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Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) 1990-09-01

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  Perryscope Productions Presents £_^°_QS__S
CONTENTS
SEPTEMBER • 1990 Issue #92
SON, WE NEED TO TALK
The Man Sherbet casts a critical and moralistic ear towards "classic rock"    6
THE SUNDAYS
They're nice, okay. So what's wrong with that?    9
SONIC YOUTH
Steve Shelley talks to a voice 11
JOHN DOE
Tex Hohm chews the fat with the ex-punk rocker turned roots rocker 13
ALL
They really don't ever stop  15
UZUME TAIKO
Japanese taiko drumming is given a lively twist by these locals 16
BRENDA WONG AOKI....
Avant garde performer or modern story teller? You decide  17
ICE-T
A nigger with an attitude 20
EDINBURGH PART II - THE METAL WEEKS
Goth is dying; metal is queen - by Christopher Kovacs 38
AIRHEAD
They hate us, they hate us, they hate us - So can you!    5
LOCAL MOTION
Let's get Janis - she listens to everything!! 19
UNDER REVIEW
We listen to 'em, we write about 'em, you read 'em. Simple 25
REAL UVE ACTION
Suicdal Tendencies, Escape From New York 27
HELL'S KITCHEN
Viola gnaws on some 'za  31
DISCORDER DATEBOOK
What's on, what's hot, what's hip and what isn't 35
ON THE DIAL
It's like TV Guide, but it's for radio 36
SPINUST
New names but it's the same. Sort of  36
SOCIALIST TURTLE
Colin Upton 29
DANCING ON THE CLOUDS
Marc Yuill and Julian Lawrence 32
BORDUM
Bryce Rasmussen 34
FOR OFF CE USE ONLY
EDITOR K. Michael Smith ART DIRECTOR Geoff Coates DiSCORDERLY ORDERLY Robynn Iwata EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS Chris Buchanan, Viola Funk, Usa Marr PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Usa Lutman, Lydia Schymansky WRITERS
James Boldt, Pat Carroll, Viola Funk, Brian Hohm, Randy Iwata, Michael Klassen, Christopher Kovacs, Janis
McKenzie, Peter Sickert, Erik Thorkelsson, Bill Tzotzolls PHOTOGRAPHERS G reg Elsie, Audra Nell, Leonard Whistler
GRAPHICS Geoff Coates, Kyle Morales WORD PROCESSING Randy Iwata COVER PHOTO Greg Elsie SPINLIST Randy
Iwata ADVERTISING Bill Baker ADVERTISING PRODUCTION Bill Baker LOCAL DISTRIBUTION Matt Stefflch SUBSCRIPTIONS/MAIL DISTRIBUTION Lydia Schymansky PROGRAM GUIDE/DATEBOOK/DELIVERY FRIEND Randy Iwata
ACCOUNTS Unda Scholten TECHNICAL SUPPORT Ted Aussem PUBLISHER Barbara Elgood
DISCORDER Copyright 6 1990 by The Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All Right* Reserved. Discorder is That
Magazine from CiTR fM 102, and ii published twelve times t year by The Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. Discorder
-printed in Canada on paper manufactured in Canada. Discorder prints what it wants to, including the CiTR On rhe DiaJ program guide and t>_ CiTR
SpinList playlist chart. Circulation is 20000copies distributed free of charge to over 230 locations. Twelve-month subscriptions are $15 in Canada,
$15 (US) to the US, and 524 elsewhere. Please make cheques or money orders payable to Discorder Magazine. 'I think I know you. Yes, I know
yoa'-H.Rotliiu.  Deadline for ads and submissions is the 15th ofthe month. Talk to us - we want your stuff: if we like it, well use it. Ifnot.wcll
CM from UBC to Langley, Squamish to Point Roberts, but not a
Mobile Sound Rental are Mon- Fri, 1 Oam - 4pm (please avoid Friday afternoons). Call the CiTR/Discorder Office at 228-3017fc
Mid circulation enquiries; CiTR News+Sports at 222-2487, or the CiTR DJ line at 228- CiTR. Write to us at 6138 SUBBlvdVi
ShawCi NETTWERK   PRODUCTIONS   AND   CITR   PRESENT
MC   900FT.   JESUS
with   DJ  ZERO
WITH SPECIAL GUESTS FROM SAN FRANCISCO
THE RETURN OF
CONSOLIDATE
WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 12th
t_I"S^_E__     A_T     THE
LUVAFAIR
1275    SEYMOUR    AT    DRAKE
TEL.685-3288
TICKETS   AVAILABLE   AT   TRACK   RECORDS
AND   LUVAFAIR UNDERSTAND?
.      Dear Airhead,
A little note to Zoe
Annastasia: Read here and
have knowledge, babe. The
Mission is a damn jokey
band, and including them with
true hipsters Bauhuas, The
^ Cure et al and that whole
gloomy scene...Well why not
include Josie and the Pussycats
to your list? The Mission are
about as Goth as Loverboy is
speedmetal. You're pretty
young, right? Next time, when
0 jumping someone else's train,
at least try to catch the caboose.
Yours
in nothingness.
Negative Man
'<- Negative Man...are you that
superhero that's so smart your
head hurts? Well, thanks for
sharing.
DJ SOUND WAR CHAPTER ONE
is Vancouver's first full-fledged rap and dance music competition happening September 7th
and 8th at SUB Ballroom, UBC. This event is your opportunity to check out the best and
newest local talents in hip-hop, house and reggae dancehall music.
Following in the greal traditions of Jamaican and New York DJ and MC battles, DJ Sound War
is unique in that it features a variety of different musical styles coming together in an all-out
sound clash. Fueled by the intense energy of Vancouver's budding young dance music scene,
DJ Sound War will provide the potential for unique and exciting new sonic adventures in the
increasingly rhythm-conscious world of the 1990s.
Entrants may compete in any of four categories: DJ, MC, Dancers and Groups (or "Crews").
The DJ, MC and Dancer competitions are scheduled for Friday, September 7th and Groups
are scheduled to compete on Saturday, September 8th. All ages welcome. Admission $5 at the
door. The deadline for entries is August 31st, so if you're thinking of entering, call CiTR at
228-3017 now!
DJ Sound War Chapter One also features a panel of distinguished local judges including:
Michael Shea (Graceland/Infinite Beat), George Barrett (CiTR/Barrett Electronic's), George
Maniatis (Nettwerk), David "Love" Jones, Chris Wong (Georgia Straight), Stan Strong (EQ),
Vanessa Richards (Bolero Lava), Earl the Pearl and Don Chow (CiTR/Home Taping
International).
Rules for Dancers
* Dancers may compete individually or in teams.
* Dancers will supply a music track of a maximum length of five minutes on cassette or record.
* Dancers will be judged on technique, timing, originality, presentation and audience
response.
* MCs will compete individually in elimination rounds until a winner is declared.
* Contestants may use any rhythm or backing track they wish in the first round.
* In successive rounds, MCs will be required to perform to rhythm tracks of 60-90 seconds in
duration as decided by the judges. Each MC will have a choice of hip- hop, house or reggae
style backing tracks in each round.
* MCs will be judged on delivery, lyrical content, originality and audience response.
* DJs will compete individually in elimination rounds until a winner is declared.
* DJs will perform in rounds of 90 seconds to 3 minutes in length as decided by the judges.
* DJs may use turntables, tapes and other sound sources but must provide a list of equipment
to be used which will be approved or revised by the judges as they see fit.
* DJs will be judged on technique, timing, originality and audience response.
* Group entries may comprise any combination of the other three categories.
* Groups will perform one set of 10 to 15 minutes in duration.
* Groups will be judged on performance, originality and audience response.
NOTE: Rules are subject tc
>r changes pending final approval by the judging staff.
Zulu Records
X Back to School Sale
J (You don't even have to be a student!)
ANY NEW CD(s), CASSETTE(s) OR LP(s)
10%OFF
WITH THIS COUPON ^-
20%OFF
'■^ VALID SEPT. 1-15
WITH THIS COUPON
VALID SEPT. 1-15
ANY USED LP(s), NOT
INCL. COLLECTOR'S LPS
TAMANHOUSTHEATRE
JESUS DOES LAUNDRY TOO by Sharon Bajer. A workshop production.
An eastside laundromat. A tattered garbage bag full of soiled souls.
Ruby's laundry Palace is the setting as Jesus Christ takes us through the
wash and spin cycle of life. Everwonder where the missing socks end up?
We might have the answer. Tickets/Info: 688-8399
Sept 27, 28, 29. Oct. 4, 5,6. Tickets $7 / $5- "SON,
INT __=__= ID
TO
TALK!"
By the Man Sherbet
In recent years, "concerned
parent" groups have cropped
up, intent on silencing music's
raunchier players. Bickering
between the defenders of morality and the defenders of
expression ensued and continues unabated. Bowing to
pressure, record companies
began policing their own material, attaching warning labels
toproductlesttheoddW.A.S.P.
or 2 Live Crew consumer was
expecting a walk in the park.
But why the fuss? Foul-
mouthed singers and blatant
lyrics come and go; they're as
old as music itself. Nasty
material has never gained a
foothold within mainstream
"classic rock" tastes anyway.
Or so we thought.
Discorder's staff turned a
critical ear towards the classic
rock lyrics. Our findings were
disconcerting. The truest paean
of decadence and turmoil was
6 DISCORDER
the grand old man of rock
songs. Led Zeppelin's "Stairway to Heaven." After our
research and well-reasoned
speculation as to the song's
meaning, we reached the
conclusion that there is need
for concern, if not moral out-'
rage, over what is being sung
As has been the case in
every such survey of its kind
since 1972, "Stairway to
Heaven" was the number one
song of C-FOX FM's annual
Top 500. In Seattle, KISW's
twice as good Top 1000
countdown rarely surprises
because Zep beats 'em all there,
too. Clearly, a lot of people
think this is a damned important song. When word broke
that we'd be tampering with
"Stairway," revering fans fired
angry letters and threats to
Discorder.
Our magazine would never
condone censorship, but it
cannot turn a blind eye to corruption. Just how many of us
have been pushed of f our truer
course through repetition after repetition of Zep's tour de
force entered our consciousness? The effect could be subtle
and harmless: a twelve year-
old hears "Stairway," thinks
"Wow! what a song!", then
nicks a candy bar from a shop.
But the other extreme is
chilling: one moment a roomful of swaying suburban Zep
fans are "partying down," the
next moment they're out
"wilding" at a nearby mall.
It's time for Jello Biafra
and other advocates of free
speech to get off their high
horses. Everyone should stop
shouting and just listen. Consider the effect "Hey, hey,
Mama/ Said the way you move,
etc." might have ifyou hear it
enough times. And who hasn't?
It's too late for many of us,
but let's respect posterity.
Padlock your vinyl collection
if need be. Kids should be
started slowly with, say, Neil
Sedaka records, with elders
explaining what it all means,
like with the facts of life. So
when they finally hear, for
instance, "The Lemon Song,"
they can say, "I'm hip, this
stuff is naughty."
Pre-schoolers deserve the
same attention. They might
not understand, "Don't play
my Marvin Gaye records.
Sweetie." But try those "Mr.
Yuck" decals you slap on
bleach bottles under the sink.
For young kids, Mr. Yuck
means "Don't Touch!" Be
assured, they'll stay clear of
any Slade or Billy Idol LP
you've left lying around.
- the Man Sherbet.
II. "I'LL BUSTLE YOUR
HEDGEROW, MISTER!"
Finally, the definitive explanation of rock's definitive
bombast.
Led Zeppelin were ahelluva
band. Truly. The concerts
they put on in their early days
reportedly left audiences
weakened. Not only did they
do super-charged renditions of
their own material, they tossed
in thunderous rock'n'blues
boogies to round out their sets.
Tour after tour, even night after
night, they came up with a
new plan to thrill concert-goers.
Stadium shows today are all
calculated overkill. Zep shows
by comparison were stripped
down and sinewy. Zep were
just four underweight English
lads, badly in need of dental
work: Robert "Percy" Plant,
John Paul" Jonesy" Jones, John
"Bonzo" Bonham, and James
Patrick "Jimmy" Page. They
turned up the temperature of
music. A lot of white kids got
hooked.
It was said, "Led turned
into gold." Behind the glorious image, however, lifestyles
slowly went awry. The money
flow let band members indulge
themselves. Record and tour
profits paid for a lot of vintage
autos and open bar whoop-
em-ups. The most conspicuous purchase of all was a castle
in Lelawcge-an-bryn, Wales.
Reportedly, guitarist Jimmy
Page paid cash for his royal
abode.
The castle and the surrounding county, a supply of
Zeppelin groupies, and a team
of apprentice carpenters provided the ambience in which
Robert Plant penned "Stairway to Heaven" in the spring
of 1971. It was a time of
confusion and introspection for
the young crooner, not helped
by the giggles of girls, and the
whacking of hammers. FOOTNOTES
Erma Rees-Gwynn, a Welsh div
arting ber own carpentry contra
ie was recommended (some say a
rcee Intent
ting bu&lnes
*, actor Richard Har
5. In order to secure the landing at the second floor,
Erma's crew had to enter Jimmy's so-called "Guitar
Room." The sign on the wall said "Keep the Fuck Out
- Everyone!" These words don't have two meanings,
do they? Well, Erma let herself In anyway. Only two
double-necked Gibsons ont of Page's reputed collection of 75 guitars conld be found in the room. This
was his Occult Room, full of red satin furnishings and
things with horns on them.
6. Reportedly, Jimmy was out on his property, singing
In his favourite tree, when he saw Erma's helper
hanging out of the Guitar Room's window. His
berserk ranting ("misgiven thoughts") could be heard
in the next county.
3. This means "building" a stairway to heaven, or,
more likely, buying the materials for the stairway.
Erma was contracted to build a three storey high deck
In back of Page's castle. The plans were for a second-
floor landing, and steps leading up from the back
vegetable patch. Plant once described Lelawege-an-
bryn as "heaven." The staircase when completed
would be a stairway to view heaven If you climbed up
tt, or going down, a stairway to carrots and peas.
9. It's likely Plant spend as much time wondering
about things as It took for him to write this line.
11. The "May-Queen" was May-tag's laundromat-
sized washer/dryer combo ordered in to handle hotel-
sized loads of laundry being done at Page's castle.
Jimmy wus promised a money-back warranty on the
set if be wasn't satisfied. The "two paths" were
whether to keep or return them. The warranty gave
him time to change the road he was on, you see.
13. Jonesy**
s going back to London and asked Plant
to come along.
15. Jonesy and Plant hit the road in John Paul's Stutz
Bearcat. By coincidence, they came across Erma
waving a flashlight, trying to hitch out of Lelawcge-
an-bryn County. After the sundeck fiasco she gave up
on carpentry, and was leaving for a cousin's residence
in King's Cross. "Everything still turns to gold," she
promised, boasting ten thousand pounds profit on the
Page job alone.
There's a lady (1) who's sure all
that
glitters is gold (2).
And she's buying a stairway to
heaven (3).
And when she gets there she knows
if the stores are closed.
With a word (4) she can get what
she came for.
There's a sign on the wall
but she wants to be sure.
Cause you know sometimes words
have two meanings (S).
In a tree by the brook there's a
songbird who sings sometimes (6).
All of our thoughts are misgiven.
There's a feeling I get when I look
to the west.
And my spirit is crying for leaving.
In my thoughts I have seen rings of
smoke through the trees (7).
And the voices of those who stand
looking.
And it's whispered that soon if we
all
call the tune.
Then the piper will lead us to
reason.
And a new day will dawn for those
who stand long (8).
And the forests will echo with
laughter.
And it makes me wonder (9).
If there's a bustle in your hedgerow
don't be alarmed now (10).
It's just a spring clean for the May-
Queen.
Yes there are two paths you can go
by.
But in the long run.
There's still time to change the road
you're on (II).
Your head is humming and it won't
go - in case you don't know (12).
The piper's calling you to join him
(13).
Dear lady can you hear the wind
blow.
And did you know
your stairway lies on the whispering
wind (14).
And as we wind on down the road.
Our shadows taller than our soul.
There walks a lady we all know.
Who shines white light and wants to
show.
How everything still turns gold (15).
And ifyou listen very hard
the tune will come to you at last.
When all are one and one is all (16).
To be a rock and not to roll (17).
And she's buying a stairway to
heaven (18).
2. This Is a bit of Plant's Irony. In other words, if it
didn't glitter, it probably wasn't worth much. Erma
and her assistants reportedly broke and scratched a
lot of valuables carrying lumber through the rest-
4. "Foreclosure." The small Welsh town In the district
had only one hardware store and the owner was on a ;
picnic with his family. Erma complained to Jimmy
about not being able to get screw nails. So Jimmy j
called a couple of local aldermen he had In his back j
pocket in order to get the damn store open. The store j
owner soon received the politicians' threats and cut
short his picnic.
7, West of Page's property, beyond a neighbour's
forest grove, there was a coal-burning power plant.
Apparently the tons of sulphur-rich deposits pouring
from Its stacks disheartened Plant. One day Percy got
pretty inebriated, and schemed that they should all
protest until the plant was shut down. Why not get all
the girls, the other lads, and large-flsted manager
Peter Grant out blocking their gate? "Great idea,"
one of the girls responded, "but how are we going to
keep the stereo going, or even have hot baths without
power?" This comment silenced Plant's protest.
8. Jonesy was the true all-round musician of the
group. Before Led Zeppelin the bassist/keyboardist
extraordinaire wrote and arranged some of Lulu's
best work, Including "To Sir with Love." Whilst up
at Page's castle he tried to form a little choir he
wanted to call the Zepettes. Singing careers
could've meant a "new day" for the girls, but none
could carry a tune. The neighbours watched as they
rehearsed In vain, hence the laughter echoing In the
forest.
10. It's said a lot of clothes were found in strange
places after their infamous Victorian dress-up parties.
12. This was one of the worst hangovers Plant ever
had.
14. Actually, your stairway, and the whole damn
suhdeck lay on the ground. A spring torrent ripped
through Great Britain that year and destroyed Erma's
shoddy work.
16. A sarcastic hit of advice from Percy to the
Zeppettes: just keep practicing, girls.
17. Plant decided to be u rock, if not a lump of clay,
and stay borne with bis wife and family until the next
tour.
18. Lost heard from, Erma was in the Bahamas. "And
she's buying a ticket to Nassau."
for the last
: ten years. Nobody,      nobody asked him to take the     ture recordings, Plant will      rently deciphering "class
^ulu herself, seems      job. He's the most successful     continue to be popular and      rock" lyrics for a conservi
Jimmy Page now resides soundtracks.  John Bonham
alone in his castle. He remains died in 1980 after an alcohol
intheresavewhenhe'scoaxed binge at Page's castle. John
outforsatellite-transmittedZep Paul Jones has tried to get
reunions, or Death Wish movie Lulu's career off the ground
t even Lulu herself, seems
to be interested. Robert Plant
has become one of the elder
statesmen of rock, although
job. He's the most successful
beneficiary of retro-Zeppelin
hysteria. And as long as he
keeps Phil Collins off any fu-
to be popular and      rock" lyrics for a conservation, tive thinktank.    He is also
•     preparing a supplementary
*** the Man Sherbet is cur-      back-masking guide.
SEPTEMBER 1990 7 ® © Y
1
0 M P © ^ TT
VANCOUVERS ALTERNATIVE RECORD STORE
DOWNTOWN  .
VANCOUVER
534 Seymour St.
669-6644
RECORDS • CDS • CASSETTES
RAP • REGGAE » POP * HOUSE * JAZZ » SOUL » ROCK » BLUES
T1I1S COULD BE YOU.
Join CfTD and we'll shrink you lhi_ email and make you ait forever in an
ad in Discorder. Get involved in radio. Join CfTD. CaO .28-3017.
BLACK ORPHEUS
Sio  Wo-rsPRitsIGS ROAtJ
H ARfVi 5 ONl-VtoTSPRtoG-ST* B.C.
open tlAfn-MiDNIGHT (to*) ?%-?*_- The Sundays are nice
people, who've made a nice recoTd
and recently put on a nice show.
They began when David Gavurin and
Harriet Wheeler were attending university in the Nice English Town of
Bristol. ("English Lit," says she and
makes a face. "Spanish and French"
says he, seemingly less embarrassed
by his post secondary choices.) "We
were writing songs with my four track
recorder and our friends said [it
sounded] pretty Jjpod. I usually start
with a bit of something, aguitar lick,
or a drum part and then
from there. Once that's
play it for Harriet and she comes up
with a melody... with a little help
from me. Then we say wail-
something's missing and we write
the lyrics."
"Yeah, we are always happy
with the completed songs, the ones
with something wrong just don't get
finished," adds Wheeler. They then
snagged a bass player and drummer
(Paul Brindley and Patrick Hannan)
to back up Gavurin's guitar and
Wheeler's vocals and journeyed up
to London.       ^.**am+dtti.' ■      *>■'
I should add here that these
two live together and (I'm guessing)
are married. Throughout the interview David continually played with
his wedding (?) ring. Pulled itoff one
finger, tried it on another, placed it
back on the first finger, pulled it off
again and so on throughout the in
terview. Harriet was the picture of
low key British charm, sitting on the
couch next to David, legs tucked under
her, with her hennaed hair up in a
loose bun. He did most of the
talking."We had this vague sort of
plan to play a few shows and then try
to... well, it was a vague plan." The
plan was overrun by events. "Our
first show was reviewed by the music papers and after that the record
labels came looking for us. They'd
ask if we had a tape, and all we had
was this hissy four track," recalls
David, the ring at this point appear-
on the end of his thumb. "It's all
youreally need. It lets the A&R people
think they're discovering something,"
adds Harriet.
So they spent a lot of 1988
negotiating with record companies
and then recording the debut album,
"reading, writing and arithmetic"
(available in North America from
the friendly folks at David Geffen
Records, owned by the nicely wealthy
David Geffen). Those of you who've
never played in a band and then attempted to get someone to pay for
your album i.e. get a record contract,
no matter how small, can't possibly
imagine how unlikely this would be
in Vancouver. I can't remember the
last time a local band got signed after
playing one gig in, say, Toronto. Not
to discourage those of you in bands,
f things like this don't hap-
untiy with too much g
raphy and too few people. Anyway,
The Sundays are still talking and
David's ring is still shifting position.
"The 'studio' is a very sterile place", notes David.
"And we prefer working in
the back room of our flat; it's dark
and damp," continued Harriet.
"But the roof collapsed the
day before we left to go on tour,"
both at the same time.
"I hope it's not an omen,"
said he.
'The Natural Disaster Tour
'90?" suggests Harriet. *^_^|
Uhm...So the studio is a
sterile place?
"Oh well, 1 don't want to
make it sound like it was completely
unpleasant," said he, the ring back
on its original finger. "It's just that
our four track tapeshad a quality that
we liked. We recordedHarriet's vocals
through this mike ft friend of mine
stole years ago and then we ran it
through the echo peddle for my gui-
"Once we got in the studio
we couldn't get the same feel," said
she. "It was all just too dry and clean."
"We tried using the set up
from the four track but it just didn't
work either," continued he. "We ended
up using a tape delay for the vocals,
which is a kind of old fashioned effect." Gavurin recalls similar adjustments being made throughout the
recording. "So after you spend hours
and hours getting the sound you had
unintentionally recorded back on the
four track, you just don't feel like
playing anymore. So it's quite hard
to get the sound you want with a
good performance." By comparison,
they are ecstatic about the album's
cover. "It was a case of meeting a
deadline in the studio. Sort of, they
want it now? Oh Shit!" said she in
her very proper accent. "We took the
photo of the fossils," adds he. "We
diditourselves;itjustwenttogether.
Very satisfying compared to the recording." He's probably overstating
the case here. _■!__
The album is a collection
of beautifully understated pop songs
featuring Wheeler's fragile voice and
Gavurin's chorused pseudo jangly
guitar. Obvious comparisons would
be to a sober Sugarcubes or a less
orchestrated New Bohemians. When
it arrived late last year we cynical
music fans out here at CiTR quickly
labeled the record as nice but forget
table and placed it (metaphorically)
with previous Brit non-starters (in
North America) like Aztec Camera
Beautiful South, Lilac Time, Pah
Fountains etc, etc. (I tried to interes
people in it by claiming it was "fac<
ripping metal, faster than Megadeth,
scarier than Venom and better than
Motorhead." It didn't work). C(
mercial radio stations still don' t play
it andevenMuch Music (which actually plays a reasonable variety of
stuff in between New Kids and Janet
Jackson videos) hasn't shown much
Meanwhile, people who
actually have to pay to own records
or go see bands play live, decided
they liked The Sundays. In "Industry" talk, the release is a sleeper.
This quiet, nice little English band
has placed itself in the bottom half of
Rolling Stone's chart and had reviews
which claim they'd be the best band
in England if The Cure would just
break up. Locally, people ask what it
is when they hear it, some stores
can't keep it in stock, and their mid
week show at the Town Pump late
last month was more than sold out.
Live, The Sundays are an
extension of themselves on record.
Casual, relaxed and captivating. They
wander up on to the stage, plug in
and begin. Gavurin and Wheeler, still
dressed in the clothes they wore that
afternoon, lead the band through the
set, covering most of the material on
the record. The audience stands and
lets it wash over them. Well, except
for the soon-to-be passionate couple
in front of me who were yelling sweet
nothings into each others c. s. ("1
think you're the strongest boyfriend
I've ever had!" said the girl to the
boy.) And then there was this other
guy who kept yelling "Harriet!" despite the fact that David's wedding
(?) ring was clearly visible. Still, it
s all kinda nice. CiTR
101.9  fM   PRESENTS
OO
S    O    U    N
WAR
CHAPTER ONE
BATTLE FOR THE TOP
DJ'S, MC'S, DANCERS, CREWS
SEPTEMBER 7 - 8, J.990
ALL AGES
SPECIAL GUESTS
(MON THE 8TH
SUB BALLROOM UBC
(LOCATED ON THE 2ND FLOOR OF THE STUDENT UNION BUILDING)
ADMISSION $5 PER NIGHT AT THE DOOR
(DOORS AT 6PM, STARTS AT 7PM)
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odv____ irn?o-t_i
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CiTR  101.9 fIVI,  6138 SUB  Blvd,
CiTR
101.9  fM   PRESENTS
CBS
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MCA
RECORDS
"C
,   BC,  VeT 2A5
Yikes! It's Shindig! CiTR's annual local band competition.
Every Monday night from Sept.1 Oth to Dec.10th
(except 0ct.8th) at the Railway Club (579 Dunsmuir),
come see three different rockin' combos battle it out head to head
in a fierce, heated musical discussion.
SepUQth
BENT, ELBORE JAMES, THE VASECTEMOIDS
Sept.17.li *
PICTURE PAINTINGS, SUN DOG SUN, TOXIC JIMMY
Sept.24th
BARON VON FOKKER, DARKLING THRUSHES, PHINEAS GAGE
Oct.lst
FIRST ROUND OF SHINDIG SEMI-FINALS
For more info or to enter, call Robynn at 228-3017.
(Note: line-ups are listed in alphabetical order.) ^Os^ilj^
STEVE    SHELLEY    RESPONDS
TO A VOICE
Imagine one early evening in August. Steve Shelley is sitting at a
table in a darkened hall on the tourist
trap strip in Sacramento, California,
sipping aCoke while Thurston Moore,
Lee Renaldo and Kim Gordon twang
away during sound check. Steve is
taking a break from beating the drums
for awhile, preferring to sit and watch
the action. Sonic Youth are almost
through their North American tour in
support of "Goo," their seventh album since Sonic Youth's birth in
1981; their first one since having
signed with David Geffen Company
in the fall of 1989. Imagine a bearded
man comes over to Steve's table and
says something to him. Steve sighs,
gets up suddenly and goes to a phone.
Imagine, after a minute of clicking
and silence, the following takes place.
Voice: How do you respond to
Thurston Moore's assertions that
Sonic Youth "just outgrew each record
company" and that an upward major
label change was necessary?
Steve: Well, all of those labels that
we were on we were really into. We
are very supportive of them. We
were really glad to be on those labels,
but there came a time when we outgrew them. Blast First was our label
for quite a few years in Europe and
also for "Daydream Nation" in the
United States along side of Enigma.
We worked with all those labels and
grew. There just came a point when
the label just couldn't keep the records
in the stores. We'd be on tour and
kids would come up to us and say,
"Where can I buy your record?"
People couldn't keep it in print and
they had a hard time paying us when
they did sell the records. And so that
brought us to the point of being on
Geffen and I don't know what will
happen from there. The records are
in the stores. We're having a hard
time keeping the vinyl available, but
we're working on it. People have
been writing us and going, like, "I
can't believe it, but I found your
record in a shopping mall or whatever.
I'm so psyched." So far it seems to
be good in that respect.
Voice: How do you respond to
charges that Sonic Youth has sold
out even though/in spite of the fact
that Geffen A&R man Gary Gersh
had stipulated that the band would
retain full creative control?
Steve: Well, that's a good question:
"How do you respond?" Idon'tknow.
It's obvious that we haven't sold out.
We're doing whatever we feel like
doing. That's always been behind
the band. Just to go and do what we
want. And selling out, Idon'tknow,
it seems to project a feeling of having lost your original motives and
vision and whatever. That's not the
case at all. We're doing exactly what
we want. We haven't sold out our
ideals to anything. We're not responsible to anyone except ourselves.
People can say whatever they want
but that doesn't affect how you feel.
Voice: How do you respond to
people who ask how long can Sonic
Steve: Idon'tknow. I really don't
know.
Voice: How has the current American censorship lobby affected Sonic
Youth?
Steve: Thurston drew
the "Smash the PMRC"
logo that's on "Goo."
We're musicians, and
the PMRC has affected
other musicians. We
tend to take that personally because say, by
today's standards, if we
wanted to put out our
old single "Flower
Hallowe'en" on Geffen
Records and put it in
the K-Marts and everything, the PMRC
would be d( .n on it.
But that's not (he record
we are releas ;ng today.
It's like we want the
freedom to do whatever
we want, which we've
always had. And the
RMRC is i
some sort o
rality. It's i
real moralit
justcoverin
that look na
want to get involved. You can write
Jesse Helms and let him know how
you feel about these things. I really
don't know what you can do that's
going to make the most difference.
You can vote for the people who are
supporting the arts and who are supporting freedom. You can get rid of
people who are not supporting whatever the personal freedoms you're
into. And even by that, how far can
you get by voting? It's limited.
Voice: Public Enemy's Chuck D
contributed some material to "Kool
Thing." Do you have anything new
and different on the topic of Chuck
D, "Kool Thing," and "Goo"?
Steve: On the whole "Goo" thing?
Well, I don't think I have anything
new to say about Chuck.   You've
pporting
ilse mo-
i even a
they're
p things
Voice: Wha
dowment of
lation that a
bout the National Ens' Arts and their stipu-
tists sign documents
proclaiming loyalty to the politic?
Steve: (laughs) It's pretty frightening. It's comical. I guess it's going
to make some people act up a little,
which maybe isn't all that bad. It's
been good for the art world in a
creative way because the art world is
getting pissed off, and they're doing
something about it. It's a farce. I
don't know what to say. It's too
funny.
I don't know how people
can protest. It depends on how you
heard the story. We were in the same
studio, Greene Street Studio, and we
just asked him if he wanted to do
something on "Kool Thing." He's a
very nice guy and he said "Yeah."
And he did it in ten minutes and it
was amazing listening to him put
down his track. It was great. We
liked those guys a lot and we appreciate some of the things that they are
doing.
Voice: Did/will Sonic Youth reciprocate vis a vis Chuck D on Goo?
Steve: It's doubtful. We wouldn't
be opposed to it. But they're really
busy people. We're getting pretty
busy. It's hard to cross paths. We
were working at the same studio and
it was a meeting point for both of us.
I think we are much more aware of
their music than they are of ours. It's
sort of a one-sided thing. But the
same people can enjoy both musics.
Voice: What would be Sonic Youth's
best opening band? What band arrangements exist on the current tour?
Steve: It would be hard to pick out a
best opening band. We've had a million opening bands. We always pick
them all. Right away we start with
bands we like. Bands that we are
playing with now, hmram. On the
east coast, we're playing with Bewitched and STP. Bewitched are a
New York band fronted by Bob Bert
who used to drum for
Sonic Youth, and STP
are an all-girl band
from New York. Julie,
who used to play in
Pussy Galore, is in
STP. Rightnow we're
playing with Nirvana
on the west coast.
Coming up, we're
going to Europe and
we're going to be
playing with These
Immortal Souls which
has Rowland Howard
from The Birthday
Party in the band, and
Epic Soundtracks
from Swell Maps and
Crime and the City
Solution is in the band.
We're going to be
playing with B abes in
Toyland who are from
Minneapolis. And
when we come back
to the States in the
fall, we're going to
be playing with Redd
Kross, Laughing Hyenas, Gumball - which
is a New York band with a couple of
the guys from B.A.L.L., Jesus Lizard, Zebedo - which is an ex-Dinosaur band with Lou from Dinosaur.
We've played with a bunch of live
bands. Dinosaur were one of the
better ones.
Voice: How about bands that Sonic
Youth have opened for?
Steve: Not too many bands, actually. We don't do too much opening.
We have played on festivals before. •
In Europe, there are these festivals
with ten bands in an afternoon. We
played on a festiv al before Nick C ave
and the B ad Seeds and that was pretty
fun. There's not too many people
we'd open for. Maybe Neil Young.
Voice: Sonic Youth performed in
Russia recently.
Steve: That's right. It was alright.
We had this weird situation where
we would play in these mini sport
arenas or large theatres which were
really great and beautiful which could
have sounded really great but we had
hardly any sound equipment at all,
which was frustrating. The actual
playing was the least satisfying part
of the Soviet trip. The education and
the travel was pretty great. The playing
was pretty disappointing because we
had expected to go over there and do
what we do on a good night on any
stage in the western world, but it just
wasn't possible equipment-wise. So
you're playing and the drum kit is
falling apart and that sort of thing.
The PA was really small and it was
hard to get the vocals through.
Voice: What is a damn good night
for Sonic Youth?
Steve: A good night for Sonic Youth
is hard to describe. The right energy;
everybody who's playing feeling good
and playing well and being able to
hear and having an audience who's
into it. Those are the best nights.
And maybe just a little element of
something going off a bit, something
happening that you didn't expect. In
LA, we had a great show in the Palladium.
Voice: Who is Suzanne Sasic? Why
is she called "stylist"?
Steve: Stylist Suzanne Sasic is our
lighting person. She's just a friend
of ours, that's just there to be there.
It doesn't really mean anything. She
brought some of those clothes that
we wore, but she's a friend of ours.
She travels with us and does the lights
and merchandise, but more than all
that, she's a friend. Stylist was a fun
way to put her down, to give her
credit. That's all. That's all.
Now imagine both parties bid farewell.
Steve puts the receiver down and
goes and returns to his seat, his drink
fifteen minutes warmer. Thurston,
Kim and Lee are now waiting for
Steve so they can continue the sound
check. By the time he picks up his
sticks and starts hitting the drums, he
has already forgotten about the previous quarter hour. He's alone in
that respect.
SEPTEMBER 1990 11 *  SOUND PRODUCTS WITH SOUND IDEAS
MX-2200 Fader control, 2 phono inputs & 1 mic
input, talkover switch, heaphone jack for cueing,
VU meters.
MX-5300 Assignable fader control.VU meters,
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over switch, low-cut mic switch, XLR gooseneck
lamp adaptor, headphone jack with volume
control for cueing.
MX-5500SE Six built-in sound effects, assignable fader control, VU meters, 14-band equalizer,
10 inputs, XLR mic input, talk-over switch, low-cut
mic switch, XLR gooseneck lamp adaptor, headphone jack with volume control for cueing.
mx-3300 Assignable fader, bass & treble controls, 7 inputs, mic input, talk-over switch, LED
meters, XLR gooseneck lamp adaptor, headphone jack with volume control for cueing.
MX-6300 Echo effect, assignable fader control, LED meters, 14-band equalizer, 10 inputs,
XLR mic input, talk-over switch, low-cut mic
switch, XLR gooseneck lamp adaptor, headphone jack with volume control for cueing.
mX-6500SE Six built-in sound effects, echo effect, assignable fader control, LED meters, 14-band
equalizer, 10 inputs, XL mic input, talk-over switch,
low-cut mic switch, XLF- gooseneck lamp adaptor,
headphone jack with v olume control for cueing.
PDM - 5000 Dig tai Sampling Mixer
• 16-bit chip for crysta clear digital samples
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• Samples from mic or iny input source
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SOUNDS
DISTRI BU T I ON
238 DAVENPORT RD. #82
TORONTO, ON. M5R 1J6
DEALERS CALL:
TEL (416) 686-4263
FAX (416) 686-5010 hey do weird and exciting things with gees these days. Take
I the chromosomes of
one species and mix it
with those of another. You get
half llama/half camels; half water
buffalo/half texas long horns. It
happens with music too. John Doe,
occasional lead singer and bassist
for the seminal U.S. punk band,
X, is a case in point. His voice has
not changed from X's early albums, but these days you can find
it superimposed over roots music.
Fronting his own band
Doe came through Vancouver on
August 9th. His band was truly an
all-star line-up, featuring Jon-Dee
Graham of the True Believers and
Richard Uoyd of Television. The
two guitarists swapped complementary leads all night, laying
down some of the best Texas boogie
music I've heard since Calgary.
Doe stuck to his own non-X material. On stage, he was down right
prickly over references lohis other
famous band. Doe responded to a
question from the audience about
the whereabouts of his X-mate
Exene Cerenka with, "Exene's in
Idaho. If you want to go there
you'll find her." Later, to another
question he said, "What's my real
name? John Hitler, but I had to
change it. No, actually it's Che
Guevara."
I spoke with John Doe
before the concert. The interview
meandered over Doe's various
(Doe's had parts in "Great Balls
of Fire," "Salvador," "Slamdance,"
"Roadhouse," as well as a cameo
in Sandra Bemhard's "Without
You I'm Nothing"). We ended up
talking about current events. Doe
likened the American military and
its involvement in the Persian Gulf
to a garage band. "I just think
they're really happy that they got
a gig. It's like a band that's been
rehearsing for years and years and
never got to play live."
The interview began
with John Doe talking about
clearing customs. Earlier in the
afternoon Canadian customs had
made a fuss about the band bringing a few T-shirts across the border. It reminded Doe of a crossing he made once when the boarder
guards wanted to seize some of
his movie collection.
Doe: I had a video tape called
"The Honeymoon Killers" which
is an old B-movie from the fifties
and a Robert Mitchum movie about
cowboys and rodeo called "The
Lusty Men." They thought that
this was a porno tape. I wouldn't
let them take it. I said, "If you
want to take this you're going to
have to watch it and you're going
to have to watch it now."
Discorder: Are you comfortable
with answering questions about
X? A lot of guys don't seem interested in talking about things
they were doing ten years ago.
Doe: I'm proud of what X did.
People don't like talking about
that because it seems to be old
jby  jr.  tt_e_:?c  MOMTVX.
looking forward.
ing behind one
record you're
already thinking
about what the
next one's going
to be about or
what you're go-
you're finished
with this tour.
Is it a matter of
boredom loo,
because you've
already been
asked all these
questionabout...
Doe: Yes, but
you try to figure
oul different aspects of the same
question. Try to
keep yourself
interested by
answering in
different ways.   Or just flat out
What kind of questions do you gel
asked most often?
Doe: What was different about
making this record than making
an X record? Is X going to get
back together? We never broke
up. We see each other quite a bit
when Exene is in town. X is on
vacation - officially on vacation.
How did you go about assembling
your band?
Doe: Kind of dumb luck, mixed
with a bit of finagling here and
there.
Did you know Richard Lloyd from
before?
How do you people meet?
Doe: Like anybody else. You
just call them up. Say, "Hi, you
don't know me but...", you know.
Usually there are business people
who call other business people
first and they say, "I'm going to
give Richard your number or vice
versa. The odd thing was that
Richard and I had never met before and that's peculiar since we
travel in similar circles. Jon Dee
Graham and I met about a year
and a half ago and he and Tony
Marsico, whol've known forever,
since he was in the Cruzados, had
been playing together for eight
months before we started the
record. We felt Richard would be
a valuable addition, mostly 'cause
of the difference in his style from
Jon Dee's. Jeff Donavan is the
drummer for Dwight Yoakum's
group.    Our producer, Davitt
Sigerson, saw him doing another
session and thought he would be
just perfect.
How was il putting these musicians together? Do ihey work
well together?
Doe: It seemed to become a band
much faster lhan I hoped. I thought
it was going to take a month or
two in order for people lo stay out
of each other's way. It happened
much faster. A week, maybe two
weeks, and then we rehearsed the
songs we were going to put on
record for about a month. I'm a
big fan of pre-production.
One take in the studio?
Doe: A few takes and if something isn't working move on to
something else and come back to
it so it remains fresh. You can
over rehearse a record. It's exciting to make those discoveries when
it's for real. I think some studio
musicians would probably be best
if they just played a song once and
then recorded it on the second
lime. Some of those studio musicians are so good that they become bored the third time through
a song. They're just playing a
part by rote. But not these guys.
[laughs] They have to work a bit
harder. They're fast but they're
not that fast.
Doe: I was lucky enough to be
involved with a session that never
got released with John Hiatt. I
was called in at the last minute to
replace Nick Lowe playing bass.
It was David Lindley and Dave
Mattacks from Fairport Convention and myself and John Hiatt.
We went through a bunch of songs
and one of them was "The Real
One." I knew it was a great song
the first time I heard it. And the
rest is obvious.
Another situation where the phone
jusl rang one day?
Doe: The producer runs a club in
Los Angeles called McCaves. It's
an acoustic venue and and I've
played there four or five times.
He was familiar with X and called
me up and asked me if I wanted to
play on one or two songs. And
then they realized lhat they were
up the creek so they said, "Do you
want to play on the whole deal?"
What's il like playing in Los Angeles these days?
Doe: Well, I don't live in Los
Angeles anymore. I moved out
closer to Bakersfield. I live out in
the country now. Where I live is
more California that Los Angeles
or San Francisco. They're just big
cities. It would be as if you were
to judge all of Canada on
Vancouver and Toronto and
Montreal; took those three cities
and said that's Canada.
Whal is your Califor
2 like?
Doe: It's a high desert. A lot of
pine trees. Very hard country.
Elemental in a sort of
Hemingwayesque way. Man
against the elements. It's not pastoral. It's more like a Robert
Johnson song than a Renoir painting.
You've been here a lol on the road.
What do you know about Canada?
Doe: I don't try to judge or pretend to understand places lhat I'm
erything. We had the good fortune, ormisf ortune, to go lo Calgary
for the first time during Stampede. As we pulled up to the
hotel, one man chased anotherman
outofabar. The first guy jumped
in his truck and the other guy
jumped on the hood and broke the
front windshield with his heel,
then jumped down off as the first
guy was rolling up his window.
He put his fist through the window and just dragged the olher
guy out. He was angry-boy was
he mad. It was quite an eye opener
to pull into town and that's the
first thing you see. We figured,
shit, these guys are serious.
Whal are you reading these days ?
Doe: I just finished a Jim Harrison
book called "Sun Dog." Harrison
is a poet/novelist from-I think he
lives in Montana now. If you
don't know about him you should
find oul 'cause he's really great.
And I'm reading a biography about
Phil Ochs who I've been a fan of
and I've tried to read this book
about three or four times but never
gol more than fifty pages into it.
But now I'm almost halfway
through so I'll finish that. And I
always keep a little Charles
Bukowski around, just for the
simplicity he's able to conjure up.
Tell me about the Sandra Bernhard
Doe: Actually I was the replacement for k.d.lang. Sandra and
k.d.lang had done a duet of "I'm
So Lonesome I Could Cry" and
for one reason or another k.d.lang
didn 't want to, or was too busy, to
be in the movie. They called me
up and I said, "Sure, I think Sandra
Bernard is realfunny." They filmed
the whole deal in about ten days
The community you work from
tends to be political in its outlook,
which is good...
Doe:It's good depending on how
much people understand and how
seriously they take themselves, I
think. There is nothing worse
than someone who is standing on
a soapbox and spouting off stuff
that they aren't really lhal familiar with. When that happens it
lakes on a real hollow quality.
The person is oul for themselves
and not for the cause and ihc cause
is thereby lessened. I think it's up
to people to try to find oul as
much information as they can, like
any citizen should, and then do
most of your work in your private
life. Just saying to everyone, "I'm
for this" doesn't do shit. It's like
you're saying, "This is what I believe-now you go act on it, you
peons, you regular citizens, 'cause
I am a star." That's complete B.S.
That's wrong.
Your music, particularly "Meet
John Doe," is very personal. A
lot of it is aboul love and relationships. Meanwhile the people you
hang out with seem to be more
driven by the news, by fear and
Doe: Well, reportage only goes
so far. This is more the politics of
personal mailers, rather than the
personal mailers of politics. Tdon't
think anything is going to be solved
in a political vein until people
learn how to get along. Understanding why you have difficulty
wilh relationships or why it's hard
to maintain a relationship is to me
as important as feeding people.
You' ve got to get along in order to
work on something. Idon'tknow.
It's just the way ihe songs were
coming out. Maybe the next record
will be different but I don't see
eilher being better or worse than
the other. Whether a record or
song is political or not seems almost secondary. It doesn't mean
that you should be afraid of political issues, or politics, or discussing them. That, in the States anyway, is the biggest malaise-people
are afraid of politics. They're
afraid of discussing politics wilh
their friends or anybody.
Why is that?
Doe: Because people get all
heated, get all excited and angry.
And then they think that it endangers their friendship.   Which is
t belie
what
they are doing up by Montreal
wilh the Mohawks. Ican'tbelieve
that they aren't trying to talk to
these people in termsof why they're
doing what they're doing. The
report that I read in the newspaper, which was from Seattle, dealt
in a phrase wilh what the reasons
behind this thing were and the rest
of the column dealt with what
they're going to do about it and
how many guns they had and how
long they've held this position.
And then it just had, "A golf course
wants to take over some of their
ancestralground." Well, that seems
to be pretty fucking important.
SEPTEMBER 1990 13 Timbre Productions Presents
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 01
THE ORPHEUM THEATRE
DOORS: 7:30 P.M. / SHOW: 8:00 P.M.
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT   jg*€*"-^*
MCA RECORDING ARTISTS _■ __f*
UOtsrft jcM»
MONDAY, SEP. 3
CICf8 SODA
1055 HOMER
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE DOOR
r.r. racer
FRIDAY
SEPT. 7
DOORS: 8 PM SHOWTIME 10:30 PM    TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE DOOR
cmp presents Island Recording Artist
Etta lames    fifa
and her 10 piece band with guests she*~f-
FRIDAY, SEPT. 14 DOORS: 8:00
SHOW: 9:30
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT j^«» CHARGE BY
PHONE 280-4444, TRACK, ZULU, BLACK
SWAN, HIGHLIFE, SCRATCH, RAZZBERRY,
AND REMINISCING RECORDS
CiTR
_LO_L.9   fTM
PRESENTS
NEW YORK THEATRE
639 COMMERCIAL DRIVE
DOORS: 7 PM / SHOW: 7:30 PM
DM ANGEL
WITH   GUESTS
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT «"&--.,_. CHARGE BY PHONE 280-4444, TRACK, ZULU,
BLACK SWAN, HIGHLIFE, SCRATCH, RAZZBERRY, AND REMINISCING RECORDS
TUESDAY
SEPTEMBER 25
DOOR: 8 PM
SHOW: 9:30 PM
KLUB  KAOS
2745  BARNET  HIGHWAY
>^^ COQUITLAM -a
premier pop-core
bands of the post-
punk era. All - Cruz
recording artist and southern
California wonderband,
rambled through Vancouver
'C in July to play an all ages gig
at the New York Theatre in
support of their latest album,
"Trailblazer." CiTR's Flex
Your Head crew, Eric and Jinx,
managed to catch original
drummer Bill Stevenson, and
'*' bassist Karl Alvarez (the guy
who penned the Trailblazer
album cover) before the band
hit the stage. Guitarist Scott
Reynolds and lung-man
Stephan Egerton unfortunately
((. weren't around for the fun
' talkfest. Maybe they were
feeling too popular.
Bill Stevenson: When I was
fifteen I started a band called
i j^The Descendents. This is what
we have twelve years later.
We changed our name to All
about three years ago. We've
been through the full line up
three times, all instruments,
except we've only had one
drummer: me. That's twelve
years and here we are in 1990
doing an interview and it's
great! (laughs) I was just
thinking, just the reality of that
like, "Why don't you quit?!"
Discorder: Twelve years is a
long time....
BS: It's like when we play
every time, every show is like
the first show ever. I guess
when it's not like that anymore, that's when we'll quit.
People think ifyou play all the
time you reach a point where
you're good, but it just doesn't
happen. You never get good!
You have to be together so
long. Even in eighty years I'd
still be like, "We're no good."
D: From when you first started
twelve years ago, what are the
things you miss? What's different? What's changed? What
do you miss about those days?
BS: That's a good question! I
like that!
Karl Alvarez: What's changed
is: every band had its own
deal. You'd go to a show and
every band played a different
music. I'm not talking about
clothes, I'm not talking about
fashion, every band sounded
different. Now if you go to
your average punk rock, rock
'n' roll show, the bands generally sound similar or identical in a lot of cases. There's
now a given set of flavours of
the punk rock or rock *n' roll
thing that people adhere to religiously, whereas ten years
ago there wasn't.
BS: I can relate to that question on a personal level. When
we started, it was me and these
two guys, Frank and Tony,
who went to my high school.
We'd go down on the weekends and practice in Long
Beach in Frank's brother's
garage. We all had a common
thing of being socially unaccepted, sort of like nerds. I
think the band was this way of
hav ing our litde club like " Little
Rascals." We had our little
gang, so ever if no one liked
us, at least we knew we liked
each other.
D: You get the prestige of
being in a band...
BS: But we couldn't get any
shows. We started getting
shows six years after, after we
quit playing and I went with
Black Flat for three years.
When I came back then we
were able to get some shows.
No one ever liked us; hardly
anyone still does. We play in
these little bars! There's no
prestige!! Now instead of it
being the only alternative like
"I have to have a band because
I'm a failure in life." Now I
think it's gotten sort of an artistic seriousness that is good
and bad. There's heavy art at
stake, feelings and expressiveness, whereas before it was,
"Well I'm in high school and
no one will talk to me. I have
to be in a band." That's how
it's different for me. I just do
it for fun, I don't have to do it
for anything. We enjoy playing.
D: Nowyou'reBill Stevenson
the Great!
BS: Uhuh!!! I just play for
fun and if no one likes me I
don't really care! When you're
in high school you've got to
be a cool guy; you've got to be
popular. Once you get rid of
high school and college you
don't have to be cool at all.
You don't care if the whole
world hates you.
DA: As long as you've got
your family and your two
friends you're set. Stephan
and I were high school rejects
when we were kids .I've known
him since we were twelve. We
went through junior high and
high school being the outside
people. It really gives you a
chip on your shoulder.
BS: They [Karl and Stephan]
had this whole other culture
that got put into this culture
(the ALL culture!). All of the
guys that I'm talking about in
high school-they're not in the
band anymore. They haven't
been in the band since 1983.
Karl and Stephan joined at the
same time. They grew up together. Milo went to our high
school. He joined the group
later after we started. He quit
a few years back. He and I
went back a real long time
too. He's still probably by
dearest friend.
D: Is Milo going to do any
other bands?
BS: He just does his science.
He's really not interested in
music.
KA: Once in a blue moon
he'll write a song and sit in his
closet and play it. Or he'll
come to one of our shows and
play it to us in our van on our
van beater. Then he'11 go back
to
know, that's why Doug and
Ray are out of the picture.
BS: Doug and Ray were the
bass and guitar players before
Karl and Stephan. They left
because they didn't want to do
the touring thing.
D: You guys are on the road
pretty much all the time. How
do you stay healthy?
KA: By eating: trying to eat
real food instead of road food.
And sweating our balls off
every night.
BS: Sometimes it gets the
better of me. Some tours I go
out and by the end of the tour
I've put on ten to twenty
pounds. Sometimes it can be
really difficult. It's something
I have a problem with. On
tour you're dealing with a lot
of ridiculous time schedules.
The other day we drove through
the Rockies from Calgary to
Victoria. Two consecutive
nights of playing shows. You
can't go and cook yourself a
big vegetarian dinner. It's like
BS: He has a pretty cool song
that we recorded on our new
album that's about his dad. I
don't think you could ever lose
a love for music, but he's more
interested in science and I can
understand that. I think science is the bottom line, period.
KA: To ruin Bill's metaphor,
it's one of the highest things
you can do because you're
using your brain to get to the
natureof how things are rather
than how they seem.
BS: Or how they should be.
"Cancer cells will behave in
this manner." No matter how
much you care about something, "This is how cancer
works and this is how leukemia works." This is the facts.
KA: There's something really cool about that. Also, we
tour eight months of the year,
it's very hard on people. If
you have any interests that
aren'tplaying music, it'sreally
hard. That's why we've gone
through so many people. Dave
Smalley, who was singing for
us for awhile, quit. As far as I
Denny's or something.
Sometimes I have a real problem keeping my shit together
on tour. Nutrition-wise I really don't do it too well.
KA: At this point, we're so
used to it. Tours are like
working with clay. Ifyou put
it in the kiln it either breaks
the piece you have or it makes
it really tough. There are those
who are broken and there are
those who can continue doing
BS: We tour eight months of
the year, record two months
of the year, and sleep two
months of the year. We really
don't ever stop.
The not so incredibly in depth
(or perfect!) All discography
- all on Cruz.
Allroy Sez... LP/CS/CS
"Just   Perfect"/"Wlshlng
Well" 12"
Allroy for Prez... 127CS/CD
Allroy's Revenge LP/CS/CD
"She's my Ex" 12"
Trailblazer LP/CS/CD   §__
SEPTEMBER 1990 IS The recent Vancouver Folk
Festival presented a noticeable contingent of artists
  and musicians of Asian descent from Canada, the United States,
and Britain who as members of
western culture have begun to look
at their identity and heritage in the
light of both growing global cultural
awareness as well as the rising exposure of the west to societies in China,
South-East Asia, and the Pacific Rim.
These artists included Brenda Wong
Aoki, a storyteller from California,
and Su-Chong Lim, a singer from
Alberta who not only sings about the
lives of South-East Asians overseas
and as immigrants, but also performs
prairie country ballads and Ukrainian
folk songs (in Ukrainian). Also present
were Phurbu Tsering and Thubtcn
Samdup, two Tibetanese musicians
working in Montreal, Xiao Yu, a
"pipa" player from Vancouver, and
locally acclaimed musicians Takeo
Yamashiro and Teresa Ohnishi. On
the more eccentric side, the playful
antics ofthe Japanese female electro-
pop duo from Britain, Frank Chickens, were a refreshing break from
normality.
However, it was the energetic musical and theatrical presence
of Vancouver's young, professional
Japanese drumming group, Uzume
Taiko, which received the best audience response. The ensemble of
unfamiliar drums and percussion instruments combined with the three
core members' stunning choreography and physical playing style easily
transfixed the crowd, especially those
who had never witnessed this kind of
music before. Even more surprising
to many was the perfectly "normal"
North American accents and mannerisms of the performers when they
addressed the audience outside of
their cultural presentations.
Discorder was able to talk
with Leslie Komori, one of the three
full-time members of Uzume Taiko,
about the group's music and the recent efforts of Asian-Canadians and
Asian-Americans to explore and forge
contemporary identities based upon
their cultural heritage as well as the
western culture they are a part of.
Discorder: Could you tell us about
Uzume Taiko's members and when
the group was formed?
Komori: Uzume Taiko was formed
in 1988 by John Greenaway, Eileen
Kage and myself. The group varies
in size with other guest artists but the
three of us are the only ones performing
as full-time professionals.
D:Tell us about Japanese drumming
and the kind of traditional music you
work with.
K:Taiko means "big drum" and is a
part of Japanese folk artistry which
comes from the farming and fishing
communities of Japan. The drums
were used in battle to encourage troops
to go to war and so on. In the past
thirty years it has become more of an
ensemble  instrument played on
stage....music as opposed to ritual.
In North America, it has been here
for about thirty years, originally
brought over by Tanaka, who set up
taiko workshops, including Katari
Taiko, where we all learned to play.
D: Are the other instruments and drums
you use traditional?
K: Generally they are. Some we make
ourselves while others are made in
California and Japan.
D:But you've always used these traditional Japanese instruments and
musical styles to explore your own
compositions.
K: Yeah. Most of our pieces are our
own compositions. We actually do
very few traditional pieces. On our
album, only "Spring on Heavenly
Mountain" is a traditional taiko piece.
D:Tell us about your new album,
"Chirashi." How did it come about?
K:About a year ago we were approached by Gary Cristall [Folk
Festival director] to do a concert at
the V.E.C.C. with Takeo Yamashiro
and Xiao Yu. He liked what he heard
and offered to produce an album,
which is just what we wanted.
D:The album features not only traditional instruments but non-traditional
ones as well, such as a bass and a
saxophone. Why did you use these?
K: All three of us are Japanese-Canadians and our musical tastes are rooted
in Canadian and American styles.
We incorporate what we hear around
us. Eileen wanted to use a bass and I
wanted to incorporate a saxophone
because they are instruments we hear
around us all the time.
D:Many people are fascinated by your
stage presence and your choreography. How do you plan the movements and how long does it take to
learn each piece more or less?
summer we'll go on a tour of Europe.
D:Are other taiko groups forming in
North America? Is there a growing
awareness of these types of traditional
musical forms in the youth of communities of Asian heritage?
K:Oh yeah! There are groups starting up all over Canada, such as in
Ottawa and Edmonton, as well as in
the States. The communities are embracing the music.
D:Is this growth reflected in Japan?
K:I really don't know. I have a sense
that it might not be. In Japan it is
different. Over there you have schools
of [ traditional] art and music which
sort of suppress any creativity. They
keep the music so traditional that it
makes it unappealing after a point- to
always play just what someone else
has taught you. In North America it
is great that you have more freedom
and are not controlled so much by the
schools. There is a group in Japan
called Koto who are probably the
premier taiko group in the world, but
otherwise there are just village taiko
groups or schools. I don't know if
there are taiko groups like us over
there.
D:Thank you for talking to us and
good luck in the future.
K:Thank you.
Discorder would like to thank the
Vancouver Folk Festival people for
the interview opportunities they
provided us. In all, wonderful performances by artists such as
Zimbabwe's Machanic Manyeruke,
Bulgaria's Ivo Papasov and his Bulgarian Wedding Band, Uganda's
Samite, bagpipe toting Kathryn
Tickell, and Morocco's sintir player
Hassan Hakmoun proved that global
culture has not totally consumed ethnic
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K:A lot of our choreography is improvised. Basically you have a base
rhythm and sound which you build
upon and develop the music around.
It's a collaborative effort.
D:What have you planned for the
future?
K:We don't have anymore recordings planned yet, but hopefully next
music throughout the world. And as
evidenced by local groups such as
the Andean music ensemble. Ancient
Cultures, and the Asian-Canadian
groups discussed above, people in
Vancouver and all across Canada are
looking to their heritage as a means
of giving themselves asenseof identity
with a view to the future.
16 DISCORDER renda Wong Aoki is an avant
Bl garde solo performer, actress
and story teller from Cali-
I fornia. She performed at this
year's Folk Festival, enthralling audiences with
performance pieces that tell stories
drawn from her own life and the
Asian-American community as a
whole.
The Browns (Peter and
James) took time out from the nonstop musical smorgasbord to talk to
Brenda Wong about her art and found
that the tradition of story telling is
alive and well.
Discorder: How did you get interested in telling stories?
BWA: Well, I was the eldest of six
kids. I had to put them to bed every
night so one way you could do that
was to tell them stories. Also, I was
a pretty dorky kid and I was really fat
and I had asthma so I couldn't play.
As a kid it was really important to
play games and things, so nobody
liked me. So, I liked to read books all
the time, and what I liked to read best
was story books. I have always been
fascinated by stories. Also, I am a
professional actress and I have all
the union cards in the United States,
but there isn' t always that much work
for a minority actress, and when I
was in and out of roles I would always
continue to do solo performances to
keep what we call "chops" up. Eventually, I am getting more and more
calls just to do solo performances,
and that is kind of how it happened.
It actually happened more easily than
one would think. I went through so
much "angst" as an actress, but becoming a story teller was so easy, I
think, because it finally fell into place
for me.
D: It's funny, as a child you say you
feltabitofanoutcast. Wheredidyou
gain your confidence for getting up
in front of an audience and telling
stories of your life?
BWA: It's a front (laughs). I think so
for real. I really don't have that
confidence. I think a lot of performers are actually really insecure people.
It's like this big challenge to get up
on stage...to be able to do that. I still
have incredible stage fright. I am
always thinking, "Oh, why?...they
don't really want me...do they want
me?" and all that stuff. You still go
through it a lot, I still don't have
complete confidence about going in
front of people.
D: Are adult audiences as receptive
to story tellers as the children?
BWA: No, I think that's more of a
presenter's problem. The presenter
is the person who is marketing the
artist. If people know they're coming
to hear adult stories then they have
that expectation already; they know
what they are getting into.
I come from a background
in the "avant garde" theatre. As a
soloist I was not billed as a story
teller as such; I was billed as a solo
performance artist. So, at least in the
San Francisco area, if people would
come to see me they would already
think, "Well, Brenda is a performance
artist." It is just recently, in the past
couple of years, that people have
called me a story teller. I have been
doing the same solo monologue-
movement stuff for fifteen years, but
now in the last two, three years people
label me as a story teller.
D: Your characters are always overcoming problems, problems even as
great as death. And it seems to have
that poignancy. It seems as if a relief
of your perfor
BWA: Well, my background was
mostly in dance and Japanese classical theatre, Noh and Kyogen. In that
training, my coach would always say
to me, "When in doubt don't move."
I think that is really key, because I
think what I try really hard to do is
very specific. If there is a purpose for
moving then move; if there is no
purpose then stand still. One of my
other philosophies is that if you can
; the words.
or a happiness exists there too. Is this
a conscious thing?
BWA: I try to do that. I have to give
a lot of credit to, this is the time you
say "Hi Mom" and everything
(laughs), my director. I have a director, who works on most of my adult
stuff. His name is J.L. Wiseman. He's
fairly well known in the States for
working with the Delarte Theatre
Company and Vaudeville Nouveau;
they are performance groups. He's
also my co-writer.
I think every story that I
take, whether I make it up myself or
whether it is an existing story, I have
to rewrite it for my own personal
style from my own interpretation. I
think that is what is most important;
to figure out the angle of your interpretation, how you are going to interpret it.
I don't know ifyou saw me
do the MsStory (workshop). Well,
that particular story is an ancient
Japanese legend. The way the legend
goes, at least currently, is this poor
suffering monk who is wanting to
attain nirvana and this "dirty woman"
who is always in his face. It's never
from the perspective of her conditioning or whatever. I wanted to
reinterpret it from a different angle.
That is what is the most fun. The
most important thing is to give it
your own perspective.
D: When you tell stories you do not
only rely on your voice but also on
very carefully choreographed movements and a few carefully selected
props. Is that always an integral part
or if you can say it with a look, or
even say it with silence. Words are
almost the weakest part of a performance, so if I can get away without
words I try to do that.
D: Any parting thoughts?
BWA: I just want to say that I'm
really happy to be in Canada, because first of all it's such a different
experience from the first time I came
to Vancouver. I was in Vancouver
right after the Vietnam war was over
and I was one of the anti-war protesters who had been invited to Vancouver
by members of the Vict Cong to celebrate the ending of the war. Many
people in Vancouver were not exactly pleased that all these radicals
from the United States were meeting
with the Viet Cong. Our bus was
getting stoned and people were
throwing things into the church we
were staying in. It was pretty scary.
This has been so much nicer, but that
was one thing I remember. The second thing I wanted to say is that I'm
really exited about all the different
Japanese-Canadian artists that I have
met, like Uzume Taiko. I read this
book by this wonderful story teller
named Paul Yee. I would really like
to meet him, so I thought I would like
to put that into the "Hi Mom" series,
too. And my good friend Rick Shiomi
is from here. He is a wonderful playwright. I thought I'd say something
to my fellow Japanese-Canadians. I
really appreciate being in your country
and I thank you for having me here.
D: Great, thanks very much.
BWA: Yes, thank you.
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SEPTEMBER 1990 17 MANDATORY    COUR8E    REQUIREMENT    FOR    PALL     1990
Tribalwares 101:" Lessons in Style"
classes in session monday thru friday 11:00 - 5:30 / Saturdays:  12:00 - 5:00
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tribalwares
#3IS - 825 granville st.
phone: 684-5479
the cruel elephant
COOL AS FUCK
at the Cruel Elephant. Yes, brothers and sisters,
cool as fuck Indeed (Amen). The Cruel Elephant
has been open for over a month now for worship
and enlightenment. Blessed be the brave souls
that have crossed the threshold into the new
reality that is the Cruel Elephant. Thank you
brothers and sisters for making the world's coolest
jukebox more than just an idea but a reality for
freedom of choice (Amen). Ever-willing to offer
an opinion, Jello Biafra had this to say about the
ever-changing jukebox, "Oh, Mhink it's great, but
freedom of choice can sometimes confuse the
public"(damned forever be the PMRC. Amen).
Worship continues 7 days per week 5:50 - 12
midnight. Live intense worship has expanded (the
People have spoken and been heard) to 4 nights
per week. This is not for the weak of heart or those
fickle in taste but for the strong willed and true of
conscience (Amen). A free mystery meal or 2
dollars off the menu with paid admission and
cheap beverages - there Is no reason not to
worship, going to a show later. Just bring your full
ticket down and show at the door, and you're In
for free. What more do you fucking want?
Il 1
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1937 Cornwall
732-8840 '— Freshly back from a West
Coast tour backed by Dirt,
Curious George is off to open
for the UK Subs for a month
or so on the East Coast, now
without Ian and Iain (singer
and guitarist respectively) and
** with a new singer, formerly
of Route 666. And Dirt has
made a line-up change too,
losing their lead singer-guitarist, who'll be replaced (on
vocals, anyway) by the former
I bass player, "Diamond" Doug
Smith. And the Ludwigs have
two pieces of news-they have
a new guitarist and seven new
songs, recorded at Profile, that,
added to their previously recorded three, they hope to
A,     have pressed soon as an LP.
Here     are     this
month's tape n
Glee-"Vancouver." Glee
take no chances here on losing their reputation as one of
"*- this city's most obnoxious
bands. First, there's the cover
photo of the five members
holding up letters (which look
as if they're made of/chunks
of wood) to spell C-U-N-T.
Naughty, naughty. Then of
course there's the song itself.
The lyrics of this quasi-
lounge-polka-municipal anthem mention strip bars and
murdered prostitutes and include snippets like this: "You
Ul you you, you elate me/You
you you, you gyrate me/You
you you, you fellate me."
Maybe I have no sense of
humour, or then again, maybe
you have to be a white male
adolescent to fully appreciate
this. (I think these boys are
just trying too hard.) At any
rate, Glee is bound to make
changes of one kind or another in the near future, since
the bass player and the one
female band member, Nettie,
who played accordian, have
since left.
Darkling Thrushes-"Hall of
Souls." Their promotional
copy, while not riddled with
spelling mistakes (like so
many press releases bands
send us), does make one serious error, revealing the
Thrushes' influences as The
Cure and R.E.M. After all,
the average listener could
probably get through almost
half a song before figuring
that out for his or her self,
and now, fortunately for all
but serious fans of this sort of
slick slop, there's no need to
bother. While I understand
that a Kelowna group may
not have a chance to listen to
much on the "alternative" front
beyond these two bands, the
Darkling Thrushes would do
well to make that little bit of
extra effort needed to acquire
more music heroes and give
themselves a more original
sound. Still, you have to ad-
e them for winning aBattle
of the Bands competition in
the Interior without playing
slick, hard rock.
The Hollowheads-"Inter-
esting Shoes." Every now
and again I become quite
charmed by a lo-fi and
unpretentious little tape from
a young, almost unheard of
band, and this is one of them.
Is it the fact that these boys
are just out of high school
(well, at least one of them)?
Is it that they've only played
four or five times (most re
cently at the Archimedes Club,
when a careless promoter
neglected to tell them their
show had been cancelled, so
they showed up with their gear
anyway and played for free)?
Or maybe it's just the utter
sincerity here: the singer
catching his breath between
lines, clean chunky guitar,
sweet organ runs and
unapologetically farty bass.
Gradually, this song has really grown on me, and I'm
happy to say that soon we'll
have more-The Hollowheads
have just recorded six new
songs at 525 Studios in New
Westminster, where Oversoul
7 recorded their first LP.
Rap Rat-"Do the Rat
Thang." Who are these
people, and what exactly are
they trying to do? (And how
do you manage to start an
original band in Crescent
Beach, of all places?) And
who really cares? This is
actually quite funny, rude and
authentic sounding and quite
danceable, emphasised with
the occasional "Rat on, rat
on." A guilty pleasure.
The Mint 100-"Summer of
Discontent, ""Mister
Inbetween."Frontedby
singer/songwriter Sam
Salmon, The Mint 100 sounds
like a new project that hasn' t
quite found itself yet. "Summer of Discontent" is the
catchier of the two, with the
vocals almost sounding like
laid-back Iggy, and Sam takes
his lyrics seriously (one line
in this song about acquisitiveness says, "My toys are
expensive/DNA is free").
"Mister Inbetween" could use
some hooks and the addition
of the unintelligible TV-
sounding voice in the long
break doesn't add a lot. Unfortunately what this tape lacks
in fidelity (it sounds like a
muddy 4-track) is not made
up for in freshness or power,
but this is a common symptom of new bands made up of
experienced musicians, and
one that ought to clear itself
up in time.
Jazzmanian Devils-Happy
Hour 17-song cassette: "One
Scotch, One Bourbon, One
Beer," "X-Ray Cat." I suspect that at seventeen songs
this tape (available in stores)
is a mere sampling of the
JDs'repertoire-this band must
know an amazing number of
songs. And this cassette is a
pretty good mix, with at least
eight "Goodman"s playing
instruments and four different lead singers (the two
women, Vannessa Richards
and Madeleine Morris, not
appearing in the two playlisted
songs). What's especially
impressive is that the whole
thing was recorded live to
two-track DAT, with no
overdubs, at Blue Wave Studios in only three days.
(Which means it's remarkable that the mix is so good,
and the performances, on the
whole, sound so assured.)
"One Scotch" is a simple little
tune, with the familiar theme
ofmy-baby-done-me-wrong-
so-I'm-drinking-lots, while
"X-Ray Cat"'ssubjectmatter
is weirder: an irradiated kitty.
Quite a successful tape, although of course not really
comparable to seeing a band
like this live.
SEPTEMBER 1990 19 20 DISCORDER It was a Wednesday early afternoon. The soaps on TV were
pathetic. I was gearing down
to take a nap...
Ring ring.
"Hello. Hi BZ. Ice is havin' a
soundcheck at the Commodore
from 4 to 6. Head down there
and I'll tell Greg (the photographer) to meet you down
there."
"Thanks, Linda." Linda is the
station manager.
I get up and check in at the
Commodore around4:20. Greg
is already there. Ice and Donald
D check the mics and levels
by bustin some freestyle.
Donald gets tired and sits down.
I talk to Donald about chattin'
with CiTR-he says no prob.
After the chat with Donald D,
we find out that Ice is being
interviewed already. We are
waiting outside the room he's
in, hoping he wouldn' t be tired
or hungry. Ice walks out of
the room. He looks tired, and
hungry.
"Ice, would you like a chat?"
"Sure, why not?" he says with
a weak smile.
Oh thank you lord, oh thank
you, I thought to myself.
DISCORDER: How many
interviews have you done in
your life?
ICE T: Ummm... damn. I've
been doin' one continuous
interview for the past four
D: What's the most asked
question Ice T gets.
/: I don't know... ummm...
they ask lots of gang stuff. In
Britain, they asked the sexism
stuff.
D: Overall impressions of
Canada...
/; Canada is cool. A lot of
people, you know, in the States,
don't even know Canada exists, you know, but we came
up here. We were really well
received up here; we go platinum up here. To me, a fan is
a fan, I don't care. You know,
you don't have to sell as many
records up here to go platinum
here.
D: 'Causel'm sure the money
down in the States is way better
than Canada right?
/: Well, you know to go platinum up here you sell one hun
dred thousand versus one
million records in the United
States. Well, then to do one
hundred thousand records if
you can do that, you pretty
much got all the people. It's a
lot of records up here. Like
I'm sayin', it doesn't really
matter where you're at. I like
it up here; people are cool.
You know, there's places in
the United States I don't like
touring, like down south, places
like Louisiana and Mississippi.
D: Why is that?
/: 'Cause, you know, that's
the core where all the racial
tension was. You ask them,
well, show me around town.
They take you and show you
the whipping posts and slave
quarters. The people down
there, they've been treatin'
black people a certain way for
about 300 years. So here all
of a sudden we come and we
got white kids with their fists
in the air. We aren't really
warmly received. The fans
are great but the people running
the places down there, you
know, we get chased out of
there all the time.
D: What kind of problems did
you have at the border? I
heard a rumour that the Tipper
Gores of Canada were tryin'
to get you banned.
/; (chuckles) Well, I don't
know; you know, since I'm on
the radio and this ain't at the
show, nahh, we just said that
to create some hype. Usually
when we hit the stage, we might
say somethin' like the police
had us hemmed up outside the
car. To be honest, the cops
haven'tmessed with us up here;
no problems. But when we
get to the show the kids wanna
hear that Ice was undergoing
some drams so when I get here
tonight-the cops had me outside, they beat me down, but
I 'm here. Then they' II go crazy.
So it's hype; on the real tip, no
problems up here.
D: How would you describe
(PMRC head and Senator Al
Gore's wife) Tipper Gore for
someone who doesn't know
who she is?
/: She's just a politician's
wife in the United States who' s
really on a campaign to stop
certain forms of music. She
claims she does it for the kids
but she's on a totally differnt
agenda. She's backed by what
they call fundamentalist
christians. They are the people
down that have those TV
evangelist shows. I mean, I'm
all for anybody's religion but
the problem with fundamentalist christians is basically they
believe that ifyou don't believe
in what they believe, then you
should be arrested or you're
going to hell.
If you look back in
time all the torture chambers
and things were all built by
fundamentalist nuns. Whips
and iron maidens and devices
of torture. So religion can be
taken to an extreme where it's
much worse than no religion
at all you know.
We don't worry
about her. She's on amission
where she's sayin' rock lyrics
and rap lyrics are messin' up
kids' minds but that's not the
real problem. The real problem is once again we've come
to a musical form where white
kids are liking black kids again.
Back when Little Richard and
Chuck Berry started, they had
a thing called rock 'n' roll and
all the white girls screamed
for Little Richard. There were
people that said that this is not
healthy, let's put in this guy
named Elvis, let's put in Jerry
Lee Lewis. Here we go, 20,
30years later there's this new
thing called rap. Now you got
white kids. Now the thing of
it's not the white kids listening to the lyrics 'cause most of
the parents don't understand
the lyrics anyhow. It's the
fact that the kid likes Ice T, he
likes Donald D, he likes NWA
and this is breaking down a lot
of the stereotypes that have
been built up: "If you talk to
a black guy he's gonna beat
you up; he hates you because
you're white; he doesn't like
you," which is bull.
They're tryin' to stop
it again, so what they do is
they say we're tryin' to protect
these kids from these lyrics,
which is bull too. Now here's
the problem: a lot of the white
kids in Mid-America are bred
to be thenext governor, senator,
the next supreme court justice
and all of a sudden at a law
school like Harvard, you got
an Ice T album as the top record
of the school. So you got a
supreme court justice sittin'
on the bench and he's an NWA
fan; it could really twist the
whole way of thinking of the
world, so we have to stop this.
Now say me and you wanted
toendToyota, sayin'wedidn't
like Toyota cars for some
reason. Let's see how we'll
put them outof business. Let's
say more kids are killed in
Toyotas 'cause we can get
people to rally behind children.
So that's what they're doin'.
But there's never been one
documented case of a kid listening to a rap album and
committing a crime or a kid
listening to a 2 Live Crew album and rapin' somebody.
You know, they're
try in' to push their Judas Priest
suicide. I was sittin' up here
at the Suicidal Tendencies show
last night and rockin' with
Exodus and the kids were
slammin' and they were divin'
and they were gettin' off.
Nobody got hurt; everybody
had fun. Butifyou bring Tipper
in there, she would say that
was devil worshipping and they
were doin' all kinds of things.
What I really hope is
that the white kids of the 90's
are smart enough to tell their
parents to get fucked when
their parents come with them;
and they say, "Hey, that's Ice
T, Mom, chill out. I'm not
going on with all lhat bullshit
that you bein' trying to preach
to me; that's why the world is
all messed up now, you know."
Black kids have a
reason to be upset. Indians
got a reason to be upset. But I
don't really think that white
kids of today are on that trip.
My attitude is that you could
put. a black kid, white kid,
Mexican kid, oriental kid,
Puerto Rican kid in a sand box
and they'll all play 'til they're
50 years old 'til somebody
comes and tells them different.
That's what the parents do;
parents are the worst enemies.
D: What would you say to
somethin' like, "Is it okay for
white kids to listen to the music
if Chuck D makes it for black
youth?"
/; Definitely. But Chuck's
agenda is to get black youth to
gain some respect about
themselves. See, if I don't
have respect about my self then
I can only feel jealous of a
white kid. If I don't realise
that I was a king and King Tut
was black, Jesus was black,
we built the pyramids,
Cleopatra was not white, it's
geographically impossible; if
I realise I'm somethin'; if I
realise diamond and gold comes
from my country; you know
the things that people hold so
precious to them is African;
now I have respect and no
longer do I have to look at you
like you've got everything. I
realise I'm somethin'.
The problem is in
school. Schools teach racism:
you go to school, a white kid
graduates outta school and he
learns that he's the father of
our country and he learns everything. He learns that the
black kids are the slave, oriental
kids are the enemy, and
Mexican kids are the alamo.
What is a Puerto Rican, you
don't know.   The black kid
cannot help but feel inferior
and the white kid feels superior. It's not his fault, he was
taught it. The white kid needs
to learn about black kids'
culture with respect added to
it. You need to learn that Indians were chiefs. And I look
at you as an equal. We both
realise that we have somethin'
to be proud of and it ain't
taught like that.
So Chuck says let's
get the black people together.
Chuck definitely is not a racist. Chuck is just basically
sayin', "You said you was
going to give us 40 acres and
a mule." You now, c'mon,
that's what you said. So we're
gonna work it out; brothers
gonna work it out.
I was out on tour with
Chuck D. l's like 80% white
audience, you know. The white
kids are ready to end this shit.
Reagan says I wanna take it
back to the good ol'days. Tell
me what the good ol' days
were; what's the good ol' days
for a brother? I mean, what
does the flag mean to me? The
flag was flyin' when my
brothers and sisters were in
bondage. What    about
Thanksgiving? I should give
a fuck about Thanksgiving
when Thanksgiving means to
me the day they jacked the
Indians for the country and
started bringing my ancestors
over here at the bottom of the
boat? What do I do? I sit up
and eat turkey and give a fuck
about Thanksgiving and then
I go out and work my fingers
to the bone and I try to buy my
kid a ten-speed bike.
On Christmas I give
my credit to the white man in
abeard. Youknow,fuckSanta
Claus. You know, I'm Santa
Claus; it's all devil's food cake,
angel's food cake. It's all a
big program to keep someone
in charge, not y'all, but the
older ones. To me, American
government is a bunch of
theivin' lowlife, just the worst
criminals. They just took everything from everybody and
then they said we gotta make a
way to stay in power.
D: Is someone like KRS-One
being overly concerned about
Africa, forgetting his own
backyard?
/; His     new     album
[Edutainment] is more home.
Everybody has their o wn thing,
you know. Chuck's focus is
very global, my focus is very
urban. Kris might be a little
Afrocentric, Ice Cube might
be attempt to be more militant
urban.
D: So everyone has a differ
ent way...
/: Right. We're all spokes on
a wheel and we all meet at the
same place. Also, you're
dealin' with a lot of different
IQs. And you're dealin' with
rappers who've been rappin'
for four years and have learned
a lot in these four years. You're
startin' out with a rapper like
me who had never been out of
LA so I go around the world
and I get smarter every year.
D:  Knowledge.
/: Yeah, so what you heard on
my first album is a little deeper
then it's deeper and deeper;
you know, growin' up.
D: You were at the New Music Seminar and gave a little
speech. What was that all
about?
/: Pretty much what I just
broke down to you, tellin'
people don't go with what you
think it is. I think that the
music community has to join
forces for the censorship thing.
But the music community is
so divided, you know. Those
people who claim they're not
for censorship have somethin'
they want censored. It's like
the gay people all are like,
"We are against censorship but
we don't like this record."
You know, everybody has their thing they want
censored. I listen to Screwdriver, which are very hardcore
skinheads, Nazi I mean. I don't
agree with them but if I'm for
anti-censorship, they got to
have their right to make those
records. I can't say, "Well
you shouldn't censor things
but that record shouldn't be
allowed to be made." Ya,
c'mon, I have to fight for the
right for the KKK to march
'cause I wanna march. Now
once they march and someone
wants to kick their ass that's
their business. But it cannot
be illegal for certain people to
do things.
See, like I said, free
speech is aconceptnot areality.
No one has free speech or ever
did. You cannot say anything
you want on the radio or in
your paper-you got an editor.
No one has free speech. TV's
nothin' anymore. There's a
point where you cross the line
and they say, hey, go out on
the street; just tryin' to say
anything - fuck everybody, fuck
the world, fuck the government. Start fucking with the
government and they '11 get w ith
you. What's up free speech?
Why don't you come back here
for a sec? You might go
missin'. When people say
they're takin' away our right,
SEPTEMBER 1990 21  Victoria Stan-1-.tic critic for
Outneac* Magazine): People
like Chuck D and Ice T ar*
proclaiming to mart to cfcaaf*
waa off Um street bat by Um
next time I learned. I used to
do tkings ia my concerts bat
"everybody's who's ugly ba
quiet," I used to say "everybody with AIDS be qaief* wbicb
tbat'i a serious diuau." I
took tt oat at my abow. Mat
aobody sayin' that ka T kaowi
laara, build wtth aw. Taach
•a* a Irttla bit about something. I'm raady to build. Ml
a rappar caa uy la what ba
knows at the time. Maybe Aa-
have to laara. BatatthaaaaM
time, aoaia people ara never
(oaaa change their attitadaa
about carta ia things bat that's
just how it is. Buiyou gotta be
"nigger." Damn, alotof people
have called ne "nigger" and
thea .one oat for dlaaar wtth
ne or signed a contract wtth
ne. I happaaad to have net
AxIRosa. I'n gonna do a song
with Axl Rosa, "Welcome to
tha Jungle", lea T atyle. Ha
nude a ni .take. Ha bad aavar
net somebody with a gold chaia.
Axl's cool ia tha gang now.
Veraoa Raid:   I toll yoa oaa
the word "nigger"
rt    111 toll yoa
where I (raw ap ia, tha bast
Tba guy played saxophone, ba
played (altar, playad tba
trumpet much better than—I
doa*t kaow aayoaa who could
play tba (attar as good as ba
plays, or ba playad—ba played
tba piano. When ha played tba
piano he sounded like Art Tatun
or some s** you kaow. So we
all looked ap to this (ay, his
name was Arthur Ray who I
looked ap to, aad all tha musicians looked ap to him, al tba
musiciaasia the neighbourhood
asad to go aad sea his concerts out ia Brooklyn at Prospect Park and he was just crazy.
At that time I was a teenager
aad I was vary insecure about
homosexual males aad often
ref erred to them as "f aggots".
Aad then, R came to my attention that Arthur had come out
of the closet, he had come out
of the closet and was gay. This
was someone who I totally look
cause Artbar today was no faggot. When ba pat tba tenor
saxopboaa ia bis mouth, when
ba strapped tha guitar on, ha
was no faggot. Ha was tba bast
nusiciaa I bad ever hoard aad
probably ever will. So that
started to change ay attitude
a bout that and I started to think
about the names we call people,
last last year, while I was on
tha Stoaes tour, I foaad oat
that Arthur had AIDS. Wbea
wa had a break ia tha tour, I
w*at to see hin at the hospital
aad be weighed about 95 pounds
wbea I saw hin. I went back oa
the tour aad right when tba
oat that Arthur had passed away.
For ne to listen to people to
talk about -God bless AIDS"
aad "faggot tkis" aad "faggot
that" I can't even deal wtth
this shit anymore. I caa Ideal
with it. And I feel the same
way about the word "nigger."
"Nigger" is not somethi ng that
black people invented to call
themselves aad that's it tor
me. I go up to Harlem aH the
time, yoa kaow, I was at the
shopping mall once and I heard
two little kids talkie' to each
othar, a kid Ave years old talkin'
to a kid maybe eight, aad tha
little kid eoas "key nigger tkis"
aad "bay nigger that" aad I
just had to go aad say " where'd
you get thatT" I know alot of
intelligent brothers sayin'
"nigger this"aod"niggerthat",
aua yoa kaow what it means. I
say to them, when yon look at
Malcolm X, Martin Lather King
or Nelson Mandela, do you see
a "nigger"? Then why ara you?
ke T: This is my attitude oa
the whole subject. I'm a nigger
alright, let me tell to yoa why
I'm a aigger. Straight ap. If
you can't get to this, then that's
your business. But this is why
lam. Dae to the fact that white
people ia America today don't
consider me a aigger is similar
to the fact that someone who's
fat who knows they're fat They
say "yo I'm lat." That dilates
the thing. They're gonna call
me a aigger regardless what I
okay, I'm a nigger bow, bat I'm
a aigger with aa attitude, a
aigger with ague. So therefore
I do not realty care, I dilute tha
word "aigger." I gaess I'm a
Bluer because I'm not going
Nona Headiyx: Yoa don't have
to identify with tha oppressor
as tba oppressed.
IceT: It's a state of mind, you
kaow what I'm saying. Malcolm
X ia the eyes of then was a
Nona Headryx: There is no
oppression without consent.
IceT: I understand that I use
the word "nigger" the way I
asa tt. It's my dialect, the way
I use it. I do not asa tt la that
attitude. I'm using it as I'm the
enemy of the people who call
me a aigger aad I want to identify as that
NonaHendryx: Bat they doat
know tkat
SEPTEMBER 1990 23 STUDENTS - WELCOME TO
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M_§_5_3 Some Loves
Something or Other
(White Label)
Regular Discorder
readers might remember a review I did a few years back of
a band who unfortunately have
since broken up. The Stems
were an excellent pop band
from Australia. They released
a dozen or so singles and an
LP, but alas, the band members went their separate ways
about two years ago.
Lead s inger and gui -
tarist Dom Mariani has gotten
things back together with some
new compadres as The Some
Loves. The group carries on
where The Stems left off. With
help from producer
extraordinaire and Let's Active main man Mitch Easter,
The Some Loves make flawless pop akin to the db's.
The LP "Something
or Other" is an excellent combination of the talents of Easter and Mariani. It makes for
one of the best debuts of this
year. Mariani's strong signing
and tune crafting ability produce a bright, shimmering
sound.
Although the LP is
currently only available on
import, hopefully it will soon
be out domestically.
Greg Garlick
Wire
Manscape
(Capitol)
Wire's latest effort
provides a surprisingly refreshing change in sound. Their
last two albums, especially
der what drummer/
horticulturalist Robert
Gotobed's role in Wire has
become.
Though a typically
fine LP for Wire, "Manscape"
does have a major weakness.
I usually dread the annoying
whine of singer/guitarist Colin
Newman and look forward to
the soothing baritone of bassist/singer Lewis. However,
Newman tends to sound quite
pleasant in the melodies he
has created while it is Lewis
who is annoying on this LP.
His vocal technique consists
largely of half-screaming and
talking. Compounding this are
Lewis' pretentious lyrics. I
will be skipping over most of
the tracks on which Lewis
sings. Although I'm left with
only part of an LP, it is comforting to know that "art-pop"
is still alive.
Patrik Sampler
West Coast Rap All-Stars
Introducing the Grand Jury
All-Stars
We're All in the Same Gang
(WEA)
When first receiv ing
this album for reviewing, I
thought to myself, "This should
be interesting." The album
has various west coast rappers
plastered all over the front. I
don't know if whether this is
to mislead you into thinking
that these are the rap artists on
the whole cassette, but if you
look carefully at the small print
at the top of the cover you
soon realise that these west
coast rappers are INTRO-
Michel'le's high
pitched voice is capable when
she sings but as soon as she
speaks, the whole thing seems
like a joke. Appearances by
Ren and Dre are a little disappointing. Their rhymes lack a
steady flow. This may be due
to the absence of Ice Cube,
although Eazy-E pulls through
all right. Interestingly, J.J.
Fad and Sugar & Spice (rival
rap artists) are both present,
stating that they are all in the
same gang.
There is a nice balance of both male and female
rappers although the females
tend to talk about themselves
just a little too much. And
Soula strikes a pose while she
lets her dress fall off for the
exception of those of the West
Coast Rap All-Stars. But considering that this tape goes to
a worthwhile charity to promote education, "We're All in
the Same Gang" is worth supporting.
MC Terror T
Audio Two
I Don't Care
(First Priority Music Fam-
ily/WEA)
Audio Two, never
one of my favourite rap artists, appeared on the First Priority Music Family record
"Basement Flavour" with the
songs "Many Styles" and "Peer
Pressure" in 1988. Well, it's
1990now. This LP has seventeen songs in many different
thought of having to listen to
this sloppy job again is unbearable.
MC Terror T
Shinehead
The Real Rock
(African   Love   Records/
WEA) Unlike Shinehead's
previous album, "Unity," this
album is lacking both musically and lyrically. A first
listening is disappointing, but
repeated plays may allow the
listener to build a tolerance
for a few tunes.
There are quite a
number of love songs that tend
to drag on. The backing sound
is very plain; there isn't the
variety and vibrancy that was
created by Shinehead's old
posse. Bland beats and rhythms
replace what used to be the
ultimate combination.
There are still a few
good positive messages, for
which Shinehead is known. But
as for "the real rock," I don't
think so.
MC Terror T
Unrest
Kustom Kannal
Blaxploitation
(Caroline)
We were expecting
ourownsecondcoming.lt was
going to happen in '86, the
sixth year ofthe decade, like it
had every ten years since
WWII.
We were the fallout
ofthe hardcore revolution that
was still collapsing around us.
The bands that once meant
something had become comi-
are saying that was the year
that the funk came back.) Since
then, I've approached music
with a cynicism that I didn't
think possible for me.
I've just taken the
long way 'round to explain
that it takes a very special
record to get me excited about
rock'n'roll any more. The third
album by Washington D.C.'s
Unrest is such a record.
Guitar, bass and
drums provide a wide pallet:
songs chug-a-lug along or jerk
and screech to a halt only to
give way to a gently rendered
ballad. Singer Mark E. can grit
his teeth and growl out poisonous words or croon lyrics
of teenage want.
What holds this
record together is also the only
similarity Unrest share with
D.C. bands of the Dischord
Records heyday. The songs all
seem to skirt with the theme
of power reclaimed for and by
the self; a notion that hasn't
been shouted this earnestly
since Minor Threat's first
record.
Patient listening is
required, but        "KK
Blaxploitation" has enough
surface richness to reward even
on the first listenings.
Len Morgan
Gwar
Scumdogs of the Universe
(Metal Blade/WEA)
"The record
reviewer's art," explained a
writer friend of mine, "is to
throw all appearance of study
and reason out the window in
"IBTABA," were rather sterile in arrangement; contrived
continuations of "The Ideal
Copy."
With Wire having
finally reached the computer
age, much of the music on this
LP is sequenced. Most shockingly arranged is the song
"Morning Bell," reminiscent
of Momus' "Tender Pervert"
album. This makes me won-
DUCING the Grand Jury All-
Stars.
As expected, the only
song worth listening to is by
the West Coast Rap All-Stars
(such as Ice T, Digital Underground, NWA, etc). The title
track is a compilation of each
rapper bustin' about twenty to
thirty lines of info and personal opinions on the subject
of gang violence.
cassette photo. The lady from
New World Mafia also seems
to have had trouble with the
fitting of her dress. If you
look closely you can probably
see what she ate for dinner!
Not very attractive.
This album depends
on the producers' ability to
provide funky tracks and hip
hoppin' beats. Unfortunately,
the lyrics are lacking, with the
styles, but the first few are
enough to put anyone into a
aggravated frenzy.
With Milk the MC
having the voice of a Smurfette
carrying an extra couple of
pounds and awful lyrics that
just aren't worth listening to,
this album is a waste: a waste
of money, time, energy, and
most of all, sanity. This review would be longer but the
cally redundant overnight. The
only interesting developments
seemed to come out of left
field. Talented folk were
abandoning what at the time
was no longer a movement but
an excuse for welfare dependence and street fighting.
Needless to say,
nothing happened in '86 to
bring all us lost sheep back
together. (In hindsight, people
favour of the hyperbolic."
I, of course, retorted
that it is the music-the actual
subject of the review-and not
the scratchings of critics, that
is of highest import.
A writer's art, no,
duty, is to provide enough information and objectivity for
the lay person to decide whether
CONT'D ON PAGE 27
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|   whine. Their set consisted of
the usual  bonehead metal
classics as "Rapture" and
"Dreaming." Debbie Harry's
a lot better live than
Caustic Thought
lem      Exodus
Suicidal Tendencies
The Commodore
Tuesday, August 14
I wandered into the
Commodore and witnessed
what I thought w as the tail end
£    of Exodus' set. It turned out to
be a local band called Caustic
the Barber."
It became obvious
that Exodus was the next band
up when a crowd of monstrous
hairshakers filled the floor and
started chanting their name.
As a bizarre surprise, Ice-T
came out and introduced the
band. Initially, Exodus created
a wall of distortion. Luckily,
Thought. Imagine a cross between speed metal and Sub-
♦ Pop grunge and you'll have
some idea of what they sounded
like. They pulled it off quite
well and as an added bonus
they churned out a rippin'
version of Nirvana's "Floyd
the sound improved as the set
went on. I'd forgotten how
truly intense the double bass
drumming of a good speed
metal band can be. The lead
singer seems to have drifted
away from the punkish scream
of their first album into a
chants of "You guys are fuckin'
iacs!" and "Vancouver is
the fuckin' best!" but, as the
i attest, the music
was intense. At times the entire ballroom floor was a mass
of thrashing sweaty bodies.
For Suicidal's set, the
metalheads seemed to all but
disappear, replaced by a
slightly younger skaterish
crowd. The level of intensity
continued for this very tight
and very fast set. Thankfully,
they played most of their best
songs, including a large number from their first album. This
is where my bias for hardcore
becomes evident, as I enjoyed
Suicidal's set the most. A great
gig and I didn't expect to like
any of it.
Tom Milne
Escape From New York
PNE Concert Bowl
Friday, August 17th
Escape from New York
could probably best be described as a sort of Woodstock
II for the dressed in black
crowd.
Although the participants - the Tom Tom Club,
Debbie Harry and the mighty
Ramones - have been around
for a long time, Escape avoided
being a nostalgia show. Everybody sounded fresh. Especially the Tom Tom Club, featuring Tina Weymouth and
Jerry Harrison, who are famous for hanging out with that
David Byrne guy. The Tom
Tom Club consists of two drum
kits, two vocalists/dancers,
guitar, bass and keyboards.
They played extremely
danceable and amazingly energetic music. Tina
Weymouth's bass playing was
incredible throughout. They
did trot out some Talking Heads
tunes, such as "Life During
Wartime," but did them with a
great sense of irreverence.
Having Blondie's
"Greatest Hits" in my record
collection, I was happily
bopping along with such pop
I thought it would be and her
band (including Chris Stein)
was very tight. She finished
up with two rave-ups of her
own.
Then came what everybody was waiting for: The
Ramones! With no introduction, they slammed their way
through an hour long aural
assault. Yes, they banged their
way through all their old hits,
"I WannaBe Sedated," "Rock
'n' Roll High School," etc,
which sounded more alive than
some of their recent stuff. It
was easy to get caught up in
the Ramones' wall of noise - a
sign of a good concert.
June Scudeler
CONT'D FROM PAGE 25
to pursue the music further or
not. And a judgement should
only be made after considering that music's contributions
and relative stature within our
cultural wealth. Great records
will always be important no
matter what a critic says. "And
bad records? Hmmm?"
My adversary had
slain me. I could not think of a
single reason why a Jive Bunny
record should be put to a serious
review; or one by David Foster or Andrew Lloyd Webber.
Take your pick.
But isn't it just taste-
that elusive determinant-that
distinguishes good from bad?
Isn't a reviewer displaying
good taste by not bothering to
write more that two words (ie:
"shit sandwich")? Isn't another
critic proving his naivete or
just plain bad taste when line
after line of a review describes
in minute detail the various
inflections lovingly applied lo
the words "baby, baby.'baby"?
You can't judge a
book by its ntfmbdr of pages, I
suppose. Not that I have been
won over to the guerilla rock
critique, but my resistance to
the approach has lessened
somewhat. Here goes:
Gadzooks! The Fab Four' sfirst
platter since Sgt. Pepper's, and
a full twenty years later! What's
that you say? Oh yeah, forgot
to fill you in. So, like, after
recording above-said only-
record-that-ever-mattered-till-
now, our mop-tops were abducted by space aliens (true!)
who dropped them at the South
Pole. Reason being wuz so
they'd unlearn all their evil
ways (their cloned replacements continued the damage,
you'll remember) and return
to make "Scumdogs of the
Universe." Disguised in the
interplanetary zoot-suits ofthe
truly hip, the Beatles have come
back to claim rock eminence
andworld domination as Gwar.
It's all in there. Look and see.
Len Morgan
Nick Cave
And the Ass Saw the Angel
(Black Spring Press)
This is a weird and
wonderful release by Nick
Cave. This latest offering is a
magnificent entry into the
twisted mind of one Euchrid
Eucrow, a sensitive but unfortunately malformed and
mute boy. We meet him as he
tells his tragic (what else??)
story, while slowly sinking to
his death in the swampland
outside his town.
Euchrid is the offspring of several generations
of inbreeding and alcoholism.
'
He grows up in a cane-growing valley controlled by a strict
religious sect called the
Ukulites. Between his crazed
parents and the violent ostracism of the Ukulites, the impressionable Euchrid starts to
lose his proverbial marbles.
The valley is also hit by years
of torrential rains and the
sudden appearance of an
abandoned girl-child who is
not all she seems. All these
forces drive Euchrid farther
into madness and into a final,
cataclysmic act.
This book (OK, I'll
let you in on the secret; this is
a book, not an album!) is quite
unlike anything I've ever read.
Cave uses made-up words that
are so clever that sometimes I
didn't realize they were fabricated. His use of imagery is
superb. Here is Cave's description of the new moon and
what it becomes in Euchrid's
fertile mind: "...asliceoflcmon
rind-a sinister fin menacing
the welkin water's royal pool-
a pellet from the golden fieece-
thcJleaper's tool-agoldenbow
released-a single slipper made
of glass-a lamp cast in gold-a
fold-a gilded horn within a
maiden's gown-a lick-a tongue-
an angry thom-a manger'sroof-
a crib or a cradle-a ladle-a
tooth-all up there, above me
and beyond mah touch. Removed."
This is an extraordinary book, full of magic and
horror, but also of feelings
which everybody can relate
to. For people who want to be
challenged in music or literature, I heartily recommend it.
June Scudeler
KMFDM
UAIOE
(Wax Trax/Cargo)
KMFDM, hailing
from Germany, experiment
with industrial and world beat
music, especially reggae. The
results, such as "Ganja Rock"
and "Rip the System," are
successfully fresh sounding.
KMFDM also seem to be fairly
politically aware. The chorus
of the aforementioned song is
"Black man/White man/Rip the
system." But alas, for the first
two songs on the second side,
KMFDM decide to go the
Ministry route, with displeasing results. Being an avid
Ministry admirer, these songs
do not compare to such Ministry thrashfests as "Never Believe" or "Thieves." These
inferior pseudo-thrash songs
really fall flat after the more
original and experimental
songs on the album and so this
is not the great dance-a-thon
album it could have been.
June Scudeler
SEPTEMBER 1990 27 free clip-and-save reminder
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101.9 fM ■____________________. ____■ ______  _■_.
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What: CiTR's local band competition.
When: Every Monday night September
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Where: The Railway Club, 579 Dunsmuir
Street. Finals at the Town Pump, 66
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Sponsored by:
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CUPING THE  SICK'
VANCOUVER'S HOTTEST BLUES NIGHTCLUB
Sep. 1 The Demons
Sep. 3 Special Afternoon Jam Session - Jack
Lavin & The Demons with Oliver & The Elements
Sep. 4-8 Pinetop Perkins
Sep. 11-15 William Clarke
Sep. 18-22 Sherman Robertson
Sep. 25-29 Ron Thompson
Sep. 3, 10, 17, 24 - Oliver & The Elements
DON'T MISS JACK LA VIN'S JAMS:
SAT. 3-8 PM / SUNDAY BLUES MARATHON JAM SUN. 3 PM-MIDNITE
OPEN EACH NIGHT FROM 9:30 pm -1:30 am OPEN WEEKDAYS FROM 11:30 a
VANCOUVER INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL
Sept. 28 - Oct. 14
CULTIVATED MOVIES!
HUSH A BYE BABY-Music and cameo by Sinead O'Connor
THE KRAYS - Infamous London gangsters
HARDWARE - Features Iggy Pop and music by Thrash
Metallst Simon Boswell
THE DEAD FISH - Midnight Show, eerie synth soundtrack
by Michel Portal
A YOUNG MAN'S DREAM; A WOMAN'S SECRET
- soundtrack by David Byrne
7 38-4567   DANCIN" THRU THE DARK - Liverpool youth, soul music
PROFESSIONAL QUALITY DEMOS
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(604) 687-5803 SEPTEMBER CONCERTS
SATURDAY 1
JR Country presents Stony Plain recording artist TOM
RUSSELL with guest ERIK JOHNSON
SUNDAY 2
CiTR presents from the UK, IRS recording artists PATO
BANTON AND THE REGGAE REVOLUTION with guest PETER
SPENCE
MONDAY 3
CAT'S GAME, CHIEFS OF BELIEF, DOSE PUMP, CURIOUS
GEORGE
TUESDAY 4
MIND THE GAP, THE ALIEN AND THE PSYCHO, BARON
VON FOKKER, JUICE MONKEYS
WEDNESDAY 5
Double Bill • THE PERSUADERS and DEAD HEAD COOL
THURSDAY 6
ONE WORLD with guests GEMINI RISING
FRIDAY 7
TT RACER with guests PUBLIC HOUSE
SATURDAY 8
CiTR presents GAYE BYKERS ON ACID with guests ELVIS
HITLER
SUNDAY 9
MONDAY 10
THE ODDS with guests RAGGED RICH
TUESDAY 11
WEDNESDAY 12
ROCK 1040 presents MCA recording artists MANTEYE with
guests GREENHOUSE
ETHNOCENTRIC BUBBLEHEADS with guests OH YEAH
THURSDAY 13
EMILY STOP
FRIDAY 14 -
SATURDAY 15
ROCK 1040 presents THE SCRAMBLERS with
guests CHANGE OF HEART
SUNDAY 16
MORIS TEPPER formerly of Tom Waits and Captain
Beefheart
MONDAY 17
BIG DEAL, MORTAL PUZZLE, DIRT
TUESDAY 18
From Winnipeg, THE WATCHMEN with Bests Y-KNOT
V>   DNESDAY19
From Toronto, KING APPARATUS (Ska)*
Th   RSDAY20
A Timeless Production, from Seattle, MY SISTER'S
MACHINE and PAISLEY SIN                  *
FRIDAY 21
From Seattle, YOUNG FRESH FELLOW»h guests FIELD
TRIP
SATURDAY 22
Perryscope and CFOX present A&M recAng artist DAVID
BAERWALD
MONDAY 24
AGENT ORANGE
TUESDAY 25
ROCK 1040 presents from the UK, WE/Bcording artists
WEDNESDAY 26
SHAME featuring Norm Rodgers of TV JKnd The
Waterboys with special guests CATHERK WHEEL
Perryscope and CiTR present from the l^BPolyGram
recording artists THEE HYPNOTICS      Wk
THURSDAY 27
From Boston, Relativity recording artist JR> HARVEY with
guests ONE RIDDIM
FRIDAY 28 -
SATURDAY 29
ROCK 1040 presents Enigma/Capitol recording artists THE
FORGOTTEN REBELS with guests TANKHOG
THE
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Witnesses to one of several
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tween 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. "If I hated the mushroom pizza,
I would have SAID *1 hate the
mushroom pizza. I '11 be fucked
if I'm going to have another
piece of the mushroom pizza.'"
Wise words from a
wise woman.
Myself, I didn't even
really taste pizza till I was,
like, twelve, and then it was
Auntie Merle's homemade,
baked up in a big rectangular
pan and served in oblong slabs.
Prior to that, the nearest exposure I'd and to the stuff was
that fateful night of my best
friend's...what was it?...7th?
birthday party. The event had
been hyped out of proportion
way in advance: We were going
to Shakey's!, we were going
to Shakey's!, we were going
to Shakey's!, and we were
going to have PIZZA (which
was at the time scaling a zenith
of coolness and popularity).
And not just pizza, but pizza
with SPARKLERS on top.
Exciting shit. This was a big
enough deal for my peers, but
for me, raised in a staunchly
"Pepper?! I didn't even know
you could BUY that here!"
household, the prospect was
downright mind-warping.
So there I sat in the
yellow Bug, crammed in
amongst my shrieking compatriots, nursing the knot of
anxiety that was a dead weight
in my stomach. Of course on
the outside I made a show of
being cool, urbane, sophisticated (some things never
change), INTO the whole pizza
scene - Hell, if you weren't
into the pizza scene in the '70s,
there was no hope for you...So
that when we arrived at the
promised land, everyone was
a bit taken aback at my refusing
pizza. By this time the whole
vicious cycle - "Oh my god,
I 'm going to have to eat PIZZA,
what if I don't like it, what if
it's weird, (what if it tastes
like pepper), WHAT IF EVERYONE HATES ME BECAUSE OF IT?!?" - had such
a grip on my digestive system
I couldn't have eaten anything,
itchen
B£ANZ
TOOAV
much less pizza. One of my
earliest and most vivid
memories of ineptly trying to
grin and equivocate my way
through an unbearable social
situation.
But okay okay, truth
enough, this isn't Let's Delve
into Viola's Childhood, it's
Hell's darned Kitchen, andl'm
gonna tell you what pizza in
town's worth eating and what
The best pizza for
my money hails from the Greek
Taverna in Surrey, hidden
away at the end of a desolate
early-'80s mall just south of
the Newton Inn. But in
Vancouver, Sunrise Pizza &
Steak House on Commercial
Drive serves up a pretty darn
mean rendition thereof too.
Their vegetarian with feta
cheese, a transcendent eat, is
so lewdly liquid-y that a fellow
connoisseur was prompted to
observe, "It's like, someone
forgot to drain the tomatoes..."
The kooky take-out/delivery
folder offers only a hint of
what awaits inside the actual
restaurant. Eat in sometime;
it's a trip replete with all the
'70s accoutrements from your
most warped nightmares.
Highly recommended.
The Delphi, down
the street and around the corner on Hastings by the Canadian Tire, gives Sunrise a run
for its money, pizza-wise, and
has a really cool,
neighbourhood hangout/publike atmosphere. There's one
of them crazy bead curtains,
nothing more, dividing the
eating area from the kitchen;
the delivery guy runs back and
forth from kitchen to door like
a mad hen; and the proprietor
and a couple regulars sit at the
table in the middle, drinking
red wine and loquaciously
lording it over their smoky
domain. The Caesar salad is
sort of abnormal, but stock up
on the pizza and you can't go
wrong. Reasonable prices too,
eh.
Johnny's Pizza
Factory, with two Granville
St. locations, one in the seedy
end of the Mall and the other
in Marpole, now has a new
outlet on the East Side at the
confluence of Broadway and
Grandview Hwy. While this
one looks relentlessly spartan
inside, with nothing of the
manic she-come-she-go-she of
the little hole-in-the-wall Mall
one, the gods have nevertheless smiled upon my
neighbourhood, as the Johnny's
pizza recipe is nothing to sniff
at. Especially for a 2-for-l
dealie, definitely eatworthy
stuff. And with a delivery menu
that boasts wording like, "You
can order submarines with
same kind of toppings like
pizza,"; well, I say heck, you
can't lose.
Speaking of 2-for-l
pizza, and losing, that segues
well into mention of the big 2-
for-1 places. Panagopoulos,
although edible, actually costs
more than Johnny's, and the
quality, quote-unquote, is inconsistent from location to
location and even from week
to week within the same location. As to the other No. 1
corporate deathpizza, the
Richlerian 222; well, suffice
it to say that I've never tasted
it - one look at the scarifying
photos on their flyer cured me
of any desire to do so. Any
reports from the field, of people
who have actually eaten it and
lived, would be welcome.
As a more or less full-
fledged Drive-ite (whatever
that is), it shames me to admit
that I've never set foot in, or
sunk tooth into, either of the
street's pizza-by-the-slice institutions, Golden Boy's or
Don Giovanni. Every time I
walk by these side-by-side
south of 1st competitors, I'm
tempted; but cheapness is my
downfall and I always tell
myself, "C'mon, don't make
an impulse purchase; you're
only a few minutes from home
and you can make yourself
something to eat when you get
there." Anyway, Golden Boy's
(great name, great logo) offers
the customary piece-of-pie-
shaped wedges, and Don
Giovanninextdoor serves 'em
up in big oblong chunks, like
Auntie Merle. Both places have
a few tables crammed into a3-
by-3 yard space, and are usually occupied by at least a
couple of dreadlocked- or blue-
or no-haired denizens of the
Drive, merrily chowing down.
Damn! Why haven'11 checked
out these places yet? I must be
sick in the head.
Buthey, it'snotasif
I don't already knowof enough
places where my pizza buck is
well-spent. Sunrise, the Delphi,
and the Greek Taverna when
I'm in Surrey should keep my
sufficiency suffuncified, I
reckon. Yours too, eh.
9^—
COOK'S
SPECIAL
FETA CHEESE, TOMATOES, ONIONS
MUSHROOMS, LEAN BEEF, CHEESE
AND TOMATO SAUCE
Sm. 10.95 Med. 13.45 Lg. 15.45
JOHNNY'S SPECIAL
PEPPERONI, BACON, MUSHROOMS, GREEN
PEPPERS, OLIVES, ONIONS, CHEESE
AND TOMATO SAUCE
Sm. 10.50 Med. 13.95 Lg. 16.45
VEGETARIAN
FRESH TOMATOES, MUSHROOMS, OLIVES
GREEN PEPPERS, ONIONS, PINEAPPLE
CHEESE AND TOMATO SAUCE
Sm. 10.15 Med. 13.45 Lg. 15.95
SEPTEMBER 1990 21 * 'WE rvrSTEKYAf<0 Powep.
was rAiNEALorve/x woolo
8E HIS CREATOR and DISCIPLE--) mJne LIMBS ANDFE^TURCS OF THE SAVIOUR
sToWLf Bt6AN TO TAKE SHAPE.. I_ AAAOE.
SORE TOSCH«-FT THtrAObT  BEAUTIFUL
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WAS THE SON OF GOP'  K
SATURDAY 1 HardrockMinersattheRailway.. The
Stealers at the Cruel Elephant..The Tom Russell Band and guest
Erik Johnson at the Town Pump.The Demons atthe Yale. Albert
King and Irma Thomas at the PNE Exhibition Bowl (8:30pm)...
Sue Medley at86 Street .Al Foreman at Hogan's Alley.. RyCooder
and David Llndley at the Orpheum... Spread Eagle at the Rock
Cellar... Breathing Together (7:30pm) and Head (9:15pm) at
PacificCinematheque... Lonely Heart* (7:30pm) and Warm Nights
(9:30pm) at the Starlight Cinema..
SUNDAY 2 CiTR presents IRS recording artist Pato
Banton and Um Reggae Revolution at the Town Puma...Special
afternoon jam session with Oliver and the Elements and Jack Lavin
and the Demons at the Yale... Nardwuar the Human Serviette
Presents Don Wuan'z Fried Carrots with Medusa's Raft, Stagnant
Water, The Evaporators and The Worst at the Arts Club Seymour
(all ages)... Koko Taylor at the Commodore... Sue Medley at 86
Street... Ai Foreman at Hogan's Alley... Count ol the Old Town
(7:30pm) and B (9pm) at Pacific Cinematheque... Young Einstein
(7:30pm) and Crocodile Dundee at the Starlight Cinema..
MON DAY 3 Cat's Gam, Chiefs ol Ballet, Dose Pump.
Curious George at the Town Pump... Barney Bentalland Lava Hay
at the PNE Exhibition Bowl (8:30pm)... Squirrels Live Unit at
Bumbershoot (Seattle)... The Five Blind Boys ol Alabama at the
Vancouver East Cultural Centre (8:30pm)... Oliver and the Ele-
ments at the Yale... Al Foreman at Hogan's Alley... Dogzilla at Klub
Kaos...Classics Night In the Pit Pub, music provided by CiTR...
Count ol the Old Town (7:30pm) and B (9pm) at Pacific
Cinematheque... Grlevious Bodily Harm (7:30pm) and Road
Warrior at the Starlight Cinema..
TUESDAY 4 Mind the Gap. Alien and the Psycho,
Baron Von Fokker, Juice Monkeys at the Town Pump... Pinetop
Perkins at the Yale... The Coca-Cola Kid (7:30pm) and Burke and
Wills (9:30pm) at the Starlight Cinema... World Beat Night at the
Pit Pub, music provided by CiTR...
WEDNESDAYS The Pursuaders and Dead Head
Cool at the Town Pump... Pinetop Perkins at the Yale... Bruce
Caughlan at Hogan's Alley... Hot Wednesdays In the Pit Pub,
music provided by CITR... Films of Iceland with Land and Sons
(7:30pm) and The House (9:20pm) at Pacific Cinematheque... A
Cry in the Dark (7:30pm) and Kangaroo (9:45pm) at the Starlight
THURSDAY 6 One Wortdwith Gemini Rising at the
Town Pump...PinetopPerkinsatthe Yale... LamontHillatHogan's
Alley... Cool Thursdays In the Pit Pub, music provided by CiTR...
Pop Tart Cabaret at the Fringe Club (9pm)... Rims of Iceland with
Land and Sons (7:30pm) and The House (9:20pm) at Pacific
Cinematheque... Kangaroo (7:30pm) and A Cry in the Dark
(9:30pm) at the Starlight Cinema.. The Sixth Annual Fringe Festival opens In the Mount Pleasant community, check the Fringe
Program for details)....
FRIDAY 7 CITR presents night one of OJ SOUND WAR
CHAPTER ONE, Vancouver's first rap competition, at the SUB
Ballroom (7pm, $5)... T.T. Racer and Public Housat the Town
Pump... Jazzmanian Devils and Wall Street at 86 Street.. Pinetop
Perkinsatthe Yale... La mont Hitlat Hogan's Alley... Chris Creighton
Kelly at the Fringe Club (9pm)... Stereo (7:30pm) and Stalker
(8:50pm) at Pacific Cinematheque... Celia opens at the Starlight
Cinema (7:30 & 9:30)... Fringe Festival continues in Mount
Pleasant; check the Fringe Program for details....
SATURDAY 8 CITR presents nighl two of DJ SOUND
WAR CHAPTER ONE, Vancouver's first rap competition, at the
SUB Ballroom (7pm, $5) with guests EQ... CiTR presents Gaye
Bikers on Acid with guests Elvis Hitler at the Town Pump...
Jazzmanian Devils and Wall Street at 86StreeL. Pinetop Perkins
at the Yale... Lamont Hill at Hogan's Alley... Fan tazaa at the Fringe
Club Bandstand... Olrv at the Fringe Club (10:30pm)... Stereo
(7:30pm) and Stalker (8:50pm) at Pacific Cinematheque... Celia
continues at the Starlight Cinema (7:30 & 9:30)... Fringe Festival
continues in Mount Pleasant; check the Fringe Program for
details...
SUNDAY 9 Graftitti with Lovers and Madmen at the
Town Pump... Sheri-D Wilson at the Fringe Club (pm)...
Swedenhielms (7:30pm) and Walpurgis Night (9:15pm) at Pacific Cinematheque... Celia continues at the Starlight Cinema
(7:30 & 9:30)... Fringe Festival continues in Mount Pleasant;
check the Fringe Program for details....
MONDAY 10 That Band Competition from CiTR
Shindig '90 opens at the Railway Club with Bent, Elbore James
and the Vasectomoids... The Oddsand Ragged Rich atthe Town
Pump... Oliver and the Elements at the Yale... Margo Kane at the
Fringe Club (9pm)... Classics Night in the Pit Pub, music provided
by CiTR... Swedenhielms (7:30pm)and Walpurgis Night(9:15pm)
at Pacific Cinematheque. ..Celia continues at the StartightCinema
(7:30 & 9:30)... Fringe Festival continues in Mo _it Pleasant check
the Fringe Program for details....
TUESDAY 11 Manteye with Green House at the Town
Pump... Garnet Rogers at the Vancouver East Cultural Centre
(8pm)... William Clarke at the Yale... ScottTata at the Fringe Club
(9pm)... World Beat Night at the Pit Pub, music provided by
CiTR...Personality Software and Baby Pinsky at Pacific
Cinematheque (8pm)... Celia continues at the Starlight Cinema
(7:30 & 9:30)... Fringe Festival continues in Mount Pleasant;
check the Fringe Program for details....
WEDNESDAY 12  CiTR presents Consolidated
and MC 900 FT Jesus with DJ Zero at the Luv-a-Fair... The
Ethnocentric Bubbleheads and Oh Yeah at the Town Pump...
William Clarke at the Yale... Emily Faryna at the Fringe Club
(9pm)... The Fault at the Fringe Club Bandstand... Hot Wednesdays In the Pit Pub, music provided by CiTR... Films of Iceland with
Outlaw: the Saga of Gisli (7:30pm) and Atomic Station (9:30pm)
at Pacific Cinematheque... Celia continues atthe Starlight Cinema
(7:30 & 9:30)... Fringe Festival continues in Mount Pleasant;
check the Fringe Program for details....
THURSDAY 13 Emily Stop at the Town Pump...
William Clarke at the Yale... Sandra Lockwood at the Fringe Club
(9pm)... Cool Thursdays In the Pit Pub, music provided by CITR...
Films of Iceland with Oudaw:theSagaofGisli(7:30pm)and Atomic
Station (9:30pm) at Pacific Cinematheque... Celia continues at
the Starlight Cinema (7:30 & 9:30)... Fringe Festival continues in
Mount Pleasant check the Fringe Program for details...
FRIDAY 14  Tha Scramblers and Change of Heart at
the Town Pump... Etta James at 86 Street... Wi I liam Clarke at the
Yale... Ancient Cultures at the Vancouver East Cultural Centre...
Elizabeth Fischer at the Fringe Club (10:30)... Sympathy lor the
Devil (7:30pm) and Performance (9:20pm) at Pacific
Cinematheque... Fringe Festival continues In Mount Pleasant;
check the Fringe Program for details....
SATURDAY 15 CiTR presents Death Angel,
Forbidden and Sanctuary atthe New York Theatre... The Scramblers and Change of Heart at the Town Pump... William Clarke
at the Yale... Etta James at 86 Street... Tommy Flanagan Trio at
the Vancouver East Cultural Centre... Spin Doctors at the Fringe
Club Bandstand... Lowell Morris at the Fringe Club (9pm)...
Sympathy for the Devil (7:30pm) and Performance (9:20pm) at
Pacific Cinematheque... Fringe Festival continues in Mount
Pleasant; check the Fringe Program for details...
SUNDAY 16    Moris Tepper at the Town Pump...
Tannahl II Weavers at the WISE Hall (8:30pm)... Andrew Wilson
at the Fringe Club (9pm)... A Woman's Face (7:30pm) and Dollar
(9:30pm) at Pacific Cinematheque... Fringe Festival closes In
Mount Pleasant; check the Fringe Program for details...
MONDAY 17 Shindig '90 continues at the Railway
Club with Picture Paintings, Sun Dog Sun and Toxic Jimmy...
Big Deaf, Mortal Puzzle, Dirtat the Town Pump... Oliver and the
Elements at the Yale... Classics Night in the Pit Pub, music
provided by CITR... A Woman's Face (7:30pm) and Dollar
(9:30pm) at Pacific Cinematheque... Beyond the Fringe opens at
the Vancouver East Cultural Centre...
TUESDAY 18 The Watchmen and Y-Knot at the Town
Pump... Sherman Robertson at the Yale... World Beat Nlghtat the
Pit Pub, music provided by CiTR...Beyond the Fringe continues
at the Vancouver East Cultural Centre...
WEDNESDAY 19 ScrawlandBombshellsatthe
Cruel Elephant... King Apparatus at the Town Pump... Sherman
Robertson at the Yale... UBC Clubz Daze 1990 begins with CITR
presents a free concert by Roosters and Waterwalk on SUB Plaza
(12:30pm)... Hot Wednesdays In the Pit Pub, music provided by
CiTR... Films of Iceland with Magnus (7:30pm) and White Whales
(9:15pm) at Pacific Cinematheque... Beyond the Fringe continues at the Van couverEastCuItu ral Centre... A View from the Bridge
by Arthur Miller opens at Frederic Wood Theatre...
THURSDAY 20 My Sister's Machine and Paisley
Sin at the Town Pump... Sherman Robertson at the Yale... UBC
Clubz Daze 1990 continues with CiTR presents EJ Brule on SUB
Plaza (12:30PM)... Cool Thursdays in the Pit Pub, music provided
by CITR... Beyond the Fringe continues at the Vancouver East
Cultural Centre... A View from Ihe Bridge continues at Frederic
Wood Theatre...
FRIDAY 21 Young Fresh Fellows and Field Trip at the
Town Pump... Tower of Powerat 86 Street.. Sherman Robertson
at the Yale... UBC Clubz Daze 1990 ends with CiTR presents Jody
"Eh/is' Cranston on SUB Plaza (12:30pm)... Crimes of the Future
(7:30pm) and The Mirror (8:50pm) at Pacific Cinematheque...
Beyond the Fringe continues at the Vancouver East Cultural
Centre... A View from the Bridge continues at Frederic Wood
Theatre...
SATURDAY 22 DavidBaerwaldattheTownPump...
Sherman Robertsonat the Yale.JohnHiattat 86 Street. Crimes
of the Future (7:30pm) and The Mirror (8:50pm) at Pacific
Cinematheque... Beyond the Fringe continues at the Vancouver
EastCultural Centre.. AViewfrom the Bridge continues atFrederic
Wood Theatre...
SUNDAY23 OnlyOneNight(7:30pm)andJuneNight
(9:15pm) at Pacific Cinematheque... A View from the Bridge
continues at Frederic Wood Theatre...
MONDAY 24 Shindig -90 continues at the Railway
Club with Baron Von Fokker, Darkling Thrushes and Phineas
Gage... Agent Orangeat the Town Pump... Oliver and the Elements at the Yale... Classics Night in the Pit Pub, music provided
by CITR... Only One Night (7:30pm) and June Night (9:15pm) at
Pacific Cinematheque... A View from the Bridge continues at
Frederic Wood Theatre...
TUESDAY 25 Shame and Catherine Wheal at the
Town Pump... Ron Thompson at the Yale... David "Fathead"
Newman at the Glass Slipper... World Beat Night at the Pit Pub,
music provided by CiTR... A View from the Bridge continues at
Frederic Wood Theatre...
WEDNESDAY 26 CiTR presantsTheeHypnotics
at tha Town Pump... Ron Thompsonat the Yale... Hot Wednes-
noizi r
days in the Pit Pub. music provided by CITR... A View from the
Bridge continues at Frederic Wood Theatre...
THURSDAY 27 Bop Harvey at the Town Pump...
Ron Thompson at the Yale... Cool Thursdays In the Pit Pub, music
provided by CiTR... A View from the Bridge by Arthur Miller
continues at Frederic Wood Theatre...
FRIDAY 28 The Forgotten Rebels and Tankhog at the
Town Pump... Ron Thompson at the Yale... Garbo's Hat and
Lunar Adventures at the Glass Slipper (9pm)... Rainforest Benefit
II with speakers Dr. David Suzuki, Dr. Wade Davis,. Miles
Richardson, Thorn Henley and Adrlana Carr and music by Doug
and the Slugs, Jim Byrnes, Long John Baldry, Ann Mortifee.
Murray McLachlan and Celso Machado at the Hotel Vancouver...
Vancouver International Film Festival opens until October 14...
A View from the Bridge by Arthur Miller continues atFrederic
Wood Theatre...
SATURDAY 29 The Forgotten Rebels and Tankhog
at the Town Pump... Ron Thompson at the Yale... Paul Plimley
Group and Chiel Feature at the Glass Slipper (9pm)... Vancouver
International Writers Festival Preview Event with Alice Munro at
the Arts Club Granville Island... A View from the Bridge continues
at Frederic Wood Theatre...
SUNDAY 30   Betty Carter at the Commodore...
SPACES  SPACES  SPACES
Anza Club 3 West 8th Street
Arcadian Hall main floor, 2214 Main Street
Arts Club Granville Island Granville Island
Arts Club Seymour 1181 Seymour Street
Cambrian Hall 215 East 17th Avenue
Cinderella Ballroom 185 East 11th Avenue
Commodore Ballroom 870 Granville Street
Community Arts Council 837 Davie Street
Cruel Elephant 1176 Granville Street
86 Street Music Hall BC Enterprise Centre
Firehall Arts Centre 260 East Cordova Street
Frederic Wood Theatre 6454 Crescent Road, UBC
Fringe Club 3rd floor, 2655 Main Street
Grunt Gallery 209 East 6th Avenue
Heritage Hall 3102 Main Street
Hogan's Alley 730 Main Street
Kitsilano Community Centre 2690 Larch Street
La Quena Coffee House 1111 Commercial Drive
Main Dance Place upstairs, 2214 Main Street
Mt Pleasant Community Centre 3161 Ontario Street
Pacific Cinematheque 1131 Howe Street
Pit Pub                            basement, Student Union Building
Railway Club 579 DunsmuirStreet
Ridge Theatre 3131 Arbutus Street
Starlight Cinema 935 Denman Street
Station Street Arts Centre 930 Station Street
Studio 58                     Main Building, Langara Campus, VCC
Student Union Building 6138 SUB Boulevard, UBC
SUB Ballroom second floor, Student Union Building
SUB Plaza south side, Student Union Building
SUB Theatre                     main floor, Student Union Building
Tom Lee Music Hall 929 Granville Street
Town Pump 66 Water Street
Underground Broadway & Kingsway
Van. East Cultural Centre 1895 Venables Street
Vancouver Little Theatre 3102 Main Street
White Crane Studio 2440 Main Street
WISE Hall 1882 Adanac Street
Yale 1300 Granville Street
=r-r-_hv-i^i
im im
And,
Available NOW via some cool record stores. Phone (604)274*4828 ifyou can't
find it and we'll hook you up with a copy.     . ^$   •
More merchandise is on the way so keep an eye out for it.  [nri 006.
Tip]
SEPTEMBER 1990 35 WEA/DGC
._■_■__■ ■.•]; [fin ;_._•_•_•_•_, m *•* ■:•_•
SonlcYo-th 4Vx
Jello Bistre _ DOA.     Last Scream ol aa Mttsatg
at      -  Emtammeat
Lights... Camart... Rmokttloa C8S/Epk
Urban Daaci Sqaad
at—tat float lor Oat Slob*
BM(V Arista
Sfrawbam-7.ota
Cart, Flown. Ttmphoa**
BMG/RCA
Foetus Mc.
Smk
Car|(VWax Trai
KMFDM
MM
WaiTrn
Skin Yard
Flat Shot Cheeks
C«go/Cnu
Lm "Scratch" Perry
From th* Sacrat Labratorr
MCA/bland
XClm
To th* Fast, Black waits
MCA/4-1 _ B'way
H«t**p
Brie* br Brick
A*M/Vkgla
Stoaapla' Toa Coeeor*             * Proad Canadian
Capttol/EMI
Lhrybr Llaethoa
B*T
Concrete/Pinpoint
Shinehead
Tea Heal Rock
WEA/Afrkaa Love
Sbaaalers
1$
CBS/tpIc
Untamed Youth       Wore Goaa Caxsars trom 0>e Untamed Youth            Norton
Change ol Heart
Soapbox
C»jo
Lake Featuring The 2 Lhre Crew Banned la tha U.S.A.
WEAAuke
Various Artists
Holland Hocks MM5 Sampler
Pkouograau BV Holland
Cabaret Voltaire
Groovy, Laldback mt Hast,
Capltol/EMI
Clock DVA
Tba Act
WaiTrax
Various Artists
The Joha Zorn Radio Hour
WEA
Various Artists
Sound Bites trom tha Counter Culture                  Atlantic
Bolt's Your Duel*
Tai* ot2 Lags
Dr. Dream
MOM
Haad/Dowa
Nettwerk
Jack Kerouac
Tha Jack Kerouac Collection Capltol/Enlgma/Wor Id Beat
De*o
Smooth Boodle Maps
Capltol/Enlgma
HDV
Sax, Drugs * Violence
CBS/lsba
Various Artists
Wera All la lha Same Gang
WEA
Mark Stewart Metatroa
Neville Brothers Brothers Keeper UM
Maalathlnl&theManotella...    Parts Sowtn PolyGraaVUrbaa Africa
IbWMMoe All the Statt (ami Mora) Vamma tma *• WEA/Sbe
CotthBrua* Rupture C/Z
Rest hi Pieces
Load mm Plowed ami... live!
UadarMrSkm Roadrunaar
Victims at tba Mixing Om* Volume 1 Vis lo.
Philip Perkles     Shapiro, Varmaar, Florida ami Saa Francisco Fee Musk
Various ArtIsts                     Celebrate tha Sonic Arts ana Hrtt
Shadowy Moe oa a Shadowy... Savvy Show Stoppers CargrVJetpac
Stereo MCs                              The Stereo MCs          MCA/4 th 8. B'way/Gea St
Estrus
New Alliance
MCA/Is land/Mango
Ginger Baker
Mlddla Passage
MCA/lsland/Mango/Ailon
Seap!
World Power
BMG/Arista
F.U.C.T.
Dlmaaslonal Depth Par caption                        Car ty le
Negazhwe
Tha Wild Bunch/tar Ir Days                        Wa Bite
Bad Br alas
Th* rmm Ara Getting Restless                       Carolina
Haywire
Private Hell
We Bite
Le Mystera ia Vobt Bulgar «     A Cathedral Concert
PolyCram/Phllips
Ala la T). loan It
von
SRI/Dltreska 1 Media
Joha Doe
Meal John Do*
WEA/DGC
Dead Milk man
Metaphysial Giattlttt
Capltol/Enlgma
Steel Pole Bath
bb                       tare*
Shartse College of Gaodaa...    Tibetan Buddhism
Bridge
Various Artists
Hot World
Sonet
Paleface
Backlash
Final Not ke
MarkLanegaa
Tba Winding Sheet
SubPop
Deee-Lite
Sampla-Dellc
WEA/Elektra
MCJacooie
SoLlstm
Capltol/CEC
Carl Stone
FourPlecas
Electro Acoustic Musk
Master Aca
Take a Look Around
WEA/Reprlse/CoM Chlllln'
Billy Bragi
The Internationale
PotyGramAltlllty
Mail Priest
Bonatide
A4M/Vlrgln
Eric B _ Rakhn
Let the Rtirtbm Hit-am
MCA
Various Artists
Music ol Harrr Partch
CRI
Holly Cole Trio
Ski Taat
Capitol/Alert
Guilt Parade
Coprophobla
Fringe
Ever last
ForeverIter las tin'
WE A/Rhyme Syndicate
Patrkk Street
blsh Times
Green Linnet
Dwarves
Blood, Guts mt Pussy
SubPop
TheFartz
You. We See You Coming
Empty
Third World
Serious Business
PolyGranVMercury
The Jody Grini
Oaa Maw's Trash ts Another Mat's Treasure           DB Recs
Mano Negra
Putas Fever
ASM/Virgln
The Brown Album
Land ol the Damned
The Greg Johnson Set The Watertable
Task Shock
Alai
WE A/Slash
Eggplant Monkeybars
Gang Green Cant Live Without It
Chaba Fadela A Cheb Srtraqul     Hana Han a
House of Large Sizes Haat Miser
Modern Vending One Bat Peccary
WIM Flowers Tales Like These
TheWarratahs Too Hot tor Sleep...
LaMuertre Death Race 2000                               Wai Trax
Mallow Man Aca Escape trom Havana                                Capitol
Enor Asphalt Paradise                          Desert Engine
3-D Invisibles They Wool Star Beat!                      Neurotic Bop
Ass Ponys Mr. Superlove                                       Okra
DaK. Davlg U ■ Lucttuge                       Def American
Judy Nylon Pal Judy                Reach-Out International
Hi: Ii]:, 0 4 ;*fem*mm'¥XmWmXi&9 WIi__l
36 DISCORDER
■■111:1 •IXtmmmm.
ARE YOU SERIOUS? MUSIC 8:00AM-
12:00PM
The newest new music: Ugetl.
Dhomont. Schittke. Lutakowskl.
Blrtwistte. Information on concerts,
recordings, composers. Paul B.A.
Steenhuisen and Ian Crutchtey al-
tematlng weeks.
THE BRUNCH REPORT 12:00-
12:15PM
News, sports, weather and more
with the CITR News. Sports and
Weather Departments.
THE ROCKERS SHOW 12:15-3:00PM
Reggae. Roc k Steady and Ska with
George Barrett.
THE SUNDAY NEWS MAG 5.00-
5:30PM
CiTR's In-depth current affairs/news
magazine show. Coverage and
analysis of UBC News plus news
and sports, dally editorial commentary, entertainment reviews
and reports on events here at UBC.
all In a comprehensive and comprehensible magazine package.
And we promise, no traffic reports.
HEARSAY 5:30-6:00PM
CiTR's literary arts program needs
YOU to submit your works for on-alr
performance or reading (by you
or us, your choice).
ELECTRONIC SMOKE SIGNALS/DECOMPOSITIONS 4:00-8:00? M
Information, news. Interviews, political analysis from the global cultures of resistance hosted by
Horaclo de la Cueva, alternating
Sundays with eclectic music and
caustic alphabets/spoken word.
RADIO FREE AMERICA 10:00PM-
12:00AM
Join host Dave Emory and colleague Nip Tuck for some
extraodinary political research
guaranteed to make you think
twice. Bring your tape deck and
two C-vOs. Originally broadcast
on KFJC (Los Altos, CaWornia).
m\\%m^K\>JLY^m\\%m
THE MORNING SHOW 7:308:15AM
From the famous siren to Ihe not-
so-famous BBC Radio News Reel,
wake up with the CITR Moming
Show. Information to go: news,
sports, weather and 'scenic view'
reports, features, entertainment
reviews and Alberta hog prices.
Not for anger and despair, but for peace and a kind of home.
Suicide note of Lewis Hill, founder of KPFA Berkeley - 1957
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS 8:15-
11:00AM
Are you blue?  Get Brown!   Your
favourite brownsters James and
Peter offer a savoury blend of the
familiar and exotic in an excitingly
luscious blend of aural delights!
Tune in and enjoy each weekly
brown plate special.
THE AFTERNOON REPORT    1:00-
1:15PM
News, sports and weather.
THE CITR DINNER REPORT   5:00-
5:30PM
See Sunday for details.
SPORTS DIGEST 5:30-6:00PM
Join the CiTR Sports Department
for all the latest in Thunderbird
varsity sports action and sports
everywhere else for that matter!
FACING THE MUSIC 6:00-8:OOPM
A music/Informational hour with
an emphasis on topics related to
awarenessandsanity. HostWayne
Davis.
BOXER SHORT BOYZ 7:00-9:0OPM
Wear boxer shorts and walk with
confidence. Jerome Broadway
and Garnet Timothy Harry alternate weeks.
THE JAZZ SHOW 9:00PM- 12:00AM
Vancouver's longest running prime
hme jazz program. Hosted by the
ever-suave Gavin Walker. Features at 11.
3rd Parallel Realities with three
virtuosos Pat Metheny. Herbie
Hancock and Jack DeJohnette in
an ego-free collective. Ths group
opened this summer's Montreal
ARE YOU
SERIOUS
MUSIC
ELECTRONIC
SMOKED/DECOMPOSITIONS
ONE STEP
BEYOND/RADIO
FREE AMERICA
^COHERENCY
BREAKFAST
WITH THE
BROWNS
MOOO-ZICK
__B.ui.ui 11:
WEEKLY
SHINDIG 90
WINNERS
ANNOUNCED
HERE
KERENTAFFEHRZ
■HM-aFJ-WJW   >*_f„*l:M:l.«*_:EI
SUMTHIN' NICH
PERMANENT
CULTURE
SHOCK
OPEN
COUNTRY
JOY/OPEN
SEASON
TOP O'DA BOPS
UVE FROM
THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
[___I_1__]_]
NOISE TWO
H__C2________
Jazz Festival.
10th The Unheard Mingus: Part 1 of
rare broadcast tapes by the
Charles Mingus Jazz Workshop.
Bassist and composer Mingus leads
Booker Ervin (tenor). Toshiko (piano) and others in one session and
Pepper Adams (baritone) and
Charles MacPherson (alto) In another.
17th What Is Jaz_? School time: an
educational and often humourous
look at what Jazz Is and what It
Isn't. Narrated by Leonard
Bernstein who plays piano and
sings(?) along with examples by
well known Jazz players.
24th The Unheard Mingus: Part 2.
More rare broadcast tapes by two
editions of Mingus' Jazz Workshop.
___M i i J 4-1 »J: Yt--_B__-_.
THE MORNING SHOW 7:30-8:15AM
See Monday for details.
THE AFTERNOON  REPORT    1:00-
1:15PM
See Monday for details.
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE     1:15-
3:00PM
Country music to scrape the
cowshlt off your boots to. With yer
host-poke Jeff Gray.
THE UNHEARD MUSIC 3:00-5:00PM
Demo Director Dale Sawyer provides some insight into the best
and the worst of the newest Canadian music.
THE CITR DINNER REPORT 5:00-
5:30PM
See Monday for details.
B.C.FOLK 5:30-7:00PM
The thoughts and musk: of B.C.
•folk' artists, hosted by Barb
Waldern and Wayne Davis.
AVANT PIG 7:00-9:00PM
Avant-garde thuggery with Pete
Lutwyche.    First Tuesday each
month: World Music Exploration.
■■■ 11 ire-iii ,. _■
THE MORN ING SHOW 7:30-8:15AM
See Monday for details.
THE AFTERNOON REPORT    1:00-
1:15PM
See Monday for details.
PAULA'S MUG 3:0O-5:0OPM
The only alternative to KLYN.
THE CITR DINNER REPORT   5:00-
5:30PM
See Monday for details.
7
8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
4
5
KERENTAFFEHRZ
KERENTAFFEHRZ
HOME VIDEO
INTERNATIONAL
THE NEW
AFRICAN
SHOW
7
8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
4 JIGGLE 7:00-9:00PM
Mlkey's here, Gavin's here. Six
years of combined DJ experience.
40 years of lovin' experience.
Games, hiking, drugs, orgies. Impetuous banter: an adolescent
paradise.
PERMANENTCULTURESHOCK 9:00-
12:00AM
Permanent Cper-md-ndnt): lasting,
intented to last, indefinitely
Culture Ckdl-chdr): (1) the
civilisation of a given race or nation
at a given time or over all time; (2)
the raising of microorganisms In
specially prepared media for scientific study.
Shock Cshdk): (1) violent collision,
concussions; (2) sudden and disturbing mental and physical Im-
______ I: HI ;M«7:V*----_b_B
THE MORNING SHOW 7:30-8;15AM
See Monday for details.
NOWYOUHAS JAZZ 8:15-10:00AM
Jazz with Tommy Paley.
HANFORD NUCLEAR PIZZA PIE
10:00-11:00AM
Rowena's moving.   She doesn't
know where. Any suggestions?
THE AFTERNOON REPORT    1:00-
1:15PM
See Monday for details.
FLEX YOUR HEAD 3:00-5:0OPM
 HARD JINX	
 ERIC CORE	
THE CITR DINNER REPORT   5:00-
5:30PM
See Monday for details.
ARTS CAFE 5:30-6:00PM
Be updated, be with it, be informed
about Art, theatre, film and any
other cultural event happening in
Vancouver. WithAntjel
TOP OF THE BOPS 6:00-7:00PM
Musical chef Marc Coulevln bolls
up a tasty pot of gumbo stew.
1 c. rockabilly fools
'    2 tbsp. wild western-swingers
2 tbsp. rompin' R&Bers
4 tsp. jumpin bluesmen
3 tsp. country swingers
a pinch of doo wop
a zest of cajun and zydeco
and a dash of surfin' intros
Stir well and simmer. Bonappetit!
I    OUT FOR KICKS 7:00-9:00PM
Wild beat protest youth with Pat
UVE FROM THUNDERBIRD RADIO
HELL 9:00-11:00 PM
Local music played by Adam, Ed,
Tom, Janis and Andy from 9 to 10.
Live bands from lOto 11. Shindig!!!!
| 6th The Nlghtstalkers debuting
tunes from their new cassette
Cloud 9 in Outer Space
13th Tune in and find out why
Dogzllla is CiTRs most requested
band
201h Tonight, The Logic Conspiracy helpingCiTRcetebrateUBC
Clubz Daze 90
►   27th AuntAcldbringlngyou'spray
paint punchy rawk*
SOUND OF REALITY    11:00PM -
1:00AM
Experimental Radio, with Vision!
featuring environmental sounds,
found noises, information/propaganda and the world'sethnic and
h experimental musics from the auditory fringe. Live! Contributions
welcome. Practitioner: Anthony
Roberts.
MEGABLAST! 1:00-4:00 AM
Compact discs and concepts on
autorepeat, band specials, turntable feedbackgammon courtesy
at. uncle mifty, stagnating creativity:
welcome to late night radio where
the Ghetto Boys are considered
artistic.
____-_■ -Til »7'V*r»___wa__l
MOV1NG IMAGES 10:30-11:00AM
Join host Ken Maclntyre as he takes
you on a tour through the silver
screen's back lot of live with film
new* reviews. Interviews and
soundtracks.
THE VENUS FLYTRAP SHOW
11:00AM- 1:00 PM
Greg Elsie is your guide through
these two hours of music and fun.
Tons o' new tunes. And disco too!
THE AFTERNOON REPORT 1:00-
1:15PM
See Monday for details.
ITS NOT EASY BEING GREEN  1:15-
2:30PM
The greenest of the CITR DJ crop
try to germinate and take root on
the air. Ifyou are interested In CITR
programming opportunities, call
the Program Director at 228-3017.
ABSOLUTE VALUE OF NOISE PART
ONE2:30-3:30ANDPARTTWO4:00-
5:00PM
Found sounds, tape loops, compositions of organised and
unorganised auralify. power electricians and sound collage: 100%
Canadian Industrialism.
NARDWUAR THE HUMAN SERVIETTE
PRESENTS... 3:30-4:00PM
Keep on rocking In the free world.
THE CITR DINNER REPORT 5:00-
5:30PM
See Monday for details.
HOME VIDEO INTERNATIONAL 6:00-
9:00PM
Movies remixed for radio. Taping
this program is strictly prohibited.
FOR THE RECORD 6:30-6:45PM
Excerpts from Dave Emory's Radio
Free America Series.
HOMEBASS 9:00PM- 12:30AM
Turn your home into your very own
club.   Get out your flared pants,
put on your dancing shoes and
prepare yourself for 3 1 /2 hours of
house, new beat and a little disco
and rap thrown in to liven things
up. Dope jams and fresh beats for
a groovy evening with DJ Noah on
fhe wheels of steel.
a_.BE f \ iU il»7:V_: ___■
THE SATURDAY EDGE 6:00AM-
12:00PM
Steve Edge hosts Vancouver's
biggest and best acoustic/roots/
rogue folk music radio show. Now
initssixthyearonCiTR! Roots music
from around the world, new releases , studio guests. and the World
Cup Football Report at 11:30.
THE BRUNCH REPORT 12:00-
12:15PM
News, sports, weather and an appropriate amount of more.
POWERCHORD  12:15-3:0OPM
Vancouver's only true metal show
with the underground speed to
mainstream metal; local demo
tapes, imports and other rarities.
Gerald Rattlehead and Metal Ron
do the damage.
IN EFFECT 3:00-5:00PM
The Hip Hop Beat brought to you
by DJ's Somethin' Smooth, BZ Jam
and Chazzy B.
THE SATURDAY MAG 5:00-5:30PM
See Monday for details.
THE YAP GAP 5:30-6:00PM
Hear figures in the Arts world talk
about their works, other people's
works and anything else that occurs to them. Hosted by Antje
Rauwerda.
THE NEW AFRICAN SHOW 8:00-
10:00PM
World of Africa Dance Party
We welcome each other home
We the children of Africa
and
We welcome you
All you of the other heritages
Of our beautiful world
In peace, harmony and oneness
To our house party
Welcome.
THE ELECTRIC ENEMA l:00-4:0OAM
The Cosmic Cat and Mrs. Needles
are off on another adventure.
Lotsa guitars and fast music. Don't
shower alone.
___*VHSII___n
C iTR provides free airtime for Community Access by groups and individuals. Ifyou oryour group would
like to say something to someone
somewhere, please call the Program Director.
_■___■ '/•; m>; -a_____«
CiTR wants you to become involved wifh your friendly UBC Radio Station which broadcasts at
1800 watts to the campus and
beyond. Opportunities abound!
Wheeee! Programming, producing, editing, writing, engineering,
operatating, announcing, hosting,
etc etc. Come by the studios during normal business hours. Or
phone us.
______■ VJSL'Ji'jrfrmmmWm
ARTS ANTJE RAUWERDA
DEMOS/CASSETTES DALE SAWYER
ENGINEER RICHARD ANDERSON
EXECUTIVE ENGINEER
ADAM SLOAN
MOBILESOUND LINDASCHOLTEN
MUSIC
LLOYD ULIANA. RANDY IWATA
NEWS KIM TRAINOR
PRESIDENT ROBYNN IWATA
PRODUCTION MIKE LYSENG
PROGRAMMING RANDY IWATA
SECRETARY JOELFRANSEN
SPORTS JEFF PATERSON
STATION MANAGER
LINDA SCHOLTEN
TRAFFIC TOMMY PALEY
VICE PRESIDENT
BARBARA ELGOOD
VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR
BILL BAKER
mmm**** i;:>l._____■
BUSINESS UNE 604/228-3017
DJ UNE 604/228-2487 (228-CiTR)
NEWS UNE 604/222-2487 (222-CiTR)
FAX UNE 604/228-6093
ENVOY ID CITR.FM
STAND IN UNE ROOM 233.
SECOND FLOOR OF THE STUDENT
UNION BUILDING. 6138 SUB BOULEVARD. UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA, VANCOUVER. BC.
CANADA V6T2A5
mjjbttiiwi'MWium
CiTR presents the first annual rap
contest to be hetd on the 7th and
8th of September in the SUB Ballroom here on the UBC Campus!
Categories: MC... DJ... dancers...
groups.... Prizes for the various
categories include recording time
courtesy of Profile Studios and Rad
Studios, gift certificates from Zulu.
Odyssey. Rhythm Zone and Barrett
Electronics, subscriptions to
StreetSound Magazine, equipment from Gemini and an opening spot for an out-of-town rap act
produced by Perry scope. Allages!
With special guests EQ. For more
information, call CiTR at 228-3017.
mmmW~-i: IISI >1 /> */'_■■
That local band competition is
back. CiTR is in the process of
organising Shindig 90. the live band
competition to be held this fall at
the Railway Club (579 Dunsmuir).
Bands interested in entering Shindig
90 should submit a cassette to the
Shindig Coordinator complete with
bio and phone numbers. For more
information, call 228-3017.
WII:I**iVI--r'4>7ir*4m
UBC's big clubs extravaganza takes
place from Wednesday September 19th to Friday September 21st
on the UBC Campus. CiTR is cel
ebrating Clubz Daze wtth noon-
hour concerts on the SUB Plaza
from 12:30.
19th Rallied Rooster* and
Waterwalk
20th E.J. Brule from Montreal
21st Jodie "Elvis-Cranston
Be sure to drop by the CiTR booth
on the main floor of the Student
Union Building.
Preparations for the third annuai
CiTR Week are now in full swing.
Taking place on the UBC Campus
during the third week of November, the week-long event completely produced by CiTR promises to be an extravaganza of fun
and frivollfyfor your ears, your eyes
and your nose. Stay tuned to these
pages, the radio and your local
poster board for more details!
UmWHli;e^-J>l;t^mmm
Once again, that crack CITR Sports
Team will be covering the UBC
Thunderbird in action in selected
ice hockey, football and basketball varsity games. Play-by-play
action pre-empts regular CiTR.
FOOTBALL
Saturday September 8th at 7:30pm
vs Simon Fraser University
Saturday September 29th at
2:00pm vs. University of Manitoba
Saturday October 6th at2:00pm vs.
University of Saskatchewan
Saturday October 20th at 7:30pm
vs. University of Alberta
Saturday November 3rd at 1:00pm
vs. University of Calgary
ICE HOCKEY
Friday October 19th at 7:30pm vs.
University of Regina
Sunday November 4th at 1:30pm
vs. Univeristy of Manitoba
Friday November 23rd at 7:30pm
vs. University of Brandon
Friday January 18lh at 7:30pm vs.
University of Alberta
Saturday February 2nd at 7:30pm
vs. Unrversityof Lethbridge
Friday February 6th at 7:30pm vs.
University of Saskatchewan
Friday February 22nd at 7:30pm vs.
University of Calgary
BASKETBALL
Friday November 2nd at 7:30pm
vs. Simon Fraser University
Saturday  November   17th  at
8:00pm     vs.      University     of
Saskatchewan
Friday November 30th (time TBA)
vs. University of Victoria
Saturday December 1st (time TBA)
vs. University of Victoria
Saturday January 12th at 8:00pm
vs. University of Lethbridge
Saturday January 26th at 8:00pm
vs. University of Alberta
Saturday February 9th at 8:00pm
vs. University of Calgary
B.C. High School Basketball Final
Saturday March 16th, time to be
announced.
CWUAA playoff schedules to fol-
MMVa/M/>__■_-_■
CiTR welcomes all forms of aural
expression with open ears. If you
want to submit any material, just
remember to include important
details like names, phone numbers.addresses,etc. Send/address
your stuff to the attention of the
Music Department please.
On these pages, you will find three
separate charts indenfifying the
most played new releases and
other keen material CiTR has received in the past little while. The
charts areorganised according to
relative airplay from information
supplied by programmer
playsheets. For more information
on CiTR's broadcast of musical expression, please contact the music department or the individual
programmers.
r tiles
-1: [•]:*__».:.•_•_■_ *1-1 • __■______■_■
"Votowla" ir
PolyGram/4AD
koT
-Dkk Tracy- ir
WEA/Sk*
Jane's Addiction
"StopTTnreeDayrir
WEA
-One Love" ir
BMG/Sllvertone
ConsolMatod
"Dysfunctional" ir
Nettwerk
Happy Monday.
"Step On" ir
PolyGram/Fnctory
DkklOM
Tm a ManVSaddle Trnmp" 7"
SubPop
Henry Rollins
-1 Know Yon" r
SubPop
Queen Lntlf nh & De la Soul "Manja Own Birth to tho..
-ir          Tommy Boy
Mudhoney
'You're Gone7"You Make Me Ole"
r                  SubPop
Hilt
"Stoneraan" ir
Nettwerk
MIchleMee
"Jamaica. Funk" ir
WEA/Flrtt Priority
Industrial Artz
"Psychotic Reaction" ir
Squid Brothers
Young Gods
Longue Route7"September Song"
r        Cargo/Wan Trax
Poison Clan
"The B"*hThntl Hate" ir
Lake
They Might Be Giants  "Istanbul (Not Constantinople)"
CO EP      WEA/Elektra
Stetsasook
Lamia
Legend** Pink Dot
"Anytime Anyplace" ir
Tommy Boy
l         "Princess Coldheart" 12"               Cargo/Win Tm
EQ
"Put Your Body k IT ir
laf la tie Beat
Nitzer Et*
"Getting Closer" ir
DGC
Poison Iden      "Just to Get AwayVKkk out tha Jams" r   America. Leather
Heart Throbs
"Dream Time" CO single
WEA/Elektra
Foetus lac.
-Butterfly Potion" ir
Cargo/Wax Trux
Was (Not Was)
"Papa Was a Rolling Stone" 12"       PolyGram/Fontaaa
Frontline Assembly
"keolata" ir
Cargo/Wax Trax
Inspector 12 b/w Libido Boyz         Spirt r
Family Fast
Face Value
Coming ot Age r FP
Conversion
Bke Aeroplane*
"...And Stones" CD single
MCA/Chrysulls/Ensl|u
Black Bra
"Everybody Everybody" ir
BMG/De Construction
New Order
"World h Motion" ir
PolyGram/Fnctory
tee Cube
"Amnrlkkka's Most Wanted" ir                      Priority
LunachIcks        "Cookie Monster~rCompllcstloa" 7"
Blast First
"Heatseeker" ir
Cargo/Wax Trax
Network
"Walk Like Sex" ir
Musk Dome
Poison Mna
"DlscontenrrJallhouse Stomp" 7*       American Leather
Marble Orchard   "Something HappensT'Ever Think About Me?" 7"       Estrus
Sockeye b/w Choozy Sensation       Split r
Family Fast
Above the Law
"Untouchable" ir
CBS/Epk/Ruthkss
Hammsrbra
-Kept House-r
Big Fla mlng Ego
Nitzer Ebb
"lightning Man" ir
DGC
Accused b/w Morphuls                  Split r
Empty
Janes
"How Was It for Your ir
Poly Gram/Fon tana
Afro's
"Feel IT ir
CBS/Rush
Pare Joy
Soto Throte Dead Boat TIP
No Throe*
Charlatans
"Tha Only One 1 Know" ir
PolyGram/Sltuatlon 2
The Creep*
"Ooh—1 Like It!" ir
WEA/Allantlc
Chill Rob 0
"The Power" ir
Electric/Somersault
Goober Petrol b/w Vehicle Derek    Spilt 7* EP
Bon Tuneage
Suckspeed
"StormbrlngerTStep Out" T
We Bite
»1i:[t_q-4i,jr:l'i:i4i[HIJ:l;.r£*i^i:i-^_tlt__|
The Picasso Sot
"Bitter Lemon"
3-song demo cassette
Rocket 88
"Gimme Some Action"
2-song demo cassette
Watch Children
"Kinda Retarded"
9-song demo cassette
Roots Roundup
"Boulderdash"
Get Rooted!
Tankhoj
"Reptlllon"
2-song demo cassette
Rattled Roosters
-57 Cadillac"
Get Wilt!
Off**!
"Long Face"
Bright Red Paint
Headstart!
"Calling You
demo cassette
Furnaceface
'll l*eo"
Lelrt Down
Trembling Mlmsles
"Got Weir
George J els ons Karma
Jazzmanian Devils
"One Scotch, One Bourbon, One
BaoT         Happy Hour
Honest Joha
"Still Missing You"
1 Track Madness
UMS
"Middle East"
"Middle East"
Dogzllla
"0k Mauer"
"Die Manor
Foreign Factor
"Thanks 4 the Ride"
"Thank* 4 the Ride"
Nuclear Holocats
"Mister X-TA C"
"Mister X-TA C"
Joloka
"Aviary (1) Crow"
Joloka
Memory Day
"Addiction and Devotion"
demo cassette
Jazzmanian Devils
"X Ray Cat"
Happy Hour
Opposite* Attract
"Mother Nature"
1981
Sadhappy
"Social Retard"
Sideways Laughing
Donald Campeau
"Alter a While"
Pen Pals
Myk Gordon
"World s Little Me**- The Emperor's Bot Ho Clothes
Darkling Thrushes
"Hall of Souls"
4-song demo cassette
Glee
"Vancouver"
"Vancouver"
Howe Sound
-Somebody Girl"
4-song demo cassette
Steve Adams
"Rage aad Ancient Times"
demo cassette
Baton
"Complacency Will Devour U("                    Baton 2
The Mint 100
"Summer of Discontent"
5-song demo cassette
Bacteria
"Industry"
demo cassette
Voi Popull
"Sorry"
Ot Beyond Zebra
Common Language
"Dead White Horse"
Common Language
Nellie's Room
"Bleed for Me"
demo cassette
Baron Von Fokker
"Beads of Cholesterol"
live on CITR
Jimmy Roy's 5 Star Hillbillies  "Everybody's Talkie'"
6-song demo cassette
Hoover Effect
"Zombie"             18th Wonder ot the World
Noisefloor
"Too Much Negativity"
Sideways
Crucified
"Wheel of Hate"
"Wheel of Hate"
"Beacondsend"    From the Cain Tout Sessions
Jack Feeis Fine
"Block Sky"
5 song demo cassette
Video Bar-b-que
"Subway 5pm"
6-song demo cassette
Rap Rat
"Do the Rat Thing"
Rata-tat Attitude
Hollowheeds
"Ocean"
3-song demo cassette
"A Question of Love"
3-song demo cassette
Plant of Spider*
"A Place I Found"
5-song demo cassette
Emily Farynu
"Ding a Ling-    The Return ol the Repressed
Mortal Puzzle
"Drag"
"Drag"
The Surrealists
"The Creep"
Fish!
Nlghtstalkers
"Images"
3-song demo cassette
SEPTEMBER 1990 35 £5^
That old yeasty smell
still like a sweaty quilt over
the city, a late afternoon invitation to snuggle down in the
cozy warmth of some small
pub and mutter "Aye, aye, aye"
to yourself. Not much immediately obvious has changed
in my 18 months away from
Scotland, at least not in the
weak, watery light of a May
afternoon. That's a small surprise, I suppose, in a city with
landmarks that date back (if
only in name) to Arthurian
times. The Royal Mile still
rears its spiky spine through
the city centre, reminding me
of Godzilla resting on her belly,
conserving energy for the next
stomp session on poor old
Tokyo. With its liberal frosting of dogshit, Portobello still
cringes contemplatively at the
seaside like a tomcat studying
a wave tossed dead fish. The
house I used to live in still
presents the same grimy stone
pokerface to the sea. The girls
I used to know think of themselves as women now, and I
suppose they are. They're still
in school or not, alcoholic or
not, married or not. Nothing
much has changed. They still
won't go to bed with me.
But then after all it
is the 90's in the "AIDS Capital of the UK," and the scary
poster advertising has finally
switched into high gear. Apparently a great deal of the
blame for Edinburgh's AIDS
statistics is laid at the feet of
IV drug use, for which the city
is inexplicably notorious. The
only people who seem to want
to talk about it are the folks
from outside Edinburgh, who
go all googly-eyed when I
38 DISCORDER
mention I'm staying there, who
lean a bit closer and whisper
conspiratorially "Did you
know...?" I dutifully make the
required comments of surprise
and dismay, join them in a
hearty round of disdain and
disapproval of the cesspool of
vice and decay that is
Scotland's capital, and invariably make a sophomoric
joke about condoms. Sitting
as I did today, though, in a
sun-suffused morning in the
park near Waverly Station,
listening to the shouts of children and seagulls, it's hard to
condemn the city too harshly.
But in the immortal
words of whoever the hell wrote
that Clash song, all the scum
come out at night. So do I, but,
well, you know what I mean.
Even if the AIDS scare is a
new thing, I suppose there've
always been junkies and men
who categorically refuse to
"wear a little rubber thing on
their dick." Nothing new there.
What is new, in the clubs and
bars and student gatherings, is
the way these and other people
listen to music, and the music
to which they're listening.
In a country whose
musical loyalties careen
drunkenly from style to style,
where "in" and "out" flip flop
in the span of weeks, it's not
that surprising that tastes have
changed noticeably in the span
of 18 months. What is remarkable, though, is the
wholeheartedness of the
change, and the degree to which
it's been ignored by the media. There have long been the
baths and the lockers and the
punk never-say-dies and the
popyuppies and the various
wannabes. There's also a huge
dance music scene that easily
survived
the    happily
rapid demise of most
of the acid house shenanigans. They take their
dancing seriously here, and
they've held on to those beats
per minute with the tenacity
of a pitbull making dinner of a
pensioner.
But in Edinburgh, at
least, it was primarily the Goths
that held sway amongst school-
leavers and University-age
young people, and for an astonishingly long time. "Goth"
has always seemed to me to be
less a matter of music than of
clothing. Thinking I might be
judging hastily, I asked around.
And in spite of the great numbers of people who have until
recently dressed in the Goth
style (all doom, decay, darkness and depression), there seen
to be very few who can concisely explain what Goth is
about apart from that dominant fact of clothing. A friend,
during a drunken grapple with
the slippery Goth ethos, said
you must be able to dance to
the music. I mentioned the latest Rick Astley single, and tried
valiantly to arch an eyebrow.
He qualified by saying that
you should be able to dance to
it, yes, but dance with an attitude. The attitude presumable
encompasses such diverse elements as doom, decay, darkness and depression.
Goth is, appropriately enough considered its
fixation with matters
necrophiliac, dying. A new
champion has arisen from the
guitar-strewn fields of the
musical style wars. The t-shirts
are out in force, the leather
jackets have been laboriously
repainted,  and everywhere
\*~
by Christopher Kovacs
the city young men
are sitting in dim rooms
with expressions of intense
concentration, trying to make
their hair gTow faster by sheer
force of will. The Edinburghers
refer to this music that has so
dramatically changed their
collective musical preferences,
innocuously and
uniformatively enough, as
rock'n'roll. But they don't
mean Jerry Lee Lewis or say
of the Elvises here; they're
thinking more of Motley Crue
and the Cult, of the Quireboys
and the Black Crowes, and
other bands of that ilk, both
unlauded and not. If cornered,
I'd put it all in the spectrum of
metal to popmetal to justplain
(if a little crunchy) pop.
And so going out to
some of the clubs my Scottish
friends frequent these days, I
find myself heartily regretting
my decision to cut my hair. As
we enter the metal mecca
known as madison's, a group
of metal bully boys, some with
childscaring potential to rival
that of the legendary Lemmy
Kilmeister, eye my newly shorn
skull suspiciously, but make
no comment. They'll give the
loan of a tie for the
underdressed at some of the
posher restaurants, or so Hollywood tells us. Why not the
loan of a wig for the hair-
impaired at Madison's? No
matter-we're in amongst them
now, and I fight off the urge to
order Jack Daniels' as a sort
of protective
colouration. I fight
off the urge to giggle a
bit, too. Some of the
spandex'n'denim'n'leather
combinations are at best uncomfortable looking, at worst
potentially lethal. Best of all
are the primitive types, hair
straight and uncut, with a band
t-shirt and skintight denim
encasing skinny shanks,
standing in a circle in the centre of the floor. Just standing
there amongst the disco lights
on a highly polished dance
floor. The DJ has announced
that he's playing a song by
Hell'o'ween next, and these
lads want to be prepared. In
the presong silence they widen
their stances carefully, hang
heads limply, and as the guitar
begins is assault, they begin
to, well, bang their heads. In a
circle, hair flying, for four
minutes they enact their dead
serious ritual, then return to
their seats or stand blankly
awaiting the next musiCal
trigger that will set their heads
bobbing. All I can think of is a
rock'n'roll circle jerk, which
my companions find not very
amusing. The night progresses
apace, and as the headbangers
give way to the weekend
metalheads dancing to
Tigertailz or Poison, the proportion of slash-kill-mutilate
metal declines. The propor-
of booze-party-
chicks metal increases correspondingly, and though I can
stomach that variety marginally more than the nasty stuff,
I drain my bear and leap up
when my companions suggest
departure. As we leave, I discover by the pain in my jaw
that my teeth have been tightly
clenched for a couple of hours.
So I suppose a few
things in Edinburgh have
changed. Cobwebs and lace
have given way to t-shirts and
jeans. Guitars have gotten
crunchier and electronics become a definite no-no. Pints
of beer have been pushed aside
for American bourbon. These
surface changes are of little
consequence, though. All that's
really happened is that one
calculated, contrived attitude
has given way to another. It's
all so very serious. The guidelines have changed, certainly,
but the game is still being
played, in all its unconscious
self-parody. It may not be the
decline and fall of western
civilization, it may not even
be particularly significant, but
in some vague way, it frightens me a little. DEVO Devo's History is well known to any casual
student of popular music. With "Smooth Noodle
Maps", Devo establish themselves firmly as the
purveyors of catchy, quirky pop tunes. Check out
"Post Post Modem Man".
8'
99
.CASS.
1C99
LDa, CD
HOLLY COLE TRIO Playing to rave reviews and
sold out concerts all over the country, Holly Cole defies
categorization... alternative jazz comes closest. Digitally recorded by Cowboy Junkies producer Peter Moore
using his famous Calrcc Ambisonic Microphone. The
ambience is beatnik, the singing unforgettable, the
material unconventional.
7 99   1 ? 99
/ oCASS. _L«J«C1)
J Lo Uo JON CO Jesus Jones is a London-based 5 piece group
with some murky, backwood origins they'd prefer not to discuss.
The band has been busy with 3 singles in the UK top 50 and a UK
gold album. And the press? The 1990 Readers Poll of Melody
Maker, NME, and Sounds all named them top 5 in the "Best Band"
category, while "Info Freako" made top 10 in all 3 for "Best Single
of the Year".
8 99   1 C 99
• CASS. A*3«CD
THE JITTERS Their second LP is "Louder Than Words",
produced by cult hero Jules Shear. The combination of these
two kindred musical spirits has brought anew depth and maturity to the group's material. Spare arrangements allow maximum room for the songs to shine through. R+B - flavoured
material has made them campus favourites.
8 99   1 C 99
• CASS. X^7oCD
REVENGE While New Order takes an extended hiatus
from recording, the group's bassist/singer, Peter Hook, occupies himself as the leader of this new trio and delivers a
most intriguing album. "One True Passion" is reminiscent of
the best parts of New Order's "Low Life" in terms of combining
driving rhythms and Hook's trademark throbbing bassline.
8 99   1 C 99
•cass. JL*D»
CD
SKYDIGGERS The warmth and intimacy of their
harmonies conspires to enhance their melodic hybrid of acoustic pop rock. In an entertainment scene
used to pre-packaged, form-fit, contrived rock, the
Skydiggers shine through with songs full of emo-
,io„, full of life.
O.CASS. A»J«CD
RIVER CITY PEOPLE RealSongs about real life: that's the
bottom line when it comes to the music of River City People. Their
debut album, "Say Something Good" states their case with Tim
Speed's chiming guitar, Siobhan Maher's crisp, assured vocals, and a
firm grip on both a message and a hook. The title track and "Walking
on Ice" in particular communicate their forthright intentions in a
similarly clear-eyed fashion. ^   qq      ^   _   qq
O.CASS. J.3# CD
MCJ & COOL G MCJ & COOL G mix rap with a bit
o' Funk, spiced up with HipHop, in a sound we call
Double R&B (Rap, Rhythm + Blues). The music comes
from the inner city of Halifax by way of Montreal. MCJ
is the rapper while Cool G provides the soulful vocals.
"So Listen" is the debut single and album.
8 99   1 ff 99
•CASS. X^oCD
LAVA HAY A blend of guitar, organ, piano, violin,
flute, banjo, saxophone and the warm vocals of Suzanne
Little and Michelle Gould. Guest appearances by Kevin
Kane, Tom Hooper, Vincent Jones (The Grapes of
Wrath). Produced by Steve Berlin (Los Lobos, Faith
NoMore) 0 99   1C99
O.CASS. ±*?»CD
NATIONAL VELVET Includes the singles, "Sex
Gorilla", "Hysteria", and "Shine On". Produced by Zeus
B. Held (Nina Hagen, Zodiac Mindwarp, Transvision
Vamp). One of the best live bands in Canada; you will
never forget the stage presence of striking vocalist
Maria Del Mar. This is their second album.
U.CASS.
15
99
THE COOLEST RECORDS
STOMPIN' TOM CONNORS This 20
song retrospective collection is just a sampling
of some of Stompin' Tom's songs about the
people and places in Canada. This crosscountry section of Stompin' Tom's career includes: "Bud The Spud", "Sudbury Saturday
Night", "Tillsonburg", "The Ketchup Song",
"Lady K.D. Lang", and "Gumboot Cloggeroo".
99
THE COOLEST STORES
899 ie
•CASS. JL Da,
CANADA'S LARGEST AND BEST KNOWN RECORD STORE
DOWNTOWN 568 SEYMOUR ST, EATON CENTRE METROTOWN, RICHMOND CENTRE, SURREY PLACE OiU^s m± c* ihc ^_f***-
cyt<rri«e-W"lld<*>
■ .   m    . _^_- ht \Aou\dcatrUza>ld.

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