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 jkhl  » X X X X X x^s
NOVEMBER 2010 XX X
// SUPPORTING VANCOUVER'S INDEPENDENT MUSIC COMMUNTY FOR OVER 25 YEARS
M
«T PANDA/SLH^S/
MUMi^/ACHEREC^^^I
1
il r ? ■■
X
_i EDITOR
Jordie You;
ART DIRECTOR
Lindsey Hampton
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Debby Reis
COPY EDITORS
Sorah Berman, Steve Louie, Andrew
"Over the Shoulder" Kai-Yin
MacKenzie, Debby Reis
AD MANAGER
Maeaan Thomas
UNDER REVIEW EDITOR
Sarah Berman
RLA EDITOR
Steve Louie
WEB EDITOR
Reilly Wood
CALENDAR LISTINGS
Debby Reis, Jordie Yow
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
Corey Ratch
PROGRAM GUIDE
Bryce Dunn, Debby Reis
OFFICIAL TWEETERS
Debby Reis, Dorothy Neufeld
CiTR STATION MANAGER
Brenda Grunau
PUBLISHER
Student Radio Society of UBC
PROMOTIONS INTERN
Dorothy Neufeld
COVER
Ryan Dyck
EDITOR'S NOTE
Dear Discorder:
November is a special month for non-profits. Despite
the ads you see gracing our pages, that is what we are—a
non-profit Our magazine exists because of a gracious grant
from our publisher, CiTR, That grant covers the costs that
we cannot make up with ads.
November is a special month for non-profits. It is
viewed for a variety of reasons as the key month for
fundraising. It is the month when people seek to make
charitable donations for tax purposes, and on an emotional
level, it is the time when people are in a more charitable
spirit of giving as the Xmas season rolls around.
CiTR has a dedication to maintain it's presence as a
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SEPTEMBER
WRITERS
Sarah Berman, Nathaniel Bryce, Slavko Bucifal, Fathima Calder, Sarah Charrouf, Zarah Cheng, Adrian Dziewanski,
Tony Kess, Kamil Krawczyk, Doug Mackenzie, Miranda Martini, Kaidin McNabb, Mark Paulhus, Will Pedley, Ashley
Perry, Alexis Stoymenoff, Jasper Walley, Ming Wong, Jordie Yow
PHOTOGRAPHERS & ILLUSTRATORS
Tyler Crich, Andy Dixon, Ryan Dyck, Russell Leng, Steve Louie, Ben Marvin, Skot Nelson, Jon Pesochin,
Jacob Sussmen, Jordie Yow
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1 request TABLE OF CONTENTS //
NOVEMBER 2010
MOUSTACHES!
IF YOU ARE CURIOUS WHY THERE ARE
SO MANY MOUSTACHIOED FACES IN THE
PAGES OF OUR MAGAZINE THIS MONTH,
YOU WILL FIND YOUR EXPLANATION RIGHT
HERE. DISCORDER IS PARTICIPATING IN
MOVEMBER THIS MONTH, THE ANNUAL
EVENT TO RAISE FUNDS AND AWARENESS
FOR PROSTATE CANCER BY GROWING
MOUSTACHES FOR A MONTH. TO DONATE
GO TO CA.M0VEMBER.COM AND CLICK ON
"DONATE" TO MAKE A DONATION TO THE
CAUSE. HAPPY MOVEMBER!
08/HOT PANDA
Vancouver has a new band and Edmonton has one less and that band is Mint
Records recording artists Hot Panda. Our reporter chatted with them about
their new album, new band member and new city.
10/HUMANS
Where did Humans get those weird puppets that they use in all their videos?
Are they just fun or are they really fun or are they really, really realty fun? These
questions are answered on page ten along with many other things.
12/SUUNS
Suuns took are pretty busy touring, backing up Land ofTalk, opening for Land
of Talk, changing their band name so they don't get sued, releasing their debut
album, but they still had time to chat with our reporter from New York.
13 / ACHE'S TEN YEAR ANNIVERSARY
Ten years and Ache Records is celebrating it's anniversary with a super duper
sale. Also there's a big picture of Andy Dixon.
14/TONY DALLAS
In September we did a piece in which cool people talked about things to do
in town and we should have asked Tony from Boogie Monster, the SSRIs,Hot
Tub Time Machine and Fan Death to participate then. We didn't, but we're making up for it now. He doesn't talk about the new album Boogie Monster has
recorded, but when it's released we'll bring him back to do that
18/PHILANTHROPY
Did you know that the power to be a philanthropist was in you all along? In
the middle of this charitable month we point out some of the most deserving
nonprofit organizations in Vancouver.
07/FILM STRIPPED
Nowhere Boy
20/CALENDAR
by Ben Marvin
22/PROGRAM GUIDE
25/ART PROJECT
Russel Leng
35/DEPARTURES REVISITED
A our newest column syndicated from Weird Canada featuring Fraser
& Debolt and the Ugly Ducklings.
39 /CHARTS
00
<
D
w
t4
28/UNDER REVIEW
Antony & the Johnsons / Beekeeper / Das Racist / Defektors / Diamond Rings
/ the Dreadnoughts / Eskmo / Fine Mist / Five Alarm Funk / Mark Haney /
Humans / Lab Coast & Extra Happy Ghost II! / Matt & Kim / the Mountains
& the Trees / No Age / Salem / Tyranahorse
32/REAL LIVE ACTION
Broken Social Scene / Caribou / Dead Prez / Dungen / Efterklang / Christian
Fennesz / Holy Fuck / Jon & Roy / Surfer Blood
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GMAILCOM DEPARTURES REVISITED//
BY AARON LEVIN
ILLUSTRATION BY JORDIE YOW
Departures was a radio program hosted by Marcel Dion on CJSRFM 88.5
in Edmonton, Alberta between 1978 and 1991. The program, highly
inspired by the legendary Alien Soundtracks program on Vancouver's
Co-op Radio, contained a diverse mix ofvintage and new-at-me-time
left-field and fringe music and was the first and only of its kind in
Alberta. On top of curating a weekly program, Dion helped found the Borealis
Electroacoustic Music Society (BEAMS) and released one or two compilations
of avant-garde music in Alberta. Departures Revisited is a column we are syndicating from the Weird Canada website, which is inspired and dedicated to
Dion's early efforts at establishing Alberta and Canada's weird musics. Thank
you, Marcel! You can find the original entries of these reviews, complete with
streams of the recordings discussed, at www.weirdcanada.ca.
Fraser & Debolt
Fraser & Debolt with Ian Guenther
(Columbia) // ??, ON // Originally Released: 1972
For an unassuming pair of country-folk dreamers, Allan Fraser and Daisy
Debolt's debut resonates with a "wyld" collection ofweirdos: hard-core psych-
folk collectors, county-fair folk-fest burn-outs, cowboy junkers and record store
braggarts alike. For years I've marveled over the LP and its audience without
resolution. It could be the innocendy tuneless harmonies, the dissonant acoustic
jangle or their harrowing explorations into freak-folk. But it's the songwriting
that gets me every time; dualic weaves of fringe rurality; a surrealist vision of
Canada rooted in the warm waters of Ontario; and a haunting, minor-key
acoustic delirium irrigated with country ballads and freak-folk shreddery.
You'll never understand it, but eventually it'll happen. I've never been wrong
with this one. Top 10 dead or alive LP. They do a devastating cover of "Don't
Let Me Down" with an alternate take on the American promo 45. Surprisingly
not very rare in Western Canada.
The Ugly Ducklings
Nothin' b/w I Can Tell
(Yorktoum Records) \\ Toronto, ON // Originally Released: 1966
Thee quintessential garage-punk single. Much has already been written
about this snarly five-piece from the centre of the world, so I'll let the wild guitar
tones and hurling vocals do the screaming. Aspiring youngsters: take note.
The black-label, silver-letter variant [redrawn] above is the first pressing. The
Classic Yorktown colour-label indicates a second pressing. Their LP Somewhere
Outside is also highly recommended. It really doesn't get better than this, m FILMSTRIPPED//
BY ANGELA YEN
ILLUSTRATION BY LINDSEY HAMPTON
NOWHERE BOY
(2009)
DIRECTOR: SAM TAYLOR-WOOD
Alt   ^MA/UMA/0(VA/^Dt| M{ UV£
Tffl
JL
C
That's right, it's yet another film about John Lennon! In the last few
years alone, there have been numerous John Lennon biopics and
documentaries. Many of them, including Chapter 27 (2006) and The
Killing of John Lennon (2006) choose to pay a great deal of attention to
Lennon's later years and the events leading up to his tragic death.
However, Nowhere Boy, directed by Sam Taylor-Wood, narrows its focus on the
less talked about story of John Lennon's troubled childhood.
Nowhere Boy was finally released in the U.S. on Oct 8, Justin time to celebrate
what would have been Lennon's 70th birthday. It had a limited released in
Canada, a week later. I saw it on opening night and as usual, the local Cineplex
was packed with teenagers. But when I walked into the theatre, I noticed that
it was practically empty, and that the few people in the audience consisted
of grey-haired, middle-aged married couples. Everyone was so neatly paired
off. It put into perspective, that 1) all the young people must be watching that
Facebook movie and 2) that these were moms and dads who have clearly been
anticipating this biopic. I hope they weren't expecting a happy, nostalgic look
back at the exciting beginnings of the Beatles, because thafs simply not what
Nowhere Boy is about
The film explores John Lennon (Aaron Johnson) through his teenage years
and his complicated relationship with his aunt, Mimi (Kristin Scott Thomas)
and his mother, Julia (Anne-Marie Duff). John lived with his aunt and uncle
and was raised by them from the time he was five year old. The film picks
up from when John begins to rebuild his relationship with his mother, who
happens to be living in the same neighbourhood. We see John learn to play
the guitar, become a wannabe Teddy Boy, learn the truth about his parents,
form a band and everything else up to around i960, right before the band is
about to head to Hamburg.
The film is told in a typical biopic fashion. The film tries to be a little
unconventional at times, like in the brief dreamlike flashbacks, but the film
doesn't push it enough to make a statement Instead, the flashbacks lead up
to a melodramatic intervention where John learns about what really happened
between his mother and father. The film really plays up the clashing personalities
between his mother and aunt to the point that it felt contrived. Even their
wardrobe and makeup were overtly presented as polar opposites. Julia's free
spirited nature sometimes feels forced and the film is definitely implying some
Freudian undertones to John and Julia's relationship, which I personally felt
was unnecessary.
Ifs quite obvious that the actor Aaron Johnson is a tad too "pretty boy" to be
playing John Lennon and the excessive close ups really didn't help. Regardless,
I have to give some credit to his performance. He played John as an up-to-no-
good teenager, rather than doing a bad impersonation of an icon. It makes it
a bit more genuine and the scenes where John is just being goofy and playful
are when you can really see and hear the resemblance.
Despite these few dramatizations, the film is quite accurate to Lennon's
biography. I think a lot of die hard fans will appreciate the film for including
even the tiniest details of John Lennon's life and also, the subde foreshadowing
to what obviously lies ahead for Lennon with the Beatles. Things like, Paul
McCartney playing "Twenty Flight Rock" to impress John in order to join the
Quarrymen, or the quick mentioning of the original Beatle's bass player Stuart
Sutcliffe, are details that definitely won't go unappreciated. There are also a
few subde references and nods to the Beades that are fun to pick up on and
they're by no means as forced as the ones in Julie Taymor's Across the Universe
(man, I hate that movie).
Having an affinity for what lies ahead for Lennon and the Beatles further
strengthens a lot of scenes emotionally. One in particular is when John loses
his temper at his mother's funeral and McCartney takes him outside. They
comfort each other with the knowledge that both of their mothers are gone
forever. Of course, the scene is highly fabricated, but if you love the Beades,
this scene is especially heart wrenching. You realize how much Lennon and
McCartney have been through together and that they'd been a part of each
other's lives since they were just two punk kids.
If you're not a huge fan or are completely unfamiliar with Lennon's
biography, the film is still decent The costumes are great and the soundtrack
is fantastic. Take away the fact that ifs about John Lennon, and you still have
a heartfelt coming-of-age story about a boy who just happens to become one
of the greatest songwriters of all time. % BY JENN PERUTKA
ILLUSTRATION BY TYLER CRICH
Have you ever heard of a band selling their own brand of hot sauce?
Well Hot Panda is one of them, joining the likes of Paul Newman
with their custom, gourmet hot sauce. Running seven dollars a
bottle, it is appropriately named Volcano ...Bloody Volcano after the
band's debut album, [ed. I heard they might have changed the .flavour,
but if you can get your hands on the original pineapple hot sauce they
made, it was excellent with a nice smokey spice to it.] The Edmonton
natives are now in the midst of promoting their sophomore record How Come
I'm Dead? I sat down with three out of the four members (Heath Parsons was
taking a power nap backstage) before their show at the Biltmore on Sept. 16 to
discuss the band's lineup change that introduces Catherine HHtz as their new
bass player, the recording process and their love for Vancouver food.
DlSCOrdBT: Looking at your website I noticed you guys have a "Foodie"
section for all the major Canadian cities. Are there any additions you'd like to
make to the Vancouver section?
Magtian Campb6lhvVhats that place called? That tiny place by Foundation
and it's long and skinny?
D: Oh, Narrow Lounge!
MC: Yes, that place!
Catherine HUtZ: I love the Eatery. And Foundation. We always end up
at Foundation.
ChHS Connelly:They have the best nachos.
MC: Legendary Noodle is ridiculous. And I love the Reef. I'm not sure if I wrote
that one on there. The best thing about Vancouver is eating. There's also that
cafe close to where we recorded that has the sandwiches.
CC: Finch's, that was a new place we went to.
D: Looking at the past couple of years you guys have opened for the Von
Bondies in Europe and played the same stage as the Beatles in Hamburg.
Is there a moment that sticks out for you where you thought "Wow, this is
really happening"?
NIC: That show in Hamburg was awesome because it was our first show in
Europe and it was a crazy flight to get there, so we were all tired and jet-lagged.
We only found out about that show two weeks before and we were already on
tour. When we finally got on stage we started playing to a crowd that we've
never played to and they were really into it and I mean, the Beatles feave played
that stage! It was so exciting and really cool.
CC:We had to cancel some dates so we could go over to Europe so it was just
this big whirlwind and she [Catherine] wasn't even in the band then.
GH:$or me, there was a show we played here for the Paralympics. We played
that show, got to bed, woke up to go to the airport and fly to Toronto where we
played Lee's Palace, and then we flew back to Vancouver and started to drive
to South by Southwest
D:The band is very versatile in its sound in that it is difficult to classify it into
one genre. Is that an effort on the band's part?
CC: I don't think ifs an effort but a result of our personalities. I think none
of us like being classified as something so there's that natural reaction that no
matter what it is, like a compliment my reaction is always to go "No, I'm not
that!" But the thing is you don't really want to be anything. I also think once
you understand a band too much and get exactly what they're doing, they kind
of become boring or just predictable.
MC: When we jam, if something sounds good we'll just run with it, even if
it's ridiculous and we're laughing while we're writing it
I?: You worked with JC/DC Studios [John Collins and David Carswell] for this
album. Would you say your sound makes it easier to collaborate in the sense
8 |.    HOT SAUCE ON EVERYTHING,
l|f THEIR MOM'S ON THE COVER
1 ANO MOVING TO VANCOUVER
in
WfffO 7P -40 CELSIUS AND WEARING
FURS SO YOU DON'T DIE. fVANCi
SO NICE.
that you have no boundaries or more difficult because there is no structure?
MC: We had a really easy recording experience this time. It was fast and
smooth, like compared to making our last record.
CC: I think if there is a structure it might make it hard for us because then
the perfectionist in us would strive to do that "thing.'' But because there isn't
necessarily anything that we're trying to do, it makes what it is right If we were
trying too hard to do a type of thing then we would be chastising ourselves too
much and thinking "Oh, we're not doing it right."
D: How did Chris' mom feel about being on the cover of How Come I'm Dead?
MC: She was so happy!
CC: I chose the photo and ran it past her and she looked at it closely and said,
"Okay, you can use it I think I look good in this picture." She has a copy of the
record and always shows it to her friends like, "Look! Ifs my son's band!"
MC: She looks foxy.
CC: My foxy mom.
CH: She's all over stickers and records now.
D: So the band is going to be making the move to Vancouver. What prompted
that decision?
MC: I feel like for me ifs time to move on from Edmonton. I lived there almost
my whole life and if s just time. And every time we come here ifs just wonderful.
Catherine's mom and sister just moved here. So she's moving anyways.
CH: My shif s already here, so I basically live here.
CC: And our record label, Mint, is here. And the winters are pretty nice.
MC: Compared to -40 Celsius and wearing furs so you don't die, ifs so
nice.
D: Catherine, what was it like coming into the band and being "the new kid?"
And what do you guys think she's added to the band?
CH: It fit pretty well because I had been playing with them for a time, a couple
years at least I played trumpet with them.
MC: One of our first shows ever was actually with her old band, Storyboard.
Thafs how we met
CH: It was a Halloween party in my basement
CC: I feel like the band feels a lot tike when we first started two years ago.
There's a sense of excitement and things are fun, and that kind of went away
for a while. The band almost broke up. So she did a good job of keeping us
together.
MC: If she didn't join the band we probably wouldn't be here.
CH: [laughing] I didn't know any of this joining.
MC: It worked out really well. We're writing songs and giggling, and our
shows are so fun now. Ifs just such positive energy. I'm actually excited to
tour and play live. Ifs really nice. * BY DEBBY REIS
PHOTOS BY SKOT NELSON
The anthemic line, "Who knew / that all we had to do was party?"
on the opening track on Humans' EP, Avec Mes Mecs, reaches out of
the song, hinting at who Humans are and what the band is about.
The band has been labeled "party band of the moment" by various
bloggers and that label sits just fine with Robbie Slade (vocals,
guitar, keys) and Peter Ricq (sampler, sequencer, drum machine).
"When I go out, I want to party, so if people say they're going to party when
they see Humans, I'll gladly take that and roll with it," Ricq said.
Partying to Ricq and Slade often means dancing, and, according to interviews
with Ion and Exclaim!, all Humans want is for their audiences to dance. "Just
dancing up a storm—ifs the epitome of enjoying music, being able to dance
to it," Slade explained, "Everyone knows how to dance, like, no matter what
language you speak or no matter what, you always laugh the same language
and dance the same language, you know? Everyone automatically gets it.
Dancing, they get it."
Slade and Ricq see dancing and singing along as audience participation.
"Ifs almost like you're jamming with them. Ifs like you're playing music with
everyone," Slade said.
Humans' own jamming sessions and songwriting process have evolved
since the band started in 2008. "Back in the day, I'd write a complete song on
the guitar, and like sing it, and that was fun on its own. And then Pete would
be like, 'OK.' And he'd like chop and screw it, I guess. He'd do his thing with
10 it and it would be completely separate. And that was fine. But now, I feel like
we can achieve more when we do it together." Slade said. "I don't even feel
like writing without Pete these days."
You wouldn't necessarily think that Slade and Ricq's musical backgrounds
would mesh. Slade has worked in roots and reggae, while Ricq has primarily
focused on electronic music. Ricq explained that he had been writing a lot
of electro beats when Slade started joining him. Slade would introduce a
drumbeat or use more organic sounds that Ricq had thought about using,
but never actually implemented. "I'd been writing this particular style of song
for so long, that to have [Slade] come by and be like 'No, no, no,'" Ricq said,
illustrating what he meant by rearranging items on the table, "'We're gonna
do it like this,' it was like, 'Oh yeah, why didn't I think of that before?" The
clash in backgrounds ended up breeding something fresh.
"The response to our first songs was really positive and, like I've said before
to other people, I had to convince Robbie too in the beginning 'cause he didn't
see this as a real live performance thing," Ricq explained. Although Slade's
voice and instrumentation had been sampled, the samples are removed when
the duo plays live.
Since then, however, their songwriting process has evolved. "Pete's been
singing more, so Pete'll like, sing. And ifs fun for him, and I'm like working
on the gear..." Slade said. Ricq interjected, saying, "Ifs like we're switching
roles."
"Ifs really fun," Slade elaborated. "And then, in a part in the song, we'll
switch again to our comfortable position, and ifs like, 'Whoa!' It's like really
fun, 'cause we get big into it and we both get better at it... Ifs really fun
exploring each other a bit more."
Another way in which Humans have been exploring each other is through
their video projects. Ricq ultimately wants to make feature films; he's the
director behind their video for "Bike Home" and for their recent short film,
"The End." Slade has certainly been involved, coming up with the concept for
"Bike Home" and acting in "The End," which premiered at their EP's launch
party at the Cobalt on Oct. 15. The music for "The End" can't be found on the
EP, however. It was written specifically for the film. When asked if the music
will be available in the future, Ricq responded by saying, "It would be like a
bonus track if anything. Or it will be like a free song that we'll give out."
" ['The End'] is a B-movie, so it starts out like a serious date, like really cute,
and then it ends up being a gore-fest," Ricq said, describing the film. "What
you see [in the preview on YouTube] is the beginning [of the film] and ifs nice
and sweet and then with the reveal of the hands in the picnic, the movie just
takes a turn and the music changes completely too."
This musical switch mid-way is repeated in many of Humans' songs. "I
always want to write songs that have totally different parts and ifs not just
like verse, chorus, verse, chorus, bridge, chorus, end. I hate that. I'm so sick
of that, you know? And I know that a lot of our melodies and hooks are super
poppy, so I feel like if you don't do that then at least you're not pure slutty
pop," Slade explained.
Humans may not make "pure slutty pop," but their electro-folk-dance music
is a lot of fun. "We're not very emo, you know what I mean?" Slade joked.
"We have a lot of minors [keys], so we use a lot of sad melodies. It's kind
of tongue-in-cheek sad though," Ricq explained. "Some of it's kinda, like, if
we go into minor sometimes, but ifs like talking about pizza boxes or some
shit. Ifs like, 'Just kidding, we're not really that sad,' you know what I mean
[laughing]."
Humans is currently on tour and will he joined by No More Strangers' DJ Tristan
Orchard umen they hit the east coast mid-November. ^
f I A\
VfVFWW
' MMm*&s m
BY COLIN THRONESS
ILLUSTRATION BY LINDSEY HAMPTON
Ttheejs's a quiet buzz in the circuitry of North America's music
Industry at the moment thafs no louder than the binary whirr
of a car engine as it zips along a lengthy stretch of highway in
Middle America through the jagged monstrous peaks of the
Canadian Rockies or along the windy, mind-boggling coasdine
of California—nothing more than the diaphanous squeal of a
-mosquito as it looks out over the edge of the world towards
die hazy horizon.
Ifs the new-band bug, and ifs in the ears of many a music critic across
the continent The buzz has been created by Montreal electro-squall rockers,
Sunns, as they formally introduced themselves to one city after another over the
pa^^roirnonthXYou might encounter words like broken, messy and lacking
cohesion, but isn't that often the case with many of the best indie rock bands?
Fellow Montrealer Jace Lasek of Besnard Lakes, who co-produced Suuns'
recently released first LP, Zeroes OKI, would probably concur.
It doesn't take long to hear the potential these four young men carry with
them. Beneath the creepy, ghostly intros, dark, twisted lyrics and pounding
robotic riffs ate real, live melodies—catchy ones at that. And the secret is now
officially out—these guys can play. They proved it not only in their own set,
which warmed several dozen stages in early fall, but also in the set that followed
theirs on this tour. Suuns not only opened for Land of Talk, they also backed
them up night after night with ostensible ease in the absence of an abundance
of guest contributors on the headliners' latest album.
There've been mixed reviews and there'll be more to come—such is the
duality of a rock band's public life. Suuns aren't short on duplicity when it
comes to their music either, but you won't see this team crack anytime soon
under the hammer and chisel of a competitive industry.
Seeing as these boys have spent the last two months crammed in a van
together, we thought we'd catch them in NYC to cram them all into this
conference call for an interview. $11/))/
WE USED TO BE
CALLED ZEROES,
DlSCOrder: Joe, Suuns are just about finished their longest tour yet—across
the continent and back again. Butyou've been down many of those roads before
with other bands. What city or stretch of the trip were you most excited about
returning to and why?
JOe YarniUSh: The U.S. is insane. In a good way. Ifs the perfect country
for A.D.D. people and myself who like constant change of scenery and people.
So, the whole country has its charms, but ifs hard to beat California: beach,
Highway i, Joshua tree—which we visited. Ifs got something for everyone.
D: Ben, if there's one memory you'll take home with you on this tour, what
is it?
Ben ShClttie: Seeing Joe get hit on by a porn star at the Best Western Hotel.
1/rMax, if you had to pick a favourite song on the new LP, Zeroes QC, what would
it be and why?
Max Henry: Hard to pick a
favourite tune, but its probably
"Pie DC," likely because of how
particularly singular and creepy it j£y       JSt
is. It's also bumpin' live and one
of my favourites to play.
"; Which one would you call the
crowd favourite?
MH: "Armed for Peace" usually
separates the men from the boys,
i.e. those who will love our set
from those who will hate it. Both
parties are quite welcome and a
necessary part of the Suuns live
experience, in my opinion.
D:Liam, tell us why the band had
to desert the name Zeroes and how you guys came up with Suuns.
LiaiTI 0 Neil I: We used to be called Zeroes. When we first started talking
to Secredy Canadian and discussing an international release, we thought a
lot about the various legal aspects of our band. We discovered that a man had
started a band called the Zeros in the '80s and had trademarked the name. We
spoke to the '70s punk band named the Zeros who were fine with us having
a very similar name, but they warned us about this guy and how he had been
attempting to sue them for years, and they aren't even active anymore. So we
decided the only thing less rock 'n' roll than changing your name is not being
able to have a rock 'n' roll band anymore 'cause you got destroyed in court. After
much discussion, we arrived at Suuns because it means zeroes in Lao. We liked
how it sounded and it was a sneaky way for us to keep our name in a way.
D:There have been a few different attempts at pronunciation—there's "suns,"
"soons," "suh-oons"—which do you prefer?
JY: Yeah, we've been going with "soons." For aunts and uncles and border
patrolers, ifs easier to say "suns." But have it your way, we don't care. Live it
up, say words how you want.
D: Joe, in terms of live performance, what song do you think benefited the
most from this tour?
J Y: "Sweet Nothing" has benefited for sure the most Ifs completely different
every night. Ben smashed his guitar in Phoenix on that song. Ifs okay though,
ifs only a 1975 Gibson SG. Whatever.
//."Max, you seem to lead the way on the keys on many of the songs. How does
the creative process work for you guys?
MH: Skeletons of each song are provided by a main writer, usually Ben. The
instruments are individual domains, however. We each bring our own interpretations, which come together as a Suuns tune. We know what to expect from
one another aesthetically, and this
allows for a creative plasticity in
our jams and live shows. That
becomes more or less solidified
when we record.
D: Ham, you have an array of
amazing facial expressions
when you're ripping away on the
drums. What kinds of thoughts
go through your mind while you
play?
LO: I never think about my facial
-. ,, JMr< -        -w expressions. I try to not let any
thoughts go through my mind at
all when I play. As soon as I get
some sort of an internal monologue going in my brain, I'm
sunk. I try to keep it as stream of consciousness as possible. I guess when you
do that, you're not really policing what goes on with your body, so that may be
why my face finds its way into various hilarious contortions.
D: Ben, a lot of your lyrics are dark and demented, yet you seem to be the least
psychopathic of all the band members, Where do your lyrics come from?
BS: Some are built around the melody, which in some cases come before the
words areiwritten. Most of the time I try to evoke some kind of story or narrative. In a lot of cases, the stories are a snapshot of a scene or moment Some
of it comes from the broader theme of identity. Other stuff is more personal..
And sometimes they're just words that make a colour that fits in the context
of the song.
D: So, did you really kill a man when you were n years old?
BS: Yes, but that's just between you and me.
Z7; Joe, what do you think n-y ear-olds think of your music?
JY: They are very afraid. &
13 BY JORDIE YOW
ILLUSTRATION BY LINDSEY HAMPTON AND ANDY DIXON
vr-\<
ACHE RECORDS!
TEN YEARS IS A LONG TIME IN THE WORLD OF INDIE RECORD LABELS. LOTS OF LABELS GO UNDER AFTER
ONE RELEASE, UNABLE TO KEEP THEIR MOMENTUM—NOT VANCOUVER'S ACHE RECORDS. UNDER THE
HELM OF VANCOUVER EX-WUNDERKIND ANDY DIXON, ACHE HAS JUST PUT OUT RELEASE NUMBER "041"
(ANDY DIXON'S CAVING PROJECT'S U.S. CAVES) IN THE HEIGHT OF THEIR TEN YEAR ANNIVERSARY PARTY.
14 Going on right now and ending Nov. 26, the Ache Records Sale is probably
your best chance to acquire everything this label puts out with every release
dropped to the rock bottom prices of $2 to $5 a piece. The label specializes
in music of the genre pushing electronic variety, with releases from Secret
Mommy, Kid 606, Basketball and the Project Bicycle compilation. They also
have a heavy dose of punk and hardcore in the mix including Death From
Above 1979, Baby Control, Winning and Healthy Students. Ache was the
original vinyl presser for Death From Above 1979 (though we doubt there's
any copies of that left in stock at this point). For those with experimental folk
tastes, this is your chance to pick up something by the Winks, Greg Davis or
the Secret Mommy Quintet
If all those bands (thafs not a complete list by any means) have one thing
in common, ifs their connection to Andy Dixon, the creative force, head
of the label and member of many of the bands on the label. He's the glue
that holds it together and the one-man creative thunderbolt who has single
handedly been half of Vancouver's music scene since he was a member of the
teen group d.b.s.
If you can make it to your favourite record shop to pick up some of Ache's
formidable catalogue, that's great but we should also suggest that you make
it out to some of the Pop Up Store events for Ache Records. Their merch table
is where most of their currently in print stuff will be available. Check the Ache
website and click on "Events" for details, |»
CHECK OUT DISCORDER.CA
FOR A Q&A WITH ANDY DIXON
15 TONY
DALLAS
DRAWING OF A GUY THAT ALMOST LOOKS LIKE TONY DALLAS BY JACOB SUSSMEN
TONY DALLAS IS AN EXCELLENT DRUMMER, HE
PLAYS WITH BOOGIE MONSTER, FAN DEATH, THE
SSRIS AND EVEN IN THE BACKING BAND FOR Ml
TUB TIME MACHINE. WE THINK HE'S A PRETTY
COOL GUY SO WE ASKED HIM IF HE WOULD SHARE
SOME OF HIS FAVOURITE PLACES IN VANCOUVER
VIA EMAIL THIS IS WHAT HE SENT US.
RESTAURANT//
Hmmmmm thafs tough. I love all kinds of food
and there's so many great places in the city to eat,
but when I'm really craving [something] (and
some may disagree), I hit up Primetime Chicken
& Chinese Food 'cause I love fried chicken and ifs
exactly what you're getting. Ifs not healthy and
damn well can't be good for you, but it's cheap
(like $5 for a four-piece deal) and if you're lucky,
you might get served by a dude with a "ponytail
mullef (Google it).
On the other hand, if you're with a few friends
who really wanna grub out go to the Afro-Canadian
Restaurant and share some huge Ethiopian platters.
The atmosphere's chill, they serve liquor and the
main guy that works there is hilarious (he asks
"how's the food?" like every ten minutes). They also
have vegetarian options so everyone's happy.
Deacon's Comer and the Reef are really great too.
You see? I can't even choose.
RECORD STORE//
Sorry I buy CDs, I know... lame :P
OTHER STORE//
I'm not a huge shopper, but I do go to the dollar
store a lot mainly the Dollar Giant on Commercial.
Ifs a simple man's shop but everything is virtually
$i. You'd be surprised what you can get for a dollar,
have you ever bought a $i starter tool kit? I have.
VENUE//
The Biltmore for sure. Ifs a just an overall great
spot to perform, dance, see live music, drink,
party, play drunk tetris, makeout... etc. The bar's
affordable, [it has] classy decor, the location is
super residential and there's always something
going on. Bored on a Wednesday? Go to Paul
Anthony's "talent time" and laugh your ass off,
nothing to do on a Saturday? Call up your gf s and
hit up "Glory Days" and bring mylgaylhusband!
some cheeseburgers, he loves cheeseburgers.
BAR//
The Keefer is like stepping into that bar from
the new Star Wars (Episode II). Ifs really sleek
and classy, some of the drinks are a bit pricey
but totally worth it I'm talking highballs-with-
hints-of-kmon-and-mint-leaves and glowing-
bottles-of-Alize fancy, even the water tastes like
cinnamon!
On a side story, once I went to party in the
building next door where the Penthouse had a
transparent see-through pool full of naked people
swimming and I thought, "how convenient is
drinking at a sweet bar downstairs then crashing
a naked pool party upstairs?" Quite.
BAND//
Since I'm forced to pick I'll have to go with
Run With the Heard, a wicked electro/hip-hop
collective. Great performers, every show has to
do with a theme (ie: cats, the '90s, cowboys) and
their sound manipulator, Zach [Webb] is the only
person I've seen to put a Guitar Hero controller
and Powerglove to good use. Hands down the
hardest working in the city.
Also check out: the Good News, Oh No! Yoko,
Humans [ivho you can read about on pa^e 10], MT-
40, Basketball, the Dreadnoughts, Manyourhorse,
Young Liars and Ninjaspy. Sorry had to sneak those
in, I can't pick just one.
ANYTHING ELSE  YOU  THINK
SHOULDN'T BE MISSED IN
VANCOUVER?//
For those that don't mind the sticky icky, Vancouver
Seed Bank is a great spot to kick it and you know.
The staff is super friendly and highly knowledgeable (no pun intended). After that, round up the
troops and bike the Seawall on a sunny day and go
to Third Beach or Stanley Park, but actually bike.
They use to make me walk-a-thon that shit in high
school and I hated that.
Lastly, check out the Jimi Hendrix Shrine,
apparendy ifs where he used to stay when he visited
his grandma back in the day, an awesome gem of
musical history, m
16 EVENT
CALENDAR
WOODHANDS
DAN MANGAN
WITH-
SUBSCRIBE TO
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($20 FOR CANADIANS, $25 FOR U.S. SUBSCRIBERS) $_
TO SUPPORT DISCORDER MAGAZINE WITH A DONATION OF $_
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DISCORDER IS VANCOUVER'S LONGEST RUNNING INDEPENDENT MUSIC MAGAZINE. SHOW YOUR SUPPORT FOR VANCOUVER'S
INDEPENDENT MUSIC COMMUNITY AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF NEW WRITERS, EDITORS AND ARTISTS. SIGN UP TO HAVE DISCORDER
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FILL OUT THIS FORM AND MAIL IN CASH OR A CHEQUE TO
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17 PHILANTHROPY***}^**
FAVOURITE NONPROFITS
BY BRENDA GRUNAU
Close your eyes and imagine a philanthropist—a tucked in blouse,
waist high skirt and immaculate lipstick, perhaps a lawyer who
spends her life sitting on boards, speaking at galas and cutting the
ribbons of new museum wings. Or, maybe you see a portly man
with a moustache and an eye glass spending his millions on cancer
research, malaria medication and textbooks for orphans. Instead,
look around, and you'll see philanthropists in the people surrounding you.
Eighty-five per cent of Canadians donate money to not-for profits or charities,
and 46 per cent of Canadians volunteer. All cultures and religions have their
own traditions of giving, whether it is giving alms to the poor, tithing a tenth
of your income to church or a zakat in the Muslim community. November in
particular is the month for giving for the following reasons.
^%JJ It is the pre-Christmas season—that holiday time where we spoil
ourselves with food, drink and gifts, and think about sharing our wealth with
those in need.
£4 	
\^J It is nearing the end of the tax year, and people are hoping to lower
their taxes through charitable tax receipts.
ft     	
\^# It is CiTR's Fundrive, that annual event where CiTR staff and
volunteers live in our lounge and entice you to donate with amazing swag and
tales about how we're amazing.
It is Movember, that time when various and sundry (tailored and
ugly) moustaches can't fail to remind us of prostates and cancer.
Whether you are a student a young professional or a loft-living artist, giving
to a cause you believe in is a joyful occasion—a chance to make a difference,
support good work in your community or abroad. It's a time to relish that
feeling of wholesomeness and gift-giving; selfishness gets very tiresome.
Since we know you are an avid music lover and want to support local music
organizations, here are some non-profits and charities to consider when you
plan your gift giving.
Discorder Magazine:
So obvious, I know, but we thank you for reading, and we hope you appreciate
the hundreds of hours that writers, photographers, illustrators and copy editors have donated for your reading pleasure. Discorder is a training ground for
people in publishing, art direction and journalism, and can boast alumni the
likes of Will Brown (art director at Adbusters Magazine) and Grant Lawrence
(CBC Radio 3). And, here's the best news—we provide all this to you for free
and we really need your support to keep this mag in print.
Our mission: To provide local music, arts and culture coverage and to develop
young writers, editors, photographers and art directors.
Why give? Quality writing and local music coverage, offered to you for free
each month. Discorder is the longest running independent music magazine in
Vancouver, and it struggles to cover costs each year. We need your help!
Tax receipt? Yes.
Jordie Yow, Editor: "Vancouver's music scene is full of talented musicians,
but if no one knows about them, then no one will listen to them. Discorder's
purpose is to expose our discerning readers to the talented artists and musicians who live here. We don't want to exclude possible audience members by
making them pay us for the privilege of reading our magazine, which is why
we're dedicated to being free. If you think that's a critical and useful service,
please donate. We greatly appreciate any and all assistance."
CiTR Radio:
In an age of media consolidation, CiTR provide locally-focused, alternative
media coverage and music of every persuasion. For those with ears that bleed
at repetition, we promise new, unique, spontaneous and surprising coverage
produced in your very own community. Plus, you too can sign up for training
and the chance to host your own show. We're offering you access to our airwaves and the chance to participate in the media environment. We showcase
the plurality of voices and niche interests in Vancouver.
For the past four years, CiTR has run an annual Fundrive, asking you to
support the station. This year we're hoping to raise $30,000 to fund operations
18 and build a digital library. We want to ensure our library of local gems will last
for generations, and that we continue to receive music from the tiny labels
that we love.
Mission: to provide broadcast training, to offer ordinary students and citizens
access to media, to provide locally-focused, alternative programming.
Why give? Fantastic coverage, interesting music, Nardwuar the Human Serviette,
the longest running jazz show in Vancouver, your only source for metal, or if
mainstream media just doesn't satisfy your ears.
Tax receipt: Yes.
Penny Clark, Student Executive President: "We provide great programming,
the people on the student executive learn so much, so many communication
skills. I've seen kids come in who can barely look you in the eye and talk to
you. University is a big risk time for people, they get lonely. They can come to
the radio station, get out into the community and meet people who are like
minded."
How to donate:
Call (604) 822-1242 with your credit card number, or mail a cheque or money
order to:
CiTR / Discorder Magazine
233-6138 SUB Blvd.
Vancouver, BC, Canada
V6T1Z1
Or, donate online at www.citr.ca/donate or www.discorder.ca
Safe Amplification Site Society:
This non-profit is working to open a legal, permanent all-ages venue in
Vancouver. If you read Discorder's Venews column, you'll know that local
venues live tenuous lives, facing bylaw infractions, financial struggles and
bureaucratic trouble. Safe Amp has launched a capital campaign to raise
$20,000 for a new space that will house all genres of music, be affordable for
all-ages shows and local musicians.
Mission: to establish a permanent all-ages space for music and other arts
events in Vancouver.
Why give? Because musicians need a place to play, we need a place to see them
and youth need all-ages shows.
Tax receipt: No.
Corbin Murdoch, Director: "There is a groundswell of support for these kinds
of initiatives—people who want to make Vancouver a more interesting place
culturally and make our cultural infrastructure sustainable... It's important to
give back to and contribute to the place that you live rather than bemoan the
fact that we live in no fun city. It's time to do something about it."
How to Donate:
Write a cheque to Safe Amplification Site Society and mail it to their Treasurer:
Safe Amplification Site Society Treasurer
#311- 2250 Oxford Street
Vancouver, BC, Canada
V5L1G1
Or donate online atwww.safeamp.org
Girls Rock Camp:
For one week in August, a team of women rockers donate their vacation time
to run a day camp for young girls aged eight to 18 years. The campers show
up on Monday, form a band, learn an instrument, write a song and perform it
live on Saturday. However, the real goal of the camp is to build confidence and
self-esteem, and the week includes sessions on image, identity and self-defense.
Girls Rock Camp raises money to subsidize those girls whose families can't
afford the camp fees—no one is turned away if their application is on time.
They also want to offer year-round programming, and need a practice space/
office they can use to make this organization sustainable and lasting.
Mission: building self-esteem in female youth through music creation and
performance.
Why give? To change the face of rock and roll and nurture happy, well-adjusted
female musicians.
Tax receipt: No.
Eli Leary, Camp Director: "I've always been a feminist since I've been a little
kid... This is the most exciting and fun way to fight sexism, and to do it with
the youth is really important to me."
How to Donate:
Donate online at www.girlsrockcampvancouver.ca/donate/
Movember:
Spawned in Australia, Movember has become a worldwide month of moustache-
themed events. Lastyear, Movember raised $7.8 million dollars for Prostate
Cancer Canada. The concept is simple: men start clean-shaven on Nov. 1 and
collect pledges to grow a monthly moustache. Women can also participate,
raising money to support their men. Movember was inspired by the amazing
efforts by women to raise money for breast cancer. The odds are not pleasant—
one in six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer, and one in eight women
will be diagnosed with breast cancer.
Mission: to raise funds for prostate cancer research, detection, awareness and
to support those affected.
Why give? You find moustaches sexy. You wish you could grow a moustache.
You will pay your man to shave off his ugly moustache.
Tax receipt: Yes.
Adam Garone, CEO and Co-Founder of Movember: "For any charity that
fights cancer, it's a critical time. Scientists believe they have the knowledge
and technology to make life-saving breakthroughs, however, funding and
collaboration is needed to facilitate this progress."
How to Donate:
Donate online at www.movember.com/donate/
This list that we've provided of some of our favourite charitable organizations
is by no means exhaustive. Discorder supports giving of all kinds, so if you
don't find what you want to support here, go out and do some research and
go onto our website and let us know what you find.  ||
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DISCORDER SUGGESTS LISTENING TO CiTR ONLINE AT WWW.CiTR.CA EVERY DAY.
SUNDAY
MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
1HHH1
CITE Ghost Mix
Pacific Pfckiri* (Roote)
-   CiTRGhostMix
:    CiTRGhostMix
-   CiTRGhostMix
Ram
6am
7
7
CiTR Ghost Mix
CiTR Ghost Mix
FrMay Sunrise
(Eclectic)
1
Breakfast With The
Browns (Eclectic)
Sounds of Africa
(mrfd)
Suburban Jungle
(Eclectic)
Md of the World   '
News (Talk)
V\r-r.::?;'^
*
The Saturday Edge
(Roots)
9
Tana Radio (World)
Synchronicity (Talk)
9
ThitdThne'sTlie
Charm (Rock)
«
Shookshookta (Talk)
Pop Drones
• pdedife)-
Sweet And Hot (Jazz)
Ska-Ts Scenic Drive ■
(Ska)
n
11
KolNodedi (World)
Stranded
(Eclectic)
11
Morning After Show
(Eclectic)
Anoize (Noise)
Up.
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The Rockers Show
(Reggae)
Alt Radio (Talk)
Duncan's Donuts
(Eclectic)
CiTR Listener Hour
Generation Annihilation
(Punk)
12pm
1
Parts Unknown (Pop)
Laugh Tracks (Talk)
The Green Majority
(Talk)
We All Fall Down
(Eclectic)
Barnburner
(Eclectic)
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(Metal)
1
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Give 'Bin the Boot
(World)
Democracy Now (Talk]
.   Ink Studs (Talk)
Radio Zero (Dance)
3
Blood On
The Saddle
(Roots)
FilUn
Mantis Cabinet
(Eclectic)
Wings (Talk) Prof (Talk)
Rumbletone Radio A
Go Go (Rock)
Japanese Musicquest
(World)
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Radio Ereetbinker
French Connection
(World)
Nardwuar Presents
(Nardwuar)
4
The Rib (Eclectic)'
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In The Cage WM Sards
5
Chips
(Pop)
JaintTro-
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News ioi (Talk)
Thunderbird Eye
(Talk)
Arts Report (Talk)
Native Solidarity News
(Talk)
News 101 (Talk)
The Leo Ramirez Show
(World)
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Queer FM (Talk)
Career Fast Track (Talk
Flex Your Head
(Hardcore)
Reel to Real (Talk)
Af$ You Aware
CiTR Sports Live
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Sore Throats, Clapping Hands (Eclectic)
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Shameless
(Eclectic)
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Crimes And Treasons
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Live From Thunderbird
Radio Hell (Live)
Synaptic Sandwich
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22 SUNDAY
TANA RADIO
(World) 9-ioam
SHOOKSHOOKTA
(Talk) io-nam
A program targeted to
Ethiopian people that
encourages education and
personal development.
KOLNODEDI
(World) uam-i2pm
Beautiful, arresting beats
and voices emanating from
all continents, corners and
voids. Always rhythmic,
always captivating. Always
crossing borders.
THE ROCKERS SHOW
(Reggae) i2-3pm
Reggae inna all styles and
fashion.
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
(Roots) 3-5pm
Alternating Sundays
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-
boots country.
CHIPS WITH EVERYTHING
(Pop) 5-6pm
Alternating Sundays
British pop music from all
decades. International pop
(Japanese, French, Swedish,
British, US, etc.), '60s soundtracks and lounge.
SAINT TROPEZ
(Pop) 5-6pm
Alternating Sundays
Welcome to St. Tropez!
Playing underrated music
from several decades!
st.tropez101.9@gmail.com
QUEER FM
(Talk) 6-8pm
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian,
bisexual and transexual communities ofVancouver. Lots
of human interest features,
background on current issues and great music.
queerfmradio@gmail.com
RHYTHMSINDIA
(World) 8-9pm
Alternatina Sundays
Featuring a wide range of
music from India, including
popular music from the 1930s
to the present) Ghazals and
Bhajans, Qawwalis, pop and
regional language numbers.
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
(Dance) 8-9pm
Alternating Sundays
A mix of the latest house music, tech-house, prog-house
and techno.
MONDOTRASHO
(Eclectic) 9-iopm
The one and the only Mon-
do Trasho with Maxwell
Maxwell—don't miss it!
TRANCENDANCE
(Dance) iopm-i2am
Join us in practicing the
ancient art of rising above
common ideas as your host
DJ Smiley Mike lays down the
latest trance cuts.
trancendance@)
hotmail.com
THROWDOWN FM
(Dance / Electronic) 12-iam
Hosts Downtown Stacee
Brown and Jen Slator are proud
to announce that our playlist
for each and every show will be
100 per cent Vancouver, B.C.
based underground music of
the sub-bass generation. This
means you'll never hear a track
that's not from our west coast
province of B.C. We call ourselves collectively: The Local
Union 604. ThrowdownFM(5)
gmail.com
MONDAY
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
(Eclectic) 8-nam
Your favourite Brownsters,
James and Peter, offer a
savoury blend of the familiar and exotic in a blend of
aural delights.
breakfastwiththebrowns(cD
hotmail.com
STRANDED
(Eclectic) nam-i2pm
Join your host Matthew for
a weekly mix of exciting
sounds, past and present,
from his Australian homeland. And journey with him
as he features fresh tunes
and explores the alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
ALTERNATIVE RADIO
(Talk) 12-ipm
Hosted by David Barsamian.
PARTS UNKNOWN
(Pop) t-3pm
An indie pop show since
1999, it's like a marshmal*
low sandwich 1 soft and
sweet and best enjoyed
Mohammad, Alligator Bogaloo.
LAUGH TRACKS
when poked with a stick
Nov. 8: The great tenor saxo
(Talk) i-2pm
and held close to a fire.
phonist Stan Getz is featured
Laugh Tracks is a show about
with the Gary McFarland
comedy. Kliph Nesteroff
MANTIS CABINET
Orchestra in Big Band Bossa
from the 'zine Generation
(Eclectic) 3-4pm
Nova. It'll take you to where
Exploitation, hosts.
it's nice and warm.
generationexploit(a)yahoo.
THE RIB
Nov. 15: Legendary pianist/
com, musicalboot®
(Eclectic) 4-5pm
composer Sonny Clark with
yahoo, ca
Explore the avant-garde
Donald Byrd, Curtis Fuller,
world of music with host
John Coltrane, Paul Cham
GIVE'EM THE BOOT
Robyn Jacob on the Rib.
bers and Arthur Taylor.
(World) 2-3pm
From new electronic and
Tough New York Jazz from
Sample the various fla
experimental music to
the mid-^os in Sonny's Crib.
vours of Italian folk music
improvised jazz and new
Nov. 22: It's trombone mas
from north to south,
classical! So weird it will
ter Jimmy Knepper's birth
traditional to modern on
blow your mind!
day. Cunningbird features
this bilingual Italian/Eng
compositions played by
lish show. Un programma
NEWS 101
Jimmy, Al Cohn, Sir Roland
bilingue che esplora
(Talk) 5-6pm
Hanna, George Mraz and
il mondo della musica
Vancouver's only live,
Dannie Richmond.
etnica italiana.
volunteer-produced,
Nov. 29: One of the great
student and community
unsung heros of the big
WINGS
newscast. Every week, we
baritone saxophone: Leo
(Talk) 3-3:30pm
take a look back at the
"Mad Lad" Parker. Leo had
Alternating Tuesdays
week's local, national and
an up and down career but
international news, as seen
bounced back in 1961 with
PROF TALK
from a fully independent
Rollin' With Leo. He died of
(Talk) 3-3:30pm
media perspective.
a heart attack shortly after
Alternating Tuesdays
recording it
Bringing UBC's professors
CAREER FAST TRACK
on air to talk about current/
fTalk) 6-6:3opm
TUESDAY
past events at the local and
Join host and author
international level. Aiming
Philippe Desrochers as
PACIFIC PICKIN'
to provide a space for fac
he teaches you how to
(Roots) 6-8am
ulty and doctoral level stu
dramatically INCREASE
Bluegrass, old-time music,
dents to engage in dialogue
your income doing work
and its derivatives with Ar
and share their current
you LOVE.
thur and the lovely Andrea
research, and to provide a
Berman.
space for interdisciplinary
SORE THROATS, CLAPPING
pacificpickin@yahoo.com
thinking. Interviews with
HANDS
professors from a variety of
(Eclectic) 6:30-7:3opm
SOUNDS OF AFRICA
disciplines.
Sore Throats Clapping
(World) 8-9:3oam
http://ubcproftalk.
Hands relies on simple
Showcasing music, current
wordpress.com
melodies and poignant lyri
affairs & news from across
proftalk@gmail.com
cism to drive our passions.
the African continent and
We embrace music that
the diaspora, you will learn
RADIO FREETHINKER
takes little production and,
all about beat and rhythm
(Talk) 3:30-4:3opm
for that reason, is extremely
and it will certainly kick-
Promoting skepticism, criti
accessible to play, share,
start your day.
cal thinking and science, we
create and enjoy—music
examine popular extraor
that can be produced with
THIRD TIME'S THE CHARM
dinary claims and subject
little more than clapping
(Rock) 9:30-n:3oam
them to critical analysis.
hands and sore throats.
Open your ears and prepare
The real world is a beautiful
for a shock! A harmless
and fascinating place and
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
note may make you a fan!
we want people to see it
(Eclectic) 7:30-9pm
Deadlier than the most
through the lens of reality
dangerous criminals!
as opposed to superstition.
THE JAZZ SHOW
borninsixtynine(a)
(Jazz) 9pm-i2am
hotmail.com
IN THE CAGE WITH BARDS
Vancouver's longest
fTalk) 4:30-5pm
running prime-time jazz
MORNING AFTER SHOW
Join Carlin Bardsley as he
program. Hosted by Gavin
(Eclectic) n:3oam-ipm
welcomes the top names
Walker. Features at npm.
An eclectic mix of Canadian
in Canadian Mixed Martial
Nov. i: It's alto saxophonist
indie with rock, experimen
Arts to put Up their dukes
Lou Donaldson's birthday.
tal, world, reggae, punk
and discuss the fastest
He's still going strong at 84.
and ska from Canada, Latin
growing sport in the world.
In honour of Lou, one of his
America and Europe. The
Recaps, Interviews, tunes
funky classics with Dr. Lon-
Morning Afrer Show has lo
and more, it's the most fun
nie Smith, George Benson,
cal bands playing live on the
you Mn have without being
Melvin Lastie and Idris
Morning After Sessions.
punched in the facet
2l\ THUNDERBIRD EYE
(Talk) 5-6pm
Your weekly roundup of UBC
Thunderbird sports action
from on campus and offwith
your host Wilson Wong.
FLEX YOUR HEAD
(Hardcore) 6-8pm
Punk rock and hardcore since
1989. Bands and guests from
around the world.
LIFE ON JUMPSTREET
(Dance) 8-9pm
CRIMES & TREASONS
(Hip-hop) 9-npm
crimesandtreasons@
gmail.com
CABARADIO
(Talk) npm-i2:3oam
For the world of Cabaret.
Tune in for interviews,
skits, musical guests and
more. It's Radio with sass!
WEDNESDAY
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
(Eclectic) 8-ioam
Live from the Jungle Room,
join radio host Jack Velvet
for an eclectic mix of music,
sound bites, information and
inanity. Not to be missed!
dj@jackvelvet.net
POP DRONES
(Eclectic) io-n:3oam
ANOIZE
(Noise) n:3oam-ipm
An hour and a half of avant-
rock, noize, plunderphonic,
psychedelic and outsider
aspects of audio. An experience for those who want to
be educated and EARjtated.
lukemeat@hotmail.com
THE GREEN MAJORITY
(Talk) i-2pm
Canada's only environmental news hour, syndicated by
CIUT 89.5 FM Toronto or
www.greenmajority.ca.
DEMOCRACY NOW
fTalk) 2-3pm
RUMBLETONE RADIO
A GO GO
(Rock) 3-spm
Primitive, fuzzed-out
garage mayhem!
ARTS REPORT
(Talk) 5-6pm
REEL TO REAL
(Talk) 6-6:3opm
Movie reviews and criticism.
SAMSQUANTCH'S
HIDEAWAY
(Eclectic) 6:30-8pm
Alternating Wednesdays
All-Canadian music with a
focus on indie-rock/pop.
anitabinder@hotmail. com
SHAMELESS
(Eclectic) 6:30-8pm
Alternating Wednesdays
Dedicated to giving local
music acts a crack at some
airplay. When not playing
the PRshtick, you can hear
some faves you never knew
you liked.
FOLK OASIS
(Roots) 8-iopm
Two hours of eclectic folk/
roots music, with a big emphasis on our local scene.
C'mon in! A kumbaya-free
zone since 1997.
folkoasis@gmail.com
SEXY IN VAN CITY
fTalk) 10-npm
Your weekly dose of education and entertainment in
the realm of relationships
and sexuality.
sexyinvancity.com/category/
sexy-in-vancity-radio
HANS KLOSS' MISERY HOUR
(Hans Kloss) npm-iam
Pretty much the best thing
on radio.
THURSDAY
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
(Talk) 8-ioam
SWEET & HOT
(Jazz) ioam-i2pm
Sweet dance music and hot
jazz from the 1920s, '30s
and '40s.
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
(Eclectic) 12-ipm
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by Duncan, sponsored by donuts.
duncansdonuts.
wordpress.com
WE ALL FALL DOWN
(Eclectic) i-2pm
Punk rock, indie pop and
whatever else I deem worthy. Hosted by a closet nerd,
www.weallfalldowncitr.
blogspotca
INK STUDS
(Talk) 2-3pm
Underground and indie
comix. Each week, we interview a different creator to
get their unique perspective
on comix and discuss their
upcoming works.
JAPANESE MUSICQUEST
(World) 3-3:3opm
Syndicated from CJLY
Kootenay Co-op Radio in
Nelson, B.C.
FRENCH CONNECTION
(World) 3:30-5pm
French language and music.
NATIVE SOLIDARITY NEWS
(Talk) 5-6pm
A national radio service and
part of an international network of information and action in support of indigenous
peoples' survival and dignity.
ARE YOU AWARE
(Eclectic) 6-7:3opm
Celebrating the message
behind the music: Profiling
music and musicians that
take the route of positive
action over apathy.
EXQUISITE CORPSE
(Experimental) 7:30-9pm
Experimental, radio-art,
sound collage, field recordings, etc. Recommended for
the insane.
artcorpse@yahoo.com
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
(Live Music) 9-npm
Featuring live band(s) every
week performing in the
CiTR Lounge. Most are from
Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country and around the world.
AURAL TENTACLES
(Eclectic) i2-6am
It could be global, trance,
spoken word, rock, the
unusual and the weird, or it
could be something different. Hosted by DJ Pierre.
auraltentacles@hotmail.com
FRIDAY
FRIDAY SUNRISE
(Eclectic) 7:30-9am
An eclectic mix of indie
rock, hip-hop and reggae to
bring you up with the sun.
SYNCHRONICS
(Talk) 9-ioam
Join host Marie B and
discuss spirituality, health
and feeling good. Tune in
and tap into good vibrations
that help you remember
why you're here: to have
fun! This is not your average
spirituality show.
SKA-rS SCENIC DRIVE
(Ska) ioam-i2pm
Canada's longest running
Ska radio program.
djska_t@hotmail.com
CiTR LISTENER HOUR
(Eclectic) 12-ipm
Tune in each week as you,
the CiTR fan, gets to program an hour of adventure
for the whole world to hear!
For more info, contact
program coordinator Bryce
Dunn at citrprogramming@
club.ams.ubc.ca.
BARNBURNER
(Eclectic) i-2pm
The greasier side of rock
'n' roll, rhythm 'n' blues,
and country... Crack a beer,
order some BBQ, and get
your boogie on.
RADIO ZERO
(Dance) 2-3.*3opm
An international mix of
super-fresh weekend party
jams from New Wave to
foreign electro, baile, Bollywood and whatever else.
www.radiozero.com
NARDWUAR
(Nardwuar) 3:30-spm
Join Nardwuar the Human
Serviette for Clam Chowder flavoured entertainment. Doot doola doot
doo...doot doo!
nardwuar@nardwuar. com
NEWS 101
(Talk) 5-6pm
See Monday for description.
CiTR SPORTS LIVE
(Talk) 6-io:3opm
SHAKE A TAIL FEATHER
(Soul/R&B) io:30-i2am
The finest in classic soul
and rhythm & blues
from the late '50s to the
early '70s, including lesser
known artists, regional hits
and lost soul gems.
THE VAMPIRE'S BALL
(Industrial) i2-4am
Dark, sinister music to
soothe and/or move the
Dragon's soul. Industrial,
goth and a touch of metal
too. Blog: thevampiresball.
blogspotcom.
thevampiresball@gmail.com
SATURDAY
THE SATURDAY EDGE
(Roots) 8am-i2pm
A personal guide to world
and roots music—with
African, Latin and European
music in the first half, followed by Celtic, blues,
songwriters, Cajun and
whatever else fits!
steveedge3@mac.c0m
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
(Punk) 12-ipm
A fine mix of streetpunk
and old-school hardcore
backed by band interviews,
guest speakers and social
commentary.
crashnburnradio@yahoo.ca
POWER CHORD
(Metal) i-3pm
Vancouver's longest running metal show. If you're
into music that's on the
heavier/darker side of the
spectrum, then you'll like
it. Sonic assault provided by
Geoff the Metal Pimp.
CODE BLUE
(Roots) 3-spm
From backwoods delta
low-down slide to urban
harp honks, blues and
blues roots with your hosts
Jim, Andy and Paul.
codeblue@
buddy-system.org
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
fyVorld) 5-6pm
The best of mix of Latin
American music.
leoramirez@canada. com
NASHAVOLNA
(World) 6-7pm
News, arts, entertainment and
music for the Russian community, local and abroad,
nashavolna.ca
NOTES FROM THE
UNDERGROUND
(Electronic/Hip-hop/More)
7-9pm
Start your Saturday night
off right with our weekly
showcase of the local
underground DJ and electronic music scene,
notesundergroundradio.
blogspot.com
notesUndergroundradio@
gmail.com
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
(Dance/Electronic/Eclectic)
9-npm
If you like everything from
electro/techno/trance/8-bit
music/retro 48os this is the
show for you!
www.synapticsandwich.net  26 27 ANTONY & THE JOHNSONS
SWANLIGHTS
(Secretly Canadian)
Antony Hegarty's connection to the
natural world, earlier explored on
2009's lovely The Crying Light, continues to drive his work with the Johnsons. Their latest release, Sivanlights,
is the aural equivalent Of^iewing the
earth from a satellite just above the
stratosphere: beautiful, austere, a
little difficult to recognize. The voices
and textures of nature are present
throughout the album; some songs,
like the chilling "Ghost," conjure a
fierce wind on the sea, while others,
like the title track, can only be properly described by Antony himself.
"Swanlights," he tells us, are "the
reflection of light on the surface of
the water at night," or "the moment
when a spirit jumps out of a body and
turns into a violet ghost."
The 144-page book of Antony's
artwork and writing included with
the special edition release of Sumn-
lights is described in its press release
as "Bleakly environmental," depicting
"a natural and spiritual world under
siege." For all its environmentalist
impulses, however, Siuanlights can't
in good conscience be described as a
political album; rather, it recalls the
tradition of the Romantic poets, with
its awe at the sublime power of nature
tempered by heady ruminations on the
most intimate, vulnerable love. Each
song is heavy with instrumentation-
string drones, lush vocal lines and
jammy, textured synths send chills racing up the spine, but as usual, they're
all bound together by the magnetic
pull of Antony's voice. "Kiss me like
a hummingbird," he coos on "I'm In
Love," and even while we listen from
far above the earth, we can't help but
feel at home.
—Miranda Martini
BEEKEEPER
BE KEPT
(Independent)
Beekeeper and their debut LP, Be Kept,
are self-advertised as a post-pop band
burgeoning into the world of math
rock dissonance with massive hearts
on their experimental Southern Ontar-
ian sleeves. Not sure what that means?
Well it's not certain if the band knows
either, but what is clear is that this
record of life, small towns and slain
dragons was derived from maximum
fun and excitement.
The album is delivered with an
earnest and raw etiquette. Lyrics are
cheeky and clever ("Bruised and all /
Tastes sweeter / Does it?") but every
bit as sincere as those made in seriousness and sombreness ("Digging
the ground / Not looking for blue
skies"). The vocal harmonies of boy/
girl sounds and the instrumentation
within voice—switching from harsh,
staccato rapping to sweet melodic pop
swoons—add another layer of character to the already extroverted sound
of constant time signature changes
and instrument interjections. Some
of the best moments are early on in
the album; "Table and Bed" features
a snappy duet, violins appear within
"Sudden Cuckoo" and the jazz odyssey-
esque markings of "Novel" are distinctive and help add to the chaotic
nature of the song.
The album is a fun and off-kilter
glimpse into the Vancouver indie music scene, but it is not, unsurprisingly,
a groundbreaking work of art. The
experimental fits of rage on "Hurt An
Enemy" are full of great, thick guitar lines and raw emotion just as the
over-dramatic violin lines in "There's
a Reason" are painfully real in their
simplistic composition; however, the
sum of the parts are not as great as
the original Beekeeper concept. Each
song has its moment, but then they
tend to lead to or from parts that are
uninteresting or just amateur sounding. As a debut, Be Kept is good with
its nods to experimentation with both
instrumentation and musical blends,
but it lacks the ability to enrapture an
audience.
—Kaitlin McNabb
DAS RACIST
SIT DOWN, MAN
(Mad Decent)
A hip-hop do from Brooklyn, Das
Racist describe their music as "de-
constructionalist". These guys break
down traditional views of hip-hop—
making it fun again. Many say you
either love or hate these guys and
it's hard not to agree. But being
supported by uber-cool label Mad
Decent, Das Racist's latest mixtape
is immediately attention-grabbing.
You know when a prodiicer/DJ like
Diplo supports you, that you're doing
something right. The musical prowess of Quincy Jones and Jay-Z gracing Sit Down, Man speaks volumes for
how highly thought of this dynamic
duo really is. When "Combination
Pizza Hut & Taco Bell"—their 2008
"hit" single—was released, they fell
into the joke-rap genre. Thankfully
Sit Doum, Man is a far from purely
humour. This mixtape offers social
satire that has barely been seen since
Eminem's Marshall Mathers LP. Hardly
gangster rap, Das Racist "Never killed
a cop though / More the type to burn a
spliffand eata bag of nachos." These
guys really are pioneers of a new class
of hip-hop, and well worth checking
out. Back to the part about Diplo, the
track he produced called "You Can
Sell Anything" is a suitable title but
remains to be seen whether Das Racist can indeed sell anything. Grab the
free mixtape while you can, because
you can expect big things from Das
Racist soon.
—Ashley Perry
DEFEKTORS
BOTTOM OF THE CITY
(Nominal/Grotesque Modern)
Defektors' debut LP The Bottom of
the City borrows from garage, punk
and the melodramatic popular song
through their flawless composite of
pop-punk drumbeats and raw guitar
riffs, matched by dark lyrics of discontent. In the first ten seconds of the
nine track album, you'll hear "Shadow
of Fear" move from a fuzzed-out surf
guitar riff to a full-blown, radio worthy
track. This whole garage noir album,
made up of older tracks that have been
re-recorded and cleaned out, is worthy
of being on the radio.
Ben Phillips' (guitar, vocals) overuse of the word "baby" in his lyrics
4.:
28 is balanced out by his much more
anxious and grim lyrics like "Red with
blood / And red with fire / So I'm longing in despair / For all the things we can'
t repair."
Ifyou haven'tnoticedyet, Vancouver
is teeming with good music. The problem here isn't finding something worthy
ofyour attention, but finding too much
and trying to decipher which of the
bands to spend all your hard-earned
minimum wage on. This record,
though, will carry Defektors from the
"maybe" into the "must have" pile
at Scratch Records, where you can
buy it [ed. Also at Red Cat and Zulu. We
called to check.]
—Sarah Charrouf
DIAMOND RINGS
SPECIAL AFFECTIONS
(Secret City Records)
As the lead singer of the D'Urbervilles,
John O'Regan rocked out to the band's
punk-rock sound. As Diamond Rings
however, his solo act, O'Regan puts
on rainbow eye makeup and slips on
zebra-printed leggings to embrace bis
'80s synth pop self. So does the jump
work? Yes indeed. His debut album is
fiin, fresh and full of catchy beats.
If we were to do the whole in-
comparison-to-other-artists thing,
his distinctive deep voice is reminiscent of Ian Curtis' or Ian McCulloch's,
and his branch of snappy electro pop
is like a cheerier La Roux. His music
is based on drum beats and synths,
but Diamond Rings manages to keep
things interesting by adding in driving
guitar riffs in "Something Else" and
keyboard melodies in "Play By Heart"
for flavour. He also keeps things fun,
and he is at his poppy best in "All Yr
Songs."
The album, aptly named Special Affections, is lyrically like the diary of the
heart: singing about getting weak at
the knees, dreams of escaping elsewhere with the significant other and
feeling unsure about whether to love
or not. "It's Not My Party," a standout tune, sounds like it belongs to a
John Hughes movie soundtrack. It has
the '80s synths sweeping throughout
and the confused teenaged feelings of
"falling in and out of love." It's cute,
and these sweet affections aren't what
you would expect to come out of Diamond Rings' strong, booming voice,
but the juxtaposition works, and combined with the fact that he wrote all
the songs himself gives the record a
sense of charm and honesty.
—Ming Wong
THE DREADNOUGHTS
POLKA'S NOT DEAD
(Stomp)
Crossbreeding punk and folk is a bold
undertaking that too often results in
a mangy, yelping mutt that does little
more than chase its tail all day for its
own half-witted amusement Once in
a while though, the genealogy blends
perfectly and a champion like the
Dreadnoughts is born.
Polka's Not Dead, their second
Stomp Records release, is a genre-
bending masterpiece. Along with the
standard lineup of instruments, they
throw in accordion, violin, mandolin,
whistle, piano, banjo, viola, bouzouki
(a Greek version of the mandolin) and
tambourines, managing to bring
these all together with intelligent
musical precision and stalwart punk
conviction. They certainly do not limit
themselves as they weave street punk
with the entire spectrum of European
folk music.
With gruff lead vocals, gypsy
breakdowns and harmonies reminiscent of Generator-era Bad Religion,
the opening track "Cider Road" is a
folk punk anthem on par with the
Dropkick Murphys' "Shipping Up
to Boston." While the title track (and
manifesto), "Polka Never Dies," adds
a bit of grit to the central European
folk tradition without creating a silly,
irritating mess. However it is the impressive a capella sea shanty "Randy
Dandy-Oh" and the gentle crunch of
"Claudia's Waltz" that really demonstrate the band's abilities and their
passion for musical traditions. Along
with these stand out tracks, Polka's Not
Dead offers eight more brilliant songs
that prove the Dreadnoughts to be a
rare breed in a trendy genre fraught
with kitsch and predictability!
—MarkPaulhus
FINE MIST
PUBLIC DOMAIN
(Independent)
Vancouver's Fine Mist is proof that
making great music is not predicated
on expensive recording equipment.
Armed with a few synths, a microphone and a computer, the debut
album from Megan McDonald and
Jay Arner is simple, meaningful, well
constructed and danceable. Don't be
fooled by the warm and fuzzy '80s
synth-pop demeanour that is somewhat comparable to a sightly stripped
down version of Goldfrapp, the song
writing abilities of the duo are far superior with lyrics that are raw and personal, including the odd poignantly
placed f-bomb.
Public Domain opens up with "Palm
Trees," a catchy and infectious tune
that does not rely on a heavy chorus
to initiate the toe-tapping tendencies
of the album. Instead, the listener is
introduced to the impressive range
of McDonald's smokey-sweet voice
which can go from edgy to soft in seconds. "Because It's The Ocean" gives
one a sense of the lyrical depth as the
song title is the answer to McDonald's pleading chorus of "Why can't
we meet in the middle?" which is sung
along side a funky retro bassline and
other analogue smatterings. "Stop or
Start" has the feel of a club anthem
and a crowd raiser. Public Domain
saves the best for last, though, as
"Murder Murder" finishes with an
array of live drums that provides the
right departure from the synth drum
tracks at just the right time. Fine Mist
makes no contention about using a
computer to do their recording, but
the debut evokes major recording studio swagger with a local edge that is
refreshing and accessible. The album
is immediately satisfying and repetitively playable.
—Slavko Burijal
29 FIVE ALARM FUNK
ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE
(Skylar Entertainment)
The front cover of Five Alarm Funk's
latest album shows a silverback gorilla
and great white shark about to engage
in fierce battle, eyes ablaze and teeth
gnashing. This seems a clever ruse
though, because behind the scenes
the two are quite close and appear to
make beautiful music together. With
Gorilla's brute strength and ability to
command attention and Shark's sleek
swimming groove and relentless bite,
they're able to create a party thafs nearly
unstoppable. Welcome to a world where
anything is possible. Impressive is a
band who can capture on record just a
hint of how exhaustingly exciting they
are as a live entity and this is what local afro-funk and everything else ten-
piece, Five Alarm Funk has done. With
a knack for setting stages ablaze and
laying waste to dance floors from coast
to coast Five Alarm once again deeply
impress with their incredible energy and
refusal to slow up the pace until the last
notes have dimmed. Anything is Possible
comes on sweetly with the Vancouver
Bach Children's Choir setting the stage
of "Infernal Monologue," and then 30
seconds on the band chimes in with a
brassed out heavy metal intro. From
there until the end it's a dance party
full of latin grooves, afro-beats, prog-
rock and a soaring jazz-funk vibe that
promises movement of the body for all
but the most emotionally crippled. Fans
ofFive Alarm will be overjoyed with this
record and the live promises it brings,
and newcomers prepare yourself for an
epic funk-battle!
—Nathaniel Bryce
MARKHANEY
AIM FOR THE ROSES
(Independent)
Aim fir the Roses is a particularly difficult album to review. It has so many
seemingly interesting concepts, all
combined into one unique release,
that it's ultimately hard to enjoy at
first Composer Mark Haney is a brilliant man, but his latest release is sort
of a mixed bag. While the concepts
do seem fantastic on paper, the disc
does not seem to live up to those
prospects. Regardless, the album is
still an engaging listen and shouldn't
be dismissed if you have any slight
inclination into minimalist or experimental music.
The album begins with a swooning
double-bass note. Shortly after, the
voice of Canadian stage actor Andrew
Wheeler is heard, resonating over the
thick aural backdrop of the instrument The stage is set the voice is
heard—the story of Ken Carter, Canadian stuntman supreme, is ready to be
told. Haney simply refers to his work
as a "musical docu-drama," a retelling
of Ken Carter's semi-depressing story
and tragic death. The subject matter at
hand is truly interesting, and it serves
as a great history lesson for those who
have not heard of the wild Carter and
his escapades. The entire narration is
composed of quotes that came directly
from Carter, and Wheeler delivers the
lines spot on with a great sense of
emotion in his voice. Musically, the
album is shallow. The entire album
consists of a double-bass composition (that has been arranged from
the first 499 digits of Pi), occasional
acoustic guitar work by David Gannett
and sparse vocals. This instrumental
emptiness is intentional, but at times,
it feels very underwhelming and dull.
At first listen, there is little variety to
the music. Most of the songs have
a similar formula: begin with deep,
double-bass, throw in Wheeler and his
Carter narration, and finally end the
track with an acoustic medley topped
with singing. While this may seem
compelling for the first few tracks,
the album soon progresses and loses
its spark, falling flat of expectations.
The last two songs, "Post Mortem"
and "Speedorama '83" are easily the
stand out tracks on the album. For
once, they are full out songs, with no
real narration. The lyrics are odd and
unorthodox ("The weather has been
bad / The runway is muddy / And the
ramp is not built"), but remarkably fill
the mood created by the tense, sparse
and mainly guitar-driven soundstage.
Overall, the album does take time to
absorb; don't be put off by the rather
unusual set-up, it may or may not be
to your listening pleasure.
In the end, there are very few people this album may be recommended
to. Despite its interestingpremise and
execution, Aim/or the Roses ultimately
falls flat in terms ofenjoyability. Unless you're a complete Carter fan, or
a nerd who is dying to hear a mathematical constant being expressed
musically, this album will most likely
lack all appeal to you. But for the optimistic and adventurous, this dark
trip down memory lane will definitely
leave you with something to ponder.
—Kamil Kravjczyk
HUMANS
AVEC MES MECS
(Independent)
Humans' new EP Avec Mes Mecs, is
exceptionally listenable; Humans
make well-calculated dance music
with catchy, anthemic choruses. And
hand claps. This is glucose for your
ears—Avec Mes Mecs is an immediate
and invigorating listen.
Besides all of the obvious appeal
of a well-crafted dance record, Humans are also capable lyricists; it feels
as though the duo are aware of the
trappings of dance music as a genre,
and they coyly play with the boundaries
of what is artistically achievable on a
dance record. Some of the more poignant tracks, like the titular "Avec Mes
Mecs," are as evocative of the ennui of
being an over-partied twenty-something
as they are dance anthems with catchy
basslines. But while Humans hint at
some pretty heavy themes regarding
the merits of partying, moving between cities, sexting and other generation appropriate topics, they rarely
remain serious for long. Auec Mes Mecs
is primarily an excellent party record;
that it also functions to soundtrack
bittersweet indie-film-nostalgia when
you look back on the good times is just
a nice bonus.
—Tony Kess
LAB COAST &
EXTRA HAPPY GHOST!!!
SPLIT V
(Saved By Vinyl)
The first in a series of split-7"s to be
released by Saved By Vinyl, the record
label of Calgary's Saved By Radio team
devoted to exposing Calgary's music
scene to the world, is a lovely look at
a pair of lo-fi pop bands. Although I
will go into much more detail about
the album, I will quote CiTR's music
director, Luke Meat, who wandered
into the Discorder office mid-review
and said "[These bands] sound like
the Dum Dum Dudes."
The songs on the album have
a lovely washed-out aesthetic that
comes with the descriptor lo-fi. The
bands fit well together aesthetically.
If you like one side of the record you'll
probably like the other, though Lab
Coast veers closer to cute pop with
what sounds like a toy piano playing on the upbeat breakup track "For
Now" that echos the line "It's not me
it's you" as the chorus. On the next
track, an 88-second wonder from
Lab Coast, "82 We'll All Be You" they
take away the toy piano and make the
guitars more angular. I would have
been happy if they played with the
song a bit more, but it's still an excellent track.
On the other side of the record
you'll find Extra Happy Ghost !!!
(Though it's spelled like that I don't
think you're supposed to pronounce
it chk-chk-chk. I think you're just supposed to get really excited after you
say "ghost"), whose music sounds
slightly less pop and slightly more
garage, but still quite good. Their
song "1990's Brain Damage" is the
most emotive and morose track on the
split, but also probably the best with
swirling theremin-like effects in the
background as the male lead singer
Swann Swann sadly sings "Don't try
to figure it out."
"Mechanical," the second song
from the group, is a little more upbeat
but the vocals are given a heavy treatment and remain just as washed out
and disaffected as ever.
—-Jordie Yow
MATT & KIM
SIDEWALKS
(Fader)
I have to alert you that if you are remotely self-serious aboutyour music
tastes, "Sidewalks," the third release
on Fader by Brooklyn synth-pop duo
30 Matt & Kim will not be your favourite,
unless you're the type of person that
finds some transcendent significance
in simple synth tunes. This album is essentially 30 minutes straightofchoruses
and handclaps. That description may
be a bit reductive, but it's not meant
to be taken negatively, unless you're
only really into Boris, in which case
it's best to just continue listening to
those guys.
"Sidewalks" is an invigorating
30 minutes—there's an earnestness
and infectious energy in Matt& Kim's
songwriting that makes this album
sound like it might be better appreciated surrounded by sweaty friends at
the Biltmore than through a pair of $18
headphones. Regardless, Matt & Kim's
ability to write a catchy pop song is apparent and even forays into balladry.
"Where You're Coming From" and
"Silver Tiles" can't help but transform
into sing-alongs by the one-minute
mark. "Sidewalks" is a consistently
upbeat album more than suited for
anyone partial to music that's poppy,
exuberant and frivolous, butyou?ve
been warned: it's chipper.
—Tony Kess
THE MOUNTAINS & THE TREES
I MADE THIS FOR YOU
(Independent)
Imagine a man with a banjo, walking through an enchanted forest and
slowly being joined by members of a
travelling woodland orchestra. That's
what I see when I listen to the Mountains & the Trees (a.k.a. Jon Janes).
In his first full-length release, Janes
shows off his extensive musical talents playing guitar, banjo, mandolin,
ukelele, harmonica and, of course,
performing lead vocals. Despite the
fact that the guy is a veritable one-man
show, the record features an eclectic
blend of instrumental accompaniment from a collective of his friends
(aptly named die Valleys & the Seas
Orchestra).
Recorded in St John's, Newfoundland, I Made This For You has a real
down-home feel with warm strings,
heartfelt lyrics and organic percussion.
There's something about Janes' music t
that seems so comfortable and famil
iar. It almost makes you want to believe
he actually "made it for you."
You can hear the album's folk,
country and pop influences in inspiring love songs like "More & More &
More" and "Minimum Wage Lovers,"
and the foot-stomping, bluegrass tune
"Travellin' Song." Of particular interest is "The Times," which features a
chorus mixed from audio tracks recorded at different times by people
around the world.
In the true spirit of collaboration
and appreciation, the Mountains &
the Trees' debut album screams a big
"Thank You!" to fellow musicians,
friends, family and fans alike. It's
good, wholesome music that'll make
you think of the woods, stringed instruments and corduroy.
—Alexis Stoymenojf
NO AGE
EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN
(Sub Pop)
No Age's new album.Euerything In Between is being released at the tail end
of a huge year in indie rock; a lot of
big bands have put out great albums,
but there still seems to be plenty of
energy and hype left for the L.A. duo.
Their much anticipated third full-
length lives up to all expectations,
Everything In Between finds Dean Spunt
and Randy Randall in the midst of a
creative explosion, offering 13 diverse
tracks solely composed and performed
by two men. "Fever Dreaming" and
"Shed and Transcend" are the kind of
trashy buzz rock that Sub Pop was built
on. More melodic songs like "Glitter" are as huge as anything any seven
piece can produce. "Life Prowler" and
"Common Heat" find beauty in simplicity and the album isn't without a
few of the duo's lush instrumentals as
well. Everything In Between is a great indie rock album made by a couple punk
rock kids who love to make music. It
is not only one of the most important
albums of the year, it is probably the
coolest So all you hipsters better pick
up an extra shift at the coffee shop so
you can buy a copy and in ten years you
can brag to the kids about how cool
you were [ed. It's worth noting that Mr.
Paulhus himself sports a wispy moustache
and faux Ray-Bansjrom time to time.]; and
all you old audiophiles, you best grab
a copy too, file it somewhere between
Pavement's Slanted and Enchanted and
Mudhoney's Piece of Cake.
—Mark Paulhus
SALEM
KING NIGHT
(I Am Sound)
Salem creates electronically tortured
and eternally damned house music,
and their latest release, King Night,
is definitely a tad on the dark side.
The lead and title track, "King Night"
gets things started with a rousing and
cheery (note the sarcasm) motif from
an Ave Maria hymn complete with goth
vocal treatments, synth echos that demons would be proud of, and thundering distorted electronic beats.
What an opener! The problem
with King Night is that the climax of
the album is over in the opening four
minutes. While the rest of the record
would have merit on its own as an ambient background soundscape, there is
nothing that matches the dark magic
of the first track. "Asia" is a decent
sequel to the opener with ominous
voices over a heavily distorted electro
beat and it serves to whet the appetite,
but the intensity decreases with each
successive track. "Sick" interrupts
the instrumental offerings with a rap
vocal slowed down to sound slightly
ghoulish. "Release Da Boar" is a collection of ambient scratchings which
in itself is not terrible, but the three
chord goth-synth motif and distorted
bass become somewhat repetitive at
this point Probably the next best track
on the album is "Hound" which has
flashes of death-synth madness and
sonic damnation. Just when you think
things were picking up a bit "Traxx"
returns to the slow, moody and repetitive wanderings. "Tair" is the third rap
vocal with a very similar meter and
rhythm pattern to the other two, making the track feel reused; a prevalent
theme of the album.
Salem's King Night starts with texture, complexity and originality and
ends with distorted repetition. While
not a complete album, King Night has
moments of brilliance and creates
a dark backdrop of dark electronic
ambiance.
—Slavko Bucifal
TYRANAHORSE
GHOSTWOLFMOTHERHAWK:
PRAIRIEUNICORNLIONLIONESS
(Independent)
As both the band name and album title
might suggest, Tyranahorse's debut
record is the deformed lovechild of
many musical creatures. Though elements of rock and indie folk are perhaps most prominent it's the seemingly unscripted ventures into vintage
psychedelia and noise that make ghost-
wolfmotherhawkiprairieunicornlionlioness
such a majestic and untamed beast
At first blush, the Vancouver quintet's approach to songwriting could
seem formulaic: bouncy riffage and
chanty sing-a-longs are coupled with
a mouthful of indie nomenclature cliches. However, a second listen reveals
unexpected pockets of creativity. Like a
hyperactive kid who forgot to take her
Ritalin, several songs absent-mindedly
transform in tone and instrumentation into something quite spectacular.
These disorienting synths, dissonant
harmonies and impromptu kazoo
solos highlight the band's tongue-
in-cheek perspective on the state of
indie rock, and are often endearing
in their sloppiness.
On the opening cut "Joy Wolf,"
frontwoman PrOphecy Sun channels
the spirit of Jefferson Airplane with
flecks of Cranberries-era angst With
voices warbling with emotion, "Teenage Girl" captures that aching jealousy
caused by too many whiskey shots and
the unexplained absence of a lover.
The album's standout track "Keep it
Together," best heard in a dark ale-
drenched dive, offers an exceptionally
satisfying electric organ hook.
For their guts, chops and strange
sense of reflexivity, Tyranahorse is truly
an exotic species.
—Sarah Berman
31 I*^'t\t      BE
JP!^ i_ |\Y fi
EFTERKtANfi/BUKE & GASS
Se|j&mim6/The Media CM .
Buke & Gass of Brooklyn and Efterklang of Denmark filled the Media Club with
wonderful music (and people eager to hear it) last Thursday. Duo Buke & Gass
brought a unique brand of acoustic prog-folk. Labrynthine chord progressions,
electronically-assisted pitch-shifting, vocal acrobatics and a rhythm section
consisting of a bass drum with a tambourine in it—I'd never heard anything
like it. They didn't play solos, but they obviously had chops; the shifting
rhythms and harmonies attested to their mastery of their chosen instruments:
the electric six-string ukulele (Buke) and guitar-bass (Gass).
Headliners Efterklang were very different—six times the personnel tilled up
the stage. Aside from a drummer, singer, guitarist and bass player, there was
a violinist, keys player, and a musician with dual MacBook Pros and an array
of blinking techno gadgets (including a super-cool Monome controller). The
lead singer charmed the crowd right away with his humble, slightly awkward
air, big smile, slightly broken English and incredible height
When they launched into their songs, the band played together wonderfully,
each one of them visibly feeling the musk as if it were flowing through them.
They had a very full sound, with lots of interplay and harmony between
the members. Some songs were long with many sections, including synth
interludes with sequenced samples; fevered group percussion passages with
the lead singer drumming on the air ducts overhead; galloping sections with
rich piano chords and violin melodies. Then, some songs rose from hushed
Whispers to a tremulous climax and ended unexpectedly in a minute. There
was a triumphant positivity to their vibe that was very uplifting, and the way
they blended electronic, symphonic and indie-rock instrumentation was very
interesting. Efterklang, directly translated to "after-sound" from Danish, means
"echo" or "reverberation.* Their performance will be reverberating with those
who were present for a long while.
—Doug Mackenzie
hHHhhhN
Sifl3illl|lliSlJ
FLYING LOTUS / LOW LIMIT (OF LA2ER SWORD)
September 22 /Fortune Sound Cluh
As I stepped Into Fortune Sound Club on a Wednesday night it was clear that people
were preparing for the main event The aroma of various recreational substances
filled the place. The air was hazy and the floor was sticky, but not sticky enough
to keep people on the dance floor.
Flying Lotus may have been the headliner but it was his guest Low Limit (of
Lazer Sword) who first got everyone up and dancing. It was the first I'd heard of
him, let alone listened to any of his music, but with the show he put on, I can't
imagine anyone walking away without becoming a big fan—unless they already
were. He started outwith sounds reminiscentofFlying Lotus, but soon unleashed 4K
a more playful and experimental range of melodies that lured the crowd to the
darker, slightly sinister, yet adolescent bass lines. Though his sound may have been
heavily varied, his roots were clearly in hip-hop, as he occasionally threw in some
remixes featuring well known southern rappers, mainly Gucci Mane. Personified,
his sound is like Dennis the Menace, wearing a New Era fitted cap, while pulling
his red wagon filled with the strange and interesting things he'd found.
The floor got wetter and stickier, the lights were dancing in the thick haze
that filled the room. Low Limit was winding down his set The crowd only grew
more restless.
Flying Lotus finally graced us with his long awaited presence and he was greeted
by an enthused crowd. Fans that were daring and tall enough stepped up to give the
young L. A.-based producer a handshake. With a smile from ear to ear, FlyLo gave
back some love to his fans as he prepared his equipment for his show.
"Cosmogramma," "LA" and "1983" could easily have been dubbed as the
soundtrack to my summer, but I still wasn't prepared for what Flying Lotus had in
store for us. The bass kicked in and the crowd lost it He looked at us and smiled
ear to ear, knowing that this was only the beginning. What blew my mind was
when he played a remix of "Nas Is Like".
The producer was dancing and so was the crowd. We started mouthing the
lyrics towards the end of it and right before it hit the hook the track was switched
up immediately.
Flying Lotus got on the microphone one last time and asked if the crowd knew
"The Astral Plane," only to be bombarded by a thunderous, roaring "YES!"
With his permanent smile, he proceeded to play the final song as the crowd
danced their hearts out They looked as though they were uncertain if he would
return to Vancouver again.
—Chibwe Mweene
September %% /Tf« Chan Centre
Hailing from Victoria, B.C. are core members Jon Middleton and Roy Vizer of
Jon & Roy, a duo that has established itself as a definitive Canadian ensemble
32 that resonate a West Coast sound. The free-spirited folk feel of their sunshine-
tinged songs has undoubtedly begun infecting the independent music scene.
Their new album, Homes, which introduces additional members Ryan Tonelli
on bass guitar and violinist Dougal McLean, is able to paint a portrait of life
away from the bustling city, and takes us into a setting that soothes all strains
and worries. Similar to the positive energy coursing through their studio
H albums, Jon & Roy's live show is able to whisk you to a place where life can
actually pause long enough for you to enjoy it. Without disappointment Jon
& Roy's participation in the Live Sessions series (broadcasted live on CBC
Radio 2's Canada Live), presented by the Chan Centre of Performing Arts at
UBC, faithfully reflected the emotions and sounds that flow through their
body of work, including their previous two albums: Another Noon (2008) and
Sittin'Back (2005). C-^rlls
Middleton stepped on stage first. Followed soon after by Vizer, and then
I Tonelli (who is eerily reminiscent of a leaner, bohemian version of Canadian
animated hero Yvon of the Yukon, who donned a similar toque). Symbols of the
group's nationalism, whether intentional or coincidental, were expressed in
both apparent and subtle ways. One of the most obvious was the Oilers sticker
casually branding the bass amp. A less conspicuous example was Vizer's lack
of shoes. I noted, with private amusement, that the band was able to make me
feel part of a culture that is forged by easygoing attitudes and positive outlooks.
Although hard to pinpoint why this faint detail left such an impression on how
I regarded this band, I know that only Granville Street teeming with people
belting the national anthem could have made me feel more Canadian than
this shoeless drummer.
Aside from the down-to-earth demeanor of this group, their musicality and
stage presence is definitely something worth mentioning. Middleton's vocal
master^civer quick, syncopated lyrics often surprised the crowd with its diverse
range of choral ability when switching from reggae-like songs such as "The
Right Groove" to slower, more melodic ballads like "To the Beach." McLean also
provided a refreshing dynamic to the composition of the band. Complimenting
the full-bodied sounds from the guitar, bass and drums, McLean's violin (and
sometimes mandolin) created an offbeat harmony to the performance. Also,
Middleton frequently snuck in jokes about his long-overdue haircut or pointed
to familiar faces in the crowd which further accentuated the intimacy of the
show. Tonelli, on the other hand, exuded a shy presence, with his attention
focused on the centre of the stage. But aside from the concentration of the
performance, the electrifying dedication and passion emitted by the band was
obvious and appreciated.
Jon & Roy are not simply a musical act providing listeners with great music
(although they do so remarkably), but rather they are a reminder to us that lite
is about taking the moment from a day of work, study and deadlines to enjoy
what we normally do not.
—Zarah Cheng
CHRISTIAN FENNES2 /SCANT INTONE & SOONS
September 26 J The Western Ftotrt
An 8.5" x 11" sheet of paper tacked to the entrance doors: Tonight Fennesz,
sold out. The majority of people that would be attending already sat comfortably in their seats well before Scant Intone & Souns (a.k.a. Constantine Katsiris
and Michael Red) took the stage.
The two opened the evening's event on what would only be their second
real-time collaboration. Maybe practice doesn't make perfect as these guys
were able to formulate a fine set filled with miniature atonal crescendos,
subdued skitter and interwoven sampling—everything played at a comfortable medium-low (sometimes it's nice not getting your ears blasted off). The
sampling ranged from environmental sounds and indiscernible murmuring
to more industrial elements.
Occasionally a cheesy drum beat slipped through, though never outstaying
its welcome. Impressively, the duo were able to restrain their sound to a fog
of subdued concrete clusters, ever dynamic and interesting. A fine display of
what Vancouver's subtler side of experimental music has to offer.
After a short intermission, the main act was announced. Not wasting any
time, Christian Fennesz dove into his first number, a heavy slice of electronica
and fragmented guitar. Fennesz is not your average laptop gawking purveyor
of electro-glitch soundscaping. The man actually plays a guitar, live, through
an actual guitar amp. All the while digitally deconstructing white noise flowing
from his computer. It's quite remarkable to see live and the opening half did not
disappoint As the set rolled on, however, claustrophobia started to settle in. What
madeFennesz's impeccable 2008 release, Black Sea so good was its sense of space.
And that space seemed to be filled-in on this particular night Despite this fact
the heat—did I mention that the Front had a serious lack of ventilation?—and
the sets particularly sour-note ending of Fennesz walking off after his last song,
disgruntled over the sound tech's overly intrusive use of compression, you'd be
hard pressed to find someone who didn't leave satisfied.
—Adrian Dziewanski
DEADPRE2
September 27 / Fortune Sound dub
And finally they were here. After years of troubles at the border, oa Sept 27,,
Dead Prez performed their first Vancouver show to a sold out crowd at Fortune
Sound Club.
In keeping with their support for indigenous sovereignty in the U.S., Stic.
man and M-i opened their show by acknowledging the unceded Coast Salish
territories on which Vancouver lies. Then they moved right into the classic
"Radio Freq." With the crowd roaring back the hook—"Turn off the radio!
Turn off that bullshit!"—the duo had established their introduction to the
"Revolutionary But Gangsta" ethos for which they are most famous. They then
proceeded to go through all their hits, from the infamous "Hell Yeah" to the
ballad-like "Mind Sex" They also threw in a few covers into the mix, including
a slick sampling of Drake's summer hit "Far From Over."
Both clad in flamboyant red and black outfits, the pair wore their politics
not only in their music, but literally on their sleeves. Then* DJ's laptop was
emblazoned with a Te Mana Motuhake o Tuhoe sticker that read "Liberators
Not Terrorists." And lestM-i'skafiyyeh be read as some humdrum hipsterism,
the two spoke between sets about the need for Palestinian liberation (last
year, right after and prompted by Israel's first raids on aid flotillas, M-i did a
performance in Gaza). Even when talking about peace and love, they predicated
its pursuit on the struggle for equitable justice. When some fans threw "Resist
Gentrification" t-shirts on stage near the end of the show—a comment on
the especially negative reputation that Fortune Sound Club's bouncers have
garnered in the Downtown East Side—they picked them up and read them on
stage. The t-shirts' backs were emblazoned with lyrics from their song "War
Zone:" "bouncers acting like cops in their club." To the hearty approval of
at least some of the crowd, they closed that set by calling on fans to remain
cognisant of the disproportionate impact that gentrification has on the poor
and marginalised. After the show, they spoke to fans individually about their
politics, proving that for them their music really is bigger than hip-hop.
If their audience that night was anything to go by, after 14 prolific years as
fixtures of underground and conscious hip-hop, Dead Prez has acquired a large
and diverse fan base, most of them clearly devotees of the RBG mantra, with
varying understandings of its underlying implications. About midway through
the show a young white man in a faux Native headdress climbed on stage, to
the disapproval of some audience members who appeared disgruntled as much
33 ^a
CHRISTIAN FENNESZ BY STEVE LOUIE
by his appropriation of sacred indigenous traditions as by his interruption of
the show. He was quickly removed.
The show ended with the duo announcing the release of Dead Prez's new
mixtape, "Turn off the Radio Volume 4: Revolutionary but Gangsta Grillz",
available for free download at www.deadprez.com. Musically, the new songs
are moving in a more mainstream direction, no doubt ensuring more fist-
pumping dance floor hits, but lyrically, the contents lack none of the critical
force that keeps fans coming back.
~Fothima Calder
DUNGEN / THE ENTRANCE BAND / RESORTS
October 2 / The Biltmore Cabaret
In stark contrast to the decidedly '6os/'7os psych/retro leanings of the other
two bands on the bill, this night's opening band, Resorts, evidently took their
inspiration from much more recent advances in music. Conjuring the same
dramatic atmosphere as Portishead, their contemporary spin on trip-hop accomplished the awkward trick of sounding simultaneously super maxed-out
chillin' and broodingly sinister. Usually the prospect of two guys nodding
their heads behind laptops is a recipe for severe tedium but they avoided such
pitfalls by adding live vocals, clarinet and the E WI (Electronic Wind Instrument)
amidst the clicking of buttons and tweaking of knobs.
The Entrance Band specializes in seriously high-grade psychedelia. It is a
testament to the creative fertility of the band that they didn't play anything from
last year's eponymous debut, and that this omission didn't feel disappointing.
As if it wasn't already blindingly obvious that the band wished it was still 1967,
they ran through a brilliant rendition of Love's "A House Is Not A Motel," just
to emphasize the point. Much of their new material found them heading in
a looser and more expansive blues rock direction with the guitar so heavily
saturated in reverb, delay and vibrato that if it wasn't for the rhythm section
keeping it tethered down with such a massive groove, it would come loose
from its moorings and float off into the cosmos.
If the Entrance Band represented the seed sown by the psych-rock bands
of the late '60s, Dungen then—in their reverence for the prog-rock bands of
the following decade—symbolized the flowering of this plant. When they're
indulging in full on jazz-infused, fuzz pedal oblivion, Dungen are mind-
meltingly awesome but due to the sheer powerofsongs like "Hogdalstoppen", the
more melodic offerings like "Marken Lag Stilla" struggled to cut it This may have
been due in part to the only weak element of tonight's performance—the singing
of Gustav Estjes. His voice didn't carry the same wistful lilt that can be found on the
band's studio outputand, compared with the band's otherwise flawless mvisicianship,
it sounded weak.
That said, as the composer of all of the band's music, it is hard notto forgive him.
It also seems churlish to criticise someone who showed such disarming humility,
as he said sincerely after hisapocalyptic-acid-blues- freakout "All this is happening
because of you."
It would be nice to be able to take some of the credit for such brilliantly monstrous
sounds, and maybe we can just a little, but Dungen were not just channelling the
energy of the audience gathered in the Biltmore, but of something ethereal and
much less tangible, the spirit of Zappa, King Crimson and a million other bands lost
to the annals of time.
—WillPedley
34 CARIBOU/EMERALDS
October 3/ The Vogue
I wonder what Dan Snaith was thinking when he decided to try to get Emeralds
to tour with him. Anyone who enjoyed their newest album Does It Look Like I'm
Here? probably never thought they'd be seeing it live, so the interest is there
on the one hand, but on the other, Emeralds is a band with a very ambiguous
level of shit-giving. They've put out dozens of releases since '06, but with
names like Dirt Weed Diaries Vol. 1 and Bullshit Boring Drone Band—and on cassette half the time.
Looking over their new Guest List on Pitchfork, one quickly finds that
"Oh, I get it they're one of those bands that can only mention the extremely
obscure, or ironically mainstream." Then, hot on the heels of an album that
worked, they go on tour and sell nothing but Mark McGuire solo stuff, plus
What Happened and the new album. I might not be a fan of the names of the old
stuff, but that doesn't mean I'm not interested in hearing it.
When I did get inside, part way through Emeralds' set, my suspicions of
how the show would play out were confirmed. Emeralds, it seems, approach
their stage show the same way they approach their image overall: it's all about
the music. Aurally, the band was superb. Their crystalline sound was translated
from album to stage without a hitch. The bulk of the time I watched the band
spend on one song, but that one song showed its range. At the flip of a switch
—that lo-fi guitar from two years ago! Turn of a knob—Ray Lynch-ian new wave!
Then back, with the press of a pedal, to the standard arpeggio madness one
expects from the band. Great sound doesn't excuse a boring visual show, though.
The video the band projected through the show (stock images, like industrial
manufacturing and cell division), was actually a pretty nice accompaniment to
the music, but an entire shows worth ofjohn Elliott's turned back and eighth-
grade-Metallica-fan head shaking was distracting, to say the least.
But who cares about them?! Not the crowd. A very warm sounding reception
couldn't keep you from knowing five seconds into "Kaili" who the people were
there to see. For the next ten songs, every white person in Vancouver was in lock
step with Snaith and his band. Setting up in a circle with Snaith and touring
drummer Brad Weber's drum kits closest to the audience, the opener, and "Leave
House" after, showed the importance placed on rhythm by the four musicians.
The vibration coming from the bass, synth and guitar was near constant, but
one could always feel the spike of the beat through that haze.
Watching Brad Weber drum reminded me of Deerhoof's Greg Saunier. He
would start to play with the band, then quickly move into doing his own thing,
as if he had lost the beat and gotten more complicated, only to find the beat
again. The intensity of his and the rest of the band's sound worked differently
from song to song, ratcheting "Hannibal" up to make it as intense as "Odessa,"
but stripping the nuance from "Melody Day" and making "Every Time She
Turns Round It's Her Birthday" more of a distraction than a treat. The show is
best summed up by its two best songs: the encore "Sun," and song of the night
"Bowls". With a band so focused, it's unsurprising that the two instrumentals
from Swim were the most interesting. The sample of the Tibetan singing bowl
used at the start of "Bowls" was played by Weber, fast and precise enough to
make the song sound like Gold Panda, only live. It was taken around for over
ten minutes, and the greatness of "Sun" was all but predetermined. It was
played for seven or eight minutes, and was a perfect encore.
—Jasper Walley
SURFER BLOOD/THE DRUMS
®$&m$ fThtMtemm .:-
If a university class in concert reviewing existed, I likely would have failed it on
Tuesday, Oct 5.1 arrived at the Biltmore at 10:30 p.m.—okay, maybe n p.m.—
just in time to see more than a handful of blissed-out Drums fans skipping
stairs on their way out of the venue. Not a good sign.
The no-nonsense bouncer confirmed thatyes, I had missed "Best Friend,"
my absolute favourite track off the Drums' self-titled debut, and indeed the
entire co-headlining set (Personally I blame the Nelson couch surfer—he was
my plus one!—who insisted on teaching me eyeball exercises and standing
meditation before the show. I wish I was making that part up.)
Anyway, if you need details on the Brooklyn goth-rock half of the set, I
suggest checking out local blogger Alex Hudson's write-up in Exclaim!. He's
probably right.
Lucky for me (and subsequently for this review) Surfer Blood had yet
to take the stage. The Floridian quartet quickly banged through their most
buzzworthy material at the top of their set including the bouncy "Take it Easy"
and mosh pit-inducing "Swim." Frontman John Paul Pitts has perfected his
stage moves, which features an adorable stationary pivot from left to right
guitar neck outstretched at an exact 90-degree angle. By the fifth song, it
seemed that audience energy had reached its ultimate peak. People in the front
continued to rock out, but the majority of attendees nodded along with silent
intrigue—perhaps unfamiliar with the non-singles on Astro Coast. The night
ended (early, it seemed) with an encore featuring a Guided By Voices cover and
a sweaty rendition of "Neighbour Riffs." Stage banter was minimal, but the
crowd was otherwise satisfied. Let this be a cautionary tale: for better or for
worse, shows at legit venues in Vancouver actually start on time.
—Sarah Berman
HOLYritt/ INDIAN JEWELRtf0UPD BEAKS
October 11 /The Rickshaio Theatre
Now, I'm all for the promotion of smaller labels, but if Holy Fuck are such big
fans of Lovepump United, they must know how much better they could have
done for openers. Pictureplane and Health? Fun! Genghis Tron and AIDS Wolf?
Exciting! Clipd Beaks and Indian
Comprehensive:
Shows linked to profiles
maintained by musicians,
promoters, venues, ticket
outlet/stores, and YOU!
Jewelry? Swing and a miss, you
guys.
I'm trying to figure out the
nicest way to say I fell asleep
during Clipd Beaks' set For a
band I had never heard before
their set, I was pleasantly
surprised when I heard
something a lot like Liars' "A
Visit from Drum." The problem
is, their vocals are so murky, and
their droning so level, that it
was hard to tell the difference
from song to song. That and
the long day, and the soothing
vibrations... and I was out for a
minute. There were glimpses of
energy in the set, like when the
vocals were at the forefront of
the mix, or when some surprise
trumpet joined the mix, but, by
and large, I would have rather
just seen Liars play "A Visit from
Drum" proper, then different
songs for the rest of the show.
Indian Jewelry had the
opposite problem, energy-wise.
""33F
COMMUNITY
DRIVEN
CONCERT
USTIN6S
^% m& Between being double the volume of the other two bands, and having a strobe
light on for the entire show, it was impossible not to hear everything. You could
see the band's style coming from the sounds produced during their quick pre-
show tune-up. Fuzzed out floor torn, deep Rhodes-y synth, heavy vocal echo,
it was as big a mess as you might expect. Almost every song started with the i
triggering of some ill advised drum machine, which was then taken over by !
an obnoxious wall of screeches and thuds from the band. Moving from guitar \
to synth, toning down the reverb, switching vocalists, nothing made any of
it any better. But! I will give Indian Jewelry a big line of credit for sticking to
their image. Whether or not I liked any of it the set was uniformly creepy,
and it takes uncommon dedication to stick to it that long. So, Indian Jewelry,
I don't want to kick an already thoroughly kicked horse, but maybe it's time
youjjot serious, and went on tour with a band anything like you. I'm open to
change! Really!
Despite the rocky start to the evening, Holy Fuck came onstage to a still
energized crowd, and started off right with a locked-in "Super Inuit" What
followed showed how far the band has come in just a few years. The band,
while still jumping around, now seems to work with kraut-like accuracy and
restraint. Near constant touring must have sharpened the four musicians,
because they played forcefully, but as one. It's a far cry from both their shows
at Bumbershoot two years ago and the Capitol Hill Block Party in July (both
in Seattle). With the former show, while more energetic, felt propelled more
by each band member's musicianship that by any cohesive feel. At the latter,
the band was more together, but the energy dipped with the introduction of
simple between song palette cleansers. This show at the Rickshaw proves
that the band has taken the best of both worlds, and emerged stronger. They
propelled between songs from this year's Latin, and 2007's LP, but never lost
their restraint and freaked out in an unnecessary solo or fill. Two notes into
"Frenchy's," a weaker song on the album, and the audience was eating out of
the palm of their hands. The only real sonic curveball was "Lucky." Last time
I saw it performed live, it was as pretty as on the album, but somewhat limp.
At this show, it was still pretty, but rock solid. It was almost definitely the song
of the night. By the end of the set, the diehards were clawing for more, which
they got in the form of "Lovely Allen," the only song of the night that did get
taken for a bit of an extravagant spin. At that point, they deserved it.
—-Jasper Walley
BROKEN SOCIAL SCENE / THE SEA & CAKE
October 15 {TheCommodore BsMroom
Some explosions of creative magnitude cannot be adequately rendered in just
a few hundred words or less and though last nights gig wasn't the "God gig"
it was still a mighty thrill to witness so much talent on one stage. It is in this
"so much" that Broken Social Scene thrives and becomes so much more than
just a big band.
Openers the Sea & Cake got the crowd warmed up with some jazzy rock,
sounding at times like a mini-BSS with post-rock Tortoise trappings. Not
overly memorable but it was cool to see some musical trailblazers whom I have
loosely followed since the mid-'oos. With little wait between sets BSS took to
stage and proceeded to create fireworks. This first of two sold-out nights at the
Commodore was a doozy that kicked off proper with the wicked four-punch
combination of "World Sick," "Texico Bitches," "7/4 (Shoreline)" and "Fire
Eye'd Boy." The band played with cooled determination to give everything they
had for us, and it was clear, this is just what they do best This is music for the
people, by the people. Swelling to upwards of n deep, members drifted on and
offstage between songs to fill their roles and then to take their leave, giving
massive numbers such as "Meet Me In The Bedroom" an even more lethal
sonic punch while swooners like "Anthems For a Seventeen-Year-Old Girl" and
"Sweetest Kfll*sounded even sweeter with the added help of this tours female
role, Lisa Lobsinger, who absolutely killed it Still decompressing after this
whirlwind of a show, I'm sure some impressions will come over time. Like I
said, words are kind of hard to come by. If you were there then you knrj^wpit,
I mean. Th^fe celebration rock played by a lot of talented people and we¥«ie
quite lucky to be witness to a heaping two-hour helping of it.
—Nathaniel Bryce
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STRICTLY THE DOPEST HITZ OF OCTOBER
RTS
 #___
ARTIST
ALBUM
LABEL
 #.	
ARTIST	
ALBUM
LABEL	
1
Women*
Public Strain
Flemish Eye
26
To Rococo Rot
Speculation
Domino
2
Black Mountain*
Wilderness Heart
Outside
27
Sister*
s/t
Independent
3
Nobunny
First Blood
Goner
28
Best Coast
Crazy For You
Mexican Summer
4
AHNA*
s/t
The Broadway
to Boundary
29
Tucker Finn*
The Cup & the Lip
Jayne Wayne
5
White Lung*
It's the Evil
Deranged
30
Crocodiles
Sleep Forever
Fat Possum
6
Various
Flipper Psychout!
Vampi Soul
31
ShiYi*
s/t
Holy Darkness
7
Fond of Tigers*
Continent
& Western
Drip Audio
32
Antony &
the Johnsons
Thank You For
Your Love EP
Secretly Canadian
8
Dreadnoughts*
Polka's Not Dead
Stomp
33
FranJde Rose
8c the Outs
s/t
Slumberland
9
B.A. Johnston*
Thank You for
Being a Friend
Just Friends
34
Arcade Fire*
The Suburbs
Merge
10
Grinderman
Grinderman 2
ANTI-
35
Bola Johnson
Man No Die
Vampi Soul
11
Dubmatix*
System Shakedown
Clamour
36
Hot Panda*
How Come
I'm Dead?
Mint
12
Rae Spoon*
Love is a Hunter
Saved By Radio
37
Suuns*
Zeros EP
Secretly Canadian
13
Blue Hawaii*
Blooming Summer
Arbutus
38
Dungen
SkitlAllt
Kemado
14
Sean Nicholas
Savage*
Moving Up
In Society
Arbutus
39
Owen Pailett* ^
A Swedish Love
Story EP
For Great Justice
15
The Vaselines
Sex With an X
Sub Pop
40
The Black Angels
Posphene Dream
Blue Horizon
16
Mavis Staples
You Are Not Alone
ANTI-
41
The Intelligence
Males
In The Red
17
The Orpheans*
Turn Out the
Lights EP
Neptooij/^
42
Tatsuya Nakatani
Abiogenesis
Independent
18
The Budos Band
The Budos Band III
Daptone
43
Ariel Pink's
Haunted Graffiti
Before Today
4AD
19
No Age
Everything
In Between
Sub Pop
44
Y La Bamba
Lupon
Tender
Loving Empire
20
Cloudland Canyon*
Fin Eaves
Holy Mountain
45
Jenny & Johnny
I'm Having
Fun Now
Warner
21
On & Fennesz
Something That...
That Does Not
Type
46
Dryft
Ventricle
N5MD
22
PS I Love You*
Meet Me at the
Muster Station
Paper Bag
47
Personal & the
Pizzas
Raw Pie
1234 GO!
23
Underworld
Barking
Om
48
Bad Religion
The Dissent of Man
Epitaph
24
Swans
My Father Will
Guide ...to the Sky
Young God
49
Delerium*
Voice
Nettwerk
25
Indignant Senility
Plays Wagner
Type
50
Cotton Candy
Top-Notch and
First-Rate
Teen Beat
CiTR'
excell
at(6o
charts
i charts reflect what's been played on the air by CiTR's lovely
;nt albums can be found at fine independent music stores acros.
4) 822-8733. His name is Luke Meat If you ask nicely he'll tell
at www.earshot-online.com.
DJs last m
»Vancouvei
you how tc
onth. Records with as
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t other great campu
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j Jf (212) Productions
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454 W Cordova St.
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Cinematheque
1131 Howe St.
1 East Hastings
604-685-2426
604-872-8180
604-733-1037
604-687-6355
604-688-8202
Antisocial
Bonerattle Music
Hart and Sole
Temple of the
Skateboard Shop
2012 Commercial Dr.
Clothing Inc
People's Co-op
Modern Girl
2337 Main St.
604-251-BONE
843 Granville St.
Bookstore
2695 Main St.
604-708-5678
Devil May Wear
604-630-9151
1391 Commercial Dr.
604-253-6422
778-737-8953
Audiopile
3957 Main St
Highlife Records
True Value Vintage
2016 Commercial Dr.
604-216-2515
1317 Commrecial Dr.
Prussin Music
710 Robson St.
604-253-7453
Dream Apparel +
604-251-6964
3607 W Broadway
604-736-3036
604-685-5403
Band Merch Canada
Articles for People
Hitz Boutique
Vinyl Records
www.bandmerch.ca
311 W Cordova St.
316 W Cordova St.
Red Cat Records
319 W Hastings St.
604-683-7326
604-662-3334
4332 Main St.
604-488-1234
Banyen Books
604-708-9422
3608 W 4th Ave.
The Eatery
The Kiss Store
The Wallflower
604-732-7912
3431 W Broadway
319 Gamble St.
The Regional
Modern Diner
604-738-5298
604-675-9972
Assembly of Text
2420 Main St.
Baru Cafe
3934 Main St.
604-568-7554
2535 Alma St.
The Fall Tattooing
Koerner's Pub
604-877-2247
604-222-9171
644 Seymour St.
6371 Crescent Road
Westcoast Music
604-676-3066
604-822-0983
R/X Comics
3454 W Broadway
Beatstreet Records
2418 Main St.
604-682-4422
439 W Hastings St.
Flaming Angels
Lucky's Comics
604-454-5099
604-683-3344
Boutique
3972 Main St.
Woo Vintage
4307 Main St.
604-875-9858
Rufus' Guitar Shop
Clothing
BigMama
604-689-3224
2621 Alma St.
4366 Main St.
www.bigmama.ca
Fresh is Best Salsa
Neptoon Records
3561 Main Street
604-222-1717
604-687-8200
The Bike Kitchen
2972 W Broadway
604-324-1229
Zoo Zhop
6138 SUB Blvd.
778-737-2442
223 Main St.
604-822-BIKE
604-875-9958
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c i t r. c a 

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