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  Thurs., Fri., Sat.
July 31, Aug. 1, 2
Sun., Mon
August 3, 4
lues., Wed.
August 5, 6
Thurs., Fri., Sat.
August 7, 8, 9
Monday
August 11
lues., Wed.
August 12, 13
Thursday
August 14
Fri., Sat.
August 15, 16
Sun. - Sun.
August 17 to#31
.' iv M .*. I
B.B. GABOR
T.B.A.
THE WARDELLS
THE SCREAMING SIRENS
TERMINAL CITY
SUE MEDLEY and WICHITA
BIG ELECTRIC CAT
RHYTHM MISSION
C-liRiA.C» Canadian Independent
Recording Artists In Concert
Gourmet Express - Nightly Dinner Specials 7-9 PM
Open Sundays
7 to 9 PRE-MOVIE SPECIALS • NO COVER 7 to 9 UNLESS POSTED
932 GRANVILLE ST • OPEN 7 pm TIL 2 am • 684-VENU Di^coimER
That Magazine from CITR fml02 cablelOO
August 1986 • Vol. 4/No. 7
EDITOR
Chris Dafoe
CONTRIBUTORS
Kandace Kerr, Don Chow, Steve Edge,
Scott Steedman, Ralph Synning, Julia Steele,
Dave Campbell, Mike Harding, CD
PHOTOS
Jim Main
CARTOONS
Rod Filbrandt, Chris Pearson, Ian Verchere
COVER
Illustration — David Rosychuk
Colour — David Wilson
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Karen Shea
DESIGN
Don Bull, Harreson Atley
LAYOUT
Karen Shea, Don Bull, Alan Scales,
Johanna Block, Mike Mines, Teresa Chan,
Lynn Snedden, Pat Carroll,
Randy Iwata, Robin Razzell
TYPESETTING
Dena Corby
PUBLISHER
Harreson Atley
ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE
Robin Razzell
DISTRIBUTION MANAGERS
Bill Mullan, Steve Robertson
BUSINESS MANAGER
Randy Iwata
DISCORDER, c/o CITR Radio 6138 SUB Blvd.,
Vancouver, B.C., V6T 2A5. Phone (604) 228-3017.
DISCORDER Magazine is published monthly by
the Student Radio Society of the University of British
Columbia (CITR-UBC Radio).
CITR fml01.9 cablelOO.l broadcasts a 49-watt signal in stereo throughout Vancouver from Gage Towers
on the UBC campus. CITR is also available via FM
cable in Vancouver, West Vancouver, North Vancouver, Burnaby, Richmond, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam,
Port Moody, Maple Ridge and Mission.
DISCORDER circulates 15,000 free copies. For
advertising and circulation inquiries call 228-3017 and
ask for station manager Nancy Smith.
Twelve-month subscriptions available: $10 in Canada, $10 U.S. in the U.S.A., $15 overseas. Send cheque
or money order payable to CITR Publications.
Unsolicited manuscripts, photographs, cartoons
and graphics are welcome but they can be returned
only if accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped
envelope. DISCORDER does not assume responsibility for unsolicited material.
The offices of CITR and DISCORDER are located
in room 233 of the UBC's Student Union Building. For
general business inquiries or to book the CITR Mobile
Sound System call 228-3017 and ask for station
manager Nancy Smith. The Music Request line is
228-CITR.
IN THIS ISSUE
PUNXPO
Cashing In or Selling Out? Kandace Kerr looks through the gates
of Expo at the Festival of Independent Recording Artists. 7
FLOATING WITH THE WOODENTOPS
Don Chow splashes around the Well, Well, Well with
England's favorite white noise merchants. 10
IN EVERY ISSUE
AIRHEAD
Hate mail and love letters from near and far. 4
BEHIND THE DIAL
Love CITR Style, Shindig, and more.
ON THE DIAL
How to use the radio without hurting yourself.
SPIN LIST
The ones that matter.
VINYL VERDICT
Gnu Wax from Spirit of the West, The Smiths, Michel Lemieux,
and more.
DEMO DERBY
Julia reaches into the black tape bag and finds...
OH MY GOD...
THE ROVING EAR
Summer in Montreal. Scott Steedman stocks up on hair gel
and warm beer. 22
AUGUST  1986        3
14
15
18
19
21 THE
AUGUST"*-'*
four J
JramSH
fiLi*•■/    **WT t*tum,/ *Mu
■"^ Irl       ! - VERTICAL I All/:
r li if ^iy      j urn tatum
gtfyl deviant*
DOORS    830
COVER  $3.
deviant^ones
THE.
NEW HEADS
VERTICAL LAUCHTER
VERTICAL LAUCHTEl f
AUGUST 15i AUGUST 16
VERTICAL LAUCHTER
n£JeSU8BAFe
aatnaisg'
DRUNK (^^
(**J*><***U*UVV*tiWl^^
THE RHYTHMS
OF R R I l\/! yX L
D/XNCE    MUSIC
3H1
FUN  TUNES FOR
FUN TYPE*)/!
the ZONE
13465 KING GEORGE
SURREY   584-1044
VED
FRI
SAT
SUN
7PM
RESTRICTED
UNDER 19
RH0AJ*
Calling All Emily
Carr Dropouts
Dear Airhead,
The Discorder covers of the
last year have progressively decreased in taste and judgement,
to the point of convincing those
unwary of its contents that it is a
quasi-bourgeois sports rock-rag
put together by tasteless, no-
time-for-talent "students." In a
city full of Emily Carr dropouts,
you should be able to commission each month a real cover,
one that will intrigue, stimulate,
and in some cases, beguile the
unwary into picking up and even
reading "this" mag from CITR.
R. Bucky Fuller
The gauntlet has been dropped.
Just for the record, Discorder is
always interested in receiving,
cover submissions from Emily
Carr dropouts, or anyone else for
that matter. Photos, illustrations,
paintings, sculptures (no performance art, please) should be designed to fit into a space 8"H x
73/8"W. Send your submission to:
Discorder Cover Club
6138 SUB Blvd., UBC
Vancouver, B.C V6T 2A5
Confused
Dear Airhead,
I'm confused. The other night
I walked past the Channel One
Klub and a group of people
hanging around were laughing
and making fun of my clothes
(jeans and a D.O.A. shirt). My
hair was wet from the shower
and I had no makeup on. I am
capable of sticking my hair out
in all directions. I have some
black clothes and I even have
black eyeliner, but when I go to
the corner store I don't dress up.
Is it becoming necessary to
make sure anyone in a 2-block
0>I3& 5U& 3LVP>.
radius knows I'm into the punk
scene, so they can point at me
and say to their pals "Ooooh.
Radical," or are the days of
being yourself over? Life is not
a fashion show, although a lot of
people may believe that. I'm not
a yuppie secretary or a skinhead, but something in between.
I just find it irritating to be made
fun of by people who I can blend
in with at a punk gig, but not
when I go to the 7-Eleven.
Signed
small hair
P.S. By the way, I vote against
Skinny Puppy.
In answer to your questions: yes,
yes, and it is so (a fashion show,
that is).
Notes From Nepean
Dear Airhead,
I think your rag is really great.
My brother, a Vancouver native,
faithfully sends me Discorder in
my monthly care package. Also,
I'd like to warn anyone against
visiting Ottawa. We do have one
good radio station, CKCU, but
mild success has apparently
swelled their alternative heads.
There is, however, a thriving
underground scenei but a lack of
venues to play in and sporadic
support keeps it very subterranean. Not only is Ottawa dead,
as one of your journalists once
observed, it's rigormortised and
civil service maggots have long
since removed the flesh and
bone of our once fair city.
On your June issue; couldn't
you have found a picture of Di
biting the pavement after she
passed out? Sorry, royalty
doesn't pass out, they swoon.
Oh, and about Expo, why doesn't
someone just tow it out into the
harbour and sink it?
David Davidson
Nepean, Ontario
4     DISCORDER HELD OVER! 2ND MONTH!
Return Engagement of the original full-length version
MALCOLM MCDCWELL
CALIGULA
tWk?
DAILY AT 3:20, 6:15, 9:10
& Midnite Tuesdays
ALL SEATS/ALL DAY $5.50
TUESDAYS- $2.50
COMING LATER IN AUGUST
ANIMATED   DOUBLE FEATURE
A RALPH BAKSHI FILM
"HEY GOOD LOOKIN"
the outrageous 50s
i   from JOHN KORTY & LUCASFILM LTD.
HMEfld ^mCE upon A TIME"
ALSO ON THE SAME PROGRAMME
CLASSIC WARNER BROS. CARTOONS
VANCOUVER'S
DOWNTOWN INDEPENDENT
August
1/2 CHOCOLATE BUNNIES FROM HELL
8/9 ROOTS ROUNDUP
15/16 ROCKIN' HARRY AND THE HACKJOBS
22/23    Canadian Independent Recording Artists
29/30 In Concert	
I LIVE MUSIC IN THE LOUNGE
I   FRIDAYS FROM 10:30-SATURDAYS FROM 11:30 RM.
ARTS CLUB THEATRE   1181 SEYMOUR  683-0151
AUGUST  1986 FRIDAY    SEPTEMBER    5    /    UBC    SUB    BALLROOM
ADVANCE     TICKETS     A   V  A   I   I,  A   B   L   E    A  T     AMS     /     ODYSSEY     /      ZULU
-
BENEFIT SOIREE
CONTINUES. .
Tuesday, September 2nd
THE BOTTOM LINE
VERTICAL LAUGHTER
HELEN GONE
Wednesday, September 3rd
STUBBORN BLOOD
SAFE TO ASSUME
MORE UNCLE STORIES
just $2.00 cover
(we wont be
undersold!)
presented by
SFU Radio CJIV 94.5 FM Cable 291-3727
Wearable Graphies
IOO% Cotton T-Shirts
Affordable Fashions
2565 ALMA
6     DISCORDER Kandace
through the
Festival of Independent Recording Artists
I. VE BEEN TRYING TO WRITE THIS
7 piece for some months now. At the
time the issue of local bands playing
at Expo seemed very important. Now
it all seems somewhat passe.
Now that Expo is three months old we've
all sort of adjusted to it. I say sort of, because
something of that scale will continue to disrupt
our lives for years. We will pay and pay till our
ears bleed. You see, I'm not convinced that
Expo is what the province needed—or wanted, for that matter. Did anyone ask us if we
wanted to invite the world?
A lot of Expo boosters are now whining the
blues. Some stores have laid off staff, newly
hired in the euphoria of an expected Expo
boom. Some hotels still have lots of rooms,
would-be landlords have empty Expo suites,
shows are losing business and the Interior
tourist trade is taking a beating. Come November, when 15,000 Expo workers get their
last paycheque, it'll take hours to get through
the front door of your local UIC office, not to
mention weeks to get in to see someone.
Imagine the unemployment rate come
December.
So it's not someone else's lost profit margin
that keeps me from passing through the Expo
gates. It's things like welfare rates, frozen at
$350 for the past few years. It's people sleeping in the streets, under the viaduct, two
blocks from the main Expo gate. It's hotels
evicting long-time residents in favour of a
quick tourist buck fix. It's fitting justice that
those same hotels are now being boycotted,
and that tourists are seeing them for the rat-
traps they really are. It's two friends dying as
a result of Expo—one because he was evicted, and another because he could no longer
find the silence and solace he needed in a
world filled with Scream Machines and 24-
hour noise. It's money being taken from social
programs and social services to build giant
hockey sticks, and to blow off in a 20-minute
pyrotechnic masturbatory splurt every night.
It's a celebration of everything that capitalism
stands for: it's exploitation ("gee, $3.50 an
hour? I'd LOVE the job"), it's greed ("McDonald's stands for everything Expo stands for"
—Jim Pattison) and it's here until November.
Am I having fun yet?
Now, into the middle of it all, comes a week
of local independent bands.
Punxspo. That's the insider's name for
FIRA, the Festival of Independent Recording
Artists, being held at the Xerox International
Theatre (XIT) between August 4 and August
10. Seventeen bands, two bands a night,
somedays three, non-threatening music that
mom and dad won't feel bad about leaving
Expo'd-out and ankle biters 3rid out-of-town
big hairs to graze on.
The big question is: would YOU pay $20 to
see Poisoned? (or insert your fave local band
here __).
I
ation:
Ian Verchere
N THE EARLY DAYS EVERYONE WAS
running to jump into the Expo handcart.
The arts community held meetings early
last spring to ensure they wouldn't be crushed
by the weight of the world festival and other
Expo entertainment. There was fear of companies and theatres collapsing. Regular
events like the Folk Festival and the Children's
Festival seemed to be in jeopardy. It stood to
reason that the local music scene would get
nervous too. With clubs operating on the Expo
site, local venues would be given a run
for their money. It was feared there would be
a real drought as Expo sucked in all the business. A few local acts, like Herald Nix and the
Crimpolines, had been signed to play at various Expo sites, but by and large the local
music scene, like the local theatre community,
had been ignored.
Ill be a big noise with all
the big boys
there's so much stuff I will
own
and I will pray to a big god
and I kneel in the big church
Peter Gabriel "Big Time"
AUGUST  1986       7 So a group of local music industry people
—promoters, managers and writers and programmers—approached Expo with a proposal
to include more independent musicians in the
then-uncomfirmed lineup. They argued there
was a lot happening in the local scene that
should be highlighted and showcased. Expo
agreed, and FIRA was set in motion.
Myra Davies, a supervisor at the XIT, the
eventual site of FIRA, recalls it as a long process. "We had to demonstrate a community
demand for the music. Sixty, bands were considered, mainly from the Vancouver area.
Davies was looking for bands that not only
were representative of the breadth of the local
scene, but also wouldn't be lost in the caverns
of the XIT.
"We looked through the community to find
different expressions of the various aspects
of the scene," she says, adding that the week
of performers is supposed to show both the
roots and the future of local alternative music.
What's the difference
between BIO. and D.O.A.?
B.T.O.'s not playing at Expo.
graffiti, Waldorf Hotel,
Vancouver, March 1986
Seattle And Vancouver:
You've Blown Us Away With Support. Now John Fluevog
Blows You Away With A First Birthday Sale.
IM ast year, John Fluevog blew into Seattle,
saving soles all over the eity. Now it's
Birthday One, and time for thanks all round.
For the entire month of August, you ean
enjoy Gale Foree Savings of 40 to 60 per cent.
So breeze in early, while the selection's best.
John Fluevog Shoes Ltd.
VANCOUVER 852 Granville 688-2828 SEATTLE 1611 First 441-1065
T THAT'S HOW RUMOURS GET START-
ed. At first no one knew who was playing or not playing. Then names started
to surface, becoming candidates for some
prime muck smucking. D.O.A. was at the top
of the list. Names of other bands with varying degrees of stated political awareness or
involvement followed: Red Herring, Slow,
Rhythm Mission and Bolero Lava, among
others. And that's when the breakdown in
communications between audience and acts
hit like a wad of overchewed gum—hard and
colourless. Instead of working together to ensure that local music would survive Expo, or
trying to arrange alternatives to Expo that were
affordable and entertaining, bulk of the conversations were busy trying to find out who
was or was not playing. It became an issue
for some audiences, who felt their support of,
and shared assumptions with, local bands
Wre being usurped by musical dreams of
Expo sugarplums.
A case in point: D.O.A. has had a rough
political time these past few months. First
there was that rumoured interview in Hustler.
Then came the rumour behind door number
2—that D.O.A. was going ,to play Expo. The
gasps could be heard all the way to Clark and
Frances. Expo management says D.O.A. was
on the verge of signing, and then pulled out.
D.O.A. management confirmed, at the time,
that negotiations were going on with Expo. An
inside source confirmed that the D.O.A. contract had been typed and was ready for the
inking.
As for the boys in the band—hell, they were
on tour, and returned to the questions of their
friends and fans. Well? Are you going to play
Expo?
Other bands had to deal with internal dis-
sention and discussion before deciding what
to do. 54-40, Rhythm Mission and Bolero Lava
all wavered back and forth before deciding
whether or not to follow that yellow brick road.
The best rumours dealt with Slow, who were
playing/not playing/broken up/signed to a
major label or just waiting, depending on who
you were drinking with.
Meanwhile, D.O.A. has joined the ranks of
the Animal Slaves, Mecca Normal, Industrial
Waste Banned and others who have publicly
and politically stated that they will not play
Expo.
The whole thing raises some nasty issues.
Is compliance complicity? Or is it the time to
take the Expo money and run? For some
people this is the one chance to make good
bucks and get some exposure. For others, it's
nothing more than being slotted into a Social
Credit re-election campaign. Is being in the
back pocket of the beast the same as being
in its belly?
Lillian Allen is a Toronto dub poet. When
her name appeared as a Folklife performer
many of her fans were angry. They felt her
work opposed many of the values that Expo
extolls, and that her performance did little
more than justify those practices. But for her,
performing at Expo was a little different than
another bar gig, or getting Canada Council
money.
8     DISCORDER THERE IS STILL ONE THING THAT
picks my ass about some bands playing at Expo. Singing politics is one
thing, but for a number of the FIRA bands
their politics and their music are closely linked. So I'm confused with bands doing double
duty—playing benefit gigs for people like
DERA (Slow), the Stein River Valley coalition
(Bob's Your Uncle) and Poor People's Expo
(Red Herring, the Zealots), and then playing
Expo. Isn't it somewhat of a contradiction?
And if talk about those contradictions is
making the rounds of the bars (and the washroom walls) what kind of response will that
engender in the audience?
Myra Davies is curious to see what the
audience response to FIRA will be. The XIT
has been home to a wide range of international acts, from Test Department to folk dancing to a Hong Kong TV. show. It's a tough act
for a local four-piece to follow.
"People come to this theatre to see the
exotica, the different...it'll be a challenge for
these people...to have an impact."
She is quick to place the responsibility for
the success of FIRA in the lap of the fans.
"It's up the community to make something
of it. I guess if they're as innovative as they
say they are, they'll do something with it...I
don't know how loyal their audiences are."
There is an alternative to all of this if you
either can't afford or don't want to go to Expo.
It's called CI.R.A.C (pronounced kerrack),
and is the Canadian Independent Recording
Artists in Concert. Co-organizer Jay Scott says
while CIRAC is not intended as competition
for FIRA, it is a good alternative to the $20
Expo gate fee.
Over 30 bands from across Canada will perform at venues in Vancouver and Victoria from
August 17 to August 30. Bands from Ottawa,
Toronto, Halifax, London, Winnipeg, Saskatoon, Edmonton and Calgary will be teamed
up with local bands to fill the venues. Jay sees
CIRAC as strengthening an existing but weak
network of venues and independent bands
across the country. He hopes FIRA will give
CIRAC a boost by highlighting local indpen-
dent talent. "FIRA might help give us a higher
profile...maybe translate some of the attention
to local bands over the next three weeks.'"
Down on your luck boys
An' out in the streets
Billy an' the Socreds are
laughing
Throwin' nickels at your feet
D.O.A.
IN HAWAII THERE IS THIS TOURIST
pastime that overfed, greasy visitors like
to indulge in. They stand on the edges
of piers in the marinas, smoking cigars and
sipping funny drinks with paper parasols and
chunks of fruit in them. The big trick is to get
the poor kids, who live on the streets, to dive
into the water and chase after the nickels they
throw in. They toss those nickels quite far out
into the middle of the marina, between boats
and other piers. Sometimes a big spender will
come along and huck a quarter. It's a big joke,
throwing a coin into the oily water and watching those kids dive into each other, fighting
over a scrap of American metal. Maybe it
reminds those coconut-oiled tourists of the
workplace they left back home.
It reminds me of Expo, and what Expo has
done to the local alternative community. Instead of sitting tight and working together to
make sure we get through Expo, people are
out there, diving for the nickels. And they are
nickels—no quarters here. Just scraps from
the big trough, tossed with all the finesse of
a cigar smoking tourist. A little bit of local
culture to keep the locals amused, bring their
friends in, those people who have been bad-
mouthing Expo. Hey, we're progressive. We're
into local culture. We like Skinny Puppy...
There's one thing I forgot to mention about
those kids diving for nickels in Hawaii. When
all those overfed tourists go to bed in their luxury condos, the kids frim the streets come
back out. This time, they have knives. And
screwdrivers and wrenches and crowbars.
And they can strip a car in minutes. They're
especially good at big American cars—and
not so bad on BMWs and Mercedes. There's
big trade in stereos, cameras, traveller's
cheques, passports and other tourist perishables. The nickel chasing just keeps the tourists entertained, keeps them thinking they
have one up on the locals. It's the nighttime
activity that pays the bills.
Keep that in mind.
I Aug. 4:
2:30 2Wh Century 8:30 Slow 1
. P&i$&&&&                 ."; I
5:
3:00 Zealots 3:30 flick Scott
Bm$ - r. hn im^m &
WtikScmBm^ :<     *   -J
6:
a $ .                     i
Rhythm ttissfcm
frv^
8:00 K Braineater 10:00 Bob's
Your Uncle
: ■■",.■■&■
8:00 Brilliant Orange 10:30
Homing Party
9;
9:00 Paul Dolden 10:30
Skinny Puppy
10:
8:30 4th Floor 10:00 Grapes ofl
ZEN
DESSERT
& COFFEE SPECIAL $2.25
Evenings from 6:00 p.m.
— cappuccino or cafe latte
with cheesecake
Open
Mon.-Thurs.       8 am-10:30 pm
Friday 8 am-Midnight
Saturday 11 am-Midnight
Sunday noon-7 pm
820 HOWE STREET   683-5122
Bottom - Bracket Bicycles
REBUIIT BIKES from 75"* to 20000
- guaranteed —
BOUGHT — SOLD — REPAIRED
X
Tues. - Sat. 10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
215 Dunlevy St. (across from Oppenheimer Park)
"Bikes with Personality!" • 689-9536
y
AUGUST  1986 FLOATING  £*
WITH  i-
%^
H90EK
Lifeguard:
Don Chow
THE SUMMER AIR IS PIERCED BY
cries of mimicked dolphins as London's Woodentops splash in Kits
pool. For the two nights previous, it
was the air of a couple of Vancouver's watering holes that was pierced, by chiming feedback and sweet, driving pop. Rolo—singer,
songwriter, and guitarist—dives in.
"What we are is a mixture of punk ideals,
hi-tech music, and dance-groove a la Kraft-
werk, Suicide; all of those things put together
and played on very simple instruments. It's
very pounding and repetitive and schizophrenic; one minute it's seducing you and the
next minute it's freaking you out. That's what
we aim to do. On a good night, we can take
you extremely high; on a bad night, you'll be
thinking to yourself, 'this is quite funny, isn't
it?' And that's what we try to be, amusing as
well. We would like you to feel somehow drawn
into what we're saying, rather than stand and
brandish our fists at you and say 'fuckin' listen
to this, this is it.' We don't do that."
They don't have to. Having just finished their
first American tour—which started in Vancouver—there are plenty of people who are saying it for them. Even as you read this, their
first LP, Giant, is being released here and in
the States by CBS. Consider their humble
beginnings only three years ago:
"We started off unable to play. If you'd heard
our first rehearsals, you'd really laugh because it was just white noise, complete white
noise, from one end to the other. We started
doing small parties, and we got offered this
concert at a club called Dingwall's, which you
may have heard of because it is what they say
is one of the legendary places in London. But
when you get there, it's pretty tacky and seedy
and just all about rhythm 'n' blues, really.
Julian Cope from The Teardrop Explodes was
in the audience and he invited us to go on a
tour around the U.K. with him, which we did.
And ever since then, our phone has been ringing constantly; we never had a chance to sit
and watch the world go by, really, we've been
so busy."
The Woodentops subsequently signed with
Rough Trade, and released several excellent
singles, two of which—'Move Me" and "Well
Well Well'—were produced by Andy Partridge,
under the pseudonym Animal Jesus:
"I can't tell you what he's like. I mean, when
you speak to him, you think he's on acid or
something all the time, but he's actually
10     DISCORDER
straight. In his brain, he's just permanently
psychedelic. We had this other producer, called the Mad Professor, who's a dub producer,
and we were choosing maybe to go with him
as well. But Andy just said, 'No, I'm doing it.'
The way he said it convinced us immediately,
and the next thing we knew we were in the
studio with him ripping tape recorders apart.
Some of the sounds that we got working with
him were literally out of tape recorder vandalism. It was so funny and so exciting, and I'm
really pleased with everything we ever did with
him.
"We had had major record company contracts on a table and we were going through
them like a pack of cards, trying to figure out
what was best for us. And then, next thing we
knew, Rough Trade had told everyone that
they'd signed us. It was pretty obvious what
we were gonna do. But we went around and
met the WEAs, and all those people back in
England, and they weren't very attractive.
They're pretty much into the selling of their
product. But round at Rough Trade, we had
the chance to make four or five really off-the-
cuff singles, with us mixing them ourselves
if we wished, and so on. We had a lot of freedom, which I think is really important for any
band. It's so competitive, but if you can find
someone that is going to do the job for you
and also let you grow up a little bit within your
own art—i.e. mix it and make decisions yourself about the production and stuff, and
choose who you want to work with—well, then
Rough Trade was perfect for us, because we'd
grown up relaly slowly. We say now, okay,
we're ready, but it's been really nice taking our
time about it. To be honest, I can't imagine
being any more busy than we are anyway. If
we were selling millions and millions of records, I'm sure it wouldn't be any different than
it is at the moment. I get up early in the morning and my phone rings, and it's interviews
pretty well the moment I get up."
CERTAINLY, THE WOODENTOPS
haven't had much trouble getting attention from the press; they performed
an utter upstaging of Vancouver's current
raves, 54-40, the first night they played here.
Their set coiled like a spring, finally exploding
in a flurry of feedback anf face-slapping drumming, with Rolo jamming his gui+ar into the
monitor and pounding the mike stand into the
stage. In their home country, though, they are
probably better known for giving Morrissey of
The Smiths a pack of exploding cigarettes:
"Oh, that's all bullshit! What that was, is
there's a guy from Melody Maker who's trying to do an interview with us, and what we're
being is, sort of sweet-minded, good-natured
people. But the way he sees it is, well surely
this band ought to be a rock 'n' roll band. We
were driving along a motorway with The
Smiths, and we were overtaking them, and,
like kids, we were all waving and going 'hello!'
because we're on a tour with them. As the car
overtook, there was this bump in the road and
the two cars went OOMPH! and swerved into
each other at high speed. They didn't hit each
other, but went near to it, and what we saw
was The Smiths with a look of horror on their
faces because they thought they were going
to die. Morrissey turned around looking like
he was going to die. So when this journalist
was talking to us about why The Smiths
wouldn't talk to us anymore—which was because of that incident—we said, well, it's really
silly because it's not as if we'd gone and told
them we'd put a bomb under the stage. And
the journalist went, Aha! I can make a story
out of this!' New York Talk phoned me up the
other day, and the first thing the guy says to
me is, oh yeah, we heard you tried to blow up
The Smiths. I think that's a real shame, because that just goes to show that rock 'n' roll
journalists are in a funny state, not really sure
what to make of anything and finding it very
difficult to choose from what's going around,
and having to dirty everything they possibly
can just to make some kind of story. They're
always really disappointed with us because
we seem so innocent or something."
INNOCENCE? NOT A QUALITY THAT
one would ascribe to many rock 'n' roll
bands these days, but those that could are
generally not worth the effort. But watching
them splash through the water, they seem
childlike as well; there is something very real
about this group. Rolo is clearly the leader,
but at the same time, just a piece of the whole
picture. There is an exuberance about them
which extends from their music, and happily,
their innocence doesn't get in the way. For example, let's let Rolo tell us about how "Good
Thing" was mixed:
"What we did was, we took a short patch
of the music and opened it out. If you listen
to the 7", it starts out really sweet and soft.
Then as it goes on, it gets more and more intense, and suddenly, it turns into this ball of
white noise. When we were mixing it in the
studio, the speakers couldn't take it because
all the white noise and everything that we had
in the mix, but had been saving for the end,
was just pushed up so much that the drums
and the bass just disappear. And for a second,
all you can hear is, 'VVVVH.' As the fade-out
starts, the drums and the bass come back in,
because that's the level to which we'd pushed the guitars and keyboards up. The needles
on the studio desk were really funny. When
it come to the actual way the band is, we're
basically white noise merchants; all of our pop
music comes out of working this stuff into I II < Ifc
• • theatre • • I   m-
16th & Arbutus 738-6311
HOHEOFTHEBRRUE
H FILM BV LRURIE RHDERSON
"My work Is a combination of film, music, electronics, storytelling,
dancing, social commentary, Impersonation, animation and anything
else I can come up with. What I do has been described as 'high-tech
opera,' 'live art,' 'electronic stand-up comedy...'
Starts August 8
with
ADRIAN BELEW
RICHARD LANDRY
JOY ASKEW
'...as a certification
of Miss Anderson's
unique gifts, Its a
genuine success."
- John Rockwell, N. Y. Times
RATING T.B.A.
2 SHOWS NIGHTLY 7:30 & 9:30
COMING MOVIES TO WATCH FOR —
from Israel
from France
from this planet
— BEYOND THE WALLS
— FRENCH CANCAN
— ANIMATION FESTIVAL
some kind of shape. This is an intelligent process, I think. I really enjoy it, it's like panning
for gold.
"We're not believers in long, drawn-out
guitar solos, but if the guitarist can play, he
might as well play. On some of the songs,
Simon's guitar solos are continual feedback
for about 20 minutes. The most obvious guitar
solo in any of our music sounds more like
Jango Reinhardt or something than rock
guitar; it's more tasteful. When you really
notice solo guitar, it's generally not in the rock
'n' roll fashion. Most of the rock 'n' roll is, in
fact, coming from the keyboards, which are
played through a sort of distortion pedal most
of the time to get the right texture. We're seen
as a guitar band, but the way we use guitar
is, it weaves around the bassline and the
repetitive, pulsing rhythm thing. And my singing just scoots over the whole lot, really.
"So many bands seem to like the idea of
having a set they can trust. I think that if you
can really trust what you're gonna do, then
there isn't much excitement and imagination
to be gained from it. I love it when things go
wrong, basically, It's good fun. When we play,
we're often laughing at each other because
it's funny when things go wrong. I think all the
really adolescent pleasures that make you
wish to start a band are very very inherent in
our group. After three years, they seem to be
snowballing rather than going away, which is
great.
"I'd like to think that people could say that
our music has been valuable and influenced
other people. It would be nice if people left
where we played feeling inspired in some way,
in their own right. You know, people who are
maybe toying with the idea of forming a band
or something, or who see The Woodentops
and see that it's so believable, that they could
probably do what we're doing without much
problem. We're not using all this gear that
means you don't understand what we're doing; you can see what we're doing, it's really
obvious what we're doing, and you know that
you could do it. It just didn't occur to you to
do it this way. I think our value, for the moment, is there. If it comes to what we would
do with big bucks, well, then I think that we'd
probably be useful with that as well. But at the
moment, we don't make big bucks, so on a
personal level, the best we can hope to do is
to inspire people and to uplift them. We're doing that, so we know we're succeeding in that
direction."
I don't think I need to tell you to watch out
for this band, because they'll be much more
visible next time around. Do, however, look out
for the Adrian Sherwood remixes that are in
the works, and if you missed The Woodentops
this time, try not to fuck up like that again.
AUGUST  1986      11 d\an
\ndePetV
fd\nfe
Itsa Skltsa
Tulpa
Shadowy Men On A Shadowy Planet
Shuffle Demons
Hopping Penguins
Amoeba Quiche
Sleepless
Toronto
Toronto
Toronto
TO.
T.O.
T.O.
T.O.
1                                            »
London, Ontario
SheepLook L»p
T.O.
1     Cowboy Junkies
Halifax
I     Lone Stars
Halifax
October Game
Halifax
1     Vox Violins
Winnipeg, Manitoba
1     Fool's Crow
Winnipeg
|     Beach Mutants
-
1     Stretch Marks
^^^^.   ■ ;   -;■-•
1     foments Galore
Winnipeg
I     IB.S.
Active Joy
Saskatoon, SaskaTcKn
I     SNFU
Saskatoon
Junior Gone Wild
Edmonton, Alberta
j     Idyl Tea
Edmonton
L
Edmonton
Edmonton
1     Shadow Project
Edmonton
1     This Fear
Calgary, Alberta
Colour Me Psycho
Victoria
1      NoMeansNo
Vancouver
1      DOA
Vancouver
1      Bamff
Vancouver
Big Electric Cat
■
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Victoria
Harpo's Cabaret
^5 BasVwn Squaie WHAT A SPOT!
Get your ad a
spot in the amazing
25,000 copy, Back-
to-School, September
issue of Discorder.
AD DEADLINE
FRI, AUG. 15
Book now for that
spot-on feeling.
CALL ROBIN
228-3017
BEHIND
"THE
DIAL
Back From Beyond The Crypt
It's ...OH GOD!...SHINDIG
JUST WHEN YOU thought it was safe to go
out on Mondays, CITR is pulling the nastiest
dirty trick of all time: getting out the shovel,
removing six feet of wormy sod, and bringing
the monster back to life.
Yes, folks, SHINDIG is back. A mite foul-
smelling after those months underground, we
admit, but that's nothing the blood of a few
virgin bands won't cure.
Virgin bands?! What is this sickness, this
depravity? All right, we'll be the first to admit
that it isn't very nice to feed aspiring young
musicians who have never faced the beast
before to the music demon SHINDIG, but
that's the way it's got to be. If we offer the
FORWARD FASHION
FOR THE
MODERN MAN
UP TO
BOYS' CO. OAKRIDGE CENTRE
monster a band it's seen before, it'll get angry.
And then we'll all be in trouble. Bands with
previous record releases cause a similar reaction, so none of those either.
If you are in, or know of a band, that is thinking of entering SHINDIG, for god's sake, talk
them out of it!... They may hate you now, but
they'll thank you later, in November, when the
previously innocent SHINDIG finalists are being turned into drooling, flesh-eating zombies
by prizes of recording time and equipment.
In November, the basement won't seem such
a bad place to be.
And if you can't talk them out of it, have
them contact Linda Scholten (a.k.a. The Black
Princess of Powell Street) at 228-3017.
But don't say we sent you.
Doggy Debate Decided
THAT'S IT. No more. We've had enough of
both pro and anti-Skinny Puppy Letters to the
Airhead. This has to stop. Now.
To facilitate an armistice CITR presents
Skinny Puppy with special guests Severed
Heads, September 5 at the SUB Ballroom at
UBC. All ages, sexes, factions and PACs
(Puppy Action Committees) are welcome.
Tickets are available at the usual outlets.
And please, no weapons.
...But CITR Lights Up Your
Night
FROM The Province, July 22, 1986:
*Eric Sluis, 28, of Vancouver says: "One great
place I've found to meet single women in their
early 20s is the UBC Pit Pub, especially on
Wednesday evenings when CITR campus
radio plays tunes."
LAST
CHANCE
BLACK BOOK
NOT YOUR AVERAGE COUPON BOOK
Blackbook coupons expire Oct 31
so now is the time to buy that book
you've always been meaning to.
Three months left to save hundreds
of dollars...
NOW
ONLY
$
5
EACH
At Zulu, AMS TKS-UBC, CBO
501 W. Georgia and Odyssey
14     DISCORDER ON
"THE
DIAL
CITR fml02 cablelOO
WEEKDAY REGULARS
7:30 am    Sign-On
8:00 am    WAKE-UP REPORT
News, sports and weather.
10:00 am BREAKFAST REPORT
News, sports and weather followed
by GENERIC REVIEW and INSIGHT.
12:00 pm HIGH PROFILE.
1:00 pm    LUNCH REPORT
News, sports and weather.
3:00 pm   AFTERNOON SPORTSBREAK
5:00 pm    DINNER MAGAZINE
News, sports and weather followed
by GENERIC REVIEWS, INSIGHT and
a DAILY FEATURE.
4:00 am    Sign-Off
WEEKDAY HIGHLIGHTS
MONDAYS
SOUNDTRAK
10:30-11:30 am
Theatre-style radio incorporating the voice,
music, and other permutable sounds.
Produced by ESI.
THE BLUES SHOW
8:00-9:00 pm
Can blue men sing the whites? Join host
Eric Von Schlippen to find out.
THE JAZZ SHOW
9:00 pm-12:30 am
Vancouver's longest-running prime time Jazz
program, featuring all the classic players, the
occasional interview, and local music news.
Hosted by the ever-suave Gavin Walker.
Album Features: 11:00 pm.
04 Aug.  Abdullah Ibrahim at Montreux
(1980). Ibrahim's Quintet was one of
the hits of Europe's largest Jazz
Festival. Listen to Ibrahim's African
Concepts with Carlos Ward and
trombone virtuoso Craig Harris.
11 Aug.   Miles Davis Kind of Blue. A true
"classic" recording and one that
has influenced jazz for the last 25
years. Miles with John Coltrane, Bill
Evans, Cannonball Adderley, etc.
78 Aug.   Pat Metheny and Ornette Coleman
"Song X. Ornette's best outing in
years with his new-found musical
"soulmate" (Metheney).
25 Aug.   By popular request a repeat of Pete
Johnson's Houseparty. The great
boogie-woogie and blues pianist
with his special guests Ben
Webster, J.C. Heard, "Hot Lips"
Page, etc.
TUESDAYS
THE FOLK SHOW
8:00-9:30 pm
Summer is rolling on quite nicely, really. This
month sees a difficult choice facing CITR
Folk Show host Steve Edge. Do I go to the
Edmonton festival with Spirit of the West, or
should it be Cropredy, U.K. for the annual
Fairport Convention reunion? No problem!
Being stone broke and unemployed I'll have
to stay here and improvise.
05 Aug. Sweet Honey in the Rock. Those
silky voiced women from Washington D.C. were so good at the Vancouver festival. Why not have some
more.
12 Aug.   Fairport reunion time again.
Cropredy reports and artists
featured at that event, including
Dick Gaughan, Richard Thompson
Band, Redgum, Brass Monkey etc.
19 Aug.   Geoffrey Kelly of Spirit of the West
with a personal selection of folk
music, plus reflections on life on the
way to top!
26 Aug.  The stars sing Richard Thompson.
The great man is a superb songwriter, so here are the likes of
Sandy Denny, Albion Band, Elvis
Costello, Any Trouble, etc. to
prove it.
BUNKUM OBSCURA
9:30-11:00 pm
A drop on the end of a needle reflects the
world around it as well as a virgin's tear.
LOVE PEACE AND VIOLENCE
11:00 pm-1:00 am
An earnest effort to resolve 7,000 years of
passion, sedation and empty threats (read
civilization), featuring live sex, tape loops,
simulated drug taking and lots of normal
music. "Some things are so stupid that they
must be done." E. Raoul
This month featuring the return of the
oblivious talents of Eating Vomit Ltd.
PLAYLOUD
Late night 1:00-4:00 am
Where dreams go to die.
"Today people seem to be trying rather too
hard to give the impression that they are
enjoying themselves. What if something were
brooding beneath their feet."
Paul Claudel
Aural surgery performed by Larry Thiessen.
NANCY
PREW
clue in the fast lane
by
' Beverly Cooper
& Ann Marie
MacDonald
Directed by
Roy Surette
an exciting 3-part comedy mystery featuring
everybody's favorite teen detective!
ON NOW TIL AUGUST 16th
Firehall Theatre 280 E. Cordova Street
Reservations (passes & tickets) 689-0926
3-Part^
> passes  5
j^M
TOUt^M
T-SHIRTS
from 5.00
INTERNATIONAL
MILITARY CLOTHING
T-TOPS
from 7.50
334 W. PENDER
VANCOUVER, B.C.
669-8843
AUGUST  1986      15 WEDNESDAYS
JUST LIKE WOMEN
5:75-6 pm
Tune in for 45 minutes of invigorating and
stimulating interviews, news and music. For
anyone interested in women's issues or learning more about them.
THE AFRICAN SHOW
8:009:30 pm
Catch the latest in African news and Music
with Umerah Patrick Oukulu and Todd
Langmuir. News at 8:30. Special feature
weekly at 9:00. Onward-Harambe.
THE KNIGHT AFTER
Midnight to 4:00 am
Music to clobber Yuppies by (and anyone
wearing floral baggy shorts). Featuring radio
shows traded with alternative stations in
Europe and the U.S., and every 5 weeks a
new episode of MUSIC FROM THE TAR
PITS, an ode to early seventies recreational-
substance rock. Regular guests include
MOAMMAR K., the Prince of Wales and
Lyndon Lerouche.
THURSDAYS
PARTY WITH ME, PUNKER!
3:00-5:00 pm
Same place, same time, different hosts. Join
Rock Action and Crusty Love for cool tunes
and special guests and features.
COMPILATION COMPILATION
6:30-7:30 pm
The name says it all. Explore the rich and
varied sound of the world of compilation
tapes and albums, with your host Kawika.
TOP OF THE BOPS
8:00-9:00 pm
Screaming guitars, throbbing basses, pounding drums, pumping pianos and howling
saxes: Top of the Bops has them all, and you
can have them too!
MEL BREWER PRESENTS
11:00 pm-Midnight
If you haven't tuned in yet then you missed
The Arts Club Memorial Blues Band playing
live in the studio, and a lot of other way keen
stuff. So stay up late one night a week to
hear Patrick, Jay and Jerry interview local
bands and highlight local music. Remember,
no spitting or foul language, Pat's mother is
listening.
FRIDAYS
FRIDAY MORNING MAGAZINE
10:30-11:30 am
Join host Kirby Hill for interviews, features,
and a taste of the exotic. The White Wolf
lives!
POWER CHORD
3:30-5:00 pm
Vancouver's only true metal show, featuring
the underground alternative to mainstream
metal: local demo tapes, imports and other
rarities, plus album give-aways.
THE COCKTAIL PARTY
5:30-8:00 pm
The summer replacement for the Saturday
night P.J. Party. Mike Mines & Robin Razzell
invite you to a world of bibulous pleasure via
the newest psychedelic sounds from both
sides of the pond. Just add ice and shake.
SOUL GALORE
8:00-9:30 pm
All the tearjerkers, all the hipshakers. From
R&B to funk and especially soul. Join Fiona
MacKay and Anne Devine and wear your
soul shoes.
01 Aug. Male Gospel Groups—Dixie Hummingbirds, Mighty Clouds of Joy,
Soul Stirrers and more.
08 Aug. Aretha Franklin—the high priestess
of soul.
15 Aug.  The Drifters—an hour of the preeminent vocal group of the 1950s.
22 Aug. Anne and Fiona's Vacation Special
29 Aug. TBA
THE BIG SHOW
9:30 pm-midnight
Elevate your BPMs with Robert Shea and AI
Big. And shine your shoes, for God's sake.
THE VISITING PENGUIN SHOW
Late night 1:00-4:00 am
Now, finally, a reason to stay up past the BIG
SHOW on Friday nights. Yes, Andreas Kitz-
mann and Steve Gibson dish out requests,
new music, interviews and selfless egotism.
WEEKEND REGULARS
8:00 am    Sign-On
Noon        BRUNCH REPORT
News, sports and weather.
6:00 pm   SAT./SUN. MAGAZINE
News, sports and weather, plus
GENERIC REVIEW, analysis of current affairs and special features.
4:00 am    Sign-Off
1 FEEE BUB6ER
TCE-X-C-E • L • L • EThTD ^r r
H E    EAT E RY
16
THE GOOD DEAL IS your
least expensive burger is
free when two are ordered.
This applies to beef and tofu
burgers only, and isn't valid
for take-out or any other
coupon.
Enjoy your burg &
have a nice day!
DISCORDER
l33@(<g£§) ON THE BOULEVARD
ha'n and suntanning co.
SUNTANNING
10 SESSIONS        20 SESSIONS **
$39   $69 ^
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ALSO AVAILABLE 1 BED WITH SPECIAL
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HAIR STYLING
20% Discount
on any hair care services
with Robert
5784 University Blvd.        Ph. 224-1922
(in UBC Village) 224-9116
Valid with presentation of this ad        Expires Aug. 31, 1986 WEEKEND HIGHLIGHTS
SATURDAYS
EARLY MUSIC SHOW
7:30-10:00 am
Have breakfast to music from the Medieval,
Renaissance and Baroque periods, played on
strange and exotic instruments. With host
Paul Smith.
NEOFILE
Noon-4:00 pm
A rundown of the newest, most exciting and
insipid releases raked in during the week at
CITR. Join music directors and charismalep-
tic hosts Don Chow and Kevin Smith for an
eclectic musical pig-out, with occasional interviews, live mixes, and peripheral relevance.
PROPAGANDA!
6:30-9:00 pm
An eclectic mix of interviews, reviews, music,
humour, High Profiles, and other features
with Mike Johal.
09 Aug. Interview with The Jazz Butchers,
7 p.m.
16 Aug.  High Profile: The SORDIDE
SENTIMENTALE record label.
23 Aug. Interview with Blixa Bargeld of
Einsturzende Neubauten, 8 p.m.
30 Aug. High Profile: Front 242
Drama: Starting on Aug. 9th, 7:20 p.m., a
broadcast in four parts of the recording of
the hit Broadway play Ma Rainey's Black
Bottom, a sharp-witted and funny story of a
group of black American singers and blues-
men in 1930's-40's Chicago. Tune in to CITR
for more details.
Features: Aug. 2, 16 & 30, Today In History,
AEIOU—Policical humour by the Artists
Educational Iconoclastic Organization
(Un)Limited.
TUNES 'R' US
Late night 1:00-4:00 am
Music, Music, Music, Handyman Bob, Music,
Music, My Favorite Album, Music, Music,
Experimental To Classical, Teddy Kelowna
presents, and yes more music.
SUNDAYS
MUSIC OF OUR TIME
8:00 am-Noon
Talk about opening a can of worms. The
month-long concentraton on Canadian
classical music has expanded to fill all
available time. Special features will include
the centennial opera Louis Re/7, by Harry
Somers and hopefully a listen to the music
and words of some up-and-coming Vancouver
composers. With your hosts Tyler Cutforth
and Paul Smith.
ROCKERS SHOW
Noon-3:00 pm
The best in Roots, Rock, Reggae, DJ and
Dub. With your hosts George Family Man
Barrett, Collin Hepburn and Bruce James.
03 Aug.  LP feature—Michael Palmer Sweet
Daddy
10 Aug.   LP feature—Nitty Gritty Turbo
Charged
17 Aug.  Byron Lee and the Dragonaires
Soca Music
24 Aug.  Bunny Wailer in LA
31 Aug.   LP feature Echo/Minnot Lazy Body
MICHAEL WILLMORE'S ROCK TALK
3:006:00 pm
Authentic Rock 'N' Roll from the 1950s and
1960s featuring many collectors' items and
rock rarities you'd never hear anywhere else.
SUNDAY NIGHT LIVE
7:00-9:00 pm
Hosts StuArt and Gunter S. Thompson bring
you mostly locally recorded great, or soon to
be great bands, in their purest form, LIVE!
Technical expertise provided by Peter C.
03 Aug. Jazzmanian Devils
10 Aug.  Camper Van Beethoven
17 Aug.   Echo & the Bunnymen
24 Aug.  New Order
37 Aug.  TBA (another great band)
FAST FORWARD
9:00 pm-1:00 am
Mark Mushet searches the world over for
experimental, minimalist, avant-garde, electronic, and other non-mainstream sounds.
LIFE AFTER BED
1 am-4 am
The return of the nightmare from the people
you're parents warned you about. Ugly radio
has returned. Warn your avocados.
Floyd's Corner—Country and Western with
Jeff G. Starts at 2:00 a.m.
Vancouver Posters
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AUGUST  1986      17 TOP AIRPLAY ALBUMS
54-40
RAMONES
MOJO NIXON & SKID
ROPER
HUSKER DU
BEAT FARMERS
CAMPER VAN
BEETHOVEN
LETS ACTIVE
BUTTHOLE SURFERS
VARIOUS ARTISTS
MINUTEMEN
TUXEDOMOON
PETER GABRIEL
THE WIPERS
SCREAMING BLUE
MESSIAHS
SONIC YOUTH
LAURIE ANDERSON
SMACK
CHRIS HOUSTON
SIOUXSIE & THE
BANSHEES
ROBOTIKS
54-40
Animal Boy
Frenzy
Candy Apple Grey
Van Go
II & III
Big Plans for Everybody
Rembrandt Pussy Horse
Vhutemas Archetypi
3 Way Tie For Last
Ship of Fools
So
Land of the Lost
Gun-Shy
Evol
Home of the Brave
Rattlesnake Bite
Hate Filled Man
Tinderbox
My Computer's Acting Strange!
THE WOODENTOPS
BOLERO LAVA
THE THE
D.O.A.
LOVE & ROCKETS
TOP AIRPLAY SINGLES
Good Thing
Move a Groove
Sweet Bird of Truth
Billy & the Socreds
Kundalini Express
REPRISE/WEA
SIRE/WEA
RESTLESS
WBA/VEA
CURB/MCA
RGH. TRD. (US)
I.R.S./MCA
RRE
SIDE EFFECTS
SST
RESTLESS
GEFFEN/WEA
RESTLESS
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PINK DUST
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734-2922 ®®yO
VERDICT
Michel Lemieux
Lemieux
Polygram
"Romance for you is tried and tested
We don't want to be in love any more
You can see too much trouble in store
When sentiments start to complicate
You only want to make looooove
without: Romantic Complications..."
AND WITH THAT BEAUTIFULLY SAR-
castic vocal swoon on "looooove," you get
the feeling that Monsieur Lemieux is taking
a little swipe at the popular notions of "free
love" that grew out of the late sixties (you
know, looooove with no ties, looooove with no
demands, looooove with no obligations)—and,
I suppose, in our present social climate of
latent cynicism with respect to anything even
hinting at permanence, such conservatism
has a refreshing air of rebelliousness. Who
would have thought it?
"Romantic Complications," which opens
this debut album, is, without a doubt, the outstanding track. It's so good in fact, that we get
three versions of it.
Michel Lemieux is a performance artist: one
of those artists who attempt to integrate visual,
musical, and theatrical elements into a unified
whole. It's complicated business—both artistically and economically. For the most part, I
think Lemieux has been successful as far as
the art is concerned; which is to say that I
don't think his work reflects any domination
of one medium over another. They all balance
and mesh with each other. Those who have
seen his videos and live performances would
probably agree with this. Of course, there is
a problem with a multi-media performance:
once it's put on vinyl you lose all the visual
components, and, more often than not, the
music suffers without them.
But Lemieux's music avoids this pitfall because it has a certain "autonomy;" much the
same way as Laurie Anderson's Mister Heartbreak LP sounds more musically "autonomous" than her earlier Big Science.
For Lemieux, this translates into music with
an infectious beat and superb vocals. It
sounds like he pilfers a bit here and there from
(not surprisingly) Laurie Anderson and (dare
I say it) Malcolm McLaren. In fact, his music
is like a cross between these two influences:
the production is multi-faceted, crisp, and with
a good thump—it's best heard loud and preferably close to a dance floor.
What actually bothers me about this debut
is that for an album which has three versions
of one song, it still only manages a scant 22
minutes of music; I wonder if it's worth it-
even with a glossy fold-out cover. At least it
has the virtue of not boring the listener; which
in itself is a lot more than can be said of a lot
of releases these days. Just by the way: Michel
Lemieux is well worth catching live if you get
the chance.
—Ralph Synning
The Smiths
The Queen is Dead
Rough Trade/Sire
UNFORTUNATELY OR NOT, THE SMITHS
are back (with their third album, that is).
Well, superlatives usually fail when trying to
describe them anyway. Huge expectations
have been put upon the Smiths for this record
and they haven't let down at all.
Johnny Marr's trademark guitar is of course,
all there, but his talents as a writer/arranger/
producer have broadened considerably. He
and the band draw on and bring off a variety
of musical styles including a straight rockabilly country tune ("Vicar in a Tutu"), a Northern English music hall style, working-class
popular song ("Frankly, Mr. Shankly"), a beautiful lilting ballad in 6/8 time ("I Know It's
Over") and more.
Morrissey shows that he is still one of the,
if not the best lyricist in popular music, and
even those who have in the past found him
too "depressing" may find something to smile
at. On the chaotic title song, about the decaying state of English society, Morrissey imagines: "her very Lowness with her head in a
sling/I'm truly sorry—but it sounds like a
wonderful thing." "Cemetery Gates" is a very
bright song about "borrowing" lines from
others (something which Morrissey freely
does) encased in a story about visiting a
cemetery and "gravely" reading tombstones:
A dreaded sunny day/So let's go where we're
happy and I'll meet you at the cemetery gates/
Keates and Yeats are on your side but you
lose, 'cause Wilde is on mine."
The Smiths are masters at creating and
conveying a mood within one song, as most
powerfully expressed on "There is a Light and
it Never Goes Out." Marr's string arrangement
is exquisite, soaring and gushing over a classic Morrissey lyric: "And if a double-decker
bus crashed into us/To die by your side, such
a heavenly way to die...To die by your side, well
the pleasure and the privilege is mine."
This is the Smiths in their element and
they're consistently there on this record—it's
the essence of their appeal. If you ever (or
always) feel maudlin or melancholy, then the
Smiths are just the right thing.
—Mike Harding
My Dad Is Dead
...And He's Not Gonna Take
It Any More
IT'S ONE OF THOSE MORNINGS. YOU'RE
feeling all too much the effects of yet
another broken promise to never drink that
much again. What time did you get to bed?
Four, or was it five in the a.m.? No matter-
it's nine o'clock now and the phone is ringing.
One...two...five...eight...SHUT UP! I'm not
going to answer you! eleven...twelHELLO!
"Hi. This is Wendy. Is my car ready yet?"
(Take a deep breath now.) "No. You have the
wrong number."
"Sorry."
Stupid asshole. Oh well, try to get back to
sleep.
Ten-thirty. One...two...seven...HELLO!
"So, you're up."
"No I'm not."
"Oh, a little testy today. What is it? Hangover?"
"Yes. Does it show?" (asshole)
"What are you doing today?"
"Avoiding you and everyone who looks like
you."
"Well, to hell with you."
"Good idea!" (If you can't treat your friends
like that, what good are they?)
No point in going back to bed now. The pattern for the day is set. Some day off this is.
Only thing to do now is crack open a brown,
light up a smoke and play My Dad Is Dead
as loud as possible.
It is the experience of this reporter that the
only sure cure for one of "those days" is this
solo effort by Mark Edwards (titled ...AndHe's
Not Going To Take It Any More). This is not
another too too clever attempt by art students
to shock the world by using the word DEAD
in their name. This is the truth. His dad is
AUGUST  1986      19 Records
i 0FEO H3EET
HEADQUARTERS
AFRICAN • CARRIBEAN
LATIN • BLUES • JAZZ
FUNK • ETC.
251-6964
1317 Commercial Dr.
(4 blocks north of 1st Ave)
dead. Edwards has taken this fact, along with
several instruments, into his studio to tell the
world what it feels like.
The effect on the listener? No matter how
low you personally may feel that day, you will
find comfort in knowing there is still at least
one person on the planet more depressed
than you.
A warning to potential buyers of this work.
This is not a dance record. It will not get your
party hopping. It will not help you seduce your
date. It will not make your plants grow. Played
loudly enough, it could get you evicted. It will
get your roommate out of the house when you
want to be alone.
Listen to it from start to finish and you'll be
ready to face the world again (or at least make
coffee).
Is Mason on yet?
—Oral Dave
Spirit of the West
Tripping Up the Stairs
Stony Plain Records
TURN THE CLOCK BACK TO MAY 1985.
An ordinary midweek evening at the Railway Club. A frustrated aspiring DJ sits alone
near the stage, his only hope of a slot on CITR
is a Folk Show and all he has are two Richard Thompson LPs, a badly recorded tape of
The Pogues, The Men They Couldn't Hang
and some bloke called Christy Moore. On
came Spirit of the West to blow away all the
9-to-5 office drudgery cobwebs and remind
me of the folk rock explosion of the 70s when
I'd spent many a similar intoxicated evening
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20     DISCORDER
in the North Staffordshire Poly Bar, listening
to the likes of Fairport Convention and the JSD
Band. So, Vancouver had its own excellent
Celtic folk rock band...
Much has happened to them since then.
Their first LP has just received its third pressing and they have blazed a happy trail from
Vancouver Island to Winnipeg.
So now we have a follow-up to the debut LP.
This time Paul 'Watney' Hyde, Payola$' front
man, has stepped in to do the production. It's
a tough job trying to capture the band's infectious enthusiasm on vinyl, but he's built on all
their strengths and the result is pretty good.
"Tripping Up the Stairs" is the name of the
jig which opens the album as the intro to 'An
Honest Gamble" (which has been on the
CITR spinlist for six months now), but it also
seems to conjure up an appropriate image for
this band. An upturned beer bottle and a
broken guitar string would be a great motif;
it is to their credit that whatever may go wrong
on stage, they get through with a smile and
a new way to present the song that makes you
feel it was all planned that way.
The 10 songs are all original compositions,
interspersed with the occasional traditional
piece, and most are about such intrinsically
British Columbian phenomena as the plight
of evicted tenants, flooding in the Pemberton
Valley, and the aromatic joys of life in a pulp
mill town.
"Our Station" is about the Railway Club and
features an insistent bodhran-driven beat and
a wonderful chorus:
Meet me tonight and I'll buy the first round
I know a little place that you might not have
found
It looks down on the city from the underground
This is our station in the heart of town.
"Room Without a View" tells the sorry tale
of an elderly tenant evicted and forced to
resort to the Food Bank as her only means
of survival. "The Crawl" is the North Van
drinking anthem and features some excellent
bouzouki work from J. Knutson.
Other familiar songs for SOTW devotees are
"The Mists of Crofton," about the Crofton pulp
mill on Vancouver Island (with a great remix
of a tin whistle solo by Geoffrey Kelly), "Rivers
Rise," the B.C. annual flood song, and "Till
the Cows Come Home," the lament of the
trucker's wife.
My favourite track is "Homelands," which
opens with one of the catchiest of all Irish jigs,
"The Kesh Jig," and then recounts the problems of the Haida Indians faced with the prospect of having their last outpost of native forest
torn away from them.
We took their land, dilute their nation
Forced them on to reservations
Corporate interest won't stop there
Take the trees and leave this homeland
bare.
John Mann's voice, customarily forceful, is
tastefully restrained here, and the "up" feeling of the jig adds to the subtle masking of
this powerful song.
The new LP is released on August 8th by
Stony Plain Records, backed by the considerable distribution power of RCA. With your
help these guys won't need Gary Cristall's
blessing...
—Steve Edge DEMO DERBY
The Spores
"Expo in B.C."
THIS IS A great takeoff of the Sex Pistols'
"Anarchy in the UK." Unltke their companions
on the Expo Hurts Everyone 7", Rhythm Activism, The Spore's new lyrics are hilarious and
pointed. This is one of my favorite Expo
songs—the best line: "Is this the PNE?"
A Merry Cow
"Honey Don't"
"HONEY DON'T" is a great upbeat pop-song
by one of Vancouver's better bands. This effort doesn't suffer from the bad production that
its predecessor, "Look Around" does. The
result? A better idea of how the female lead
singer's voice is and how likeable A Merry
Cow's sound is. If you get a chance, see them
live.
Twenty Four Gone
"Water"
"WATER" SOUNDS like it was heavily influenced by bands like the old Cure, but without
keyboards and a slightly more positive outlook
on life. This is not exactly curl-up-with-a-razor-
blade music, but it isn't My-girl-wants-to-party-
all-the-time either. Big heavy drums and big
heavy basslines are the distinctive features of
this song, which, frankly, I find quite boring.
This Fear
"Look Along the Edge"
MAYBE IF this band looked over, or better yet,
jumped over the edge, this would be a better
song. This fear sounds like my little brother,
with a deeper voice, let loose on one of those
huge department store organs, the kind with
violins, a steady drumbeat, and lots of neat-o
noises.
Rhythm Activism
"Tyranosaurus Wrexpo"
IT'S LATE and I have a headache. This song
didn't make me feel any better about Expo.
In fact, it reminded me that the only place still
open with a stock of 222s is Save-On Foods.
Witty aphorisms about Expo begin and end
with the title of this song. The rest of the lyrics
are overcooked slogans shaked and baked
into a theme of "Wrexpo" crushing everything
in its path except for the rebels. I guess the
song is meant to encourage prudential rebelliousness. Anyway, the song sounds a bit like
the Residents with awful lyrics.
Industrial Waste Banned
"Paranoid? You Should Be"
WHILE I HAVE never particularly enjoyed IWB
musically, I have always been very interested
in what they have to say politically. That's why
I didn't really like this track. I couldn't for the
life of me make out what the band had to say.
And I always thought the point of IWB was
their lyrics.
Bruised and Stupid
"Guns, Liquor, 24 Hours"
OKAY. NEVER judge a book by its cover, or
a band by its name. I was expecting anything
from demolition rock to hardcore, but "Guns,
Liquor, 24 Hours" is melodic, with lots of sensitive guitar. I really like this song, but I think
that it could be better if the production was
cleaned up.
—Julia
DIRECT FROM BRAZIL
n pete**
° *»«* Djavan
si*
»ral<»o Oo
Wlo«te
DIRECT IMPORT
2936 W. 4th Ave.  734-2328
AUGUST  1986     21 The Roving Ear
This Month from Montreal  c
RORY, ADJUSTING HIS TIE-DYED
drawstrings, wants to go to Africa to
live with a tribe that has no language.
His proposal is greeted with rolling smiles.
The late afternoon sunlight is licking red and
green triangles across the kitchen walls. Leopold, black, white and shivering—scratches
at the kitchen window.
"Roll another one," says David, "I'll let the
little bugger in." Tom Waits continues his unshaven mutterings from the other side of the
sink. A long sighing pause follows as we
change postures, watching the rituals through
watery eyes.
The old Portuguese gentleman is in his
familiar position on the second floor balcony
across the street, his beige hat over his forehead, a sausage cigar protruding from beneath the brim. An ample belly parts his black
suspenders. "I say, gentlemen, but he looks
more like a retired fisherman.''
"Salute," he calls, rolling his cigar and exposing yellow teeth. We know he's Portuguese
but are flattered to know he thinks we're Que-
becers. On the balcony above his giggling
grandsons peer down at us through a pair of
binoculars. We poke out our tongues. David
flashes a peace sign and we head for the
park.
In the square the sun is setting. The leaves .
are back, swathing everything and everyone
in green. Lady Di and Bill flutter in the wind,
their grins frozen on the cover of La Presse.
Around the empty fountain the games of sack
are getting intense, cut-offs and tempers fray
and screams of blasphemy punctuate the air.
We lounge on a park bench, tapping two-
toned toes to "The Harlem Shuffle" as it blasts
from a passing Datsun, waiting for the night.
The bums next door are loud, gesticulating
crazily as they give us a swig of sweet, warm
beer from a paper bag.
Of course, they want something in return.
We give them some change. Rory doesn't
think they're going to spend it on the Metro.
We weren't either, so we rise and cross the
grass to the corner store.
Down on St. Denis it's just warm enough
to drink on the sidewalk. White legs and tables
slow the evening pedestrians to a crawl. Now
we're cruising, secretly blessing the inventor
of gel, throwing sly glances at the femmes
fatales posed around their glasses and ashtrays. Into the Saint Sulpice, black and
smokey, a sea of stares and earrings bordered
by mirrors on three sides and a curving bar
on the other.
"Too cool to breathe," snickers Rory as we
grope for a table. "The first round's on me."
Our voices join in the babble, calling to be
heard above the bass beat that makes the furniture tremble and send the bottles dancing across the table top.
Beers later, up the stairs and back into the
fresh darkness of the street, swallowed by the
carnivorous night and its streetlamp fangs.
"Hashshsh, coke, acid," hisses a rocker
from a murky pose astride a bench. From his
glaring eyes to the staggering traffic and
south, towards the river and the brick and
neon of hookerland.
"Why do I get the feeling," I wonder out
loud, one foot after the other, head wandering, "sometimes, that we are few who notice?"
The dubious replies are lost in the evening
din.
Les Foufounes Electriques is a loud and
angry disco which sits above a street of strip
clubs and diners. We enter through an alley,
crumbling door frames and cigarette butts
held together by a dark scaffolding of fire
escapes. It is black in atmosphere, the stairs
are steep, boots are in and the paintings glow
their horrific grins. From the open windows
comes Vancouver: "got, to, assimilate, got, to,
annihilate." My dictionary of Quebecois slang
tells me that "foufoune" means "buttock." We
start to wiggle ours, diving into the spasmic
dancefloor and daring, now and then, to exchange smiles.
Enter unannounced the smoked-meat cowboy, the Montreal cop, blue-bellied and suspicious, an open-holstered Colt threatening
from a generous ryp. He is, like all of us,
ignored.
"Onward, onward," bleats Rory, and down
we go, pushing past the propositions along
the interminable sidewalk they call St. Catherine. We find the stranded auto and pile in,
fumbling among the nameless cassettes as
the engine rises to its wobbly feet. I manage
to find the Stooges and jam it in the deck—
"I've been dirt...But I don't care...I've been
hurt...But I don't care..."
"Off with that crap," screeches Rory, "let's
try and get the same station as the dude next
door." The dude eyes us, checks his look in
the rear-view and turns her up.
Left and left again, around the one-ways and
up a hurtling strip, away from the intoxicating
fervour of downtown. Suburbia is sleepy, dark
and quiet, rows of dreaming terrace houses
in the moonlight. We find an all-night bagel
joint, a corridor of flourescent light where the
post-disco crowd is putting off sleep over
cigarettes and tea. Our hairstyles and eyelids
are drooping.
"The time has come," decides David, "to
speak of many things." We try, but fatigue is
winning.
In the still apartment the night must end
snuggled beneath a mountain of quilts with
the window open just a crack. My mind is full
of catchy tunes and flashing lights, washed
away by sleep, warm and painless.
—Scott Steedman
6Hff.C«UTr.
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22      DISCORDER •*r
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\   HAPPY HOUR 7'?0-9O0   >ft» mfr »fr nfr »|fr »
1 MON0AY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY        THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY 1
-■- T*m e;    EDMONTONS'     Rl 7
B3P
C      EDMONTONS'      6
AND   THE SONS  OF
RYTHM  ORCHESTRA
B-SIDES
8
11
JAZZMANIAN   DEVILS
th guests       IO "
BRILLIANT ORANGE
7 <->
big medicine
WITH GUESTS
Wl I n uucoio
HERALDJUX
j
301
j A CANADIAN NEW MUSIC FESUV/\l
special events
18-Fools Crow, Itsa Skitsa
19-Full Moon Howl (poetry, music;
20-Shadowy Men, Thi» Fear, Fool» Crow
21-Tulpa, This Fear, JR Gone Wild
22-Shuffle Demons, I.B.S.
23-Shuffle Demons, Lone Stars
25-Amoeba Quiche, Beach Mutants, Shadow Project
26-Sheep Look Up, I.B.S., Beach Mutants
27-Monuments Galore, October Game, Vox Violins
28-Monuments Galore, October Game, Active Joy
29-Sheep Look Up. Idyl Tea, Misery Goats
30-Sheep Look Up, Idyl Tea, Misery Goats
^SUNDAY
i7th ciE£u*«*-iB'
24th.   CI.RA-Ca
Lone Star*
Vox Vto«n»
Sheep Look Up
y^^C^^^^^.^4^^^^
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