twice, and the only thing that
has stayed consistent with them from show to
show is the bear suits the duo wear while playing. Although Bill Batt and Jeremy Van Wyck have
focused on heavy, noise-based music in the past,
their Red Gate performance was a quieter — if
no less schizophrenic — half hour borrowing
from the likes of early Aphex Twin. Repetitive
and droning horror-movie guitar motifs faded
into sampler and effects based sound loops, with
dischord playing a large part in their eerie atmospheric jam. The occasional glaring cymbal crash
and snare hit added an almost tribalistic air before
the end of their set.
If Klaus Schulze had, after forming and then
almost immediately leaving Ash Ra Tempel, started
collecting synthesizers, dropping acid, and finding musicians he actually liked to play with, the
resulting masterpiece would probably sound pretty
similar to Vancouver trio Von Bingen. Blending
krautrock, drone, and psych with analog synths
and one very kaleidoscopic guitar tone, the band's
rare performances continue to impress even when
their intense focus can come off as ascetic. Simple
drum machine beats gave a focus to their jams, but
the main percussion came from slowly-oscillating
synth refrains. While vocals popped up on a few
songs, they were so awash in the sea of noise that
they were just another tone to be treated and mixed
alongside the other instruments.
Jesse Creed's pet project, the Passenger, is a
moniker that envelopes a few different styles of
synth-nerd electronic wizardry, from ambient and
drone to weird noise and dance-friendly digital
jams. Rumour had it that before the show, Aerosol
Constellations' Van Wyck requested a "techno set"
of Creed, and he pulled through with a fairly minimal setup and a definite focus on drum-machine
beats. Discerning listeners would point out comparisons to the Passenger's excellent, if hard to
pronounce, record "\_|" but a marked tempo shift
and fewer layers of delicate electronic melodies
made Creed's set that capped off the night slightly
less pronounced.
—Fraser Dobbs
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604.637.5789 KOBAN / ANIMAL BODIES / WATERMELON
/ FREAK HEAT WAVES
Pat's Pub/April 20
The cover of Koban's debut LP, Null, features a
submissive figure writhing under the weight of
manifold cords: a victim of some industrial nightmare, the symbols of which drive onto, into, and
over the human body, threatening total erasure.
It's a beautiful analogue for the techno-macabre
of their post-punk. However, the release party for
Null, held on Record Store Night at Pat's Pub, was
nevertheless host to a series of gregarious, inviting
performances—all still imparting a sense of their
respective, heavy affects.
Operating with hypnotic repetition, Freak Heat
Waves' considerate melodies were transformed by
Pat's throbbing amplification into nigh-monomani-
acal treatises. Songs resolved into epiphanic release
or thoughtful deviation, but always interestingly
and elusively drifting. Dreamlike tangents waited to
transform in their throbbing hum. Capturing both
the dreary and the innervating, they established a
disposition that fit the night well.
Watermelon's similarly oneiric concerns were
broached in intriguing dream pop, compulsive
grooves and beguiling guitar lines. While perhaps
the most affected of the night's acts, the band's
surf rock melodies teased out an eerie underside, a
pulling back of the curtain presiding in every impassioned howl. They were a total pleasure and I doubt
few, if anyone, minded their going overtime.
Exchanging one series of nostalgic referents
for another, Watermelon's pop was displaced by
Animal Bodies' grimy dystopia. The duo imparted
a wall of sound, pairing a towering barrage of
unrelenting electronic stimulation cloaked by
fuzzy guitar. It was overpowering; even the vocalist seemed trapped, issuing howls that fought
amongst a vacuum. The atmosphere they cultivated
was undeniable: an absolutely effective tonal shift.
Interesting then, Koban eschewed the brooding introspection of disillusioned post-punk for
a frenzied interplay. Gothic hooks that lashed
outwards became something else in a live setting. It wasn't that their dark-wave effects were
absent: the technological furor that only drum
machines provided, and the tone of hazard that
barely withdrew. Yet Koban proved to be invigorating. They affirmed their dark style, translating
it into considerable performative rapport with an
eager audience.
As melancholic a tone as Koban and Animal
Bodies conjured up that night, it was one of celebration. For Koban, that celebration was a deeply
personal one. And in a sense, all four took material
that set one towards introspection, channeling
it instead towards the spirit that a release party
conduces.
—Jonathan Kew
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illustration by GINA MACKAY
Vancouver, it's time to shed those toques, pack the Goretex away, and bust out
the SPF 30. Summer is coming! What would this season be with out a butt-
shakingly great soundtrack? Probably still quite lovely, but not as fun, so we've
curated our favourite songs from now and then to share with you. Pack up the
cooler and break out the frisbee, and we'll see you at the beach.
PENNY CLARK, contributor
NEW: "Rock and Roll Night Club" by
Mac DeMarco (Rock and Roll Nightclub,
2012) Every time I enter within the beach
vicinity with my music on shuffle, that
song comes on.
OLD: "1977" by The Clash (White Hot
B-Side, 1977) I can specifically remember
listening to it in the early days of summer
last year while stepping out the door into
the sunshine, hearing the opening chords
and being like, "Yeah!"
SARAH CORDINGLY. music director
NEW: "Better" by Teen (In Limbo, 2012)
A shimmering sweet and softly sarcastic
ray of light from one of the most underrated albums of last year.
OLD: "Red Towel" by The Beakers (Red
Towel, 1980) Playful post-apocalyptic
post-punk full of searing saxophone and
images of a bleak, melted future. This
song came to me in 2001 on a mix tape
made by Nathan Howdeshell (of Fast
Weapons and other famousnesses).
It was promptly dubbed to a minidisc
(the convenient digital music format of
the time) and served as the soundtrack
to at least one sweaty summer West
Coast tour.
JACEY GIBB. contributor
NEW: "San Francisco" by
Foxygen(Wfe are the 21st
Century Ambassadors of
Peace & Magic, 2013) It's the
perfect summer jam: one part
summer-haze, two parts pleasant melody. Place in mixer,
blend, pour over ice and serve
with a sunny day.
OLD(ish): "The Bay" by Met-
ronomy (The English Riviera,
2011) The perfect soundtrack
for a shore-side, summer drive
with your three closest friends.
Not to mention the suave
music video, which basically
drips with hints of paradise.
COLEMAN INGRAM
contributor
NEW: "90210" by the
Courtneys (debut LP, due June
2013 on Hockey Dad Records)
The video makes it: a beach
side pizza party set to one
of the catchiest, most fun
songs I've heard in a while. I
couldn't wait for summer from
the moment I saw it a few
months ago.
OLD: "Celebrated Summer" by
Husker Du (New Day Rising,
1985) Though it's not the most
"relaxing" song and probably
not very beach friendly, it
sounds like all of my adolescent summers churned into
one. Beautiful sunny nostalgia.
JOSEFA CAMERON
contributor
NEW: 'Salvation' by The Liminanas
(Crystan Anis, 2012) My sister and I
walked into Dandelion Records looking
for French oldies. They didn't have what
we wanted, but raved about Crystal Anis.
We listened to the first song and bought
it right away. It sounds like something
Sophia Coppola would have put in Marie
Antoinette if she could have.
OLD: "Straight to Hell" by The Clash
(Combat Rock, 1982).. The drumming is
entrancing, It's a perfect sun scorched
road trip song, and I was asked to elope
over this song... qui sait.
DOROTHY NEUFELD. official tweeter
NEW: "Sylvan Tragedy" by Gal Grace
(Blue Hearts in Exile, 2013)
Man, bought this tape for the Green
Burrito cassette release of Gal Gracen
and Aaron Read at the Astoria. Went for a
drive and popped this in, it was a blast.
OLD: "(You) Got What I Need" by Freddie
Scott (Cry to Me: The Best of Freddie Scott,
1988) I'd only heard this sampling in Biz
Markie's "Just A Friend" until I watching
a movie and the original came on. I just
love this.
CALI TRAVIS, contributor
NEW: "Freaking Out the Neighbourhood"
by Mac Demarco (2,2012) It keeps the
BBQ sizzlin' and everything laid the fuck
back.
OLD: "RunnerUps" by Kurt Vile (Smoke
Ring For My Halo, 2011) This reminds me
that sunny summertimes don't have to
be real happy to be real good.
STEVE LOUIE. RLA editor
NEW: "Tie Dye (Your Life)" by Literature
(Tie Dye single, 2013) The band is from
Philadelphia-via-Austin. Who moves to
Philadelphia from Austin? I'll take new
music from Philly.
OLD: "You Should All Be Murdered" by
Another Sunny Day (You Should All Be
Murderedsingle, 1989)
I first heard this couple of years ago
when going down an Internet rabbit hole
search on the whole C86 phenomena. Best
cranked up on fair weather road trips. The
jangle and the outro to this song instantly
got me hooked.
EVAN BROW, contributor
NEW: "Dance For You" by Dirty Projectors
(Swing Lo Magellan, 2012) For me, summer and tanning and sunshine are about
the carefree. Ice cream on a Tuesday.
T-shirts day and night. Bug bites that are
worth it. "Dance For You" is the summer
angel that bathes me in a pool of happy-
go-lucky.
OLD: "Kokomo" by the Beach Boys (Still
Cruisin', 1989) Probably heard in 2003 in
one of my grandfather's Hawaii montage
videos. I'm a sucker for a cheesy classic.
Hell, I don't even like it that much. But
summer comes along and bam, "Kokomo"
is good to go for me. Cll
rR 101.9
FM CHAR1
rQ    STRICTLY THE DOPEST
O    HITZ OF APRIL
CiTR's charts reflect what's been played on the air by CiTR's lovely DJs last mont
those marked (+) are local. Most of these excellent albums can be found at fine
can't find them, give CiTR's music coordinator a shout at (604) 822-8733. Her n
tell you how to find them. Check out other great campus/community radio charts
. Records with asterisks (*) are Canadian and
ndependent music stores across Vancouver. If you
me is Sarah Cordingley. If you ask nicely she'll    '
ARTIST
ALBUM
LABEL
ARTIST
ALBUM
LABEL
1
Various**
Vancouver Pop Alliance
Volume 3
Mint/CiTR 101.9 FM
26
Woodpigeon*
Thumbtacks And Glue
Boom pa
2
Chelsea Light Moving
Pick A Piper*
Suuns*
Chelsea Light Moving
Pick A Piper
Images Du Futur
Matador
Mint
Secret City
27
28
29
Slow Learners*+
Wax Idols
Local Natives
Habit b/w Party Police
Discipline & Desire
Hummingbird
Perfect Master
Slumberland
Frenchkiss
1111
3
4
'•«
Devendra Banhart
Mala
Nonesuch
30
Pissed leans
Honeys
Sub Pop
6
Doldrums*
Lesser Evil
A Fairway Full of Miners
Arbutus
Kill Rock Stars
31
32
Wawes
We Are Wolves*
Afraid Of Heights
La Mort Pop Club
Mom + Pop
Dare To Care
Boats*
8
War Baby*+
Jesus Horse
Self-Released
33
Henry Wagons
Expecting Company?
Six Shooter
**!£*
Homeshake*
The Homeshake Tape
Fixture
34
Veda Hille*+
Peter Panties
Self-Released
10
• ft
Ponctuation*
The Cave Singers
27 Club
Bonsound
Jagjaguwar
35
36
Koban*+
Phoenix Thunderbird
Null
*+       Repetition
The Broadway To Boundary
Self-Released
Naomi
12
Bleached
Ride Your Heart
Dead Oceans
37
Various*
Rat King II
Killer Haze
13
Various*
Weird Pop from the
Peace Country
Peace Country Diaspora
38
Beach Fossils
Clash the Truth
Captured Tracks
14
Data Romance*+
Other
Dine Alone
39
Cobra & Vulture*
Grasslands
Self-Released
15
16
The Burning Hell*
Iceage
People
Headless Owl
40
41
Gang Signs*+
Hilotrons*
Remixes
At Least There's
Commotion
Hybridtty Music
Kelp
You're Nothing
Matador
17
TheeAhs*+
Future Without Her
Self-Released
42
Low
: The Invisible Way
Sub Pop
18
Renny Wilson*
Sugarglider
Mint
43
Popstrangers
Antipodes
. Carpark
19
Apparat Organ Quartet
Polyfonia
Head In The Sand
44
PVT
Homosapien
Last Gang
20
Atoms For Peace
Amok
XL Recordings
45
Various*
Psych Pop From Toronto
Optical Sounds
i i
Minotaurs*
New Believers
Static Clang
46
lamie Lidell
Jamie LWgkl\,
Warp
22
David Bowie
The Next Day
ISO
47
Ora Cogan*
Ribbon Vine
Hairy Spider Legs
23
The Bicycles*
Stop Thinking So Much
Aporia
48
The Flaming Lips
The Terror
Warner (WEA)
24
Milk Music
Cruise Your Illusion
Fat Possum
49
Falcon Punch*
FP!
Self-Released
25
Psychic Ills
One Track Mind
Sacred Bones
50
The Belle Game*+
Ritual Tradition Habit
Boompa
39 ^ZJoUv the, 2di*/ f^^wfe (3\mh
-Me*e^s tftfe fftontli/s selection - in/ stock awi on/ sole*
2w4fe¥
BARN OWL SAVASES SEN HOWARD BOMBING CHARLES BRA0UY
V CD/LP Silence CD/LP Every Kingdom CO Nomad CD/LP Victim of Love CD/LP
4UNIP M8V PHOENIX RHYE
s/l CO/IP MBV CO/UP ,. Bankrupt! SD/U* Woman CD/LP
f|lf^ftJt( ff|lS
pftROtt FAMILY YEAH YTO YEARS DEERHUNTIR BtRTY BEACHES
Sun Verses CD/LP Mosquito CD/LP Monomania CD/LP Water Park CO/tr
FRANK TURNER
Tape Deck Heart C6&P
facebook
twitrerxom/zulurecords
facebook.com/people/
ZuluRecords-Store/68021004?
tumbln  zulurecords.tumblr.com
Zulu Records
1972-1976 W 4th Ave
STORE HOURS
Mon to Wed   1Q:30"70Q
Vancouver, BC
Tfaurs and Fri 10:3O-fcM
tel 604738.3232
Sat             9:3fl~«0
www.zulurecords.com
Sun            12-.00-6:00

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