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Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) Apr 1, 1990

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  NEW LP:
___YSI«!
ggUifitt
LP / CASSETTE - $6.94
COMPACT DISC - $12.94 CONTENTS
APRIL-1990 Issue #87
TWO GUYS NAMED JOHN
Spleenless man in rock shock horror! - by Laurel Wellman 10
ATTILA THE STOCKBROKER
God, Public Enemy, and Campbell River dogfish - by Pete Lutwyche 13
THE PRIMITIVES
Finally, all those years at CiTR pay off as Pat Carrol talks to Tracy Tracy 15
TAD
Mike and Gav bathe shamelessly in Tad's fine juices 17
THE SUGARCUBES
Bjork spills the truth about igloos and the killers of Elvis - statement taken by Rob Boper...18
JARBOE
Swans siren joins the rhythm of machines - by Lloyd Uliana 20
CLIVE BARKER
Chris Brayshaw raises hell with Clive Barker 34
AIRHEAD
People are just sic about Viola    5
LOCAL MOTION
Let's get Janis - she listens to everything!! 21
REAL LIVE ACTION
Numb, Laurie Anderson, The Primitives, and more 22
UNDER REVIEW
We listerpo 'em, we write about 'em, you read 'em. Simple 23
HELL'S KITCHEN
Dad's, Dolly Madison, Mr. Christie, and now Viola Funk 24
COMIX ARE ALL I READ
Leigh Wolf spills about Blotter #10 25
DISCORDER DATEBOOK
What's on, what's hot, what's hip and what isn't 26
ON THE DIAL
It's like TV Guide, but it's for radio 32
SPINUST
Spinlist is only a third of it - demos is the other two thirds 33
EARTH GUY
Scott Fearnley  5
SOCIALIST TURTLE
Colin Upton 27
ROLAND THE HAPPY WANDERER
Geoff Coates 27
DANCING ON THE CLOUDS
Marc Yuill and Julian Lawrence 28
BORDUM
Bryce Rasmussen 30
FOR OFFICE USE ONLY
EDITOR Kevin Smith ART DIRECTORScott Chernoff PRODUCTION MANAGER Bill Baker EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS Paul
Funk, Viola Funk, Laurel Wellman ASSISTANT TO THE ART DIRECTOR Geoff Coates PRODUCTION ASSISTANT Alice
Lorlng WRITERS Rob Boper, Chris Brayshaw, Gavin Brown, Pat Carroll, Pete Lutwyche, Mikey Ukeslt, Janis
McKenzie, Lloyd Uliana, Laurel Wellman, Leigh Wolf PHOTOGRAPHERS Gavin Brown, Mikey Ukeslt, Leonard
Whistler WORD PROCESSING Alice Hul, Alice Lorlng, Laurel Wellman COVER PHOTO Leonard Whistler SPINLIST Jas
Uppal ADVERTISING Mike Harding, Lloyd Uliana ADVERTISING PRODUCTION Bill Baker SUBSCRIPTIONS/MAIL
DISTRIBUTION Robynn Iwata PROGRAM GUIDE/DATEBOOK/DELIVERY FRIEND Randy Iwata ACCOUNTS Barbara
Wilson TECHNICAL SUPPORT Alexandra Johnson
DISCORDER Copyright © 1990 by The Student Radio Society ofthe University of British Columbia. All Rights Reserved.
Discorder is That Magazine from CiTR fM 102, and is published twelve times a year by The Student Radio Society of the
University of British Columbia. Discorder is printed in Canada on papermanufactured in Canada. Discorder prints what it wants
to, including the CiTR On the Dial program guide and the CiTR Spinlist playlist chart. Circulation is 17500 copies distributed
free to over 200 locations. Twelve-month subscriptions are $ 15 in Canada, $ 15 (US) to the US, and $24 elsewhere. Please make
cheques or money orders payable to Discorder Magazine. "Hi, Mike Gunderloy" -Staff. Discorder wants vour stuff: send in
stories, drawings, comics, money, photos or what have you. If we like 'em, well use 'em. If we don't, well lose em. Deadline
for submissions and ad bookings is the 15th ofthe previous month.
CiTR 101.9 fM is 1800 watts of stereophonic bliss on cable fM from UBC to Langley, Squamish to Point Roberts, but not on
Shaw Cable in White Rock (if you want it, you'll find a way). CiTR is now available on most clock radios and in cars too. Office
hours for CiTR, Discorder, and CiTR Mobile Sound Rental are Mon-Fri, 10am - 4pm (please avoid Friday afternoons) Call the
CiTR/Discorder Office at 228-3017, CiTR News+Sports at 224-4320, or the CiTR DJ line at 228-CiTR. Send stuff c/o Discorder
Magazine or CiTR Radio to Room 233, 6138 SUB Boulevard, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A5.   Fax (604) 228-6093.
aoefg.
...Of
INDEPENDENT
LABELS AT
FANTASTIC
PRICES!
JvS^*
H**°
tf__#$8**
«>«■__
®mi
oKT»
^O.POSTE*S
VIDEO
DEPOT
TWO
LOCATIONS!
TOP DOG IN CDs FOR NW WASHINGTON!
J^lL^r
1435 Railroad Ave. 676-0319   •
LAKEWA Y EXIT to RAILROAD, RIGHT 2 BLOCKS
The Bellis Fair Mall 671-6065
All Prices in Yankee Dollars lOi 9 S   Presents
MARIANNE
FAITHFULL
^witla guitarist Barry Reynolds
SATURDAY
APRIL 14
THE
COMMODORE
Doors   S  p>ixi
Show   X O  p>m
Produced by Tickets: Available at Track and Zulu Records, as well as all .
Perryscope locations. Charge by phone 280-4444 YOU'RE SUCH A FREND TO
ME
Dear Airhead,
RE: BUT IS IT ART? and
follow-up mono/dia/logues:
(Nearly) everyone remembers
Old Mom wagging the finger in
the middle of "Now, (insert
name), don't you know that two
wrongs don't make a right?".
Beyond the refexive stupidity of
public attention, the proposed
argument of Rick Gibson and his
sleeping suffixes looks like:
"Well, shit, I might be doing this
something repellent, but at least
it's me doing, and I'm AWARE.
Other folks, y'know, I mean, are
plain doing far worse stuff and
don't even know it, y'know. If
they see my style they might
wake up. Besides, I might not
have done it anyway." This is
even more lame than the excuse
offered Old Mom. It's also pure
Pataphysics. Hard to believe it
comes unbidden.
But Rear Guard admits, and
his near-lynching proves, that he
finds the mechanics of publicity
out of his reach, a strange disorder for a performance artist (have
you heard the one about the guy
who set his hair on fire and tried
to put it out wilh a hammer?). Of
course, he's pioneered anew land
of ethics, where the use of freeze-
dried biomass as sculpture keeps
the aesthetic few in a tossing
nights weat, yet leather is the state
uniform. In this new moral wilderness gelling lost is half the
fun. And everyone looks a little
stupid   when  they  don't  know
where ihey are.
Understatement is the priority in T.V. culture. Posers like
Gibson and his Gofers could
leam much from the modem
master of public behaviour, the
serial killer. Accomplished sociopaths, S.K.'s are like dedicated artists: they work in private, completely unseen.until
ihey have a large body (sic) of
work. On occasion they are finally brought to a social
prominece usually reserved for
politicians and exploding astronauts. The anonymous modern
world is their garret, their materials are their own species, their
methods are exact and effective,
but not without a sense of play.
Patiently they absorb the real,
hidden lessons of our malicious
culture - predation, exploitation,
and contingent violence, all held
beneath the oily mask of common
propriety.
Obviously, though in a
semi-alert way, R.G. knows
about and is repelled by the
scheme of society, but he can't
do anything with it. Minus resources - basic talent, history - he
mimics. But a put-on is enlightening only if you can get it off
again. The sharpest artists have
always used the same lever for
removing heads from their owners' buttholcs: making, not
matching. One can imagine the
calamities that would have pursued R.G. had he remained a
psychologist.
Sigmoid Frcnd
Parksville, B.C.
YEAH, VIOLA!
Dearest Airhead,
Go Viola Go! You are the
highlight of the Discorder! Not
only do you have a cool name but
you can incite the mindless to
think enough to write: myself
included. I have a question for
the "Disappointed yet hopeful,
Pete Stonderove." What makes
your list of bands "definately
[sic] worth hearing"? They, for
the most part, all put on very
good  live  shows  but  can  their
SELF-MOTIVATED?
ENTHUSIASTIC?
ENERGETIC?
DISCORDER MAGAZINE
NEEDS AN ADVERTISING
REPRESENTATIVE
That's right. That Magazine from CiTR seeks
an individual to sell advertising space on a
commission basis. Earn up to $1000 a month.
Submit resume and covering letter to Discorder Magazine, 6138 SUB Boulevard, Vancouver, BC, on or before Monday April 30th.
Discorder is also accepting applications
for production and art assistants.
stand apart from the the
atre and stage antics they
ploy? Do you own their record
ings or do you merely enjoy see
ing them jump around on stage'
Does this earn them the epithet
"great"? Never mind; I already
know the answer. But you, Viola,
always please me with your writing: "Hooker-Women of the
Roxy" is wonderfully descriptive. I scream it with delight! Go
Viola Go!
I have an idea for you at the
Discorder: you should procure
advertismints from sound reproduction equipment manufacturers. Sound reproduction manufacturers, and even their retailers, have much money. Sell ad
space lo ihem: for your magazine
has everything to do with music
lhat eventually needs to be reproduced. Your interviews are of
musicians wilh records and cds to
be purchased, your letters section
is of readers expounding who is
the best rock band to ihem, and,
obviously, your station sells
music daily. Then, with the
money aquired (sic), write columns selling more music and
equipment and places at which to
listen to the music. But don't sell
any of lhal awful commercial
music: the market for that has
been used up by other people.
I listened to the "ARE YOU
SERIOUS? MUSIC" show this
Sunday after-midnight. Thank
you to the record/cd playing, talking guy who played my request.
Also I listened to the previous
Nardwuar show Friday; unfortunately for me, it became noisy. I
don't like noise: a minor shortcoming on my fart. Until then it
was mirthful. The SERIOUS
show was serious. I often wish it
I like most of the comics.
They are, I guess, O.K. I do not
understand, however, DANCING ON THE CLOUDS. I get the
feeling that it is very profound
and I become frustrated because I
can't interpret why. It is also
busy. Perhaps I think simplicity
is best for comics. I should rise to
the comic maker's challenge.
I concur with your decision
to keep the Public Enemy tune on
the 'waves, (eww.-interjection
from my roomate on the use of
the colloquialism.) Stir up the
sh*t! Again, Viola Funk is cool.
I'm glad that that is her real name.
Fairly jincerely,
Mark Sladen
GREETINGS EARTHLINGS
Dear Airhead,
We here on Mars monitor
Earth radio and TV transmissions
wilh regularity and enthusiam.
By chance, my colleagues and I
at the Tav-Lxi-G'Nan Observatory happened upon the emissions from your CITR. I must
say, we are most impressed. The
: ptsha (insight) you pos-
idmirable. There are even
»ur Grand Poobah
(exalted leader) has been seen
grooving lo the hep tunes put
forth by the likes of Nardwuar (a
fine Martian moniker), Join The
Rhythm Of Machines, and also
Home Video I.N.T.E.R.N.A.-
T.I.O.N.A.L., which offers us
valuable information on Earth
cultures as depicted in motion
As you have probably surmised, we do not speak for all
Mars citizens. In fact, I speak for
only myself and a small circle of
friends and a club of Earth aficionados. We seek correspondence
and cultural exchanges with
Earthings who are open-minded,
want to leam about Mars, and
galac PRESENTED BY
f Travel
COOP
A TAMAHNOUS THEATRE PRODUCTION
A FASHION AND THEATRE EXTRAVAGANZA
jWAT&R
FH_»
8 All
PRIZES FOR BEST COSTUME   I
POSITIVELY MERMAIDAL
tMONDAY, APRIL 23
doors open at
9 pm
waves of fun
AT GRACELAND   1250 RICHARDS ST^EiT ALLEY ENTRANCE
TICKETS AND INFORMATION 688-8399 also possess many boils and
moles situated gratuitously
around their bodies. Any Earth-
ling interested please write to:
Club of Earth
Room 1414
Dome 4-B
Mars
We thank you.
K'Ere K'Tuga (Big Wet
Handshakes of Love)
Kahal Midwan G'Bor and
YEAH, VIOLA! AGINI (SIC)
Dear Airhead,
Please, if I may, a few notes
on last months (sic) Discorder,
Miss Funk, and this telephone
operators life in general.
Well well well, loads o letters to Airhead. Great. I've always enjoyed reading letters to
the Editor (especially bitchy
ones, I must admit). This shows
people are responding to what's
laid before 'em. Lots of fun for
the price of a stamp, etc.
But whoa kids, lay off Viola. I read her reviews of concerts
and enjoy the opinions expressed
- gosh, even when I don't agree
with 'em. Viola has a creative,
colloquial style which I enjoy
reading immensely. So back off,
take a deep breath (especially you
Liz, boy were your claws out!
And by the way what's this stuff
about "telephone operator style
writing"? Watch it babe. Sheesh.)
Viola, yop were hard-done-
by! There sure are some touchy
folks out there. Look I'm gonna
call you up at the
month... let's go ou
food, my treat. Yoi
worth meeting.
Another thang dear Airhead
which you may wish to use in this
section. I've noticed the profuse
usage of that old bastion of gram -
mer (sic) the (sic) symbol. I don't
know about you, but it bugs me lo
no end. Take this letter for example, I'm sure you could have a
field day correcting it, but even
with some minor errors I've had a
fun time writing to you, my fave
local paper. Howsaboul some
disclaimer at the "head" of
Airhead staling lhat all letters are
printed as recieved. It may not be
correct but it's from the heart.
I've really enjoyed the last
few issues of Discorder. Wilh
luck more people will start contributing (moi aussi) and everyone will live happily ever after.
And remember folks, there's
more to life than rock and roll...
Thev
nthe-A
Judith Naomi Lahti
Well, Naomi, we also are sick of
the (sic). After this issue we will
just have a disclaimer related lo
the fact that we print letters as
received.
BOO, VIOLA!
Dear Airhead,
RE: The rather shabbily
written review of the Bamff/
Superconductor/Mary gig, the
resultant "letters to the editor"
and the supercilk
italics below them.
Perhaps it would be to Ms.
Funk's advantage to decorously
back off. Four letters to the editor
can't all be wrong. No one is
denying her her God-given right
to hate Bamff to her little heart's
content but do please tell us
why 111 Her pet peeve of headset
mics simply won't wash. Any
imbecile can see the advantages
of using a headset mic if one
wants to sing and play violin at
the same time. Or shall we sacrifice all innovation to ihe great
Shure-SM58-God as a nostalgic
act of contrition for daring to use
the new technology available?
And could Ms. Funk please explain why she does not "care for"
"TECHNOSTUFF' (???) Is it the
same problem she has with the
mic? Or is it that keyboards, violins and headless guitars just
don't rate as phallic enough to be
harbingers of "real ROCK AND
ROLL"? Was it all just nol earthy
enough, tribal enough, adolescent enough for Ms. Funk?
There is very little point in a
reviewer going to a heavy metal
gig and giving it a bad review
because he simply doesn't like
heavy metal. The object of the
exercise is to rate that bands performance within their chosen
medium. If you don't like "technostuff", Ms. Funk, then don't
review it because, if your dislike
of ihe medium is that strong, you
will never find a band in that
genre to your satisfaction.
Finally, (and this is directed
lo the editorial staff at the Discor
der) the re-printing of the "Alex
Varty Hate Club" item went far
beyond the realms of tasteless-
ness. It sits only slightly below
the level of Ms. Funk's review in
terms of it's (sic) lack of literary
style and poor jounalistic properties. Hate literature is not only
illegal bul also disgusting and it's
(sic) reproduction on the pages of
ihe Discorder. The Discorder is
now the ONLY alternative music
publication in this city and it has
a responsibility lo uphold and a
reputation to build.
With the Georgia Straight
now a film and food publication
and Nite Moves a mainstream
fanzine, it is up to the Discorder
to fill the widening gap. I sincerely hope it survives some of
it's (sic) editorial decisions.
Madeleine Morris
Supercilious, nous? But gee, I
guess you're right, four letters to
the editor can't all be wrong.
ALEX VARTY LOVE CLUB
Dear Airhead,
The Alex Varty Club ad, in
your last issue, gave me the
creeps. It's one thing to criticize.
It's something else to promote a
hate vendetta, and to jeer at bodies and the processes of aging.
Looks like whoever did this is
still al the smearing-shit-on-the
walls stage. Why give it space?
Renee Rodin
We have received numerous calls
and letters regarding the "Alex
Varty Hate Club" graphic which
appeared in last month's issue.
The graphic related to an
Airhead letter and was not intended as an attack upon Alex.
We assumed that people would
read the actual letter and understand the relevance of the
graphic; sorry, our mistake, we
should have included a caption.
Incidentally, we called Alex to
get his reaction. He was not offended (honest!) and hoped lhat
through continued mentions of
his name in Discorder he would
become as famous as Rick Gi-
YEAH, VIOLA!
Dear Airhead,
After reading Viola's piece
on cereal, I am now convinced
that we are in fact the same person. 70s cereals never die...
J.PJ.K.
of Sniffy was a performance
piece. Do you think there
shouldn't have been a protest?
Do you feel used by Mr. Gibson?
The protesters were artists too,
and they yanked the event out of
the control of Mr. Gibson. Mr.
Gibson's little artistic world-
bubble was burst by artists more
powerful than he. That day he
created nothing but excitement
for the anti-performance protesters, when they saw what they had
created; the look of fear in his
eyes as he was slapped and kicked
at. Mr. Gibson was clearly not in
control of the situation, and,
having lost control, had no role in
the "performance", except as
"subject". It was the protestors'
piece all the way, and they should
savour their artistic victory,
rather than bicker and in fight.
I  was  very  dissappointed
CENTRO DI COMUNICAZIONE RISTRETTA
Discorder received tl
mysterious letterhead
responsible should cc
ctAlexVc
•NO NAME LETTER- on paper bearing this
h any information regarding the individual(s)
the god of their choice.
NO NAME LETTER
Dear Airhead,
To "Logic Bomb":
So What's your point? S
that Discorder decided to run an
v with Mr. Gibson. And
is frustrating to read that Mr.
Gibsqn is not afraid of negative
Mr. Gibson's attempted snuffing       reation.   He's  not  afraid  "that
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^r$<?   a.v*ilaJ>le for
6.4*3322
HOg ItawUtftit Aiuet someone's gonna break down my
door and whatever". Maybe he's
just being brave, but I doubt it.
He's just stupid and underestimates the power of anyone else' s
art other than his own. His comments indicate that this "performance event" is not yet complete,
and the creation desired has not
yet taken shape. Mr. Gibson has
not yet recieved his "free art les-
So teach! you "art school punks"
and "skinheads".
And learn! "Rick Gibson".
To the "Man Sherbert":
What's wilh dissing Red
Robinson? The man is an avid
collector of both movies and
music, and he selflessly shares
fruits of his labours with the
public at large! It's hard trying to
dig up those great shows! They're
cool! We should be thanking him.
This "dont trust anyont over 30"
shtick is bullshit and has got to
go.
To "Viola Funk": You've done il
again! You've hi-jacked a much
needed public space dedicated to
the printed exposure of local
bands and gigs, and turned it into
an idiotic, irrelevant, indecipherable sideshow.
What are "Hooker-Women of the
Roxy"?
Why is Love Battery's lead
singer thanking Mudhoney for
the opening slot and bringing
them upAere, construed as "verbal ass-ftcing"?
Why do you think your "Roxy
hookers" have come to see Tankhog?
You never explain your inane
scribblings in your black notepad. You just relate them as if
you are as bewildered by your
comments as we (the readers) are.
What is a "short man syndrome"?
Let alone one "run amok"?
How can the lead singer be "fresh
outta Chi Pig High" when the
lead singer for Tankhog has been
performing in his usual manner
long before he'd ever seen SNFU
live? Besides, the two front men
are quite unique in their own right
and patently un-similar! They
never performed a New York
Dolls cover (although they introduced one). How do you perceive
them to have a large contingent
of "groupies"? How do you identify said "groupies"? Girls dancing? Tankhog have a modest
circle of friends/supporters, of
which there is no preponderance
of females as opposed to males.
You seem to be living in some
sort of fantasy world unberdened
(sic) by the constraints of reality,
and that wouldnt (sic) be so bad
in itself, except that you are sharing your warped perceptions with
a great deal of readers who are
taking your "reviews" at face
value. You are misrepresenting
local bands (in this issue and
others) to readers on the periphery of the "scene" who don't
know better, because all they get
is shit from you until they go out
and see these acts for themselves
(that is, if they still want to, after
reading your tripe that poses as
"coverage").
To continue: Mudhoney never
made any stupid jokes about the
Teamsters.  That  was  a  stupid
: "the Ku
p group".
urorgani-
audience-goer who jumped onstage. You got Mark Arm's ad-
libbed audience participation
chant wrong; it was "Where are
we? The Town Pump! What are
we? Live!"
They never did a Fastbacks
cover. They said they thought
Tankhog's rendition of The
Sweet's "Action" was cool, and
they asked the crowd if anyone
had seen The Fastbacks' version
of The Sweet's "Set Me Free".
Mudhoney are no Green River
phoenix. Mark Arm is the only
Mudhoney lhat sports lhat questionable pedigree. The rest of the
Greeners are in the abysmal
Mother Love Bone.
To Chris Buchanan: I'm glad you
did not knuckle under and remove "Welcome to the Terror-
dome". Your decision showed intelligence and integrity. Now if
only you could use those same
powers of judgement to address
the existence of records by NW A,
among others, on the CITR playlist. Especially after the American Ku Klux Klan's recent endorsement of NWA ;
Klux Klan's favorite i
Other recording
offend, among others,
zation, include
JESUS LIZARD, GG ALLIN,
POISON IDEA, THE CRO
MAGS, AGNOSTIC FRONT,
TUPELO CHAIN SEX. THE
BUTTHOLE SURFERS,
RAPEMAN. THE BEASTIE
BOYS, TWO LIVE CREW,
WARZONE, and THE MENTORS among others.
I suggest you re-read your
CRTC Broadcasting Act in regards to the "artists" listed above.
PLEASE PRINT THIS PART:
In addition, we implore the
clandestine and/or above-ground
feminist, gay & lesbian, and anti-
racist groups to educate themselves with what CITR programs
under the guise of "alternative"
and take action and get involved
with the campus radio station that
purports to represent you.
Peace y'all.
P.S. Alex Varty is god.
So, like, which member of Tankhog are you friends with? There
was no connection made between
the "Hooker-Women of the
Roxy" and Tankhog. And why
didn't you sign your name ? Or al
least  thai   of your   "organiza-
YEAH, VIOLA!
Dear Airhead,
I am writing in response to
the four (count 'em) negative
replies to Viola Funk's February
"Real Live Action" column. Sour
grapes, people! I don'l blame her
one iota for concentrating on the
proliferation of silly equipment
in Bamff's performance. Believe
me, ther wasn't much else to
concentrate on. The fact is that
for most people, and certainly
those in attendance at The Town
Pump that night, Bamff's music
is just plain boring. You snooze,
you looze.
Ms. Funk was also criticized for her misrepresentation
of certain people's genders, concentrating on Alex Varty, and not
"supporting" local bands, regardless of how awful their music is.
Look, it's great that people take
the time to write in letters expressing their opinions, but at
least Ms. Funk doesn't write moronic 'they-came-on-it-was-
great-and-they-left' reviews like
one might discover in pulp like
the Straight or John 'Monosyllabic' Mackie in the Sun. I'm
sure Discorder could always use
more reviewers, so why not give
it a shot yourself... Pete Ston-
derove, Peter Lipskis, and Elizabeth Fischer?
Viola Funk captured the
very strange, shewered and just
plain fucked up atmosphere of
that particular evening.
Sincerely,
Anthony Hempell
FAMOUS LAST WORDS
Dear Airhead,
I am still a sick man. Yet my
wretched life and hence the incessant torment associated wilh
it continues. Oh please, carry on
despising me if il makes you feel
lhat your insect-like lives have
even the remotest form of importance. My heart and soul have already been soured by over a century's worth of hatred, deceit and
contempt injected into my blook-
stream by jny so-called fellow
countrymen. More appropriately
I should call them my co-sufferers for they too are sick with the
same insidious cancer which has
gnawed iheir flesh down to the
bare bone.
But in recent times my heart
has felt a margin of lightness as
now it seems our country's great
leaders (how great they are I hope
to never know for fear I would
evacuate my stomach's contents)
have, at last decided to abandon
the hopeless charade which they
embarked upon early in this century. Hurrah! I say. Now we may
return to the true matters of living; open hatred, jelousy and
covetting of the material objects
of all those people we hate. Once
again we can return to the natural
(shall I say Darwinian) process
of trodding upon the shoulders
and heads of those around us to
raise ourselves out of the muck
and stench ofthe masses and into
the ranks of an openly accepted
elite. There we may roll in the
reak of the excrement deposited
upon us by the hatred nd jelousy
of the masses whom we refer to
sardonically as the backbone of
the country.
But alas, I grow excited and
I must watch myself despite
myself. For the first time in ages
I can feel the faint pulse of my
heart which forces my poisoned
blood through my hardened
veins. Please do not misinterpret
my meaning. I still despise everyone of you but I feel this old
bitter soul must thank you for
whatever role your countries
have played in this return to the
natural business  of living  and
Underground Man
P.S. Yes, remove the facade, the
veil, so we may see the tormented
tortured faces and laugh full-
heartedly at them.
PiscoRDeR
mre cli/B
Here's what some local celebrity Discorder Hate Club members have to say:
"I think [DiSCORDER] showed a real lack of sensitivity"
- local nostalgia record store owner
"If you don't publish a retracdon, I'll never advertise again!"
- local tobacco company pawn
"I think [DiSCORDER] is unnecessarily cruel...and hurtful..."
- the competition
I Sure! I hate Discorder as much as the next person! Plus, I'm getting tired of
scraping the floor of my bird cage! Sign me up for a one year membership in
the Discorder Hate Club!! Please find enclosed a cheque or money order for:
□ $15 - I'm a Canadian, and I hate DiSCORDER.
□ $15 USD - I'm an American, dammit. Of course I hate DiSCORDER.
□ $24 - I'm neither, but I still hate your damned magazine.
NAME	
ADDRESS_
CITY
_AGE_
l__
. PROV./STATE _
_ CODE _ LAUREL WELLMAN &
TWO GUYS NAMED JOHN
"Wa      have      nothing
against intellectuals," says
John Flansburgh. One half of
New York-based duo They Might
Be Giants, he's sitting in the chilly
basement greenroom of the Vancouver East Cultural Centre
wearing a parka. He's eager to
defend the band's music against
charges by Rolling Stone that it's
overly cerebral.
tarded, but we became good
friends." The band, which has
been together seven years,
formed a few years later in New
York, where Flansburgh was attending art school at the Pratt Institute.
"I would never have imagined art school could be so
square," he says. "I couldn't tell
anyone I was in a band or I would
have lost all my credibility as a
student. I was performing at the
Pyramid Club on Wednesday
nights and coming in to class on
Thursday completely bleary-
eyed and they were like, 'What
happened to you?' And I was
like, 'Oh, nothing."
The band chose the name
They Might Be Giants from the
title of a 1971 movie starring
Joanne Woodward and George
C. Scott, even though, as
Flansburgh says, "It's kind of a
sucky movie. We just gave ourselves   that   name   because   it
"When you're writing a pop song
it's like you versus the entire
Lennon-McCartney catalogue"
"People hear our music and
they don't understand how it
could not be a self-conscious
thing. We're most misunderstood
in that people think there's this
very distant approach to the way
we write our songs. I think basically we put our songs together
in very much the same way the
guys in Metallica do. We just sit
with our instruments and sing,
and we have to be really completely wide-awake and realty
excited by the sound that we're
making, and go, 'That's really
cool! I can't believe how cool that
sounds!' It's this very real-life,
passionate kind of thing to do.
It's not something that we listen
to a record and go, "That's an
interesting rhythm. I think we
should take that apart and apply
it to our many ideas."
"The main thing about it is
that we don't go to the trouble of
explaining anything to ourselves
until it reaches the interview
stage," adds John Linnell, They
Might Be Giants' other member.
Linnell and Flansburgh met
in elementary school in Lincoln,
Massachusetts (hence the title of
their second LP). "The first thing
I ever heard about John (Linnell)
was that he was in the hospital
because he had lost his spleen.
And everyone in my class had to
write him a get-well card," says
Flansburgh. Twenty-nine and
thirty respectively.he and Linnell
have been friends since high
school. "You know how kids don't
intermingle between grades. It's
kind of asign of being socially re-
seemed like an interesting, paranoid set of words."
"Sometimes I wonder if the
name is even that great," says
Linnelt. "1 think we've had a hard
time convincing people that They
Might Be Giants is not about me
and John. People think we're
egomaniacs because we're saying, "We're giants, man. We're
big."
"But basically, every band
name gets used as a weapon of
torture," observes Flansburgh.
The Giants' early lack of a
record deal inspired the band to
start their Dial-A-Song phone
line, stil! operating today at (718)
387-6962 and featuring a new
song every 24 hours. "We were
just guys in a local band in New
York doing a lot of home recording," says Flansburgh. "No one
was interested in what we were
doing so we had plenty of time to
write songs. We thought we
needed a way, other than playing in clubs, to get our stuff
heard."
The band members do most
of their songwriting separately.
"People are so anxious to hear
that you're twins and best friends
and inseparable that when you
admit that you do stuff apart they
suddenly think you're completely
not working in tandem," says
Flansburgh. "It definitely is a
partnership and I think it is a very
positive collaboration. Basically,
one person starts a song and
guides it through, and the other
person offers up an honest appraisal of it, which is a valuable
10 DISCORDER thing to have."
"We obviously have a certain distance on the other's
ideas," says Linnell. "We feel
equipped to criticize the other
person. If some random person
was telling me that they hated my
song I probably would not be as
inclined to change part of it or
throw it away."
The success of the poppy
single "Birdhouse In Your Soul,"
a song which is in some ways
atypical of the group's work,
surprises Linnell. "I think it's too
bad in away. I feel least proud, in
some ways, of the lyrics to "Don't
Let's Start" and "Birdhouse." The
way that songs are set up to be
blockbusters, it's hard to do the
most specific stuff, the stuff that
seems the most meaningful to
us. I think of "Chesspiece Face"
and "Whistling In the Dark,"
songs with a lot more going on in
them, because they have such a
specific mood that they're giving
off. You have a strong sense that
they've been done correctly and
that they're really saying what
they're trying to be saying."
"Also, they might seem like
more singular songs," says
Flansburgh. "When you do a
song like "Chesspiece Face,"
you're on your own. You're dealing with songwriting on your own
personal terms. When you're
writing a pop song it's like you
versus the entire Lennon-Mc-
Cartney catalogue."
"The melody came first,"
says Linnell of "Birdhouse In Your
Soul." "1 think that's how you
come up with your most oblique
lyrics, by having a melody that's
completely done and knowing
that certain syllables are probably going to work better in certain
places. You really end up going,
'Blue canary in the outlet by the
light switch,' by default."
In a similarly organic manner, the title of the new album,
"Flood," grew out of the way in
which the Giants compose their
material, 'm a^
Says Flansburgh, "We just
thought it was a good kind of a, a
"Name," Linnell says.
"Good name. I don't know."
"It was his idea," claims Linnell.
"We have a lot of tapes and
computer disks when we're putting things together, thathold ten
different songs or ten different
sounds or whatever," Flansburgh
explains. "I end up giving things
group names that have nothing
to do with what's on them, because there's no way to describe
it otherwise. And so I just named
a disc "Flood" just because it
seemed like a word. I don't know,
I heard it on TV or something. I
wrote it on the disc, and John
saw it and went, 'Huh!'
"It's an interesting word. It's
a very non-emotionally loaded
natural disaster. Everything gets
naturally upset in this very complete way, but it's not very hysterical. People don't go'FLOOD!'
We just like the idea of things
being completely shifted. Things
happen in floods that are interesting. It re-draws the horizon
line in a way that makes you rethink everything. It's a living-with-
disaster title and cover."
Because there are only two
band members, They Might Be
Giants tour using backing tapes.
Onstage, Linnell plays saxophone and accordion, while
Flansburgh plays guitar, harmonica, and a marching band
bass drum so heavy that during
the Giants' European tour he
developed severe backstrain.
Their current tour, recent signing
to a major record label, and the
release of "Flood" has dramatically increased the band's visibility.
"I have to admit I feel kind of
ambivalent about people considering us to be somehow rock
stars rather than just an interesting band," says Flansburgh. "I
really enjoy being the alternative,
rather than the oppressive person you can't avoid in the culture."
The Giants gave a lot of
thought to their decision to jump
from U.S. indie Bar/None to El-
ektra. "They seemed like the
least sucky of all the major record labels," Flansburgh says.
"They have 10,000 Maniacs, The
Sugarcubes, Tracy Chapman,
and Motley Crue."
"And Metallica," adds Linnell. "We also got the impression
that they among the major labels
were going to not interfere as
much in what we're doing. I don't
think we would have signed a
major if we didn't feel we were
going to be able to do what we
wanted, or at least have the
amount of control that we had on
the first two albums."
"There was really a reason
why we stayed independent as
long as we did. We probably
could have gotten a major label
deal right after our first record,
because we sold a lot of records,
but it was important to us that we
just do the thing that we're interested in and not have to deal with
so much of the market forces,"
explains Flansburgh. "We feel
very lucky that we're with Elektra,
because it's entirely possible
that a big record company would
have really tried to ruin us."
He adjusts his black-framed
glasses and reflects. "I don't listen to our old records and think
things failed, but I can tell when
we're stretching out. Itseemslike
a good thing to be in a band that
is interested in stretching out." From Clive
Barker, the
I modern mas-
|ter of the macabre. An
Epic Comics
[adaptation of
this winter's
major motion picture,
available at:
B.C.'s Largest Comic Store
738-8122
New & Collector's
comics • Buy - Sell
- Trade • Science
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2089 W. 4th
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Mon.-Sat.11-6;
Fri. 11-8;
Sun. & Hoi. 12-5
The rip-roaring comedy show that will
knock you out of your seat!
rhe entire tradition of American theatrical satire
can be summed up in three words:
Touring
Company
Clive Barnes,
New York Times"
May 4,5 & 6 • 8pm
Vancouver East Cultural Centre
1895 Venables at Victoria
Reservations 254-9578   Ticketmaster 280331b
Tickets also available at Black Swan Records, Highlife Records and       Cpi***"
the Vancouver Folk Musio-FestivalOffice.
PRESENTED BY VANCOUVER EASTCULTURAL CENTRE
and VANCOUVER FOLK MUSIC FESTIVAL
E_4
Cf*9K fM99
86 Street and lf^jfi>\ Present
WEA Recording Artists
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
APRIL 6 & 7
Tickets Available At
l^£_____l_»_». THE BRITISH THRKSH-RtWT ?OET FROM HEU.
ATTILMHE*/
by Peter Lutwyche
ATTILA the Stockbroker has got it all worked out and he doesn't mind telling you. In March,
just before his gig at the Vancouver East Cultural Centre, he dropped by CiTR for an on-air
interview which in forty-five minutes covered such diverse topics as God, East Germany, Canadian
T.V., Existentialism, Heavy Metal, Public Enemy and dogfish. A committed Socialist with a
wicked sense of humour, Attila quickly cut through standard interview bullshit to get straight to
what he sees as the important issues of today.
down ...well, to Seattle or Boston but I certainly don't want to go
and play somewhere like Houstonor Atlanta. I think I might end
up getting lynched! Billy Bragg told me that he went on stage
somewhere in Georgia wearing a Lenin t-shirt and people
started throwing darts at him!
...Attila the Stockbroker on Canadian audiences...
I'm always going to be talking about Britain 'cause that's my
home. Equally, I have the capacity to write stuff that is
international. I have some new stuff which is about Canada, as
Canada is so like the U.K. in many ways. You have the naff
politicians here like we do, like Vander Zalm and John Crosbie
- that type of generic patronizing, dumb, sexist, prat politician.
So I' ve picked up on that and also the linguistic thing 'cause I'm
francophone as well so I can identify to some degree with the
way that francophones feel and the way that other people feel
about them. I've also got some stuff about catching dogfish in
Campbell River!
...on television...
/ don't watch a lot of T.V. usually but when Tm on the road,
staying in hotel rooms, I wake up in the morning, put the
television on - twenty-four channels, twenty-four total loads of
smegma. I can't believe how many game shows! I mean a
moronic game show followed by a moronic chat show, which is
bad enough, but with incredibly moronic advertising every
three minutes...that just blows your mind!
...on Canadian college radio...
The great thing about Canada is that there are all these college
radio stations. In the U.K. they talk about freedom of the
airwaves and deregulating things but all it's gonna be is more
and more independent stations setting up and playing the same
crap, the same stuff over and over again. At least here there is
an alternative.
...on the U.S.A....
/ have an allergy about America. I have a deep suspicion ofthe
psyche of the Americans. Having said that, there is a tremendous amount of good people in the States and I can envisage
myself going to the northern cities. I could see myself going
...on his ranting roots...
Punk really did change the way I felt about music. The basic
idea of it was that anyone could do it. I had some ideas of my
own that I wrote for bands that didn' t seem to work out, so I just
started getting up and doing ten minute slots between bands at
punk gigs. It developed from there...really 'cause once you've
taken on audiences at punk rock gigs, you can do virtually
anything. Now I do everything from literature festivals to
hardcore gigs.
...on poetry...
One ofthe basic things about me was that I wanted to present the
idea of being a poet in a different way. We called it "ranting,"
which was a pretty good term to describe it, but now I see what
I do in much broader terms - more serious, introspective stuff as
well as the straight total thrash.
...on 'Factory Gods' and religion...
Religion has been used throughout history as a way of dividing
people, making their lives a misery; you know the idea that was
spread through hundreds of years - if you're poor and you're
living in crap conditions, that's the way you should be 'cause
that's the way God has ordained it and you'll get your reward
in heaven. As Jean-Jacques Rousseau once said, "All religion
sucks and absolute religion sucks absolutely!"
...on Thatcher's plummeting popularity in Britain...
When I first heard about this idea of poll tax, I thought, "Yeah,
we must get this introduced 'cause that is one definite way of
getting this horrible, horrible nightmare to a close as quickly as
possible!" I knew it was absolute political suicide - everybody
knows that it is ridiculously unfair that someone in a council flat
on forty pounds a week has got to pay the same amount for local
services as a millionaire who lives in a castle. Although there's
been a lot of dickheads in Britain recently who have been voting for Thatcher and have been subscribing to this awful "I'm
alright. Jack" philosophy, basically, people, even prats, have
some vestigial idea of social justice. Of course, the last time
they tried to introduce a poll tax was in 1381 and it brought
about the Peasants' Revolution. And we've got another peas-
revolt happening now! About bloody time too!
on the changes in Eastern Europe...
/' ve done five tours in the G.D.R. and before coming to Canada,
I was there doing some gigs and some fund- raising for the Party
of Democratic Socialists, the reformed communist party, who
actually did very well in the elections. They got sixteen percent
ofthe vote, which is good compared to what was expected. How
about this for biased journalism? Forty-one percent for the
Sandanistas in Nicaragua is a massive defeat; forty-one percent
for Thatcher in 1979 was a great victory; thirty-eight percent
for the Christian Democratic Union in th G.D.R. is a great
victory! It's complete doublethink (the American newsmedia).
Talk about Communism as though Marx intended the communist paradise to be run by Ceaucescu or Honneke. It's up to us
to say that socialism isn't about grey, horrible societies run by
totalitarian dickheads who build ridiculous great palaces to
their own personal aggrandisement; it's just about caring and
compassion.
...on Salman Rushdie...
I'm a writer and my father was a writer and it's something that
I feel very strongly about, not just that these people have
condemned him to death for writing a book which is a great
work of anti-racist fiction, but also that a lot of people are
frightened of speaking out. Personally, I think he's in Albania,
the only country with an atheist constitution - what a great idea!
...on Public Enemy...
Tm unashamedly untrendy, if being trendy involves wearing
flares, liking Acid House, liking Stone Roses or liking misogynistic, violent rappers who go on about guns and wasting people
and all the rest of it. I don't make any distinction at all between
playing Public Enemy and playing Skrewdriver (an English
Nazi band). I think both bands spell racism, and specifically,
anti-semitism, which, after the awful things that happened in
World War Two and throughout history, you'd think it would be
the end of that story. For it to start up again is just unbelievable.
I'd go as far as: Anyone who plays Public Enemy is condoning
the murder of six million Jews because they are carrying on an
evil tradition that has existed in human society for two thousand
years of persecuting minorities. Ironically, for black people,
who themselves have suffered so much persecution in the past,
turn around and start blaming Jews! If it weren't so awful, it'd
be like something from a Monty Python script.
...and on his cover of Motorhead's "Ace of Spades"...
Tm very proud of this. ..I listened to the Motorhead song and I
realized that Lemmy had pretty much summed up the basic
tenets ofthe twentieth century existentialist movement -1 suspect unconsciously. I've never been aware of Lemmy as a fan
of existentialist thought! I'm doing a Venom cover now - they're
a Satanist band. They're absolutely appalling but anybody who
can write lyrics like...
I drink the vomit of the priest,
Make love to the dying whore,
I suck the blood of the beast,
And hold the key to death's door.
. ...definitely deserves to have the piss taken out of them!
APRIL 1990 13 TheORf&NAL
AhCnihion
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mmi^Kiiiy.Vil
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At last—One Performing Rights Society for Canada
SOCAN
f
Society of Composers,
Authors and
Musie
Publishers
of Canada
Societe eanadienne
des auteurs,
compositeurs
et editeurs
de musique
\
V
The merger of Canada's two performing rights societies, CAPAC and
PROCAN, is a blending of the best elements of two successful
organizations. The objective is a stronger, more effective and unified
society to enhance and protect the performing rights of copyright
owners — composers, lyricists, songwriters and music publishers —
and to better serve the users of music in an increasingly complex world.
NEW ADDRESS: 1201 West Pender St., 4th Floor, Vancouver, B.C. V6E2V2
Tel. (604) 669-5569 • Fax. (604) 688-1142
J listing after a short, famous, blond/redhead girl/woman is hardly the most original
pastime for a heterosexual male to indulge in. However, if the aforementioned
i—3 I female is in a rock band you can at least pretend you have some legitimate reason
for speaking to her. Tracy Tracy of The Primitives is, or has been, all of the above.
Discorder spoke to her on the eve of her band's Vancouver show with The Sugareubes.
RUN BABY RUN
"As far as touring goes, fans sort of
appreciate os as much here as they do in
England... I suppose there is no big difference apart from the obvious things,
like having to travel further distances
between shows."
KEEP ME IN MIND
"Paul ('Perfect* Paul, the band's guitar
player) writes the words and the chords
and then the band works it out and arranges it, the harmonies, backing
vocals..it's very much a unit."
Do you ever change the lyrics?
"14o change them from time to time. I
used to have a lot of troubles with them,
but now I just write my own little story
board in my head."
CRASH
"Crash was written within six weeks of
the band being together. Then we put it
aside and revived it...Paul was strumming along and it sounded brilliant."
(Crash was the band's first major label
single in the UK, where it went top five
and made them famous.)
STOP KILLING ME       :
"For this second album ("Pure") we
wanted to have the band in the studio on
their own and not have anybody interfering. On the first album there was quite a
few people, producers, who we didn't
particularly want." t  ■** '
CARRY ME HOME
Where does the band make its home these
Be Your Mirror,' 'As Tears Gi
'Ticket To Ride' and *I Wanna B<
Dog.'" (giggles)
DIZZY HEIGHTS
Morrissey has said you are one
favorite bands.
"Oh that was years ago. I suppose
important then We were up and a
onmSBilP
SL
"Make its home?"       '   ^f Krp __£•
Where dp you live?
"We all still live in Coventry, where the
NEVER TELL
How would you describe your bartd-
"We've got some strange personalities
in this band. We ail get along really well.
It's quite surprising. You're living out of
each others pockets... so you have to get
on, and we do. We ali just click together
and after * couple of weeks on the road
we all just start going insane."
I'LL STICK WITH YOU
"The main person I really like is Marc
Bolan from T-Rex. That has always been
one of my favorites from when 1 was
really young. And I can still stick any of
it on and play it madly and love it. Apart
from Marc Bolan T don't like many
people's whole works. It's probably the
same for the rest of the band."
I WANNA BE YOUR DOG
"We do covers from time to time... 'I'll
SICK
"That gets
to annoy me more than anyone. The band
just accepts it. I just wish people would
open thcireyes and see we are a complete
unit, complete, together. People ask for
me specifically and it makes the gap
even bigger."
/ was just told, "You're talking to her."
"Oh her, HER !?" (giggles, slightly annoyed)
OUT OF REACH
"I go to a lot of second hand clothing
stores, antique clothing stores. I hate
most mass produced clothes. Occasionally I make something."
SECRETS
Do you feet as though you're in competition with bands like Transvision Vamp (a
band referred to by some as their Evil
Twin)?
"No, we're two completely different
bands. The only comparison you can
make is that you've got two (paused;
entertaining females, that's it."
NOTHING LEFT
Is there any question you've never been
asked bul always wanted to give an an-
"No." (giggles, turning to laughter) tfVU
£5™ ofU?mnAHKQK    * SKATEBOARDS
AND ACCESSORIES
1127 GRANVILLE STREET, VANCOUVER, BC V6Z1M1
(604) 688-9555
VANCOUVER'S HOTTEST BLUES NIGHTCLUB
Feb. 2-4 from san Francisco Norton Buffalo
Feb. 5 - 7 Jim Byrnes
Feb. 9 Oliver and the Elements
Feb. 10-14 from Chicago John Watkins
Feb. 16 Sundogs
Feb. 17-24 from Chicago Phil Guy
Feb. 25 - 28 The Demons with special guest
Tony Flame of the Downchi/d Blues Band
Feb. 23 + 31 Oliver and the Elements
DON'T MISS JACK LA VIN'S JAMS:
SAT. 3-8 PM / SUNDAY BLUES MARATHON JAM SUN. 3 PM-MIDNITE
OPEN EACH NIGHT FROM 9:30 pm -1:30 am OPEN WEEKDAYS FROM 11:30 am Tha night was March 12th. The event was Tad
and Nirvana's much-anticipated Town Pump
show. Wa JIGGLE boys took tha opportunity to
speak with Tad, perhaps Seattle's heaviest
band. Understandably, we were somewhat
nervous at tha prospect of Interviewing the big
man himself. So, with traditional JIGGLE Ingenuity, we purchased a 12-pack of Hostess
donuts as a special Interview Icebreaker. To
our delight, Tad's eyes lit up as we presented
him with our offering. He and Kurt, the band's
bass player, entertained and Informed us In a
calorie-laden rap session that went a little
something like this...
Discorder: The first thing you should know. Tad,
is that we are just good conversationalists, not
interviewers.
Tad : That's fine.
Discorder: So, is this the last leg of your tour?
Kurt: Actually, the deal is we did a West Coast
tour a couple of weeks ago, and we've been
back In Seattle about two weeks. This show is
the preliminary to the next leg of our tour to the
East Coast,  Midwest and Southeast. We're
leaving Sunday for New Jersey after a few more
local shows. It's going to take us five days to
reach New Jersey and once there we're going to
play a series of shows with Thee Hypnotics from
England, and some shows by ourselves. Just
coverin' the heartland.
D : Is it kinda gross knowing you'll be living in a
van for a long time?
K : It's pretty gross. This tour won't be that bad,
but it got really bad last summer on our first
tour. It was 100-plus degrees and sweaty. It
was hell. In Washington, D.C. it was 90 percent
humidity, 110 degrees, and we had a three-day
layover where we sat in this guy's house and
smoked pot.
T : And sweated. Not even moving. Just sat
there and sweated.
K : We were in the nation's capital and we didn't
even see the sights. The monuments were tost
on us. We just spent our time getting high and
watching Andrew Dice Clay videos.
Atthis point we couldn't help but notice the
fine burgundy of which Tad and Kurt were partaking, and the conversation shifted to the
band's current wine phase. Their rider had
allowed them several cases that evening. We
were awestruck. "That's a lot of beer."
"No," said Tad. "That's a lot of wine."
D : With the fine taste you have in wine, do you
also eat gourmet food?
T : Aw no, we just hang out at the AM-PM Mini
Mart and get the three-for-a-dollar hot dogs.
K : We try to get the cheapest blush they got,
slam it down, get a kinda wacky wine buzz, get
dry mouth, drink some water and drink another
bottle of wine. You might puke sooner or later
but it sure is good.
T : When you're as big as me you can't just keep
drinking beer and hoping to get buzzed 'cause
it's not going to happen.
D : So you drink wine for the general sophistication of it?       '
T : Or the general unsophistication of being a
wino!
D : Does the wine aid your performance?
Story by_
T : Well, I used to smoke a lot of pot before
shows and drink a lot of beer and it made me
more reserved and a little more laid back. Not
quite the fun-loving and happy guy I am now. But
now I don't smoke pot any more. I just drink
wine and I'm a complete lunatic.
K : He becomes Luciano.
T : Luciano Letshavaparty.
D : You're so punk rock!
K : I'm happy to hear you say that. That's what
we consider ourselves.
D : Does Sub Pop shy away from you because of
that?
T : They shy away from us more and more as the
day goes on.
D : Are you a popular band in your hometown,
Seattle?
T: In Seattle the press has dubbed us worthless
and useless, yet everywhere else we've gone
the press digs us. But we have quite a good following in Seattle now. At first people weren't
quite sure. They'd just sit there and look at each
other going, "Well, what do you think?"
D : When you play a show with other bands from
Sub Pop, and your sound is different, how are
you received?
T : It doesn't matter what we do. Whatever we
do is going to be us and even if we tried to sound
like Blue Cheer or Hendrix, it's not going to
sound like Blue Cheer or Hendrix.
K : And sometimes we have tried, and either
through incompetence or design it comes out
sounding really bad. So we tend not to sound
like anyone else.
D : You (Tad) played all the instruments on your
first single, "Daisy." Why did you decide to take
on that project?
T : I wanted to make music. I wanted to try it. I'm
originally a drummer and I've only been playing
guitar for two years and I think anybody, if he
wants to do it, can do it. I had these songs I
could hear in my head, like Charles Manson.
D : So how did this lineup come together?
T : Kurt was in a different band at the time,
called "Bundle of Hiss," with the drummer from
Mudhoney.
K : Actually, Tad joined a couple of weeks before
it broke up, so Tad and I were sitting there and
thought, "Well, there is this Tad single out, so
why don't we call the band Tad and write more
songs in the same vein." I'm really pleased to
hear you say we're punk rock, 'cause so many
interviewers say we're a heavy metal band.
Even Sub Pop labels us heavy metal sometimes; like they're trying to target markets. But
the music is way too simple. We're not nearly
good enough to be a heavy metal band.
D : Is there a serious sweat problem in the
band? Do you have to change clothes a lot?
K : There surely is some serious sweating going
T: We change clothes only if someone shits or
barfs on themselves.
K: That was the European tour where Tad would
either shit on himself, or barf on himself, or
other people, every day.
T : Sometimes it would even happen in the
morning. I had morning sickness really bad in
Holland.
D : Have you delivered yet?
T : Coming up. Me and Bubba here (patting his
tummy) are sticking together.
D : Did the European tour open doors for your?
Was it worthwhile?
T : It was a blast!
K : It was really surprising to see audiences
react that way to us, going fucking nuts every
time we played.
T : It made us realize the Seattle press is full of
shit.
D : I assume distribution of your new EP, "Salt
Lick," will be good overseas, but what about
here?
K : Caroline (a major indie) is going to handle
distribution for the EP and Sub Pop is also on
the verge of making a deal with a very major
record company. That's actually been one of our
gripes — the collector mentality that goes along
with Sub Pop is pretty bogus. Sometimes it's
cool because it gets attention for the label, but
sooner or later you want to sell some records.
T: That's all the limited-edition crap we've been
against from the beginning. We've got three
thousand records out there. They're collectable, but nobody's got them.
(The Pussy Galore/Tad split 45 has reportedly
sold for $45 in California and £50 in Britain.)
D : Your songwriting is  so demented.  Is  it
tongue-in-cheek, or are you trying to offend?
T : It's a combination.
K : On one hand, we have this black humour
running through our lyrics that a lot of people
miss.   They  say  we're   misogynists,   freaks,
mean,  inconsiderate,  satanists,  blah,  blah,
blah. Yet we also have the attitude that we know
some people are going to be shocked by this, so
why don't we throw this in and provoke them.
D : Is that why you titled your LP "God's Balls"?
K : Actually, Tad and I were watching a porno
flick and there was this priest getting a blow job
and he was saying, "Gjxf's balls! Baby, that
feels goodl God's balls!"
D : Who's your favourite porno star?
T : I'm glad you brought that up because Kurt
and I have our own public-access cable show reviewing porno videos, but we don't get to show
anything, just talk about it.
K : Mention a title, a director, a few stars and
then right to the plot.
D : But who is your favourite porno star?
K : Kascha. She's nasty!
D : Why does your latest t-shirt feature the
sfogan, "Alcohol is the match, marijuana is the
flame, heroin is the fuse and LSD is the bomb,"
as well as a giant picture of a mud-chuckin'
truck?
K : The phrase is from a "Dragnet" episode with
a quasi-Tlmothy Leary guy who spewed all this
drug culture b.s.
T : Joe Friday told him, "Look, mister, you can
sell that line of bullshit to some other pothead,
but marijuana is the..." and then we added the
alcohol bit
D : So, are you straight edge?
K : No, if anything, we celebrate drugs.
D : Who's your favourite mud-slingin' four-by-
four?
T : The Gravedigger!
D : Any last words?
T : Be free, be furious, be fine with your juices.
Let them fly free!
K : Yeah!
APRIL 1990 17 Life began wilh lhat little
red wagon. Then came Barbie,
who was soon followed by her
hunkish lifeguard boyfriend.
Ken. Yo-yos and hula hoops captured the imagination of a generation (even if I can'l gel the
damn things to work). Gl Joes
allowed boys to be MKN and still
play with Action Figures (none
of this 'doll' crap - Mattell spent
a lot of money to teach us that
there is a world of difference
between Joe and Barbie - even if
neither has a penis).
Cabbage Patch Kids began
fetching $100 a head while consisting of nothing more lhan a
stuffed plastic outcrshell with a
hollow plastic head (kinda
sounds like Good Rockin's Stu
Jeffries), a cute name like Trixie
Trinitron, and a birth certificate.
Hulk Hogan Wrestlemania Replicas (did I hear someone say
'dolls'? Watch it, or I'll have you
removed from this article!) became the rage with bolh
Hulksters and fal balding men.
Currently, the thing is those
snot-grccn creatures in hard
shells that look like Paul Simon
and say cool words like 'radical
dudes' and can ninja lo death
every bad guy or girl from here to
Iceland (the lie in to the actual
article begins). Bul soon, very
soon, things will change.
Yours truly is now working
on the world-wide rights to ihc
hoi product in the doll world; and
no one can stop mc, not even
Alex Varty. It's the one toy to top
all others. She talks in the cutest
voice you've ever heard, and you
don't even have to pull a siring.
She has an impish smile lhat
would disarm the most evil record company executive. Bigger
eyes than even the Big Bad.Wolf
(all the better lo see you with, I
suppose). Dimples the size of a
twelve-inch single. On top of all
lhat, she can sing, play a damn
mean guitar, converse in bolh
Icelandic or English, and intelligently answer questions from a
semi-literate interviewer. Get
yours while supplies last. It's the
latest, the greatest, and it's only
$24.95 (free wilh a membership
to the Discorder Hale Club)... It's
the Bjork Sugarcube Figurine
(comes complete with micro-
phone, guitar, and distortion
pedal. Einar sold separately).
And trust me (we've been
friends for a long time now, I
think a little trust is in order),
once ihese are available in finer
stores everywhere, these will be
harder to get than a band request
for a review by Viola Funk.
Okay, so her name isn't Bjork
Sugarcube. However, if you read
any British music press reports
from the last two years, you
would have never known otherwise. Bjork Gudmudsdottir and
her bandmates make up the hottest thing to hit Iceland since the
heatwave of '49 when igloos
were melting all over the place.
Thousands went homeless as
temperatures soared to near
double-digit figures. Icelanders
actually had to buy refrigerators.
Out of this land of ice and cold
and more cold came a band lhat
took the world (okay, some rec
ord buyers) by surprise in 1987,
when Melody Maker, in a rare
display of British music press
intelligence, picked 'Birthday'
as their single of the week.
So, Discorder spoke to Bjork,
and despite swooning every time
she spoke, your very own Rob
Boper actually managed to conduct an interview wilh Iceland's
number one export.
(A brief note from The Bope:
"Thank you my friends for choosing to read yel another quality
article from the folks at Rob
Boper Inc. However, you must be
warned that digestion of this article is nol recommended or encouraged due lo poisonous dyes
and bleaches used in Ihe printing
process. This warning is for your
own good and is not done in order
lo make this article longer lhan il
really should be. For fullest enjoyment of this article, it is recommended thai you follow the
guidelines sel out in the following cast of characters.
THE CAST
Bjork - Played by your little sister or someone with an incredibly
cute voice and an Icelandic accent. Arscnio Hall would be a
good choice.
Rob Boper - Represented by
someone with a deep, masculine
voice, and is knowledgeable in
all matters. Pat Bums, perhaps.
The WEA Rep — Played by
someone who can talk very fast.
Bob Roper, my brother (wc were
separated at birth), A&R guy for
WEA Canada would be a fine
choice, but I think he's busy listening to demo tapes.
The Police - Anyone who can
speak through a megaphone.
CiTR's R.J Moorhouse or Gibby
from the Butlholes both have experience in this field.
The Discorder Editor - Anyone
who can use the 'delete' button
on a computer and has a permanent slouch when silting.
Once assembled, place the cast in
a circle around you. Wilh this
setup you will enjoy the article in
Dolby Surround Sound, with
voices approximating the actual
participants as closely as possible. Please remember lhat I am
the deep voice. Thank you for
your time and keep those cards
and letters coming.")
Firsl a little background information courtesy of Bjork.
"We all come from Reykjavik,
which is a small city of about
80,000 people. What we all have
s that v
all c
from the same scene. Some of us
had been in music, some had been
putting out books, and others
involved in organizations lhat put
on exhibitions. What drew us all
together was that no matter what
we were doing we did it ourselves. We would make the album covers or book covers ourselves and printed ihem ourselves
and put up all the posters ourselves. It was all 'memememe-
mememe' companies. Then for
many reasons, in spring '86,
when we hardly knew each olher,
all the things thai we were individually working on broke up.
The band lhat Einar (Om, singer,
agitator, and chief audience taun -
ter), Siggi (Baldursson, drums
and percussion), and I were in
broke up. Bragi (Olafsson, bass
player) had been in Spain, where
he had been writing for the last
year. Everyone else jusl came together, too. We decided to get together, to form a company which
would be a little bit bigger by
bringing all the different things
we were working on together."
So the ground work had been
laid for the Sugarcubes. Did the
people of Reykjavik support
you when they saw what you
were attempting to do?
"The attitude we had towards all
the other people in Reykjavik
was, I'm sorry to say, not very
positive because they said lhal
everything that we had done before was in bad taste and that we
were stupid people who wouldn't
grow up. But we
were convinced
that we were
doing the right
things   for   our-
olher people
didn't like it. And
since   everyone
bad taste, we
called ourselves
'Bad Taste Limited.' We started
out by putting out
postcards because wc wanted
to make some
money. So we put
oul postcards
lhat we thought
but from the rest
of the town's
point   of   view
taste. One was a
totally commercial water colour
agan and Gorbachev were in
Reykjavik, and it was of ihem
smiling to each other and saying
'Peace to the World' and gimmicky stuff like lhat. It was a best
seller. We sold 5000 copies in a
few days. We then managed to
put out a poetry book of Bragi's
stuff lhat he had been writing in
Spain. By the profit of that we put
out a poetry book of Thor's
(Eldon, guitars). Then as some
sort of joke, some of us went to a
studio and recorded some songs,
not as a band or anything, and one
of ihem was 'Birthday,' which
sold in Iceland 200 copies.
People didn't really like it except
for a small number of people lhat
always came to our gigs."
At least it's good to hear that
Vancouver isn't the only place in
ihe world that doesn't support
their local scene. At least we have
Viola to go oul and review local
bands in action. Maybe if Viola
had reviewed the early Sugarcubes shows and the demo of
"Birthday" had been submitted
to CiTR, all the doubt and an
guish that the Sugarcubes went
through could have been avoided.
But in reality, it doesn't sound
like the Sugarcubes cared too
much whether they sold 200 records or two million. They had the
Reykjavik postcard market cor-
"Then, like a year later, some
journalist in a British magazine
called Melody Maker chose
' Birthday' as Single of the Week.
I think it was an accident that he
somehow found ii. A happy accident. And then all the record companies started having a go for us.
At the same time things with Bad
Taste started to work."
So now that things were starting to work for you, did Mr.
and Mrs. Reykjavik accept you
and declare a national Bad
Taste/Sugarcubes Day?
"We slill weren't accepted in our
own country, not by ihe mainstream people at least. But you
18 DISCORDER
must understand, that when you
come from a very small town
mentality. It's like either you're
normal or weirdo."
So on a small, island country in
the middle or the North Atlantic Ocean inhabited by people
too cold to move, you were the
weirdos?
"Yeah. I don't mean this negatively, but when you have a big
city you have room for everyone.
In Iceland, we were sort of like a
side show. But the record companies were interested, even if no
one else was. All we had ever
heard about record company
people was that they were vampires and criminals and they
killed Elvis Presley."
At least someone had told you
the truth right away. Did they
want you to sign your life away
and move to Britain?
"We didn't really want to go for
that; we wanted to stay in Iceland. But we ended up saying 'why not"? It took us a year of
arguing wilh lawyers because we
are a stubborn bunch of people
and we wanted to be our own
managers. So we had to set all the
rules and go into lawyers' meetings 'cause we wanted to make
sure no one was using us. After a
year of that we finally reached an
agreement and started touring.
We've been on lour for almost
three years now and we're thinking of stopping in the summer
and taking care of Bad Taste for
Now that you are big international recording stars like Slim
Whitman and Richard
Clayderman, not to mention
Zamfir, prince of the pan flute,
do people In Iceland respect
you or are you still weirdos?
"I think people have learned to
respect us because they think we
have money, which we don't
because we put it all back into
Bad Taste. They think we have
money and people here respect
people who are able to make
money. I think we've got respect,
but we don't sell anymore records than we did before. Iceland
is a brilliant place. Even though
you become huge, people in Iceland don't change towards you.
It's a nice, homey place. You
can't become a star. It's ridiculous, theword 'star.* Autographs,
we didn't know what autographs
were; we'd only seen them in
Movies? You have movie theatres in Iceland? How can that
be possible In a country that
doesn't even have electricity?
It must have been hard for you
to venture forth from a savage
country like Iceland into the
civilized and automated comfort of the real world. Remote
control big screen TV's,
Rambo, Stealth Bombers, poverty, hunger, greed, manipulation, environmental disasters,
the United States, CFOX...Did
people treat you differently because you were from a small
country that most people know
very little about, and hasn't
been Involved In any major
wars in the last three decades?
"No. If anything we got too much
respect, too much attention.
People taking it as a miracle thai
we could actually hold guitars
and use electricity because we
came from Iceland. Do people
think that Iceland is Greenland or
something? And they lend to
think that we live in igloos or
something. Iceland is not lhat different from Norway or ScoUand.
People in the States seem to be
very self-centred, like the only
place on earth is the USA."
But Isn't that true. Ask any
American and they will tell you
that the US of A Is the only
place in the world, that they
know of, anyway. Except for
maybe Columbia, which seems
to be a very important country
for many Americans. They
must like the skiing there or
something, because they are
always talking
about how
much they like
that Columbian snow.
And I thought
Columbia was
near the equa-
Bjork, I digress, I don't
usually do
that. Why
don't  you  tell
(Both available on WEA
cassette/album/ compact
disc at your local retail outlet. While
you're there
check out some
of   our   other
IA.      This
month pick up the latest release
from Phil Collins, a scintillating piece of work guaranteed to
perk up any rainy da...This Is
the Police. Come out with your
hands up. We know that a WEA
rep has infiltrated this article.
This is the police. Come out
with your hands up...) Do you
like one more than the other?
"I don't feel better about one of
them; they were just done differently. First 'Life's Too Good'
was recorded just as an experiment in very tiny studios in Iceland. We didn't even look at us as
a band then, no one knew who
was in the band and who was not.
It was recorded in many, many
studios over a 15 month period
and then taken to England.
Whereas 'Here Today Tomorrow
Next Week' was recorded after
we had been touring for a little
more than a year and we had, as a
band, almost polished the songs
to the point where we wanted
them lo be. Then we went into
two studios in Iceland for one and
a half months and recorded it with
engineers that could do more than
just push ihe record button, which
was all we knew how to do for ihe
first album. Both albums have
their good points and bad points
and I don'l think either of the
ways was a better way. I don't
prefer one album io the other."
What about the British music
press? They seem to be more
interested in selling papers
than sharing any (Also available on WEA cassette/album/
compact disc is the latest compilation of Zeppelin rarities
'Led Poisoning.' A must for all
fans ofthe Zep...Thls is the Police. Come out with your hands
up. We will give you one last
chance, then we use force and
advanced
editing
niques to
happy to be famous. And when
ihey realized lhat we actually had
opinions on things and lhat our
music wasn't an accident - it was
somelhing thai we had worked a
lot on and it was precious lo us -
they sort of became disappointed.
It's really strange. It was like,
'Shit, we can't control them anymore.' It's a very big thing in
England. Rock music is very designed. Most of the bands I've
seen are like one guy has a bath
and gets an idea: 'Let's have a
band and play this sort of music
and wear lhat sort of clothes, and
do that sort of ihing.' And then
the press decides whether or not
this band is in or out, there is
nothing in between. It's either
trendy or not trendy. People don't
lice...) polluting our airwaves.
One thing that makes the Sugarcubes more interesting than
bands like Simply Red is your
use of both English and Icelandic. Which do you prefer to
sing in?
"I prefer lo sing in Icelandic, but
it is very important for me lo sing
in English. It is important to me
that people understand the lyrics.
I write all the songs in Icelandic
and then translate them. It's very
important that people understand
us. I mean, I could be doing this
interview in Icelandic and it
wouldn't get us anywhere, would
it?"
No, but if we put it to a good
beat and
scratched a
little...
"I make my
with such
big eyes.
They think
lhat   they
liant. They
think that ihey made our music.
It's ridiculous. When we first got
recognition from them I guess we
were pretty arrogant. We stuck lo
our guns and said what we
thought. We had decided before
Melody Maker ever discovered
'Birthday' that we were going to
do things our way. We noticed
pretty early on that they weren't
telling the truth. They were making things look like we were a
naive band lhat ihey discovered
somewhere. The first year they
treated us very badly, like we
were stupid and we were their
darlings and like we were just so
take bands just as they are. With
us, nobody designed us, we arc
just the only way we can be. The
music business in Britain is a
little like the Hollywood thing."
No kidding. The worst thing
about many bands today is that
they don't even take a bath. No
one bathes, yet we still have
people like Simply Red (This
month only $14.99 on WEA
compact disc.This is the Police. Come out with your hands-
up. The Editor is on his way
here now and he has an itchy
delete finger. This is the  IV
ally start
giggling at
any given
moment. I kept wishing thai I
could chalk it up lo my biting wit
winning her over, bul somehow I
doubt it. I kept picturing Einar
silting ihere on the floor, tickling
Bjork's feet. How dare he! During my interview! The nerve of
the guy. I mean, what does he do
anyway?
"Einar is nol in the band because
he is a musician. He is in ihe band
- il sounds tacky, but he wants lo
express himself just as he is - as a
character. I guess lhat's why it
comes across that while the rcsl
of us are maybe fiddling with mu-
With Einar you cither love him or
hale him. The firsl time I saw the
Sugarcubes, I thought he was an
arrogant brat, trying lo upstage
the band, and mouthing off and
being rude every chance he got.
But during the show at the Commodore I realized that this is
Einar's job. And he does it well.
Now I love him, not in the biblical sense of course; it is purely
ph tonic.
"As a band, we have very different opinions on everything - on
music; we dress differently; we
hale each other's food tastes. I
think that's ihe only reason why
we for such a long time stay together as a band. It's because we
are all so different. I hate describing ourselves."
Well, then, let's stop. I don't
want my face slapped on our
very first interview. And anyway, It's Viola's job to be hated.
I'm the nice guy on the Discorder writing staff. Just ask me.
Oh yeah, I'm the one asking the
questions here. Have the last
few years been what you had
hoped? Is it fun?
"Yeah wc arc having fun, bul we
arc starting to gel a bit bored wilh
things. Forme at least, wc have to
look somewhere else. There are
many things within Bad Taste
that we can spend some time
working on. It's been two years
now. I think lhal it's mosl likely
that we're going to take a few
months break and then get back
together and write some more
songs. So I guess we won't be
touring the States or Canada for
at least another two years or
somelhing."
(But then how will we sellsellsell
product? How will I keep my job
al WEA. Get out on the road, you
lazy band, you. Tourtourtour.
Productproductproduct...This is
the Police. Do not bother coming
out with your hands up. You have
been warned. We arc sending in
the Editor. You are through; there
is no escape. This is the Police...)
How popular do you want to
be?
"I would like to be world famous,
but it would definitely have lo be
on my own terms. These terms,
they come firsl. If I am supposed
to be a prophet, then I haven't gol
a clue how famous we'll get beso
far our career has been built on so
many accidents, por example, I
think one reason that the British
music press picked us up wasthat
there was nothing going on there,
so they had to look somewhere
else. So that's like one accident.
Right things at the right times
and that sort of sluff. As long as
we're having fun and it's on our
terms, we'll keep doing il."
Her lasl words to me will forever
ring in my cars. Bjork, possessor
of the world's cutest voice, said
lo me, and only to me...
APRIL 1990 19 "You can use it to relax.
Use it to fuck. Use it to release some energy. Use it to
pretend you're a little dangerous." (l)
-Mike Gira, 1986
"More than add to that description which may or may
not be from Michael's
mouth, I would say with the
change in the sound, the
music is more appropriately
used to reflect and cry and
(pause) feel jubilant."
- Jarboc. 1990
With Uoyd U
ike Gira and Jarboc
are the core of the
the New York-based
 1 Swans have bruised,
bludgeoned, and sonically violated
their way into the rectum of underground America with their brand of
plodding, overpowering, steamroller rock. In 1987 and then again in
1988, Jarboe and Gira collaborated
on a project called Skin, releasing
two LPs "Blood, Women, Roses"
and "Shame, Humility, Revenge."
Relying on the ethnic, ambient, and
classical elements of Skin and the
Swan's "Children of God" before it,
last year's major label debut, "Burning World," signalled a new beginning for a band who had remained
for so long on the fringes of alternative music. Last month an interview
with Jarboe was aired on Join the
Rhythm of Machines. It went something like this...
OFTEN WHEN CULT BANDS SIGN
UP WITH CORPORATE RECORD
COMPANIES. CRIES OF "SELLING OUT" AND SIMILAR ACCUSATIONS ARE HEARD. HAS YOUR
SIGNING TO MCA MADE PEOPLE
SUSPICIOUS OF YOUR INTENTIONS OR GOALS IN ANY WAY?
That's irrelevant to me. I really don't
care. As a musician you have a responsibility, I think, to have your
work made available and do whatever it takes to make your work
available. I'm not creating music
only for myself. I want other people
to hear it...the giving and the communication. Ultimately, you're
pleasing yourself with what you are
doing, but you're sharing it with the
world. I would say that the record
company that we last worked with
has been totally inept. I don't even
care to comment further, except to
say that definitely they are not going
to be the future company for the
Swans or myself (laughs).
/ UNDERSTAND THAT THE
"LOVE WILL TEAR US APART"
SESSION WAS QUITE A SPIRITUAL AND EMOTIONAL EXPER1-
20 DISCORDER
ENCE FOR YOU. WOULD YOU
CARE TO RELAY THOSE EXPERIENCES?
From the time that we went into a
little ham studio in New York where
my version was recorded, until the
time it was mixed and finished was
less than four hours. I just went in
and started singing it and an uncx-
plainablc form of possession came
over me. I really felt completely
consumed by Ian Curtis. I felt a lot
of pain and (deep breath) very powerful emotions running through me
and they weren't mine. They were in
my opinion, his, and I feel that his
spirit came into me when I was singing that song.
YOU WEREN'T A SWAN UNTIL
1986. WHAT ORIGINALLY ATTRACTED YOU TO MICHAEL'S
WORK?
It's very hard to say what attracted
me to Michael's work. It's just, as
I've said in numerous interviews,
that out of the three thousand plus
albums that I owned at the time, I
listened to three of them on a daily
basis. One of them was the "Goldberg Variations" played by Glenn
Gould. Another was the sort of white
light, high intensity Whitehouse
from England, and the other was
Swans' first album "Filth." And they
had a place in my life. When I played
the Swans, I lifted weights because
at the time I was working out five
hours a day. I was something of a
body-builder and music was really
good for that. The lyrics were quite
ambiguous, but I also thought they
were quite intelligent because I knew
that many times he probably meant
the exact opposite of what he was
saying. There was a lot of self-
mockery and sarcasm and irony and
thought provoking going on. I didn't
think anyone was doing anything
remotely like that and I was very
compelled to find the people making
that sound and the person writing
those words. So I flew to New York
and met Michael and interviewed
him for an art magazine in Atlanta.
He struck me as being a very inter
esting person. I'd still say that he's
most interesting person I've every
met.
/ NOTICED ON THE "CHILDREN
OF GOD" LP, THE SWANS BEGAN
INCORPORATING AMERICAN
WESTERN, ETHNIC, MEDITERRANEAN TEXTURES WHICH HAS
CARRIED INTO "BURNING
WORLD." WHOSE IDEA WAS IT
TO BRING IN THE EXTENSIVE
LIST OF SESSION MUSICIANS,
AND WAS TT DIFFICULT TO
ORGANIZE?
We started using, as you call it,
"ethnic" musicians on Skin albums.
There's an Indian oboe on some of
Michael's songs and I think it has to
do more with the way both of us look
at the world and see the world as
getting smaller and there being a real
cross-over of musics. Really, it goes
into everything. You can eat almost
any kind of cuisine from various
parts of the world in most cities and
you can go into a department store in
a suburban shopping mall and buy
clothing that is inspired by Indian
gauze and very exotic kinds of images. I think it shows an awareness
of a consciousness about this being
one planet, one world, and one earth.
Bill Laswell ("Burning World" co-
producer) knows a tremendous
number of musicians from all over
the world, so he actually contacted
the people that play on the album. I
would say that it was actually a
combination of Michael's and Bill's
ideas to bring in the various musicians like the wonderful Shankar on
violin. Working with those people
was incredible because a lot of the
arrangements on the album, melodies that are underneath, the vocal
melody, intros, outros, and embellishments are my ideas musically. I
could sing these lines to Fred Frith or
Shankar or the string section and
then they would play it beautifully
and bring it to life. It was really a
nice way to work.
TM CONCERNED WITH THE
CONNOTATION DERIVED FROM
YOUR POSING WITH SNAKES
WHICH JJ HAVE BEEN TIED, IN
BIBLICAL REFERENCES ANYWAYS, TO WOMAN'S SO-CALLED
VANITY AND 2) SYMBOLIZED
EVIL. SIN, AND MALE GENITALIA. WITHOUT BEING OVERLY
ANALYTICAL, WHAT WAS THE
APPEAL FOR YOU TO POSE WTTH
SNAKES ON "BLOOD, WOMEN,
ROSES" RATHER THAN, SAY,
WEARING A BASEBALL CAP?
The song "1000 Years" is inspired
by the Ann Rice vampire novels.
The woman that I 'm portraying visually is a sort of Egyptian vampire
priestess. The snake represents eternity. The snake is a symbol of eternity as it is constantly shedding its
skin and being reborn. Also, the
woman that I was attempting to portray is the embodiment of this goddess/ vampire/ priestess rising from
the swamp and she has these servants around her. So, it's sort of an
image of barbaric elegance as it were
and again this portrays the character
that is singing "1000 Years." If you
listen to the lyrics you'll see that it's
most definitely a really beautiful set
of words about the state of this one
woman's existence...living through
all time. She says "This body is a
temple stolen from the Lord"; that's
because she can't die. She's living
in these cycles of one thousand years
before she goes back down into the
earth and then comes back again."
FOOTNOTES
1 "Dead Heat" by Biba Kopf in
New Musical Express. March 8,
1986. p. 10.
HATENOTES
1 The first five members of the
exclusive DiSCORDER HATE
CLUB will receive a complimentary
copy ofthe Swans' "Burning World"
LP. (Page 9 for details) Listen for new tapes from
Roots Roundup and Bruce
A. and the Secular Atavists,
hopefully to be reviewed here
next month. Bruce recently
got to play guest deejay on
CBC's Nightlines (hosted by
former UJ3RK5 member,
David Wisdom), and he's
getting heaps of mail in response to his contest question
asking for definitions of Secular Atavism. Anyone who
wants to get in on the contest,
or at least to be sent exciting
S. A. paraphernalia and propaganda, can write to Bruce and
the gang at PO Box 1776,
Station A, Vancouver, V6C
2P7. And this is valuable
propaganda - the band's witty
stickers helped get them a
mention in Greil Marcus Village Voice column. Big time!
The next step, they hope, is a
record deal, so right now
they're in Vancouver Studios
working on another demo
tape.
As for Roots Roundup,
their newest cassette, recorded at Profile, is in the
stores (the last one sold,more
than 2,000) and, after one of
their not-uncommon lineup
changes, they're off on another cross-Canada tour. Besides being the only band I
know that actually makes
money on tour (by playing,
rather than selling t-shirts, I
ui), they also play in places
where other bands fear to
tread, like Dawson City.
News from Vic
Funnycars, who unfortunately lost singer/ guitarist/1-
shirt-and-poster-artiste Eric
Cottiell to a prestigious art
director job in Japan, have
found a replacement, Robin
Platts. (According to the other
Eric in the band, he "fits the
nerd image and plays swell
guitar too.") The Funnycars
have just recorded four songs
for a 7" EP, to be called "Hog
Wild," at Egg Studios in Seattle. Unfortunately, their
collaborations with the
Young Fresh Fellows' Scott
McCaughey won't be included, but then there will be
a song called "AMC Pacer"
(definitely not a Beach Boys
cover). I just hope this 7"
doesn't take as long to come
out as the LP did!
And also from Seattle:
The long-in-the-can second
LP from the mighty Fast-
backs is going to be released
after all (and just when we all
thought that the Fastbacks
were history), and there'll be
a live album coming out in
Europe    (only)
And now, this month's demos:
Mary-"101 Knights" According to the band, this tape
(entitled "AMGOD") "marks
the end of Mary's first phase."
I'm assuming this means
they're not giving CITR any
more demos - now they're
working on re-recording
songs to, ultimately, be
pressed. And appropriately
(according to a dear friend of
rho says Mary's like a
cross between NoMeansNo
and Stiff Little Fingers),
they're being produced by
John Wright of NoMe
As for this (their fifth) cassette, well, I don't like it as
much as the very first one they
sent us. Or was I just put off
by their reminder, in their
cover letter, that Mary is the
mother of God? But, leaving
out my personal reaction to
the religious name-dropping,
there's no doubt that Mary's
found their niche in the
playing songs almost as loud
and hard as they can get without losing all traces of melody.
Migraine Blur-"Thrupp
bippo Thrupp" I wonder if
the band members realise how
close their name comes to describing their sound (or the
sound's effect on an audience). When I saw them at
Shindig all I could think was
that I'd rather read Ginsberg
or at least watch that old episode of Popeye where Olive
Oyle becomes a beatnik. Really, I'm afraid to call what
they do Beat (for one thing,
the drummer's hardly got
rhythm), still, it is kind of fun,
especially on a tape, where a
person can turn it down, or
off, when it gets to be too
much.  But someone shoulcL
still tell these guys how to
record onto both channels of
their ghetto blaster.
Mystery Traln-"My Heart
Bust Thru" A new local
band, inspired by current
mainstream (and non-Afro-
American) blues types, which
I suppose isn't a bad way to go
if you want to get signed these
days. Is the singer really
trying to sound like Art
Bergmann? Or maybe they
aren't too unlike the Tragically Hip. No doubt these fellows have big plans, since
they do have that sound,
complete with subtle layers of
pianos and female backup vocals, but it's not really the
stuff CiTR demo hits are made
of.
Intoxicators-"Mlghty   Idy"
After struggling through
some strange New Age-type
thing on the side of the tape
that was labelled Intoxicators,
it was a relief to flip the cassette over and hear "Mighty
Idy," which really can only be
described as a song in the classic rock and roll tradition (not
to be confused with "cla
rock"!). This isn't an overly
expensive or fancy recording,
and, unlike the time I saw
them open for TT Racer at
Club Soda a while ago, the
vocals go just the way they
should with the band and the
music. This song's the best
I've heard from the Intoxicators so far.
Show Business Giants-
"Death of a Dayglo" I won't
touch the subject matter heTe
(for one thing, it's not too easy
to make out all the words in
this particular song). Just suffice it to say that this twelve
song cassette release is something like a busking tape (they
do say it was recorded "in a
doorway") full of nasty gossip, name-dropping, and in-
jokes from Victoria, with a
singer just a little bit like John
Lydon. They're produced by
former Shovlhed guitarist
Scott Henderson, who
must've had a good time with
this strange juxtaposition of
sweet harmonies and bizarre Laurie Anderson
Queen Elizabeth Theatre
Wednesday, February 21st
Laurie Anderson. High
Priestess of die avant-garde?
Political soothsayer of a neo-
rcality? Archetypical supplicant of tec hno-truths? Answer
"yes" to all of the above.
Anderson's recent appearance in Vancouver at the
Queen Elizabeth Theatre, her
first in five years, was an
excursion into the heart and
mind of America's favourite
poet, complete with all the
bells and whistles you could
ask for. The stage set-up was
rich and complex with a
35mm size screen that mixed
slides, video, and animation
to full effect. Beneath this
were three smaller horizontal
screens for video and at both
sides of the stage three more
screens set vertically. Assisted by vocoder, harmoniz-
ers, digital delays, distortion
units, and a bevy of hypcr-
competent technicians, Anderson was equipped with
enough technology and expertise to launch a low orbit
satellite uplink.
But enough salivating,
the performance is the thing.
Within sixty seconds of appearing on the stage she
launched into an anecdote
comparing Hitler and Mussolini with Ronald Reagan and
was thus off and running. The
first part of the show was
rather sporadic with the audience having to warm to Anderson's singing, keyboard
work, and violin playing. The
monologues and visuals were
kept at a minimum as if Anderson wanted to be accepted
for her songs alone. (All ofthe
songs were from her new album with nary a greatest hit to
be heard all night.)
After a brief intermission, Anderson seemed to
stretch out as the information
became more visual. Imagery
is the key to what Laurie
Anderson is all about. The
juxtaposition of image and
narrative is where the imagination of the audience can
have sum reel fun.
The head-stretches came hot
and heavy - John Lilly, Robert
Maplethorpc, Hendrix, Kennedy, Elvis, all were examined in that particular style wc
have become so familiar wilh.
(Following die show I found
myself dropping the last syllable of every sentence I
spoke.) Sharing found graffiti, cartoon culture, and other
myths of popular culture,
Anderson spun a web of perceptions that deeply effected
this reviewer. Anderson's attempts at consciousness raising took many forms. The
most moving to me was her
attempt to inject her humour
into the pathos surrounding
the plight of working women
in our society.
The show itself was dedicated to Abby Hoffman: "the
man who dared to shout 'theatre' at a crowded fire." In
closing, if you see people
barking like dogs at local bus
stops, shake dieir paw for they
have been to see the Lady of
our Deliverance. Great show,
great night.
leigh r wolf
The Primitives
The Sugarcubes
Commodore
Friday, February 23rd
Being forced to leave
your untouched beer in one
bar so you can rush to another
because the opening act
chooses to mount the stage at
die insanely early 9:20 in the
evening is no way lo start a
Friday night out.
So, sweaty and out of
breath, I tried to enjoy The
Primitives. Unfortunately, as
I sit here typing all I can
remember, is my ridiculously
as he took in the band while I
stared at the back of the unfortunate soul in front of me,
wishing he'd explode. 'Time
heals all wounds' I cheerfully
told myself, and 'wounds all
heals' the dark ugly side of
myself whispered. Keeping
these two thoughts foremost
in my hindbrain, I grinned and
watched Britain's foremost
proponents  of retro-power-
pop crank out an entirely
average show. Which is more
than most attendees can
claim, as the majority of them
didn't arrive until The Prims
had slipped off the stage.
By the time everyone's
favorite Slavic pop screwballs. The Sugarcubes,
bounced onto the stage, my
attitude had improved considerably (thoughts of time
mixed with over-priced alcohol can do that, funnily
enough). The Sugarcubes
were marvelously geometric
in their approach to the crowd.
The singer says, "Do you
speak French or English here?
Or are you all American?" (I
understand bar fights are quite
common in Iceland. You can
see why with this sort of pillow talk). Music-wise they
did what they were supposed
to, aided by the finest light
show ever seen at The Commodore (until the following
Monday when The The
played). Heck, if I could enjoy myself anyone could!
Pat Carroll
The The
Commodore
Thursday, February 26th
The The recently made
their first ever appearance in
Vancouver after putting out
three albums in ten years.
With all the technological
wizardry that accompanies
most of their music I wasn't
sure what kind of sound to
expect from Matt Johnson's
crew at The Commodore.
Judging from the rate at which
the The The fans purchased
tickets I expected an anxious
crowd.
The The were to be the
sole performers of the evening, so much of the dance
floor filled up quickly when
the lights started to dim and a
pre-recorded cassette of music and strange sounds started
to play, softly at first, then
increasing in volume. As the
lights grew dimmer everyone
turned their attention to the
stage in anticipation of the
mysterious silhouette of Matt
Johnson, the The The main
man, to appear from behind
the smoke-screen now engulfing the stage. Then came the
unmistakable first few notes
of "Sweet Bird of Youth,"
from the band's second album, "Infected." The evening
was off to a good start. The
next number was "Armageddon Days" from their latest
LP, "Mind Bomb." It became
clear that they were capable
of recreating in detail, all the
original sounds.
Ex-Smiths' guitarist,
Johnny Marr, skillfully contributed to tunes from "Mind
Bomb" (the album in which
he took part) as well as those
of the first two albums. Matt
Johnson is as intense and
mysterious on stage as he is
on his albums. He provided
all the male lead vocals, sometimes switching microphones
to provide the "other voice."
He did not address the audi
ence except for a half-uttered
"thank you" after the first
encore. Perhaps he is too intense an individual to be a
man of many words.
We were entertained
with a good mixture from all
three albums. Their best was
saved for last as the second
encore provided us with a
ripping version of "Giant"
from their "Soul Mining"
album, with particularly good
work on keyboards. The
show's length of ninety minutes was a bit disappointing,
considering they have enough
material for at least another
half-hour. Since they were the
only act scheduled for the
night, it should have been a
longer gig.
With their first tour on
the road and three solid albums behind them (four if you
count Matt Johnson's solo
efforts),'The The is a band to
until he finally plugged into
another amp. Now that's rock
'n' roll! I also love the part
where each band member
raises his arm in order to indicate that he is ready to begin
the riff/song. Good clean all
American fun.
Elizabeth Fisher was a
little out of place following a
loud rawk outfit such as Superconductor. Her solo performance was an interesting
mix of Elizabeth's at once
languorous and tension-filled
vocals (familiar to those who
have heard her former group.
Animal Slaves), ethnic folk
elements and modern technology, but it suffered from the
inappropriate venue. Her
style of performance would
be better served by a smaller,
more intimate room.
Up next was the new and
improved Numb. The Numb-
sters now have a more guitar -
22 DISCORDER
be reckoned with in the 1990s.
Claude de Leseleuc
Superconductor
Elizabeth Fisher
Numb
Town Pump
Wednesday, March 7th
When was the last time
you saw a band blow an amp?
Part way through Superconductor's set, the amp of one of
the five guitarists appeared to
be smoking. It was difficult to
be positive it was the amp
given the profuse activity of
the smoke machine, but sure
enough it was - there was that
oh so distinctive fried electrical circuit odour wafting
through the air. The guitar
player seemed to sense something was wrong but continued to play (given the racket
of five axes, how do you tell
when yours isn't working?)
oriented industrial sound than
previously - more Ministry
than Skinny Puppy, if you
like. Their set was immensely
better than the last time I saw
them when they opened up for
the Butthole Surfers at U.B.C.
Much of the credit for this
progress has to go to replacement agitator/frontman/vo-
calist Blair Dobson. Although
obviously nervous at first, he
quickly took charge of the
show, balancing somewhat
heavy-handed song intros
with some hilarious repartee
with hecklers. Imagine, an
"industrial" band with not
only a heart and soul, but also
a sense of humour. A star is
born. The highlights ofthe set
were the songs which featured
two guitars and two percussionists - as we say in the biz,
they cooked.
Mr. Ed Nine Inch Nails
Pretty Hate Machine
(TVT)
Batz Without Flesh
A Million Bricks
(NTS)
The introduction of
cheaper technology into the
marketplace has had a twofold effect: you don't need
excessive financial backing
nor need possess the marketability of, say, a band like
Depeche Mode in order to
create music that relies heavily on ground they've covered. More bands are creating, which is good, especially
if you are a fan of the "industrial dance" genre. But as with
punk and rap, before it, the
number of outstanding acts in
the sea of mediocrity is mini-
From Cleveland emerges
Trent Reznor, a.k.a. Nine Inch
Nails, whose debut release
"Pretty Hate Machine" has
garnered a lot of publicity in
the U.S. Whether it warrants
this coverage is another issue.
"Pretty Hate Machine" is
nowhere near as mean as the
press clippings would have
you believe. Junior high
school lyrics ("Just when
everything was making sense
/ You took away all my self-
confidence / Now all that I've
been hearing must be true / I
guess I'm not the only boy for
you / But that's what I get")
sung with Platinum Blonde
vocals and pre-Mute Nitzer
Ebb rhythms make this a truly
forgettable release. Flood,
John Fryer, Adrian Sherwood, and Keith LeBlanc
were all invited to lend their
skills on production, but it all
seems pointless, really. There
are a couple of good songs
though: "Terrible Lie" and
"Sin." A decent album only if
you're making the transition
from Paula Abdul to Ministry.
If grind-it-out aerobics
along the lines of Numb, Click
Click, and newer Controlled
Bleeding is what you're after,
dig around for the Delaware
trio, Batz Without Flesh.
Their label obviously
couldn't afford Nine Inch
Nails' production expenses,
yet their LP "A Million
Bricks" has done more to
promote the true essence of
American industrial dance
music than their Cleveland
counterpart and their British
cronies. Gloomy, mechanistic, and much more unsettling
than Trent Reznor could ever
wish to be. The album is available through NTS Productions, 742 Paper Mill Road,
Newark, DE, 19711.
Lloyd Uliana
Vancouver New Music
West Light
(Centrediscs)
Vancouver New Music is
one of the most active new
music organizations in Canada. Given its innovative programming, guest artists, and a
competition for young composers, the next logical step
was to go into the recording
studio.
The result is "West
Light," a 53-minute digital
recording of music by Rudolf
Kororous, Owen Underhill,
and Rodney Sharman - three
composers who have lived
and worked in this province
for a substantial portion of
their lives. The first two
pieces are "Rossi" and
"Twenty-three Poems About
Horses," by composer and
pedagogue Rudolf
Komorous. Both pieces are
quite fragmented, oscillating
cinematically between a variety of styles. "Rossi," in particular, moves quickly
through different, often
sharply contrasting styles,
such as boogie woogie and
waltz, as well as having an
extended snare drum solo and
references to the music of
Michel Angelo des Violino
Rossi.
"Escalator," by Vancouver New Music artistic director Owen Underhill, is similar
in some ways to the
Komorous compositions, but
with a more developed harmonic language and keener
sense of orchestration. Specifically, the use of the triangle at the beginning of the
piece and the careful exploitation of drums in the more
aggressive sections display
Underbill's thoughtful use of
colour.
The most successful
piece on "West Light" is
"Erstarrung," by Rodney
Sharman. Despite its surface
simplicity, "Erstarrung" is a
demanding piece requiring a
sensitive performance.
Underhill and the Vancouver
New Music Ensemble conclude "West Light" with an
excellent performance, unveiling the subtlety and
beauty of this work. Hopefully this is the first of many
recordings to be put together
by Vancouver New Music,
exhibiting the work of composers and performers in British Columbia. (Available for
$20 from: Vancouver New
Music, 108-206 E. 6th Ave.,
Vancouver, B.C., V5T 1J8.)
Paul Steenhuisen
Godfathers
Out On The Floor EP
Live In Texas EP
(Epic/UK)
These two releases seem
to have been released for the
late Vic Maile, who produced
the Godfathers' last two LPs.
The 12-inch "Out on the
Floor" EP contains remixes of
previously released Godfathers' tracks, "I'm Lost and
Then I'm Found," "Birth
School Work and Death" and
two remixes of "She Gives
Love" by Keith LeBlanc.
It's funny that these
songs would be remixed for
the dance floor, although
"Birth School Work Death,"
with it's strong chant chorus,
seems to always get any audience going at a Godfathers
gig-
The "Live in Texas" EP
is the Godfathers in their element, blasting out four songs
in Austin. The sound is a little
muddy but Peter Coure's
vocals cut through the murk.
The band's rendition of
"Blitzkrieg Bop" is faithful to
the last note; Johnny Ramone
would be proud of Kris Dolli-
more's chainsaw power chor-
ding. The strong steady beat
of drummer George Mazur
keeps the group anchored,
preventing them from flying
off in different directions. The
EP keeps the blood pumping
deep in the heart of Texas.
Greg Garlick
Pandoras
Live Nymphomania
(Restless Records)
When I got the cassette
of this new Pandoras offering,
I expected the tape to ooze out
of the case. It more than lives
up to its title with an abun
dance of references to you
know what.
The Pandoras have really
changed since doing their 60s
band schtick. The music is a
lot heavier now. The Glam
Metal of L.A. has obviously
rubbed off on them. Lead
Pandora Paula Peirce has gotten rid of her Vox
Starstreamer in favour of a
Gibson Les Paul, the traditional metal axe.
The songs here are not
for the faint of heart or the
morally upright.
I imagine when Penelope
Spheeris makes her "Decline
of Western Civilization Pt.
Ill," the Pandoras will no
doubt be in it.
Greg Garlick
Peter Murphy
Deep
(Polygram)
This is a highly stylized,
ambitious effort from the former lead singer of Bauhaus.
Murphy has recruited a very
tight band of studio musicians
he names 'The Hundred Men"
who play textbook modern
rock intermingled with more
sombre jazz elements.
Upon first listening to the
album, it sounds over-stylized and pretentious. The album's egocentric cover and
title add to this impression. In
spite of these problems, the
excellence of Murphy's songwriting comes to the fore.
The album displays hard
emotion dressed in poetic introspective lyrics. Cutting
rhythms are overlaid with
sombre violin, guitar and piano to create a tense backdrop
for Murphy's deep, melodic
The single, "Cuts You
Up," is a fine example of his
songwriting ability and is far
better than anything Murphy
ever did with Bauhaus. Unfortunately, such triumphs are
offset by truly pretentious
drivel such as "Marlene Dietrich's Favorite Poem" which
always caused "hot tears to
flow" down his mother's
cheek.
The album is worthwhile
for the strength and originality of Murphy's often brilliant
musical expression.
Gene Derreth
Galaxie 500
On Fire
(Rough Trade)
Like, "The Rocket" review was lame as sin, so here
goes. By now I guess Galaxie
500 have as good as outlived
their flavour-of-the-month
status, but this album'll be
seeing the light of my turntable for a long time. Not to
mention the dark twisted caverns of my Walkman. Yes,
this is music ideal for a long
walk on a clear, icy Sunday
moming ("Blue Thunder"), or
on the other hand, an interminable wait for the bus at night
in the throes of a raging blizzard ("Snowstorm"). Or for
reading to Lynda Barry
("Plastic Bird"), or for waking up in the morning in a
magnanimous, grooving
frame of mind ("Another
Day"), or just for irritating
your roommates with 10000-
decibcl whining repetitive
vocals (a cover of the previously illimitable "Isn't It A
Pity").
Some listeners hear the
Velvet Underground, others
Neil Young. I definitely catch
Pink Floyd influences. Others
are bound to make "an American Smiths" conclusion or
some such rot. Whatever.
These aspects merge with an
incisive, witty perspective on
society and flashes of sheer
musical brilliance - check out
the horns on "Decomposing
Trees" - to create a whole
that's head and shoulders
above the sum of its parts.
Viola Funk Hell'sfKitchen
ii im o
CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES from The Kids' Cookbook
2 c flour
1 tspsoda
1/2 tsp salt
3/4 c margarine (take out of
fridge in advance)
1/4 c white sugar
1 c brown sugar
legg
1 1/2 tsp vanilla
6 oz chocolate chips
1/2 c nuts, chopped (optional)
Mix margarine till creamy;
slowly add sugars, keep mixing
till light & fluffy. Add egg and
vanilla, mix well. Sift dry ingredients in separate bowl and add
them to margarine mixture. Stir
in chocolate chips, and nuts if
desired. Drop by teaspoon c
ungreased baking sheets; bake
at 375 degrees F for 10-12
minutes. Makes about 3 1/2
dozen.
If ya want them to live up to the
billing I've given them
-don't leave out the salt
-don't neglect to sift the
dry ingredients
For aesthetically-pleasing cookies, you can roll them into little
balls by hand rather than using
the teaspoon method.
Putchyer oven rack one rung
lower than what you do to make
grilled cheese sandwiches - any
lower than that, and you'll get
burnage on the cookie bottoms.
Double the recipe and you'll
have enough to feed an army (or
yourself and two voracious
roommates).
You can send your favourite
recipes to: Hell's Kitchen &o
Discorder, 6138 SUB Blvd.,
Vancouver, B.C., V6T2A5.
24 DISCORDER Blotter #10
Published by Roy Tompkins
Box 16022, Austin Texas
USA 78761
The current crop of corrupting influences ranges
from the sick to the sublime.
In one case of both. Blotter,
sick and sublime are the only
words worthy of such cultural
dementia. From the city of
Austin, Texas USA (remember Texas?) comes this mailorder surprise of many dimensions. Shocking? We're
talking eyeball intercourse
here, roofing nail enemas
from cannibal comix with
their third eye focused on the
immediate past and future
present. Funny? When you
stop screaming, the only noise
you can hear is the sound of
your eyeballs rattling 'round
your head.
In what is best described
as aery for help from a twisted
love this book.
Some of the images are
of the booger burger (side of
turd) variety, while other
items, such as Ted Bundy's
vampire teeth shown next to
photos of his victims, are
simply disturbing. Home
boys and party zombies share
these pages with an anarchistic equanimity. Blotter sez:
Gilligan's Corndog Factory is
cranking out toxic sludge in
an effort to satiate the consumption demands of the
marketplace. Blotter sez:
Sacred Cows belong on the
altar but not in the
marketplace of ideas. (Anarchism as a practical political
ideology will be granted its
place in an information economy when controlling the
flow of information is finally
impossible and global dissemination inevitable.) The
theory follows that on our way
to that distant day, we can fill
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the irregular nature of reality.
The hardlines come in visions
of natty necrophiles and murdered dreamers converging in
a banquet of decay, where the
penis is the gun and the cross
no longer a symbol of spirit
meeting matter but rather
simply an icon of crucifixion.
The full effect of taking
in Blotter is unlikely to seize
you without personal knowledge of lick and suck. In a sex
world gone mad, where everyone wants to fuck but no
one is doing much about it,
the terms of reference here
become shaded in mutated
greys. There are no narrow
escapes in these pages. This is
an America with a fundamentally racist flaw in its character. An America where the
hypodermic
needle has be
come  the  ulti
eration. Influences such as
Kim Deitch, Basil Wolverton,
Charles Burns, S. Clay
Wilson, and Jay Kinney linger throughout the book, creating an aura of fine tuning
the apprenticeship. Notable
standouts among the artists
Dennis Worden of small press
notoriety is also howling as
are Bob X, Davoid, and S.
Stevens (creator of Morty The
Dog).
The just harvest of this
madness are horns growing up
from the souls of our feet to
haps correctly, that you arc so
awake your eyelids are peeled
back across your forehead and
stapled to your ears. In this
cosmology we are all just
voyeurs watching the crash
and crumble of the far-right
Christian cults. The Hanged
Man is a victim of his own
bondage and the only job
available is that of urine
sample inspector. In these
pages Gilligan's Island is seen
as survivalist fantasy, the
Brady Bunch just a lip-smacking fantasy for the average
cannibal, corporate profits
cause cancer and Nancy and
Ron are festering sores on the
collective patootie.
The artwork here is
young and mostly inspired by
the pro's of the previous gen-
are Mary Fleener and Penny
Moran, who are both rising
talents of the graphix scene.
the base of our spines to the
tips of our heads. In an era of
Far Right Actually Inventing
editor going by the name of
Roy Tompkins, Blotter is a
car crash posing as a comix
book anthology. Wreckage?
More than your grandparents
could have ever produced or
conceived of in a lifetime of
dedicated technological decadence. Some forty-two contributors offer unsuspecting
readers a veritable feast of bad
tasting gooze that creeps off
the page and into the mind. I
the information void with as
much dissension and dissonance as the system cannot
handle.
Not that the "badkids"
who conceived and produced
Blotter have ever verbalised
such nonsense; but odds are
they'd agree. We're all prisoners in Corndog Land and
the first boat leaving for
Deva's eyeland will be piloted by those who are hype to
only. I highly
recommend
APRIL 1990 25 DISCORDER
DATEBOOK
1 SUNDAY The Squirrels
and the Smuggler* at the
Town Pump... Overkill,
Whiplash, and Excel at the
Commodore Ballroom (all
ages)... Random Numbers
at the Railway... Masterpiece Chamber Music at
the Vancouver East Cultural Centre... Urban Geography, video Installation by
Anne Ramsden, continues
at the UBC Fine Arts Gallery... Hiroshl Suglmoto's exhibition closes at Presentation House...
2 MONDAY Son of Man
at Club Soda... Capercail-
lie at the WISE Hall... Norton
Buffalo at the Yale... Jimmy
at the Railway... Urban Geography continues at UBC
Fine Arts Gallery... Carousel
Theatre's Reading the Signs
opens at the Robson
Square Conference Centre
Theatre... the second race
relations Power Play by
Headlines Theatre Co.
opens at Kitsilano High
School...
3 TUESDAY CiTR presents
Bughead and Jojoka at the
Town Pump... Shovlhed, the
Detonators and the Bombshells at Club Soda... Norton Buffalo atthe Yale... The
Rootabeggars at the Railway... Urban Geography
continues at UBC Fine Arts
Gallery... Reading the Signs
continues at the Robson
Square Conference Centre
Theatre... the second race
relations Power Play by
Headlines Theatre Co. continues at Kitsilano High
School... Pink Ink's production of Caryl Churchill's play
Vinegar Tom continues at
the Vancouver Little Theatre...
4 WEDNESDAY Tony Williams Quartet at 86 Street...
Norton Buffalo at the Yale...
The Demons with Jack Lavin
at Hogan's Alley... The
Rootabeggars at the Railway... Hot Wednesday DJ'd
by CiTR in the Pit Pub... Urban Geography continues
at UBC Fine Arts Gallery...
Reading the Signs continues at the Robson Square
Conference Centre Theatre... the second race relations Power Play by Headlines Theatre Co. continues
at Kitsilano High School...
Vinegar Tom continues at
the Vancouver Little Theatre...
5 THURSDAY Pee Wee
Manson and Innocent Fun
at the Commodore... A
Murder of Crows, Wages of
Sin and Freewater Knockout at 86 Street.. Ranch
Romance from Seattle at
the Railway... The Demons
with Jack lavin at Hogan's
Alley... Capilano College
Commercial Music Program at the Vancouver East
Cultural Centre... Cool
Thursdays DJ'd by CiTR in
the Pit Pub... Englebert
Humperdinck at the Queen
Elizabeth Theatre... The Owl
and the Pussycat by Bill
Manhoff opens at Presentation House... Reading the
Signs continues at the Robson Square Conference
Centre Theatre... the second race relations Power
Play by Headlines Theatre
Co. continues at Kitsilano
High School... Vinegar Tom
continues at the Vancouver Little Theatre..Urban
Geography continues at
UBC Fine Arts Gallery...
6 FRIDAY Ranch Romance at the Railway... 54-
40 at 86 Street... The Demons with Jack Lavin at
Hogan's Alley... Rocky Horror Picture Show at the Lux
(midnight)... The Owl and
the Pussycat continues at
Presentation House... Reading the Signs continues at
the Robson Square Conference Centre Theatre... the
second race relations
Power Play by Headlines
Theatre Co. closes at Kitsilano High School... Vinegar
Tom continues at the Vancouver Little Theatre... Urban Geography continues
at UBC Fine Arts Gallery...
7 SATURDAY Ranch Romance at the Railway... The
Demons with Jack Lavin at
Hogan's Alley... The Owl
and the Pussycat continues
at Presentation House...
Reading the Signs closes at
the Robson Square Conference Centre Theatre...
Vinegar Tom continues at
the Vancouver Little
Theatre.Urban Geography continues at UBC Fine
Arts Gallery...
8 SUNDAY Random Numbers at the Railway... Harper Brothers Band at the Arts
Club Revue Theatre... The
Purcell String Quartet wilh
the Vancouver New Music
Ensemble at the Vancouver East Cultural Centre...
Urban Geography continues at UBC Fine Arts Gallery...
9 MONDAY Roy's at the
Railway... Rory McLeod at
the Vancouver East Cultural Centre...
10 TUESDAY Numb,
Marshmaliow Overcoat
and Babes in Toyland at
Club   Soda...   Feathered
Pens with Cathy Miller at the
Railway... Steve Lacy Sextet
at the Tom Lee Music Hall...
Vinegar Tom continues at
the Vancouver Little Theatre... Urban Geography
continues at UBC Fine Arts
Gallery...
11 WEDNESDAY Wages
of Sin atthe Railway... Steve
Lacy Sextet at the Tom Lee
Music Hall... Claude Ranger
and Jade at the Grunt Gallery... The Muddy Fraser
Band at Hogan's Alley... Diana Ross at the Pacific Coliseum... Hot Wednesday
DJ'd by CiTR in the Pit Pub...
The Owl and the Pussycat
continues at Presentation
House... Vinegar Tom continues at the Vancouver
Little Theatre...Urban Geography continues at UBC
Fine Arts Gallery...
12 THURSDAY CiTR presents The Cramps at the
Commodore... Mike
Jacobs Band at the Railway... Art Bergmann at the
Town Pump... The Muddy
Fraser Band at Hogan's
Allley... Cool Thursdays DJ'd
by CiTR in the Pit Pub.., The
Owl and fhe Pussycat continues at Presentation
House... Vinegar Tom continues at the Vancouver
Little Theatre... Urban Geography continues at UBC
Fine Arts Gallery...
13 FRIDAY Mike Jacobs
Band at the Railway...
Rocky Horror Picture Show
at the Lux (midnight)... The
Owl and the Pussycat continues at Presentation
House... Vinegar Tom continues at the Vancouver
Little Theatre...Urban Geography continues at UBC
Fine Arts Gallery...
14 SATURDAY CITR presents Marianne Faithfull at
the Commodore... Mike
Jacobs Band at the Railway... The Boys Choir of
Harlem at the Orpheum...
The Hopping Penguins at
the Town Pump... The Owl
and the Pussycat continues
at Presentation House...
Vinegar Tom continues at
the Vancouver Little
Theatre...Urban Geography continues at UBC Fine
Arts Gallery...
15 SUNDAY Random
Numbers at the Railway...
Urban Geography continues at UBC Fine Arts Gallery...
16 MONDAY 5 Star Hillbilly at the Railway...
17 TUESDAY Nice Strong
Arm, All and Big Drill Car at
Club Soda... Women's Jam
Session at the Railway...
Urban Geography continues at UBC Fine Arts Gallery... Vinegar Tom continues at the Vancouver Little
Theatre...
18 WEDNESDAY Martin
Fields and the Academy at
the Railway Amanda
Hughes at Hogan's Alley...
Babayaga String Quartet at
the Grunt Gallery... Hot
Wednesday DJ'd by CiTR in
the Pit Pub... The Owl and
the Pussycat continues at
Presentation House... Vinegar Tom'continues at the
Vancouver Little Theatre...
Urban Geography continues at UBC Fine Arts Gallery...
19 THURSDAY Herald Nix
at the Railway... Amanda
Hughes at Hogan's Alley...
Peter, Paul and Mary at the
Orpheum... Cool Thursdays
DJ'd by CiTR In the Pit Pub...
That Light and Dark that did
not Clash at the Vancouver
East Cultural Centre... The
Owl and the Pussycat continues at Presentation
House... Vinegar Tom continues at the Vancouver
Little Theatre...Urban Geography continues at UBC
Fine Arts GalleryS^^L
20 FRIDAY Herald Nix at
the Railway... Amanda
Hughes at Hogan's Alley..
That Light and Dark thai did
not Clash at the Vancouver
East Cultural Centre. .
Rocky Horror Picture Show
at the Lux (midnight)... The
Owl and the Pussycat con
tinues at Presentation
House... Vinegar Tom continues at the Vancouver
Little Theatre... Urban Geography continues at UBC
Rne Arts Gallery...
21 SATURDAY Herald Nix
at the Railway... Amanda
Hughes at Hogan's Alley.
That Light and Dark fhat did
not Clash at the Vancouver'
East Cultural Centre... The
Owl and the Pussycat closes
at .Presentation House...
Vinegar Tom closes at the
Vancouver Little Theatre...
Urban Geography closes at
UBC Fine Arts Gallery...
22 SUNDAY No Fun atthe
Railway... Egberto Gismonti
Band and Hermeto Pascoai
Group from Brazil at the
Commodore...
23 MONDAY CiTR presents Tamahnous Theatre
benefit The Underwater Bali
at Graceland... Boys at the
Railway...
24 TUESDAY Young Fresh
Fellows atthe Town Pump...
Helios Creed at Club
Soda...    The Groovaholics
at the Railway... Toumanl
25 WEDNESDAY The
Groovaholics at the Railway ... Brian Harding Trio at
the Grunt Gallery... Jayson
Hoover at Hogan's Alley...
Hot  Wednesday  DJ'd  by
CITR in the Pit Pub...
26 THURSDAY Jayson
Hoover at Hogan's Alley...
Les Goodman "After Dark"
at the Railway... Music from
the Pacific Horizon with Jin
He Kim, Qui Li-Rong, Teresa
Ohnishl, Kenneth Wells and
Satwant Singh at the Vancouver East Cultural
Centre... Cool Thursdays
DJ'd by CITR in the Pit Pub...
Leona Gom and David
Watmough give a reading
at the Community Arts
Council (8pm. $3)...
27 FRIDAY The Odds at
the Railway... Jayson
Hoover at Hogan's Alley...
Music from the Pacific Horizon with Jin He Kim. Qui Ll-
Rong, Teresa Ohnishl, Kenneth Wells and Satwant
Singh at the Vancouver
East Cultural Centre...
Rocky Horror Picture Show
at the Lux (midnight)...
28 SATURDAY The Odds
at the Railway... Music from
the Pacific Horizon with
Menaka Thakkar and Ravi
C. Satyam at the Vancouver East Cultural Centre...
Jayson Hoover at Hogan's
Alley...
29 SUNDAY No Fun at the
Railway...
30 MONDAY Monsters of
Gangland at the Railway...
1 TUESDAY Marta Sebes-
tyen and Muzsikas at the
Vancouver East Cultural
Centre...  Volcano Sun at
Club Soda...
2 WEDNESDAY Hot Wednesday DJ'd by CiTR in the
Pit Pub...
7 MONDAY The Mission
and The Wonderstuff at the
Commodore...
PLACES PLACES PLACES PLACES PLACES PLACES
ARTS CLUB REVUE STAGE  Granville Island
CENTENNIAL THEATRE 23rd and Lonsdale. North Vancouver
CLUB SODA    1055 Homer Street 681-8202
COMMODORE BALLROOM 870 Granville Street 681-7838
COMMUNITY ARTS COUNCIL  837 Davie Street 683-4358
DOROTHY SOMERSET THE-ATRE  behind the Freddy Wood
Theatre. UBC  228-2678
86 STREET MUSIC HALL former Expoo Site  683-8687
FIREHALL ARTS CENTRE  280 East Cordova Street 689-0926
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE  6454 Crescent Road. UBC  228-
2678
GRUNT GALLERY 209 East 6th Avenue 875-9516
HOGAN'S ALLEY 730 Main Street 681-6326
LA QUENA COFFEEHOUSE   1111 Commercial Drive
PACIFIC CINEMATHEQUE   1131 Howe Street 688-3456
26 DISCORDER
PIT PUB    Basement of SUB, UBC 228-6511
Pin INTERNATIONAL GALLERIES 36 Powell Street 734-8001
RJ CHRISTIES    315 East Broadway 876-6777
RAILWAY CLUB   579 Dunsmuir Street 681-1625
RECITAL HALL School of Music, 6361 Memorial Road 228-
3113
RIDGE THEATRE  3131 Arbutus Street    738-6311
STATION STREET ARTS CENTRE  930 Station Street 688-3312
STUDIO 58  Main Building. Langara Campus  324-5227
SUB THEATRE  Student Union Building. UBC
TOM LEE MUSIC HALL 929 Granville Street
TOWN PUMP 66 Water Street 683-6695
VANCOUVER EAST CINEMA  2290 Commercial Drive  253-
5455
VANCOUVER EAST CULTURAL CENTRE   1895 Venables
Street  254-9578
VANCOUVER LITTLE THEATRE 3102 Main Street 876-4165
WAR MEMORIAL GYM  University Blvd & Wesbrook Mall.
UBC
WISE HALL   1882 Adanac Street (right behind the Cultch)
736-3022
WOMEN IN FOCUS STUDIO  849 Beatty Street  875-6624
YALE HOTEL   1300 Granville at Drake 681-9253
The listings that appear here do not cost a stinking dime.
Listings are printed based on available space and are as
accurate as can be, given the typist's four-eyed myopia. If
you would like your listings Included here, just submit any
and all details to Discorder Datebook, c/o Discorder Magazine, 6138 SUB Boulevard, Vancouver, BC V6T2A5. And you
can have your listings read out on CiTR 101.9 fM by sending
to Ihe same place. Thank you. HOW TO   WIN THE NICAE-AO/AN   BLBCTlOrJ...
$ f\Q?7. if tx) W££ TRY
vi > Ke^rm-r j-r-io ^\pu-
'-%^-At^L Softer*:
APRIL 1990 27 28 DISCORDER ^M
IMF1"'1
"OFOLOHOWCOHS.DERH.D   *E  hAD, THEY  WOO.O   o!stThKeSw_
CHANCED  BY EACH OTHEJ-* Ifsl THEStREETS OR ^ARV^ET.
©v*>UlO R«O0NIZ£  8OY.S AKO C,1RLS  v*HO*v X   PlATEO W|TH  ,^*JU'''""'-
SCHOOL , *ARR|CD ANO CARRY>NC, "HleiR CM.t-DRErJ
CARTS.THE.Y WERE REPLICAS OF THEIR OWN PaReNTS.ONLY "ji
WEARlHtj A DIFFERENT STYLE  OF CLoTVIES.HdWl^ vslOOLD
EVER CHANGE .NoTHiKCj IMPORTANT woolD EVER HAPPEN '
THEY WOULD CONTINUE L!V,NC, THEiR DYNAMIC USELESS NE<Xl
UNT.LTHE EHOS OF THE.R UVES .WHAT RIDICULOUS , .Ufj|
, CATTLE. TMEY iEefAED.tWOULO S.T OM BENCHES OR.*.'
J.CAFES  AND WATCH THE^ WALK BY.KNOWINOj-t^TEACH.Ii
100% COTTON T» SHIRTS
• We print with Polyfab
water based textile dyes
• No toxic chemicals or
solvents
• Soft Touch, never cracks
• Beautiful, rich colours
Mon-Fri 9:30 - 5:00 .Sat 11:00 - 3:00
clothworks 19°L27
APRIL 1990 29 30 DISCORDER APRIL 1990 31 AK YOU SERIOUS? MUSIC SAM-NOON
The newest new music: UQetl. Dho-
mont. Schnlttke. Lutoslawskl. Birtwistle.
etc. Information on concerts, record-
lno». composers. Hosted by Luciano
Berto and Gioclnto SceW (maybe)
THE BRUNCH REPORT 12-121SPM
News, sports, weather and more with
the CITR News. Sports and Weather Department*
THE ROCKERS SHOW 121S-300PM
Reggae. Rock Steady and Ska with
George Barrett.
BLUES AND SOUL SHOW S-S:00PM
Lachlan Murray provides the best ot
blues, rhythm and blues, lunk and soul.
THE CiTR NEWS MAGAZINE  S-S 30PM
CiTR's  In-depth  current  attain/news
«/. Coverage and anoty-
e day's news and sports.doily
editorial commentary, entertainment
reviews and reports on events here at
UBC. ol In a comprehensive and comprehensible magazine package. And
we promise, no traffic reports.
HEARSAY 5 30 6 00PM
Tr» best mWerature.ON RADO! Heor
what our contributing authors have to
say   Poetry, radio plays, creative non-
fiction, short stories, the best of the
bunch. » YOU want to contribute, get in
touch with Kim. Richard. Antje. Barbara
or Chris at 228-3017.
DE/COMPOSITIONS 6 8 OOPM
Caustic alphabets coupled with varied
fish sundries. Spoken word. Alternates
ELECTRONICSMOKESIGNALS 6-8 00PM
Information, news, interviews, political
analyis from the global c "
RADIO FREE AMERICA 10PM-MIDNIGHT
Join host Dave Emory for some extraordinary political research guaranteed to
moke you think twice. Bring your tap-
deck and two C-90's Originally broadcast on KFJC (Los Altos.CA).
IN THE GRIP OF INCOHERENCY 12-
4:00AM
So what if Barry doesn't show up anymore? Who gives a shit? Guido and
Trini still do.
holm Unfettered Coleman playing his
alto bocked by just bass and drums. A
stunning took at Ornette's musicattty.
7th Swinging Sounds, an album by
drummer Shelly Manne and his great
quintet An album that shows that not
a" sounds from LA In the fifties were
cool
16th Bottoms Upl is the title of a great
album by Illinois Joquet. one of the most
powerful tenor saxophonists ever.
23rd Computeioniby pianst. composer,
and innovator Andrew Hill brings complex African rhythms to a "free Jazz"
finest records The great organist along
with guitar master George Benson cook
and bum in this "live' recording.
THE MORNING SHOW 7.30-8 ISAM
From the famous siren to the not-so-famous BBC World Service, wake up with
The CiTR Moming Show. Information to
go: news, sports, weather and "scenic
view" (read, radar) reports, features,
entertainment reviews and Alberta Hog
prices.  With Tracy Dolan.
THE AFTERNOON REPORT 1-1:1SPM
Lunch goes down better with The Afternoon Report. Tune in for no frills news.
sports, and weather.
A SHOW OF STRENGTH 1:1S-3:00PM
After a peaceful 15 mlns. of News, from
out of no where a blistering bolt of audio
destruction kerrangs off your
and bursts your heart and t
andofcourseyourears. Chris8iHowlay
down an ultra-mega hot vinyl arrange
merit. What a wonderful day!
SOUND OF REAUTY 3-5:00PM
Experimental Radio, with Voton! Featui
ing environmental sounds, found noises
Information/propaganda   and   the
world's   primitive  and  experimental
musics from the auditory fringe.  '
Contributions welcome.   Practitioner
Anthony Roberts.
THE CiTR NEWS MAGAZINE 5-5 30PM
See Sunday for details.   Join host Ian
Gunn here weekdays.
SPORTS DIGEST S:M-6:0OPM
Join the CiTR Sports Department for all
the latest in Thundeibird varsity sports
oction and sports everywhere else for
rrs JUST TALK WTTHR.J. MOORHOUSE 6-
7:00PM
The big mouth is back, bigger and
mouthier than ever, taking on OH the
issues that are take-onable!
THE JAZZ SHOW 9.00PM-12:00AM
Vancouver's longest running |
graveyard/earty
Gavin Walker.
2nd   Omette Coleman Live In Stock-
32 DISCORDER
THE MORNING SHOW 7:30-6:16AM
See Monday for details. Wake up with
David Fetdbtoom
WHITE NOISE 815-1000AM
The bastard love child of 70s progressive and 80"s electronic. Plus improvised
fusions  of   tradtlional   rhythms  from
9 globe. Burroughs. Pynchon.
by Chris Brayshaw.
RADIO FILM THREAT S:3O-6:0OPM
N»w $howl   Brought to you from the
environs of CFRURadioGuefh.thisshow
promises to present the other side of the
3rd Clive Baiker
10th Mink Stole and Kitten Natividod
17th History of Comics and Films
24th Death Dream
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE 1:15-3 OOPM
Country music to scrape the cowshlt off
your boots to   With yer host-poke. Jeff
THE UNHEARD MUSIC  3 5 OOPM
Demo Director Dale Sawyer provides
some insights into the best and the worst
of the newest Canadian music   And
he's not telling you which is which!
THE TASTE OF THINGS TO COME 3-600PM
Sound waves to sink yer teeth Into, with
yer host Paula the radio sex goddess
THE an* NEWS MAGAZINE 5-5 30PM
See Monday for details
TOP Of THE BOPS 6-700PM
Trtni Lopez. Ronnie Se», and The Phantom al love you. Marc Coulevin brings
Rock n' Rol to its roots. Moving to a new
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD RADIO HELL 7-
9:00PM
Join Ed. Peter, and John for a real Bve
band In your livingroom. automobile or
In the Kwa language of Yoruba, there are two words Tor radio:
"Ghohun-ghohun" (snatcher of voices), and "A-s'oro ma gb'esl"
(that which speaks without pausing Tor reply). CiTR 101.9 fM is
both. Listen and find out for yourself. But first read ON THE DIAL.
B.C. FOLK 6-7:OOPM Dinsdate.
-LTrStaS _vl__W___!n   '   ,0'k' MORNING BR£ATH fclS-UfcOOAM
Rollover, open one eye. and share your
Wednesday morning waking expert-
May!!
28th Rattled Roosters
4th Intoxtcatore
lllh Violets are Blue
18th Hollowheads
26th Cartoon Swear
PERMANENT CULTURE  SHOCK     9:00-
12:00AM
Permanent (per-mdodnt): lasting. Intended to last. Indefinitely;
Culture Cka-ch*): (1) the civilisation of
a given race or nation at a given time or
over al time. (2) the raising of microorganisms In specially prepared media
for scientific study;
Shock (sh6k): (1) violent coKsion. concussion' (2) sudden and disturbing
mental and physical impressions.
OPEN SEASON Mid nighl -t 00AM
Nmwthow! Yes. El Khavan has made it
back on -A from Bangkok-and declared Open Season on us all... He figures we re alt just sitting ducks.
THE MORNING SHOW 7 30-8:1 SAM
See Monday for details. Wake up wil
David Feldbloom
_Yiti8iti-n'fl
OUR TALENTED FAMILY 10-11:00AM
Recordings of live performances at the
UBC School of Music.   The Comtem-
porory Players.  Student Composers.
Guest   Artists.   Stage   Band.   World
Fueled only by a lump of string cheese
and a single Crunch Berry... its Rowena
bouncing about the Pacific Northwest
Coast. Lookout. Boiing!
JIGGLE NOON- 1:00PM
Mike's mom took away the car. GaVs
got a bus pass, and it's the same old
THE AFTERNOON REPORT 1-1:15PM
See Monday for details.
FLEX YOUR HEAD 3-SOOPM
THE CITR NEWS MAGAZINE 5-S30PM
See Monday for details
ARTS CAFE 6:30-6:00 PM
Be updated, be with it. be Informed
UVE FROM THE KNITTING FACTORY   6-
7:00PM
Ntwthowt Located in north Soho. the
Knitting Factory is the workroom for the
New York Downtown music worid where
musicians experiment wtth rock. folk and
jazz conventions. These performances
6th Curlew with Amy Dento
12th Power Tools
19th Musica Electronica Viva
26th Graham Haynes/No Image & Tim
Berne Quartet.
Upcoming shows: Camper Van Chad-
bourne. John Zorn's Naked City, and
Improvised Duo: Fred Frith and Bob
Ostertag.
THE NO HOST BAR 7-9:00PM
Richard Gere knows the Dalai Lama.
Biondie did a theme song for a Richard
Gere movie. Pat and Lisa have looked
at the cover of a Biondie album. Coincidence? We think not!
MECABLASTl 12:30-4:00 AM
Concepts, noise. Radio Deutsche Welle
now you can request whole shows!.
band specials, turntable feedback-
gammon courtesy uncle mifty. stagnating creativity: welcome to late night
THE MORNING SHOW 7:30-8:16AM
See Monday for details. Wake up with
Stefan and a yard fuH of smiles and
happiness.
NOW YOU HAS JAZZ 8:15-10:30AM
Join Tommy Paley for a mixture of jazz
music, insight, and Indepth stories. Ideas.
s are always
feature that closes every show.
MOVING IMAGES 10:30-11:00AM
Join host Ken Macintyre as he takes yoi
on a tour through the silver screen'
back lot of life with film news, reviews, in
irSNOTEASYBEINGGREEN 1:15-2:30PM
The greenest of the CiTR DJ crop try to
germinate and take root on the air. If
you are interested in CiTR programming
possibilities, phone the Program Director at 228-3017.
ABSOLUTE VALUE OF NOISE - PART ONE
2:30-3:30PM AND PART TWO 4-6:00PM
Found sounds, tape loops, compositions of organized and unorganized
aurality. power electricians and sound
collage. Live experimental music. 100%
Canodian Industrialism
NARDWUAR THE HUMAN SERVIETTE PRESENTS... 3:30-4:00PM
Hoody hoody hoody hoody hoody!
Chlmichangas!
RANDOM SAMPUNG 5:30-6:00PM
Join Kim Trainor and Stefan Ellis for .21
days of definitive frequency modulation.... Lots of stuff about everything
everywhere. Varies weekly.
AND NOW THIS 6-6.30PM
HOME VIDEO INTERNATIONAL 7-9:00PM
Radio adaptations of movies. Taping
this program is strictly prohibited.
STOMP ON THAT BOPPATRON 9PM-12:30
JOIN THE RHYTHM OF MACHINES 12:30-
4:00AM
Exploring the relationship between post-
night-out anxiety, the complexity of
human movement performance, and
exercise-related mood enhancement.
Hosted by Lloyd Lffiana.
Upcoming interviews: Nitzer Ebb. Bor-
ghesia. Klinik and Suicidal Tendencies... THE SATURDAY EDGE SAM-NOON
Steve Edge hods Vancouver's biggest
and best acoustic/roots/rogue fok music radio show. Now in Its fifth year on
CITR! UK Soccer Report at 11:30.
POWERCHORD 12:18-3. OOPM
Vancouver's onty true metal show wtth
the underground speed to mainstream
metat local demo tapes. Imports and
other rarities.  Gerald Rattlehead and
Metal Ron do the damage.
IN EFFECT 3-6:0OPM
The Hip Hop Beat brought to you by DJ's
NtelScobte.ChazBarkerandBaTzotzoBs.
THE YAP GAP 5:30-6 00PM
Hear figures in the Arts world talk about
their works, other peoples works and
anything «'     "
Hosted by.
EVERYTHING YOU KNOW IS WRONG 6-
8:00PM
You'd think you were hot too If you hod
long blond hair.
MARSHA BRADY. DATELESS SATURDAY
NIGHT
Its gone. She's gone.
CITR provides free aktime for Community Access by groups and Individuals. If
you or your group would like to say
something to someone somewhere,
please cal the Program Dkectorat 228-
CITR wcnts you to become involved
with your friendly UBC Radio Station
which broadcasts at 1800 watts to the
campus and beyond. Opportunities
abound! Wheeeel Programming,
producing, editing, writing, engineer-
lng.operating.announchg.hojtlng.etc
etc etc. Come by the studios during
normal office hours. We're located In
Room /233 on the second floor of the
Student Union Building. Or phone us at
228-3017. And yeJ. Jen Ke«y. everyone
b welcome regardless of age I So come
on by and see for yourself!
Wel. the school year a coming to a
close, which means that a new CITR
executive will soon be grappling with
the reigns of responsibility of participating in the running a radio station for another twelve months. As of the writing
of this paper, the people filling al the
positions of the executive had not yet
been determined. Stay tuned to these
pages or even phone CiTR for more
information! But for the time being,
here are some names that you moy
want anyway.
DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR	
 LMDA SCHOLTEN
PRESIDENT ROBYNN IWATA
VICE PRESIDENT BARB ELGOOD
VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR.. BIU BAKER
BUSINESS LINE 228-3017
DJ UNE 228-2487 (228-CITR)
NEWS UNE 222-2487 (222-CiTR)
FAX UNE 228-6093
STAND IN UNE ROOM 233. SECOND
FLOOR OF THE STUDENT UNION BUILDING. 6138 SUB BOUL-VARD. UNIVERSITY
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. VANCOUVER. BC
V6T2A5.
CiTR welcomes al musics with open
ears. If you wanna submit any material,
just remember to include important
details Nke names, phone numbers,
addresses, etc. Send/address to the
attention of the Demo Director please.
Thank you.
CiTRs newest arts program exposing
the written word as art needs you! Be
they poetry, prose, rodio drama, etc. if
youwould Ike to read your written works
out on Hear Say. or if you would like to
have your works vocalised for you. just
phone the Hear Say coordinatorj at
228-3017. More so that most other
shows, the success Hear Soy really depends on Its contributors. That means
you dear reader.
DEMOLIST OF THE MORE
FREQUENTLY PLAYED STUFF OVER
THE PAST LITTLE WHILE
SHOVLHED	
 GREAT BIG PINK STATE
XAUMAN & ORCHESTRANGE FOR SURE
GERRYHANNAH	
PUKETHEATRE 	
 NIGHTOFTHEORCAS
 ANGST IZ SO COOL
SHE - DEVILS ON WHEELS! 3O/0W89 (EXCERPT)
RATTLED ROOSTERS CUT ACROSS SHORTY
THE MUSIC SOCIETY....
 PROBABILITY 4
UNDER THE JOHNSTON STREET BRIDGE
DEMOLIST OF THE LESS
FREQUENTLY PLAYED STUFF OVER
THE PAST LITTLE WHILE
CRASH DUMMIES	
ALAN DOBB & DUMELA .
 SAVE-ON FOODS
EARTHLING  	
 SURPRISE MEJPURE HELL
GAIL LANDAU	
MCTERRORT 	
 HERE COMES CONFUSION
 RAPPIN" RHYTHM RHYMIN'
ROUGHAGE 	
SHE	
 JAH IN VIETNAM/THE AXE
THE SHOW BUSINESS Gl/
SUPER CAUSTIC FERTIU
SPINLIST OF THE MORE FREQUENTLY
PLAYED DISC MATTER OVER THE
PAST LITTLE WHILE
LEGENDARY PINK DOTS.
VARIOUS ARTISTS	
.... THE CRUSHED VELVET APOCALYPSE
.... OH GOD MY MOM'S ON CHANNEL TEN!
MC900FT JESUS WITH DJ
VARIOUS ARTISTS	
CHICKEN SCRATCH ....
MEAT BEAT MANIFESTO
MINISTRY	
TERMINAL CITY RICOCHET SOUNDTRACK
.. IMPORTANT PEOPLE LOSE THEIR PANTS
. THE MIND ISA TERRIBLE THING TO TASTE
KILLDOZER	
VARIOUS ARTISTS	
 TWELVE POINT BUCK
 BEST OF RADIO TOKYO TAPES
ATTILA THE STOCKBROK
LUBRICATED GOAT	
JANE SIBERRY	
 PADDOCKOFLOVE
 BOUND BY THE BEAUTY
TACKHEAD	
 FRIENDLY AS A HAND GRENADE
BOLD MEANS CANADIAN,
DONCHA KNOW
w
The __
HOLE story
SPIRAL                                       ^K
+
RECORDS
presents
Cassette Release Party
With Videos and Performances
by Guest Artists:
Andrew le Pig
The Return of the Repressed"
Suzi Milne
Emily
Faryna
Judy Radul
Steve Rosin
Thurs, April 19/1990
TWILIGHT ZONE
Patty Ryan
JoeSarahan
#7 Alexander St/682-8550
Verner Thomas
$4.00 at the door
Doors open at 8 pm
ZaZa
THE RETURN OF THE REPRESSED"
Avaflobie on Cro* cassette. Manufactured and distributed by Spiral Records. by Chris Brayshaw
«*&
live Barker
___l"*yj'     debuted as a
writer in 1985,
■C     jji    when England's
wV     Sphere Books
released six
volumes of his short horror
fiction, the "Books of Blood."
The reviews were mixed: the
British literary establishment
dismissed them as the written
equivalent of "video nasties,"
while established horror writers
like Ramsey Campbell and
Stephen King hailed them as
masterpieces. The North
American release of the first
three Books was aided by a
quote from King ("Barker is so
good that I am almost literally
tongue-tied"), Barker's receipt
of a World Fantasy Award for
"In The Hills, The Cities" (in
BOB #1), and accolades from
novelist Peter Straub.
The Books of Blood are wildly
uneven in terms of content and
style. Splatterpunk-style slice 'n'
dice ("The Midnight Meat Train,"
"Rawhide Rex" and "Son of
Celluloid") rubs shoulders with
surrealistic fantasy ("In The
Hills, The Cities") and humor
that reads like Monty Python
directing a David Cronenberg
film ("The Yattering and Jack"
and "The Last Illusion").
Barker followed up the Books
of Blood with a horror novel,
"The Damnation Game," an epic
fantasy, "Weaveworld," and the
novella "The Hellbound Heart,"
which became the basis for his
first film, "Hellraiser." "The
Hellbound Heart" is a tour de
force, showcasing Barker's considerable talent for mixing the
poetic and the perverse.
Barker's new novel, "The
Great And Secret Show," is the
first volume of a trilogy. It is a
disappointing read - at nearly
eight hundred pages, the book
is terribly uneven and much too
34 DISCORDER
long for the story Barker tells.
There are flashes of brilliance
throughout, but the book seems
to have been edited far too
lightly. Readers interested in
Barker's fiction would be better
advised to check out the "Books
of Blood," "Weaveworld," and
the horror anthologies "Cutting
Edge" and "Night Visions III."
Barker illustrates, too - his
drawings can be found in the
adults-only comic book anthologies "Fly In My Eye" (Arcane
Comix) and "Taboo" (Spiderb-
aby Graphics).
I met Clive for the first time at
the Vancouver Public Library
one cold evening in 1987. After
reading excerpts from
"Weaveworld," he entertained
questions from the audience,
then chatted with those who
stayed on after the reading until
his publicist rushed him oft to
his plane. I got to talk to him for
perhaps ten minutes, and left
feeling oddly elated. Barker is
an engaging speaker with a
macabre sense of humor; we
discussed censorship, the
"Books of Blood," and comics,
while he sketched away,
designing dragons in tuxedos,
skeletons, and penises with
teeth. Learning I wrote, he
suggested a story idea: a dead
Hollywood star who conceals
her decaying condition with
successive layers of makeup.
Barker impressed me as every
young writer's dream: a professional who is open, encouraging, and, most important, not
yet jaded.
Two years later, Clive hasn't
changed much. He looks like
the photograph on the back
cover of "The Great And Secret
Show": a young Paul McCartney
in jeans and a battered leather
jacket. Though tired by a late
night flight from Los Angeles,
he answered my questions
readily, punctuating his comments with puffs on an
enormous cigar. He enthusiastically paged through Discorder
("Skinny Puppy!
Jesus! You guys got a Skinny
Puppy interview!"), sketched a
bit, and answered further
questions at a signing at the
Granville Book Company, then
later at the Vancouver Public
Library. What follows are the
highlights of a half-hour interview in his hotel room at the
Pacific Palisades.
ON BEING STEREOTYPED AS
A HORROR WRITER
I think the terminologies
suck. I think they always have. I
think that from the beginning of
the genre of the fantastique,
from "Melmouth the Wanderer"
and the gothics and "Frankenstein" and through the nineteenth century, the labels have
always been inadequate. Mary
Shelley's "Frankenstein" is
always thought of as a horror
novel, but you have to search
through it long and hard - as I'm
sure countless nine year-olds
have done, expecting a cheap
thrill - for the scenes which are
actually horrifying. It doesn't
induce horror for the most part.
It induces pity, compassion,
anxiety; it is a philosophical
treatise as much as it is anything else. So I think the label
"horror novel" doesn't apply.
The fiction of the imagination doesn't only deal with
horror; it deals with invented
realities, invented states of
consciousness. But publishers
don't like anything as woolly as
"imaginative fiction"; they need
something they can compartmentalize and put a certain kind
of cover on so that it can be
fixed in a particular place in the
store. And horror fans don't
object. The more I meet, the
more I hear, "Oh, I don't read
science fiction, or fantasy, or
sword-and-sorcery."
I'm writing for myself, not to
fill a particular niche in a
publisher's catalog. The terminology "horror writer" simply
doesn't seem to apply. I think it
did apply to the "Books of
Blood." I'm pleased that my
audiences have followed me, in
"Weaveworld" and now in "The
Great And Secret Show," into
oblique territory that resists
categorization. And I think that
if the market for this kind of
work were to dry up suddenly,
and the only thing I could do
was go back and write more
short horror fiction, I would
prefer not to write.
ON HELLRAISER, HELLRAISER II, AND MARKETING
PINHEAD
I wasn't a great fan of "Hellraiser II." If you open up a little
puzzle-box and the demons of
commerce appear and try to get
their hooks into you, there are
two routes you can go.  You
can say yes to the sequel, yes
to marketing the thermos flask.
Or you can offer up the ideas to
other people, and hope they're
going to work. I think the
Hellraiser comic worked remarkably well. P. Craig Russell
and John Bolton's work for
Eclipse Comics capture the
essence of my stories in ways I
thought comics never could.
John's illustrations for "In The
Hills, The Cities" are brilliant.
ON HARRY D'AMOUR,
BARKER'S SUPERNATURAL
PRIVATE EYE
There are a variety of projects
up after "Nightbreed" and my
next novel; a Harry D'Amour
picture is one possibility. Harry
makes a cameo appearance in
"The Great And Secret Show,"
and will be a major character in
the sequel, which is coming up
in 1991.
ON "THE DROOLIES," AN
ABORTED CHILDREN'S BOOK
(Laughing) Ah, the Droolies!
That was a joke, really. I sent it
along to John (Totleben) and
Steve (Bissette) to prove I have
an extremely ludicrous side.
(Interested readers can find
the Droolies in TABOO #2, a
black and white adults-only
comicbook anthology available
from comicshops in Vancouver.)
ON WORKING AS A WRITER/
ILLUSTRATOR
I did a lot of painting while I
was in L.A. working on
"Nightbreed"... Underwood/
Miller is putting out "Shadows In
Eden," a biography with a lot of
illustrations, and Eclipse is
doing "Clive Barker: Illustrator."
So I don't think my work as an
artist is being neglected.
ON ORGANIZED RELIGION
I think you only have to look
at what organized religion does
to realize what a monstrous
edifice can be made of a
relatively innocent philosophy or
theology. The Vatican's stand
on the use of condoms, for
instance, with AIDS rife. There's
something wrong with a church
that allows a fatal disease to
spread because of an edict that
is on dubious theological
grounds anyway. I'm not a great
fan of anyone in uniform, and a
cassock is a uniform. I am not a
great fan of someone who takes
a text - in this case the Bible -
and pontificates on that text in
such a way as to suggest that
their interpretation is the only
correct one. Look at Swaggart,
Falwell, the Bakkers. Is Jim in
jail? He is? Well, I hope he's
having a wonderful time. Those
pontificators took extraordinary
stories, extraordinary mythologies, and corrupted them. If
there is a distrust of such ponti-
fication in my writing, it's
because the evidence is very
strongly in favor of such distrust.
We have to have faith in
our relationships with the
deities and demons that haunt
us... we must achieve intimacy
with the strange and spiritual.
The moment we run to the wise
ape and say, "I'm scared, I'm
nervous, I don't know. Intercede
for me," is the moment we throw
our freedom to the winds.
While I find organized religion
abhorrent, I'm fascinated by
magical and shamanistic
practices which involve an
individual within a tribe who is
an interpreter of sacred signs, a
journeyer on behalf of his or her
community into sacred and
sealed realms. I think writers of
the fantastic have for a long
time fulfilled that role. Clearly,
the confrontation with forbidden
subject matter that is so much
the basis of the genre is something which is taken on on
behalf of the readership; the
writer is saying, I will take this
journey. I will talk about fear
and obsession, violent death
and bodily corruption, and I will
tell this tale in such a way as to
make new sense of it. Whereas
the relationship between the
literary magician and his or her
audience is one of fiction being
presented totally open to interpretation by the receiver, the
priest is offering up knowledge
as an absolute not open to
interpretation. And that, I think,
is a significant difference
between art and religion. Timbre Productions Presents:
APRIL 25
TOWN
PUMP
Doors: 8pm       Showtime: 10:30pm
TICKETS: Zulu, Black Swan, Track, Highlife, Razzberry Records (95th &
Scott Rd.), Reminiscing Records (across from The Bay at Surrey Place),
The Town Pump & all_________^^_______^. outlets. Charge by phone: 280-4444.
JS2E & Si?S present a solo evening with Rounder/Stony Plain
1 - - ■' recording artist
JONATHAN
RICHMAN
Doors: 7pm
Showtime:
8pm
THURSDAY
APRIL 26
TOWN
PUMP
TICKETS: Zulu, Black Swan, Track, Highlife, Razzberry Records (95th &
Scott Rd), Reminiscing Records (across from The Bay at Surrey Place),
The Town Pump & all _^^g__«___-_v. outlets. Charge by phone: 280-4444.
WEA recording artists  "SUBMARINERS TOUR
THE
with guests,
from Chicago,
JJ
CHILLS
reco"!^ Eleventh Dream Day
artists     Doors: 8pm      Showtime: 10:30pm
THURSDAY
MAY 3
TOWN
PUMP
TICKETS: Zulu, Black Swan, Track, Highlife, Razzberry Records (95th &
Scott Rd.), Reminiscing Records (across from The Bay at Surrey Place),
The Town Pump & all ___=___$^______w. outlets. Charge by phone: 280-4444.
A&M recording artists, from Scotland
A       .__   • SATURDAY
del Aimtn MAY19
%^^^-M.     JL    -MJL M. J_L____L W-M_    ____L       TICKETS: Zulu, Black Swan
TOWN
PUMP
with guests       Doors: 8pm      Showtime: 10:30pm
. Track, Highlife, Razzberry Records (95th &
Scott Rd.), Reminiscing Records (across from The Bay at Surrey Place),
The Town Pump & all raxaf^aT^. outlets. Charge by phone: 280-4444.
CiTR presents, Wax Trax recording artists
RsychicTVMAY2i
wj TICKETS: Zulu, Black Swan
TOWN
PUMP
Doors: 8pm      Showtime: 10:30pm
Swan, Track, Highlife, Razzberry Records (95th &
Scott Rd.), Reminiscing Records (across from The Bay at Surrey Place),
The Town Pump & all rra<mr^^wrm^A. outlets. Charge by phone: 280-4444.
■«       j^- POLYGRAM recording artist ^"^
Michelle Shocked
TUESDAY MAY 22
Doors: 8pm      Showtime: 9:30pm
with guests
•THE   FABULOUS*
fOMMODOREf
V 870 GRANVILLE MALL • 681-7838 *»
TICKETS: Zulu, Black Swan,
Track, Highlife, Razzberry Records
(95th & Scott Rd.) & Reminiscing
Records (across from The Bay at
Surrey Place). WHAY IF
WE'RE
ALL ABOUT EVE • BAUHAUS • THE BEAUTIFUL SOUTH • DAVID BOWIE • COCTEAU
TWINS • CURIOSITY KILLED THE CAT • D MOB • DOUBLE TROUBLE & REBEL MC •
EAT • THE FALL • THE JAM • JOY DIVISION • THE LILAC TIME • PAUL MCCARTNEY •
MEN WITHOUT HATS • THE MISSION • PETER MURPHY • NEW ORDER • PALE SAINTS •
PASSION FODDER • SIOUXSIE & THE BANSHEES • SLIDE • TALL TALES & TRUE •
TEARS FOR FEARS • TEXAS • THIS IS THE NEW BEAT • THE VELVET UNDERGROUND
aArt Ti'ctitN
PolyGram

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