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Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) 1988-08-01

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 August 88 free*
THAT MAGAZINE  FROM  CiTR FM  102
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That Magazine from CITR FM 102
AUGUST 1988*ISSUE #67
EDITOR Kevin Smith
ASSISTANT EDITOR David Finnan
WRITERS Lachlan Murray, Guy Bennett,
Mike Harding, Jerome Broadway, Pat
Carroll, Rob Lorenz, Mark Mushet, Lloyd
Uliana, John Frymire, Matt Richards, Becky
Scott
ART DIRECTOR Marty George
ARTISTS Michael Fraser, William Thompson, Therese Hartwig, Gregory Zbitnew
PHOTOGRAPHERS Kim Clarke, Mandel
Ngan(Cover)
PRODUCTION MANAGER Michael Grigg
LAYOUT BY Teresa Cole, Randy Iwata,
Shirley Soo, Pat Carroll
PROGRAM GUIDE BY Kathryn Hayashi
TYPESETTERS Barb Wilson, Alex Johnson,
Ken Zupan, AMS Desktop Publishing Dept.
ADVERTISING MANAGER Matt Richards
ACCOUNTS AND SUBSCRIPTION GUY
Randy Iwata
DISTRIBUllON MANAGER John Frymire
PUBLISHER Harry Hertscheg
Discorder Magazine
c/o CiTR - UBC Radio
Student Union Building
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 2A5
(604) 228 3017
Discorder is That Magazine from CiTR
FM 102 It's published monthly by the
Student Radio Society of the University
of British Columbia. It's printed in
Surrey, Canada. Discorder Magazine prints
what it wants to, but pledges to (try and)
put the CiTR On The Dial program guide
and SpinList record chart in every issue.
It also vows to circulate 17,500 copies
by the first of each month. Twelve-month
subscriptions are $12 in Canada, $12(US)
in the States, $20(CDN)elsewhere. Make
money orders or cerified cheques payable
to Discorder Magazine. All written, drawn
or photographed contributions are welcome.
But don't expect to get anything back.
Office hours for CiTR, Discorder and the
CiTR Mobile Sound Rental are
Monday-Friday, 10am-4pm. Please call then. The
number is 228-3017. For the News/Sports Room,
call 224-4320. But if you want to talk to the DJ, call
228-2487 or 228-CiTR.
7 EMOTIONALLY
DEVASTATING:ARCHIE SHEPP
AND HORACE PARLAN
Raw Emotion Fused with Consumate
Artistry
9    SINGLE-LIFE
A Story
12    DISSIDENTEN
Uve Mullrich Speaks and Speaks
16   WILLIAM S. BURROUGHS
Guns, Drugs and Jimmy Stewart
19   ART BERGMANN
Local Rocker Makes Good?
4    AIRHEAD
readers who write
5   IT'S TRUE
and it's happening
22   UNDER REVIEW
peter murphy, wire, spirit of the west
and more
23    PROFILE
frontline assembly
26   LOCAL MOTION
in a city near you
28   ON THE DIAL
every person's guide to citr
29    SPINLIST
the hipper sounds AIRHEAD
c/o CITR
•138 SUB Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C
VST 2A5
PETTY, BORING CRITICS AND MCDONALD'S
RADIO
Dear Communist International Terrorist Ring:
Attention: Airhead,
Are you trying to fuck up my mind by playing
so many things at once, or are you people just so
afraid of being offensive that you must stoop to
ambiguity. Five thousand angry folks saying
"Fuck" is "rah-bah-bah", but one, just one, is
enough to mean something. If you have something to say, say it and don't be chicken shits.
Much better to bum in hell than be a mediocrity
lizard.
Next up is Bill Mullan's review of the Beat-
nigs. Don't be afraid to say "buy it". Is there some
kind of protocol up there in the black tower that
says it's not hip to tell someone to spend money on
something? Or is it fear? See what I mean? Pasteurized, homogenized. Toss off the MSG's and
stop being McDonald's radio.
Finally, to Tom Anselmi: are you an immobilized stagnant little fuckhead or what? If you see
a problem with the "scene" why don't you stop
being a "stupid, petty, boring" critic and get off
your ass and do something about it? It's impossible to be a martyr to something you' re no longer
a part of - it's pathetic instead.
Boy, I'm spent. Gimme a cheeseburger.
Sincerely,
Godfreld V. Noosebeyer
We soundly deny any connection between CUR or
Discorder and McDonald's Corp., financial or
otherwise. It is merely a coincidence that this
month's issue contains an upclose and personal
article on the happy-go-lucky corporate clown
Ronald McDonald. Mere coincidence.
NEO MORTE TALKS BACK
Dear Airhead,
(Re: Janis McKenzie)
I thought your article "Local Motion" warranted a response from "Neo Morte". My name is
Cormac, the bass player and part time singer. It's
very true when I think about it that our demo tape
would appear one-sided. Possibly sexist, because
of the titles of three of the songs. I can't speak for
the song "Princess Die" as I am not responsible
for writing it Dandon John the singer of it wrote
it. I can't say that I can say anything good about
4 DISCORDER
her though. I did write the song "Shirley McLame/
The New Nonsense" and it's not really so much
about her but what she advocates that is being
questioned. It's an intelligent song and if one
reads the lyrics and compares what I say to one of
her books one can appreciate what is being said in
the song. "Molly Ringwald's Cunt" was written
by Nik Normal (sing/guitar). I personally would
title it differently, but it does make reactionary
types spew verbal garbage until they realize that
the song is about her exploiters. Its lyrics contain
other pop movie stars both male and female
whose only contribution they are allowed to make
is showing their attributes or shallow lines spoken. Just to show fairness we do have songs about
"creepy guys" (to coin a phrase). On our cassette
"30 Minute Workout" we have a song in particular "Stop Strip Searching" which is about the
events which happen in the North of Ireland to
women republican prisoners. It shows them to be
powerful and resistant to a male- dominated prison
system. I write this letter not to put you down nor
do I disregard your statements. But only to make
sure the general public does not take our song
titles as sexist or ignorant and we believe that the
women's struggle is important And our songs
aren't written for shock value.
Thanx,
Cormac (The Relentless)
DRINK LOTS
Dear Airhead,
On July 8, two friends and I went to see the
Jazzmanian Devils at the Roxy on Granville. I had
heard that the Devils were good and that the Roxy
was not since it took over the Venue. I decided to
risk it and in both cases, what I had heard was true.
The Devils played with style and energy.
However, after their first set they left the stage
saying "Drink lots." I have chosen not to drink
alcohol in clubs for a number of reasons, and I also
know enough to expect and ignore the average
alcohol sales pitch in clubs.
What I don't expect and cannot ignore is to be
discriminated againstfor that decision. My friends
and I arrived early enough to get a table, paid our
five dollar cover charges, endured the Roxy's
tasteless decor, endured a pushy waitress.and listened to the Devils pushing drinks. After the first
set we were asked for the proper identification
because we were not drinking. What's more, if
we did not start drinking, we would not be allowed
to sit at the table, we would have to stand, despite
the fact that we paid the cover charge. This,
according to the waitress, is the Roxy's policy.
Nowhere else in this city have my friends or I
experienced such discrimination on the basis of
choosing not to drink. Rather than argue the
Roxy's policy, we walked out. We are now writing letters of protest We understand that clubs
must sell alcohol to earn a profit, and that cover
charges are meant to equalize the gap between
drinking and non-drinking customers (as does the
high price for non-alcoholic drinks). We were not
aware a cover charge does not allow equal service
for all customers at the Roxy. The treatment we
received in the Roxy was rude and unfair.
I suggest to any present and future Jazzmanian
Devils fans that they wait for a show anywhere
else in the city. As for people who have chosen not
to drink and enjoy the club scene, when you are
discriminated against, don't keep silent! Bands
will play at better clubs, and the boycotts by
drinking friends have meaning.
Christine Cosby
SUBSCRIPTIONS
Dear Mr. Subscription Man Randy,
I am seriously considering liposuction for my
brain. I bet you never thought I'd still be in
Bonnyville. I never thought I'd still be in Bon- w
nyville. (You think you have problems with fascists.) After a year of pretending to be a science
student at university, I'm at home re-evaluating
my decidedly uncool existence. DISCORDER
SAVES! Please renew my subscription so I may
breath, sleep and eat the word of Discorder. Amen.
I'll stop by later this summer on my annual
pilgrimage to Vancouver to say Hi. Until then, W
take care. Bye
Love & Peace
Lorrl
Dear Discorder,
Imagine my relief when on page 18 of the July
issue I discovered that even here in British A
Columbia's north, That Magazine from CiTR
could be obtained. I have lived here for six months
and although the camping and hiking is terrific, I
miss the urban qualities of life in a city. For
example, I am getting a little sick of The Movie
Theatre here - how long can Rambo IQ be held
over? With only one theatre, each day becomes a
higher form of movie melodrama — £
With anxious eyes the Terrace
throng gathered and read the Tillicum
Theatre marquee only to discover with
horror that it was the same movie!
It was held over!
It was long!
It was stupid!
It was ... *
THE MOVIE THAT WOULD NOT END!
Video is the saving grace and stereo video is
akin to the Second Coming. Only one small problem - video stores up here think alternative film
means pornography, which I suppose can be cool
at times -or should I say hot - but it doesn't always
fill the void. Don't get me wrong. Life in Terrace
is swell, isn't it Beaver? But there are things I A
miss. Discorder is one of them - but not for long!
One thing is for sure, no magazine printed up here
uses the word fuck.
I expect you'll here from me again,
Richard
P.S. Does anybody really know where Terrace
is?! f
Yes, like Lorri and Richard, you too can have
meaning brought back into your life through a
subscription to God's own Discorder. Twelve
month subscriptions are $12 in Canada, $12(US)
in the States, and $20(CDN) elsewhere.
TOURISTS AND PHOTOGRAPHY
Dear Airhead,
Society is pissing me off. People should be able
to differentiate between a tourist and a local. Just
because a camera is in my hands doesn't mean I'm
a tourist Two alternative-seeking teenagers by
themselves, both holding cameras and taking
pictures of alley decor is a far cry from Supernatural British Columbia. Can I help it if I love f
photography? Another problem: I'm scared to be
taken as a tourist because tourists get so much
behind-the-back crap from us locals. Instead of
fleeing from the scene of a pair of hands embracing a Nikon, give them something to shoot at and
remember.
Sincerely,
You only live once. m P.S. Two contradictory words? I think I know an
"oxymoron" if I see one: Samantha Fox.
NEGATIVITY?
The following is a copy of a letter from David
Marsden of the CBC sent to John Ruskin in
response to John's letter which includeda copy of
his article Audition For Stardom from the July
issue. Audition For Stardom dealt with John's
experience of auditioning for the new CBC program focusing on things concerning and of interest to young people being produced by Mr.
Marsden.
Although John was not chosen for the show,
Paula the Sex Goddess was.
Dear John,
Thank your for your letter of Best Wishes for
our new show. You said in that letter 'I hope I
haven't upset you.'
The answer is that you haven't You have
however, given me concern over your negativity.
I sincerely hope that you don't perceive the print
media as a vehicle where negative becomes the
door to success.
When we opened our doors and invited all to
come to our audition I was proceeding with a very
positive motivation. My hope was to find a group
of people who could represent our show and their
friends. Not every person applying can be successful in getting on the show. But everyone had
an equal chance.
Mr. Sid Kozak is a professional and he does
know what he is doing. I value and trust his input
totally.
Incidentally, through our show you will see
many people who have never been on television
before. You will also see a lot of music and ideas
not normally given any notice by other programs.
Please try and stay positive, and give us a chance
to try something different
All the best to you in the future whatever you
may wish it to be.
Incidentally, I don't know of anyone who has
a 'CBC voice', except perhaps the late Lome
Greene.
Thank you,
David Marsden
Executive Producer
"Pilot One"
IT'S TRUE
Yes, It's true. Despite the demise of The
Savoy, Shindig will again rear it's ugly head. It
will be happening at The Railway beginning on
the 12th of September. Interested bands should
get their demos into Linda Scholten c/o CiTR
A.S.A.P. Continuing on the topic of contests —
How near is near? How far is far? If you know the
answers to these questions you could win a show
broadcast from your very own home. Check out
the CONTEST details on page 20.
Discorder is looking for contributions of
artwork, writing (fiction or non-fiction; music or
non-music related), photos (music or non-music
related),etc. Discorder also needs help with other
vital areas including layout, proofreading, and
wordprocessing. You need not be a UBC student.
This magazine can be yours as much as it is ours.
Give a call to Mr. Ed (Kevin Smith) at 228-3017.
PAY ONLY ONE DOLLAR!
with the presentation of this coupon. Limit one coupon per
customer, to see HILARIOUS IMPROVISATIONAL
comedy with the
THEATRESPORTS GANG!
Offer good Wednesday and Thursday only 8:00 pm
Regular admission $6. Phone 688-7013
Offer expires August 25/88
Back Alley Theatre, 751 Thurlow
JAJ 1915549
August 1988 THE TOWN PUMP
BB OJU SIR [ II G IL S 1 OH N 6 8 3 6 6 9 5
t
MONDAY   AUGUST 22
MB UK 3       with special guests
CO
TIPKFTQ     VTC/CBO & all usual outlets as well as Zulu, Black Swan,
I IWrfVC I O     Highlife and Track Records. CHARGE BY PHONE 280-4444
A TIMBRE PRODUCTION
t EMOTIONALLY
DEVASTATING:
ARCHIE
SHEPP AND
HORACE
PARLAN
.w
hen they said saxophonist
Archie Shepp was an emotionally overwhelming musician they weren't joking.
Sunday, July 3 marked the final night of the
Jazz Festival and a sellout audience for the
Shepp/Parian show at VECC. However, the
show didn't stay full for long. After completing his first two numbers - "Swing Low
Sweet Chariot" and "Go Down Moses"- about
£ a dozen or so people scurried for the doors. In
this writer's opinion these were people who
just couldn't take it Raw emotion fused with
consummate artistry can make a few among
us squeamish. Shepp and Parian exposed
delicate nerve ends, and the result was magnificent.
a Shepp and pianist Horace Parian have
been working on and off as a duo for almost
ten years. Shepp, the better known of the
two, has worked within an amazing variety
of jazz settings. He has played in small bop
combos, in large aggregations involving
African influences and plenty of free playing, and in this duo he has returned to the
™ earliest sources of black American and Afro-
American music. These musical roots stem
from the enslavement of black Africans in
America and grew both inside the church and
out in the fields. From spirituals and "reels"
came the modern equivalents of gospel and
the blues.
0 t is in no way a negative comment on Horace
Parian's superb musianship if he has escaped
I the attention of the average music lover.
He himself articulated the problem best
during an interview after the show:' 'Jazz,
of course, has always been a neglected art-
<£ form. It has not gotten the support, generally
speaking, of the media. Let's face it, this
music is Afro- American music. It was created by black people, and I feel that the media
has chosen not to support it for that reason,
actually, and anything that they can't control, normally they try to suppress." The
a bottom line, both Shepp and Parian make
clear, is racism.
So it was probably with a sense of irony,
and certainly with a sense of history, that
Shepp and Parian took the stage to play in
front of a predominantly white audience.
And maybe it was because of this sense of
^ irony that Shepp wasted no time musically
nailing onlookers right between the eyes. I
felt like my insides were ready to cave in by
the end of the third "negro spiritual" he'd
performed-incredibly emotive, delicate blowing utilizing the circular or continuous breathing technique one associates with Rahsaan
Roland Kirk, and a brief patch of singing
like an anguished bellow in the great tradition of Bessie Smith and other Deep Southern blues and gospel singers. Much of the
audience must have been on the verge of
tears. I know I was.
Words can't really describe what Shepp
does, and records can only approximate the
live experience. But the closest parallel which
ran through my mind was that of Shakespearean tragedy. Shepp's playing on those first
three agonizing spirituals was akin to the
greatest of the playwright's soliloquies rendered in the most masterful fashion- catharsis of the highest order. It was almost too simultaneously painful and beautiful to endure.
And certainly there is more than a touch
of the theatrical in Shepp's blood. The two
musicians together give the appearance of a
set piece. Distinguished— looking in suits,
nodding solemnly to one another and, after
applause, to the audience, they moved with a
languorous majesty befitting their roles. They
conveyed grace and a seemingly effortless
elegance. When Shepp wasn't playing he
poured himself water from a jug sitting on a
small table, then sitting on a stool he presented his profile to the audience while Par-
Ian developed crystalline— and moody expressive lines at the keyboard, creating perfect undercurrents for the saxophone to ride
on when it reappeared. Shepp may not like
the word "art", as he believes it has a tendency to alienate, yet in its best sense, there
is no name more appropriate for what this
man is creating. At age 51 he is a giant at the
height of his creative, imaginative and technical powers.
Backstage Archie Shepp is more easygoing than his stage presence might
suggest He ranged over several topics. His experience as a lecturer of Black
Studies at the University of Massachusetts
was one of them: "I think that... it has its mo
ments. I enjoy talking, see, let's call it lecturing."
On theater:"Part of the problem in this whole
business is racism. The theater is a victim of
racism. I mean Blacks aren't able to really do
creative works unless they are re-creations...
of some other works, Sophisticated Lady,
Bubbling Brown Sugar, those kind of things,
or a re-creation of Fat Waller's work, or
Duke's work, which is important... but original black composers aren't allowed in my estimation to emerge and especially they are
not allowed to write for the theater. It's very
frustrating for a black person today to conceive anything outside the very limited narrow horizons that are prescribed for us by the
larger society."
Future plans: "I have written plays for the
theater and I'd like to write a really solid
musical because I think I have a flair for that,
and by now I think I have the experience to do
something really meaningful." And of course,
black music: "The music has so many implications. We try to point them out both in our
performance and in the brief presentations I
do before each song. Many people don't
know that black music has a history beyond
the United States. I'm influenced also outside my tradition. For example, this gentleman (Celso Machado) who played before me
plays a style of music which is also a part of
the African-American tradition. It just happens to come from South America. That
music impinges also very strongly... bears
very heavily on the music that's played in the
United States, especially if you consider
things like polyrhythm and blues scale and
falsetto voice-many things in common."
Shepp ended the interview on this note,"The
avenue should be open for people who are
talented to achieve on a quality basis commensurate with their talents, their abilities."
What more can I say besides urging
you to see Archie Shepp and
Horace Parian yourself, should
they return to Vancouver. The albums which
feature the two together are Trouble In
Mind and Goin' Home both on Steeplechase records and both quite different from
Shepp's earlier avant-garde work. For these
two men to have journeyed as far as they
have in one lifetime, with all the attendant
problems of being original black composers
and jazz musicians is rather staggering.
Lachlan Murray
"Where the science of nutrition meets
the art of ambience"
724/r/d™UfaM
GM 222-4444 far fiuwofav
August 1988 The Book $ Comic Emromum
Vancouver s largest Selection Of Almost New
And Used Taper Backs
0 general magazine hack issues including music
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"Furnished with all the typical Momsseyisms....Beethoven's Nephew flouts every convention
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FRI. AUG. 19 to THURS, AUG. 25
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separate admission required for each film • classification: TBA
Coming in August and September:
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Canada V6B ITS
682-6885 •w
hen Tim was a youngster he
dreamt of having awife.This
was long before he knew
anything about copulation
or taxes. A wife was just a safe place to go,
a home base, a resting place, a safe place.
When he overheard his mother talking about
a friend of hers who had lost a breast to
cancer, he dreamt of having a one-breasted
wife.
In his dream he would be typing at his
desk like his father, and this one-breasted
woman would sneak up behind him and wrap
her arms around his neck. She had black hair
and clear skin. The look on her face said that
she knew a lot. He would feel warm when
this happened and he wanted to stop his
typing and cuddle with the woman. He was
unable to do that, even in his dream.
About a year after this dream began he
got round to wondering why the woman had
only one breast. He figured that maybe he
wasn't too confident about himself, her being
damaged made it seem more plausible that
she could love him. He wasn't far wrong
with that line of thought.
As he entered adolescence the dream
became more erotic. They would lie in bed
together and he would kiss the hard surface
of skin where the missing breast was. She
would cry and tell him that no one had ever
done that before. Sometimes he had to kiss
her again and again between the shoulder
blades before she would remove her face
from the pillow and look at him.
It never occurred to him to share the
dream with anyone. It was something just for
himself.
As he entered manhood he kept his
eye out for one-breasted women
but ended up marrying a two-
breasted woman. She was a kindergarten
teacher; a plain, nervous girl, with thin brown
hair, fidgety hands and a ski-slope nose. She
cooked well and cared about her appearance.
She did everything she could do with her appearance but she was still quite plain. Not
distractingly plain mind you. It was nothing
you couldn't get used to.
Tim went to work in a warehouse, driving a forklift. After six months at the warehouse he joked that he would be working
there at the age of fifty, stuck in middle
management.
After six years he was still working in
the warehouse, still driving the forklift He
didn't joke about it anymore.
Tim and his wife had a child together,
a girl. They called her Lucy. The
child came in July so Tim's wife
was able to keep teaching in the fall. When it
came right down to it, when they figured it
out on paper, they needed both incomes.
They 'd bought a house at the peak of the real
estate market so they had a much bigger
mortgage than some of their friends who
owned fancier houses.
Tim kept driving the forklift At the insistence of his wife he went and asked his
boss for a promotion. He told the boss he had
coached a girls' soccer team all the way to a
August 1988       9 provincial championship. It seemed a silly
thing to trumpet in front of a warehouse boss,
but Tim's wife said it showed good management ability and a whole lot of other things
too.
The boss listened, first in dread, and
then gratefully, that he was being given this
chance to set things straight with Tim, to
inform him that he had no future with this
company - that to be considered for any kind
of promotion Tim would have had to perform his duties perfectly as a forklift driver,
whereas in fact Tim was a below average
forklift driver. He consistently damaged
merchandise and slotted things in the wrong
position.
Tim left the office considerably cheered.
He only had to be a better forklift driver and
they would promote him. During the afternoon coffee break, the reality of the conversation began to seep into him. He would
never be promoted in this company. He had
bio wn it by not being a good forklift driver in
the first place.
He stopped for a drink on the way home,
worrying about what to tell his wife. She
would be disappointed. She wouldn't shout
or get angry, but she would be disappointed.
He went home and told her the truth,
that he was a second rate forklift driver and
the company wasn't interested in promoting
him.
He was right She was disappointed.
She stopped sleeping with him. She stopped
cooking for him. She stopped talking to him.
When she finally left him, fleeing to her
mother's in Vermont with the Utile girl, it
was almost a relief.
Single life, thought Tim, can't be any
' worse than that
Tim gets naked in front of the mirror in
the bathroom.
"I've got twenty thousand a year and
good stomach muscles," says Tim to his own
reflection, "and that should be enough to get
me thoroughly fucked by every manner of
strange woman."
He goes to the bars. He blows his pay
cheque in the bars.
Two months pass by. Nothing. For the
first time in his life Tim is lonely. Reluctantly, he comes to believe that there is an
aura of failure about him; a fear, a smallness,
a lapse of confidence.
Tim decides to buy a woman, feeling
that this might shake the jinx. He
approaches a whore early one winter evening, conscious of his embarrassment
She is a buxom blonde with tiny blue eyes
and broad shoulders. She is wearing a blue
dinner jacket, a string of pearls, a white mini-
dress and long, white legs. She is more wholesome looking than you would expect; she
could be plausibly cast in a Kotex commercial - except for her eyes, which are like
stone.
She says, "Hey fella, do you want to get
10        DISCORDER	
naked and make love?"
"How much?" says Tim.
"Eighty-five for me, that's a blowjob
and good hard fuck. And twenty-five for the
room. A hundred and ten bucks for something you won't forget," says the whore.
"How about eighty bucks for everything?" says Tim.
"What are you talking about?" she says.
"How about dropping the price for me?"
says Tim.
"Why should I do that?" says the whore.
"I'm not a fat pig," says Tim.
"So what?" she says.
"I'm young, I'm good looking, it should
be cheaper for me."
The blonde kicks him viciously in the
shins.
Tim walks steadily in the other direction, balancing the weight on his legs to
avoid limping.
He phones Vermont His mother-in-law
answers the phone.
"It's late," she says.
"I know. How are you?" says Tim.
"It's late," she says.
"Can I talk to my wife. Is she there?"
"Why don't you call back in the morning?" says Tim's mother-in-law.
Tim sits at his kitchen table drinking
coffee. At five in the morning he makes
scrambled eggs and toast He feels alert for
the first time in weeks. He phones Vermont
His mother-in-law answers the phone.
"It's early," she says.
"I know," says Tim.
"Alright hang on," says Tim's mother-
in-law.
Tim stares from his kitchen window to
the street below. The cars move slowly
through thin fog with their headlights on.
"Yes?" says Tim's wife.
"It's me," says Tim.
"Yes," says Tim's wife.
"I want you back," says Tim.
"That's impossible," she says.
"Why's that?" says Tim.
"I have a lover here in Vermont" says
Tim's wife.
Tim says nothing.
"He's a lawyer - and he's in love with
me." says Tim's wife.
"I stayed up all night" says Tim.
"I'm sorry," she says.
"Well, that's okay," says Tim. "I mean
thafs Okay. How's thekid?"
"Fine."
"She misses me?" says Tim.
"She hasn't said anything," says Tim's
wife.
"I'm going to sell the house," says Tim.
Tim feels ill for four days. Penis soft
in the mornings. He goes to work,
buys his lunch from the lunch wagon,
eats alone on the packing crate; usually a
sandwich, a donut and a coffee.
Tim passes a lot of wind. He notices
with some interest that there is no odor to it
He has a recurring daydream in which one of
his co-workers comes up to him and says,
'Tim, you seem down — for God's sake *
come home and meet my family, have dinner
with us." Every few days the daydream features a different co-worker. When there are
no more co-workers to fantasize about he
begins to harden inside; the pain is unwanted
wisdom.
It is a cold rainy spring. Tim realizes      $■■
that he is rootless. "I can go anywhere, do
anything," he muses to himself - and then
with some bitterness: "The world is my
oyster."
He sells the house for less than they paid
for it. The sale generates no capital. He
decides to move up north, buy a rifle, build a f
cabin, live off the land. He quits his job, sells
off the furniture and the television. He trades
the Maverick for a Datsun Truck and begins
to plot his escape to nature.
Tim drives the Datsun truck downtown
and parallel parks by a meter. The meter has
twenty minutes on it He deposits a nickel      *
and winds the handle. He has thirty five
minutes to shop.
He goes to a pawn shop and selects a
deer hunting rifle with a scope on it The man
behind the counter is overweight. He is puffing slightly and pulling gently at the corners
of his cardigan, allowing Tim to handle the ^
weapon. "It's a fine weapon, that one," he ™
says, and then he remains silent, watching
Tim carefully, realizing that the rifle is selling itself.
"How much?" says Tim.
"Three hundred and sixty five for that
one," says the fat man.
"Does that include the scope?" says      i
Tim.
"You bet it does," says the fat man.
"Do you have a licence?" says the fat
man.
"What licence?" says Tim.
"You gotta have a licence," says the fat
man, "I can't sell you a rifle without a li-      $))
cence."
"How much is a licence?" says Tim.
"You have to take a Weapon's Safety
Course to get a licence. It's forty-five bucks.
You can register here but the courses are all
booked until the end of July."
"You won't sell me that rifle now?"     4
says Tim.
month.
On the last day of the month he drives to
Foam City and purchases a thick piece of
foam which he sets up in the back of the truck
with a sleeping bag and a small transistor
radio. He sleeps in the back of the truck on a *>,
side street close to the beach. In the morning
he collects pop bottles from the garbage cans
The fat man lifts the rifle back up onto
the rack.
"I can't sell the rifle without a licence,"
says the fat man, as if this were a fact of
nature that few people are aware of. ^
Tim sits in his barren house, drinking,
counting off the days until the end of the around the picnic area adjacent to the beach.
The pop bottles bring in two or three dollars,
which is gas money for the truck.
He spends a lot of time in the public
library, usually in the science section. He
studies repair manuals; exploded views of
toasters and electric blankets. He leads a
double life. Downtown in the library and the
soup line, and around the beaches in his
truck.
One day he bumps into an old school
chum at the mall. She has a white coat on.
Her name is Nancy. She has a quick smile,
thick curly orange hair cropped short around
her face, crooked coffee-stained teeth. She is
a pharmacist She works in the pharmacy in
the mall.
"You probably have a husband and kids
by now," says Tim.
"I have a husband, no kids," she says,
"and you?"
"Nothing," says Tim.
"Join me for a cup of coffee?" says
Nancy.
Tim sits with his old school chum in the
mall drinking coffee and picking at a muffin.
She says, "Hey, do you remember that time
we drove Roger's car into the lake and Mimi
posed on the roof without her shirt on?"
"Of course I remember that" says Tim.
"That was some party, eh Tim?" says
Nancy.
"Sure it was," says Tim.
"Those were the good old days, " says
Nancy.
"They sure were," says Tim.
"Hey, I gotta get back to work. Nice
talking to you," says Nancy.
Tim joins the evening soup line and
then walks over the bridge to his
truck. He crawls into the sleeping
bag in the back of his truck and turns on the
transistor radio. There is a program devoted
to Bulgarian music. The announcer says,
"We 're about to hear three tracks. The first of
them is an unaccompanied vocal, the second
is a purely instrumental arrangement and in
the third you will hear an assortment of
musicians performing MIA CULPE CON
QUISTADOR with stunning vocals by a
young singer named Olga S areema. The titles
are all in Bulgarian and I haven't a clue what
they mean, so let's just listen."
Tim listens to the Bulgarian music. He
pictures a row of girls in bulky cotton dresses
spinning around so that their dresses rise up
above their knees.
Tim wakes up late the next morning. It
is the first warm morning of the year. The air
is clear and crisp and slightly salty. He pulls
his boots on and walks out onto the beach.
There is an elderly couple walking together
where the waves are crashing in on the sand.
They are holding hands. An Irish Setter
bounds ahead of them, charging the ocean as
it recedes and retreating as it advances.
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Guy Bennett
August 1988        11 Dissidenten was
formed in 1980/
81 by Friedo
1 Josch (flute, wild
I dancing) and
' Uve MuIIrich
(guitar, bass),
both formerly of
German prog-rock/
ethnic band Embryo. The two founding
members were later joined by Marlon
Klein (drums, production). Their second
album, Sahara Elektrik, generated immense popularity for the group in Southern Europe and Northern Africa. Their
unique combination of western and North
African instrumentation with a steady rock
dance beat, and emotive Arabic singing
has been influential throughout Europe.
They have subsequently released a third
album, Life at the Pyramids, and are in
the process of converting the rest of the
world. As part of this conversion process
they came to town on July 3 at which time
Discorder spoke to Uve Mullrich. Or
should we say he spoke, and spoke and
spoke...
The Breakup of Embryo, The
Beginning of Dissidenten, and
Non-European Music
With Embryo we played a lot in
all these Eastern countries; with
this group we made our first
contact with non-European forms of music.
We played all over India, Afghanistan, Iran
- the welcome party for Khomeni at the University of Iran in 1979. These were our first
ISSIDENTEN
contacts. We decided that these were good
places to play because we had large audiences, and much appreciation.
Later on, Friedo and I decided to leave
Embryo because it had fallen into a kind of
hippy trap. By going and playing in India
when we returned there were all these people
with incense sitting down cross-legged in
front of us going "holy, holy, this is the new
age" and so on. And here we were from
Berlin with our black leather jackets and
stuff. It was a very puzzling experience. All
over northern Europe somehow we had
become the flagship for people who didn't
want to grow, and when a thing like that becomes too nostalgic it is no longer helpful for
the artist. So we figured we would disappear
from Europe for awhile and lived in India for
about a year and a half. At this time we
already had Dissidenten as a side project for
other kinds of music. While in India we
recorded an album Germanistan with the
Karnaka College of Percussion; 10 percussionists and one female singer. We toured
a lot in India with this group, and Shakti and
John McLaughlin. Later we did a pretty
successful tour of Europe with Indian musicians but we ended up in a very intellectual
corner. People with beards and pipes sitting
there very seriously, watching this cultural
event. Though we did have a couple of really
nice gigs, like at the Berlin Jazz Festival
with Miles Davis but it did all end up in a
very heady corner. This was in 81-82.
We wanted to make pop music. The
kind of music that people would dance to. In
other places outside of Northern Europe
people would dance to our music; we didn't
have that intellectual crowd. So we went to
Morrocco and Spain and other places because we wanted to have a little bit of free
space.
The Sound Of Dissidenten
Before the sound of Dissidenten developed I just wanted to use the
Arabic language for a more weird
point of view. I had been working with Nina
Hagen, and even though she was pretty successful internationally, working in German
limits you. There are still only 120 million
people in Europe who speak German. Doing
the whole thing in English would have meant
that we would have had to deal with a whole
different structure of the English/American
show business which is no good for a group
that doesn' t come from either of these places.
So we thought from the beginning that we
would use a very strange language because
we wanted to work with vocals. Something
like the Pigmy language or Hindu or Arabic'
or whatever. We wanted to do this in order
to make people who listen to English music,
and understand it, feel the same way we feel
about an English song because we hardly
understand it I understand it but most German people don't They just go along because the groove is there. So we thought it
could be the other way where people who
understand English might just catch onto the
subconscious message of the whole thing.
And eventually they did.
My initial idea was to get any kind of
Arabic and cut it up and make a collage of
sorts. I had come across this record by Brian
Eno, My Life in the Bush of Ghosts, and I
played it for some of my Arabic friends.
They liked the approach very much but they
were bewildered by the lyrics. They felt that
if somebody is going to be singing in Arabic
then why not something we could understand. So I realized that we should get a
competent writer to write something worthwhile. ThenImetCherifLamarani,whois
a very important poet in Morrocco, and
Mbark Chadili and Mohammed Ayoubi.
The three of them make up Lem Chaheb, an
immensely popular Morroccan group. We
prepared the melodies and the arrangements,
and Cherif Lamarani would think up the
lyrics. These are the guys we recorded the
Sahara Elektrik album with.
There is this guy named Abslam Aka-
boul who is something like a sheikh, an
aristocrat. After Morocco became independent after the Second World War, he was sent
to the US to be trained by the CIA to become
the police chief of northern Morocco. This
DISCORDER guy was also a Gnaua dancer. Gnaua is a
musical cult in Northern Africa that has a
dance which is very similar to tap-dancing.
Eventually he ended up becoming a tap-
dancer with the Duke Ellington orchestra.
While he was in the US he met all sorts of
crazy people. Since he has a palace up in the
Casbahs in Tanger, in the 60's and 70's all
these different musicians and artists would
come to his place and hang out there. William Burroughs, Jack Kerouac, Timothy
Leary, Eldridge Cleaver, Jimi Hendrix, Mick
Jagger, Brian Jones...all sorts of people.
So one time after a concert with Embryo in Morocco this sheikh comes up to me
and says, "I really like what you are doing
and I would really like to sponsor a band that
is doing what you are doing so you should
come to my place and stay." So I went and
visited him there. He has this huge palace.
He says we can have a house to stay in. I
thought this was just like a fairy tale. Too
good. This guy knows everybody in the
Arabic music scene. He would phone people
and say, 'Tver got this guy from Germany
here and you'ver got to come down." If they
had no money he would send some to them,
and a plane ticket and so forth. The next day
all these famous Arabic musicians would
arrive and we would have sessions for weeks.
The sheikh would bring in all the recording
gear - it was incredible.!
This whole thing, all these sessions, is
what turned into the Sahara Elektrik album,
recorded more or less under live conditions,
as you can probably tell because the songs
are really long. The whole concept was not
really adequate for western listening so for
the second album we decided to make the
songs shorter so that we would at least be
able to get some air play.
We had an interesting experience with
the North African music business after we
did these recordings. There were two master
tapes and someone snuck out with one of the
tapes in the night. Suddenly without our
knowing, the whole of North Africa was
Ustening to our music. Someone had been
duplicating the tapes and selling them to all
sorts of record companies in Morocco, Algeria, Egypt Even as far away as Mexico there
are records of us. We could easily have made
a deal because it was a joint venture, and we
were pretty upset at the time but that is the
way things work there. Now I think it's sort
of okay because I think people who have
little money and so on should still be able to
listen to the music.
The Songs
All the compositions were done by
the three of us, and based on a lot of
Greek, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
and North African folklore. There is also a
lot of Celtic influence in there. As to how the
songs are written, take Sultan Swing for
example. It is based on a Sardinian folk song.
The main melody is from a Sardinian folk
song. Then maybe we fit in a little bridge of
our own. We have another idea ourselves,
and then along comes a Swedish folk song
that has a couple nice changes so we fit it
underneath. We get things from every corner of Europe and put it together. This
applies more to the last album (Pyramids).
Trie fact that there is Arabic singing on top
suddenly makes it switch totally into an
Arabic feeling.
On the last record — the two singers
that we have with us when we play live,
Houssaine Kill and Hamid Baroudi, also
worked on a couple of the songs but mainly
it was Cherif Lamrani who wrote the lyrics
because he has the certain approach that we
think is important. The good thing about
working with Cherif Lamrani was that he
also knew everything about western pop
music. He is not like the traditional old
masters and musicians, whom I personally
admire, but you can't do anything except
maybe play along with them because you
don't really know their stuff. It's a very old
heritage. Through Cherif Lamrani I met all
the young hip Arabic musicians. Also, his
lyrics are a very important step forward for
popular music in Northern Africa because
for the first time someone is really singing
about something, things that are of real
concern to people. It's not like "Oh God, oh
August 1988        13 my baby why did you leave me, why is it so
terrible?". This almost fatalistic approach,
he just got rid of it. He is probably the most
advanced exponent of a movement that is
comparable to what was happening in west-
em pop music at the beginning of the seventies and the end of the sixties when all these
groups came up. Like The Pretty Things,
The Who and whoever else, whereby the
sound of the electric guitar was the promise
of revolution. These guys in Northern Africa
also caught onto that but they didn't have
the money to buy themselves the Telecasters
and what not so it was reflected more in the
approach to the lyrics. By meeting with us he
had the opportunity to put his thing into a
more modern context. Which was very
important for him as well as for us.
Personally, I also don't want to get
involved in the lyrics as the European who
tells them what is happening or what to do.
The Europeans have told the rest of the world
what is right for so long, and I wouldn't like
to be an artist who plays in these countries
and acts like that
The Mediterranean Thing and Roots
I would say that our music is based on
the whole Mediterranean thing. If you
look at history you see that the whole
basis of the Mediterranean is very much the
basis for European culture. There has been
so much crossing back and forth between the
Mediterranean countries and Europe. Italy,
Greece, and the whole Balkan Spain used to
be Moslem for centuries, and now it is Chris-
tian again. So of course all these influence
are on both sides of the Mediterranean. Basically that's the idea that we draw from for
this music.
We have discovered that the old roots of
European music is a very large field because
in Europe the tribal history is still alive in a
sense. Of course weare all modern and so on
but there are the Vandals up there, and there
are the Celtics over there, and there is also the
Basque region and so on. You can still find
much history in the local music. It is not like
in America where if you are in New York
you hear one thing, and then you go all the
way across to San Francisco and you still
hear the same twangy wangy thing all the
way across. In Europe it is not like that; you
can go three hundred miles and then you
have totally different scales and a different
approach. And we feel that this hasn't really
been introduced into pop music. Pop music
is the modem expression of folk music, you
know pop music, popular. That's what it
means. All over the world it is the popular
music now, and we live in a world now where
all these different places contribute with their
own roots towards a**world pop music" even
though I dislike that term a little bit because
it is just another thing to cash in on these
days, another trend. But on the other hand
though, the roots are so rich it's quite obvious that it's going to last a long time.
New Projects and Inspiration
We have quite a few new songs
that we are doing live that aren't
on any album yet. We are not
sure if they will be recorded because we are
changing the focus of the project, and are
working with Native North American musicians now. I have already spent some time at
various reservations in Canada and the U.S.,
and have met many people, and we will
spend the rest of the month in Toronto finishing an album with these musicians. Hopefully it will also involve a one and a half hour
film. I met some Native leaders at a conference in Ottawa a couple of months ago. I also
visited Leonard Peltier who is in prison in
the U.S. If we are working with these Native
people we feel it is important that their views
also be expressed. The main theme of this
film and the album will be the 500th anniversary of the accidental arrival of Columbus in
America. We don't know if we are going to
release these other nice songs we have. If we
do more of the stuff in the Arabic mode it
might put us into a comer. We are also
preparing another project called Soundtrack
of a Continent which will take us to Bulgaria, Finland and Spain looking at all the
different kinds of music in Europe. We hope
this will inspire other people to do similar
work.
Mike Harding
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14
DISCORDER  William S. Burroughs
Discorder and its parent, CITR , have often been criticized for being elitist, so it's unfortunate that I'm going to make this next statement (
But if you don't know who William S. Burroughs is, my telling you about him and his work isn't likely to make you put down your copy
of Jackie Collins' Rock Star. Of course, on the other hand, I'm no literary expert or even a student of Burroughs' writing. I know that
he was a frontline soldier in the Beat Movement, but I've never even read his two greatest novels, Junkie and Naked Lunch. So what
do I know? Not much, other than that his voice fascinates me. It's a voice that has appeared on everything from John Giorno's Poetry Systems compilation albums to Laurie Anderson's Mr. Heartbreak. It's a great voice. The bottom line of all this is that Burroughs came to town to push his paintings
(which I thought were marginally better than the stuff you see on people's fridges titled "Mummy" or 4tGramma") and to give a reading at the Ridge
Theatre, and I wanted to see the guy without having to pay. So there I was, in the Western Front Gallery watching the man himself sitting, chain- <
smoking and pounding the vino, while an assembled group of artsies in black hand-me downs and cycling pants fired off the usual self-interested questions. Up close, the seventy-four year old Burroughs looks like your grandfather; except you just know he'd be the kind of parental figure who'd
continue to show you how to debauch long after the time counsellors say a human should be dead. William S. Burroughs is not the type of senior citizen
you'd ever see getting pushed around on the deck of some cruise ship to Alaska. What follows are Mr. Burroughs' views on a variety of topics.
|
16        DISCORDER The Quality of Writing in the Eighties
I don't see anything particularly innovative
in American writing today or in any music.
Favorite Author
Conrad. My favorite novelist of all time.
He's the best Boy, just read The Nigger of
the 'Narcissus', Lord Jim. Wow! It's so
profound. Or The Shadow Line. That's another great one. This nasty skipper sells the
quinine and they get out there, and everybody on board has fever, and he suddenly
cracks the quinine bottles open and finds
they're full of talcum powder. Imagine!
You've got a boat- load of junkies with nothing left but talcum powder!
Current Literary Project
I'm writing a novel. Well, I guess you'd call
it a novel, because there is really the historic
evidence...A very slight, very suspect novel
on Jesus Christ.. .The Christ virus gets loose
from the Museum of Extinct Species. This
is not so fantastic. Do you know, smallpox is
supposedly an extinct disease? So I talked to
the man in the World Health Organization,
who was in on the final days of smallpox.
They're keeping the smallpox virus alive in
three places. Cambridge, England, somewhere in Sweden, and I think somewhere in
Switzerland. I asked him why. He said, well
there might be a disease similar and they'd
need it for a vaccine. Well, that seems to me
to be a pretty feeble excuse. What a plot for
a terrorist novel, they hijack the smallpox
virus. They're not vaccinating anymore. In
another twenty years, imagine that getting
loose in an unvaccinated population. It's one
of the most contagious diseases known. So to
get back to the novel. The Jesus sickness gets
loose and you have hundreds of thousands of
millions of people saying, I am the Way, no
one comes through the Father except through
me, and gaining disciples and even performing miracles. After all, miracles can be performed. So, ah, the results are of course total
chaos.
Hollywood
I've never made any money in Hollywood,
but well, they've been expressing interest. In
films nothing happens 'til it happens. You
got a thirty million dollar budget? Hell, yes.
The next day you can't get through the secretary!
Who Would Play WSB In The Movie
Oh, dear. Maybe Fred Astaire. Is he dead?
How about Jimmy Stewart?
Television
I don't have one in my house. The only thing
I ever watch are animal programs. Oh man,
DO
DD
- Jerome Broadway
u
ll
QDDO
bd bo
UDD
the leaping lemurs (a type of monkey) of Madagascar. See, I have a thing about lemurs.
It's an animal I dearly love. One place I'd like
to go would be Madagascar before I die. To
see the lemurs in their natural habitat before
they're all wiped out
Hemingway Once Wrote About B u Ilfight-
ing. What Sport Would WSB Write
About?
I'd probably write something derogatory
about hunting. Particularily this safari nonsense. I meanreally, Robert Ruark(journalist
and travel writer), he goes out mere and
here's this white hunter backing him up.
There's the lion about twenty yards away.
And he goes Ka-pow! Plonk! The lion falls
dead as an apple. If the lion had charged him
of course the white hunter would have taken
him out anyway. But is that a glorious accomplishment? I would never kill anything
that I didn't intend to eat or need to eat I
could never kill a deer. Although, I am very
much into guns and target practice.
Guns
The old Colt .45 is one of my favourite guns.
It takes a lot of getting used to. But now I can
shoot with that better than I can with a 22.
It's a good gun. The 9mm Beretta has much
more firepower, it's got 15 shots. I haven't
used that gun. But I did use this Glok. This
Austrian thing that's supposed to get through
metal detectors. Which is absurd, because it
has twenty ounces of metal in it. Another
piece of junk. I couldn't hit the target with it
It jammed.
Thoughts On America Today
I begin by saying no to drug hysteria. This
drug hysteria is a flagrant pretext to set up a
police state. It's the crudest sort of pretext for
a Fascist takeover I've almost ever seen. My
words on the Reagan Administration are
not printable. And I wonder what Colby, the
former head of the CIA, is doing in Malaysia,
where he works for the Malaysian Government in some unspecified capacity. Nothing
good.
Crack and Other Drugs
Crack is one thing, heroin is another, and
they're going at absolutely opposite directions. One is a stimulant and one is a sedative. Of course, remember that opiates are
painkillers, and people who are living under
conditions of extreme pain and stress will
naturally have recourse to opium or opiates.
If there weren't any opiates there, well, would
they be better off? Of course, there's always
alcohol. The deadliest drug of them all...
Exactly what I feel is, anyone who uses
drugs, it's their own goddamn business. If he
kills himself, that's his business too.
August 1988       17 WHAT YOU WANT,
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5B0BTH
ftfl$) puNty* v«z p/ ; Interviewing Art Bergmann is a
project filled with possible disasters, mostof them self-induced mind
you.   One colleague complained,
• "He got me so drunk I couldn't walk home...
and I only lived a block away." Bergmann
himself notes, "One guy showed up ready to
interview me after he had been drinking for
36 hours straight I guess he thought I'd be
like that."
Just why   that particular  interviewer
# thought Art would be "like that" is probably
why we all expect him to be "like that". Art
has a huge reputation as, in polite terms, a
substance abuser. It's a reputation which has
been built expanded upon, enhanced, and
made legend over the last decade as Art has
played his way from White RockJ* the
m Shmorgs, to Vancouver with the K-Tels/
Young Canadians and Los Popularos, and
finally across Canada with Poisoned. Recently, I met him at the offices of his manager Sam Feldman, and found him to be
pleasant, friendly, articulate, intelligent and
all too aware of his, then, impending media
saturation. " You aren't being forced to do
• this are you?", he asks, before adding,"God,
everyone in town is going to be sick of
reading about me".
Over a couple of bowls of gumbo for
lunch we talked about his new album (released as an "Art Bergmann" record to avoid
confusion with the LAbased glamrockband
• Poison), and sundry other topics, ranging
from Bruce Allen ("he said I'd never sign a
contract") to Bill Vander Zalm ("he'll get
re elected just by smiling").
o  how  does  someone  like  Art
Bergmann end up with Adrien
r   Heath, the man in charge of Duke
Street Records? Well, it's not really all that
exciting. Poisoned, like any good aspiring
Rock Band made a video. It was a video for
their song 'Empty House*. Shot in a Sunday
afternoon, on the set of an aborted film project it caught the eye of local music impresa-
>   rioSamFeldman.WhenaskedwhyFeldman,
9   who is known for his Top 40 acts, wanted to
manage him, Art replies, "he saw the vtdeo
and thought' these guys can make us some
money'". With Feldman's support the band
was able to sign with what is, probably, the
only record label in Canada which would
take a chance with an artist as bluntly original
•    as Art, Duke Street Records.
According to Art the label is committed
to its artists; such people as Jane Sibenry,
Chalk Circle, and jazz artists, like Moe
Koffmann and Hugh Marsh get the time
and, more importantly, the money they need
to develop and progress. He also points out
• that being on a label the size of Duke Street
means that he's less likely to be lost m the
.S
shuffle, as can be the case with large US
labels, or their Canadian subsidiaries. "You
run a huge risk of disappearing forever, I
mean if you sign with them and the A&R guy
changes, the guy who takes over could say
'this isn't my project' - then you sit on the
shelf for years. Or you're signed specifically
as a tax write off, what kind of shit is that?
It'd be horrible, I'd commit suicide." Nonetheless he describes being signed to Duke
Street as akin to breaking the "sound barrier". "There are all these people that you've
never met before, and you have to trust them,
and they're all on salary." And Art Bergmann
will have to, someday soon, help pay those
salaries. It is in this rarified atmosphere that
he and the band(Ray Fulber, bass; Susann
Richter, keyboards and vocals; Taylor Nelson Little, drums) began to look for a producer.
John Cale is a somewhat legendary
figure among people who are likely
to hang around a college radio sta-
i. He, with Lou Reed, founded the Velvet Underground, and after leavmg the
Velvets, continued to write songs documenting the truly darkside of life. He also produced a variety of artists, such as Iggy Pop
and the Stooges, Patti Smith, and Jonathan Richman. People as familiar, as himself, to college radio types. "Producers are
busy months, even years in advance," recalled Art," and the money!" Getting Cale
was almost too easy.  After one of Cale s
periodic solo shows in Vancouver, hoping to
get Cale's attention, Bergmann gave him his
last cassette release, a four song EP produced by Paul Hyde. Cale was so impressed
he called Art from the airport offering to
drop everything in order to produce his album.  Obviously one does not turn down
such an offer and, as they say, the wheels
were set in motion.
Recording in Toronto (to avoid friends
and other bad influences) on a very tight
schedule (two weeks to record the album and
another five days to mix it) Bergmann has
few pleasant memories of Toronto. Not the
least of which was the band's accommodation. "We were on the twelfth floor of this
new building. I think it was Mafia-
owned.-.there were high-priced call girls
running in and out of it every morning at 4
AM. The four of us in the band were in this
tiny two bedroom appartment... it was like
24 hour-a-day Gestalt therapy". And none of
this takes Cale himself into account
When asked how Cale was to work
with, Bergmann jokes, "We
stared each other down a lot
The people in reception were afraid of him.
He's probably got a coven in deep Manhattan. He's got that kind of an aura. Actually
he's clean, a contented man. He's in great
shape for a forty-six year old." Cale's opinion of the production on Bergmann's earlier
recordings wasn't quite so complimentary.
"He listened to the songs and said, 'You
don't need that shit', and he's right". Cale s
search for a 'new clean' sound led Art and the
band in new directions. "When we were
working on the guitars he complained about
my sound,' it sounds like Megadeath—Stop
IV ", recalled Bergmann imitating Cale's
distinctive rasp. "Or he'd say,' try the Vox,
Art try the Vox'  or ' I'm loosing interest
Art.. Hurry Up' ".  Not too surprisingly,
Bergmann adds, "I was confused." Holding
it all together in the studio was ace NY
recording engineer Roger Moutenot(Nile
Rodgers, Lou Reed), whom Cale brought
with him for the sessions. "He was great",
states Bergmann, "there was no bullshit no
I'm this, I'm that.. Roger just had it "
So what does the result of 18 to^24
hours days in a "pressurc co°ker" of
arecording experience, thatleftthose
involved unsure of anything they were doing
("you listen and you can't tell if its slowing
down or notor if its too loud"), sound like?
August 1988       19 c om e  to
^ouse
jAqK   to The SoundS
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of The  UnderGrounD
dj - robert shea
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6138 SUB Boulevard Vancouver, B.C. V6T2A5 228-3017
In order to qualify, the receiver must not be hooked up to cable.
Well, nothing like any Art Bergmann recording you've ever heard before.
"I won't say it's better than Terence Trent
Darby, but I will say it's different," jokes
Bergmann when asked for his opinion of the
record. Given that Cale wanted to remove
'all that shit' congratulations are due him for
maintaining his artistic vision through the
recording process. Unfortunately, the reaction of long time Bergmann fans upon hearing this record for the first time is likely to be
one of despair and disbelief. The grinding
distorted guitar for which he has long been
loved is gone. It's been replaced by a much
toned down'clean' guitar sound. His ripped-
from-the-soul vocals have been calmed down
and mixed up in the songs. Susann Richter's
backing vocals and keyboards have also
been given a more prominent role. None of
this is lethal to the album. In fact I've come
to rather like the album. Without the surface
flash of all the 'shit' one tends to pay far more
attention to the songs themselves. Which is
probably what Cale had in mind. What this
album does is to remind us all what a great
songwriter Bergmann is. His slices of the
dark underbelly of society (domestic violence, incest, and a variety of self-abuses in
the form of everything from drug addiction
to love) are served up as no one else could
except for maybe John Cale or Lou Reed.
" I don't listen to the new album," states
Bergmann, "I'm 'listening' to the next album". A process which requires him to
descend into a friend's basement where he is
keeping an 8-track recording deck so he can
work on the songs which 'exploded' out of
him after leaving Toronto. The next batch
are far more 'stream of conciousness' than
his previous work. They include a "10 minute dirge... its sort of an antidote to Lou
Reed's 'Heroin' ", and "a big hallucination ",
which he experienced as aresult of "all those
sleepless nights" in Toronto. Of these new
songs he says, " I don't think songs have to
make sense."
All of this is tied into Bergmann's
goal of writing "something original" by digging into his own experiences. He jokes that his life thus far has
been "deep research'. Just to keep things, for
the interviewer, interesting, he also
claims,"I'm a huge thief. "I steal lyrics but
no one has caught on yet. I'm even stealing
from my self no w, I' ve been writing so long,"
he adds as his voice trails off. When the
resemblance of one song to Bryan Adams'
NRun to You' is mentioned, he replies, " Its
actually an old Blue Oyster Cult song... so
who's stealing from who?" If the Duke
Street/MCA promotional push, and play-
listing of Crawl With Me by a variety of
Top 40 stations are any indication, it's a
question we should have plenty of time to
consider.
Pat Carroll
20        DISCORDER I free  c^ppuccmo   J
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829 GRANVILLE STREET
TELEPHONE: (604) 684 - 8900
(ACROSS FROM CAPITOL 6 CINEMAS)
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. ++j PETER MURPHY
Love Hysteria
(Polygram)
Apart from the obvious vocal comparison with
David Bowie, ex-Bauhaus member Peter
Murphy has carved out a style all his own, as his
second full length solo release attests. For the
most part, Love Hysteria is a collection of stories
from Murphy's wild and vivid imagination set to
pleasingly melodic, mid tempo tunes. Murphy
does have his dark moments with Socrates the
Python and My Last Two Weeks; however, they
are not simply unhappy broodings but real, personal struggles one can identify with. All Night
Long, Indigo Eyes and the Bowie/Pop Fun Time
cover are all outstanding tracks. Interestingly,
four songs are based on paintings by a friend of
Murphy's. Fall keyboardist/producer Simon Rogers plays on and produces Love Hysteria.
Rob Lorenz
FLITOX
C'est Homme Est Mort
(Jungle Hop)
Bladderdrippin, spleentoastin, chainsawlac-
eratin goodness from France's hardcore champs
Flitox. Angrier than a chunk of camembert these
four garcons from the Paris suburbs manage their
instrumental overkill with an underlying maturity that makes this one of the best debut albums
ever.
Military conflict (Hiroshima), human rights
(Le Prisonnier) and good old fashioned America
bashing (Made in U.S. A.) are a few of the themes
the bands reflect upon. D.K. and Death Sentence
fans oughta dig bashin heads to this one.
Rob Lorenz
SPIRIT OF THE WEST
Labour Day
(Stony Plain)
of the results if the group found a more interesting
drummer seeing as Robert Gotobcd seems content playing the part of a human metronome. Also,
Bruce Gilbert, the group's guitarist and most
interesting solo artist, unfortunately seems to have •
resigned himself to a background supporting role
with this recording. In fact, the whole sound
seems to be solely the product of Colin Newman's
pop sensibilities. The lyrics are excellent as usual,
the songs are all good, but I can't help but feel a
certain cutting edge is lost, perhaps in pursuit of
more commercial viability. One thing is for certain - this material will not stand up to Uve pres- w.
entation as well as their last LP. To sum it up: good
LP but it leaves one with mixed feelings.
M. Mushet
JOHNNY CLEGG AND SAVUKA
Shadow Man
(EMI)
The "White Zulu" is back with a slick, multiracial Afro-pop lp. As might be expected, the
sound of Clegg's former group, Jaluka, can be
heard throughout Shadow Man. Although very
tactful lyrically in his treatment of the policies of
the South African government (one need not say
Apartheid), the album was still banned in South 9
Africa for having vague references to the resis-
tence movement(s). The sound is very pleasing to
the ear and heart; credit is due to the man who
continues to chip away at the rock of Apartheid.
John Frymire
THE PRIMITIVES
Lovely
(RCA)
(Eds note: This is an extremely favourable record
review. Anyone who never liked the Beatles should
not read on!)
Hailing from the industrial waste lands of
England come the latest Brit Top 10 Pop Sensation! This may cause you to pass this disc over,
given that the recent "Brit Pop Sensations" have
been unmitigated disco rehash rubbish from the
"Stock, Aitkin, Waterman" factory in London.
(More Rick Astley anyone?)
Fear not
The Primitives have managed to write the
perfect 3 chord pop-rock single, Crash, on their
first album. It's got everything a pop single should
have: catchy lyrics, fast, crunchy 6T's kinda guitar, and a total length well under 3 minutes. Of
course, there are dissenting opinions. Several of
the more cynical CiTR DJs have called Crash
wimpy. Well., sure, compared to Death Sentence,
but on its own terms Crash stands up against the
singles of such previous 'perfect' pop 'rockers' as
the Undertones and the Buzzcocks. But, Crash is
only the first track on the record.
The album as a whole is indeed "Lovely".
Over its 14 song length, the band trot out some
way decent stuff. The songs range from a raga-
rock tune, Shadows, thru to a Velvet Underground sounding Run Baby Run. However, to
be honest, most of the record stays in the territory
staked out by Crash. Which is fine. They turn out
the catchiest pop songs I've heard this year.
Lovely, it's an album that dares to walk the
fine line between saccharine, bogus-pop, like Tiffany, and the feedback overkill of the Jesus and
Mary Chain. Ix>vely...it's just lovely.
Patrick Carroll
Spirit of the West have topped off a spring
spent touring Canada with the early summer release of their new album Labour Day. The effort
made to capture the bands' live feel was successful resulting in an intense and impassioned album. More political than their first album, Labour
Day pleads the case for the oppressed, be they
undervalued lighthouse keepers in the Maritimes
or the too easily ignored street burns of Vancouver. The music of Spirit of the West falls under
the label of "Rogue Folk" with their Celtic instruments and melodies forming the backbone of a
sound which expands the traditional boundaries
of folk. Strong from start to finish, this album
should pave the way for the wider recognition this
band deserves.
Becky Scott
WIRE
A Bell is a Cup Until It is Struck
(Capitol)
The first thing one notices about this LP is the
somewhat disappointing absence of a proportionate share of vocals by Graham Lewis, the writer/
co-writer of many of Wire's best songs (at least
in this writer's opinion). Otherwise this is a collection of softcore WIRE pop tunes. Very even,
very spare, very good, but ultimately lacking in
the variety and pacing that made The Ideal Copy
such a fabulous "comeback" offering.
Colin Newman's voice is so restrained that
one wishes someone would light a fire under him
so that he might lend that WIRE edge lo the
material. Still, A Bell is A Cup will see a lot of
time on my turntable. Of particular note is a cut
featuring Graham Lewis called The Finest Drops
which, in addition to the characteristically oblique
poetics, reminds us of how Wire can grab a
listener with an incredibly elusive hook over an
effective and incessant beat. However, I wonder
ABECAEDARIANS •
AB-CD
(Caroline)
Ghostly, image-evoking melodies highlight a
guitar and percussion package from this Newport
Beach trio whose name means those who are
learning. The music on AB-CD is from three
previous releases; the Resin and Eureka albums t
and the Factory records (New Order) single
Smiling Monarchs. Trance dancers will enjoy
the hollow repitit ion of Ghosts and I Glide which
inspire an obvious comparison to Joy Division.
Smiling Monarchs is an outstanding, hypnotic
track with an eastern flavour that brings a smell of
jasmine to the dance floor. Cool, innovative yet
unpretentious, AB-CD is the definitive ABECE- #>
DARIANS anthology.
Rob Lorenz
ZOVIET-FRANCE
Shouting at the Ground
(Screaming Red)
#
Few musical entities have intrigued me so.
This "group" apparently hails from England and
has until now been responsible for some of the
most innovative (if impractical) record and tape
packaging in recent memory. I suspect that "they"
are really only one or two people. The music of
Zoviet-France is a kind of atavistic drone/calling
created by means of analogue and digital tape and 0"'
sampling effects layered and adorned with the
occasional Asian bamboo flute or koto sound.
Mostly, people who attempt this kind of thing fail
miserably at achieving the kind of hypnotic swiri
that Zoviet-France seem to produce on virtually
every outing. Atmospheres and soundtracks
abound in this music, and the possibilities for
gallery and installation collaborations with visual 0 >
artists seem fantastic. I would suggest Russell
22
DISCORDER Mills for starters, then perhaps a foray into film.
Their current LP packaging is less unwieldly than
before - they've wrapped discs in everything from
^    roof tiles to canvas to tinfoil - but it seems now that
™    they do in fact consider photography and painting
worthy of association with their music. One hates
to use the term "soundscape" as it is often used by
"new age" idiots to describe the aural laxatives
perpetuated by the aural wallpaper crowd. However, the music of Zoviet-France is truly deserving of the best implications of the term and should
^   appeal to visual artists in particular as well as
™   anyone simply interested in excellent contemporary sound sculpture. Be forewarned though, these
records have a way of disappearing into the
woodwork very quickly so act fast
M. Mushet
DEVO
#   Total Devo
(Enigma)
Ten years ago Devo released their first album.
I was sold when I saw the Satisfaction and Jocko
Homo videos the first time. I bought the album. It
changed my life. So I couldn't resist when I saw
new DEVO vinyl after a four years absence.
0 The theory of de-evolution states that humans
were once a very intelligent but small race. As we
multiply, IQ decreases proportionately and we
gradually adapt to simpler and more elementary
thought patterns. Maybe Devolution is the missing link between evolution and Elvislution. Hence
the cover. Don't be cruel.
It still sounds like eighty's DEVO but I keep
0 having a deja vu of Heaven Seventeen's The
Luxury Gap.
"II digital cartoons...", computer graphics,
new uniforms, new drummer David Kendrick...
Why do I get the feeling that the Shout album,
which bombed, was a contractual obligation album. They're right back on track and sound about
as good as they did in '82. If you're a fan of the
0 "spud boys" then you'll like this album. However,
I hope the next album is a bit weirder.
Matt Richards
BRYAN FERRY: Bete Noire
Bryan Ferry is hip, cool, suave, and can afford
W to hire superb musicians. His music is well crafted,
seductive, and highly danceable. His new album
exemplifies the aforementioned characteristics.
Only the un-chic will dare to miss his September
5th concert at the Coliseum. And only the half-
chic will fail to obtain, at all costs, front row seats
for said concert. Then again, perhaps I am slighly
won over to his favour. Bring a smoking jacket
W and a pack of Dunhill s (contrary to popular belief,
Bry does not smoke Gitanes). One must keep
abreast of these sorts of details.
M. Mushet
;2
Aims rfy RddausoAt
"Where 4 U.B.C. graduates went into
the food business"
Coll222-4444 fir fuwofaif
PROFILE
A Canadian independent finding
success in Europe? Not likely
unless N-e-t-t-w-e-r-k is
stamped on your press package.
Enter Front Line Assembly, a local duo
comprised of Bill Leeb and Michael Balch
who over the course of the past year have released four discs (the two most recent LPs -
Corrosion and Disorder - receiving extensive airplay on CiTR), have been included on
several compilations and in the whole process have become one of Vancouver's busiest
bands. Their incendiary rhythmic onslaughts
matched with a menacing, almost forboding
undercurrent have been setting club-goers'
footwear alight in both North America and
Europe.
For Royal Conservatory of Music graduate B alch, Front Line Assembly serves as the
antithesis to a career that had its origins on
the mainstream bar circuit In the FLA confines Leeb finds satisfaction with a degree of
involvement that eclipses his former status
as silent third member in Skinny Puppy; a
role he relinquished in the summer of 1986.
In an interview that took place about a
year ago, Bill Leeb (in reference to the
numerous projects which at that time
had still to be released) had said: "If
you start small, you'll generally stay
small. If you get enough little releases going
on all over the place, then hopefully it will all
come together for you in the end." After a
handful of records plus, his philosophy has
hardly changed. "I think the first two
records...the one on KK Records...it's such
a small label that it didn't even make it over
here. It's a rare kind of record almost. The
second one is pretty limited as far as accessibility goes, so to me Corrosion and Disorder are still our first quote-unquote major releases as far as North America is concerned.
Until these there wasn't too much press of
any kind, but now it's the NME, Melody
Maker, Rockpool, radio interviews..! do
them almost every day. We've got college
radio play across the States. The first two are
just little side projects almost I don't think
we've oversaturated because the average
person hasn't heard the first two, and yet you
can't relax too much."
Performance-wise, Front Line Assembly
will continue to remain low-profile for the
next little while. "Gary Levermore
(Bushido/Third Mind Records) just returned from a business trip where he spoke to
EFA Records - West Germany. Apparently
we've now sold enough records there that
they want us to do ten dates in Germany, five
in Holland, and a few other locations," states
Leeb. "We'd probably go and perform there
before playing in Vancouver." For their live
show, FLA will be packing drummer Daryl
Neudorf who is currently in Toronto working on Sarah MacLaughlin's Nettwerk debut
On vinyl, particularly on the first
two alburns Initial Command
and State of Mind, listeners
have been exposed to both sides
of FLA songwriting: material intended for
the dance floor as well as their more adventurous, experimental compositions. Rather
than making a decision to focus on any one
style in the future, Leeb explains that Front
Line Assembly are "going to try and use
more earthy-sounding instruments and stray
away from the really electronic" which "just
starts to feel too cold after a while."
"I'd rather mix in pianos and heavy metallic sounds. ..sort of like Test Department
but not as limited. More Front 242-ish meets
Test Department meets maybe the Swans
rather than just a Chris and Cosey alone.
They've been doing all that for years. It
would be silly for us to keep plugging away
at that genre. It's just better to find your own
sound. I think we want to sound more earthy
rather than too over-electronic."
While Leeb is quite confident that the
FLA approach is not a conscious trampling
on ground already covered, listeners will
compare them, a few perhaps quite critically,
to some of the aforementioned artists as well
as others such as Skinny Puppy and Revolting Cocks. Not so says Leeb. "We haven't
had any bad feedback yet I haven't had a
complaint Nobody's confronted me or said
anything like that. I do think we sound a little
more bad mood, a little tougher. We're still
in the learning stage."
Aside from a 12" single release scheduled for the fall, a pre-Christmas LP, plus
inclusion on the Funky Alternatives HI and
C'est la Mort IH compilations, Leeb is
working on a solo project He explains: "It's
called Delirium - Faces, Forms, and Illusions. It's eastern-dark-ambient soundtracky
type music that's completely different from
Front Line Assembly. There's no skipping
dance patterns or anything like that. There's
no vocals except for maybe monks and
samples...it's pretty ethnic. It's like I have
this other side that I feel I have to get out It'll
be out later this summer on Dossier Records."
Lloyd Uliana
August 1988       23 SoRpy, Dad.
Our minds are
made up.   It's
tub CiTR
SOUND
MACHINE for
OUR  HOOTENANy,
or it's nothing!
It's mobile, it's
HIP, AND ITS WAy
MORE FUN THAN
ANy John WAyNE
FILM FESTIVAL.
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\I^**n    \    N    N    \    \    S     .
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[ND I SAW A DOOR IN HEAVEN AND HEARD
1   THE SAME VOICE SPEAKING THE VOICE
LIKE A TRUMPET SAYING "COME UP AND
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'       TO      THE      FUTURE"
-REVELATIONS IV
# 6
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July's been an action-packed month
for me — within the space of about
a week I got to see one of my literary
heroes, William S. Burroughs, pop-
heroes The Young Fresh Fellows, and even
had an idyllic four-day island vacation (in
spite of, or maybe because of, not catching
any fish).
Of course the Bill Burroughs thing' s had
quite a lot of attention already, but so far I
haven'tread about anyone sharing my suspicion that a large part of the audience had
never actually read the man's work; heard
him on a Dial-A-Poet album, almost certainly, but... (See Jerome Broadway's Burroughs feature in this issue— Ed.) Oh well.
Burroughs even got applause and cheers for
asking Ridge staff to kill the spot and give
him some light on the stage so that he could
read his notes. I'm kind of embarrassed to
say that that night was the first time I saw
Judy Radul read and wow— I thought she
was great Phaedra, of Bolero Lava, and
her sort of white-rap-with-lots-of-sampling-
type band didn't fare so well.
Speaking of Bolero Lava, they're playing with Andy Graff it ti and Linda Humphries these days. Linda's band, Terminal
City, is still looking for someone to press
their debut LP (a little softer and slower,
maybe, than their live performances, but
high quality stuff). In the meantime you can
hear one of the tracks, City Love (this is
single material, Linda) as a demo right here
at CiTR. Sons of Freedom should have an
LP out really soon (maybe they already do,
I won't pretend to be the first to know about
these things). Anyway, I'm still all addled by
the Boy's Club extravaganza early in July—
how many cool bands and Black Labels can
a person really handle? (And a pox on
whoever's responsible for shutting the whole
thing down early....)
had the good luck to catch 64 Funny
Cars (who call themselves, among
other things, "Victoria's friendliest
quartet") opening for our very own
I
Icemen at the Arts Club Sunday the 17th.
First of all, it was nice to again be able to see
a band at the Seymour Street venue most
likely to be confused with a suburban basement (in spite of the conspicuous absence of
everyone's pal Garnet); secondly, the Funny
Cars were even better than I had hoped.The I
audience was small (I guess a lot of people
were at Tin God or Oversoul Seven or still
enjoying the Folk Festival) but couldn't
help but have a good time— it's no surprise
to hear that the guys (two of whom have
pretty important jobs at Victoria's CFUV)
will be in the studio soon with Conrad •
"Popllama" Uno, who produces (just to
name two of my favourite bands) The Young
Fresh Fellows and Fastbacks. Anyway, it
was the kind of evening that, besides almost
making you wish you lived in Victoria, inspires you to dream of a world where there
could be music justice wherein young, fun, #
unassuming and nice bands could get famous
sometimes.
Looking ahead to the end of August,
the first annual Vancouver
Women's Music Festival will be
taking place at New Brighton Park
on the 27th, with continuous entertainment $
on two stages from 10 am to 10 pm. This
means that the organisers are looking for lots
of performers (musicians, poets, actors,
dancers, etc), so send a bio, description of
your work, and a tape to #1-1325 Barclay
Street, V6E 1H6, if you're interested in taking part. If you're interested in going to this f
or other related events, tickets (and, I would
imagine, details) are available at The
Women's Bookstore, Ariel, Little Sisters,
Black Swan, and Octopus East.
As for demo reviews— due to various
mix-ups (and my not getting to see any tapes
I liked in time for this column) they'll have *
to wait 'til Discorder's huge September issue. OK?
Janis
THURSDAY
night
THE PiT
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*4
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your  &lS*i**'*l
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unique looks for unique people/
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FTHUOOTAYS*
THE PIT PUB
8=30 pm -VOO am      UBC SUB
f?£mc£.Ajuyiic jfru     #^ Hips (UJOUUCIb
MONDAYS
SOUP STOCK FROM THE BONES OF
THE ELEPHANT MAN 7:30-ll:00am
"You are repressed, but you're remarkably
dressed."
- Morrison, Oahu, 1988
Three and a half hours of strictly independent
music ranging from spoken word poetry to
. hardcore. Weekly features on indie labels, plus
interviews this month with Swans, Chris and
Cosey, Gary Clail, Peter Garrett, Jane Siberry,
Numb, and various performers from last month's
Vancouver Folk Festival.    Hosted by Robert
Lorenz and Lloyd Uliana.
Aug 1: Passport and Peaceville records
Aug 8: Independent club music
Aug 15: SST Part II - giveaways, interviews, and
new product from America's favorite indie
Aug 22: London mod label Unicom Records -
new music from the Toasters, the Risk, the Mondays, plus more.
Aug 29: Blast First and CD-only label Rykodisc.
ALIEN WATCHDOG l-3:00pm
Finally, radio for SPACE CADETS. Keep your
eyes on the sky and your ears on the radio, UFO
sightings, recipes, and other extra-terrestrial
goings-on.
CRAPSHOOT 5:30-6:00pm
Well it's time for the panelists: Ken (Tory), Martin
(liberal), Ed (NDP), and Mikail G. (Communist)
to chew the fat. Of course, our moderate moderator, Dylan, will make sure that things don't get out
of hand. Topics this month: Tory backstabbing,
Liberal hypocrisy, the NDP's illusions of grandeur and our favorite topic: Bill Vander Zalm.
THE JAZZ SHOW 9-12:30am
Vancouver's longest running prime time Jazz
program featuring all the classic players, the
occasional interview and local music news. Hosted
by the ever-suave Gavin Walker.
Aug 1: "Soul Stirrin'' is our theme for the Jazz
show...not only is that a great tune but it's from a
fine album (a rare collector's item) of the same
name by trombonist Bennie Green. Tonight the
whole album as our feature. Bennie Green with
Gene Ammons, Sonny Clark and more.
Aug 8: Courtney Pine, a young saxophonist from
England (bom of Jamaican parents) has come a
long way since his first recording (which was a
Jazz Show feature) he has TURNED DOWN jobs
with Elvin Jones and Art Blakey to continue to
spread the Jazz word in England. His second
album is our feature tonight and it's great!
ENVIRONMENTAL      SCATOLOGY
12:304:00am
Hey disgruntled Resident's fans without CD players! Listen August 1 for the new CD-only release,
"God in three persons" in its entirety.  I'm excited!!
28       DISCORDER
TUESDAYS
PEST CONTROL 10:00-l:00pm
They don't care about nuclear war, Bill Vander
Zalm, anti-abortion legislation, or Lyell Island.
Who are they? They're South American Killer
Bees. They'll be here by the middle of the next
decade and they just want to sung you. Listen to
this show and be prepared.
"ClfllR CABLE 102 ~~
AURAL TENTACLES midnite til the *
moon drops from above
Look into the sky and see ethereal sounds, real
news and unreal music. Hear the dark fade into
day and witness Pierre's w.w.o.d. at 2:00 and feel
the difference.
WEDNESDAYS
7:30
8:00
9:00
10:00
11:00
12:00
1:00
2:00
3:00
4:00
5:00
6:00
7:00
8:00
9:00
10:00
11:00
12:00 ■
Soup
Stock
From
The
Bones
Soup de Jour
Alien
Watchdog
Radio
Vomit
The
Jennifer Chan
Show
Pest
Control
i:s^ra;j^:WS*TttS*;
Alternating
Wednesdays
Every
Wednesday
Batter sea
Park
Gardens
Brewoiu.p REPORT crra^P^^
Blood On
The Saddle
Steaks
This
Thick
The
PTL
Show
The
PTL
Show
(Cont)
The
Spice
of Life
Better
Hohm's
&
Garlick's
TheKirsty
Alley Fan
Club
Happiness
Is Yelling
"Bingo!"
In
Context
Tribes And
Shadows
The Joanna
Graystone
Show
Narduwar
Absolute
Value of
Noise
NEWS,SPORTS, WEATHER, GENERIC REVIEW, tN»GOT AND DAILY FEATURE
CrapShoot
Hot
Pink
More
Dinosaurs
The
Jazz
Show
1:00
2:00-
3:00-
4:00
Environmental
Scatology
Neon Meat
Dream
Swirlin'
Vinyl
Spin
Aural
Tentacles
WEEKDAY REPORTS
After
The
Goddess
The
African
Show
Permanent
Culture
Shock
The
Knight
After
The
Vinyl
Frontier
Top Of
The Bops
The
Can-Con
Job
Interference
Stomp On
That
Boppa-Tron
I Don't
Know
The
Saturday
Edge
Are you
Sirius
Music?
Power
Chord
Deadly
Doom
S<t. Magazine
We Be
Botanists'/
House
Party
The
Revolving
Door
Generic
Friend
The
Rockers
Show
The
Blues
and
Soul Show
Suru Magazine
Just Like
Women/
Electronic
Smoke
Signals
Playloud
This Is
Not
A Test
In The
Grip
Of
Incoherency
SATURDAY REPORTS
SUNDAY REPORTS
100 BBCWaMR
5:00 MAJOR NEWS/SPORTS
trnn THE GTR MORNING NEWS
MAJOR NEWS/SPORTS
SATURDAY EVENING MAGAZINE
SUNDAY MAGAZINE ALTERNATING WEDNESDAYS/EVERY WEDNESDAY 7:30-10:00am
Music for erthrophobes.
THE KNIGHT AFTER mWnlte-very late
Rockin' Patrick and his pal Vem Lutner bring you
music without the gristle. Turn it up REALLY
loud and get kicked out of your house. M ARLIN
PERK1NSMUSICALHOUR brings you the weird
and wonderful from all over this sick world. This
month: Hermanos Guzanos, Tom Furgas, Person
to Person, X-Ray Pop, Abner Malaty, and more...
THURSDAYS
CAN-CON JOB 9:00-mldnite
Three hours of one hundred percent pure and
wholesome homespun C.C. with local band interviews, new tunes, and coming soon—LIVE
BANDS. Request your all-time C.C. faves. Discorder communist or fascist or Ded.
FRIDAYS
IN CONTEXT 8:30-10:00am
Hosted by Kirby Hill.
Aug 5: Recap of concert events in August, music
and interviews, CATS.   At 9:45am Arts view
(special guest commentary on Arts and events).
Aug 12: The Commodore Ballroom has been one
of Vancouver's leading dancehalls since 1927, an
interview with Drew Bums, owner, on its history
and contemporary use.
Aug 19: With events being cancelled like crazy,
it's anybody's guess... Music: David Sanborn,
Bryan Ferry, Mirian Makeba.
Aug 26: Dance and new music in the Fall.
TRIBES AND SHADOWS 10:30-
11:30am
Hosted by K. Scott Hill.
Aug 5: Private Music has been sending us some
interesting music. A listen to the latest from Lucia
Hwong, Andy Summers, Patrick O'Hearn.. .maybe
an interview.
Aug 12: Room for an Art continues.
Aug 19: The "Avante Garde" in new Jazz: new
stuff from Fred Frith, Semantics, others.
Aug 26: Room for the Unexpected (or Rapid
Occurence of Events).
NARDUWAR THE HUMAN SERVIETTE
PRESENTS...2:30-3:00pm
The Bow-marc missile crisis of 1963, certainly
caused some heat.
Join Narduwar and Cleo Von Flufflestein as they
examine the sweat that has survived all these
years on John D. Diefenbacker's embalmed body.
SATURDAYS
WE BE BOTANISTS/HOUSE PARTY
6:00-9:00pm
After 3 years on CiTR, the Botanist is splitting.
Both Melissa and Grant sell out. They have
watched too many episodes of L.A. Law and they
want BMW's too. Thanks for the hate mail. Have
a good life and marry for money.
GENERIC FRIEND l:00anvdeath
Starting August 13, join Kunio as he spends yet
another Saturday night alone with a bowl of
popcorn in front of the TV test signal, but then
again, what is so wrong with that?
LcSi
pylisi-
LABEL
ARTIST
TITLE
•ART BERGMANN
CRAWL WITH ME
DUKE STREET
NICK CAVE AND THE BAD SEEDS
MERCY SEAT
MUTE
SWANS
LOVE WILL TEAR US APART
CAROLINE
LEDERNAKEN
LET YOURSELF GO
STRIKE-BACK
MEAT BEAT MANIFESTO
1 GOT THE FEAR
SWEATBOX
PATTI SMITH
DREAM OF LIFE
ARISTA
♦NUMB
NUMB
EDGE
CAMPER VAN BEETHOVEN
OUR BELOVED REVOLUTIONARY...
VIRGIN
•SPIRIT OF THE WEST
LABOUR DAY
STONEY PLAIN
RAMONES
MANIA
WEA
X
LIVE AT THE WHISKEY A GOGO
WEA
CLASH
THE STORY OF THE CLASH VOL 1
CBS
MANUFACTURE
ARMED FORCES
NETTWERK
VARIOUS
HIP HOP 21
STREET SOUNDS
YOUNG FRESH FELLOWS
TOTALLY LOST
FRONTIER
DIAMANDA GALAS
YOU MUST BE CERTAIN OF...
MUTE
RED LORRY/YELLOW LORRY
NOTHING WRONG
SITUATION TWO
GREATER THAN ONE
DANCE OF THE COWARDS
KGKLP
STUMP
FIERCE PANCAKE
MCA
•DAYGLO ABORTIONS
HERE TODAY GUANO TOMORROW
FRINGE
•DEATH SENTENCE
STOP KILLING ME
FRINGE
PURPLE TOADS
LOVE SONGS FOR THE HARD OF...
STAR RECORDS
KILLING JOKE
AMERIC
EG
VARIOUS
PERMANENT RECORD
EPIC
MEAT BEAT MANIFESTO
STRAP DOWN
SWEATBOX
BUTTHOLE SURFERS
HAIRWAY TO STEVEN
FRINGE
BEATNIGS
BEATNIGS
ALT. TENTACLE
REVOLTING COCKS
LIVE
WAX TRAX
THE WEATHERMEN
THE BLACK ALBUM ACCORDING...
FLAY IT AGAIN
THE PRIMITIVES
LOVELY
RCA
•GRUESOMES
UNCHAINED
PRIMITIVE
WEDDINGS, PARTIES ANYTHING
ROARING DAYS
WEA
JESUS & MARY CHAIN
BARBED WIRE KISSES
WEA
TRACY CHAPMAN
TRACY CHAPMAN
ELEKTRA
SUGAR CUBES
LIFE'S TOO GOOD
ELEKTRA
•COWBOY JUNKIES
TRINITY SESSIONS
LATENT
•RANDYPETERS
YOU THOUGHT I WAS FOOLIN
AMOK
VARIOUS
RAT MUSIC FOR RAT PEOPLE
CD
KMFDM
DONT BLOW YOUR TOP
SKYSAW
•STEPHEN FEARING
OUT TO SEA
VAN FOLK FEST
WORLD DOMINATION ENTERPRISES
LET'S PLAY DOMINATION
CAROLINE
NEON JUDGEMENT
HORNY AS HELL
POLYGRAM
DJ JAZZY JEFF & FRESH PRINCE
DJ JAZZY JEFF & FRESH PRINCE
JIVE
ABSOLUTE VALUE OF NOISE (FRIDAY AFTERNOONS 3 TO 5)
•CASSETTE FEEDBACK
•CRACKING ARBORITE ON A TAPE LOOP
•TENNIS BALL WITH ECHO
•TURNTABLE FEEDBACK
•HARMONIZED POWER RAKE
•SPANISH EVANGELISTS
•DRIVING NAILS
•«NEW HEADS SOUND MACHINE»
• DENOTES CANADIAN CONTENT
August 1988        29 We   Can  Be  Bought.
Order Discorder and don't miss a beat.
Twelve-month subscriptions are $12 ($12US to the States, $20 everywhere else). Send
^i it^ut? ui 11 iui icy uiuci iu uia^muci iviuyuz.ii it?, oiuuci n ui iiui » duiiuii iy, ui liv^ioiiy ui
British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C. V6T 2A5. Don't forget to state the month with which
you would like the subscription to begin. Back issues still available for $1 each.
Aug 13: Dead Playlists Mourned, part one
Aug 20: Dead Discorders Mourned, issue one
Aug 27: Dead Playlists Mourned, part two
SUNDAYS
ARE YOU SIRIUS MUSIC? 8:00-noon
Dinner music for the 22nd century with your hosts
Witold Lutoslawski and Charles Ives.
THE BLUES AND SOUL SHOW 3:00-
6:00 pm
Blues from the Mississipi Delta to Chicago, W.W.
II to present. Soul from the Motor City, Philly,
NYC, the Deep South, and more, 60's to present.
Live interviews with local blues musicians every
so often. Your host, Rob Z. or Lachlan Murray.
JUST LIKE WOMEN/ELECTRONIC
SMOKE SIGNALS 6:30-9:00pm
Aug 7: JUST LIKE WOMEN: POST FESTIVAL
FESTTVITIES - Alix, Phranc, and Faith from the
Vancouver Folk Music Festival; the Gay Pride
Festival; more on the Vancouver Women's Music
Festival.
Aug 14: SMOKE SIGNALS: Feature reports on
Hiroshima/Nagasaki commemorations in Vancouver. Highlights of International Uranium
Congress held in Saskatoon 16-21 June 1988.
Preview of Greens Convention to be held 28
August - 2 September 1988 in White Rock.
Aug 21: JUST LIKE WOMEN: WOMEN AND
POVERTY - closer to home than most of us
would like to believe. Wendy talks to women
affected by poverty and women trying to help
others out of this vicious cycle.
Aug 28: SMOKE SIGNALS: Feature Report on
the Third North American Broregronal Congress
held 21 -26 August in Squamish. Live report from
White Rock on opening of the Greens Convention.
IN THE GRIP OF INCOHERENCY midnite til the cows come home
Your unintelligible hosts Bareman and Guido    #
bring you mayhem in the wee hours.
i\imr Ape Redanrad
"Breakfast, lunch, before and after
dinner."
72*/Ui*{utfy»M
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