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Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) Sep 1, 1986

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 That Magazine from CITR fml02 cablelOO    SEPTEMBER 1986 • FREE! 4
322!
^ "7/' j   «■/»* >?<'
if
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if  *-**#  y
1st Prize
24 hrs. Recording Time
24-track at Mushroom Studios
2nd Prize
24 hrs. Recording Time
16-track at Bullfrog Studios
3rd Prize
24 hrs. Recording Time
8-track at 'Scape Studios
— and —
a D330 BT Microphone
from Commercial Electronics
EVERY MONDAY STARTING
SEPTEMBER 15TH
AT THE SAVOV
THE SAVOY NIGHTCLUB
6 Powell Street
687-0418
J DftcOHDER
That Magazine from CITR fml02 cabielOO
September 1986 • Vol. 4/No. 8
EDITOR
Chris Dafoe
CONTRIBUTORS
Jerome Broadway, Dave Campbell, Ian Verchere,
Pat Carroll, Garnett Harry, Bill Mullan,
Steve Edge, Terry Walker, Linda Scholten,
Kevin Smith, Norm Baldwin, Larry Thiessen,
Dave Watson, Robin Razzell, CD,
Rene Skerlj, Terry Orr
FASHION EDITOR
Robin Razzell
PHOTOS
Bill Jans, Dave Campbell, Ian Verchere,
Garnett Harry
CARTOONS
Rod Filbrandt, Chris Pearson, William Thompson
COVER
Illustration — Ian Verchere
Colour — Dave Wilson
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Karen Shea
DESIGN
Harreson Atley, Dorothy Cameron
LAYOUT
Karen Shea, Pat Carroll, Teresa Chan,
Johanna Block, Alan Scales, Lynn Snedden,
CD, Mike Mines, Robin Razzell,
Randy Iwata, Don Bull
TYPESETTING
Dena Corby
PUBLISHER
Harreson Atley
ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE
Robin Razzell
DISTRIBUTION MANAGER
Bill Mullan
BUSINESS MANAGER
Randy Iwata
DISCORDKR. c/o CITR Radio 6138 SI B Blvd.,
Vancouver, B.C., V6T 2A5. Phone (604) 228-.1017.
DISCORDKR Maga/ine is published monthly by
the Student Radio Society of the University of British
Columbia (CITR-UBC Radio).
CITR fm 101.9 cable!00.1 broadcasts a 49-watt signal in stereo throughout Vancouver from Cage lowers
on the UBC campus. CITR is also available via FM
cable in Vancouver, West Vancouver. North Vancouver, Burnaby, Richmond, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam.
Port Moody, Maple Ridge and Mission.
Twelvemonth subscriptions available: $10 in Can"
ada, $10 U.S. in the U.S.A.. $15 Overseas. Send cheque
Or money order payable to CITR Publications.
Unsolicited manuscripts, photographs, cartoons
and graphics are welcome but they can be returned
on!) if accompanied by a selt'-addresscd, stamped
envelope. DISCORDFR does not assume responsibility tor unsolicited material.
1 he offices ol CITR and DISCORDER are located
in room 233 of the UBC's Student Union Building. For
general business inquiries or to book the CITR Mobile
Sound System call 228-3017 and ask tor station
manager Nancy Smith. The Music Request line is
228-C ITR.
F.I.R.A. FALLOUT
Slow gets naked, Jimmy gets shocked,
FIRA gets cancelled.
SHINDIG
It's back, and bigger    better    stranger	
(check one) than ever.
EVERYTHING LOOKS BIGGER ON TV
The tale of an innocent abroad at the Socred Convention.
CURRENT 93
Larry Thiessen explores the apocalypse with David Tibet 93.
THE SPORES
Pat Carroll meets Vancouver's reigning
rock 'n' roll bowling champs.
STYLE
Dave Watson looks for tffat elusive something
and we look at local designers.
22
8
13
17
25
IN EVERY ISSUE
AIRHEAD
Airmail from our readers and contributors. 4
BEHIND THE DIAL
New Faces, New Year, New T-shirts and more New Stuff. 32
ON THE DIAL
A guide to radio for normal people. 33
VINYL VERDICT
New vinyl from Screaming Blue Messiahs, Dayglo Abortions,
John Lurie, Agent Orange and more. 37
THE ROVING EAR
Life After Bed does Europe. The Western Alliance
may never be the same. 44
SEPTEMBER   1986       3 CLUB SODA presents the best in local and
international talent 7 DAYS A WEEK.
Here's what's coming up in September...
Sept. 1 & 2
MT Vessels
and special guest
Madeleine (formerly of MOEV)
Sept. 3-6
Barney Bentall & the Legendary Hearts
Sept. 8
From L.A., Enigma Recording Artists
THE SMITHEREENS
Sept. 9-13
Juan Trak
Sept. 14, 21 & 28 are CHEAP THRILL SUNDAYS
with the best in new local talent being showcased.
Sept. 15 & 16
Steven Drake in the Twentieth Century
with special guests the Casulties
Sept. 17-20
1-800
Sept. 22-24
T.B.A.
Sept. 25-27
Paradox
Sept. 29 & 30
MCA Recording Artists
FM with Nash the Slash
1055 HOMER
681-8202
An Open Letter
To Slow
Dear Slow (and especially
Anselmi),
When we read that FIRA dates
at Expo were cancelled we almost pissed our pants. (Hurray!)
It seems that performing at
Expo is a "Yes" for fascism, cutbacks and born-again economics. Whatever your motives for
playing at Expo we nevertheless
want to congratulate you on your
performance August 4 at Xerox
Theatre, which was cut short by
Expo officials. Especially delightful was the cancellation of the remainder of the concert schedule.
"Expo and rock and roll don't
mix." Expo doesn't mix with anything that's worth living for.
Ex Plode
Dateline: Surge
Narrows
Dear Mr. Editor and readers of
Discorder:
It's pretty desolate up here on
the Inside Passage, just the
place for a person to hide from
his persecutors. After years of
hiding from Chris Dafoe and his
"Clique of Three," however, I
have finally been found. The telegram was quite clear—mail in a
record review, or they would
erase the tapes of my old shows.
Even though it hurt when my
name and photo were removed
from the CITR Hall of Fame, I
cannot sit idly by while you des-
P
RH0At>
U>\2& 5U& &LVP>.
troy my last vestige of self-respect. Chris, you shall have your
review.
It seems long ago now, that I
left my once-beloved CITR in a
storm of controversy so severe
that I'm sure the arguments rage
even today. I will never forget that
cold winter's day, when I was
summoned before the Elders of
CITR to explain my actions. Then
came the threats, with everyone
jumping to conclusions, the bitter recriminations, and ultimately, my flight into exile. Yes, Mr.
Dafoe, you've done a tidy bit of
work indeed, conveniently scattering my compatriots to junior
college stations and out-of-the-
way Striptease Clubs. Depriving
us of our dignity, reducing us to
nothing, just to keep the facade
of CITR squeaky clean.
Dafoe probably figures I am so
out of touch that my review this
month will be the absolute laughing stock among Discorder's
readers. Luckily, I still have a few
loyal contacts left in the underground. Through a person
known only as "Grant," I have
been kept reasonably well-informed. Knowing you as I do
though, Chris, you probably
won't have the guts to print either
this letter or my review.
Sincerely,
Norm Balwin
111 Bet This is
From Their Manager
Dear Airhead,
Why oh why has your magazine not yet featured the coolest
band to emerge from this city in
decades—the Hip Type? Their
tape "lllumination/Blue-bottle
Flies" was good but their live
show is awesome. I don't know
what the singer's name is but
she looks and sings great, and
the guys sure know how to rock.
Anyways, me and my friends
would like to know a little more
about the Hip Type, so please
interview them or something,
okay?
Thanks,
L.B., T.C. and S.G.
DISCORDER ^VXPO
The Morning After
IT WAS A VERY SHORT FESTIVAL. BY
now you've probably heard most of the
details of the cancellation of the Festival
of Independent Recording Artists scheduled
for the Xerox International Theatre at Expo
August 4-10.
But just in case you haven't, here's what
happened: Slow kicked off the first night of the
festival with a performance that was classic
Slow: anarchic, provocative, offensive, in short,
as near as rock and roll gets to the decline
of Western Civilization. The show started with
a trashing of the stage props the band had
ordered for the performance. By the second
song, singer Tom Anselmi was down to his
powder-blue boxer shorts, leading Sieg Heil
cheers for Bill Bennett, who had been given
an extravegant Expo sendoff earlier in theday.
Siow's peformance led to the departure of
a number of patrons who left in various degrees of outrage and disgust. Apparently, a
number of these contacted Vancouver City
Police to complain of an "obscene performance," because by the third song of the set
there were two uniformed officers perched at
the back of the theatre. Another offended
departee reportedly confronted Expo chairman Jimmy Pattison in the parking lot and
delivered a 20-minute tirade about the show.
Meanwhile, back at the Xerox, Anselmi was
inviting audience members up on stage to
howl into the microphone. The crowd that remained seemed to be enjoying themselves
immensely. I he tun was cut short when Xerox
organizers pulled the plug on the band. Slow
bassist Steve Hamm responded to the power
cut by unveiling his considerable bulk as Expo
security attempted to clear the stage. There
were scuffles between security, band members and people from the audience. More
Vancouver City Police arrived, with paddy
wagons, and two audience members were
"We have nothing to fear
but FIRA itself..."
arrested. (They were later released without
charges being laid.)
The controversy over the Slow performance
led Expo officials to cancel Poisoned's 10:00
p.m. performance, a decision which had predictably unpleasant results. About 150 audience members milled around the theatre,
chanting anti-Expo slogans as tense security
staff hovered on the edges of the theatre. At
around 10:45 the crowd marched to the on-
site studios of BCTV, where thev managed to
drown out the last half of the News Hour with
chants of "Expo Injustice" and "Expo Sucks."
(The crowd noise forced BCTV to go to their
late movie early. The movie? The Ramones
in "Rock and Roll High School." Who says
there isn't a God?)
On the morning of August 5th, Xerox Theatre organizers met with Pattison and Expo
Entertainment head Hamilton McClymont to
discuss the future of the festival. According
to Expo insiders, Pattison had already decided
to pull the plug on the festival. "Once Jimmy
heard about nudity and profanity and people
calling Bill Bennett a facist, the festival was
as good as dead," said one fair employee.
McClymont announced the decision at 2:00
p.m. that afternoon, citing concerns for "the
safety and security of our audience and performers" as the reason for the cancellation.
"We believe that this incident has given the
festival an unwanted notoriety that will likely
attract undesirable elements to future performances," said McClymont.
The cancellation fo the festival left 14 bands
in limbo and a certain amount of acrimony in
the air. The days following the cancellation
featured a good deal of finger-pointing by
bands who held Slow responsible for the cancellation of FIRA. As tempers cooled, however,
the consensus seemed to be that Expo had
overreacted to what was essentially a typical
Slow performance.
"When I first heard about what happened,
I thought 'those little bastards'," said Randy
Carpenter of The Hunting Party, one of the
bands affected by the cancellation. "But Slow
just did what they usually do. Expo just overreacted."
Others were concerned that the cancellation would affect the reputation of the local
music scene.
"By cancelling FIRA because of Slow's performance, Expo has effectively tarred the
other 14 bands with the same brush as Slow,
which is ridiculous," said Bolero Lava
manager Keith Porteus. "The Rick Scott band
is not Slow. Grapes of Wrath are not Slow.
Bolero Lava are not Slow."
In the weeks since the festival Expo officials
seem to be attempting to build the bridges to
the Vancouver music community damaged by
the cancellation. While Expo refused to discuss contractual arrangements with the
media, most bands have apparently received
a kill fee for the cancellation and a number
have been rebooked for other venues at Expo.
And Slow? They left for a tour the day after
their show and are reportedly going over very
well in Eastern Canada and the U.S., aided,
no doubt, by the flood of publicity generated
by their Xerox performance.
And as far as we've heard, they've kept their
pants on.
''Give me a Tylenol and I'll go
home. I do mu. own dental worK.N
I took my client to the Hilton "i7o7n ERST she didn't say I   "Don't be sorry, iuti go on in
m   Tt I °Z ™ 9? fo U dldn'f gtt U **>> M lf W* *> w* kmotiJl ™ Wnd.
mS^  rl ^   f°n toe  WQ**\M* year, so I'll get of tnIng ^times happens
I like the H.lfon. another chance to bk?u, it."    wiih J industrial kwnmower.H
SEPTEMBER  1986 J
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THE
THUNDERBIRD
\
SHOP ON CAMPUS
UBC Sweatshirts, T-shirts, Shorts, Sweatpants
• Gifts, Mugs, Greeting Cards
 • School Supplies & More!
Lower Level Mon. - Fri.
Student Union        224-1911   8:00 am " 6:00 pm
Building, UBC Sat. 10 am - 5 pm
/
1 **~~3c^\
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You want to go out for an
inexpensive but totally fun
night of dancing and partying
Can it be done?
YOU BET!
\
From Wednesday to Saturday
The Pit offers superb dance
music. Progressive New Tunes
on   Wednesdays, Top 40 Thurs.
& Sat. and Classic Rock 'n' Roll
on Fridays. And the Pit has
great prices. We'll even waive
our $1.00 cover charge if you
show us a valid post-secondary
student card. So come on!
Party a lot. . . for a little.
The Pit Pub
Student Union Building
6138 Sub Blvd. U.B.C.
Lower Concourse Level
Open: Mon-Sat 11 am 1 am
Sundays 11 am-11 pm
DISCORDER IMP TRAVEL CUTS "\
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Travel Service Ltd.
I Airline Ticketing I
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Flights
IWorld Wide Student Flights
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Budget Flights
And many other little known
travel discounts and opportunities.
TRAVEL CUTS VANCOUVER
Student Union Building Granville Island
University ot British Columbia      1516 Duranleau Street
224-2344 687-6033
*V
UBC'S LARGEST CAFETERIA!
•LOCATED IN THE STUDENT UNION BUILDING
•FOOD CHOICES TO SUIT ALL TASTES
•ITALIAN PASTA & PIZZA BAR
•OLD FAVOURITE SPECIALS
•STEAMED FRESH VEGGIE BAR
•ASIAN FOOD
•POPULAR & FEATURE BURGERS
•NEW ICE CREAM BAR "Lickety Split"
•FRESH BAKERY GOODS FROM OUR OWN
BAKE SHOP
"We have it ALL for you!"
HOURS: MON-THURS 7:30 am - 7:00 pm
FRIDAY     7:30 am ■ 3:30 pm
SATURDAY 10:00 am - 2:00 pm
DON T S£TTU FOR AN fAtPiRSONATOR'.
OCT THE REAL ELVIS COOKIE
Gourmet Cookies
^pjHiccino
► B.C.I.T.
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£&M                                           fl||
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II     1
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DAVID CAMBELl
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The caution
of an innoce
abroad at thi
Credit Lead(
1     Convention.
I     By Oral Dav
8      DISCORDER
p
ary
>nt
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41   IK ^^^jMray^    a          m
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^     1                                                                                 stapled to roadside trees.
We had crossed the boundary into the
Danger Zone.
Fortunately for us, our driver/cartoonist, a
^g^m VERYTHING LOOKS BIGGER ON      former resident of the area, had negotiated
TV. Watching an event on the tube,      this road before, so although we departed later
W*m  one is given the impression of size     than our original plan, we arrived drunk and
■■■ and importance that far outweighs     on time. (We had started the day with the tradi-
ip,              tne reality.                                                          tional Socred breakfast of cornflakes and
\                  Your humble scribe spent the first day of the     scotch.)
Social Credit leadership convention at home,         In a misguided attempt to appear inconspi-
safe and warm in 'Couverville, absorbing the     cuous and quickly blend in with our surroun-
events from Whistler via the electronic gun.     dings, we arrived in what we thought was ap-
i     1         And golly, did it look impressive. The banners,     propriate attire—black wool suits, white shirts
T3I0    the balloons, the bands, the tents, the hats,     and ties. We realized our error almost as soon
the food and especially the convention floor,     as we got out of the car. With everyone clad
were all relayed with an enormity that over-     in bright colourful prints and plaids, we stuck
whelmed. It all looked so huge, so important,     out like Jim Neilson's eye. (Important lesson
■     1        My God! Our lives and the Future of ol      here: Don't make judgments on what you see
DC 131    society for the next 150 years were going to     on TV unless you have a colour set.)
be decided, mapped out, directed and etched         We immediately became known as "The
^ I f\          in stone over the next three days! And we were    Undertakers." This meant we were noticed. Not
■ * K          going there to act as witness. What a thought     a good start.
to take to bed.                                                      Our nrst stop was the school. The process-
We were somewhere near Lion's Bay, on the     ing centre We presented our credentials, pick-
Squamish highway, then the reality took hold,     ed up our passes and headed out into the eye
The first indications of our impending doom     of the storm...Tent City,
took the form of blue and white cardboard        On the way we passed through the Village,
signs bearing the name "Neilsen," lovingly    The instant resort built by the Socreds as their own private pleasure dome. We were waylaid
by rumours of drinks being freepoured in Bob
Wenman's hospitality suite.
While outside it was all hype, hoopla, colour and noise, inside the lobby of the hotel
we were greeted by the grim faces of ex-cops
and stern expressions on bloated car salesmen from Vernon. The sense of impending
doom suddenly became stronger.
There was a Grace button on the bulletin
board. I pulled it off for a souvenir, and reams
of paper held on by the button fell to the floor.
A hard-as-a-rock truck driver with a don't-
mess-with-me-l-work-here look on his face,
said, "Don't do that again."
I said "Okay," and quickly escaped into the
elevator.
We spent a few minutes in Wenman's
suite. Enough time to watch the video, talk to
Mrs. Candidate, meet a few loyal supporters,
drink the free scotch and wolf down a few platters of sandwiches. (Note: Wenman, a Federal Tory MP, was feeding us tuna...think about
it...)
A page from the Delegate's Handbook-
Dealing With The Media.
Q: Why are you supporting (candidate)?
A: Because he/she's the best man for the job.
Q: Why is that?
A: Strength, leadership, proven record.
Q: What does Free Enterprise mean to you?
A: Why are you media people always so down
on the party?
...like the Bizzaro world of
Superman comics of the
60s, everything was just
a little out of kilter.
Tent City
The driving range (yes, the driving range.
Bud Smith built his tent over a sand trap and
people kept falling into it in their chairs) (ed's
note: He doesn't mean people, he means
himself) was a meateater's paradise. (Grace
called hers the Oink 'n Moo Bar-B-Que.) But
you know all that already. How could you have
avoided it? It was in all the papers. Heck, there
was nothing on TV except "Leadership '86...
Choosing a Future." But somehow your correspondent was left with the feeling that he
missed the real convention.
The names were the same, the faces, all
outward appearances were identical to what
we all saw on the tube, but, like the Bizzaro
world of Superman Comics of the 60s, everything was just a little out of kilter.
Then again, maybe it was me.
For example; walk into Jim Neilsen's bar
cont. ► <3?..
(yes, dear reader, every candidate had his or
her own bar), and step up to the bartender:.
Q: What's the story on complimentary drinks?
A: What do you want?
Q: /'// have a Chivas. Neat.
A: You want a double, don't you.
Q: Yes, I want a double. And a mug of draught
w v
to chase it down.
A: You mean a Heineken.
Q: Yah, a Heineken. Sorry.
A: 'Sokay.
Mind you, not all candidates were so free
with their liquor.
In John Reynolds' joint, free drinks had to
2nd Annual
Vancouver Fringe Festival
September 12th—21st, 1986
Noon to Midnight
Main St./Mount Pleasant
Over 400 performances in 9 venues
The New, the Old, the Alternate, the Fringe!
For info.: 681-0818
4
...one leg pointed straight out,
her skirt hiked up high
enough so you could
see the Grace garter...
be purchased with tickets provided by ex-
jocks. (Former B.C. Lions great, Jim "Dirty 30"
Young was one.) And then we were ID'd for
proof of age!
Then there were the Can Can girls.
They were in Grace McCarthy's tent. One
of them sat in a raised chair with one leg
pointed straight out, her skirt hiked up high
enough so you could see the Grace garter invitingly wrapped around her net clad thigh.
Her partner stood smiling on the floor, holding
eight-inch bamboo hoops, encouraging delegates to toss them on the aforementioned extended fimb.
The University of British Columbia
FREDERIC ,_ -   *
\\7f\rn\ 1986-87 Season
™£™^ of Four Plays
THEATRE
BLOOD RELATIONS
Pollock        September 17-27
The Crucible
Miller November 12-22
I THE SCHOOL FOR WIVES
Moliere January 14-24
97i& Winters 9a/&
|) Shakespeare March 4-14
dv Information & Reservations
PHONE 228-2678
10      DISCORDER lumpy and blue. Pass the security check.
Through the lobby. Pass the second security
check. Into the Big Hall.
The lights, the noise, the colour, the music,
the TV cameras. Wait a minute, this isn't the
convention, we've somehow stumbled in on
a game show taping. Isn't that Bob Barker?
No, it's Bill Vander Zalm.
premier Vander Zalm...Premier Vander
Zalm...PREMIER Vander Zalm?????????B
(ed's note: This is where Mr. Dave's story
ends. We're not sure what really happened to
him. He's either suffered a major stroke, or
another of his many nervous breakdowns.
Whatever the case, he's home now, recovering well, we trust. None of us dare visit him.)
But, I can hear you asking, what has this
to do with the selection of our new leader? The
person destined to drag us, kicking and
screaming, into the 21st Century?
What about issues?
What about policy?
Issues? Policy? Dear reader, you forget, you
live in British Columbia. On to the convention
floor.
Bill Won't Smell! Bill Won't Smell! Bill Won't
Smell!
We all woke up with hangovers. No time for
showers. Got to rush down to breakfast before
the first ballot. Bud Smith's tent. Chewy pancakes... rancid sausages...something steamy,
I
4I IU Tfc
=■     I   * * THEATRE • • I
THEATRE
16th & Arbutus 738-6311
EXPO
85
SEPT. 5 -
SEPT. 11
MEXICAN
FILM
FESTIVAL
Program to be announced. Watch
for details in the Vancouver Sun.
SPECIAL SHOWING FRIDAY SEPT. 12
WITH DIRECTOR PETER DAVIS
ALL PROCEEDS TO OXFAM - ONE SHOW AT 7:30 p.m.
Admission
$5.00
WITNESS TO APARTHEID
AtoflDOA
SEPT. 13-18
7:00 & 9:30
SEPT. 19-23       7:00&9:30
SUN., SEPT. 21 (only) Matinee 4:00
THE SECOND ANNUAL MELLOW MANOR
ACCLAIMED
WORKS OF ANIMATION
SEPTEMBER  1986     11 ■ W SENSATIONAL
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I SANDWICHES
I COLD LIQUIDS
I ESPRESSO BAR
I OPEN TILL 3 A.M.
With the Ultimate
in hot cappuccinos,
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and much, much more.
For lunch we offer
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and sandwiches
Citf
Suite 108
950 WEST BROADWAY
Vi block east of Oak Street
732-1664
2 for 1
Cappuccino
with this Ad!
September
6/7  TBA
13/14 THE HUNTING PARTY
19/20" THE LOVE CLUB with guests
26/27  TBA
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ARTS CLUB THEATRE   1181 SEYMOUR  683-0151 ■ ■i^iftiiia nflmn imIjil ma
Where do dreams go when they die,
mummy?
They go to dreams of menstrual winters
yet to come, beloved.
And do dead gods smell?
Of dust and must and reaping time.
THE FIRST TIME I HEARD CURRENT
93 was a bit like having every nightmare I'd ever had made manifest.
Here at last was music which made
no attempt to entertain or distract from all that
which is horrible in our lives. Using tape loops,
strident voices that shriek from every dark corner of the human psyche, repetition that becomes a giant wheel that slowly turns and
turns and turns—each time a little more off
balance, a little more febrile—the music is a
relentless statement of power and hopelessness.
The idea of predicting the end of the world
through music is not a new one. Recently
there have been a number of bands who tell
us of the iminent collapse through their album
liner notes and their lyrics and their dance
hits—they don't convince. By comparison they
are revealed for what they are not: prophets
of doom? Never.
I had to know more; so I wrote to David Tibet
93, enclosing a blank cassette to record his
reply. The return letter began most inauspi-
ciously:
"Dear Brethren:
We very much dislike doing interviews: for
what reason, to what end? To relieve ignorance? To provide fun? To be approachable? To
have our ideas stolen?"
I held little hope for the cassette, but happily (sic) all my posed questions were answered. The following are extracts from the
tape and the letter.
DISCORDER: The Current's music seems to
involve different people from project to project.
Do you have a core of artists to which you add
or subtract? How does it all work?
DAVID TIBET 93: What happens is that the
Current partakes of a specific nucleus, which
is myself and Steven Stapleton. There have
always been other people that I have used as
much as possible, but it depends on their projects because they are all in groups as well-
so really Current 93 is a specific group and
it's made up of myself, Steve Stapleton from
Nurse With Wound, John Balance from Coil,
Rose McDowall from Strawberry Switchblade,
Dru McDowall, Hilmarorn Hilmarsson, formerly of Psychic TV...so what I'm able to do depends largely on their availability to partake
in a particular recording session. That having been said, Steve Stapleton has been involved in everything and I hope will continue
to be, because I would find it impossible to
do any of it without Steve. There is a lot of collaboration between the people I use because
UP
SEPTEMBER   1986     13 we all tend to be friends and see each other
socially as well as having similar ideas or
similar interests—which doesn't necessarily
mean that the music is similar.
D: What kinds of instruments and equipment do you use?
T. Heavy electronic effects—we don't use
emulators, we don't use synthesizers, we do
use guitar quite a lot, bass, drums, a fairly conventional setup in a sense; but we do use a
lot of electronic vocal effects and devices: har-
monizers, special reverb units, special sorts
of echo. Current 93's music has always been
based on the pre-eminence of a vocal quality.
My music can be easy or not; but the music
has always come to me easily. I never found
it a long process—a frustrating process, perhaps, but not painful, because it's always a
result of pain that's gone before—so it's a way
of exorcizing the pain. The Current has always
been my means of hearing externally those
things that I don't like to keep inside me. If you
keep too much inside, you go fucking crazy—
so better out than in, don't you think?
D: Who do you listen to?
T. I'll give you an idea; but obviously the
music I listen to will depend on what mood
I'm in: Gregorian Chants—especially Armenian, Tibetan Ritual Music, piano music by
Erik Satie, Billie Holliday, myself, Crass, 13th
Floor Elevators, Seeds, Death in June, some
classical music—the Faure Requiem which I
used a loop of on "The Mystical Body of Christ
In Chorazaim," early Alice Cooper, Carl Orff—
but not Carmina Burana—dear God—not Car-
mina Burana, Black Sabbath when Ozzie Oz-
borne was with them, Prince, Metallica, Love,
Wagner, Nick Drake, Boyd Rice (a.k.a. Non).
SALVADOR
"THE FILM UNFOLDS LIKE A MESCALINE JAG.
In an insane society—as El Salvador has become—it's nice to
have a scumbag represent us." —Village Voice
"Oliver Stone's topical thriller on El Salvador is an action movie
that broils, snaps and explodes with energy. James Woods portrays Boyle as a Hunter Thompson-esque paragon of gonzo
journalism; a yuppie-hating con man, alternately obsequious
and vitriolic." —L.A. Times
Two weeks
Friday Sept. 5 - Thursday Sept. 18
7:15-9:45
classification TBA
D: There seems to be a dramatic change from
the early single "Lashtal" to Nature Unveiled was
there an event or change in your approach
which might account for that?
"ft The first thing that's probably worth mentioning is that a very close friend of mine and
I were both about to have children about three
years ago. Both children died before they were
born. One of them was aborted because of
the involvement of Paul's wife in a motorcycle
accident—the other one was aborted because
the person involved obviously didn't like me
very much and didn't like the idea of carrying
on the carrion on this earth.
Both Paul and I had planned separately to
call them Maldoror. Neither, needless to say,
eventually got the name because both Were
flushed down various toilets in various parts
of the world. This was when the song "Maldoror is Dead" came about.
Nature Unveiled was the first project after
I left Psychic TV and parted ways with 23
Skidoo. I was now following my own direction
without having to agree or change even slightly according to other people's views. It was a
I project based on things that came to obsess
' me more and more: the imminence of Armageddon, the imminence of the apocalypse, the
imminence of the final conflict, the imminence
of the fucking end...and that's something I still
feel now—that we are coming to the end...
whether you look at it in religious terms, political terms or in nuclear terms, it doesn't matter a fuck. I think people have got to prepare
themselves for this conflict, for this finality. If
they don't, they're dead. They're probably
dead already, and maybe they don't care.
Maybe they'd rather not live in the world that's
going to come. But whatever the truth is, they
should start thinking about it now...that's
immediately—because there isn't much time
left, and there's no hiding from the black bird.
D: What about Dog's Blood Rising? There
seems to be a variety of styles here.
T: Dog's Blood Rising was different because
there were various periods coming together
in that. "Christus Christus" and "Jesus Wept"
were both carryovers from the Nature Unveiled feeling. "Falling Back in Fields of Rape"
was where my interests and mood were starting to change slightly—it wasn't that I was
leaving the old mood behind; but I was getting more involved with the ideas of the
modern apocalypse, so that track was heavily based on the German attack on Russia and
the general idea of violence committed toward
women in a magical sense. There was also
a heavy influence of the ideals of threshing
floors, harvesting, reaping, the corn being
taken in, connecting again with fertility rites,
the earth, the earth goddess, the horned god.
The last piece, Simon & Garfunkel's "The
Sounds of Silence," was a song I always
wanted to do because it always depressed me
a lot and those are my favourite sorts of songs.
D: Current 93 has now released a picture disc
entitled On Menstrual Night. What's it like?
T. On Menstrual Night is based on nightmares, on little girls' voices, on acid, on wondering where dreams go when they die. It
should be listened to at 2:00 in the morning for
optimum effect. It's the work that I'm most
happy with so far.
D: / read a piece of literature from L.A.Y.L.A.H*
DISCORDER which said, among other things, that Nurse
With Wound were a Christian group who met
once a week. Critics seem to have thrown you
into the same bag, as it were. Others seem to
be skeptical.
T: The Nurse With Wound piece about the
Christians was based on a press release
which I sent out which was a total mistake.
Steve Stapleton told me to withdraw it, which
I did. Steve doesn't have any interest whatsoever in religion or magick, so he was a bit pissed off. Other reviewers may well lump us into
the same bag; but they are obviously wrong—
because Nurse With Wound aren't Christians,
nor am I. Christian apocalypse has always
obsessed me; but so do other things.
D: I read an interview with Steve Stapleton in
Unsounds in which he totally condemned the
idea of play ing in public. How do you feel about
live gigs?
T. Steve Stapleton has always hated live
performances—always will. I think it's highly
unlikely that he will ever play in any sort of live
scenario again unless he's mixing a Current
93 show. I quite like the idea of live performances under very special, very definite circumstances; but it's difficult to get people who
are ready to put out the time and money to
ensure that these circumstances are as correct as possible.
Add to that, the fact is the average Current
93 set is about 13 minutes long, which puts
promoters off even more, and the fact that we
will all never play in London again—apart
perhaps from a farewell concert at Bar Mal-
doror. Why exactly are you doing a live concert? Is it because you want to impress people with a piece of power or emotionality, or
is it because you want to get up on stage for
reasons of vanity? If it's the latter, it's a way
of getting lost. There are more important
things to do with your time.
D: Where is Current 93 going? What plans do
you have taking shape in the way of future
releases, etc?
T: The single which was going to be On
Menstrual Night will now probably be called
"Happy Birthday Pigface Christus" (so it won't
be confused with the picture disc...and we
won't lose sales...ahahahahahahahaha). It's
the Current 93 pop single. Every group must
do a pop single—this one's ours.
I'm in Brussels at the moment working on
a LP for L.A.Y.L.A.H. which we're cutting next
month along the "Happy Birthday Pigface
Christus." We're not sure of the title of the LP;
but it will not be by Current 93. We're thinking of calling ourselves the Aryan Aquayans.
Should be good for the hippies and the surf-
nazis.
We think that in view of the impending End
there is very little hope for any of you. It is suggested that in view of this approaching situation that all of you start considering the
methods of survival and victory over those who
threaten you. If you love, love selectively or not
at all. Are those recipients of your affection
worthy of it? Are they using you? Are they your
crutch? That which is falling should also be
pushed. That which is crawling should also be
crushed. There's no hiding from the blackbird...
which side are you on? It doesn't matter if
they're big or small. There's only one answer-
kill them all.
Lots of love 93 CURRENT 93.     ■
LIGHTS
muiic...
ACT/ON/
Fridays
All male
casting call!
ONE BLOCK FROM EXPO. WEST GATE
VANCOUVER. B.C.  CANADA
SEPTEMBER   1986      15 A bad haircut
is no laughing matter wmm
A Matter of Taste
Pat Carroll goes bowling for dollars with the boys
Spore: single cell that becomes free
and capable of individual development.
THAT, ACCORDING TO MY CONCISE
Oxford Dictionary (all 1552 pages of
it), is the definition of a spore. The
Spores, meanwhile, are five guys for
whom the above definition could serve as
well—provided you add the words "...while
fuelled by copious quantities of beer and a
singer's questionable sense of humour."
This group of spores meets about once a
week in the basement of a neatly groomed
house in East Van and produces songs which
tend to convey a rather iconoclastic view of
the world. The Spores, as individuals, are
Danny Schmany, lead vocals, who is not the
world-famous forklift driver "but an aspiring
cameraman." He's worked on numerous rock
videos and done documentary work for the
CBC. The photos which grace their two
singles, one album, and promotional posters,
are largely his handiwork. It is his view of the
world which gives the Spores much of their
character, largely because he writes the lyrics.
As the drummer's girlfriend notes: "He writes
a lot of society's-up-my-ass kind of songs."
Wayne Abstain, lead guitar, a self-employed individual who claims his aim is "...to try
not to work too much," would seem to be
largely responsible for the musical end of
things. He and Sandy Beach, the rhythm
guitar player, who works as a research technician in medical genetics at UBC, produce
the music, and Danny writes lyrics to fit the
melody of the song.
"I have a problem with a lot of hardcore
bands who claim to have important lyrics, yet
you can't hear them for the band," states Danny. The Spores try to make sure they get theirs
across.
'And if we can't, we make sure they don't
matter," laughs their drummer.
Their rhythm section is Boom Boom Benson—'My nickname is Barry'—on drums,
who's employed by the quality control department of a local brewery (yes, he does get to
take home plenty of free samples to ensure
he's doing his job correctly) and Johnny Von
Klutz on the bass. Johnny, like Sandy, is a lab
technician, which is where he met Sandy. He
wasn't there so we'll have to take the word of
the rest of the band that he's from England,
and that he once went to the Cavern Club
while it was still open. "But he didn't see the
Beatles or anything."
As a musical entity, The Spores are actually
part of the continuing musical experience of
Wayne, Sandy and Boom Boom, all of whom
got their start in community bands "back in
grade five." They've somehow found themselves, according to Wayne, "evolving backwards into what we are now. We're bored of
everything else, now we just try to play whatever it is we're doing."
The Spores came to life when the namesake of their previous group, The Pete Sinatra
Band,' left. "Pete quit, Dan wrote a song with
Sandy, then we played it and thought, 'Gee,
that sounds pretty neat,' and it just went from
there." That song, the powerfully funny "Meat
Byproduct," contains, according to Dan, the
cont. ►
SEPTEMBER   1986      17 /nMorron'i Continuing AHempte f$ Woo Lorettct, He Sufi ARt'irtfJohn FluevQfS:
VANCOUVER 852 Granville Street, 688-21
"John Fluevog Shoes Ltd:
SEATTLE 1611 First Avenue. 441-1
; '• ;' Photo/ Design DENISSEGUIN?   -_   ;;
Dan claims: "It sounds
real good.. .except
for the band."
"anti-consumerism,   anti-media   kind   of
blather" that is the basis for the band.
THEY LIKELY WOULD HAVE REMAINED
in their basement if not for the intervention of ... bowling.
Entering a rock 'n roll bowling tourney as
a gag (only Wayne really knows how to play),
they came away in first place and found themselves the recipients of free records, recording
time and a video. With this victory behind
them, the Spores became a bit of a fixture on
the local scene. Danny explains: "It's a hobby,
we stayed together because it's so much fun,
we get together whenever we can, someone
brings beer, we play our favourite songs by our
favourite bands, we get asked to play sometimes, I get to make a fool of myself on stage..."
"And now we're stars," intones Boom Boom.
However, because of band members' jobs
and other commitments, like Johnny's 3-year-
old son (who knows all the words to "Meat
Byproduct," "he brings the average age of the
band down quite a bit"), the band can't really
tour, although they once played behind barbed
wire for a gang of bikers in Peachland. To get
around this the band released their album,
Schizofungi (pronounced like something out
of badly dubbed Bruce Lee movie).
"We wanted to get the songs out so we
could play them for people," is the rationale
Sandy offers for releasing the album. Made
18      DISCORDER with gear they begged, borrowed and rented,
and recorded in their engineer, Steve White-
house's basement, Schizofungi is 11 tracks of
the funniest punk/hardcore songs released
since the Dickies' first album.
It was also supposed to expand the sound
of the band. "We wanted female back-up
vocals," remembers Dan. "We've got a lot on
this album... No, actually we've got one. In
'Chemical Rainbow' she whispers, 'it hurts'."
Plans for other female back-up vocals were
dashed when Dan's girlfriend at the time responded to his comments on her singing efforts by pushing him down the stairs, breaking his collarbone.
Which brings us to the Spores' opinion of
themselves. "We're good," says Boom Boom,
"because we're not just multitudes of thrash.
I mean, it would all sound the same if you're
used to listening to country, but in its own
terms it's quite different."
I think you should forget everything after,
'we're good'," crackes Dan.
You can judge for yourself with the release
of their new single, "Narcs in My Pants."
They've had a record release party for it already, but "it was a bit funny. The record didn't
show up for one thing." This was due to the
records arriving from Toronto with the labels
backwards and reversed. The single is their
first recording in a real studio. Dan claims: "It
sounds really good...except for the band."
The A side recounts Danny's experiences
with RCMP surveillance. "They were putting
microphones in my neighbour's trees." The
side contains two songs: the instrumental
"PM" (dedicated to the Enigmas) ("It's a
musical I wrote for them," says Wayne), and
"Conspiracy in the Sky," the song Danny says
is about hijackings and terrorism.
And the last word? From Danny as usual:
"My sphincter hurts." ■
VANCOUVER'S
HOTTEST
FUNK
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SEPTEMBER  1986      19 A
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Visit all of us on
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3645 WEST BROADWAY
738-6458 The long-awaited return of the biggest, best, most exciting, scariest,
most maddeningly unpredictable (and certainly our favorite) music
festival cum Battle of the Bands in history.
SM/Wfc
ALL RIGHT, SO MAYBE WE'RE EXAG-
gerating just a little bit. But Shindig is
back in all its monstrous glory. Every
Monday night starting September 15 CITR will
present three unsigned, unrecorded local acts
in concert at the Savoy. Each week the band
that stands out in the eyes of the judges,
chosen from various facets of the local music
community, will advance to the next round. On
Monday, December 15 the three remaining
acts will compete for the following prizes:
1st Prize—24 hours of recording in the 24-
track facilities of Mushroom Studios.
2nd Prize—24 hours of recording time in
the 16-track facilities of Bullfrog Studios.
3rd Prize—24 hours of recording time at the
8-track facilities of 'Scape Studios, plus a
D330 BT microphone from Commercial Electronics.
While the prizes might bring a sparkle to
the eye of local musicians, the real attraction
of Shindig is the opportunity to catch the best
in local underground music. Shindig is not a
collection of careerist, money-grubbing would-
be local heroes trying to Shmooze their way
into a major label recording deal with the right
haircuts and the right gladhanding attitude
At least most of the time it's not. Shindig takes
chances on bands that are still fresh, raw, and
exciting. Among the bands Shindig and its
predecessor, The Hot Air Show, held at the
Pit at UBC, have featured are: Bolero Lava,
Beverley Sisters, Slow, Rhythm Mission, Bob's
Your Uncle, and the Wardells. A number of
these bands have since released records;
when they played Shindig they were unrecorded and, for the most part, unknown beyond
a small circle of friends and family.
So basically, Shindig is the best thing that
ever happened to local music and we figure
that anyone who has anything to do with it
deserves an Order of Canada, a personal telephone audience with the Pope (he won't even
call collect), and a gift certificate worth a
week's stay at the Betty Ford Clinic. Anyone
who doesn't show up every week is an unworthy Philistine whose idea of fun begins and
ends with entering lip-sync contests as Billy
Idol and doing "White Wedding." So there.
We'll see you all September 15th, okay?
Bands wishing to enter Shindig should contact Linda Scholten or Julia Steele at 228-3017.
Bands should be able to provide a demo tape
of two or more songs, be able to play 45 minutes of original material, not be on the verge
of signing a record contract of any kind, and
should be able to get through a set without
slaughtering small animals, setting fire to (or
otherwise destroying) the club, or breaking all
the beer glasses. Call now. There's only room
for a few more bands.
DISCHARGE
WITH SPECIAL GUESTS
Sunday, Sept. 14/86
All Ages Welcome!                Doors: 7:00 p.m.
All tickets: CBO/VTC. 501 W. Georgia St. and all major malls. Zulu. Black
Swan, Highlife, Breeze. Track (Seymour) and C&R Guitars, plus
THE RICHARD
THOMPSON
BAND
featuring...
Richard Thompson, Guitar
Christine Collister, Vocals
Klaus Gregson, Guitar
Rory McFarlane, Bass
Jerry Conway, Drums
John Kirkpatrick, Accordian
with special guests
Wednesday, Sept. 24/86
Thursday, Sept. 25/86
All tickets: CBO/VTC. 501 W. Georgia St. and all major malls. Zulu. Black
Swan. Highlife. Breeze. Track (Seymour) and C&R Guitars, plus
TOWN PUMP
| the new YORK THEATRE 1
The Return of :.J^£
WITH GUESTS
All tickets: CBO VTC. 501 W. Georgia St. and all major malls. Zulu. Black
Swan. Highlife. Breeze. Track (Seymour) and C&R Guitars, plus
TOWN PUMP
\66 Water Street Gastown  683-66951|66 Water Street Gastown  683-6695\
22      DISCORDER HREHALL THEATRE til October 4
MIDNIGHT OPERATOR A Media Mystery by L.A. Hunt. Directed
by Suzie Payne. Film/Sound by Peg Campbell. Hats, headlines, heroines &
hankies!! September 4-13 (Closed Mon.) 8:30 PM, Sat. Matinees 2 PM.
CARNEGIE CENTENNIAL MUSIC SERIES
September 14 • 8 PM
ANOTHER MORNING Arts Club read-through of a new play. A love
story set at the time of the WWII Japanese internment. September 22 • 8 PM
OPENING DOORS, VANCOUVER'S EAST END
by Daphne Marlatt & Carole Itter. Adapted & Directed by Donna Spencer. A
series of mono-dramas. September 16-20 • 8 PM
ONE MORE STOP ON THE FREEDOM TRAIN A Gospel
Spiritual Cantata. Written, produced & directed by Leon Bibb. September
25-28 • 8 PM, Matinee.
MAJOR VISUAL ARTS EXHIBITION Eastside artists Esther
Rausenberg, organizer. September 29-October 4.
THE SUNSHINE CAFE Gerry Gilbert, Maxine Gadd & Lin Bennett.
Performance and readings in a downtown cafe setting.
September 29, 30 • 8 PM
FIREHALL THEATRE - 280 E. Cordova
.mcouvu BOX OFFICE & INFO
^        689-0926
Open Sundays
S.F.U.   RADIO    CJIV      FM-CABLE <?4.5
recommended shows
Musical Terrorise Monday evenings 8-9}
The Perry Como Cowichan Sweater Experience Monday evenings b-u>
Black Plague RadiO (Wednesday 9-u pmj
Dark ShadOWS        (Thursday 9-u pm
24I-37Z7
"Vancouver's other alternative"
SEPTEMBER   1986     23 SECRET AGENT
THE GAME. . .
The toll free calling area of Greater Vancouver
is the game board and you are one of the
game pieces. Track down your target, squirt
'em, say GOTCHA, and you could be on your
way to winning a
$5,000.00 PRIZE
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
m
24
SECRET AGENT, THE GAME.
HEADQUARTERS
Get your photo I.D.
card here by
12 pm Oct. 5.
6244 East Blvd.
Vancouver
261-GAME
(Till Sept. 2
683-5062)
mm %m saw ■■■■■■ ■■■■■■■■ abb ■■ ■
DISCORDER
TICKETS
VTC/CBO, Info Centres in all
Lower Mainland Malls, Eaton's,
Woodward's, AMS Tkts/UBC.
Charge by phone 280-4444 or at
Secret Agent The Game. . .
Headquarters 6244 East Blvd.
Ticket incl invitation to
SECRET AGENT
THE BALL. . .
Sept 29th
jY&<
Am^s*
Come dressed to spy..
but check your water
pistols at the door.
RULES
• 16 on or before Oct. 31/86
•No captures in banks, etc.
•Photos must be taken by
12 pm, Oct. 5/86
•Full rules available at
Headquarters
TIX ON SALE What are you going to wear? You've got
to wear something, right? Style and
Fashion are touchy, personal topics;
some people would sooner talk about their
sex lives. But still, you've got to wear
something. Discorder asked a number of
local designers and noted ordinary guy-
about-town Dave Watson to shed some
light on the troublesome subject of
STYLE. EVERYONE WANTS TO HAVE"
it. This month the venerable Discorder
is featuring fashion, which is part of
style in the same sense that Keith
Richards and Mick Jagger are part of Vfri Rolling Stones—essential, but not the entire bag
of cheesies. There have been isolated cases
of people exhibiting style without employing
fashion, but that is the hard way. Through the
proper mix of attitude and clothing you can
have style up the wazoo. Trust me.
Let's begin with a list of famous people (real
and fictional) with and without style, regardless of their fashion sense.
Those With Style
Emma Peel and John Steed.
Bryan Ferry, Frank Sinatra, Bob Dylan, the
Marlboro Man.
Sean Connery, Humphrey Bogart.
Marlon Brando, James Dean, Marilyn Monroe, Ma Kettle.
The Bonzo Dog Band, The Velvet Underground, The Marx Brothers.
Miles Davis, the Three Stooges.
Kathleen Turner.
Kate Bush, Vincent Price.
Mr. Clean, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Johnny Cash.
Ingrid   Bergman,   Max   Headroom,  Joni
Mitchell
The Man From Glad, the Tidybowl Man"
Michelin Man.
Dick Clark, E.T., the Love Boat.
Donny & Marie, Joan Rivers, Roger Moore.
Mr. Ed, Benny Hill, Jack Tripper, Hulk
Hogan.
Game show hosts, Boy George, Barney
Rubble.
Pee Wee Herman, Stephen King.
My dog Misty, Shirley Temple, Dick Nixon.
STYLE CAN ONLY EXIST IN PUBLIC. No
matter how good you look .and act at
home, you'll only be impressing your dog
unless you go outside. Outside can be divided
into two seasons—hot and the rest of the year.
Hot
This can be tough. Just because sweat is
the body's cooling system doesn't mean it is
cool to sweat. Become psychically tunned to the
hum of air conditioning. Breezes can save
your life on a hot day. You don't need a
weatherman to know which way the wind
blows—a wet finger will work. We get a lot of
sun. Avoid it unless you are photosynthetic.
Unfortunately sunshine is the only appropriate time to wear sunglasses, which can be
very cool, unless they are worn after dark or
inside bars. People who wear sunglasses
under those conditions are geeks deluding
themselves they look cool.
You should especially avoid the sun if you
are a devotee of the 'pale near-death look.' It
*is, however, sometimes necessary to go outside before 7 p.m. Try to dash between patches of shadow. Tanning is something people
do to leather—not themselves.
The Rest Of The Yea
Raining
Unless you own an umbrella, do not gel
your hair on rainy days. Everytime I do I end
up with spiked leg hair and a charming drowned rat appearance. A wartime coat is perfect
for the wind and sleet-dry and tres cool. Pretending that you don't notice the rain at all is
even more cool. You are waterproof, aren't
you?
Not Raining
Free at last. Dress as you please, but keep
the temperature coefficient in mind.
Clothing
T^HRIFT^
*~ place to find cool clothes but so many
people know this that you have to go to Haney
cont. ►
SEPTEMBER   1986     25 (wherever that is) to find a Value Village that
hasn't been picked clean. The only solution
is anti-fashion. Buy wide ties—they will come
back.
Five years ago black shirts were impossible
to find. Now people wear all black clothes,
probably with black underwear. This could be
disasterous. Black absorbs light and scientists
are concerned that all of the sun's photons
may get sucked up—leaving the Earth a cold
and lifeless planet. The answer is to wear
Hawaiian shirts all the time.
The best basic wardrobe is a few pairs of
jeans (no designer brands) and a big drawer
packed with crumpled up T-shirts bearing the
names of your favourite bands. I once bought
a pair of generic jeans, but I wouldn't recommend them. Yellow and black are awful colours for denim.
Shoes: Combat boots are considered
fashionable in some circles but they are hard
to be graceful in. Pointy shoes are painful.
Runners are your best bet, provided they are
not computer designed $150 joggers, which
are pretentious.
Socks: The very cool wear unmatched
socks every day. If you don't have the nerve
then stick to white.
Hats: Many people look good in hats, but
I am not one of them. I don't have a hat face.
Make sure a hat suits you before buying it and
don't forget the dangers of 'hat head,' a condition caused by the hat compressing a circular band of your hair tight to your scalp while
leaving the rest sticking but.
ransf
MANY CARS ARE VERY COOL^
very expensive. If you can't afford a nice
car, buy a loud stereo to inflict your musical
taste on everyone nearby. If your car is not a
sports car please don't drive it like one. People
will be more amused than impressed at the
pitiful squeak of 'laying rubber' in a Honda
Civic. Plus your stereo will probably drown out
the 'chirp' you produce.
Man didn't emerge from the
primordial ooze so that a
light bulb could tell him
when to cross the street.
Walking can be cool. Jaywalking is even
more cool. Man didn't emerge from the primordial ooze so that a light bulb could tell
him when to cross the street. Anyone over the
age of ten has probably developed enough
sense of perspective and appreciation of the
Doppler Effect to tell if approaching traffic
poses a threat.
Bussing need not be a socially humbling
experience. Walkmans allow you to be as obnoxious to fellow busriders as a loud car
stereo is to people stuck in rush-hour traffic.
The Jesus and Mary Chain are a good band
to listen to real loud on the bus, as are most
forms of industrial music. If you are drinking
beer on the bus, drink an expensive imported
beer like Wersteiner.
„ The SkyTrain is hard to be cool on. Almost
every seat faces another and people never
relax enough to indulge in juicy conversations
for you to overhear. It is very uncool to mimic
the station anouncements, even if you have
them down pat.
SLANG IS COOL, Blj
fast turnover. A conversation with anyone five years younger than you will quickly
establish that fact. You can either bring back
slang from another era or make up your own
by chopping syllables off a word to keep
ahead.
Swearing can be very effective, but its usefulness drops sharply in relation to how often
you use it. If you swear all the time, like fuckin'
every third fuckin' word, you won't be cool. But
if you are in a deep conversation with a member of the debating team concerning the virtues of McLuhan over Toffler, or arguing with
an economics student about his pseudo
science, then a well-placed 'fuck' can throw
them off stride. Polite, upperclass types are
especially vulnerable. They may actually flinch
if you say something like: Toffler fucks goats.'
Try it. The power of positive rudeness means
you can be positively rude.
Whistling is only cool if you are as good or
better than Roger Whittaker.
Remember: True style is original and individual. Lead the crowd, don't follow them,
unless money is dropping out of holes in their
pockets. -4
m
Next to walking, this has to be
just about the cheapest form of
transportation going.
More versatile than legging it out
around campus, the Spree can take
you to class with class. It'll also get
you around town a lot quicker. And
it doesn't even get tired.
It's a lot more fun than walking,
too.
Scoot along thanks to a 49 cc engine
with automatic clutch and single-
speed transmission and you'l!
what we mean.
Turn cities into small towns with
the Spree's great convenience and
versatility. Something you'll do in
comfort and style because Honda
puts the same attention into the
Spree that goes into our bigger
scooters. Except when it comes to
the price.
For fun or function, get off your
feet. And go on a Honda Spree.
MAIN FEATURES
■ Air-cooled, two-stroke engine with
oil injection ■ Electric start
■ Single shock rear suspension
■ Telescopic front fork ■ Front and
rear drum brakes ■ Easy-to-read
instrument panel ■ Handy rear
luggage carrier.
26      DISCORDER
■SAVINGS NOW
[CAKTERJ
HcxidaShop
SERVICE ALWAYS!'' i
Pat Robertson—
"I do what I do when the spirit
moves me. .  and I don't take
myself too seriously. I get my
ideas from the streets, from
films, from bars. I interpret — I
don't think there's anything that
hasn't been done before. Ten
years ago, I never imagined I'd
be designing. Ten years from
now, who knows? I could be
growing grapes in Sonoma
County."
t
From Pat Robertson's "Reckless"
line, above, the long and short of
it. At Urban Innovations, Black
Market, Aritzia, Cincinnati, W,
Ball of Confusion and Kicks.
esign Danny Ester occupied
"Fashion? If I said it was
everything and nothing at the
same time, wouid you know
what I meant? I just do it — I
don't even necessarily like
everything I make. I can design
for somebody else without my
own ego getting in the way of it.
I'm against anyone who thinks
you have to wear my label, the
right thing. Too many people get
sidetracked with fashion. They've
got an attitude problem. Really,
it's only what you wear, isn't it?"
Jayne Mabbott—
"The best thing about fashion is
that it's constantly changing —
every week, every month — and
in the same way my concepts,
my ideas, my everything, are
always changing too. It's so
difficult to say what motivates
me. . . everything does! Clothes,
clothes, clothes — I've got
closetsful of them. I'm always
thinking, always drawing, always
designing. It never ends." Mr. Stan—
"I see myself as a kind of
Frederick's of Hollywood. Fashion
revolves around sex appeal, so I
like to make everything skintight. What I do comes down to
form and function: Form is the
body, Function is the Date. You
wear my clothes to get dates — I
like to call it Dale-Investment
Wear — so lots of bust, lots of
hip. Nothing practical. . .ever!"
Super-long tube skirts, left &
right, by Mr. Stan for Pow-Wow.
Giant hand-knit sweater, left,
with royal motif, by Lydia for
Pow-Wow. Earrings, pin and scarf
from Ball of Confusion.
Tweedy sweater, right, by
U.B. for Ball of Confusion. Scarf
and hat from Ball of Confusion.
esign Gary Lea-Wilson—
Hats are one way I express
myself to help others express
themselves to help me express
myself. The inspiration comes
from everyone I've ever met,
every sound I've ever heard,
every life I've ever lifed and
every hurt and pleasure I've ever
felt."
Hat, left, of leather and painted
raw silk, and right, of flannel
with gold lame band and flokati
mohawk. Both by Gary Lea-
Wilson exclusively for Madame
Hatters.
Painted leather cuff, right, in
black and white "calf!' By
Katherine Jones for Urban
Innovations, Neto, Lynda's,
Morgan and Mark James.
Shapely pin and earrings, left, by
Sally Angus in acrylic and metal.
At Urban Innovations, Circle
Craft/Granville Island, and Folk
Life/Expo.
Katherine Jones—
"I like talking about my work,
but I prefer not to be quoted. I
like to think my work speaks for
itself."
Sally Angus—
"I was a sculptor before I
designed jewelry — I've always
liked working with shapes. AAy
pieces are large, but they're easy
to wear... I like the idea of
someone wearing a piece of
mine for years and years. Good
design lasts." SALLY O. ANGUS
BARBARA B.
SHELBY C.
DANA CLELAND
MARTIN DAHINDEN
FUTUR WORKS
GENET DEVICE
H.B. DESIGNS
HOAX COUTURE
SCATHING JONES
CLEMENCE LAFERRIERE
PRIMATE
REPTILE LEATHER
"RECKLESS"
K.C. ROBINSON
TRUE WEST DESIGNS
RIC YUENN
EMILY ZARB
FORWARD FASHIONS by
CANADIAN DESIGNERS
URBAN
INNOVATIONS
2194 W. 4th AVENUE, VANCOUVER 736-3112 BEHIND
THE
DIAL
Out With The Old,
In With The New
SEPTEMBER IS A TIME for new faces and
fresh starts, a time when the academic world
seems inviting and rewarding, when everyone
has an A. And it seems that the academic
world has worked its charms on a couple of
CITR staffers.
Departing will be Station Manager Nancy
Smith and Discorder Editor Chris Dafoe. Both
are returning to the green fields of academia.
Smith could not be reached for comment, but Laquerre, Dale Norrie, Johanna Block, Judy
Dafoe was quoted as saying that he is "going & Anne Dodington and William Thompson,
to Harvard on a Ford Fellowship to research, ■  ■■■■■■           ■■■■■-■■■
once and for all, whether Skinny Puppy has _          _
sold out or not. Either that, or I'm going to jour- DO Ya Wanna Be In My Gang?
nalism school to find out what I've been doing ARE Y0U WANDERING through a life bereft
wrong for all these years." of meaning? Do you find yourself plagued by
And the new faces? existential trauma? Do soggy corn-flakes in
Well, actually, they're not all that new. Tak- the   mornjng   send   you   into   a   suicidal
ing over as Station Manager will be former depression?
Discorder advertising rep and publisher Harry )f you answered yes to any of these ques-
Hertscheg. And the new Discorder Editor is tionS) you might tnjnk 0f joining CITR. For a
none other than Bill Mullan, a frequent con- mere $2o for UBC students and $30 for com-
tributor to these pages. Incestuous bunch, rnunity members you .can support radio for
ain t we? . ^ * . normal people. Your membership gives you
. ■ * * * access to training in radio skills, top-notch
■ * equipment, and possibly the opportunity to in-
CITR Wardrobe Dept. *lict your half-baked ideas on an unsuspecting public. It won't put the crunch back in your
GREAT STUFF. A much deserved thanks breakfast, but it just might make you a hap-
goes out to all those who took the time and pier) more well-rounded person,
effort to send in an entry for the design the And jf you join now> you nave the option of
new CITR T-Shirt contest. The creation chosen receiving the CITR 50th Anniversary member-
to accompany the upstanding name of CITR ship package. Included are a snappy bumper-
on T-shirts around the world for the year of the stjcker) some sweN buttons, a CITR operating
station s 50th anniversary came from Theresa manualf and a special 50th Anniversary T-shirt
Henry. For the application of her talent in the designed by Theresa Henry. The price for the
name of CITR, Theresa will have free entry package is $30.
for herself and guest to all CITR presentations DorVt waste another minute. Join now.
for one year. The new T-shirt is out this month, #
and is included in the 1986-87 membership * ,        ♦
package. All contest entrants will receive a free
CITR membership along with pur admiration
and thanks.
Kudos to: Theresa Henry, Irene Stepkowski,
Hoss Freeborn, Lindsay Banfield, Patrick
Woo, Robyn Iwata, Dr. Carl Cramer, Joseph
CITR Presents.
Sept
Oct.
5 & 6: Skinny Puppy/Severed Heads
SUB Ballroom, UBC.
3: Grapes of Wrath/Bolero Lava
SUB Ballroom, UBC.
September 10
8 pm • U.B.C. GYM
with Guests
FINE YOUNG CANNIBALS
32      DISCORDER ON
"THE
DIAL
WEEKDAY REGULARS
7:30 am    Sign-On
8:00 am    WAKE-UP REPORT
News, sports and weather.
10:00 am BREAKFAST REPORT
News, sports and weather followed
by GENERIC REVIEW and INSIGHT.
12:00 pm HIGH PROFILE.
1:00 pm    LUNCH REPORT
News, sports and weather.
AFTERNOON SPORTSBREAK
DINNER MAGAZINE
News, sports and weather followed
by GENERIC REVIEWS, INSIGHT and
a DAILY FEATURE.
Sign-Off
3:00 pm
5:00 pm
4:00 am
WEEKDAY HIGHLIGHTS
MONDAYS
SOUNDTRAK
10:30-11:30 am
Theatre-style radio incorporating the voice,
music, and other permutable sounds.
Produced by ESI.
THE BLUES SHOW
8:00-9:00 pm
Can blue men sing the whites? Join host
Eric Von Schlippen to find out.
THE JAZZ SHOW
9:00 pm-12:30 am
Vancouver's longest-running prime time Jazz
program, featuring all the classic players, the
occasional interview, and local music news.
Hosted by the ever-suave Gavin Walker.
Album Features: 11:00 pm.
01 Sept.   Kenny Dorham was often referred
to as "The Uncrowned King." He
did not reach the same plateaus of
fame and fortune as did Dizzy or
Miles...he should have. We'll sample his most personal outing on
record: Quiet Kenny..the great
trumpeter with Tommy Flanagan.
08 Sept.  Paul Horn's performance of Lalo
Schifirin's Jazz Suite on the Mass
Texts is one of his crowning
achievements on record. Hear Paul
Horn (flutes and alto sax), his
quintet, orchestra and chorus conducted by Lalo Schifrin. A
masterpiece!
75 Sept.  Bright Moments was Rahsaan
Roland Kirk's last ungimmicked
recording. Many of his later records
were cluttered and overproduced.
This record was a "live" performance in front of a great audience
...just Kirk and his band...powerful,
funny and swinging!
22 Sept. Just Feelin', McCoy Tyner's latest
album and a welcome return to
Tyner working out with his trio.
Avery Sharpe on bass and Louis
Hayes on drums bring out the best
Tyner has recorded in years.
29 Sept.  Two bands out of one. Ellington
small groups; one led by altoist
Johnny Hodges and the other led
by trumpeter Rex Steward. Some
of Jazz music's greatest small
group recordings. Recorded in
1940-41, these pieces are real
treasures.
THE EDGE ON FOLK
8:00-9:30 pm
Many people regard the label "F**k Music"
as offensive. However, there is much to enjoy
in this genre these days with artists like Spirit
of the West, The Pogues, Billy Bragg and
The Men They Couldn't Hang shaking people's preconceptions of f**k and producing
fine music in the process. What they are also
doing is opening up the more traditional f**k
music to a whole new audience. If you like
Bragg, listen to his influences, e.g. Dick
Gaughan, Leon Rosselson and Roy Bailey.
From The Pogues & Spirit of the West one
can explore the rich heritage of Celtic music.
02 Sept. Grupo Moncada. Post-Labour Day
celebration with Cuban Commies!
09 Sept. Seattle's Uncle Bonsai will be at
The Cultch Sept. 12/13 with Spirit
of the West. Here's a preview.
76 Sept.   Lo Jai. F**k music from Central
France. They were a big hit at the
Vancouver & Edmonton F**k
Festivals this Summer.
23 Sept. Guitar Heroes. F**k music's finest
pickers!
30 Sept.  F**k of the Frozen North. A whole
bunch of f**k performers who've
made "All Canadian 1986."
BUNKUM OBSCURA
9:30-11:00 pm
An eclectic mishmash of audio distrubances,
playlist and requests presented .by a former
circus entertainer who was fired from the
cannon one too many times.
LOVE PEACE AND VIOLENCE
11:00 pm-1:00 am
Radio for individuals who are past not caring.
We worship no flase gobs. We don't care
what color your hair is. All we ask is that you
listen with your ears and watch with your
eyes. It's later than you think.
PLAYLOUD
Late night 1:00-4:00 am
Where do you go when you're tired of having
fun? Music to prepare for THE END. Aural
surgery performed by Larry Thiessen.
WEDNESDAYS
JUST LIKE WOMEN
5:75-6 pm
Tune in for 45 minutes of invigorating and
stimulating interviews, news and music. For
anyone interested in women's issues or learning more about them.
SEPTEMBER   1986     33 THE AFRICAN SHOW
8:00-9:30 pm
Catch the latest in African news and Music
with Umerah Patrick Onukwulu and Todd
Langmuir. News at 8:30. Special feature
weekly at 9:00. Onward-Harambe.
THE KNIGHT AFTER
Midnight to 4:00 am
Music to clobber Yuppies by (and anyone
wearing floral baggy shorts). Featuring radio
shows traded with alternative stations in
Europe and the U.S., and every 5 weeks a
new episode of MUSIC FROM THE TAR
PITS, an ode to early seventies recreational-
substance rock. Regular guests include
MOAMMAR K.. the Prince of Wales and
Lyndon Lerouche.
THURSDAYS
PARTY WITH ME, PUNKER!
3:00-5:00 pm
Join Rock Action and Crusty Love for cool
tunes and special guests and features. Tune
into Crusty for the last Thursday of May for
the best of Vancouver punk rock, including
local antiquities.
TOP OF THE BOPS
8:00-9:00 pm
Screaming guitars, throbbing basses, pounding drums, pumping pianos and howling
saxes: Top of the Bops has them all, and you
can have them too!
MEL BREWER PRESENTS
11:00 pm-Midnight
At long last, something to fill in the gap between Hill Street Blues and David Letterman.
Join Pat, Jay and Jerry in the weekly
menage of local music, interviews, mike
squeals and general ineptness.
FRIDAYS
FRIDAY MORNING MAGAZINE
10:30-11:30 am
Autumn. Plenty of notions come to mind at
the mention of the word. Impressions. Feel
ings. Intuitions, more so than any other
season. Autumn is the season of the harvest,
of study, of the Full Moon. Of Festivity. It's
also the season of the Wolf. This month, the
White Wolf explores:
05 Sept.  The energy of the second annual
Stein festival. Music, words, and
new visions.
72 Sept.   The shadow and light of the
second annual Fringe Festival.
Plus much more, depending on what's stir-
\fr\Q^v\^i«\^\
CYCLING at its BEST!
Check out our September
Clearance Special on some
rom MIELE and B1ANCHI
20% off all summer
jerseys and shorts
Now TWO locations to serve you
2241034
669-3646
"We offer the BEST bikes, prices and
expertise and that's why we stand out.
Full year Warranty available on all our bicycles.
UBINKY'f ,'
\
caf£ restaurant      A-
Aoyiter bar
\ X V
I Open from 7:30 a.m. X
y Breakfast j
%      Lunch    f
•     Dinner
*      Coffees
T
&
Co.
y
Live Jazz on Weekends
Licenced
Till 2 a.m.
-   \
TSJIHUBLO
\*  •/
34      DISCORDER ring in these parts. With your host and
cultural tour guide, Mr. Kirby Scott Hill.
POWER CHORD
3:30-5:00 pm
Vancouver's only true metal show, featuring
the underground alternative to mainstream
metal: local demo tapes, imports and other
rarities, plus album give-aways.
THE COCKTAIL PARTY
5:30-8:00 pm
The summer replacement for the Saturday
night P.J. Party. Mike Mines & Robin Razzell
invite you to a world of bibulous pleasure via
the newest psychedelic sounds from both
sides of the pond. Just add ice and shake.
SOUL GALORE
8:00-9:30 pm
All the tearjerkers, all the hipshakers. From
R&B to funk and especially soul. Join Fiona
MacKay and Anne Devine and wear your
soul shoes.
THE BIG SHOW
9:30 pm-midnight
Elevate your BPMs with Robert Shea and AI
Big. And shine your shoes, for God's sake.
THE VISITING PENGUIN SHOW
Late night 1:00-4:00 am
Now, finally, a reason to stay up past the BIG
SHOW on Friday nights. Yes, Andreas Kitz-
mann and Steve Gibson dish out requests,
new music, interviews and selfless egotism.
WEEKEND REGULARS
WEEKEND HIGHLIGHTS
8:00 am    Sign-On
Noon        BRUNCH REPORT
News, sports and weather.
6:00 pm   SAT./SUN. MAGAZINE
News, sports and weather, plus
GENERIC REVIEW, analysis of current affairs and special features.
4:00 am    Sign-Off
SATURDAYS
EARLY MUSIC SHOW
7:30-10:00 am
Have breakfast to music from the Medieval,
Renaissance and Baroque periods, played on
strange and exotic instruments. With host
Paul Smith.
>A\\\\\\\\\V>
Wearable Graphics    ^
Affordable Fashions4
224-5711
2565      ALMA
■xvxvvvxvvsxxxvvsxvvvnnvC
SEPTEMBER   1986     35 DEEP READING
Inexpensive quality books
Hard to get art, social & literary
magazines and journals
. OCTOPUS BOOKS
2250 West Fourth 732-8721    •    1146 Commercial 253-0913
NEOFILE
Noon-4:00 pm
A rundown of the newest, most exciting and
insipid releases raked in during the week at
CITR. Join music directors and charismalep-
tic hosts Don Chow and Kevin Smith for an
eclectic musical pig-out, with occasional interviews, live mixes, and peripheral relevance.
PROPAGANDA!
6:30-9:00 pm
An eclectic mix of interviews, reviews, music,
humour, High Profiles, and other features
with Mike Johal.
CITR SPORTS PRESENTS
Pregame Show 7:20 pm
Kickoff 7:30 pm
Live Thunderbird Football Play by play from
Thunderbird Stadium.
06 Sept.  vs. University of Alberta Golden
Bears
73 Sept.   University of Calgary Dinosaurs
TUNES 'R' US
Late night 1:00-4:00 am
Music, Music, Music, Handyman Bob, Music,
Music, My Favorite Album, Music, Music,
Experimental To Classical, Teddy Kelowna
presents, and yes more music.
SUNDAYS
MUSIC OF OUR TIME
8:00 am-Noon
Talk about opening a can of worms. The
month-long concentraton on Canadian
classical music has expanded to fill all
available time. Special features will include
the centennial opera Louis Re/7, by Harry
Somers and hopefully a listen to the music
and words of some up-and-coming Vancouver
composers. With your hosts Tyler Cutforth
and Paul Smith.
ROCKERS SHOW
Noon-3:00 pm
The best in Roots, Rock, Reggae, DJ and
Dub music with your hosts George (Family
Man) Barrett and Collin Hepbourn.
MICHAEL WILLMORE'S ROCK TALK
3:00-6:00 pm
Authentic Rock 'N' Roll from the 1950s and
1960s featuring many collectors' items and
rock rarities you'd never hear anywhere else.
SUNDAY NIGHT LIVE
7:00-9:00 pm
Hosts StuArt and Gunter S. Thompson bring
you mostly locally recorded great, or soon to
be great bands, in their purest form, LIVE!
Technical expertise provided by Peter C.
FAST FORWARD
9:00 pm-1:00 am
Mark Mushet searches the world over for
experimental, minimalist, avant-garde, electronic, and other non-mainstream sounds.
LIFE AFTER BED
7 am-4 am
The return of the nightmare from the people
you're parents warned you about. Ugly radio
has returned. Warn your avocados.
Floyd's Corner—Country and Western with
Jeff G. Starts at 2:00 a.m. VERDIC1
The Chills
The Lost EP
Look Blue Go Purple
Bewitched
ppjf? p       I «y
m
i*;     *  '■■
,0
THE KIWI INVASION HAS BEGUN UNDER
the banner of Flying Nun, the major distributor, initiater, and producer of N.Z. alternative music, and there's no lack of talent to
vinylize. In a country where most but not all
sign on the dole, with relative abundance of
drugs, a great pub scene, not to mention the
luscious beaches, the making of music has
become an alternative pursuit for alternative
folks.
The Clean laid the ground for sprouting
bands such as the Chills, Verlaines, Sneaky
Feelings, Stones and Bats, all of whom live
in a chilly, wind-blown city called Dunedin.
The Chills released The Lost EP before they
went to England and played a few gigs in
London—ah, international stardom!—and
while over there recorded and released Kaleidoscope World. Martin Phillips wrote five of
the six songs on The Lost EP and the record
tends to be an introspective look at one man's
psyche.
On "This Is The Way," twangy sliding guitar
echoes escapism: "Fill your head with alcohol,
comic books and drugs." There's even a folksy
tune thrown in, "Bee Bah Bee Bah Bee Boe,"
something your grandparents could identify
with. The best song on this EP has to be
"Whole Weird World," opening with a harrowing scratching guitar and then exploding into
a melodious omnipresent aural gorge undermined by that eternal scratch. The more you
listen to this EP the more you get the feeling
that it's music of the Tolkien world—the Hob-
bits could be grooving to it—'Dreamland" certainly inspired that feeling. A record sown with
innocence—listen to The Chills and fuck
realism.
With so many bands in one small town life
can become incestuous. The sister of Martin
Bull (ex-member of the Chills who died of
leukemia) is in a band called Look Blue Go
Purple. Their first EP Bewitched revives the
paisley underground albeit with an inherent
altered perspective. It all comes together in
a mysterious bewitching manner with a combination of flute, bass/organ, drums/guitar. It's
good stuff—completely out of the ordinary.
The four songs by five women manage to invoke a feeling of remoteness, of being all
alone—'Vain Hopes" with that twirling flute
and pounding rhythm section achieves it.
Things get upbeat, even boppy in "As Does
the Sun." There's an ethereal quality to this
record; maybe it's the flute or maybe it's the
organ or maybe it's....
—Rene Skerlj
Screaming Blue Messiahs
Gun Shy
WEA
SO WHAT IF IT'S BEEN A HORRIBLE
summer. So what if the only concerts worth
seeing have been presented in an arena not
even acoustically suitable for a livestock auction. So what if your girlfriend, or worse, your
boyfriend, has run off with a sailor from a U.S.
navy destroyer. So what if Expo is refusing to
agree to your suggestion of putting the John
Lennon Rolls on the "Dropping Things from
Four Stories Up" segments of Late Night with
Letterman. It's no reason to stop rocking, is it?
No, of course not. Especially when you can
blast away the back to school blues with a hot
piece of vinyl like the Screaming Blue Messiahs' debut album Gun Shy. This Brit combo has released an LP that is not only an excellent follow-up to their 1984 self-titled EP—
which featured the Ready for Warish "Someone to Talk to—but is also packed with fast-
paced angry rock reminiscent of the Clash's
Give Em Enough Rope and 999's High Energy
Plan.
The best cuts on this very solid LP are "Twin
Cadillac Valentine" (released as a single),
"Wild Blue Yonder," and "Smash the Market
Place." All of which are perfect tunes for combating the brutal month that September is
destined to become.
—Jerome Broadway
Giant Sand
Valley of Rain
Black Sand/Enigma US
Rave Ups
Town n' Country
Demon UK
SURGE NARROWS, B.C.: TIMES WERE,
people thought fishermen listened to
nothing except Hoyt Axton and Stompin' Tom.
Well, they still do, only they also troll to a whole
lot more. Most seiners afloat these days stow
a great cargo of everything from Blood on The
Saddle to The Young Fresh Fellows. The fishing lodges up here seem to have all the Long
Ryder's discs, and I've heard Dwight Yoakam
blaring out of many a gas barge. At a dance
one night in the Gorges Islands I jigged to
bands like The Beat Farmers, Naked Prey, and
Zeitgeist. Talk about motion on the ocean!!
From Kelsey Bay to Lund though, two bands
have really had the fish jumping for close to
a year now—Giant Sand and The Rave Ups.
From Tuscon, Arizona, Giant Sand play the
most soul-stirring music this side of the
Primevals. TSOL is another reference point,
but where TSOL's music is city-based, Giant
Sand give the listener a glimpse of life in trfe
big American southwest.
Arizona is a pretty wide open state, crisscrossed by long, straight freeways. Freeways
seem to represent something quite different
in the U.S. than they do in Canada, and Valley
of Rain is undoubtedly critical listening when
driving Interstate 17 from Flagstaff to Phoenix.
This is rural music all the way.
Side two is the killer, starting with the beautifully performed title track. "Tumble and Tear"
is the typical Giant Sand rocker. Pounding
drums, loud but really distant guitars, and
Howe Gelb's warped vocals. Lyrically, the spirit
of sincerity runs through every song. "Bario,"
and "Death, Dying and Channel 5" are one
person's attempt to deal with the wide varieties
of social and mental poverty.
"Down On Town/Love's No Answer" kicks
off side one in masterful style. I wonder if this
SEPTEMBER   i986     37 song can be pulled off live. While hardly happy
music, it does have the unique power to motivate a listener's gut feelings. The rest of the
side follows the pace set by "Down On Town,"
that being that life in Arizona can be a drag,
but that's no reason to roll over and play dead.
The Rave Ups, like Giant Sand, released
their debut LP last fall. Unlike Giant Sand,
their brand of soul leans more toward country and rockabilly. Of course it's all derivative,
but this LP breathes with creative spirit. Of the
countless American bands now turning to
country as a means of expression, few have
it figured out like Los Angeles' Rave Ups.
This LP combines several winning elements: acoustic guitars, great use of steel
guitar, and plenty of classic song construction
where restraint is the key. It's no wonder that
Town n' Country swings from start to finish.
The album's opener, "Positively Lost Me,"
is superb. With only two chords, it points the
way for the following tunes—no excess, just
bare bones music. "Better World," also on
side one, is a countrified look at a particularly American set of values.
Side two opens with "Radio," which could
be a hit on any country station if it was only
a wee bit shorter. "By The Way" continues the
irresistible country theme, as does the side's
fourth track, Dylan's "You Ain't Goin' Nowhere;" The Byrd's version being the first
country rock song most people ever heard.
The version here rocks much harder, and
displays a terrific arrangement.
—Norm Baldwin
Big
TOP AIRPLAY ALBUMS
THE JAZZ BUTCHER
R.E.M.
VELVET UNDERGROUND
THE WOODENTOPS
VARIOUS ARTISTS
GUADALCANAL DIARY
LET'S ACTIVE
VARIOUS ARTISTS
THE SMITHS
THE BODEANS
Bloody Nonsense
Life's Rich Pageant
Another View
Giant
It Came From The Garage
Jamboree
Big Plans for Everybody
Love Kills
The Queen is Dead
Love & Hope & Sex & Dreams
TOP AIRPLAY SINGLES
BOLERO LAVA
THE THE
GARY CLAIL &
TACKHEAD
THE FALL
ALIEN SEX FIEND
LOVE AND ROCKETS
BILLY BRAGG
GUANA BATZ
FATS COMET
STUBBORN BLOOD
MPENDO MOJA
RAY CONDO &
HARDROCK GONERS
SPIRIT OF THE WEST
Move a Groove/
Dance and Be Happy
Sweet Bird of Truth
Hard Keft
Living Too Late^
I Walk the Line
Kundalini Express
Levi Stubbs' Tears
I'm on Fire
Stormy Weather
TOP DEMO TAPES
Tightrope/Love Fix
Get Up and Fight
Skala Bop Baby
The Crawl
GLASS/Polygram
I.R.S./MCA
POLYGRAM
RGH. TRD./CBS
METRO—AMER.
ELECTRA/WEA
I.R.S./MCA
MCA/UK
RGH. TRD./WEA
SLASH/WEA
LAVAROCK
SOME BIZARRE
WORLD
BGRS. BNQUT.
FLICKNIFE
BGRS. BNQUT.
GO
ID
LOGARHYTHM
**DEMO*
"DEMO*
**DEMO*
**DEMO*
Black
Atomizer
Homestead
WHAT THE HELL DO YOU EXPECT
from a joker who, for a college art project, stood behind a plexiglass shield and
insulted people into hurling bottles, bowling
pins and bricks at him. Provocative, confrontational and hard, that's what you get. The
joker is Steve Albini; the band, Big Black.
Coming to us from the megalopolis of Chicago, U.S.A., Big Black aim to make an impression. In fact they impertinently insist on it.
Mellow, easy listening tones will have to be
searched for elsewhere. This ain't music for
savouring a brandy and a fine Cuban cigar
whilst relaxing with the evening paper. No sir,
Big Black enjoy making a racket.
The foundation for Atomizer comes from the
sound of Roland, one bad-ass drum machine
that pounds, pounds, pounds and never relents. To this crunching beat is added one
chugging guitar that drives the tune, and one
missile guitar that zeroes in for a direct hit.
Sometimes it seems Albini's rocket guitar
could have all its strings suddenly snap, leaving him bare-fretted. Controlled destruction,
decidedly confrontational in its approach;
sounds and words that can disturb and invigorate simultaneously, this is Big Black.
Wife beating, child molestation and arson;
ah, the little events in life which really attract
attention. Atomizer presents people who do
"bad things." Particularly attention getting is
a littly ditty called "Jordan, Minnesota," about
a place where everyone molests the children
in the town. The tunes on the LP don't make
for casual listening or imbue a room with a
delightful ambience suitable for a romantic
evening. Instead, Big Black is powerful, intriguing, and at times, unsettling. Lest the intent of the songs be misunderstood, this isn't
another band leaping into the quagmire of
"depression rock" where wallowing in gloom
seems the only purpose. The aim is to provoke reaction and thought rather than to instill resignation. That's Big Black.
—Kevin S.
Peter Case
Geffen
Bob Brozman
Hello Central
Rounder
Albert Lee
Speechless
MCA
Christy Moore
Time Has Come and Ride On
Green Linnet
CITR RECENTLY ACQUIRED A WHOLE
bunch of stuff which nearly falls into the
category of "folk music," and they threw them
all at me. I now feel well enough to pass on
my views to you...
Peter Case used to be with L.A. rockers The
Plimsouls and now has a solo LP, produced
by T-Bone Burnett. This effort is notable for
having the first cover version of a Pogues'
song that I have heard—Case does a pass-
38     DISCORDER able, if unremarkable, version of Shane Mc-
Gowan's classic "A Pair of Brown Eyes."
Case relies mostly on acoustic guitar and
harmonica to supplement his vocals, with
occasional organ, drums and electric guitar
thrown in. There are some haunting songs,
"Echo Wars," "More Than Curious" and
"Walk In The Woods" are standouts, while
"Shook His Hand" and "Man of Steel" have
a fuller, up-tempo feel. "Smalltown Spree" is
reminiscent of Springsteen's "Nebraska"
album, but with a moody string section accompaniment, and "Old Blue Car" sounds
like John Cougar sings The Rolling Stones.
On the whole, a promising debut and you can
certainly detect the influence of J. Henry
Burnett in there.
For lovers of steel guitar music, Bob Broz-
man is the walking encyclopedia of the Na
tional Steel Guitar Company (you know, the
one on the Dire Straits album cover). This LP
features a lot of jazz and upbeat blues tunes
("12th Street Rag" is the best known), as well
as some fine Hawaiian guitar music (before
they started making elevator muzak) and the
classic Robert Johnson song "Love In Vain"
recorded live and featuring great bottleneck
and yodelling.
English guitarist Albert Lee has released an
LP of country picking and elegant piano music
which belies his European heritage. His "T-
Bird To Vegas" sounds just as authentic as
the traditional pieces "Arkansas Traveller" and
"Salt Creek," while "Seventeenth Summer"
features some beautiful acoustic guitar. The
closing track "Erin" is surprisingly un-lrish
and is a very mellow piano tune. Not a bad
album, but I tend to get a bit pissed-off with
the long guitar-picking orgies.
Green Linnet has re-released some of
Christy Moore's earlier LPs and these two are
highly recommended. "Ride On" features two
songs penned by Bobby Sands while on hunger strike in a Belfast prison: "Back Home In
Derry" is a moving tale of Irish deportees
heading for Australia. "Viva la Quinta Brigada"
is the story of Irish volunteers in the Spanish
Civil War and "The City of Chicago" is about
homesick Irish patriots in the windy city (the
Cefts seem to convey this emotion better than
any other race).
The Time Has Come has such stirring stuff
as Woody Guthrie's "Saccho & Vanzetti," a
story of two Italian immigrants to the U.S.A.
who were executed in the 1920s, and Phil
Chevron's "Faithful Departed" (written in his
pre-Pogue days). There are also two Irish standards, "Nancy Spain" and "Lakes of Pontchar-
train."
—Steve Edge
Dayglo    Abortions
LP
FRONT COVER: RON SITTING AT THE
table with Nancy standing behind him,
hand placed affectionately on his shoulder.
Behind them, a large plaque—FEED U.S.A.
FETUS—with an eagle holding arrows (i.e.
missiles). On Ron's plate is a large-sized fetus
covered in blood, peas, corn, etc. Why are they
smiling?
BACK COVER: Picture of band, typical
hardcore poses, antics, etc. Song titles. So
what!
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SEPTEMBER  1986     39 INSIDE COVEFf: Song titles and complete
lyrics. Recipe for Dayglo Abortion Chili (includes one ripe human fetus). If you haven't
been put off by the front cover, try this recipe
out for size. The thought of it makes me want
to puke. Is that the idea?
SIDE TWO: Eleven songs recorded in 1981,
previously released on the Out of the Womb LP
Hardcore, borderline metal. Why bother re-
releasing these songs?
SIDE ONE: Ten songs recorded in 1985.
About Americans, Canadians, stupid songs,
stupid people. Production very good. Lots of
guitars, lots. Heavy, fast and clear. But why the
immature childish lyrics? Probably grade four
dropouts.
FAVOURITE SONG: "Bedtime Story." A
brilliant heavy metal-hardcore-heavy metal,
bash, riff, rock, bang your head song. Carry
it 'round with a six-pack.
FAVOURITE LYRICS: Lisa washed her hair
on Monday. Lisa washed her hair on Tuesday.
Lisa washed her hair on Wednesday. Lisa
washed her hair on Thursday.
IS IT WORTH BUYING: Do you like metal,
hardcore, speed, unintelligence? Go ahead.
SUGGESTIONS: Paint the cover black, or
burn it. Don't let your mother or sister or girlfriend hear the songs, or read the lyrics. Make
sure you play "Dogfarts" to your pet hound
at least twice a day. Send a copy to Nancy and
Ron, Jerry Falwell, your American friends
(enemies). Play loud when you have a party
and no girls show up but you get drunk anyway.
—Stuart Whitling
John Lurie
Stranger Than Paradise and
The Resurrection of Albert Ayler
liii
A WOMAN CAN TAKE YOU TO ANOTHER
universe—sometimes she just leaves you
there. Bella By Barlight: an eerie figure sitting
on the table against the wall in the dim, yellow
light, her quiet eyelids purplish with faint
sparkles. Outside, the August wind was rustling through the Sad Trees, and a soft night
air billowed in through the open windows. "The
Lampposts Are Mine..." she said dreamily. I
looked outside at the hard flourescent light
cast down to the street from the arched lamps,
and I could hear their tireless, electric drone.
Beyond the light, it was black, not the slightest
glimmer of anything. I sat very still. Then, off
in the distance, the clammy sound of tires
rushing over pavement, darkness pierced by
a single glaring headlight...suddenly, a green
metallic flash in the white streetlight, and the
slow, fading glow of taillights—gone: Car
Cleveland. Seconds later, the same in the
opposite direction: Car California.
Bella slid her ass off the table and moaned
dryly, "All this is mine..." She spread her arms
wide, then slowly crossed them over her
breasts, "and it can be all yours too, soldier."
She moved toward me. "What's your name
soldier?" My heart began to pound. She leaned over me. Her hair was dirty and hung in
strands pasted to her head. I could smell her
sweat. "Where's The Good And Happy Army
now, soldier?" I smiled weakly. I'd missed my
Greyhound. I said, " Do you know when the
next bus leaves?" Bella loosened my tie and
undid the top button of my shirt. "Tell Bella
your name, soldier..." Suddenly I felt feverish.
"AI, Albert." I stammered. Bella rolled her eyes
and laughed. "That's a cute name for a soldier, Albert. By why'd you stop here? The test
site is three hundred miles that way." She
pointed a finger into the darkness, then sang
ever so slowly: "but you won't find a living
thing out there when you get there..."
We looked at each other for a long time. I
hadn't planned to stop here. "When you feel
that warm wind," Bella whispered, "it always
comes from there." I felt nauseous, and began
to swallow. No, I had to leave, it was my, my...
Bella waved a cigarette in front of my face. I
took it. She lit it. "That's a pretty uniform,,
Albert, all grey like." The cigarette smoke filled my lungs and I felt myself relax. All at once
Bella grabbed me by the hair, a fistful, and
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40      DISCORDER yanked my head back: "Listen!" She hissed
inches from my face. "Listen! Do you hear it?"
I heard nothing—I only felt pain, my eyes
watered. "Listen! ...a sssound Stranger Than
Paradissse." Then I heard it. "What is it!?" I
gasped. I had actually felt the sound as much
as heard it, felt it in my gut. Bella let go and
my head fell forward almost hitting the table.
"It always comes with that wind," she said.
"It's the sound of the world before us, before
people..."
Whoa! But of course, the review: sometimes
a record reclines one to mental drifting. Two
violins, viola, and cello (the Paradise Quartet),
a trombone, a saxophone, various percussion
—allow some space in your mind and John
Lurie's music will lead you there. You can't
imagine where I've been.
—Ralph Synning
Agent Orange
This Is The Voice
THE SUMMER MAY BE OVER, BUT THE
memories of blaring down the street at
300 m.p.h. in my long, red shark convertible
still remain. I had the top down, I had the wind
in my face, I leaned over to turn the stereo on
and, of course, Agent Orange's new album
This Is The Voice began pumping out the
speakers. Throngs of people mobbed at my
car at the stoplight, they wanted to hear more.
But the best I could do was blind them with
my reflecto-glasses and turn up the volume.
Like Agent Orange, I had to move on.
No longer content with surf-inspired instrumental, Agent Orange has instead concentrated on refining and experimenting with their
creative original songwriting talents making
this their fifth solid disc. Have you ever heard
a lousy AO song? No, and this album doesn't
disappoint either. The production is excellent
and gives this three-piece band a very full
sound. Although not as raw as earlier AO,
songs like "It's In Your Head" and "Say It Isn't
True" combine powerful guitar with supersonic
vocals. "In Your Dreams Tonight" takes off on
a melodic Caribbean tangent, while "Tearing
Me Apart" is more a distinctive AO rocker.
Agent Orange is consistent, innovative, and
original. This Is The Voice reflects their talent
and reinforces their standing as one of the
premier forward-moving alternative bands.
—Terry Orr
Tues. - Sat. 10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
215 Dunlevy St. (across from Oppenheimer Park)
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SUGAR MINOTT
... Radio Freedom (A.N.C.)
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. Heartbeat Reggae 6.98 LP
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SHUFFLE DEMONS	
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QUEEN IDA Various Titles Back in Stock
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SEPTEMBER   1986     43 The Roving Ear
Life After Bed
Blitzes Europe.
The Highlights:
London:
Bad food, warm beer and more bad food.
It is hard to find a good meal in England, and
a cold beer is definitely out of the question.
London does have its charms; drivers who all
got their licenses from cereal boxes, pigeon
shit, and as mentioned, warm beer. This is
refreshing? The highlight of London is the
Ree's Hotel, a bed and breakfast run by (who
else) Mrs. Ree, a chain-smoking, sharp-witted
gem of a lady who cooks up the best breakfast
in London. If you're lucky, you'll get to stay in
the penthouse.
Paris:
I don't think the French would speak English to you if their lives depended on it. The
City of Love often becomes the City of Pompous Little Shits. The only thing they knew is
that people will go to Paris whether they're
polite or not. If you're easily intimidated, just
hang out at the Louvre. They've got great
plush couches inside that you can flake out
on for hours, and it's air-conditioned. Or you
can walk over to the Eiffel Tower and spit on
the cheeseheads.
Amsterdam:
I don't remember much. I was too stoned
from Space-cakes.
Berlin:
Okay. The past was great—Iggy, David
Bowie, Lou Reed, heroin and all that neat
Berlin stuff—and I'm sure that if you look hard
enough all of the above can be found. It's just
harder than in days past. For the most part,
the underground scene has taken an 180°
turn. Instead of dancing to '80's underground
sound in local clubs you're more likely to be
moved by 70's Motown, Phillie Soul and funk.
You'll have to look hard if you want to do the
Luv-A-Fair two-step.
Lisbon:
See Madrid and add on 1500-year-old fortresses, hills, a strange phone system, and
37°C temperatures.
Madrid:
We only stayed long enough to grab a hot
shower, a meal, and a pair or way-rocKin
boots. But in those 12 short hours I was offered every drug known to Don Bull, a pair of
counterfeit Ray-Bans, two gold rings, and
nude pictures of Vanna White. So, for the most
part, I'd say it's just another big city.
Salsburg:
No room for bullshit here, I'm afraid. Austria's too great: scenic, musical (you know—
the hills are alive) and the people are a ton
o' fun. They can be a little overzealous at
times, whether it's to get your money or to be
your best friend, which can work to your advantage if you're good at taking people for
everything they're worth.
Rome:
I couldn't get in to see the Pope because
I wasn't wearing pants. I heard that the Pontiff gets crazy at the sight of bare legs, so they
make you wear pants so he doesn't get out
of hand. But basically Rome is men in tight
double knits, ice cream, pasta, and old buildings they should really get rid of.
—Garnett Harry
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SEPTEMBER   1986     45 Armchair Eye
Bill Mullan examines Tennessee Williams,
The Golden Arches, and Slow at Expo.
<«
M
RS. BURROWS IS A HIGHLY
moral person. If she ever
found out the truth about herself, it would destroy her." (Richard Burton to
Ava Gardner, speaking of a third character
who, in spite of her righteous conservative
Christian standards, harbors latent homosexual impulses for a certain beautiful young
girl—from Night of the Iguana, John Huston's
stellar film adaptation of Tennessee Williams'
play). Who says commercial television's a
moronic void, absolutely empty of any and all
quality experience? This is not true. Not yet
anyway. Fortunately, there still isn't enough
crass, unadventurous, overpriced, surreally
bland poor taste (read, "pure shit") available
to fill all the programming requirements. Try
as they might, those responsible for choosing what we see must, on occasion, schedule
something good, something real, something
perceptive, provocative and ultimately fun.
It's the same with Expo. Try as they have
to offer us a fair that is completely concerned
with crass, unadventurous, overpriced, surreally bland poor taste (be it in food, souvenirs,
pavilions or entertainment), those responsible
have necessarily allowed a few decent (dare
I say memorable?) moments to occur. Once
again, there just isn't enough pure shit available. Yet.
Take the Xerox Theatre. Einsturtzende Neubauten played it in May, and Test Dept. in July.
And the Festival of Independent Recording Artists (FIRA) was scheduled there for early
August; seventeen bands (or artists) in seven
days; the best, the wildest, the most adventurous contemporary sounds this town has to
offer (in theory). Unfortunately, Slow were
chosen to kick the whole thing off, and they
did ungentlemanly things. They called the
audience "fuckin' idiots," they suggested the
ex-Premier was a facist, and "Ham flapped
his wally." And that's as far as it got. The
Festival of Independent Recording Artists was
cancelled by the Expo powers-that-be the day
after it began.
Oh well.
Which brings us back to our righteous,
highly moral Mrs. Burrows. Richard Burton
was afraid that a dose of truth would destroy
her; afraid that if she realized, by her own unforgiving moral standards, that she herself was
a dangerous pervert, she would melt on the
spot. I don't think he needed to worry. The
Mrs. Burrows of the world have proven far
stronger than he thought, and more powerful. Night of the Iguana (the movie) was made
in 1964, right at the cusp of the cultural revolt,
rebellion, breakthrough, renaissance (whatever) that we now just fondly remember as
"the Sixties." Since then, Mrs. Burrows has
been told right to her face thousands of times
that she's a hypocrite, a bitch, a pervert, a
murderer, a psychopath. At first it really did
upset her, but not so much anymore. She's
stronger than ever now, because she's been
tested, and she passed the test. Now she
knows for sure that she's right. Her vision of
the world—'We want a huge, mostly plastic
shopping mall with nine McDonalds per
square mile and lots of polite, preperly dressed, predominantly white people everywhere"
—is only the vision. Alternatives won't be
tolerated.
WHICH BRINGS US BACK TO THE
now-famous Slow-at-Expo incident.
Monday evening, August 4th, 1986 in the
Xerox Theatre. I wasn't there, but having seen
Slow on other occasions, I can imagine how
funny it must have been. And I stress that.
Funny. Nobody got hurt. No serious damage
was done. A rock band just did what rock
bands are supposed to do. They raised a little hell. Too much hell for the highly moral
types who run Expo. So in all the time it takes
for a small mind to make a big decision (no
time at all), a truly excellent (in theory) festival,
of Vancouver's best contemporary music and
"musicians was cancelled.
So the world (the world who can afford it
anyway) won't get to see and hear what we've
got to offer. So various local artists have lost
out on invaluable international exposure. So
what.
Jimmy Pattison said, "Expo stands for
everything McDonald's stands for." Unfortunately, ever since a stiflingly hot afternoon in San
Ysidro, California, in July 1984, when James
Huberty went human hunting at his local McDonald's, and murdered twenty-one people
and my TV brought it all crashing home to me
in brilliant blood red color (remember those
two dead kids all caught up in the spokes of
their bicycles?), I've had a hard time associating the Golden Arches with anything but
murder, suicide and the worst kind of insane
malevolence. And I'll bet you Huberty didn't
like rock 'n roll any more than Mrs. Burrows
or Jim Pattison does.
I'm glad Slow misbehaved.
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