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Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) Apr 1, 1988

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 I
t
I CITR FM 101.9 PRESENTS
FROM ZIMBABWE
BHUHSH
with special guest
From Seattle
DUMI MARIARE
MONDAY
APRIL 4 1988
TOWN PUMP
Monday April 25th (venue: TBA)
@ The Commodore   Wednesday
& Thursday May 18th & 19th
Tickets: VTC/CBO & all major malls as well as
Black Swan, Highlife, Zulu & Track Records.
Charge by Phone 280-4444.
A TIMBRE PRODUCTION W^. * ^ftH         ^^__^  M^.           M^
DISCORDER
1    N
THIS       ISSUE
That Magazine from CITR Radio 102
6.
THOSE WERE THE DAYS
April 1988 • Vol. V Issue #63
8.
The Art's Club bites the dust
WELL, WHY DOES RADIO SUCK, THEN?
EDITOR
Dili   MJI..II__
Bill Mullan
The whole ugly story
WRITERS
Gord Badanic, Garnet Harry,
10.
DANGERS AHEAD
Denlse Richard, Mark Quail, Janis
It's new, it's heavy, but is it rock 'n' roll
McKenzie, Helen J. orr, Matt Richards
ART DIRECTOR
22.
SOCIAL TOURNIQUET
Matt Richards
Yes, you have been here before
ILLUSTRATORS
Rod Filbrandt, Julia Schenck,
William Thompson,   helen J. orr
1   N
MOST       ISSUES
PHOTOS
Ned,  helen J. orr
4.
AIRHEAD
COVER
readers who write
Ned
14.
DIS CHORD
PRODUCTION MANAGER
they call it music
Michael Grigg
LAYOUT
14.
LOCAL MOTION
Julia Schenck, Miwako,
in a city near you
helen J. orr, Byron Salahor,
Barb Wilson, Lucy Crowther
19.
ON THE DIAL
PROGRAM CHART
everyperson's guide to CITR
Katherine Hayashl
20.
SPIN LIST
TYPESETTING
the hipper sounds
Barbara Wilson, Peter Francis,
Alex Johnson, Peter Lankester
X"<7*                     ,   MIL MJJ^^^^ '"    ^
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
£§^ ^"TlL   .d&ksk ^^^^"^"^N^r
Randy Iwata
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ADVERTISING MANAGER
Lucy Crowther
PUBLISHER
Harry Hertscheg
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Discorder Magazine, c/o CITR - UBC Radio
6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C. Canada
arEL—
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V6T 2A5                             ©(604) 228-3017
Discorder is That Magazine from CITR Radio
f—
V/    *      |f6 ALMOST HELL, J>
102 and is published monthly by the Student Radio
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Society of the University of British Columbia, al
though it winds up being printed deep from within
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Surrey, Canada.
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Discorder Magazine prints what it wants to, but
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pledges to put the CITR On The Dial program sche
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dule and SpinList record chart in every issue. Dis
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corder also vows to circulate 17,500 copies by the
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Bf^vft^ 'V
first of each month. Subscriptions are encouraged.
JNM /
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Twelve issues: $12 in Canada, $12(US) in the
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States, $18 elsewhere. Make money orders or
In
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certified cheques payable to CITR Publications'.
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CITR Radio 102 broadcasts a 49-watt stereo sig
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nal throughout the Vancouver area at 101.9 FM.
, C,
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But for best reception, hook up to the FM cable net
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work. CITR is at 101.9 cable FM on Rogers (Lower
c ■*%
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Mainland) and Shaw (North Shore) cable systems,
but is still at 100.1 on Rogers (Fraser Valley).
Inquiries about CITR, Discorder or the Mobile
wr^^iJ^^^^^^-S^L^.—» ' T   sJH      j?
^^      ■                                     _v ^"—^\         wl
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Sound System can be directed to station manager
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Harry Hertscheg at 228-3017, between 10 am - 4
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pm, Monday to Friday. If you want to talk to the
ni ^»; i
im\
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deejay, call 228-2487 or 228-CITR.
w^|   '    >
April 1988       3
1 "A     HEALTHY     AIRHEAD      IS    A
AIRHEAD
c/o CITR
0138 SOS Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C.
V8T2AS
YAY!
Dear Airhead,
Happy St. Patrick's Day to you too!
Yes, I received the March issue (two actually) and
I thought I'd scribble a bit about it.
Wow, head lash! After a futile attempt
at trying to read it in an orderly fashion, I gave up.
Chaos! You definitely succeeded in making me,
the reader, participate in the topic whether I
wanted to or not. Didn't think I would, but I
survived! I thought that the "I Licked Satan's
Killer Blood" story pointed out an interesting fact
of life: "For the first time in a long time, we sat
together as a family and just talked. Funny how
it takes extreme circumstances to really bring
people together..." I agree. I like finding such
stories upon which to ponder in the mag. Keep it
coming.
Anne-Marie, Toronto
NAY!
Airhead,
What's happened to Discorder? I used
to look forward to each issue, eagerly descending
on my favorite record store at the the beginning of
every month to pick up a copy. Now it's become
nothing more than a force of habit, a habit I intend
to break if this publication doesn't improve posthaste. The latest issue (March '88) looks like it
was thrown together for the sake of fulfilling the
claim that you publish monthly. Not only was it
dull and extremely pretentious, it was poorly
designed and devoid of style. The lack of imagination is evident throughout, from the hideous
backwards cover (how quaint) to the hodgepodge of "articles" inside. The Plague has
churned out better stuff, with a fraction of the
money you people have to play with.
Why aren't there anymore of those
excellent feature articles on such topics as censorship and skateboarding? Why have they been
replaced with "theme articles" on religion and
drugs? Even worse, where the hell is some
coverage of the local scene? Why are there no
interviews with local bands? Mr Editor, you've
effectively choked the music content out of "that
magazine from CTTR". If Vancouver has an
underground music scene, you'd never know it
from reading Discorder. I notice you didn't even
include a table of contents in the March issue.
How appropriate, since there's nothing of substance to be found inside anyways.
How about a really radical step in the
right direction - - a sabbatical? That's right, how
about ceasing publication for a couple of months
and using that time to do some serious assessment Hopefully, you'll realize that Discorder's
creative stagnation is partly due to the fact that
you consider yourselves an impenetrable bastion
of alternative culture. Let's face it. You have
done absolutely nothing in the past few issues to
encourage new people to contribute material. It's
time to do some housekeeping. Ditch those self-
4 DISCORDER
centered scribblers and recruit new talent. Show
some creativity and humanness, please. Save
your readership before it's too late.
Andrea C.
You raise many points; too many to respond to
them all without getting extremely pretentious
and dull. However, as for last month's issue being
"thrown together" and "poorly designed", we
can only suggest that you lookagain. We invested
far more time, concern and thought on its layout
that usual. As for our coverage of the local scene,
ya, you've raised a good point. Part of this is by
design. In case you haven't noticed, we aren't the
only print media in town that pays serious attention to alternative music anymore (The Georgia
Straight, The Sun, The Province and Vancouver
Magazine come quickly to mind). Maybe it's not
so deadly important that we continue to wave the
flag so furiously. Maybe it's time to pursue other
possibilities. The point is, various Discorder
writers (encouraged by the editor) have been experimenting over the past few months (not that
this hasn't happened before in Discorder; let's
just say, it's been more prevalent). Experimentation b an essential part of any creative process.
Without it, you bog down, stagnate, atrophy (if
you can't abide it, you're more dangerous than
you realize). No doubt, some of it has been
pretentious, dull, stupid or just plain bad. How
very human of us! We're sorry. Sorry. Sorry.
Sorry. Sorry. It's over for now anyway (sort of)
so stop worrying. Consider the past few mont/is
a diversion. Expect more on the "local scene" in
upcoming months. Finally, as for being "an impenetrable bastion of alternative culture" which
has done "absolutely nothing in the past few
issues to encourage new people to contribute
material", well, this is your letter, we are printing
it and somehow or other, we did motivate you to
write it and send it in. Airhead is open game.
Anybody who wants to can say anything he/she
wants. If we have the space and if the editor likes
it (ie: finds it relevant and worth sharing with our
thousands of readers), we'll print it. As for other
stories, articles, rants, ruminations, realizations
etc, yes, we're always interested. We don't pay
and we do edit. Interested? Call Bill Mullan
(228-3017).
YAY!
Dear Airhead,
I personally liked the "theme" issues.
I feel those "themes" are like drums and should be
beaten all the time. Especially the legazilizations
of marijuana and prostitution. While the former
is under the control of the second govemement
(the mafia), the latter is combined prejudice
against women/confused morality (Cathali-
cism?)/mafia issue. Any way you look at it,
there's a transfer of funds from the second government to the first. The real obstacle?????
As for Bill Mullan, he's an intelligent,
thoughtful, sensitive person. Even if he does have
weird taste musically speaking.
D.D.
re: the weird taste in music.   It must be the
lobotomy.
NAY!
Dear Airhead,
I went to five different stores in search
of a Discorder. Eagerly ran home to read what
was a winter of discontent (not hate). And found
it had as much bile as Jimn\y Swaggard, Jim
Baker and John I Iolmes combined. Ge"t educated.
I will pick up April's edition and if it's good, and
has 'ON THE DIAL' (missing in March) I may
get a subscription. (Vinegar is good for diluting
bile).
An Uneducated Bum on
Welfare in Burnaby
YAY!
Dear Airhead,
With reference to the utterly chaotic
March issue, we found the magazine very creative, but with a few flaws:
1) too much ink (not enough open
white space to let our imaginations breathe; also,
the black gets all over everything and you don't
have time to read the whole issue before you have
to wash your hands.
2) talk to your printer about their lack
of care in keeping graphics from falling into the
text of such a fine article as that of Mr. Grigg.
Now, this brings us to another point:
the overwhelming insight that Mr. Grigg displayed in his article regarding "order from
chaos". This article blended the fundamental
ideals of biochemistry, physical chemistry and
philosophy in such an awe-inspiring manner as to
keep us from going to wash our hands until we
finished every soul-stirring word of it! We hope
to see more of his riveting work in future issues.
Yodrs in randomness,
The Three Chicks
1) Yes, ink is a problem. Unfortunately,
everyone's so hung up on black these days, how
could we remain an impenetrable bastion of alternative culture if we didn't flaunt it? Anyway, as
we said in the January issue, the best place to read
Discorder is in the washroom, near a sink. 2)
Leave our printers out of it. They work long, hard
hours and get more ink all over themselves in one
day than you'll wash off your hands in a lifetime.
The mystery exclamation mark? That mystery
remains. It might have something to do with our
new computerized typesetting. It might be mag-
ick.
SPIRITUAL GUIDANCE
Howdy,
Thanks for sending your magazine.
It's always fun to read. I don't want to burst
anybody's bubble but the BUTTHOLE SURFERS aren't gods, jes' regular folks. Well, I guess
if you worship them, they are gods.
Laura
(Rabid Cat Records/Austin,
Texas)
SPIRITUAL POLITICS
Airhead,
A letter which I sent regarding the
December Hindsight article should not be printed
without this supplement.
Within the Christian church, there is a
branch that has found strong expression, particu- »!
HEALTHY      DISCORDER."   (Harreson Atley)
larly in Central America, known as 'Liberation
Theology'. It recognizes 'marxism' as being the
vehicle to bring equality and social justice into
reality, and thus a practical means for the establishment of the Christian ideal in the real world.
On the other hand, there exist a range
of religious followings within Christianity, particularly the U.S. fundamentalist right, as well as
numerous cults and pscudo-(new age)-religions
which teach that the universe revolves around
'self', and/or that allegiance to God and country is
one and the same thing. The elements of an
intense national patriotism combined with an
inflated sense of national destiny were present in
the rise of Nazi Germany prior to the outbreak of
the Second World War. These elements have
been paralleled in the United States.
All of this is contrary to marxist theory, as well as liberation theology. In a multicultural society based upon socialism (or the
model of socialism), tolerance and understanding
should be weighed out to all, regardless of their
tradition and beliefs, insofar as the nature of those
beliefs do not threaten the lives of others, or
undermine a system which guarantees equality
and opportunity for all.
Tim J. Lawrence
(Delta Music Research)
re: the letter referred to. Unfortunately we lost it.
What can we say? We're sorry. We won't do it
again.
FUCK THE SYSTEM
Airhead,
(In response to D. Robinson's letter in
the last issue) You say, "while fusing the classes
and collasping the corrupt power structure which
our government so haplessly represents, another
more extreme form of government would arise,"
Well, to get rid of this "corrupt power structure",
people would have to be extremely well organized (say, through Anarchist unions, community
councils and citizens' militias) and if people are
organized enough to get rid of this system, which
is deeply entrenched in society, I can't see them
not being able to deal with "another more extreme
form of government".
You go on to say "Our basic capitalist
pattern would emerge from the morally bancrupt
swine who have power, guns, security, material
independence and influence over the miserable
wretches who work for them." Who gives them
power? Who makes their guns? Who makes them
secure? Who gives them material independence?
The answer is ordinary people.
And to have gained an Anarchist society, people would have had to have lost respect for
politicians, bosses, cops, the rich and all figures of
authority, so who could they influence? You then
say, "Even the sometimes desirable chaos of
Anarchy wouldn't change our modem survival
instincts." Anarchy isn't chaos so much as government isn't order. Anarchy means mutual aid.
It means organizing from the grass roots up. It's
because of our modem survival instincts that we
have to change society, because the way things
are going, we haven't much chance of surviving
while power is in the hands of the few.
Love & Guns,
Anna Key
ANGRY
Airhead,
There is a plague that has struck Vancouver recently. And it's pissing me off. The
pretentious MAG/RAG called "V". Because my
parents live in a supposedly fashionable area (I
guess that's how they determine circulation) we
get some stupid rag once a month telling us how
wonderful it is to be well off and socially and
fashionably aware. As I've said before, "Suck my
deck." If we keep on paying attention to this
bullshit, it will continue to survive. Just ignore it
and be yourself.
Two other things. No, three. 1) Who
is responding to the Ad gimmicks of heavy suggestive scenes? A perfume that uses as a picture
three naked women suggests a definitely different
scent. 2) Why do women go out with cads? 3)
SKATEBOARDING IS NOT A FORM OF
DEVIANT BEHAVIOUR. There are lots of
assholes who skate, but that does not mean we all
are. Think of all the assholes who drive.
Drainpipe
INSIGNIFICANCE
Airhead
Today, I was sitting at a bus stop
reading Discorder when I noticed that Discorder
is actually an anagram for "Die Socred" - - wait,
oh fuck it isn't because there is an extra V. There
I was thinking I had discovered this amazing thing
when actually... well, it must have been the way
it looked. Wow, man, what a bummer.
Yours truly,
Argh Arg Fuckface alias 'Kreegah-
Buwado-Mbwatha' of the Animal
Slaves
WORTH KNOWING
Airhead,
A couple of simple questions from a
non-listener in the Fraser Valley. 1) Are subscriptions to Discorder tax-deductible (those of
CFUV and CO-OP radio are)? 2) Am I likely to
get Discorder early enough in the month to plan
my Vancouver club-hopping (the Sun is certainly
no help)? 3) When will CITR be available on
Western (MSA) Cable, and would letters to
Western Cable managers help in the cause?
Phil Cottrell, Abbotsford
1) No. We're not tax deductible, but we're working on it. 2) Assuming our wonderful mail service
is on schedule, Yes, it will reach you early. We
usually mail out before the beginning of the given
month. 3) Yes! Yes! Yes! Letters always help.
Apparently, there is serious talk regarding cable
CITR for the Big Valley. Cross your fingers, say
your prayers and write more letters.
CONCERT PRESENTATIONS
\ The Bhundu Boys w/Dumi Manare: April 4th <
j> The Town Pump.
\ Jane Sibbery: April 8th @ The New York Thea-
\ ler. Two shows. 7pm and 10:30 pm.
J Sincad O'Connor: April 18th @ 86 Street
\ Spring Reggae Splash (with Chester Miller): \
[ April 20th @ 86 Street.
-CHAfTgft
<>EryeNTEfc-fT
WOT FVEN A qiPE OH THE WAcKy
fXNlNlAL SKutU RACERS PtP /WY-
TrW6- to AuWiXlt MY ArVREHEN
April 1988 Those were the days
The Administration and/or a large number of shareholders of The Arts Club of Vancouver decided this past
January that they would no longer allow live music at their Seymour Street Playhouse/bar, and that this would
come into effect as of March first. This decision was made apparently after one or more of this Arts Club
collective viewed part of a set by that bitchin* rock'n'roll sensation The Dayglo Abortions. It was the proverbial
straw that broke the Arts Club's back.
Nobody is exactly sure where the other straws lie but the guess is that certain Arts Club shareholders have gotten
the P.M.R.C. bug and are now throwing their weight around like a fat lady in a freak show, and putting the heat on the
administration. As a result, the administration of the Arts Club Shareholders (nothing less than a bunch of shit-eating
commies) are in essense banning what they would 'like' to stand for most: artistic expression.
The Arts Club Seymour began weekend bookings of so-called alternative bands in July 1985. Because of its
"anything goes" style of booking (the only criteria beging that the bands should play mainly original compositions), the
venue fast became a popular weekend nightclub (having the city's most lax doorman probably helped a bit). With bands
such as The Grooveaholics, Slow, Death Sentence, Deja Voodoo and NoMeansNo, it was an exciting place to be: a place
where it was easy to apply the well worn adage, "Anything can Happen!", and something very often did.
In recent years, The Arts Club Seymour has been a dumping ground for those plays which it was felt would
attract a clientele uninterested in the more mainstream fodder found at the Granville Island venue. So the more traditional
pole-up-their-ass patrons kept to Granville Island and the more liberal try-anything-once brigade kept to Seymour Street.
So mellow jazz and "Ain't Misbehaving" on Granville Island, and rock/thrash (anything but jazz) on Seymour Street. Well,
it worked, smooth as . .. well fuck the cliches, it worked. So what's the problem?
The problem is age-old. Older than even Jerry Garcia. Really. Simply put, it's prejudice. Because of the type
of music performed at the club (dubbed the rec-room by Deja Voodoo), the weekend crowd was different than the so-called
regular Arts Club clientele. They dressed funny, some looked downright strange, some even smelled bad; but they were
what kept the Arts Club alive. They supported not only the bar but the musicians who played there: musicians who had
the integrity and balls to play what they felt. And the Arts Club let them do it, for two and half years. Then they pulled
the rug out from under them.
So that's it The end of an era. Hopefully, the Arts Club Administration will open its eyes and realize what
year it is instead of running around like headless chickens scared of what might happen next Then maybe the Rec-Room
will re-open and again be a place to go, scam your way in, drink copious ammounts of beer, see a band you've never seen
before and maybe even get laid.
Garnet Harry, Arts Club Doorman
(August '85 - March '88)
DISCORDER taff and management of The Savoy
wish to thank CITR, the Discorder and
y^L{ their customers fotiff/yem of
sMfrport... Bye Bye.
If™
C|ub is joying to the
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MAIN CONCOURSE
UBC SUB Arcades
all ages welcome
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April 1988       7 Well, why does Comme
ACTUALLY, THE QUESTION SHOULD BE.
"Why do you expect commercial radio to suck
less than it does?" A music lover arguing that
commercial radio should be playing only music of
quality and distinction can be compared to a
fashion-concious consumer arguing that department stores should sell only stunning courturier
designs. Most people don't bother dressing fashionably because it isn't important to them. It isn't
the role of the department store to passionately
foist high fashion on the public because, money
aside, most people simply don't have the time or
interest for it. Similarly, commercial radio cannot
reasonably justify being righteous and holy about
its "art" when the bulk of its listeners are seeking
casual distraction on the way to work in the
morning.
Okay, but why does radio play what it
does? Cynics, of course, say that it's all done via
payola and underhanded backroom dealing, that
anyone can buy themselves to the top if they have
enough cocaine. But even if this were true, it
would have only a limited role in the music
industry. Why should a record company shell out
a quarter million dollars to buy some new artist's
way to the top when they can spend half as much
on payola for an established artist?
Payola exists only as grease in the
wheels, not as the entire machine. The greatest
financial inducement in radio comes from the
advertisers. If you're going to shell out millions
of bucks to promote your beer, you 'd be a fool not
to insist that these bucks be spent in the most cost-
effective fashion. So you advertise with the
station most popular with your target market
audience.
Commercial stations, ever sensitive to
the needs of the advertisers, have developed a
system which serves up a predetermined audience
on a platter. The BBM rating system tells
advertisers not only how popular a radio station is,
but the age, sex and income bracket of the listening audience at any given moment. Unfortunately, the best way to win with this kind of
clinical perfection is to format as consistent a
format of music as possible. If a station is stupid
enough to play a variety of music, only God
knows who's listening, and even He couldn't
document it for cautious advertisers.
The pressure on commercial radio is
to maintain a consistent listenership: "all the hits,
all the time." They just can't risk the loss of
listeners by playing even one song of dubious
appeal. It's too easy for folks to flick the dial. The
entire machine is geared toward music not of
quality or distinction, but toward music that
doesn't offend anyone.
The world of musical appreciation is
split into two kinds of people: Active
(us) and Passive (them). A passive
listener is best described as someone for
whom music isn't that important. It serves as a
backdrop to their moods and activities: partying
at the Keg, making out (you need music, right?),
ski parties at Whistler, etc. The point is, the music
itself is subordinate. The passive (shallow) listener comes to have favorite songs from their
association with specific positive events in his/
her life. The good time makes the favorite song
8 DISCORDER
I rather than the good song makes the favorite song.
In contrast, the active listener is someone for whom listening to music is a total activity.
For whatever reason, he/she has a much greater
interest in (and appreciation of) the music, and
listens to it more critically. Commercial radio
wants to appeal to the passive listener. Active
listeners, by definition, have tuned out and/or
bought tape decks.
Originally, in the 1950s, before most of
us Were bom, disc jockeys ran the
shows. They played whatever they
liked, read the commercials themselves, and the strength of their programs were
their personalities. They were musically aware
and unrestricted by the demands of their advertisers. In the mid-50s, Top 40 radio was invented.1
By repeating a limited number of very popular
songs rather than choosing from the entire spectrum of available pop music (which would necessarily include tunes of limited interest or esoteric
appeal), Top 40 blew unformatted radio right out
of the water. Listeners flocked to the stations that
played "only good music".
Advertisers flocked to this opportunity to run their commercials on station that could
guarantee half the listening audience, a hitherto
unknown phenomenon. In the mid-60s this Top
40 was itself beached in favor of the Boss 30
format which featured fast-paced chatter and
jingles between the even slimmer selection of
sure-fire hits. All of it, of course, was delivered
with machine-like precision.
Nevertheless, despite the success of
both of these formats, commercial radio was not
yet the fabled "license to print money" that it is
today. That took the arrival in the late 60s of the
baby boomers as the significant demographic, a
situation which continues to plague us to this day.
Either directly or indirectly, their tastes control
every commercial market Why should any
commercial enterprise conciously turn its back on
them and concentrate on a younger audience
which is both smaller and poorer?
Welcome then to the 80s, the world of
CHR (Contemporary Hit Radio), AOR (Adult
Oriented Rock), AC (Adult Contemporary), and a
host of other formulas and permutations, none of
which are particularly interested in the eighteen to
twenty-five year old audience. If you like music
that's aimed at middle-aged people, good. If not,
tough luck. Your purchasing power just doesn't
rate compared to that of the new reactionaries.
Unfortunately, with all this money at
stake, radio stations arc keen to find a sure thing.
In New York and Los Angeles where the competition for an audience is fiercest, innovation still
rears its ugly head from time to time. Should
some station that's faltering in the ratings stumble
across a new format that actually works, news of
a new gold formula will race across North America, eventually giving rise to countless imitations
in smaller markets across the continent. Hence,
our own local imitations: The Morning Zoo, The
Electric Lunch and one station's entire concept of
"less talk, more shlock" You didn't think these
were Vancouver originals, did you?
There's another golden formula these
days. Two years ago, Tommy James
(ex of The Shondells) had already netted half a million bucks from the relative success of Billy Idol's 1982 version of his
"Mony Mony". Now, with Tiffany's cover of "I
Think We're Alone Now", Idol's live version of
"Mony Mony" and someone else's cover of
"Draggin' the Line" all having placed in
Billboard's Top 100, Mr James is stinking rich (in
case he wasn't already). The point is not that he's
been particularly lucky, but that radio is obviously far happier playing a cover version of a
former hit than it is taking a risk with such an
intangible as a new song. By tarting up an old
song with a new artist, commercial radio has the
best of both worlds: a facade of newness and the
bankability of a proven favorite. Welcome to the
Big Chill era.
How else can you explain the popularity of the California Raisins, of Tiffany's version
of "I Saw Her Standing There"? Why did it lake
a cover of "La Bamba" for Los Lobos to gain the
commercial recognition they've long deserved?
It's the same tried and true mentality which keeps
Pink Floyd, George Harrison, Aerosmith, Yes,
Slcvie Winwood et al high up in the current charts.
They may not be covering old songs, but they are
covering old ground. Why are over half the acts
on the charts ten to twenty years old already? Do you honestly believe "When We Was Fab" would
be getting the attention it's enjoying had it been
done by Guadalcanal Diary?
All of this has given the 80s an inferiority complex. Since the 60s were evidently such
a wonderful era (loftier ideals, better music, better
drugs, cooler clothes, wilder parties) why should
we even bother aspiring to match their zenith of
culture and refinement? To say that a new band
sounds "60s inspired" is the highest compliment
one can offer.
There also persists today a mystique
about the integrity of FM radio. In the
late 60s, FM radio was introduced as an
experimental stereo broadcast format
(CKLG FM, in 1967, was one of the groundbreak-
ers in this market). Since commercial radio at the
time meant AM radio, advertisers didn't bother
with FM. Suddenly, unrestricted by financial
considerations, FM deejays (for a brief time) realized a freedom unheard of in over fifteen years.
FM radio played whatever it damn well wanted to,
be it two uninterupted hours of Grateful Dead or
Gregorian Chants or the latest Stones bootleg. In
essence, FM was doing then what campus radio
does today. Tres cool.
All of this ceased of course when
advertisers realized a significant chunk of their
audience was tuning out of AM. FM quickly
became big baby boom business. Out went unformatted experimentation. In came formula rock.
Of course, FM continued to maintain that it was
inherently cooler than AM, a swindle that goes on
to this day. Given the choice, I'd take
Vancouver's AM radio over its FM any day.
Six months ago while driving across
the prairies I had the pleasure of tuning into a
Regina station which, in the space of a single half
hour, played Prince, old Aerosmith, Lisa Lisa and
the Cult Jam, mid-sixties Who and an assortment
of other artists whose material falls into the nebulous range of so-called commercial music. It was
radio that walked all over anything commercial
heard this side of Abbotsford.
What does Regina (or Halifax or Calgary) have going for it that Vancouver doesn't?
Well, for one thing, a smaller market. There is
less pressure for "all the hits all the time", less
stations competing for those precious advertiser's
dollars. The deejays are permitted to sample from
the bottom half of Billboard's chart. This added
wealth of material adds enough "spice" to the
programming to make it sound significantly more
interesting. Vancouver, with its proportionately
larger rock audience and number of competing
rock stations, doesn't offer the same fertile
ground for variety. It's just not prudent to take a
chance on The Cure when, just a flick of the dial
away, the other guys are doing a Stones tribute.
Of course, if you take this reasoning to
its logical extreme, Los Angeles, Toronto and
New York should have the worst commercial
radio in the world. Not so. In cities larger than
Vancouver, other factors become significant.
Here, the audience is small enough to be treated as
homogeneous, whereas, in larger centers limited
interest (even Active listener) audiences are large
enough to be singled out and targctled by advertisers. Take, for instance, KROQ in Los Angeles
or CFNY in Toronto, both of which manage to
throw in the occasional Robyn Hitchcock, New,
Order or Sinead O'Connor track without alienating their audience. In Vancouver on the other
hand, conservatism has reached Ripley's Believe
it or Not proportions. It is rumoured that one
station does not add anything new to its playlist
until it has been sitting on the Billboard charts for
over six months, the reason being: "if it didn't last
that long, it couldn't have been that good." Or
how about the station that bases its playlist on the
views of randomly selected groups of thirteen
year old girls? All the commercial rock stations
in town check consistently with A&B Sound's
sales to see what they should be playing.
Another new (encouraging?) outcome
of our current radio situation is the
growing lack of correlation between
an artist's airplay and financial success. Of course, it's never been extraordinary for
an artist to have success without airplay (The
Grateful Dead), but we now have an unprecedented situation where an artist can gain an incredible amount of airplay and yet fail to sell
records or concert tickets. So keen arc radio
stations to find a sure-thing, they'll play music
which is so inoffensive that no one is interested in
it at all.
You've probably heard several songs
by Cutting Crew through radio airplay (by osmosis perhaps), yet have you ever fell the urge lo buy
their records or concert tickets? Apparently,
you're not alone, as they had lo cancel their entire
North American concert tour due to lack of ticket
sales. In Vancouver, despite three top ten singles,
they sold less than fifty tickets for their concert at
the Expo Theatre before it was cancelled. This
quality of being "radio friendly" hasn't helped the
careers of Gowan or Paul Janz either. Conversely, bands like The Cure and The Smiths and
a host of others that represent a new generation of
bands (and audience) are selling records quite
well, thankyou, without the help of commerical
radio. Could radio no longer be the relevant
commercial medium it once was?
So what's next? Is radio going to get any
better? No, why should it? Will there be
another Next Big Thing? I don't think
so, because the last Big Thing - - Punk -
- left us with a legacy of a healthy alternative
music scene and the concepts of Do-It-Yourself
independent labels and media. Frustrated with
the crass absurdity of the commercial mainstream? You can always turn to the alternative. It
may be a touch scrappy about the edges, but it is
fresh.
With the advent of digital home recording, personal computers and an overall increased awareness of (and access to) technology,
the Next Big Thing may well be not the matter
communicated but, to borrow from Marshall
McLuhan, the medium itself. Commercial radio
will not change until dwindling revenues render it
completely obsolete.
Gord Badanic
April 1988 u
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Remember when rock and roll was
shocking, when "Elvis the Pelvis"
was censored on Ed Sullivan, when.
The Who could excite an audience
by destroying their equipment on
stage? Look what's happened to us
today. Eric Clapton now plays guitar solos in beer
commercials. The Beatles exhort "Revolution" in a
sneakers ad. The list goes on and it gets worse. What
the hell's happening here? Rock and roll was once the
totem music of youthful rebellion and of a youth
culture distinct from the generation that had brought
us WWEt and Hiroshima. Now it's the music of a
consumer culture, a culture that remembers the music
but has forgotten the original feeling and the original
dream. Can rock ever be dangerous again?
Cultural arts are only dangerous when
they create or are part of a new paradigm or cultural
ethic. The easiest and surest indicator that you're on
to something is when the older generation decries the
new developments as crap. The new development or
new music becomes dangerous because it sets the
tone for something beyond their comprehension and
beyond their control. It invades their comfortable
world, the world they've carefully insulated. It walks
in and kicks over their chairs, knocks down their
paintings and generally messes things up. It tells
them things they don't want to hear (ever listen to
Public Enemy?).
Hip hop is, by far, the best hope anyone
has at stirring things up right now. As John Leland has
said, hip hop is music about the loudspeaker. It takes
the sounds and songs of everyday life that the audience is familiar with and reshapes it, molds it and tears
tttt
-rTXX
"Cu
it up again. It reclaims the deceptively seamless
world of Top 40 or Contemporary Hits Radio and puts
the aural control back into the hands of the artists.
Freed from conventional restraints the results are
diverse. Some artists work on heavy scratching and
cutting (Jazzy Jeff and Fresh Prince) while others
become extremely political (listen to Public Enemy's
"Bring The Noise", their hardest driving work yet
with homage to Louis Farrakhan in the middle).
Music of this sort lends itself to different
ways of thinking. Its use of technology helps create a
different frame of mind. When you hear the sounds
of things falling apart on a Tackhead LP it doesn't
exactly make you feel like you're listening to a
Beatles album does it? No, this is new, its attitude is
different, it's subversive and pleasurable. Part of the
pleasure arises out of the technology employed.
Since samplers can snatch everything in an incredibly
pure form and replay it as such, you can get spectres
of Led Zep tunes floating in and out and drum patterns
that you can't exactly place but sound very familiar.
Hip hop takes the stuff that used to give you pleasure,
slips it into the mix, and so takes you into the past as
well as the future.
This, of course, changes the boundaries"of
music but is it so radically different? If they sample
a Led Zep tune won't Led Zep fans dig it too? Yes and
No. What sets hip hop apart (besides its cultural
origins) lies in the altitude of ihe artists towards, yes
again, the technology. The technology is the brush
used lo repaint the world. The colours are still the
same but the picture is different. You might like
Victorian portraits but can you handle neo-expres-
sionism? The same goes for hip hop in the context of
rock music. What you're hearing is a colossal reorganization in the way songs are defined. It's a
sidestep from the punk ethos because instead of the
music being about itself (i.e. the original raw rock and
roll feeling) hip hop focuses, on the machines that
pump it out and the voice that raps becomes the tool
not to sing with but to sing through because the
mesage presented is also important. Listen to the
records that literally scratch out turntable solos, listen
Uxthe DJ induced skips in the drum beat and then
marvel at four minute dramatic monologues that
these guys let loose.
By and large mainstream radio is too weak
and feeble to play this stuff. Fat old program directors
with moustaches and silk jackets won't let their
playlist go this far. It's too dangerous. It alienates
them and if it alienates them, it alienates people like
them who listen to their stations. In other words, hip
hop is doing what it should: carving out a new cultural
ethic. Yet as more student radio stations go high
power without the constraints of advertising dollars,
this stuff will spread. All over. Amen.
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April 1988      13 RARE AIR
Hard To Beat
Toronto's Rare Air is a remarkable quartet of virtuoso
musicians featuring two champion pipers (Grier
Coppins and Pat O'Gorman), a champion drummer
(Trevor Ferrier) and a superb guitarist/bass player
(Dick Murai). Coppins and O'Gorman also play
whistles, flute, bombarde and the North African bin-
iou-koz, a sort of shrill oboe. Ferrier excels on roto-
toms and a variety of ethnic percussion implements,
while Murai plays fretted 5-string bass, fretlesss bass
and acoustic guitars. This all makes for a pretty wild
and varied sound!
Side 1 is a pretty varied collection of instru-
mentals, opening with the stomping single Tribal
Rites, driven by funky bass and roto-toms, and led by
the dual bagpipes. This is followed by Taxi Suite, a
catchy little number again showcasing the highland
pipes. Inside Out is in sharp contrast, featuring a
superb acoustic guitar solo by Murai, which was one of
the highlights of their three-day stint at the Savoy in
July. It is an atmospheric, dare I say, "New Age" piece,
rather long, but nevertheless superb. Small as Life
features the Middle Eastern sound of the biniou-koz,
and more inspired percussion.
Side 2 lends to drag a bit, with too many
trivial pipe jams, although Marvin's March for Marvin
Gaye, is a unique tribute to the soul giant (probably the
only one played on the pipes), and Waiting Room has
as infectious, atmospheric feel.
Rare Air provided some of my personal
highlights at Canadian folk festivals this year, not least
for their dance wosrkshop with the OYSTER BAND
at Edmonton, where they massacred Tutti Frutti. They
are one of the finest, most eclectic, innovative and personable bands in North America.
Steve Edge
THE DIK VAN DYKES
Nobody Likes the Dik Van Dykes
Q: What does it take to make the HI record on
college radio across Canada?
So, Local Motion and I are back after a
month's action-packed, glamorous, and
fun-filled vacation, only to find things in
a bit of a shambles. The vast demo tape
department at CITR has been going
through serious upheavals. Ed and Dale
will now be the folks actually getting demos on-air,
while Local Motion will continue to review select
tapes once they've made their way through our tortured bureaucratic system. So this month, while Ed
and Dale try to dig their way out of the backlog,
there's not much I can do in the way of reviews,
although you can expect to hear from A Merry Cow
(who've just found a new drummer and will be
playing with The Hip Type at the Wardells' record
release party at the end of March), The One Hitters
(aka Biff Hackett, The Young Adults, etc), The Rockin'
Edsells, and more, really soon.
And even though April might seem a little
late for me to make corrections to The Best and Worst
of '87 Local Motion column (of January '88), I just
thought I'd mention (for the benefit of David M. and
No Fun, who don't get half the attention they deserve)
that while I didn't include their No Fun in Love show
as one of the year's best gigs (I didn't mention any
local bands, actually) I did want to say that my Show
Most Regrettably Missed was their Rock and Roll's
Drug Heritage extravaganza at the Railway. (If they
| handed out condoms at the "Love" performances,
14 DISCORDER
what did they do for this one?) Maybe they'll consider a repeat....
Unfortunately, April brings very bad
news for the "alternative" music scene in Vancouver.
In case you haven't heard, the Savoy has been sold
and will undergo a radical change in format. While
the Venue has apparently stopped booking alternative
bands and then started again several times, and it
looks like the Arts Club has stopped its weekend
shows for good (for a long time the only venue for a
lot of bands), it's the loss of the Savoy that will
probably hit most of us the hardest. Not only was it
the home of CITR's Shindig for four years, but the
Savoy had (I think) the best staff, the best atmosphere,
and most of the best gigs (for example, ask anyone
who saw their Surf Night show at the Savoy which
was Slow's best ever performance). A lot of my
personal affection for the club comes from the fact
that it was the only venue where I felt comfortable
going by myself. I'll also miss all the graffiti in the
band room, which I really hope someone manages to
photograph before the inevitable paint job (or worse).
At the very least, the Railway, Venue, Waterfront,
and other clubs will find it hard to fill the hole left by
the Savoy. More likely, that gap will never quite be
filled again. I'll miss the Savoy very much.
Janis
A: Not very much, and preferably, as little as
possible.
This should've been just another quintet-from-
Hamilton-that-manages-to sound-thinner-than-
Deja-Voodoo-with-female-backup-vocals.. .except they've got good velocity and above average
material — much of it has a life expectancy
stretching beyond two listenings. But seriously
folks, what does it say about the industry when
university radio is dominated by fuck-bands?
JB Hohm
CURRENT 93
Swastikas for Noddy
Laylah
It was over a year ago that David Tibet warned
everyone who craves the music of Current 93 that
they may not be as thrilled with Swastikas For
Noddy as with previous material. A cursory aural
glance might confirm this reservation. The concept is essentially English folk music and is
worlds away from the Current's first 4 or 5
releases. Those familiar with Imperium and
Happy Birthday Pigface however will not be surprised with the result. The mood is still
unremittingly dark. Far from being less convincing, though, the album has the potential to affirm
to more people than ever that there is much in
Current 93's music to be admired. And if this
bothers the elitist in some listeners, well ain't that
a shame.
Larry Thiessen
DIE FORM/1987
Poupee Mecanlque
New Rose
Try to imagine a bowl of rice krispies snap-
crackle-and-popping away using blood instead of
cream and sugar. Poupee is a little like that. Die
Form's Linn drum programs and helium-rock
vocals have all the trademarks of typically vapid,
silly Gallic Europop (albeit beautifully produced
and pressed - Pyrolater and Yello keep coming to
mind). The words are another matter. They're
mixed prominently enough to be unavoidably
comprehensible: "The soil on me dries out under
the cold wind. It's no more useful to scream.
Thousands dead at the bottom of my stomach have
created my abysses. On those bristling faces I can
only read patience. Not a word for those hurts.
Just a cross." The net effect is a sort of malice
which is all the more compelling for its brainless-
ness.
Larry Thiessen POWER TOOLS
Strange Meeting
Fusion, when applied to music, usually refers to
a blending of jazz with rock. Fusion in the
instrumental parlance of Power Tools is something more akin to what happens at the end of an
acetylene torch.
The amazing guitar work of Bill
Frisell buzzes and crashes throughout. The range
of this artist is compelling. He will offer the
suggestion of melody, then build a rapid development of confusing intensity before pausing to let
the pent up energy of sound subside in slow angry
phrases. Drummer Ronald Shannon Jackson
works with longtime partner bassist Melvin
Gibbs to redefine the potential of a rhythm section. Not content with combining bass and drums
in a controlled frenzy of beat and counter rhythm
designed to keep Frisell within the boundaries of
this musical construction site, they do more.
Staying away from flashy cymbal and high hat
combinations, Jackson uses the pitch of his drums
to augment and complete Gibbs' bass runs, producing a counter melody to Frisell which provides
a clarity to the demanding compositions.
Strange Meetings was recorded studio-live with digital technology and the energy of
that session has not been diluted with further
remixing of overdubs. It is an intelligent, imaginative and noisy album that can't be ignored.
David Firman
LEGENDARY PINK DOTS
Any Day Now
Like a shitty Alan Barson's Project. Some of it
anti-papist. All of it pompous, dreary, self-indulgent and forgettable. Take away the strings and
the keyboards, give them guitars and Marshall
Amps, and these guys could go on the road as a
tribute to Spinal Tap.
JB Hohm
THE TEAR GARDEN
Tired Eyes Slowly Burning
Nettwerk
The first EP by Tear Garden I heard was so
warped I ended up using it to rinse grapes. Nonetheless, it was well done (a more presentable copy
was purchased to replace it). TiredEyes is an even
better outing. Edward Ka-spell has always had a
certain lyrical appeal; but his solo ventures have
suffered from being "DOT'-ish, lacking in
punch. Skinny Puppy on the other hand have
always excelled in producing a muscular sound
which has, for me, been best when least tuneful.
The uniting of both talents may end up being a
sum greater than its equal parts. Ka-spell's words
and voice have a larger, more dramatic setting and
the Puppies are presented in a more poetic light. It
is quite simply very, very good. I hope they do
Larry Thiessen
SIDNEY MOROZOFF PRESENTS
JOHN SEX
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April 1988      15 MISSION FROM HELL
The  Humane  Drum Society with
Tippy-a-Go-Go
The Savoy Feb.23: benefit for bombing victims of El Salvadore
Neopsychedelism rules, rebels
come and go-go. Masks lurking, backdrop
sheet staring. Going underground?
Tippy scrambles onstage, commanding attention to his world, what it sounds
looks and feels like. The wildman in creation
with his bizarre assortment of toys, the busted
classical guitar from hell. Edging on cosmic
at times, definitely alien. I felt like I was
watching a child at play in the kitchen cupboard with the pots and pans letting out distorted, altered sounds every now and then.
Clownish, artsy, spontaneous. Where's the
light show?
This is called the folkset. Everything seems to be well under control, there is
a great deal of certainty around this guy as he
"pulls out of the woodwork some of the
members of the band" for a series of duos.
Ever silly and playful ("politicians taking off
their Chevrolets"), strangely touching love
song ("I love you even if you're so fat, fat,
fat"), some good old folk tunes and guitar
playing.
Yes, Tippy likes to steer. "He even
told me what my part was." "Ego-a-go-go!"
shouts a member of the audience (or is that
one of the many in the band?) It becomes
evident why leadership is necessary during
the following dance set.
Various impressions come up as
the parade, carnival style, makes its way
across, into, around the room, the dance floor
and stage. It's bacchanal time. The atmosphere evokes visions of demi-gods, elephants
in the Brazilian jungle (?), hanging out at
some oasis, dancing with the gypsies under
the stars (there are so many talented people in
the desert). Everyone is up to something,
wearing a mask, playing a percussive or
musical instrument, theatrics, dancing, the
costumes colorful as the music.
The bedlam that ensues is like
watching a soap but with much better sound
effects. What puzzled me was that no female
bodies were into doing percussion, they
seemed to prefer hanging out on the dance
floor. Eventually, however, they were able to
muster the guts to get up on stage and make
noise with the rest of the gang - the rap was
fun.
This is where Tippy comes in
extra handy as more and more relatives feel
the urge to come and play and crowded conditions make it a bit crazy. Good old Mr.T.
The Humane Drum Society is a
street-oriented performing arts organism
whose goals are based, if not on ideology, on
the sincere urge to help those who are willing
to realize the shape of things through expression, learn as you play methods. They're a
non-profit organization and have been so
busy doing benefits and such they're feeling
burned out. And it's not shampoo burnout.
There is talk of a free concert in the
paik, workshops for children, non-musicians
and a big pot of soup. Feed the hungry, heal
the earth, save humanity from itself. Watch
reality snapping at their dancing heels.
Denlse Richard
A 40 Second Interview With Tlppy-A-Go-Go
Who are You?
I'm a vocal percussion go-go dancer, multiethnic, hardcore, jazz sort of improvisationalist.
Do you like sweat?
I love sweat. I'm a vegetarian, but I like tomato
sweat and spaghetti sweat.
About how many hamburgers have you eaten in
your life?
Well, when I lived in California as a young lad I
had quite a few of Macs, but now I freeze dry them
and juggle with them; however, now I'm more
into nut burgers, but I don't like new age music.
Who is God?
God is not god. God is dog backwards. God is the
great spirit within you and I, and Christ, and Joan
of Arc, and Buddha, and Krishna, and oogala
boogala and the anteater of the universe.
Interviewed by John Ruskln.
16
DISCORDER What's That poppin'?
There was a confluence of cultural nosebleeds at the
Savoy on February 15th as the first pop-tart cabaret
played with a full house. Performance poetry, music
industriopop to cowpunk, ranting readings, contestants from the studio audience, an idioschizincratic MC
were mashed into a no-brow event. Many new human subjects were exposed to infectious instant anartic
energy that breached the containment toasters.
What's in a tart
pOp-tart: an upbeat magazine that turns to food in your toaster. This
magazine of instant art is not just a roll in the hay of signifies, more art-schtick
than artspeak. crying out for mall merchandising and TV spinoffs, accessible/ex-
cessible/inciteful, it dares not to be just another jar of marshmello fluff.
Surrounded in fake pastry you'll find aphorsms, cartoons, computer graphics,
collages, drawings, essays, film/video stills, interviews, journals, mail art. novels,
paintings, photographs, plagiarism, playscripts. poetry, reviews, screenplays,
songs, stories, xerox art, zen.
How fast is instant
tartars seek fresh squeezed artistic juices not canned tomatoes, the whole clove
not botulated garlic pasties. For a spontaneous flavour we eschew and spit out
editing, premeditating, headitorialising. categorising, and ego-elitistical control.
Hysterical perspective
Vancouver artsy-toasties began popping and puffing with fruity fillings nine
months ago. Seven Issues (sneezy, dopey, horsey, censory, party, military &
sexy...) have been delivered to angelic choruses of pop-tartalettes. The team
tartar has coopterated with galleries, clubs, theatres, politicos. etceterrestrials on
rasberry jam sessions, calendars, 20 Y~
minute poetry workouts, cabarettes.
and harmoniacal humms. Events.
pages, walls have an opening to all
who try. So send it, say it, draw it, play |
it. buy it, try it, do it. now.
Before midnight tonight.
April 1988      17 WANTED!
WARNING:
SINCE HAVING BROKEN OUT OF KINGSTON IN DEC. 67, THEY'VE
BEEN ON A ROCK RAMPAGE ACROSS CANADA, BLOWING AWAY AUDIENCES WHEREVER THEY PLAY
DESCRIPTION—THEY'RE HOT!, THEY LOVE TO PLAY!
KNOWN TO BE APPEARING AT THE TOWN PUMP APRIL 1 AND 2
REWARD: ONE HELL OF A GOOD TIME, AND A CHANCE TO BUY
THEIR DEBUT LP/CASSETTE, "TRAGICALLY HIP" (INCLUDES "SMALL
TOWN BRINGDOWN" AND "WEREWOLF") ON SALE NOW AT—TRACK
RECORDS, BLACK SWAN RECORDS, MELISSA'S RECORDS & TAPES,
HIGHLIFE RECORDS AND MUSIC.
^nwf
<*EEK
ivayEfcNA
"Lamb on a Spit our Specialty"
DAILY SPECIALS FOR
LUNCH AND DINNER
Try our unique menu, including
•Tzanziki, Melitzano, Houmos
•Spanakotiropita, Saganaki, Lukaniko
•Souvlakia, Mousaka, Kalamaria
•And much, much more!
•Plus... pizza
• Pasta also a specialty
Mon. - Sat. 11 a.m. to 1 a.m.
Sunday to Midnight
TAKE OUT • CATERING • WEDDINGS
ANNIVERSARIES • BIRTHDAYS
FREE DELIVERY
Phone for Reservations:
736-2118 / 736-9442
2272 West 4th Ave., Kitsilano
Everything
Under the Sun
from the 50's to
the 80's
v»01»>»*«» *"
*•:"■! L* ■> t*****.*!
* *
18
-*
«m.
DISCORDER
Vancouver East Cultural Centre
& Vancouver Folk Music Festival
present
April 20-23
8 pm
Vancouver East Cultural Centre
1895 Venables at Victoria Drive
Reservations 254-9578
Tickets available at Black Swan Records. Highlife Records,
the Vancouver Folk Music Festival and VTC ( * 280-4444 to charge by phone) Dial
MONDAYS
CRAPSHOOT
5:30 pm - 6:00 pm
A slap happy, zany show of serious discussion.
Moderated by Dylan (G.Q.) Armbrust and
including panelists Donovan Kuehn (NDP),
Robbie (The Boy) Withers and Rob (Not less but)
Morehouse. Upcoming topics for April are Bill
Vander Zalm, Mila Mulroney, Free Trade and that
ever important issue... abortion. Remember, it's
a phone in show, so participate.
THE JAZZ SHOW
9:00 pm- 12:30 am
Vancouver's longest-running prime time Jazz
program, featuring all the classic players, the
occasional interview and local music news.
April 4: Freddie Hubbard quickly became THE
trumpet star of the generation before Wynton
Marsalis. He had it all, sound, fire, technique and
at twenty-one possessed one thing that Wynton
does not have..originality.
Here is his first album under his own name . .
"Open Sesame".. with Freddie Hubbard is McCoy
Tyner, the legendary Tina Brooks and others.
April 11: The music of Cecil Taylor. Always a
challenge and an emotionally exhausting
experience .. but always worth your undevided
attention. "The Spring of Two Blue-Jays" (A rare
collectors item) is both a solo and group effort by
piano-genius Taylor. With Jimmy Lyons (Alto) and
Andrew Cyrille (Drums) and Sirone (Bass). The
Cecil Taylor Unit.
April 18: Along with Louis Armstrong ... Sidney
Bechet must rank as high as a player and
innovator in the New Orleans tradition. He moved
to France in the early fifties (where he died in 1959)
and became a national hero. He is almost
forgotten now, but now will be alive on "The Jazz
Show". ...Sidney Bechet, his clarinet and soprano
saxophone.
April 25: A new album by pianist Mal Waldron is
always a treat. Mal is a true international (dividing
his time between America and Europe, where he
lives). Here's Mal in New York, at the Village
Vanguard fronting a great quintet with Charlie
Rouse, Woody Shaw, Reggie Workman and
Eddie Blackwell. Recorded in 1986.
Hosted by the ever-suave Gavin Walker.
TUESDAYS
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
1:00 pm -3:00 pm
Music to scrape the cowshit off your boots too.
RECTAL RECTITUDE
5:30 pm - 8:30 pm
"I'd rather eat Belly Poison
I'd rather jump the Empire State".
AURAL TENTACLES
midnight - 4:00 am
This Tuesday nite from midnight till 4 in the morning:
A tragedy will occur, Some people will enjoy sex,
Some will get high, countless cigarettes will be
torched, numerous bottles will be emptied, a Big
Mac will be consumed, A hubcap will be stolen in
Surrey, The wide World of Drugs will be heard-
(around 2), someone will throw Up, Mutant rats will
be born, Nocturnal "Red-Eyes" wearing either
nothing at all or wearing drab institutional garb
(You know, those "white jackets' with the funny
sleeves tied behind the back) will receive a special
message from God, telling he/she why he/she has
been selected as the chosen one, AND Aural
Tentacles will creep out into the nite (Spewing
upbeat and undefinable sounds). Cheap Lobot-
omy performed by Pierre Huish!!!
WEDNESDAYS
THE CLASSICAL SHOW
7:30 am - 70:00 am
A variety of musical styles ranging from the early
Medieval to the Twentieth Century. All styles will
be discussed with historical importance.
Requests taken. Hosted by Wolfgang J. Ehebald.
THE AFRICAN SHOW
8:00 pm - 9:30 pm
The latest in modern African dance music plus /
minus a few oldies but greats and extras. Your
way we come every Wednesday at 8:00 pm.
Information and news as they come at 8:30 pm.
Possible features at 9:00 pm. Your host Umerah
P. Onukwulu. Welcome.
THE KNIGHT AFTER
midnight ■ very late
Rockin Patrick is back'- Turn it up. Featuring the
Marlin Perkins Exotic Musical Hour: The best
psychotic sickoid music from all over the world.
FM102
CABLE 102'
7:30
8:00
9:00
10:00
11:00
12:00
1:00
2:00
3:00
4:00
5:00
6:00
7:00
8:00
9:00
10:00
11:00
12:00
1:00
2:00
3:00
TUESDAY      WEDNESDAY    THURSDAY
SATURDAY      SUNDAY
The
Beautiful
Music Show
NEWS. SPORTS. WEATHER. GENERIC REVIEW AND INSIGHT
Random
Soup Of
The Day
The
Jennifer Chan
Show
Pest
Control
Radio
Vomit
Blood On
The Saddle
Quality Time
For Latchkey
Kids
The
Classical
Show
If
The
Spice
of Life
In
Context
Fine
Lines
Tribes And
Shadows
Better
Hohm's | The Joanna
& | Graystone
Garlick's I      Show
CTTR NEWS, SPORTS AND WEATHER
The
FTL
Show
The
FTL
Show
(Com)
First
Blood
Pump
Up Da
Volume
Narduwar
Absolute
Value of
Noise
NEWS, SPORTS, WEATHER, GENERIC REVIEW, INSIGHT AND DAILY FEATURE
CrapShoot
Hot
Pink
More
Dinosaurs
The
Jazz
Show
[Environmental;
Scatology
Rectal
Rectitude
Bunkum
Obscura
Aural
Tentacles
WEEKDAY REPORTS
Kathy
Day
The
African
Show
Permanent
Culture
Shock
The
Vinyl
Top Of
The Bops
The
Can-Con
Job
Crack
Rhythm
The
Knight
After
Louis
Louis
The Music
Saturday    ,      0f our
Edge Time
Power
Chord
The
Rockers
Show
We Be
Botanists
Blues,
Blues,
Blues
Soul
City
SaL Magazine   Sua Magazine
«'•'
*
KNOCK
TERNZ
Just Like
Women/
Electronic
Smoke
Signals
Playloud/
This Is
Not
A Test
Tunes
*R
Us
In The
Grip
Of
Incoherency
SATURDAY REPORTS
J  .L
SUNDAY REPORTS
MAJOR  NEWS/SPORTS
NEWSBRIEF
NEWSBREAK
NEWSBRIEF
MAJOR  NEWSVSPORTS
VANCOUVER NEW  MUSIC
CALENDAR
NEWS
SUNDAY  MAGAZINE
April 1988      19 THURSDAYS
BETTER HOHM'S AND
GARLICK'S
11:10 am- 1:00 pm
We have your cat. 500 Dollars. Small bills. No
cops.
March 31:        Garlick's
April 7: Hohm's
April 14: Garlick's
April 21: Hohm's
PUMP UP DA VOLUME
(FORMERLY PARTY WITH ME
PUNKER)
Music to lose your friends by. An hour of probing
social commentary as seen through eyes of two
suburban guys with few friends and bad haircuts.
Hosts: Mike and Gavin.
THE VINYL FRONTIER
5:30 pm - 8:00 pm
The Spinlist will never be the same again! Tune in
..Turn on.. Dropout..
TOP OF THE BOPS
8:00 pm • 9:00 pm
More Rock 'n' Roll than you shake a stick at! And
I don't mean Phil Collins either . . . Flip out,
eggheads!!! (with Aplogies to Billy Miller and KicJss
Magazine.
THE CAN CON JOB
9:00 pm ■ midnight
Two hours of Canadian bands with lots of local
stuff. Demos too. Band interviews:
April 7: Zaza and the Zooms
April 14: Roots Roundup
April 21: Hip Type, Cannon Heath Down.
April 28: The Dots.
EXHIBITIONISM
midnight • 3:30 am
Its the slide of dormant matrix interface.
April 21, Throbbing Gristle. All of it.
Spin
list
artist
title    r
iaoei         NMK8
;a:i 3j~:-er
Fishcatiutqai
PQcYSRAH
5
NE6ATIVLWB
Escape Fron Noise
SST
4
&WW MW
Sharp As A Neecle
ON-J SOUND
2
! BONE BJRSET"
'ne Taiking Arueals
CBS
2
L£5tJiMRt PINK DCTS
Any Day Nch
PLAY IT MAIN 5AM
2
S^ACE RE6RGES
favorite Songs Free
The Sixtiti
MF ARF
2
^y a ..  EAT [TSElF
Box Frenzy
CHAPTER 22
i
VARIS'JS
Rinutcs Tc So
INTERIOR
2
JQHSJifa
Highlights Ot A Dang
erous Lifi
ENiSWI
■
FLAflV 6R30VIES
One Night Stand
rRINSE
;4
JESUS \  MARY CHAIN
Darklands
WEA
16
rRC\ri:*E ASSE?ELV
Corrosion
THIRD HIND
2
3:*eas j'cshei
'ne Lion and tne Cobra
Chrysalis
2
c :--. 'A Dtrc
Nctnin' But 'ne TrU*
h
ROUNDER
2
SISTERS jr SESCV
Fl Mil and
WEA
$
13 6hosts
ENIGMA
IC
5CREAHIW BLUE -ES5IAH5
Biitini Red
WEA
16
THAT ?ETRCL EHCT1CK
Shdrt/Lopg 33 EP
POuYDCR
2
::.;: youth
faster Dik On Beat
Blast First
2
isiccla ;-::van:
Intervista
VIRGIN
2
Ir'AfclOUS
Music Pros Tne Arapi
t ot Canas a
PROBLEM chi.dren
2
5CJFATtfRS
Birth, School, Work
with
EPIC
9
1E5ASETH
So far, So Gooo, So
What
EH I
2
*:::e\"0ps
Vou Hake fie Feel
RO.'SH TRADE
4
TRASIC «,_A'7D
Locos ?or El Sexc
ALTERNATIVE T£\'AC_E5
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-re vp-_
A Good Night Out
SOME BIZARRE
4
SREEN RIVE8
Dry As A Bone
SUB POP
4
BUSTER PGINDEiTER
Buster Pomcexter
BH6
;4
0 l'lz  BANC
Wild Blue Yonder
FESTIVAL
14
SA&QARA LC5S
Thirst
PATHFINDER
16
5'4AUi3
Children Ot Sod
PRODUCT INC.
31
paladins
The niacins
Wrestler
2
EftR_\ «yy«ALS
Dinosaur Oaelot
CHANNEL 83
2
;s:c£ rA^
Voice Far*
RALPH
2
:.y:".>
ror The Country
P0LY5RAH
2
e._:ese: cl" -a'a_:s"s
B.issed Out Fatalis
.s
HCTICO
?
BALAAH -N" ~^E AN5E,
LiVI Pree or Die
VIR5IN
2
THE >.'>
Starfish
WIST*
2
"'•• COMWHCKENTS
seird Out
SENSIBLE
4
•::. kce see
Hon Ya LWtl He No*
BHS
9
SINSLE &i»5i THEORY
Exorcise Tms Was:?
and
^-*U*Y.
\~j
::.'.:;-:e!.
Scrtat.no, Li-fe
SUB POP
14
:-E:r^i:s
Greatest Nits
X
ii
ERU LIND6REM
Polar Yet Tropical
ARF ARF
2
JANE SIBERRY
"he Walking
DLiKE STREET
2
ICE STRUHHEfl
Walker
VIRGIN
2
VARIOUS
Jack Trax. The Third A^Pu*
INDIGO
j
VARIOUS
These Dogs Line in
tne Garage
ARP ARF
2
BLUE HIPPOS
Forty Forty
TWINTONE
2
FRIDAYS
IN CONTEXT
0:30 am -10:00 am
April 1: An interview with Phillip Glass. New jazz:
Steve Lacy sextet.
April 15:  Vancouver Opera Presents... Profile:
Rare Air.
April 22: Previewing events at Hollyhock Farm.
Some words from "In performance".
April 29: DANCE SPECIAL: Provocative dance
ideas from the Rebound Dance Collective.   An
interview with  Lola MacLaughlin; dance and
expressionism.    Previewing Karen Jamieson's
performances.
TRIBES AND SHADOWS
10:30 am -11:30 am
Despite a rather busy month for dance in
Vancouver, and a rare performance by Philip
Glass, this month's programs will explore Paris,
France. In particular, we will explore Paris
between the periods of 1900 - 1930, with the
"Surge" of creative movements that occurred
during this time and place including Surrealism,
Cubism, New Music, plus a look at the minds that
gave birth to such thought: Picasso, Appolinaire,
Breton, Poulenc, Music by Stravinsky, utilizing
methods of Anthropology and communications,
this program will attempt to discern how this period
of creative and political ferment is influencing
"New thought" that may be emergent in the fabric
of today's consciousness and whatever are the
corelations between the activities that occurred
then and what may happen now. Hosted by Kirby
Scott Hill.
THE NEW EXPO *66
1:00 pm-2:30 pm
"WOW! J. Paul Kennedy is definitely Hip!"
- young Teen admirer.
This is typical of the thousands of comments we
receive daily at the Telstar Records office. Adoring
teens, happy housewives, kids in Chryslers - just
a few of the many that "just have to" phone in about
ournewswingin" sensation, J. Paul Kennedy. He's
hip, he's smooth, he's streetwise. He's got a
radioshow called the New Expo '66. He's got an
album out Stick-to-the-ribs rock 'n roll, and he's
starred in three runaway smash motion pictures.
J. Paul's got a finger on the pulse of teensville, and
we're proud. So's his family, except brother Dean,
whose missing.
-Tom Conners, Host of the Telstar
Rock Show on your local NBC station.
NARDWUAR THE HUMAN
SERVIETTE PRESENTS ...
2:30 pm - 3:00 pm
Nardwuar and Cleo love the radio, people, VOX,
amps, the Fleshtones, Yakima Knut, FarFisa
organs, theStandells, Shamrock Shakes, Chan
Romero and Triple Pattied A + W Mozza burgers
with Skipper's Clam Chowder.
April 29: meet Nardwuar at the Haney Hotspot
(Main and 7th) in Patsy's Restaurant for Cleo's
Cave-In, a giant 6 band blow-out.
THE WAY WE SEE IT
5:30 pm - 6:00 pm
20
DISCORDER Join the CiTR News Staff as they discuss a week
of events and issues, causes and consequences.
Learn all there is to know about a world of
happenings, as each reporter gives story details,
and discusses its implications.
INTERFERENCE
6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
The choice of bankers everywhere. With your
host, Gerald McBoingboing.
CRACK RHYTHM
9:00 pm - midnight
A large, messy, enigmatically entertaining
evening program, highlighting the hefty sounds of
exotic beats and the malicious chunk of modern
funk, with constant and current info on the
Vancouver alternative music scene supplied by
those who should know.
Hastily hosted by Robert Shea.
SATURDAYS
POWER CHORD
noon - 3:00 pm
Vancouver's only true metal show, featuring the
underground alternative to mainstream metal:
Local demo tapes, imports and other rarities, pius
album giveaways.
WE BE BOTANISTS
3:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Up for clubbing? Prime to the disturbing melodiesi
of the Plant Master Grant. Funk and dead dance.
Honey, I've got rhythms I haven't even used yet.
TUNES 'R' US
midnight - 4:00 am
The incredible music show from two uncredible
people. Join us for four hours of fun and foolishness. But mostly music!
SUNDAYS
MUSIC OF OUR TIME
8:00 am - noon
Modern   Twentieth   Century   classical   music,
ranging from the tonal to the avante garde.
Commentary on the historical, technical and latest
fashions with regards to all genres.   Requests
taken. Your host, Wolfgang J. Ehebald.
THE ROCKERS SHOW
noon • 3:00 pm
Reggae, Rock Steady and Ska. At 1:30, Reggae
Beat International Hour: News and interviews
about Reggae music worldwide.   Host: George
Barrett.
BLUES BLUES BLUES
3:00 pm -5:00 pm
Delta Blues, Post War Urban Blues, Boogie Blues,
Honky Tonk Blues, Rockabilly Blues, Psychadelic
Blues, Blues Rock, Punk Blues and even that laid-
back Contemporary Blues shit. Hosted by Robert
Zepeski or Lachlan Murray.
April 10, "Hey Bo Diddley" with Rob Z.
April 24, Huddie Leadbetter A.K.A. LEADBELLY
with Rob Z.
SOUL CITY
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
The best in soul music from the '50's to the '80's:
R 'n B, Southern Soul, Atlantic, Motown, Philly"
International, plus the latest in Dance Floor Funk.
JUST LIKE WOMEN /
ELECTRONIC SMOKE
SIGNALS
April 3, Just Like Women, tune in for feminist
news and analysis and women's music.
April 10, Electronic Smoke Signals, Special
feature on the health effects of nuclear radiation,
including a speech by radiation expert Dr. Rosalie
Bertell. Also, a preview of the B.C. Environmental
Network Congress to be held at U.B.C. April 15 -
17. Also updates from the Indigenous Uranium
Network and the International Treaty Council.
April 17 Just Like Women, more news and
analysis  from  a  feminist  perspective  and  a
selection of women's music.
April 24, Electronic Smoke Signals, Special
Report on the Annual Walk For Peace.  Feature
reports on resistance to the visits by nuclear
CiTR presents
101 .<*   (M
warships to B.C., and Canada's plans to acquire
a fleet of nuclear submarines. Also a profile of the
North American Indian Peace Movement,
established in 1812 and the Tree of Peace
Plantings.
PLAYLOUD / THIS IS NOT A
TEST
9:00 pm - midnight
"When you lookinto the abyss, the abyss looks into
you."
Friedrich Niettzsche
Aural surgery performed by Larry Thiessen.
iN THE GRIP OF
INCOHERENCY
midnight - 'til plenty late
Chaos in the wee hours, with Evil Bareman and his
disabled cohort Guidmaster.
\3iml\jk\
CHESTER MILLER
Top Male Vocalist—1987 Canada Reggae Music Awards
pius CARL PRINCE
(FROM TORONTO)
LADDIE DAWES
and
•REDEMPTION
hosted by
George Barrett
April 20th
DOORS 7 PM
86 Street
Tix: VTC/CBO
280-4444;
also at
Barrett
Electronics
. 1391 Kingsway,
Jl        Black Swan,
Spice Mart Social    Tourniquet
So it's Saturday night and you have a
few drinks with some friends and
you're at their place and someone
says let's go out and where do they
want to go they want to go to the club
but you've been going there for eight
years and it's just the same thing again but you go
anyway because they're going and someone's
already called a taxi and it gets there before
you've finished your drink so you finish it in the
taxi on the way there which means you have to
drink it down fast because the club isn't that far
away and then when you get there there's a lineup
and the walls of the building resound with the
volume within but you see someone you know in
the line and act as though you were going to meet
them there all along and join them at the front of
the line and there's that smell when you get in the
entrance that same old smell it's like deja vu but
it's not it's a burned in memory because you've
been going there for eight years and the doormen
look at you as though they know something dirty
about you and then they smear ink on your hand
and tell you to check your coat and the disco thud
presses the smokey atmosphere into your skin and
it doesn't matter whether you're in there for three
minutes or three hours you come out smelling the
same but you want to dance because they're
playing your favorite song so you head for the
dance floor and it doesn't matter if you're not
dancing with anyone because no one really
dances with anyone else and some people don't
even dance they just stand there with a drink in
their hand with a dazed look on their face and you
wonder if they're really all there but you dance
anyway and ignore them and you see someone
you know and for a moment maybe you're dancing with someone and then they're gone and you
start to feel thirsty so you head for the bar and
there's someone you know and they're talking to
someone you don't want to talk to so you just
pretend like you didn't see them and then in front
of you is that person you've been attracted to for
so long but you've got that other person on your
mind and you can't think of anything to say and
the moment's gone and then someone behind you
says something and it's hi hello how are you
you're looking goou what have you been up to not
much great to see you again drop over sometime
oh I just saw a friend got to go I'll talk lo you later
see ya bye and then someone else says something
and what's your name Hike it what do you do wow
that's great sounds fascinating you're very attractive can I buy you a drink let's dance love your
hair love this song and you remind me of someone
oh really thanks do you know so and so oh we're
great friends haven't seen them for a while though
hey do you want to smoke a joint and then you're
outside and the air is cool and you're smoking and
the person you least want to see joins you without
being invited and they're friends with the other
person so you don't say anything but when you're
back inside it all seems different and you lose
yourself in the crowd and it doesn't really matter
because it's your favorite tune and you want to
dance so you dance and the rhythm sinks into your
brain and there's nothing but you and the music
and everything's wonderful and everybody's
dancing and you see someone you know and you
smile and the lights spin round and you can't tell
which way is up and someone bumps into you or'
you bump into them and they bump into someone
else and then everyone is bouncing off everyone
else and somehow it all seems perfectly natural
and nothing really matters and there's a kind of
freedom and spontaneity that keeps you on your
feet and then the music stops and the lights go up
and your ears are ringing and you're covered in
sweat and it's time to go home but you don't want
the evening to be over so soon but you can't see
any of your friends that you came in with and it's
such a drag walking home alone but you didn't
ask anyone if there were any parties around and
it's too late now because they've left and everybody outside is waiting for somebody to give
them a ride and there's no one you really know
anyway so you start walking up the street traffic
noise horns and people yelling their idiocies out
the windows and the hookers make comments on
the state of the world's economics and a car full of
people you know speeds past honks and they
wave all smiles and the party continues up the
street at thirty miles an hour and then a drunk takes
a swing at you but you manage to duck because
your not as drunk as he is and drag queens come
stumbling and teetering on their high heels from
the bar they've just been ejected from and they
comment on the state of the human condition in
high pitched voices and peals of laughter and a
street bum asks you for spare change and you
won't give him anything this time because you
didn't give him anything last time and you probably never will because you need it yourself and
what the hell is with him anyway can't he remember my face can't he remember that I never give
anything away and you think about the club and
you wonder why you go there and you wonder if
maybe just maybe there's something better to do
with your time.
Matt Richards
22
DISCORDER CITR PRESENTS
SINEAD O'CONNOR
Monday April 18
Doors 7 pm
86 ST. MUSIC HALL
Tickets: VTC/CBO & all usual outlets.
Charge by phone 280-4444.
Also available at the door. THEORPHEUM HERITAGE PROJECT
AND
THE VANCOUVER INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL
PRESENT
SATURDAY MAY 7,8:00 PM ORPHEUM THEATRE
ON STAGE! "WINGS" LEADING MAN
BUDDY ROGERS
WITH HOST HUGH PICKETT
BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND THEATRE ORGAN LEGEND
GAYLORD CARTER
PLATS HIS ORIGINAL SCORE ON THE MIGHTY WURLITZER
dOIWft
STEREO
TICKETS $15 & $12* AT VTC/CBO • EATON'S, WOODWARD'S.
CHARGE BY PHONE 280-4444 •   INFO LINE 280-3311
•PLUS SERVICE CHARGE

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