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 1000 FOR 8R&PES | TOP LESS j WHITE POPPY | THE LI ON TOE BEAR 1H W | MFFUNWA | ¥Ii6IHIA JACK « CHUBCH
OCTOBER 2013 ! That M*g?z*iie Fton C-fft " 0!9 FM j Free! I Supporting Vancouver's Independent Music Commuftrty For 3ft Years-;. ._ : -'.
I shindig
Shindig starts Tuesday, September 17 and runs until December 10 at the Railway Club.
Three refreshing bands nightfy, and Jokes for Beer,
Wsk wwwxftrxa/shlrKllg for fu\l schedule,
THANK-VOU TO OUR SPONSORS
AMSEVENfTS Fader Master Studios Nimbus School of Recording Arts
BackilneMusIdan Services Rain City Recorders NXNE
Band Merch Canada Long&McQuade Vogville Recording
Canadian Music Week Mint Records Zulu Records
Discorder Magazine Music Waste
UPCOMING
SHOWS
[39 CANCER BATS
I With Bat Sabbath and Dusty Tucker
AUTHORITY^"
With White Knights Rnish Last, Slush
NKNJASPY EP/GRAPHIC
NOVEL RELEASE PARTY!!!
SI WE HUNT BUFFALO
With La Chinga, War Baby, If We Are
Machines
DIAMOND HEAD & RAVEN
With Titan's Eve
| GUITAR WOLF
\ With Coat Hangers and Coward
RtCKSttAW
OOOOOO0
ORANGE GOBLIN E3JWATAIN
With Holy Grail, Lazer/Wulf, 88 Mile Trip W^£M with ln Solitude, Tribulation
254 East Hastings Street
604.681.8915
NERD FEST III: A NIGHT OF
EPIC FANTASY
WS KING KHAN AND THE SHRINES E3J CHURCH OF MISERY B52 DESERT DWELLERS AND
With Hell Shovel and Indian Wars J^sSJI With Saviours, Baptists and Wizard Rifle    KUI KAMINANDA
THEE OH SEES
With The Blind Shakes and OBN Ill's
GOBLIN
With V.Vecker Ensemble and Basketball
THE PSYCHIC ALLIANCE
•M With guests
r| THE SADIES
THE MAIN EVENT: RELEASE
YOUR ALTER EGO
OKKERVILLE RIVER
•J With Matthew E. White
Q HELLCHAMBER ALBUM RELEASE
With JAR, Nihilate, Deveined
_ RED FANG
£1 With Guests
KREATOR AND OVERKILL
WithWarbringer
Celebration of Reggae Legend PETER
TOSH
FUCKED IIP ANDHRROR    ESQ DYINGFETUS
With Power Trip and Code Orange Kids     pyil With Exhumed, Devourment, Abiotic,
Archspire
SIMON KING B33 DEERTICK
With guests* 2 shows! 8PM & 10:30PM   |2U With Robert Ellis
GTH ANNUAL EARTHSTRONG £3 RAESPOON H| THE PHILKEAGGYGUITAR
WrttiWintermitts and Kingsgate Chorus     Ufjj CLINIC AND FAN EXPERIENCE
BC/DC & HAM WAILIN'S     i§J MONSTER MAGNET
UAII HWrriJ OniQ k^4!*1  With Zodiac and Royal Thunder
DEATH
With Special Guests
BLACK JOE LEWIS
Additional show listings, ticket info, band bios, videos and more are online at: WWW. I i VGcttriC kshSW. COiTI EDITOR'S NOTE: STRANGER IN A FAMILIAR LAND
Everyone might want to sit down for this, because I have some shocking news
for you: somehow, beyond all means of logic and reason, it's already October.
Remember a month ago when everyone was welcoming/dreading the back
to school season and companies were finding any and every way possible to
somehow tie in their product with the return? I was part of a guerilla photo
shoot near the end of August and we ended up in a furniture store where
there was a "Back to School Sale" on mattresses. Ironically enough, anytime
school's in session is when I find myself getting the least amount of sleep,
but who am I to challenge the commercial overlords?
Overpriced education aside, September marked my first solo month as
Editor without the fearless Laurel Borrowman around to kick my ass and
make sure I learned everything I could before her departure. My time with
Discorder has been great so far and aside from the occasional article-induced
panic attack, things are going smoothly.
I come with a background in writing and editing, so oddly enough the most
difficult part of the job has been what I assumed was one of my strengths:
the music. On my resume for the position I wrote that I had "a familiarity
with the music scene in the Lower Mainland," which I honestly thought was
comparable—at least amongst my group of friends. But over the last few
months, I've found myself increasingly tumbling down the rabbit hole I call
the Vancouver music scene. Turns out this frontman is also a solo artist under
a different name and does event bookings for this venue, while this other
frontman is a DJ and does promotional work for another venue. It isn't just a
case of double-dipping; it's quadruple-dipping with freakin' sprinkles on top.
In a way it's convenient though, since the overlap acts to strengthen the
mesh ofVancouver arts. Simply put, it was surprising to realize that just because
I'd seen You Say Party! once in concert didn't mean I was local music savvy. But
I'm a fast learner and I look at this October issue as a kind of test I just aced.
This A+ issue boasts a variety of firsts for Discorder: seasoned writer Evan
Brow's continuous coverage ofVancouver's funny business has graduated to
full-on column status as "In Good Humour"; there are plenty of great features
on local favourites like Top Less Gay Love Tekno Party, White Poppy, and Good
for Grapes; we have a Riff-ific spread on last month's Rifflandia festival; and
the cherry atop your Discorder sundae, a feature on our cover band Village.
October also means we're band-deep in SHiNDiG, so look forward to
coverage of that in future issues of Discorder, as well as a non-stop showcase
of other great local bands. If the Vancouver music scene really is a rabbit hole,
what do you say we find out how deep this thing goes?
So it goes,
Jacey Gibb
T Cover photo by      logo lettering by
ELEANOR WEARING    TYLER CRICH
FEATURES
5—Good for Grapes Pioneers of the folk
stomp movement, the Surrey band seem poised
for success. With their debut full-length out
this month, a cross-country tour of Canada
to coincide, and a finalist spot in the Peak
Performance Project, they're the busiest bunch
of grapes you'll ever meet, by Luan Li
8—Top Less When your album's called Top
Less Gay Love Tekno Party, you know you're doing
something right. Discorderslts down with the
glitter enthusiasts Top Less to discuss their first
full-length, musical influences, and backstage
etiquette, by Elliot Chan
13—The Lion The Bear The Fox What would
make for an unlikely trio in the wild makes for
fantastic music in the recording studio. Three
musicians, each with their own projects, come
together to form a folk-rock triforce.
by Lindsay Chung
15—Rifflandia For four days last month, the
city of Victoria was transformed into a non-stop,
pop-and-lock, breeding ground for great music
and greater times. We offer you one festival-
goer's recount of the event and some snapshots
to add to your Rifflandia scrapbook.
by Nicola Storey
days of summer, we caught up with Crystal
Dorval a.ka. White Poppy to talk about the
therapy of making music, her debut album's
cover work, and the'benefits of adding layers.
by Fraser Dobbs
appearances, the four-piece shoegaze-rock
band Village talk about their upcoming seven-
inch and how the relocation to a jam space in
East Van impacted the music they play.
a Espinoza
REGULARS
4 Here's The Thing Trial by Turkey
20 Calendar Glenn Harvey
18 In Good Humour Virginia Jack
22 Program Guide
28 Discorder's Staff Sound-off
29 Under Review
33 Real Live Action
35 I'm With The Band Sex Church
38 On The Air Butta On The Bread
39 Charts
NOTICE OF DIGITAUZATION
10—White Poppy On one of the last legitimate   25—Village Fresh off a summer full of festival j
st contributors i
I Let it be known that CiTR is currently working to digitalize |
| the entirety if Discorder's archives. Soon, all of the past |
I issues you know and love will be available for viewing |
I online. Thanks, computers! 1
I If you have any questions or concerns, please contact |
I Brenda at stationmanager@citr.ca
m
Editor
Jacey Gibb
Art Director
Jaz Halloran
Copy Editors
Robin Schroffel,
Steve Louie
Ad Coordinator
Curtis Michael Davey
Under Review Editor
Robin Schroffel
RLA Editor
Steve Louie
Web Editor
Chirag Mahajan
Calendar Listings
Sarah Cordirr^fey   "
Accounts Manager
Corey Ratch
Official Tweeter
Evan Brow
CiTR Station Manager
Brenda Grunau
Publisher
^Stitjkytt Radio Society
of UBC
Student Liasons
Evan Brow,
Josefa Cameron
Photographers & Illustrators
Maria Asselin-Roy, Britta Bacchus, Kate
Brown, Tyler Crich, Jonathan Dy, Glenn
Harvey, Dana Kearley, Justin Longoz, Steve
Louie, Gina MacKay, Moses Magee, Tierney
Milne, James Olson, Yu Su, Ola Vola,
Eleanor Wearing
Proofreaders
Joshua Gabert-Doyon
Writers
Evan Brow, Slavko BucifaI, Josefa Cameron,
Elliot Chan, Lindsay Chung, Curtis Michael
Davey, Fraser Dobbs, Angela Espinoza,
Joshua Gabert-Doyon, Coleman Ingram,
Luan Li, James Olson, Mark Paulhus,
Stefan Raupach, Chris Schonfeldt, Nicola
Storey, Max Wainwright, Justin White,
Bob Woolsey
Advertise
Ad space for upcoming issues
can be booked by calling (604)
822-3017 ext. 3 or emailing
advertising@citr.ca. Rates
available upon request.
Contribute
To submit words to Discorder,
please contact: editor. ■/;
discorder@citr.ca. To submit
images, contact: artdirector.
discorder@citr.ca
Subscribe
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©Discorder 2013 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 10,200. Discorder is published almost monthly by CiTR, which
can be heard at 101.9 FM, online at citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line at (604) 822-2487,
CiTR's office at (604) 822-3017, email CiTR at stationmanager@citr.ca, or pick up a pen and write #233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T1Z1, Canada.
Editorial cutoff: September 20,2013 TRIAL BY TURKEY
by B(8J<-
WOOLSEg
illustration by
JUSTIN LONGOZ
There is a time in any home-cook's life that changes everything. They pass beyond that unassuming amafeur who occasionally throws together impromptu meals and become a
truly seasoned home-chef. Yes, I'm speaking of that trial of
all home-cooking trials: the turkey dinner. And thanks to
Thanksgiving's pending proximity, many more will be welcomed to the ranks this month.
Food is pretty important to me. Not just in the sense that
I need food to live, but because food helps me connect with
my fellow human beings. Especially the ones I've grown up
with and love the most, despite their intimate knowledge
of my most embarrassing moments in life. As far back as I
can remember my family has been happiest when it's been
together and eating. I grew up in a house where my mum
cooked dinner every night—a somewhat lost cultural cornerstone in today's world.
I have a vivid memory of a school field trip when I-^Ssfet,,
about 5 or 6. At lunch, I looked around at what everyone
was eating and I saw my lunch was by far the best. At that
moment, I knew my mum loved me more than all the other
kid's mothers.
Upon moving to Vancouver, I soon found that I lived in
one of the greatest food cities in the world. Once I got oyeyny }
northern boy fear of sushi, my culinary tastes expanded exponentially. My only problem was the limited financial capacity
of my paycheques. Dilemma. After exhausting the amount
of dollar pizza one man can (or should) eat, I bought some
cookbooks and a subscription to the Food Network. In the
beginning, my food wasn't great. Even now, I go a little off
track when I toss aside the cookbooks and pretend I'm on an
episode of Chopped but that's the reward of cooking. It's just
like art. It's a form of communication between people that
doesn't require words. It's primal. We all need to eat but to
have an experience of a great meal is one of the purest pleasures there is.
So you can see that I've put quite a bit of thought into
this whole food thing. Which is the reason why I was so nervous when tasked with cooking my very first turkey feast for
my family a couple years ago. If anyone reading this is going
through this right of passage this year, I have one piece of
advice for you: prepare. There's more than one way to cook
a turkey and finding your signature way is part of the process. My personal guru through this first trial was Jamie
Oliver. I studied his holiday recipes and practiced on smaller
birds as the big meal approached. That year, I nailed the turkey, I cooked all different kinds of vegetables and, yes, I even
departed from a few family traditions in favour of my own
ideas. I had graduated from the proverbial kid's table of life,
which brings me to my second piece of advice for any aspiring
turkey cookers: get the best ingredients you can.
In addition to being a hub of great restaurants, Vancouver
also boasts a network of local farmers, butchers, bakers, and
other providers of top-notch ingredients that will provide you
with what you need. Whether you're vegan, gluten-intolerant,
or any other form of dietary specific kind of person, this is
your culinary paradise.
Here's the thing about food: no matter what you're eating,
eat the best of it. Not the most expensive or the one with the
celebrity endorsement but what's local, fresh, and full of love.
When you think about all the personal love that goes into
great ingredients, it's amazing. The fact that whatever is created will be gone by the night's end adds another special element to it. Like all the best things in life, the experience of a
meal is fleeting. It's no mistake that every culture has holidays
that include and, in fact, revolve around food. If you really
want to get to know someone, eat with them. by LUAN LI
illustration by
T1ERNEY MILNE
^;|fi0to$ by
JONATHAN DY
There isn't a formula for what makes a band great. Every so
often, a group comes along with the right sounds, energy,
and optimism to set them apart from other burgeoning
acts of the shared genre. It's not the plaid shirts; it's not
the accordions or the occasional brass section thrown in
for flair; and it's definitely not the hair-throwing; it's Good
for Grapes.
A six-piece folk band hailing from Surrey, GFG is composed of frontman/guitarist Daniel McBurnie, guitarist
Graham Gomez, pianist Alexa Unwin, Sean MacKeigan
on accordion, Robert Hardie on bass, and Blair Hansen
on drums. The band formed when several of the members
performed in their high school theatre production, A Very
Potter Musical. In 2011, a casual jam session on a feny in
Victoria attracted an unprecedented crowd, and Good for
Grapes was born. A humble beginning for a group that's
now a finalist in the Peak Performance Project.
I first encountered the band when I saw them perform
at last year's CelticFest, where I was instantly drawn to
their ambient sound, well-layered harmonies, and energetic presence. Now, just over a year later, the band is
attracting a fast-growing fanbase, releasing a full-length
album, and will soon be hitting the road for their first
cross-country tour across Canada. I sit down for a Skype interview with
McBurnie and Gomez, just as the band
finishes rehearsing with a new cello
player. GFG draws upon artists like Bob
Dylan and Mumford & Sons—but the
music doesn't sound like either one.
After all, Good for Grapes is accredited with a rising music genre: the folk
stomp.
"A man told us that we sounded
like a mix between Pink Floyd and
Led Zeppelin... on shrooms," says
McBurnie.
GFG's first full-length album, Man on
the Pa^e, arrives this month and features
the single "Renminbi Tips," for which
a video has already been released. I ask
about the cryptic tide and McBurnie
demystifies: "I was really mad at Stephen
Harper's Action Plan and his back door
deals with China." Songwriting typically starts with McBurnie and ideas are
bounced back-and-forth with Gomez
before they push the material to the rest
of the band.
When I ask about their most unforgettable gig, McBurnie recalls two specifically: one for a primarily homeless
crowd at the Carnegie Centre in downtown Vancouver and another opening
for Mother Mother at the Commodore.
When asked about their dream venue,
McBurnie and Gomez share similar
replies.
"I think arenas would suck,"
McBurnie says. "I would [rather] play
at two smaller venues on two different
nights."
"I would play at The Orpheum," says
Gomez. For some bands, bigger isn't
always better. By playing in smaller venues, you're able to attract a more intimate audience.
At a typical GFG show, stomping and
singalongs are inevitable. Crowds are
packed tight, there's sweat and good
cheer, and a genuine energy vibrates
from the band for the audience to react
to. Perhaps what sets GFG apart is the
relaxed and positive dynamic shared
between the members; an inevitability when a band evolves
organically from high school friends.
Capturing the attention of folksters and the rest of us
alike, I see many more amazing things for this young band in
the future. At this rate, playing The Orpheum seems like just
a matter of time. VANCOUVER INTERNATIONAL
FILM FESTIVAL
OROGER"
Tito On Ice (Sweden/Germany/Bosnia, 77 min.)
On a barnstorming tour of the former Yugoslavia, graphic novelists
Max Andersson (who directs, with Helena Ahonen) and Lars
Sjunneson bring a macabre "mummy" of Marshal Tito along for
the ride. Astonishing stop-motion animation sequences render their
journey ail the more surreal while a Balkan New Wave soundtrack
affirms this doc's punk-rock spirit.
Fri. Sep 27,7:00 pm, Cinematheque
Sun. Oct 6,8:45 pm, Cinematheque )|4r l#Klr ft
Hie. Oct 8,4:45 pm, Cinematheque        GENEROUSLY sponsored by
The Great Flood (USA, 80 min.)
Director Bill Morrison weaves together compelling archival footage of
the great Mississippi flood of 1927 complemented by a very well-
considered Bill Frisell original score. This flood led to an exodus
of sharecroppers, all heading north. The result? Chicago blues,
rhythm & blues and, ultimately, rock 'n' roll... ££l
Wed. Oct 9,2:00 pm, Centre for Arts yPHF
Fri. Oct 11,7:00 pm, Vancity GENER0(JSLY ^^ ^
Big Bad Wolves (Israel, 110 min.)
A disgraced cop and grieving
father look to exact vengeance
on a suspected pedophile murderer in this grisly tale. With its
heady mix of brutality, merciless black comedy and potent
subtext, Aharon Keshales and
Navot Papushado's thriller
leaves you reeling and forces
you to question where your
sympathies lie. Winner, Best
Film, Best Screenplay, Fantasia 2013.
Sat Oct 5,11:30 pm, Rio
Sua Oct 6,1s40 pm, IntJ Village 10
INFORMATION VIFF.org
FILM INFO LINE 604-683FILM
B0X0FFICE0NLINEatVIFF.org
IN-PERS0N
Vancity Theatre, 1181 Seymour Street,
at Davie (Noon - 7 pm)
VENUES
The Centre for the Performing Arts
The Cinematheque
Cineplex Odeon International Village
Rio Theatre
SFU Goldcorp Centre for the Arts
Vancity Theatre
Vancouver Playhouse
PLEASE CHECK AGE RESTRICTIONS
BEFORE TICKET PURCHASE. Ojfctt^
IT?'IN
%wi^^
Exterior: the sound of thunder and a flash of lightning as Vancouver's night sky presents another complementary performance.
Interior: sound check for Top Less Gay Love Tekno Party's CD
release concert continues at a casual pace.
I sit alone in Venue on a turbulent Thursday night as technicians
walk back and forth through the brightly-lit dance club. I dismiss
the shattered illusion of show production and patiently wait for
my interview with the eccentrically named power-pop band. After
attention on each instrument and three practice songs, the seven
group members make their way offstage.
When the band's first EP came out in 2010, they enjoyed a quick
rise in popularity and developed an enthusiastic fan base. Three
years later, they're releasing their first full-length.
"It really packs a punch," says TGLTP's frontman, Michael
Schindler. "People are used to our shows being really intense.
Our album represents that in many different ways, but it's not
done by sheer energy; it's done more meticulously by adding more
arrangements and textures."
"It's like neon camouflage sexual dysfunction," chimes
drummer and vocalist, Benny Schutze from the other side of
the green room. The rest of the band turns to Schutze, chuckle,
and request an explanation. "Because the neon camouflages the
sexual dysfunction."
Up a narrow staircase, behind the stage is Venue's ironically
blue green room. I sit nuzzled in the corner between bass player
Ian Bevis and Schindler, while the other five members arrange
themselves intimately on couches and chairs in the cramped closetlike space. It's a cozy sanctuary for the night.
"Put him on the guest list, but don't let him come up here,"
the group debates whether to offer VTP wristbands to friends of
friends attending the show.
"I'm down for a super-strict wristband
rule," says Tyson. "This needs to be tranquility."
"We get pumped up," says Schindler. "But
we don'twant30 people in here partying while
we get prepared. Also you want 20 minutes
before you play to get in the zone."
It's unusual observing a band named Top
Less Gay Love Tekno Party proposing rules
and allocating privileges. But they've learned
through past experiences that guests sometimes take advantage of the band's hospitality.
Obnoxious third parties become distractions, precious costume
changing spaces become occupied, and most importandy: complimentary beverages vanish. They aren't uptight; they're simply
professionals.
Though they've come to an agreement on the backstage regulations, there are still other ongoing disputes—namely, their
band name.
"We shortened it [TGLTP] for all intensive purposes," says
Schindler. "Top Less is just easier for everyone to say... butwe will
always be Top Less Gay Love Tekno Party."
The name derived from a Kid Alex song that Schindler thought
was called "Topless Gaylove," but was actually called "Young Love
(Topless)." "I just kind of screwed it up." The band smiles over the
ridiculous outcome. "And Tekno Party is just a party with everyone
raving it up. Partying with sparkles in your hair."
"And in your beard," guitarist Kevin Fairbairn points to the
leftover glitter in Schindler's facial hair. "You need to shower."
"I showered today!" says Schindler. "It doesn't come off of me,
by ELLIOT
CHAilf "?
I don't understand what it is—I have a weird skin thing."
"It takes a couple days even if you shower... unless you have
aluffa."
As children of the '90s, TGLTP indulged in hip-hop, classic
rock, and funk—none of which they replicate today, but still have
a large influence in the music they make.
"Some of the guitar writing we do, you can definitely feel some
of the classic rock coming through," said Tyson. "We're not making phat hip-hop beats, but there is still a hot dance groove. There
is still a sexy bass."
Once a week TGLTP gather in their shared studio space to
work on music, but seldom would you see the seven together in
a non-music environment. "We're friends, we hang out, but it's
music—always," says Bevis. "Some of us DJ together, some of us
produce together, and some of us write stuff-—"
"I sometimes go over to Benny's house and hang outwhen he's
in his bathrobe," Schindler interrupts, "because that's the only
time he'll hang out with me."
The long awaited self-titled album by TGLTP is now available
for purchase and download on iTunes, but having time to perform
is the real accomplishment. Although their CD release tour was
brief, expect them to be on the stage again real soon.
"Even though we were doing a ton ofwork," says Schutze, "and
people were always asking about [the album], it was like being in a
sexless marriage. The live show was like flicking, it's the culmination and the climax of what we get to do together. But when you
are not doing it— that gets to be the feeling."
With confetti, balloons, and sparkles in the forecast, TGLTP
dress accordingly. Golden spandexes, silver jackets, or even one-
sies—but they're careful to avoid wool products. The tinsel tempest
may capsize ships and bring down mountains, but it won't apologize to your glitter-clogged shower drain and laundry machine. But
it doesn't matter, because shimmer is the new clean. by FRASER
DOBBS
photos by
KATE BROWN
illustration by
MOSES MAGEE
I'm sitting across from Crystal Dorval underneath a tree at
Templeton Park. Not far from both our homes in Hastings-
Sunrise, the final burst of summer heat and clear skies make
the park an idyllic spot to meet. As kids play baseball in the
field behind us and float planes fly overhead, we talk about
depression, drone fuzz, and music as medicine. The topics may seem sporadic, but it fits Dorval's project, White
Poppy, to a tee.
White Poppy is the unlikely pairing of lo-fi shoegaze
and dream-pop, blending dirty analog drum machines and
layer upon layer of undulating, reverb-laden space guitar
riffs. Dorval's soothing, blanketed vocals drift over top of
each vaguely tropical track like phantom waves, with lyrics
barely distinguishable amid the oceanic haze. Born out of
the ashes of Dorval's Victoria-based band My Friend Wallace,
White Poppy's evolution eventually led to Drifter's Gold. The EP,
released by Constellation Tatsu, brought Dorval's pet project
into the limelight, but her new self-titled full-length is a much
more sombre affair.
"[The LP] comes from a dark place," says Dorval of the
recording process. "I've always been one to make happier music when I'm feeling sad. From my perspective, it
absolutely feels like a treatment. It's what I go and do if I'm
stressed out or in a bad space. I was going through some
mental health stuff, and I think that comes across very literally... but I feel like I found clarity through [recording] it."
With song titles like "Emotional Intelligence" and "Existential
Angst", it's hard not to approach her record—which is otherwise serene and calming—with a certain preconception.
It's Dorval's hope that the medicinal properties of White Poppy
extend beyond her own self, and with sounds like the opening synth riffon "Skygaze" it's hard to imagine it not having a
calming effect on listeners.
White Poppy's cover is a haze of overlaid images, a picture
of Dorval herself double-exposed over a collage of Grecian
ruins. The cover, which Dorval designed, was originally set to
be much more sparse. "Originally, I wanted just that collage to
be the cover," Dorval explains meekly, "but a friend strongly
encouraged me to put my face there, too."
Besides her work on White Poppy's cover art, Dorval's work
as a visual artist extends further back than her music career.
"Ever since I was a kid I'd make art. Music took over my life as
a teen, but art has always been there in the background. Both
mediums distract me in the same way, they take me out of my
mind and let me focus on the present If you're a multidisci-
plinary artist, all of your [output] will have a similar overall theme, because it's from your own perspective. Creativity
is just your personality coming out in a physical way—and
whether it's writing or decorating your house or cooking food,
it's going to be uniquely you."
It's true, Dorval's visual art very closely resembles White
Poppy's audible psychedelic haze. Her work, which previously
went towards music videos for songs from Drifter's Gold, is a
mash of abstract art, '90s VCR. static, and swirling colours.
"People ask me why my music is so textured, and why so
many layers are hidden and warped, but I don't consciously do
that It's the same way with my art, it's just what I prefer. My
ears want something to sound a certain way, my eye wants an
image to look a certain way. I just do whatever I can to make
them happy. It doesn't make sense to me, but I have a very
methodical way of arranging shape and colours and sounds."
The sounds of White Poppy are obviously accomplished
through the use of heavy effects and processing;—a technique
that has garnered her big nods from the drone and ambient
communities. But Dorval insists that she isn't reliant on technology to accomplish "what her ear wants." "I think I would
find other ways to express the sounds that are in my head if the
pedals weren't there, but it might take longer. I'm really drawn
to the quality of older recordings—on older, sometimes crap-
pier, gear. Trying to replicate something now that, then, was
just the best it could be... it's funny trying! The idea of recording a high-fidelity album doesn't appeal to me at all. I liked all
the happy accidents that I experienced while recording."
Despite of, or perhaps because of, her affinity for that particular aesthetic, White Poppy has never set foot in a studio.
Her debut LP was recorded at home, on a 4-track, over die. ■'
span of many months.
"What would be ideal," Dorval laughs, "would be if I had
a friend who had a year free and wanted to record me. We'd
spend all our time in a cabin hanging out, and whenever I
had something I wanted to record they'd be right there to
help out" With so many tidal layers of guitars, synths, drum
machine blips, and vocal crooning, each record only comes
with time and patience.
Our daydreaming of personal studio engineer slaves is
interrupted by a little girl, fresh out of the Templeton Pool,
and her mother, who come over to admire Dorval's bike. With
little charms of neon-coloured moons, lightning bolts and sun
rays adorning the spokes, her wheels definitely scream "envy
of 4-year-olds everywhere." It's the perfect ending to a relaxing
interview under the sun, and as the little girl bids us farewell
with one last longing gaze at Dorval's bike, so too do we part
ways. I was once told that ambient music was "most definitely
not for the summer—it's winter music", but I can't think of a
more perfect way to enjoy White Poppy than underneath this
big tree as the September sun starts to dip. THE BEST OEMS IK TOWN
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L LION
BEAR
by LINDSAY
CHUNG
lettering & illustration by
TIERNEY MILNE
photos by
JONATHAN DY
"Son, don't you dare give up now / Your cavalry has finally
arrived, a bear and fox by your side /1 think it's high time you
found out that sometimes you lose everything before you can
find a place you call home."
For singer-songwriter Christopher Arruda, these lyrics—the
chorus of a song he wrote called "Home"—represent hope.
He didn't feel quite as hopeful when he first wrote the song,
before he brought it to Cory Woodward and Ryan McMahon,
his bandmates in the lion the bear the fox.
"'Home' started off as a sad little number before I introduced
it to the band," Arruda says through an email interview. "As a
musician, from the momentyou start playing shows, your friends '
and family become extremely supportive of your efforts for the
most part. You get a lot of positive feedback from
them and from people that become genuine fans.
'Home' is about waking up one day and realizing that
you've really gotten nowhere and feeling ashamed
that you've bought into all the bullshit people have
been feeding you and allowing your ego to grow."
When Arruda brought "Home" to the band, it
became a very different song.
"As musicians, the three of us have had many
of the same struggles over the past decade, so the
song was turned into something of a battle cry or
anthem for us," he says. "Before I started this band, I felt like I
had nothing, like I'd lost it all (again), but with the bear and the
fox by my side, I truly feel like our struggles are over and that it's
our destiny to propel each other further than we ever thought
imaginable. It feels like I've come home."
And right now, home is an exciting—and busy—place for
Arruda (the lion), Woodward (the bear) and McMahon (the fox).
Arruda and Woodward, who live in Vancouver, and McMahon,
who lives in Ladysmith, are Top 20 finalists in the Peak
Performance Project. And at the beginning of October, the lion
the bear the fox will release its debut EP, We'd Be Good Men, an
album they recorded and mixed themselves, initially motivated
by finances—or, more accurately, lack thereof.
"I love that we've had the opportunity to do it this way," says
Woodward. "It gave us the chance to do some guerilla-style
recording in the 30-odd locations thatwe setup shop to track in.
I've learned so much about common recording techniques and
have had a blast creating my own. All of this has added a certain
honesty to the record, a lovability that has made me happy to say
it's the best record I've been a part of to date. I look forward to
the next one immensely."
After releasing the EP, the lion the bear the fox is hitting
the road for a 13-date tour through BC and Alberta, ending on
October 25 in Vancouver.    ^*^p It was on a tour just like this one that the band started
to take shape. In May 2012, Arruda, Woodward, and
McMahon toured together to promote their respective solo efforts. Travelling across western Canada, an
unshakeable bond began to form as they shared their
stories and their dreams. They began supporting each
other on stage, and by the end of the tour, they discovered they had a sedist worth of material—and that they
wanted to keep making music together.
McMahon says he was inspired by Arruda and
Woodward during that tour because they are their
whole, honest selves, and that honesty continues to
inspire him today.
"They are two big personalities, cut from the same
materials as I am," he explains. "That much was apparent early on, sitting around a campfire in Winlaw. That
night when we shared stories about our wins, losses,
and aspirations, I was like the Bee Girl in the Blind
Melon video years ago. I had found my colony of like-
minded friends where I could feel safe to be my whole,
honest self."
In the wild, a lion, bear, and fox would make for an
unlikely team; in this case, it makes for beautiful music.
Catch the lion the bear the/ox as they open jbr Lee Harvey Osmond
on October 25 at Venue.
"AS MUSICIANS, THE THREE OF US HAVE HAD MANY OF THE
SAME STRUGGLES OVER THE PAST DECADE, SO THE SONG
WAS TURNED INTO SOMETHING OF A BATTLE CRY
OR ANTHEM FOR US,"
YFO * TICKETS ♦ *EB
ST. CHINATOWN VANCOUVER
ortuie
;ytip.it»vo<T *t»,.--
Happy Ending Frida;
SJS
ttSS X)Eirt>RTIZ
L^fM!L%SSmJ    -=^^V       SLOW JAM SUMHAYS      HUNDRED WATEF
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12
Snak The Ripper Early Show: Joell Ortiz
Suicide Kings HI Legitimate, Ghost, 9-C
FMTEUSH
.egitimate, Ghost, 9-0       LongWeeken	
Nickel & Robbie G Marlon J Engli:
" jm        N© PEER
, *H       PRESS-
1   liJREI
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26
Happy Ending Fridays Early Show: Flatbush Zombies
Halloween Bodega Bamz
HEF DJs w/ guests kJ^^^t .wf '■ 4m%       H'-- ^^jmw^
PNilWliiy|i,»kwji^ia -Blip! «m*<
RIFFLANDIA
by NICOLA
STOREY
illustration by
OLAVOLA
photos by
NICOLA STOREY
& JORDAN WADE
It was the beginning of Rifflandia and I wasn't sure what to expect.
Catching the last 9 p.m. ferry from Vancouver, I was left with no choice
but to pre-drink during the voyage like a lone alcoholic. While the serene
scenery via boat was a trip I usually enjoy, my body was ready to bask in the
sweat of others as I moshed against them. I was ready for the madness to
ensue.
Stumbling off the ferry, I booked it to Market Square where the funk-
adelic Funk Hunters were playing. Swimming through throngs ofbately     .
legals, I managed to make it inside the venue with minimal scarring. Inside
the venue was a visual projection cube hanging over the crowd, with lights
settling down on various showgoers; a magical visual that made the Market
Square one of the festival's best venues—especially for the likes of Funk
Hunters. Armed with four turntables, their mash ups and remixes of soul
and funk had the tweens getting their boogie on. Leaving the underages behind, I carried onward
to my most anticipated show of the night: Mykki
Blanco.
Opening for Mykki was a topless individual,
covered in painted white lines and holding orb-like
lights in their mouth and hands, thrashing across
the stage in a weird trance-like dance.
After the performance art, Mykki came onstage,
rocking a pink fiouncy underwear frock, garters,
and garters belts to accompany the festive attire.
After an incredible performance, Mykki addressed
the tender-hearted Victoria crowd: "This crowd
looks nice. Maybe a little too nice." Mykki then
jumped into the crowd and tried to turn up the row-
diness meter, but despite his attempts, I seemed to
be the only one moshing while everyone else just
stood" there awkwardly.
Day Two didn't start until 4 p.m. for me, when
the Mounties took to the outdoor stage and got
the crowd up on their feet. But the highlight of my
Friday experience had to be Courtney Love. Not
only was I curious to see her perform, but Love was
one of the most talked about shows of Rifflandia. I
headed to the photography pit and watched as she
stomped onstage with both a cigarette and drink in-
hand, blowing ominous smoke-at the crowd before
sashaying on her guitar.
In her raspy voice, Love yelled to the crowd:
"Aren't we good?" to which the crowd responded
with a weak cheer, leaving Love unimpressed.
"Oh, you're underestimating my ego. Are we
good?" While not the quality of music I expected
for Courtney Love, her stage presence helped to
compensate.
I ended the night with a show at Philips Brewery
to witness the epicness of Action Bronson. Telling
the crowd to "Shake your ass, shake your pussy,
shake your little dicks," Action put on an incredible show and ended the night with the classic track
"Stricdy 4 my Jeeps."
It was Day Three and I was ready to get steamy.
After watching Hot Hot Heat and Wintersleep play
back-to-back, I grabbed another drink and made
my way to the DJ stage to see Rob Garza of Thievery
Corporation. While not as good as Thievery
Corporation itself, his was a show to remember. A
little funkier than Thievery normally, Garza hit the
'90s techno funk spot on.
And then it was time. Death from Above 1979
took to the stage, asking the crowd "Do you guys
remember laughter? Let's get weird." One of the
biggest and most-anticipated shows at Rifflandia,
DFA played favourites like "Black History Month,"
"Romantic Rights," and "Turn It Out." The crowd
was the the messiest and rowdiest of the whole festival, with full-on mosh pits and a dude with a horse
head crowd surfing. After some mosh pit bruises and injuries, I
limped over to Phillips Brewery to witness Dam
Funk, with a crowd that was ready to get their
boogie on. Dam Funk gave 'em exacdy what they
wanted, whipping out his keytar to play the funkiest
beats of the festival.
The final day of Rifflandia was confided to
the main stages and ended earlier than previous
nights—a welcome drawback, as my three-day-
old hangover was reaching new heights. Beats
Antique were first up, known for their riveting live
performances. Next were Matt & Kim, who played
all my favourites—including "Cameras"—as confetti flew through the air. Always at their rowdiest, Kim told the crowd "Imma get nasty tonight
Imma talk about butts, my ass, your ass, and
maybe even anal," and then proceeded to twerk up
on a security guard.
Closing out Rifflandia '13 were Edward Sharpe
& the Magnetic Zeros, a band I've seen several
times, and while I never cry, I've cried at exactly
three of their shows. Frontman Alex Ebert told the
crowd: "Everyone's life is poetry, its cinema. The
love, the hate, the goals, everything. I just figured
this out today. Aren't you happy for me? " Playing
classics like "Janglin"' and "40 Day Dream," they
got the crowd swaying their hips and groovin' into
the night At the end of their set Alex Ebert told the
crowd "One of these days, I'm going to figure out
this whole architecture thing. You guys are behind
a fence. Who came up with that? I don't want to get
into this right now, but it's a systemic problem. If
you want to change, if you change it don't wait for
anyone else."
Hear that, Rifflandia? Next year we're storming
the stages! by EVAN
■ BROW
lettering & illustration by
BRITFA BACCHUS
photos by
MARIA ASSELIN-ROY
It's hard to present the rose of a serious interview
when your subjects joke witfe you so much. Stationed
at Grounds For Coffee a* iotfe Avenue and Alma
Street for a good hour and a featf, the improv duo
Virginia Jack does just that: they joke with-HBOt
at—me.
The duo, comprised of Nicole Passmore and
Briana Rayner, are pretty good friends. They riff on
everything each other says and even playfully rag
on the formality of our meet-up. Numerous times
throughout our discussion, Passmore goes off on
a tangent, only to end her point by exclaiming, in
her best vaudevillian voice, "Put that in your article
and smoke id"
Virginia Jack has steadily built itself into one of the top
improv acts in the city. The duo, winners of both the Vancouver
CageMateh Tournament of Champions as well as the Vancouver
Improv Fight Club Tournament of Champions, describes themselves as artsy, theatrical, and cinematic. They define their style
as quaint and tell me that at one of their first shows, they baked
cookies, made drinks for people, and even did a raffle.
"We almost feel like we're inviting people into our living
room for a really fun party, and then we do a show," says Rayner.
"Really?" replies Passmore. "I just treat it like a show with
"Well, t treat k like cookies and a raffle with a show," says
Their performances are very unique. They do a form inspired
by the movie Am&ie where they'll both narrate the characters,
noting their likes and dislikes, and then proceed to do one story
in one setting, exploring everything to its fullest.
"Every character we create onstage, we both play. Any narration is both of us. So anything that gets created, the other person
is fully accountable for it as well," says Passmore.
This symbiotic relationship Passmore and Rayner have created translates easily and necessarily onstage. The two can never
take a break, as they're always in the scene. "The thing about
being in a duo is that it's physically taxing, especially when
we're playing everything," says Passmore. "And the great thing
is there's sometimes this connected moment where she'll be
like, 'Oh, you're brain dead right now. I'm going to take over,'
and that's really nice for me."
"It's always nice to have somebody to be like, 'Can you just
do the thinking for a second? Because I'm out'" says Rayner.
The duo will have been performing strong for three years
this January. Looking back, they remember one of the first times
the two realized their duo would work out, noting, however, the
uniqueness of the venue. The duo, describing
performances they have
given at their show,
Sex is Funny:
PASSMORE: "I had a piece of erotic fiction I wrote
about Kevin Costner. Because I love Kevin Costner.
It's a piece that mentions all his movies. You
know, a lot of puns, a lot of jokes. When I say Field
of Dreams, I'm referencing a certain body part."
RAYNER: "One of my favourites was 'The Internet'
so I could claim to know everyone's search
histories. So I was wearing a suit, because I
decided that the Internet is all business, and then
proceeded to put sexy outfits on over my suit, just
in the instruction of how to put on sexy outfits.
And it was incredibly challenging to put som&of
them on over a blazer."
"We got hired to do improv at a prison and I genuinely don't
remember why," says Passmore. "But they wanted to pay us to
go do improv there. When we checked in, we had to give them
all our personal possessions and our bobby pins."
"We never got those back," says Rayner.
"It was their Christmas party," says Passmore. "It was really
nerve-wracking for me, because somewhere in my brain I was
thinking, 'They're never letting you out You're stuck. You'll have
to be here for the rest of your life.'"
Despite the anxiety, they clicked. The group performed their
high energy, narrative-based set well and even gained some
unexpected respect from the crowd.
"At one point the crowd was getting rowdy, starting to yell
a bit louder, and this one woman, with really short hair, kind of
tough-looking, stood up and just very slowly turned to the crowd
and said, 'Quiet' And everyone shut up. Every single person,"
says Passmore. "And we just thanked her and then kept going.
She basically shut up an entire room of grown women with one
word. And I thought, 'Oh, you're in charge here. Glad you're
cool with us.'"
"It was the rowdiest sober group of people I've ever seen,"
says Rayner.
Nowadays, when the duo isn't performing their signature
Amelie-inspired set, they're working on producing their own
show, Sex is Funny, where the two "take the piss out of being sexy."
"If you wanted real sexy, there's other places to go. You're not
coming to us," says Passmore. "If you want real funny, with that
added element of sexy, yeah, come our way, because we got it"
In the meantime, Virginia Jack will continue to perform their
form around town, charming audiences with their wit and their
friendship. And should you go to a Virginia Jack show, expect
grounded, yet zany jokes, expect a three-dimensional story, and
expect cookies.
Virginia Jack urill be debuting a ^femmejatale" improv jbrm (inspired
by Orange is the New Black) November 25th at the Havana Theatre. •i SB
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w>°- o;  a, « CiTR 101.9 FM PROGRAM GUIDE
DISCORDER SUGGESTS LISTENING TO CiTR ONLINE AT WWW.CiTR.CA EVERY DAY.
SUN
MON
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3
111
5
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ni
1
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3
4
5
ipi Crespan Presents..
(Difficult Music)
Classical Chaos
(Classical)
Breakfast With The Browns
(Eclectic)
The Rockers Show
Blood On
The Saddle
(Roots)
Chips
(Pop)
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Tail Feather
(Soul/R&B)
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Boom!
(Rock)
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My Friends
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Farm Show
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Queer FM Vancouver:
Reloaded
(Talk)
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(Ambient)
Morning After Show
(Eclectic)
Student Special Hour
(Eclectic)
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(Eclectic)
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(Eclectic)
Smart People    treatas&Contnbuta
The Shakespeare Show
(Old Skoof}
Terry Project    Democracy
Podcast (Talk) j Now (Talk)
Extraenvironmentalist
(Talk)
Butta on
the Bread
Arts Report (Talk)
End of the World Mews
(Talk)
Rocket from Russia
^unkRocN/PapPtmk}
Relentlessly Awesome
Duncan's Donuts
(Eclectic)
Chips n Dip
(Underground Pop,
Garage, Lo-Fi)
Programming Training
Thunderbird Eye
«a«rtraX
(Eclectic) j
Simorgh
(Persian Literacy)
Student FilMn Slot
Smai&'ithe&Sj
(Eclectic)
Stereo Blues
(Blues/Eclectic)
It Ain't Easy Being Green
..^Ecieetjc)
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(Drama/Poetry)
Nardwaar Presents
(NatdwuBf)
CiTR Ghost Mi*   -
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(Eritrian)
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(Roots*
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11111
I
Code Blue
. (Roots)
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(Electro/Hip Hop)
4*33"
(Contemporary Classical
and Experimental)
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(Electronic/Experimental)
Rhythms      Techno
(World)     Progressive
Exploding Head Movies
(Cta«matlcJ
Flex Your Head
(Hardcore)
Inside Out
r (Dance)
Sam-
squantch
(Eel)
StK>
World?
(Eclectic)
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Jams
(Eclectic)
StratHfed
N8sha\fetea(Wbrtd)
Stereoscopic Redoubt
(Experimental)
Africao Rhythms
' 0ltorM) '
;s & B-Sides
(Dance/Electronic)
Trancendance
(Dance)
The Jazz Show
(Jazz)
Crimes And Treasons
(Kip-hop)
Sexy In Van City (Talk)
Live From Thunderbird
Radio Hell
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The Bassment
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A Deepor Reverb-
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Synaptic Sandwich
(DarHs/Etectreflie/
•__:
jEctectte)
Beaver Hour aka Rossin
(World Ghetto)
Hans Von Kloss
Misery Hour
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(Talk & Underground Electronic)
Canada Post-Rock (Rock)
Randophonic
(Eclectic}"
Vampire's Bail
(Industrial)
Aural Tentacles
(Eclectic)
The Late HigbtShow
CDwra+8a$$,AwbieBt,
fewhfctriaJ...)
a
The Absolute
Value of Insomnia
-  * (GfcBOfat&fcj   '
3
H
5 BEPI CRESPAN PRESENTS...
(Difficult Music) 7'-9am
Bepi Crespan Presents... CiTR's
24 Hours Of Radio Art in a snack
size format! Difficult music,
harsh electronics, spoken word,
cut-up/collage and general
Crespan© weirdness. Twitter:
©bepicrespan Blog: bepicrespan.
blogspot.ca
CLASSICALCHAOS
(Classical) 9-10am
From the Ancient World to the 21st
century, join host Marguerite in exploring and celebrating classical
music from around the world.
SHOOkSHOOKTA
(Talk) 10am-12pm
A program targeted to Ethiopian
people that encourages education
and personal development.
THrROCKERSSHOW
(Reggae) 12-3pm
Reggae  inna  all   styles  and
fashion.
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
(Roots) 3-5pm
Alternating Sundays
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country.
shaka™
(Soul/R&B) 3-5pm
The finest in classic soul and rhythm
& blues from the late '50s to the early
70s, including lesser known artists,
regional hits and lost soul gems.
CHIPS^^WTH EVERnHTNG
{Pop) 5-6pm
Alternating Sundays
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Swedish, British, US, etc.), '60s
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CHTHONIC BOOmV
(Pop) 5-6pm
Alternating Sundays
A show dedicated to playing psychedelic music from parts of the
spectrum (rock, pop, electronic) as
well as garage and noise rock.
SOSALAClbuS
(Electro/Hip Hop) 6-7pm
Skadz and Sprocket Doyle bring you
Electro Swing, Alternative Hip Hop,
Dubstep, Acid Jazz, Trip Hop, Local
and Canadian Content - good and
dirty beats.
MORETHANHUMAN
(Electronic/Experimental) 7-8pm
Strange and wonderful electronic
sounds from the past, present, and
future with host Gareth Moses. Music
from parallel worlds.
RHYTHMsTMiu
(World) 8-9pm
Alternating Sundays
Featuring a wide range of music from
India, including popular music from
the 1930s to the present; Ghazals
and Bhajans, Qawwalis, pop and
\ regional language numbers.
| TECHNO PR06RESSIV0
| (Dance) 8-9pm
Alternating Sundays
A mix of the latest house music,
tech-house, prog-house and techno.
BflOTUasiB-SlDES[**
(Dance/Electronic) 9-10pm
Hosted by Doe-Ran, the show was
a nominated finalist for "Canadian
College Radio Show of the year 2012
in the Pioneer DJ Stylus Awards". A
complete mixbag every week, covering: Ghetto funk, Breakbeat, Hip-
Hop, Funk & Soul, Chillout, Drum &
Bass, Mashups, Electro House and
loads of other crackin' tunes. Search
'Doe Ran1 at percussionlab.com and
on facebook.com
TRANCENDANCE
(Dance) 10pm-12am
Hosted by DJ Smiley Mike and DJ
Caddyshack, Trancendance has been
broadcasting from Vancouver, B.C.
| since 2001. We favour Psytrance,
! Hard Trance and Epic Trance, but
| also play Acid Trance, Deep Trance,
I Hard Dance and even some Break-
| beat. We also love a good Classic
\ Trance Anthem, especially if it's
i remixed. Current influences include
\ Sander van Doom, Gareth Emery,
j Nick Sentience, Ovnimoon, Ace Ven-
! tura, Save the Robot, Liquid Soul
j and Astrix. Older influences include
\ Union Jack, Carl Cox, Christopher
: Lawrence, Whoop! Records, TidyTrax,
; Platipus Records and Nukleuz. Email:
: djsmileymike ©trancendance.net.
i Website: www.trancendance.net.
6000 MORNING MY FRIENDS
(Upbeat Music) 6:30-8am
BREAKFASTWITHI THE[BROWNS
(Eclectic) Z-llam
Your    favourite    Brownsters,
James and Peter, offer a savoury
blend of the familiar and exotic
in a blend of aural delights.
breakfastwiththebrowns®
hotmail.com.
inbvi^EiiiiDiiiviE
(S*aj llam-12pm
sviiiiimmiJwirW
(Talk) 12-lpm
Join host Marie B and discuss spirituality, health and feeling good. Tune
in and tap into good vibrations that
help you remember why you're here:
to have fun!
PARTS UNKNOWN
(Pop) l-3pm
An indie pop show since 1999, it's
like a marshmallow sandwich: soft
and sweet and best enjoyed when
poked with a stick and held close
to a fire.
THE ALL CANAoiANIFARM SHOW
(Pop) 3-4pm
The All Canadian Farm Show cultivates new and old indie jams from
across genres and provinces. Tune
in to hear the a fresh crop of CiTR
volunteers take you on a musical
cross-country road trip!
THE LECI RAMIREZ SHOW
(World) 4-5pm
The best of mix of Latin American
music, leoramirez@canada.com
NEWS101
<7a/*J5-6pm
Vancouver's only live, volunteer-
produced, student and community
newscast. Every week, we take a
look back at the week's local, national and international news, as
seen from a fully independent media
perspective.
4'33"
(Contemporary Classical and
Experimental) 6-7pm
This program showcases "new music" - contemporary classical and
experimental music, especially highlighting Vancouver's local performers and composers of new music,
to uncover a new musical niche to
the broader public in a friendly and
accessible manner.
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
(Cinematic) 7-9pm
Join gak as he explores music from
the movies, tunes from television
and any other cinematic source,
along with atmospheric pieces, cutting edge new tracks and strange
old goodies that could be used in a
soundtrack to be.
THE JAZZ SHOW
(Jazz) 9pm-12am
Vancouver's longest running prime-
time Jazz program. Hosted by Gavin
Walker. Features at 11 p.m. Oct. 7:
Tonight we celebrate the birthday of
the great drummer "Papa" Jo Jones
as he leads an all-star band on this
5 star recording. "The Jo Jones Special." Oct. 14: The undisputed king of
the Hammond B3. Jimmy Smith performs with saxophonists Ike Quebec
and Jackie McLean and trumpeter
Blue Mitchell. "Open House." Oct.21:
Tonight we honour the Birthday of
Jazz Pioneer and trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie in the company of his peers.
"The Modern Jazz Sextet." Oct.28:
A wonderful adventurous date with
trombonist/composer Grachan
Moncur 111 with Jackie McLean,
Lee Morgan and Tony Williams et
al. "Evolution."
PACIFIC PICKIN'
(Roots) S-Zam
Bluegrass,    old-time    music,
and its derivatives with Arthur
and the lovely Andrea Berman.
pacificpickin@yahoo.com
QUEERFM
VANCOUVER: RELOADED
|7a//r;8-10:30am
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bisexual andtransexual communities
of Vancouver. Lots of human interest
features, background on current is- I
sues and great music.queerfmra-
dio@gmail.com
MINDVOYAGE
f£c/erf/c;i0:30-ll:30am
Mind Voyage presents cosmic tones
of celestial counterpoint on CiTR!
Experience weekly encounters of
synth, ambient, witchy and new \
classical items in one-hour with DJ
Tall Jamal.
MORNING AFTER SHOW
(Eclectic) ll:30am-lpm
An eclectic mix of Canadian indie
with rock, experimental, world, reggae, punk and ska from Canada,
Latin America and Europe. Hosted
by Oswaldo Perez Cabrera.
STUDENT SPECIAL HOI
(Eclectic) l-2pm
Students play music.
GIVE EM THE BOOT
(World) 2-3pm
Sample the various flavours of
Italian music from north to south,
traditional to modern on this bilingual show. Folk, singer-songwriter, jazz and much more. Un
programma bilingue che esplora
il mondo della musica italiana.
http://giveemtheboot.wordpress.
com
PROGRAMMING TRAINING
(Ta/jy3-3:30pm
RADtOFREETH
(Skepticism)3-4pm
Promoting skepticism, critical thinking and science, we examine popular
extraordinary claims and subject
them to critical analysis.
DISCORDERI RADIO
(On-air version of Discorder) 4-5 p m
Discorder Magazine now has its own
radio show! Join us to hear excerpts
of interviews, reviews and more!
THE CITY
|7a//r75-6pm
An alternative and critical look
at our changing urban spaces.
New website: www.thecityfm.org.
New twitter handle: @thecity_fm.
FLEXYOURHEAD
(Hardcore) 6-8pm
Punk rock and hardcore since 1989.
Bands and guests from around the
world.
INSIDEOUT
(Dance) 8-9pm
CRIMESi&TREASONS
(Hip-hop) V-llpm
dj@cri mesa ndtrea sons.com
together through social media. Website: tweetsandtunes.com Twitter:
©tweetsandtunes.
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
(£c/ecf/c;8-10am
Live from the Jungle Room, join radio
host Jack Velvet for an eclectic mix of
music, sound bites, information and
inanity, dj@jackvelvet.net.
POPDRONES
(Eclectic) 10-11:30am
CREffl^
Alternates with "Smart People"
(Ta/Wll:30am-12pm
Talking to artists, entrepreneurs,
founders, and innovators about their
work, their process, and why they do
what they do. Individuals who make
positive contributions to the world in
the hopes of inspiring and helping
others to act on their own vision of
contribution.
SMART PEOPLE
Alternates with
"Creators & Contributors"
(TaWll:30am-12pm
Interviewing people we think are
smart. This program features weekly
guests who have something intelligent to say. Tune in to hear researchers, professors, writers, activists,
scientists, etc.
THE SHAKESPEARE SHOW
(Old Skool) 12-lpm
Dan Shakespeare is herewith music
for your ear. Kick back with gems of
the previous years.
TERRY PROJECT^PODCAST7"
(Talk) l-2pm
BEAVER HOUR AKA ROSSIN
(World Ghetto) llpm-12am
Emma vs music.
WEDNESDAY
TWEETS & TUNES
(New) 6:30-8am
We practice what we Tweet! Show- ]
casing local indie music and \
bringing bands, artists and fans |
I There once was a project named
: Terry, That wanted to make people
\ wary, Of things going on In the world
| that are wrong without making it all
i seem too scary
I Semcr^now
! (7aWl-2pm
: Alternating Wednesdays
I EXTRAENVIRONMENTALiST
I (7aW2-3pm
| Exploring the  mindset of an
'■■ outsider looking in on Earth.
| Featuring interviews with leading
\ thinkers in the area of sustainable
: economics and our global ecologi-
; cal crisis.
[sIewlh
; 4-5pm
1 In many Coast Salish dialects,
I "sne'waylh" is the word for teachings
I or laws. The aboriginal language-
I learning program begins with the
teachings of the skwxwu7mesh
snichim (Squamish language).
| Originally aired on Coop Radio CFRO
j 100.5 FM in Vancouver, Tuesdays
I 1-2 pm ARTS REPORT
(Talk) 5-6pm
Reviews, interviews and coverage of
local arts (film, theatre, dance, visual and performance art, comedy,
and more) by host Maegan Thomas *
and the Arts Reporters.
ARTS PROJECT
(Talk) 6-6:30pm
Alternating with UBC Arts On Air
Stay tuned after the Arts Report for
Arts Project Interviews, documentaries and artsy stuff that doesn't fit
into CiTR's original arts hour.
HsFARfsONAiR
r7aW6-6:30pm
Alternating with Arts Extra!
On break from June-September
2013.
SAMSO^CHimbEAWAY
f£c/ecf/cj 6:30-8pm
Alternating Wednesdays
All-Canadian music with a focus
on indie-rock/pop. anitabinder®
hotmail.com
SUPWORLD?
ffc/ectfc; 6:30-8pm
Alternating Wednesdays
Fuzzy and sweet, a total treat! Tune
in to hear the latest and greatest
tracks from independent and Vancouver bands.
fWoASlS
(Roots) i-lOpm
Two hours of eclectic folk/roots
music, with a big emphasis on our
local scene. C'mon in! A kumbaya-
free zone since 1997. folkoasis®
gmail.com
SEXifiNVANCiTY
(Talk) 10-1 lpm
Your weekly dose of education
and entertainment in the realm
of relationships and sexuality. sexyinvancity.com/category/
sexy-in-vancity-radio
RELENTLESSLY AWESOME
llam-12pm
Vancouver's got a fever, and the only
prescription is CiTR's "Relentlessly
Awesome." Each and every week,
Jason attempts to offer adrenaline-
pumping, heart-stopping, hands-
over-the-eyes suspense. He is a fan
of various genres, and a supporter
of local music.
and a weekly pairing for your date
calendar.
STEREOSCOPIC REDOUBT
(Experimental) 7:30-9pm
entertainment. Doot doola doot ;
doo...doot   doo!   nardwuar®
nardwuar.com
HANS VON KLOSS'MISERY HOUR
(Hans Von Kloss) 11pm-lam
Pretty much the best thing on radio.
nii^Mumii^luuI
(Industrial) l-5am
Industrial, electro, noise, experimental, and synth-based music.
thevampiresball@gmail.com the-
vampiresballoncitr.com
THURSDAY
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
(Talk) 8-10am
nmlRo¥Rlij«iu
(PunkRock/Pop Punk) 10-1 lam
Hello hello hello! I interview bands
and play new, international and
local punk rock music. Great Success! P.S. Broadcasted in brokenish
English. Hosted by Russian Tim.
Website: http://rocketfromrussia.
tumblr.com. Email: rocketfrom
russiacitr@gmail.com. Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/Rocket-
FromRussia. Twitter: http^/twitter.
com/tima_tzar.
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
(Eclectic) 12-lpm
Sweet treats from the pop underground. Hosted by Duncan, sponsored by donuts. http://duncans
donuts.wordpress.com
CHIPS N DIP
(Underground Pop, Garage, Lo-Fi)
l-2pm
Dip in every Thursday afternoon with
host Hanna Fazio for the freshest
local indie pop tracks and upcoming shows.
INKSTUDS
(Talk) 2-3pm
Underground and indie comix. Each
week, we interview a different creator to get their unique perspective
on comix and discuss their upcoming works.
THUNDERBIRD EYE
(Sports) 3:30-ipm
Your weekly roundup of UBC Thunderbird sports action from on campus
and off with your host Wilson Wong.
MANTRA
(World) AS pm
Kirtan, Mantra, Chanting and
Culture. There's no place like Om.
Hosted by Raghunath with special
guests. Email: mantraradioshow®
gmail.com. Website: mantraradio.
co.
SIMORGH
(Persian Literacy) 5-6pm
Simorgh Radio is devoted to the
education and literacy for the Persian speaking communities and
those interested in connecting to
Persian oral and written literature.
Simorgh takes you through a journey
of ecological sustains biiity evolving
within cultural and social literacy.
Simorgh the mythological multiplicity of tale-figures, lands-in as
your mythological narrator in the
storyland; the contingent space of
beings, connecting Persian peoples
within and to Indigenous peoples.
ARE YOU AWARE
(Eclectic) Alternating Thursdays
6-7:30pm
Celebrating the message behind the
music: Profiling music and musicians that take the route of positive
action over apathy.
PEANUTBUTTEFI'N' JAMS
(Eclectic) Alternating Thursdays
6-7:30pm
Explore local music and food with
your hosts, Brenda and Jordie. You'll
hear interviews and reviews on eats
and tunes from your neighbourhood,
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
(Live Music) 9-Upm
Featuring live band(s) every week
performing in thefirTR Lounge. Most
are from Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country and
around the world.
THE CoWmGHT EXPEm
(Talk & Underground Electronic)
llpm-12am
Discussing music copyright topics
and issues and mixing freely available music.
AURAL^TENTACLES
(Eclectic) 12-6am
It could be global, trance, spoken
word, rock, the unusual and the
weird, or it could be something
different. Hosted by DJ Pierre.
auraltentacles@hotmail.com
MOON GROK
7:30-10am
THE CAT'S PAJAMS
(Indie Pop, Garage Rock) 10-11 am
The cat's pajamas: a phrase to describe something/someone super
awesome or cool. The Cat's Pajams:
a super awesome and cool radio
show featuring the latest and greatest indie pop, rock, lofi and more
from Vancouver and beyond!
STEREOBLUES
(Blues/Eclectic) llam-12pm
Every Friday host Dorothy Neufeld
sinks into blues, garage and rock
n' roll goodies!
iT^HYEASYlMBiRlEIEIII
(£c/ecf7c)12-lpm
CiTR has revived it's long-dormant
beginner's show It Ain't Easy Being
Green! With the support of experienced programmers, this show
offers fully-trained CiTR members,
especially students, the opportunity
to get their feet wet on the air.
SKALD'SHALL
(Drama/Poetry) l-2pm
Skald's Hall entertains with the spoken word via story readings, poetry
recitals, and drama. Established
and upcoming artists join host Brian
MacDonald. Interested in performing
on air? Contact us: @Skalds_Hall.
RADIO ZERO
(Dance) 2-3:30pm
An international mix of super-
fresh weekend party jams from
New Wave to foreign electro, baile,
Bollywood, and whatever else.
www.radiozero.com
NARDWUAR
(7Vart/M/a/-;3:30-5pm
Join Nardwuar the Human Serviette for Clam Chowder flavoured
NEWS 101
(Talk)5-Spm
See Monday for description.
STRANDED
/£c/ecf/e;6-7:30pm
Join your host Matthew for a weekly
mix of exciting sounds, past and
present, from his Australian homeland. And journey with him as he
features fresh tunes and explores
the alternative musical heritage
of Canada.
AFRICAN RHYHMS
(Wor/cf;7:30-9pm
www.africanrhythmsradio.com
THEBWSMENT
(Dance/Electronic) 9-10:30pm
The Bassment is Vancouver's only
bass-driven radio show, playing
Glitch, Dubstep, Drum and Bass,
Ghetto Funk, Crunk, Breaks, and UK
Funky, while focusing on Canadian
talent and highlighting Vancouver
DJs, producers, and the parties
they throw.
CANADAiPOST-RbCK
(Rock) 10:30pm-12am
Formerly on CKXU, Canada Post-
Rock now resides on the west coast
but it's still committed to the best
in post-rock, drone, ambient, experimental, noise and basically
anything your host Pbone can put
the word "post" in front of.
THE UTE NIGHT SHOW
(Drum+Bass, Ambient, Industrial...)
12-6am
Drum+Bass, Ambient, Industrial,
Noise, artist profiles with DJ Rea.
SATURDAY
THE SATURDAY EDGE
(7?00/:s)8am-12pm
A personal guide to world and roots
music—with African, Latin, and
European music in the first half,
followed by Celtic, blues, songwriters, Cajun, and whatever else fits!
steveedge3@mac.com
GENERATibN AN^^
(Punk) 12-lpm
On the air since 2002,
playing old and new punk on
the non-commercial side of the
spectrum. Hosts: Aaron Brown,
Jeff "The Foat" Kraft. Website:
www.generationannihilation.com.
Facebook: www.facebook.com/
generationannihilation".
POWERCHORD
(Metal) l-3pm
Vancouver's longest running metal j
show. If you're into music that's ,
on the heavier/darker side of the ;
spectrum, then you'll like it. Sonic '
assault provided by Geoff, Marcia, I
and Andy.
CODE BLUE
(Roots) 3-5pm
From backwoods delta low-down
slide to urban harp honks, blues,
and blues roots with your hosts
Jim, Andy, and Paul, codeblue®
buddy-system.org
MOONGRbK
5-6pm
N^ASHAVbLNA
(World) S-7pm
News, arts, entertainment and music for the Russian community, local
and abroad, nashavolna.ca
ullISTA
(World) 7-8pm
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue, Latin
House, and Reggaeton with your
host GspotDJ.
aoIeeperrIeverb
(Heavy Reverb) 8-9pm
"Bringing you the chillout world
of the heavy reverb genres: shoe-
gaze, post rock, dream pop, space
rock, trip hop and everything in
between, including new tracks
and old favorites. Facebook: face-
book.com/adeeperreverb. Email:
adeeperreverb [a] gmail.com"
SYNAPtlC SMDm
(Dance/Electronic) 9-11 pm
If you like everything from electro/
techno/trance/8-bit music/retro
'80s, this is the show for you!
www.synapticsandwich.net
randophonTc
(Eclectic) Upm-2am
Randophonic is best thought of as
an intraversal jukebox which has
no concept of genre, style, political
boundaries, or even space-time
relevance. But it does know good
sounds from bad. Lately, the program
has been focused on Philip Random's
All Vinyl Countdown + Apocalypse
(the 1,111 greatest records you probably haven't heard). And we're not
afraid of noise.
THE ABSOLUTE[VALUEOFTnSOMNIA
(Generative) 2-6am
Four solid hours of fresh generative
music c/o the Absolute Value of Noise
and its world famous Generator. Ideal
for enhancing your dreams or, if sleep
is not on your agenda, your reveries. "*"»..
by ANGELA
ESPINOZA
illustration by
ROBONDZIK
photos by
ELEANOR WEARING
I first met Jessica Chau about eight years ago in high school,
when she took on the daunting task of tutoring me in math.
Today, I'm sitting beside her in a Tim Hortons, interviewing
her as the lead singer and keyboardist for Vancouver dream
pop band Village. Partway into the interview, I hear guitarist
Alex Smith say her Casio VL-Tone keyboard has a built-in calculator, and I experience mixed feelings.
Chau says the idea for starting Village came to her in 2009,
with Smith clarifying the group didn't officially start until
2011. The two have a constant back and forth, and it's easy to
see that they've been with Village the longest Lindsay Partin,
who initially joined as a keyboardist and now plays bass, and
drummer Ina Vukmirovich became involved last year. Smith
notes the current lineup is a change of pace from their original
setup as a five-piece group.
Much of their time with me is spent reminiscing on their
year together. Not long into the interview; Smith offhandedly
mentions their experience at this year's disastrous Sled Island.
But the group wants to keep their minds on more positive
festival experiences from this year, such as Khatsalano! and
Music Waste.
Looking to the future, we discuss Village's upcoming
sophomore seven-inch release of "Stranger Thoughts," with a "NOW WE REHEARSE IN
YOUR STANDARD, GROSS,
EAST VAN CAVERNLIKE UNDERGROUND
SHITHOLE."
B-side remix by the Passenger. Their previous seven-inch was
released last November with the songs "Nowhere" and B-side
"Claustro."
"'Stranger Thoughts' is an older song," Smith says. "It
used to be reaUy slow, right?"
Chau responds: "'Stranger Thoughts' was originally written in Tokyo by me and [Count Oak] collaborating over the
Internet. It used to be really slow, and really soft sounding. I
wrote this song to be very minimal, everything was super lo-fi.
I recorded on GarageBand, and then... sent the files over to
[Count Oak], and he'd put his own bits and pieces into it.
"Since then, Smith and Andrea Wan [original keyboardist]
came in, and 'Stranger Thoughts', started to change a bit, and
got noisier."
"I don't think it got noisier," Smith cuts in, "it just got
faster and it's a more focused, indie-pop kind of song now,
sort of indie-rockish."
Collectively, the group points out specific moments in
"Stranger Thoughts" development. Added textural parts here,
additional drums there, and, at one time, multiple keyboard
parts.
"'Stranger Thoughts' is actually one of the two songs that
were already there when we came together as a band," Smith
adds. "Everything since then, we've all kind of worked on."
Chau remarks on how "Stranger Thoughts" has changed,
and how the group's sound on the whole has started morph-
ing from gentle dream pop to a livelier sound: "I think it's
really just finding our own style."
"Initially it was all very quiet," Smith says. "I also have a
theory that it has to do with how we used to rehearse in my
house. It was a different vibe than rehearsing in a gross, cavernous jam space; I think that maybe affects [the sound] a
little bit.
"I live in a house where the owners live upstairs, and they
were away for a year, so we just jammed in my house... hung
out, made dinner, played some music, and it was all chilled
out. Now we rehearse in your standard, gross, East Van cavern-like underground shithole. And we're competing with a
million dad rock bands who are playing in the same space. The
walls are really thin, and if we were right next to a metal band,
they would completely drown us out, so I think that maybe
we got louder just as a way to compete with all these fucking   %
super loud bands."
Smith mentions plans to record a full-length album by the
end of the year for a spring/summer 2014 release. Considering^
how Village's sound has grown, an album at this point might'".
be a good idea.
"Our newer songs are a bit different," Smith adds, "things
have changed a bit, things have gotten... heavier, louder,
which I think everyone's pretty excited about. Makes for a
more fun live show too."
Experience Village's evolving sound in-person on October 5 at Electric
Owl, where they'll be opening for Houses. ■ DISCORDER'S STAFF
SOUND-OFF
illustration by DANA KEARLEY
While a standout soundtrack won't make or break a film, it's certainly never hurt. From
gems like Empire Records or Pirate Radio, finding the right sound to accompany a movie
is an art of its own. This month, we asked the Discorder staff what film they thought
had the best music and why. Lights, camera, soundtrack!
EVAN BROW Contributor
Forrest Sump-. Just like the movie itself, the soundtrack takes us on a journey across
America, from Elvis to Dylan to Hendrix to Skynyrd. It's a folk tale, told of the scope of
American music, of the pioneers, the stars, the legends, and the like. The Forrest Gump
soundtrack is like that special high school teacher, the one that taught you even when
you thought you weren't learning. I owe myself to this soundtrack for sparking a curiosity in me that led everywhere.
ELLIOT CHAN Contributor
Ouga Chaka ouga ouga! Few people understand movies and music better than Quentin
Tarantino. His directorial debut, Reservoir Dogs brings me right back on the track for
a little green bag and maybe a lime in the coconut. The compilation features classic gasoline-dosing songs I thought I'd forgotten, including "Stuck in the Middle" by
Stealers Wheel and "Hooked on a Feeling" by Blue Swede. It's a soundtrack that makes
me glad that I still have my earlobes, but I wonder if they ever figured out what "Like
A Virgin" was all about.
CURTIS MICHAEL DAVEY Ad Coordinator
Two that stand out in my mind as having impacted me greatly are: Immortal Beloved.
It was the first time that I had seen/heard the story behind Beethoven's music and the
life experiences that influenced his work. Simply beautiful!
The other is The Pink Panther (1967). Aside from the silky smooth jazz tunes from
Henry Mancini that blend seamlessly into the film, there's this scene around the middle
of the movie where an impromptu song/dance number takes place in a ski lodge. Fran
Jeffries entertains the audience with a sultry performance of "Meglio Stasera" while
Inspector Jacque Clouseau bumbles about around her. I'll never forget it.
FRASER DOBBS Contributor
28 Days Later. The pairing of two phenomenal talents, composer John Murphy and director Danny Boyle, to extraordinary result. The whole film, Boyle confessed, "was cut
to Godspeed [You! Black Emperor]" in his head, and features an edited version of their
movement "East Hastings." A more perfect pairing for a zombie film does not exist.
Murphy crafted the score, including the iconic "In The House - In A Heartbeat," and
later went on to compose the absolutely beautiful "Sunshine (Adagio In D Minor)" for
the movie of the same name. Not only was 28 Days Later the soundtrack that introduced me to Grandaddy ("AM 180"), it features Brian Eno's "An Ending (Ascent)" and
Blue States' "Season Song."
COLEMAN INGRAM Contributor
I have to mention two: the "soundtrack" for the film Hard Core Logo because it actually transcends the label of soundtrack for me. When I hear Hugh Dillon and Swamp
Baby busting out those tunes, I don't think of it as them; I think of it as the fictional
band Hard Core Logo. Tied for first place is Yann Tiersen's gorgeous work on the Amelie
soundtrack. It has been on my iPod since the film was released and won't be leaving too soon.
JAMES OLSON Contributor
Pulp Fiction: Firstly, "Misirlou" by Dick Dale is one of the greatest songs ever used in a
title sequence. That menacing surf guitar lick can't help but get my blood boiling. What
follows is an eclectic and decidedly retro mix of surf rotk, funk, soul, and folk that masterfully complements the tone of what I consider to be Quentin Tarantino's magnum opus.
Sound bites from the movie are added in to create a truly unique listening experience.
You can almost see the movie play out in front of you as you progress through the album.
"Let's Stay Together," "Son of a Preacher Man," and especially "Jungle Boogie" never get
old. Neither does Samuel L Jackson's iconic "Ezekiel 25:17" speech.
MAX WAINWRIGHT Contributor
The "Spaghetti Western" trilogy-. If I had to narrow it down, it would be For A Few
Dollars More because my dad has it on record. Ennio Morricone's scores not only narrate the film amazingly, but the pieces by themselves are just way too cool. Surf guitar
next to mariachi horns and lonely harmonicas? I mean c'mon. These also feature some
of the most iconic melodies in pop music. UNDER REVIEW—OCTOBER
BEAR MOUNTAIN
(Last Gang Records)
***** ■""'*'^wi
■ *".'..    ..'   j
However underappreciated Bear Mountain may be
within the local realm of Vancouver, their alien-
meets-tribal hubbub has caught on with the music
savvy across the globe. Having self-released their
first EP only a year ago and after turning down
major labels, the band has toured the major summer festivals, playing for mass amounts of sunbaked crowds, and even opened for Hot Chip on
LoUapalooza's big stage.
The electronic four-piece has proven themselves well-deserving of their achievements
through the exuberant XO. The blog-flooding
hype-machine hit "Two Step" plays in uplifting
tranquility and lustful energy. The raw beats and
luminous synths make for a whirlwind of intoxicated and dreamy party pop. The band soars magically into "Congo," a confident tune made to drive
dancers into a mad, instinctual pulse. Deep bass
lines, live instrumentation, scratchy vocals, bubbly
guitar, bird chirps, echoed chanting, throbbing
synths, it has it all. The listener is taken through
heartfelt lyrics and danceable beats in "Survive"
and "Faded." A more tropical sound blended with
a classy, Euro-tech mix seeps through "Swim." You
are reminded of summer heat waves, every hour
of the night used to dance and jump around with
a fruity cocktail in hand, and days spent swimming in the thick waves of the West Coast XO
is concluded with a jazzy, intense number, "See
You Through." Mournful lyrics and a build up of
psychedelic synths, guitars, and whiny screams
of keys pound past like a mindfully distraught but
dramatically motivating dream.
Consequently, the album sounds like a
blend of the emotion of the National, less
drowsy vocals of Chad Valley, the ease of
Millionyoung, and '8os-driven energy like that
of Goldroom. Bear Mountain knows how to
make a sad listener's blood boil in hope and
dance to a rhythm so real it's as though we are
witnessing a live, tribal dance circle meet an
alien electro band rise from the ash of'80s sass.
—Josefa Cameron
THEBINZ
(Rocktcyjon Recordings)
•MfeU-S-A
From the first buzzing riff of the Binz's debut EP,
it's evident that these four zealous Vancouverites
are on a mission to blast into your head and claim.
your soul. The initiation to this manic rite begins
with "Arms Race," a minute and fifteen seconds of
swirling guitars, rock solid rhythm, and fire-and-
brimstone vocals that will spin your head around
so fast that you won't even see the thicker, darker
"Hale-Bop" coming.
Then, right when you think you have the Binz
figured out, they hityou with the luminous "Forget
I Said a Thing," a dynamic climax that suggests
that there is more to these brethren than a handful of predictable chords. The swagger of "Time
is Everything^keeps things on the more buoyant
side, offering up the hand-raising revival with hips
shaking uncontrollably and four sweat-drenched
heads thrown back towards the sky.
Finally, the ritual comes to an end with the final
paramount sermon; "We are the City" is the most
compelling and unique song on the EP, the brisk
vocals building to possessed howls that merge
towards a surprisingly melodic chorus. Together,
these five songs are at once a fervent proclamation of the Binz's sonic mission and a full out
punk rock 'n' roll assault that will bring you to
your knees. There's no doubt that this EP is only
a glimpse of bigger things to come: a band with
this much spirit won't stand down anytime soon.
—MarkPaulhus
DRAWN SHIP
(Scratch)
There are definitely some ghosts resurrected in the
sophomore effort by Drawn Ship, a Vancouver trio
offering up a minimal brand of rock that a mature,
sophisticated audience is sure to appreciate. Ghost
Weight focuses on dealing with the burdens of the
past, be them from the pages of history books,
current social injustices, or from the personal
memoirs of lead singer Lyn Heinemann. Songs like
"Gabriel Dumont," "Orangemen," and "Unknown
Sister" accomplish a dual purpose of stimulating
the mind while staying extremely pleasant to the
ears—a feat achieved with aid from the band's
friends.
Drawn Ship's second full-length presents
a slightly fuller sound when compared to their
debut, thanks to a number of guest appearances
by Hannah Georgas, Leah Abramson, and Mother
Mother's Ryan Guldemon. All the extra help with
vocals amounts to a consistent stream of gorgeous melodies and harmonies that complement minimal-but-effective arrangements. The
few instruments that are played never compete
with each other and every note seems emphasized
and unhurried, allowing the story to be told with
full clarity.
Songs like "Break Up Math" and "Call Darling
John" have that rare ability to spark a sing-a-long
all the while dealing with rather heavy prose. "In
the morning when I woke / Every cloud is filled with blood" is the starting chorus of "Call Darling
John," and though the visual detail of the tragic
story is vivid, the tune is catchy and warrants attention on its own. Such is the allure of Ghost Weight.
With Heinemann and company's smooth
vocals, the album has a calming effect even with
the arrangements drenched in minor tonalities and the lyrics settled in melancholy. Ghost
Weight is delicate and well-produced balance of
folk spirit, pop melody, and rock attitude. It is a
simple and beautiful listen from start to finish.
—Slavko Bucifal
FIELD ASSEMBLY
(Independent)
FIEID ASSEMBLY NA3CO
Acoustic singer-songwriter projects can be treacherous affairs to assess. Field Assembly's second
release, Narco, is in the positive-yet-confusing
position of being so well-crafted, so subtle, and
so enjoyable to listen to that the praise is great yet
paradoxically in short supply.
Lyle Adam Fox is an outstanding musician and
songsmith, crafting subdued-yet-bold tracks that
blend together seamlessly as an album. And that
might just be part of the problem. Fox's voice is
distinctive, clear, and articulate, but his inflection and tone rarely varies. Such is the case with
the tone of most of the songs. "Through a Bottle
Through a Well" stands out only in that it seems
to deviate from the relaxed, wistful atmosphere
of the remaining songs in its melancholic minor
chord guitar work.
The use of additional instruments really brings
out the individual character of each of the songs
beyond Fox's vocal and guitar work. "Storm and
Stress" begins with guitar and percussion with
languid bass, stately trumpet, and warm keys
gradually weaving into the track. "Lions Versus
Christians" glides along with quiet grace, punctuated by marching drums, tasteful electric guitar
leads, and bookended by yearning harmonica.
The remaining tracks follow suit, incorporating
additional instrumentation with such careful consideration and grace in a way to emotionally enrich
Fox's melodies and lyrical tales.
Narco is an accomplished folk album by an
equally proficient Canadian talent Sunsets have
never sounded so sweet.
—James Olson
MARTYRS
(Independent)
Spring reverb, tremolo, and a catchy guitar line.
Every album has to start somewhere, and Martyr's self-titled debut starts out classically. Opener
"Amensia" is a dreamy beach jam, with plenty of
smoky vocals thrown on top of bright instrumental
ornamentation and a slightly-too-noodly bass
undercurrent
It's startling, then, when what starts off as
a straight-up rock album takes a steep dive into
whiskey-soaked (literally) folk territory. "Bourbon
Breakfast" "Vancouver," "Julian," and "Just A
Ballad" all show off Martyrs brainchild Dan Ross'
country-porch fingerpicking skills and reedy voice
in a simple and unrepentantly formulaic manner. Each track sounds wonderful, with careful backing vocals supplied by Hannah Walker
(Mercy Years) entering into the mix at just the
right places. Ross' singer-songwriter catalog is
somber territory, and it comes out at odds against
the rock band music that opens and closes the
album. Martyrs is an emotional rollercoaster, but
it's also a beautiful journey from front to back.
—Fraser Dobbs
NEEDLES//PINS
OUTTA THIS PLACE B/W DATE
NIGHT (Y0
J BRING
THE NAPALM) SEVEN-INCH
(LaTiDa)
Needles//Pins (prounounced "needles and pins,"
like the Sonny Bono song) are back. For those of
you unfamiliar with the group, they're a power-
pop-punk band from right here in Vancouver.
Singer Adam Ess' voice is gravelly and the rhythm
section plays mostly straight simple stuff—so
why are they good? Because they write amazing
songs. Also, the guitar work is melodic, favouring multi-stringed patterns for leads over more
traditional guitar solos. The A-side, "Outta This
Place," is no crazy departure from their 12:34 LP,
but the B-side is different: a little slower, a little
poppier, and it features some nice pop touches like
hand-claps and guest vocals by the Ballantynes'
Vanessa Dandurand. Two solid songs to make a
solid seven-inch.
—Justin White
(Saved By Radio)
*-<*'■
Rae Spoon is an extraordinarily talented musician
and singer, with a diverse and varied history of
playing country, indie rock, and electronica. Ten
years and ten albums in, Spoon had the ability to
do pretty much anything with My Prairie Home, but
the result is a mixed bag.
The album plays, for the most part, like
straight-up story-fed country. It's not that Spoon
is in want for things to write about—the effects
of rural life on minorities, ignorance, and abuse
are just some of the heavy topics Spoon decides to
tackle—but the instrumentation applied is uninspired and static under the lyrics. My Prairie Home
is Spoon's Nashville Skyline, a record made mostly with simple strong structures and largely universal
themes that seems to dedicate too much time to
country tropes and Spoon's soft voice.
My Prairie Home is at its most interesting when
it realizes itself as the soundtrack that it is, to a
National Film Board documentary of the same
name. Interludes like "Glacier Step," "Moving
Bus," and "Airplane Home" flesh out the 19-song
recording with ambience and beauty, and are also
some of the few tracks where Spoon's rich history
with electronic experimentation bursts through
the seams. Meanwhile, the grungy, power-chord-
fueled "Snake In The Water" plays black sheep
with distortion and legitimate rock yowling.
My Prairie Home is the whole of several half-
realized but fully-distinct parts. Together,
it's a rocky but enjoyable road, showing
off where Rae Spoon has come from musically without bothering to blend it up at all.
—Fraser Dobbs
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M08UNF0alMRGC0NQlTS.COM   // TICIfliTSAVAILABIiMN0RTieNTICKETS.COM THE EVAPORATORS /TOUGH AGE/
1 THEE GOBLINS
I September 8 / Astorino's
I There axe plenty of analogs between Astorino's and
1 Vancouver's own Nardwuar: both are crazy remnants of a time gone by, but wholly inclusive to new
people and ideas. An all-ages show at this ancient
banquet hall presented by the zaniest Canadian
journalist ever to grace the cover of ION Magazine
just made some kind of weird sense.
Thee Goblins paraded their brand of two-piece
punk-rock proudly. Playing to an early crowd of
children and teens, Thee Goblins' frontmantnot-
so-secretly Nardwuar in a mask and one hell of a
sweater) made sure his enthusiasm sparked the
audience before the end of their brief set.
Tough Age were a logical fit to break up the
heavy dose of the Nard' filtering throughout the
evening. Jarrett K., their ex-Apollo Ghosts/Korean
Gut singer/guitarist, was one of the original members of the Safe Amplification Site Society, the
collective that gutted Astorino's just a short time
ago to turn it into an all-ages venue. The band,
recently signed to Mint Records, played an exemplary set of psych-fused rock with the occasional
'50s throwback cover song.
Unfortunately, Astorino's definitely wasn't
designed for four-piece rock acts to play at 11
simultaneously, and it was hard to hear anything
over the wash of tile reverb and fake-wood-panel .
echo of guitar and drums bouncing off the cavernous space.
After a very brief intermission, it was back
into the incredibly sweaty bingo hall to witness
the glory of the Evaporators. The greatest lie the
world ever told was that this three-piece, again
fronted by Nardwuar The Human Serviette, wasn't
a motivational speaker in disguise. If your high
school years were anything like mine, they were
filled with groups of dancing beat-boxers doing
acapella covers of Led Zeppelin and rapping about
the dangers of hard drugs; The Evaporators are
like that, but way cooler.
The genius is that they weren't playing in
a school gymnasium, and that kids and teens
were going out of their way (some from as far as
Manning Park) to show up and listen. Songs about
Canadian history (Nardwuar can't keep factoids
out of his music, either!), standing up for yourself, and the importance of individuality were all
underlined by great old-school punk guitar riffs
and some killer yellow costumes.
The genius is that they weren't playing in
a school gymnasium, and that kids and teens
were going out of their way (some from as far
as Manning Park) to show up and listen. Songs
about Canadian history (Nardwuar can't keep
factoids out of his music, either!), standing up
for yourself, and the importance of individuality!
were all underlined by great old-school punk guitar I
riffs and some killer yellow costumes.
Nardwuar busted out all the usual tricks—that I
is, crowd-surfing with a Rhodes, a Canadian-flag I
knit sweater and matching motorcycle helmet,
shout-alongs, and trivia questions—and though
I'd seen each one a dozen times, Nardwuar's
schtick never gets old.
Maybe it's his unwavering enthusiasm and
positivity, or maybe it was the legion of young
people getting sucked into the world of good punk-
rock, but by the end of the night I was beaming
just as widely as the Nard was, even if I wasn't
sweating quite as hard.
—Fraser Dobbs
THE DODOS/COUSINS
September 9 / The Biltmore
It was a Monday night, as smoke crept across the
stage at the Biltmore Cabaret and the opening
band's first track, "Thunder," marked the start of
the show. Opening for the Dodos was Cousins, a
two-piece pop-grunge band from Halifax.
From the song's name you might expect a roar,
but instead this thunder rolled. Frontman Aaron
Mangle's doleful wail began as an undertone but
gradually built to a howl over the course of the
song as Leigh Dotey pounded out an unrelenting rhythm. Mangle's singing was reminiscent of Jim
James of My Morning Jacket, with his voice containing a softness and yet a power simultaneously.
Outside of a brief interlude at the 15-minute
mark to provide an odd yet welcoming tribute
to Pisces, Cousins is all business. They powered
through their set of songs full of gradual escalations that become detonations before closing out
with "Die," the final track on their latest album The
Palm at the End of the Mind.
Like Cousins, the Dodos are a band of slow
builds and fierce rhythms — so fierce in fact that
David Letterman himself couldn't stop commenting on drummer Logan Kroeber's performance
of "Confidence" on his show just six days before
the Biltmore. "But honest to God, how about the
kid?!?" said Letterman after thanking the band.
The Dodos started with "Confidence" on
Monday and Letterman was right; it's hard to
describe the way Kroeber drums. Self-assured,
imperative, and confident, his drumming has a
relentless voice of its own. It's not that Kroeber
overpowers singer Meric Long, far from it; they
rose and fell in a harmonious balance as each song
swelled. Also joining Long and Kroeber on stage
was a third musician, guitarist Joe Haege, who's
been recruited for their tour and fit in flawlessly.
Though new album Carrier was well represented, the Dodos made sure to delve into the
depths of a solid back catalogue. New songs such
as "Relief" and "The Current" were joined by hits
from previous albums, including "Black Night,"
from No Colour and holder of over half a million
views on YouTube.
It seemed for a moment that the Dodos were
leaving the crowd with "Good," a song that exponentially grew from a twangy-electric finger-picking rhythm to a catharsis of howling guitars and
rattling percussion artillery before it exited with
a fuzz of drum beats and "ohohohoh" intoning.
It's a natural fit for the end of a set but luckily
the crowd at the Biltmore didn't have to wait long
for an encore; the Dodos let them cheer and chant
for barely a minute before another two-song set
The real final song of the night was "Foois"
from 2008 album Visiter. The quiet-loud-quiet over
relentless rhythm dynamic combined with a solid
"Woah oh" sing-along refrain made it a highlight
and favourite even in a night of loyal fans being
rewarded with what they came to hear.
—Chris Schonfeldt
GREET THE MIND / ELEKWENT FOLK
September 14 / Fortune Sound Club
The sold out Greet the Mind show at Fortune Sound
Club on September 14 could best be described by
the lyrics of opening act, Elekwent Folk. "Feel
the energy," the Vancouver-based hip hop group
tell the crowd while performing their hook-filled
track "Embers." Both performers and audience
alike felt said energy, as the positive vibes in the
venue were palpable.
What was the cause behind all this positive
energy? Maybe it was the1 proportion of all ticket
sales went to Pacific Wild, a non-profit organization working to protect coastal habitat and wildlife
in British Columbia. Or maybe it was because of
the organizers, the UBC surf club, that there were
so many audience members there to show their
support. Or maybe it was just the always impressive
sound system that Fortune has to offer, providing
crisp beats and easily discernable instrument and
vocal track quality. Every one of these factors could
have heightened the mood, but when combined
with the flowing music and captivating stage presence of the performers, the deal was easily sealed.
A-Ro, AstroLogical, and Slippery Elm of
Elekwent Folk kicked off the evening with their
smooth, lyrical hip hop. It was the group's first
performance of the year, but it didn't show.
Melodic, meditative beats set the background for
conscious lyrics and the tight interplay between
the two emcees. Looking around the audience,
I noticed that some people were genuinely surprised and excited about how good a local hip
hop group could sound. Though hip hop music
has a relatively long history and deep roots in
Vancouver, it was refreshing to see people making
the realization that local groups are still creating
great hip hop music.
Headliners Greet the Mind followed suit
with a set of contemplative, yet groove-oriented
downtempo/trip hop beats. This was the fourth
show for beatmaker/guitarist Mike Jensen and
beatmaker/violinist Igor Puzanov. Starting the
set off acoustically with the Animals classic "The
House of the Rising Sun," they already had the
audience singing along at the top of their lungs.
They followed up with original songs, which are
a mix of live instrumentation and electronic beats/
samples. Songs featuring smooth atmospheric
guitar lines, haunting violin melodies and textures,
both over expansive atmosphere and crisp hardhitting drum sounds. A highlight of the set was
"Joni Watts," featuring a quote from the Western
Zen philosopher Alan Watts reminding us "What
you do is something the whole universe is doing,
at the place we call here and now."
The duo ended the night with a supremely
funky and danceable remix of the Dale Hawkins'
song "Suzie Q," with the crowd acting as a pulsating ball of dancing energy until the set ended to
thunderous applause.
—Stefan Raupach
BOSNIAN RAINBOWS / NOSTALGHIA
September 14 / The Biltmore
Expecting delays, this reviewer arrived just before
the headlining Bosnian Rainbows were set to take
the stage. It was a shame that Nostalghia were so
timely, as exclusively Spanish speaking alternative rock groups tend to be a rare sight in the city.
On their first-ever stop in Vancouver, Bosnian
Rainbows delighted fans on an unusually foggy
Saturday night. As the curtain rose, Nicci Kasper
flooded the Biltmore with ambient synths in an
extended intro to "Eli." The first song of the night
smoldered with slow burning intensity as Teri
Gender Bender's vocals were awash in reverb and
echo effects. Teri inquired to the crowd, "Why do
you smile at me?" as the music grew with a fury
into a bombastic crescendo setting the right tone
for the night ahead.
Teri Gender Bender (Le Butcherettes) was fascinating to behold. Her deeper tone is reminiscent of Siouxsie Sioux in her prime and her stage
presence was compelling. Heavily invested in the
music generated by her three stage mates, Teri
gestured and moved in a simultaneously theatrical
and idiosyncratic manner. Omar Rodriguez-Lopez
was incendiary; a veteran of At the Drive-in and The
Mars Volta, Rodriguez-Lopez is a genius behind
the fretboard in the same manner of a mad scientist Frequently experimenting with distortion and
effects, his tone sounded everything from spacey to
piercing, sometimes within the same solo. Special
props to his solo on "I Cry For You" which sounded
like a molested saxophone and his turn at fretboard
canoodling on "Turtle Neck" which can only be
described as caterwauling.
The aforementioned "Turtle Neck" was a definite highlight of the band's set As one of the stronger tracks from the group's already consistently
enjoyable debut, the song felt fully realized in a live
setting. Smoke billowed on to the theatrically light
stage as Deantoni Parks' (another Mars Volta alum)
sputtering drums gave way to Rodriguez-Lopez's
dreamy guitar riffing. Teri commanded the audience throughout the track's many dynamic and
rhythmic twists and turns, navigating the audience
through a sea of noise and musical bliss.
Running through the breadth of their debut
from cover to cover, Bosnian Rainbows fully displayed their prowess as a live act Mesmerizing,
bizarre, sincere, quirky, and transcendent in equal
measures, Bosnian Rainbows left the crowd begging for more as the curtain alas came to a close.
—James Olson SEX CHURCH
by JOSHUA
GABERT-DOYON
illustration by
GINA MACKAY
For those of you just joining us, Sex Church is a Vancouver-based band with
a dark, suffocating and frenzied sound, that hovers somewhere near post-
punk. With that said, they were surprisingly good-humoured when I spoke
to them outside of the Cobalt before their show with Defektors and Detroit-
based Human Eye.
"Beef bourguignon: it's really plain, but really good," says bassist Nick
Groessl.
"Yeah it lets everything kind of simmer," continues frontman and guitarist Levon Olsen. They're discussing what kind of food their music would be.
They're quick to unanimously agree (between repressed chuckles) on the
French delicacy.
With two album's already to Sex Church's name, the band has a third
currently in the works. "We're writing it, working on it, it's simmering" says
Olsen. He cites the, "the drudge of daily life" —though it's hard to tell how
seriously he's taking himself.
When I ask about "Wrong Side," a track off of their 2012 EP Somnambulist,
Sex Church's drummer admits the band didn't have anything definite planned,
but decided to work things out while recording. Olsen takes a shot at explaining
the general development of a Sex Church song: "We basically make a map of
a song and we have a structure, a loose structure, and we take it from there."
This lack of rigidity is what makes the music so hypnotic; everything hinges
on a balance between distressed vocals and droning, cyclic noise—a balance
they toy with extensively.
It's no secret that the members of Sex Church often seem like they play
independently of how their audience is responding. "I'm either staring at the
floor or at my hands the whole time, and once in a while I glance up and see
the audience," says Groessl. No grand performance, no deep connection with
the audience, they play in their own worlds.
"It's not that I don't appreciate when the audience is into it, that's still
good," Olsen explains, "but to me sometimes it doesn't matter if you're playing to two people or at a venue like the Biltmore when it's fucking packed."
Despite their lack of showmanship, the band's sound is intensely visceral.
Their inaudible but fervent vocals, paired with the repetition of the phrase
"daily life" during our interview, speaks to a broader sense of alienation. In
a city full of neon signs and buzzing machines, the inability to communicate
is a big part of their tangled sound. When I ask them about gentrification
and the shutting down of venues in the city, their drummer believes that it
"contributes to a sense of frustration." Olsen takes a moment to think: "Yeah
sure, but the bigger picture ofVancouver is like, gloom, and poverty plays into
the [pauses] I work in the Downtown Eastside. Every morning I walk past
hookers and see shit in front of my warehouse doors."
When asked how they decide if a song is too abrasive, smiles show up
slowly on Sex Church's faces. "It's nothing I've ever thought about frankly,"
answers Olsen, with a coy grin.
"I try to get some really high pitch sounds during my recordings, that are
like, painful," Caleb Bouey, the band's other guitarist gleefully adds. When
it comes down to it, Olsen says he's completely unconcerned with how listeners react to Sex Church, "except for the person that's paying to put it out"
While their sound is occasionally disorganized, the band's ability to soak a
listener in an extended shoegaze jam shouldn't be underestimated. Sex Church
is all about tension; their music hinges on the tension between muffled lyrics
and highly distorted instrumentation. A raw and chaotic sound coining from
guys who acknowledge the sometimes vapid nature of city life. MODO IS A PROUD SPONSOR OF THIS YEAR'S VICTORY SQUARE BLOCK PARTY
mention DISCORDER MAGAZINE at signup to get
|    $35 FREE DRIVING
offer expires dec 31,2013, and cannot be used in conjunction with any other offer, valid for new members only.
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BUTTA ON THE BREAD SHOW
with Ryan Rosell
interviewed by JAMES OLSON
lettering by JUSTIN LONGOZ
photo by JAMES OLSON
Taking over the CiTR airwaves every Wednesday from 3-4 p.m., host Ryan
Rosell serves up an eclectic mix of beats, from what's local to what's loco.
If that's not enough to get you listening, then how about the show's description: "It's like mixing unicorn blood with Christopher Walken's tears,
then pouring it into your ears."
Discorder: What's the show about? '
Rosell: Butta on the Bread started two and a half years ago. The show primarily focuses on local bands as well as concerts and other events that are happening around
town—primarily in the scenes of garage-rock and pop. But I also dabble in a little hip
hop and electronic music as well.
How did the show come to be?
I came to CiTR just to start using the CD library and the vinyl library, just to have access to it. Then I met a few of the programmers, in particular Chris-a-riffic, host of the
Parts Unknown show. I went on his show and eventually made a demo and then started
working on the student executive and then just sort of got sucked into CiTR consuming
pretty much every waking hour of my life.
Are there any specific local bands you like to feature on the show?
Young Braised. He's a rapper who I think is taking the rap game by storm and I'm really
impressed every time I see his shows. He's probably the most interesting musician that
I have my eyes on. And the B-Lines. I also want to give a RIP to Apollo Ghosts. I performed on stage at their last show on one of their songs that I won through the Fundrive
silent auction this year. That is a CiTR-owed highlight in my life.
How did you get involved in the CiTR community?
It started off just dabbling but now I'm an employee. I'm on staff; I'm the president of
the student executive, I host a show, and then I also volunteer. I'm an employee as the
Production Coordinator to specify. How that happened I have no idea. I woke up one day
and CiTR was kind of my whole life.
How did you get employment at CiTR?
We offer several work study positions that are reserved for students and basically I was
just a slave here until I got one. I say slave but I love doing what I do here; I would do
it for free. It's just nice that if it's taking up that much of my time, I can at least have
some income.
What music did you listen to growing up?
Nothing I'm too proud of. When I was really, really young I used to dance a lot to Elvis,
which isn't that bad. It got pretty embarrassing when puberty happened. Puberty is
not a high point in my life in any aspect, but certainly for my musical tastes. I got really big into classic rock when I was 13. The first cqncert I saw was Roger Waters live
in Key Arena in Seattle performing Dark Side of the Moon. It was crazy. It's interesting
how my first concert experience was like a giant stadium pyrotechnics concert. Now my
preferred concert is a really intimate, maybe 10-person show where you know the band
personally and you can connect and rage, not sit in a seat. I want to be able to have
their sweat flicked onto me.
What is your favourite show besides your own?
My top list is Good Morning My Friends with DJ Abraham, the Parts Unknown show with
Chris-a-riffic, Duncan's Donuts, and the Shakespeare ShowwVn Dan Shakespeare.
What does the future hold for the show?
I'm not sure how much longer Butta on the Bread in its current format will last.
I'm working more on a spoken word entertainment podcasty type show called
Podcasturbation so keep your eyes peeled for that. I like to plug it even though it doesn't
exist yet. Now that school's started up I have a lot less time because I'm trying to be a
full-time student and work a full-time job here. September I'm here usually 30 hours a
week. So I'm dying a little bit inside; but in a good way. CITR 101.9 FM CHARTS  hitz of September 2013 assftw
ARTIST
1 Jay Arner**
2 Washed Out
4     Kristi Lane Sinclair**
ALBUM
Jay Arner
Paracosm
Flourish//Perish
The Sea Alone
Poochy
Mint
Sub Pop
Flemish Eye
Self-Released
6     The Deep Dark Woods*        Jubilee
9    ladjfjmd*
0    The Pack A.D.*+
2    Gauntlet Hair
3    Lightning Dust*+
5 The Passenger**
6 Austra*
7 The Courtneys**
Grand Analog*
Solar Year*
White Poppy*+
21    Hermetic**
23 " FwTraw**
25    Said The Whaled
Music For Objects
The Midnight Mass
ladyfmd
Some Sssongs
Can't Get No
Stills
Fantasy
Six Shooter
Paper Bag
Light Organ
Hybridity Music
Nettwerk
Burger
The Worse Things Get, The
Harder 1 Fight, The Harder
1 Fight...
Anti-
Negative Object
More Than Human
Olympia
Paper Bag
The Courtneys
Hockey Dad
Modern Thunder
The Shadow Cabinet
Waverly
Arbutus.
White Poppy
Not Not Fun
Heartbreakology
Alarum
Perpetual Surrender
Paper Bag
Oont Get Heavy
Last Gang
Deserve
Couple Skate
1 love You
Hidden Pony
L\)
.0     tell you how to find them. Ch
eck out other great campus/community radio
chartsatwww.earshot-online.com
ARTIST
ALBUM
LABEL
26
Dinosaur Bones*
Shaky Dream
Dine Alone ->
27
Plays:four*+
Lay Doe
More Than Human
28
Prairie Cat**
Got Nothin'
Triple Crown
29
Bear Mountain*
XO
Last Gang
30
Bankrobber*
life's Nutso
/$S$w-Released
ti. Records with asterisks (*) are Canadian and
independent music stores across Vancouver. If you
is Sarah Cordingley. If you ask nicely she'll
32 Ikomka
33 Rae Spoon*
34 Sean Nicholas Savage*
35 SLUTEVER
36 David Lynch
37 Lindi Ortega*
38 MtKimbie
39 Rose Windows
40 The Albertans*+
41 Julia Hotter
42 Julianna Barwick
43 Montag*
44 Paper Lions*
45 Sonny & The Sunsets
46 The Ballantynes**
47 Diane**
48 Monomyth*
49 Jasper Sloan Yip*+
50 Dearhunter     ;^&|
HSY
Aerotropolis
My Prairie Home
Other Life
1994 B/W SPIT
Cold Spring Fault Less
Youth
The Sun Dogs
Dangerous Anythings
Loud City Song
Nepenthe
Phases
Hyperdub
Alberta Foundation Arts
Warp Records
Sub Pop
Ernest jenning Record Co
Domino
Dead Oceans
Carpark
Fountain Pop
Antenna to the Afterworld      Polyvinyl
King, Does This Not
Please You? THE PACK AD
SOME SSSONGS LP
v    TaB*
OF MONTREAL
LOUSrWITH...Cfi/tP
HAIM
DAYS ARE SOME CD/LP
*Bi&0mmM
TALL TALL SHADOWS CD/LP
WISE UP GHOST
AND Ot HER SONGS
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TUB ROOTS
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WISE UP GHOST CD/LP
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with COUPON
m m
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*\. Zulu Records
1972-1976 W 4th Ave      ]
f|     Vancouver, BC i
&M   tel 604738.3232 ;
L*S%Jc£*aB  www.zulurecords.com L
STORE HOURS

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