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  JOLIE HO? s.63M
Album Available Oct. 7th
Jolie Holland's most revealing and expansive
work yet featuring M. Ward &Marc Ribot
Live October 19
Richards on Richards
CiTR 101.9 FM presents... the longest running music battle in Vancouver
OCTOBER LINEUP
y^u     Isotopes
Language-Arts
The Stumbler's Inn
14th   ^en ^ Gorodetsky
Boogie Monster
i The Sappers k
2jsj- Trembling
Cargohold
Lakefield |
28th   ^hane Turner Overdrive
The Barcelona Chair
^
Deaf To Shouting
Every Tuesday night, stows at 9 PM
The Railway Club (Seumour/Dunsmuir)
ST|    * Bands subject to change.
fej|r Ij    Foe the latest schedules and results, visit
jBfc |    http://shindig.citr.ca
OUR GREAT SPONSORS:
THEHIVE
CANADIAN
MUSIC 1IEI19
MARCH 11   14   TORONTO. OH
www.amsevents.ca ,
2 October 2008 Discorder Magazine
•OCTOBER«2008
Editor
Jordie Yow
Art Director
Nicole Ondre
Production Manager
Kristin Warkentin
Copy Editors
Jordie Yow
Alex Smith
Kristin Warkentin
Ad Manager
Catherine Rana
Under Review Editor
Melissa Smith
Datebook Editor
Melanie Coles
RLA Editor
Brock Thiessen
Layout + Design
Nicole Ondre
Jordie Yow
Graeme Worthy
Will Brown
Contributors
Terris Schneider
Daniel Fumano
Mine" Salkin
Melissa Smith
Bryce Dunn
Gerald Deo
Simon Foreman
Adam Simpkins
Benjamin Luk
Freddy Harder
Becky Sandler
Nick Parinu
Brock Thiessen
Alex Hudson
Linda Bull
Justin Langille
Rose Eckert-Jontzie
Nathan Pike
Miranda Martini
Aaron Goldsman
Photo & Illustration
Nicole Ondre
Michelle Mayne
Benjamin Luk
Gerald Deo
Freddy Harder
Program Guide
Bryce Dunn
Charts
Luke Meat
Distribution
Peter MacDonald
CiTR Station Manager
Brenda Grunau
Publisher
Student Radio Society
of UBC
Cover Art By:
Nicole Ondre
© DiSCORDER 2008 by the Student Radio Society of the University
of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 7,000.
Subscriptions, payable in advance, to Canadian residents used to
be $15 for one year, to residents of the USA were $15 US; $24
CDN elsewhere. Single copies are $2 (to cover postage). Please
make cheques or money orders payable to Discorder Magazine.
Currently we're taking a look at changing these prices to look more
like rates from 2008 as opposed to rates from 2006. If you try and
subscribe we'll work something out. If you would like to write for
Discorder please send your idea and a writing sample to editor.
discorder@gmail.com. Ad space is available for the September
issue and can be booked by calling 604.822.3017 ext 3 or emailing
discorder.advertising@gmail.com. Our rates are available upon
request. Discorder does not accept unsolicited material, but
welcomes new writers. For more info, contact editor.discorder®
gmail.com. Discorder is not responsible for loss, damage, or any
other injury to any submitted materials, solicited or unsolicited,
including but not limited to manuscripts,' artwork, photographs,
compact discs, review materials, or any other submitted materials.
From UBC to Langley and Squamish to Bellingham, CiTR can be
heard at 101.9 FM as well as through all major cable systems in the
Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ line
at 822.2487, our office at 822.3017, or our news and sports lines at
822.3017 ext. 2. Fax us at 822.9364, e-mail us at: citrmgr@mail.
ams.ubc.ca or just pick up a pen and write #233-6138 SUB Blvd.,
Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1, CANADA. If you would like Discorder
Magazine in your business, email distro.discorder@gmail.com to
be added to our distribution list.
Editor's Note
Hello Discordians:
In this issue we cover some of Vancouver's best music events: Only's end of summer Victory Square Block Party, the New Pornographers' laid back Stanley Park
Singing Festival and the experimental New Forms Festival. You'll also find the
beginning of our Shindig coverage which will be ongoing until Shindig's thrilling
Dec. 9 finale which we will cover in a timely manner, in February.
As you maybe able to tell from the shiny TimesNewRoman-y look of the magazine we have found a new art director, Nicole Ondre. She drew the bison on the
cover, and singers at the Stanley Park Singing Exhibition. This month was also put
together with a little help from our friends. Special thanks to those who came out
to proof, and to Discorder heavyweights and lifesavers Graeme Worthy and Will
Brown, who brought some cupcakes, inserted several spelling errors, attempted to
enforce outdated notions about. Oxford commas and amused us with tales of the
old days.
Discorder has a- long history and it's nice to be able to draw on our past for
advice and assistance. Reading about our illustrious selves on the venerable institution Wikipedia we discovered that Jennifer Fahrni and Mike Mines created
Discorder "as an alternative music magazine for Vancouver and the program guide
for CiTR" in 1983.That's 25 years to this day (give or take eight months). To celebrate Discorder turning a quarter century old we will be throwing a party in early
December in which Discorder staff and readers can meet up to celebrate this here
magazine. I hope that more than the current staff come out— so if you happen
to know anyone who has worked with Discorder in the past let them know this
is going to happen. We'd love to meet them. We'll drink some beers, chat about
music and pat each other on the back. The venue, date and time are all t.b.a., but
you specifically, dear reader, are invited. I hope to see you there.
'Til next month,
Jordie Yow
Titl.?^
Do you get rilfed up when you notice that discorder is rife with spetnagrammar
and S^yle errorsnfcu have no one to blame but yourself. Before every issue gets sent
to the printers Discorder has a proofing parff^w^iaoiuli and you can be part of
it. If you enjoy reading things before everyone eke, firing copy-or eating snacks (this-
month we haw sesame sticks, coconut macaroons, ^Ehampagne graces. Ambrosia
apples and dried apricots) you should come down.        ..,.1      *   .
-n,    ' c JDtaufAtf ft ^*e«-
We proofing party is an important part ofpswawiim. It's the part whejr our editorial
staff needs fresh eyesJJEyes capable of catching tfctifo errors that we've been tefbusy,
tired or incompetent to catch.
Our proofing party isftsualh/fee last Sunday of every month, but don't settle for that
vague descriptionjend us an email! Get in touch and find out! Set your afternoon
asid^TVfeu won't regret it! /
tfi^'-mH
If you'ns interested in getting involved email our production manager Kristin ^
Warkentta at |mxhK^n.jfei«^<^pnaa.coBa. Shc'B hook yon up.   •
J rttoveAWSrJ**'*,
Discorder Magazine RIFF
RAFF
by Bryce Dunn
Ahoy mateys! The good ship Riff Raff set sail
for Austin, Texas last month to take part in The
Wild Weekend Powerpop Festival. She came
back hot and bothered and with an armload of
. vinyl booty, some of which we will report on
here for all the scallywags who missed out.
The Greatest Hits outta Seattle teamed up
with their West Coast brethren the Luxury
Sweets from Santa Cruz for a split T collaboration that works wonders for the ears. A
■ stadium-sized, mid-tempo (but by no means
slouchy) epic called "For Our Hearts" by the
Greatest Hits kicks things off with Hanoi
Rocks rifts, handclaps and... xylophone? That's
right, no self-respecting glam-rock group can
afford not to put a Uttle metal (pun intended)
on a track this sweet. Speaking of sweet, our
kids the Luxury Sweets from Cali amp it up
with some bubblegum-styled buzz-saw pop on
"Wishing Well," barely two minutes long and
terrific all at once. My first introduction to these
guys and doll made for repeated spins thanks to
some double-barrelled drumming and spunky
bass pounding. It sounds a lot like the Devil
Dogs on a sugar high, high praise, methinks.
In between the cities of Seattle and Santa
Cruz lies San Francisco, home to the Pleasure
Kills, another cool band I had the pleasure of
meeting at the festival. They floated me a copy
of their recent picture-perfect pop single, ^Mission Boy". Both the tide track and "Pictures On
The Floor" just go for broke and get lodged in
your brain as any good power pop song should
thanks in large part to singer Lydiot's vocals-
how she can simultaneously channel great female pop divas of the past like Martha Davis
of the Motels, Jul Kossoris of the Shiwers or
even Debbie Harry without making it sound
rehashed is what makes this stand out. The rest '
of the band are no slouches either; with catchy-
as-hell keyboard, crunchy guitar breaks and a
hard hitting rhythm, section this is a winner all
around.
One of the highlights of the fest that folks
travelled from far and wide to see were Tulsa-
born, Los Angeles-raised pop godfathers 20/20.
This band stuck out like a sore thumb in a
scene that birthed (among others) The Germs
and Black Flag, releasing two fantastic albums
that got buried under the avalanche of punk in
the4ate 70s/early '80s. Thankfully, the folks at
Radio Heartbeat Records sought to resuscitate
this seemingly forgotten band with two unre- •
leased tracks and wow, I'm glad they did. Having owned their debut LP and seen them Uve,
I was suitably impressed, but nothing prepared
me for these gems. "Going Up With My Girl"
has "radio hit" written aU over it, as does "World
Of Fools"; both songs have the same "hey baby
jump in my car and we'U leave these squares
behind whue the radio's blasting our favourite
song" vibe. I guess they had to sing about something other than fighting "the Man" or the government, didn't they? Pristine production and
memorable melodies make for good songs, and
these guys knew what they were doing without
most of their peers knowing it.
RnaUy, a record that has nothing to do with
my trip down south. Vancouver's own Nominal
Records has an unblemished record thus far of
releasing tomorrow's hit makers today and Defektors are next in Une. Check "Secret Trials"
and "Doomsday Girl" off the "Songs I Wish I'd
Written" Ust and go cry me a river. Whoomp,
there it is.
See ya later, don't be a hater!
■
iWfry.Ms.
Wishing Wefl
WOMEN
VOLUNTEERS
needed for our 24 Hour
Rape Crisis Line and Transition
House for battered women
For an interview, please call
604-872-8212
Vancouver Rape Relief & Women's Shelter
 www.rapereliefshelter.bc.ca   	
The Greatest Hits & the Luxury
Sweets
Desert Island Discs
myspace.com/desertislanddiscsseattle
Ihe Pleasure Kills
Polypore Records
1264 Grove St. San Francisco, CA
94117
20/20
Radio Heartbeat Records
myspace.com/radioheartbeatnow
Defektors
Nominal Records,
726 Richards St. Vancouver BC
V6B 3A4
|ji|f2Sc out October 14;
-^   ltd, edition UP w/digital download.
¥
THE BUTTLESS CHAPS CAROLYN MARK
THE PACK A.D.
thebuttlesschaps.com carolynmark.com thepaeiattenieatti.com
10/31 The Biltmore, Vancouver BC      10/24 Railway Club, Vancouver BC 10/31  Railway Club, Vancouver B
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October 2008 FTT M STRTPPFD
VANCOUVER INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL:
Throw Down Your Heart, Wild Combination,
and, Faubourg Treme: The Untold Story Of Black New Orleans
by Daniel Fumano
Throw Down Your Heart
The continent that gave birth to humanity gives birth to some
pretty sweet jam sessions in Throw Down Your Heart, a fantastic
documentary that follows American banjo virtuoso Bela Fleck
as he travels to Africa to meet, Uve and play with musicians in
Uganda, Tunisia, Senegal, Gambia and Mali.
Fleck explains that although the banjo is often associated
with the white American south, its origins are, in fact, African.
His mission to "bring the banjo back to Africa" has him performing with a wide arrangement of traditional instruments—the
marimba, the thumb piano, the ngoni (a guitar-like instrument)
and the "original banjo," the akonting.
By traveling to several separate and distant regions of Africa,
the film showcases the diversity of the continent's musical styles
(not to mention its different people, cultures, and landscapes).
Though there isn't much of a narrative, the film shows a series of
fabulous musical performances—both impromptu and rehearsed,
playing everywhere from the beach to the village to the recording studio.
Fleck does a very impressive job of incorporating his banjo
into these traditional musical forms, and he's not ostentatious by
nature—he doesn't seek the spotlight during the performances,
wanting only to be a part of what's happening. Osi ^"j
You don't have to be an enthusiast of banjo music to appreciate this movie; any music lover will find something to treasure
here. And it's probably safe to say that Throw Down Your Heart
should be required viewing for anyone who thinks that African music begins and ends with Akon, Paul Simon or Vampire
Weekend.
Wild Combination
Wild Combination is director Matt Wolf's feature film debut, providing an inornate and fascinating look at the life and music of
Arthur Russell, an American composer, cellist and music producer. Though Russell created music prolifically in his lifetime
and collaborated with such luminaries as Allen Ginsberg, Phillip
Glass and David Byrne, his music never achieved much popular success. In recent years, however, Russell's music has found a
new and wider audience through a series of reissues and compilations. Russell's profile will be raised even further with Wolf's film,
which has already appeared at several festivals and earned the
distinction of "Official Selection" at the Berlin and Edinburgh
Pum Festivals.
The film combines Russell's music with interviews of the
people closest to him: his parents, his long-term boyfriend, his
friends, his musical collaborators. It tells the story of how an
awkward kid from Oskaloosa, Iowa began playing the cello and
writing music, before moving to San Francisco and eventually to
New Y>rk In the late '70s, Russell was part of the scene at David Mancuso's legendary loft parties, which proved to be hugely
influential on the development of dance music and club culture
both in New York and elsewhere. During that time, Russell produced a series of disco singles under a variety of pseudonyms
and co-founded Sleeping Bag Records. Though his disco records
met with a very positive response in New Yorks gay club culture,
Russell continued composing and producing more experimental
music at his home, amassing hours of recordings.
The full title of the film is Wild Combination: A Portrait of
Arthur Russell, and it is aptly named. Instead of attempting to tell
the definitive story of Russell's life, we get one look, a lovingly
rendered portrait. It is a glimpse of a passionate and creative man,
possessed of a singular talent, who was also detached, reticent,
and sometimes maddeningly eccentric.
Faubourg Tremi: The Untold Story of Black New
Orleans
Faubourg Tremi: The Untold Story of Black New Orleans is a look at
a historic area in New'Orleans, the "oldest Black neighbourhood
in America." Lolis Eric Elie, a local journalist who resides in "the
Treme," hosts the documentary, which was produced by another
Trem6 native—-Jazz giant Wynton Marsalis, who also appears in
the film.
The film recounts the area's fascinating history, beginning in
the slavery era, when Faubourg Treme had the largest black population in the Deep South. According to the film, thisis where the
first civil rights movement began in the United States, before the
movement took off across the nation. More than 100 years before the famed Harlem Renaissance, Faubourg Treme was home
to black poets, musicians, painters, composers and singers. This
was also the neighbourhood that gave jazz music to the rest of
America and the world—throughout its history, every aspect of k
daily life in Faubourg Treme is intrinsically linked with music.
The film stresses the importance of music to the city of New
Orleans, especially in the face of struggle and tragedy—in the
Reconstruction era of the late 19th Century, African Americans
found many of their hard-earned civil rights taken away by racist
oppression. The film presents that "death of civil rights" as leading
to "the birth of jazz." During the filming of the movie, Hurricane
Katrina hit New Orleans, devastating the city, especially poorer
black neighbourhoods like Faubourg Treme. "It's Reconstruction
all over again in my city," says our narrator, and in the wake of
all of this destruction, jazz musicians parade down the streets,
followed by the "second line": hundreds of people singing and
dancing along in procession. It's a powerful and memorable moment that speaks volumes about the importance of music in this
culture.
Discorder Magazine W \ very year, Only Magazine puts
r%   togetherone of thebestmusic
JL__J festivals Vancouver has to offer;
hipsters mingle with the homeless in Victory
Square to watch Vancouver's buzz bands
play for free. This year, all funds raised went
to tbe Street Corner Media Foundation,
which produces Megaphone magazine. This
"street magazine" was sold by homeless and
low-income vendors, who made their way
through the crowd in case you wanted to
pick up a copy during the event.
The Victory Square Block party isn't just an
opportunity to see great bands for free—it's
also one of the few times in the year that you
can go somewhere and fully expect to see everyone you know. You may pause and think
to yourself, "But wait! I wasn't there, what's
this guy talking about?" Well, maybe you
weren't, but I would like to encourage you to
attend next year's event. Here's why:
Mohawk Lodge
These indie rockers were the first group
we got to see—unfortunate, because that
meant we'd missed Ice Cream and Defektors. Mohawk Lodge played a nice set of
straight-ahead rock Their music has never
been exciting or even all that original, but
they're good at what they do: picking up
the pieces of other rock songs and tossing
them together, making a sound that's both
familiar and pleasant.
Man Hussy and Bronx Cheer
In between bands, local funny bone ticklers Man Hussy and Bronx Cheer took
turns performing comedy sketches they'd
6 October 2008
come up with for the event. The best part
t was definitely when two giant heads made
out with puppet tongues.
Certain Breeds
If you miss new wave, you would have
loved to see Jen Riego lead Certain Breeds
through their '80s inspired music. Riego's
vocal talent combined with bass, synth,
drums and cello created a sound that was
ignored by half the crowd and loved by the
other half.
The Green Hour Band
Green Hour is a band of four guys who
care a lot about their tight, tight pants.
Their sound draws heavily on rock from
the late 60s, but it was hard to care. I wish
Ice Cream had played at this time instead,
but at least it gave everyone time to chat
and find the bathroom.
No Kids
No Kids provided a nice break from all
the rock and punk being played. The
three-piece that used to be P:ano (sort
of) consisted of two keyboard players and
a drummer and was the most low-key
performance of the day. Playing music
from their debut Come Into My House, the
band mixed it up with soft pretty melodies
and R&B influenced crooning. No Kids
sound better recorded than five, but their
performance didn't lose them any fans.
Traditionally, at about this point in the
festivities, Victory Square's lawn sprinklers
go off, soaking and surprising the audience. But breaking with tradition this
Evaporators
The Evaporators are always good Uve. 0
What everyone loves about their live
performance isn't so much the music as
the spectacle. Whether Nardwuar s doing
mid-set costume changes, crowd surfing
in a motorcycle helmet or convincing his
entire audience to perform calisthenics
(I think they're called squat-jumps), he
always brings more energy and excitement to a single performance than most
performers will in their entire life. That
said, what I love about the Evaporators
is the same thing that I complain about:
if you've seen them once you've probably
seen all the tricks I mentioned above, or
variations on them. Their performance,
while brilliant, hasn't changed much over
the years.
Basketball
Anyone who raised their "eyebrows at seeing Basketball (formerly Raking Bombs)
billed as headliners over the Evaporators
had their doubts blown away after this
set. Basketball's last show before heading
off to tour in Spain was one to remember.
They played an energetic electro-tribal
set that demonstrated why they are one
of the best bands Vancouver has to offer.
Members of the crowd who still had
energy got down to dance in the dark of
Victory Square. This would have been a
fitting end to the evening, but there was
more to come... SANCTI IRY
2 BEST OF THE BEST
The After Party
In theory, a Vic Square after party is a
really good idea. What could be better
after seeing a bunch of awesome bands in
a parkthan moving to a bar and seeing
more awesome bands? Well, maybe taking
a day in between to recuperate. Anyone
who has spent eight hours watching music
is bound* to be a Uttle tired. That's probably why not too many people trekked the
couple of blocks to the Bourbon to see
more bands and listen to mu«ie^provided
by the Blastramp DJs.
Sorcerers
Sorcerers bounced back and forth in their
set from faster ptmk numbers to dubbier
reggae numbers. The lead singer never lost
his freaky-sounding vocals, which gave
the dub numbers a punky feel, but the
combination didn't work as well as the
loud angry fast songs. That could be my
personal bias against reggae though.
Bison B.C.
If you love really heavy, really tight, proper
metal, you'U love this hairy four-piece. If
you don't, you probably won't. I had the
hiccups and was starting to nod off so I
saw one song and jetted, but they were in
fine form.
80'S I NEW WAVE I ELECTRO
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uiscoraer Magazine It seems strangely appropriate that
Okkervil River should take their name
from a piece of Russian Uterature (a
short story by Tatyana Tolstaya). At first
glance both are dark, brooding, and tend
to use words that encapsulate archaicaUy
specific situations. But more thorough examination reveals a joy born of unique flaws
and a deUcate reverence for the absurdity
of the human experience. After releasing
their newest studio album The Stand Ins,
Okkervil River had a Vancouver tour stop
Sept. 18, and lead singer WiU Sheff spoke
to Discorder about green touring, the appeal
of obscure characters and the problem with
double albums.
I notice that you guys are having a motion
to push more of a greener tour, which starts
with the commute—how is that being
received?
I think that people are largely positive about
the idea, but the offset stickers that we're
trying to seU... we're not selling as many as I
had hoped, but we're only reaUy five shows
in so I think that it's hard to teU.
It's been very weU received. Obviously, as everybody knows there's a difference between
something being weU received and somebody actuaUy spending money on it or doing
anything about it.
Some of the bigger shows that came
through town, especially Radiohead,
were huge for pushing sustainability with
recycled shirts and other stuff. Have you
considered anything along those lines, or
is it more about the [carbon offset] stickers
and working your way up from there?
The biggest impact environmentaUy from a
tour is from the fans who drive to the shows.
Recycled stuff is aU weU and good, but what
it reaUy comes down to is aU those cars driving to the show. With Radiohead it's a much
greater environmental impact than with
Okkervil, but that's why we concentrated on
doing the donation to offset everyone's drive.
The CD that we have out now The Stand Ins,
is the first time we haven't used a jewel case
and it's aU recycled paper for that CD waUet.
It takes a whUe to adapt to these things, and
sometimes the price break is extremely high,
you're just like "Oh my god, we can't afford
to put out a record if we do it this way."
Tell me more about the new record; it's
called The Stand Ins and it's the second
half of a theme you started with The
Stage Names}
The Stand Ins and The Stage Names were
part of a whole lot of songs that instead of
putting out in a great big double album, we
decided to stagger into two albums.
Any particular reason for that? It feels like
a lot of the songs on The Stand Ins are mirror images of songs from The Stage Names,
where instead of musicians we're more
looking at the people who are consuming,
or not consuming, your stuff.
Yeah, that's somewhat true that one has to
do with the artist and one has to do with
the audience, and The Stand Ins is definitely
more about the fans, of music and of art.
That was a reason, and basicaUy I didn't
want to choke people with a gigantic double
album. When I reatty think soberly about
double albums, I often find that I don't Usten
to them in one sitting and I reaUy like the
idea of putting it out in something that's
a Uttle bit easier to digest When we chose
things, we chose songs that seemed Uke they
answered each other, songs where you could
put a song on The Stand Ins and it would be
like an echo of a song on The Stage Names. In
fact, some of the songs were written to echo
each other, instead of immediately foUow-
ing a song up with its echo, we decided it
was better not to put them together on one
record.
With some of the songs you have that
reference really obscure figures—Bruce
Wayne Campbell, John Berryman—people that your listeners wouldn't have come
across without you writing a song about
them—how do you find these people?
The three people who appear in The Stage
Names and The Stand Ins, they were aU people whose stories appealed to me. My heart
went out to them and I thought that they
aH had something similar to their stories;
there was something of this obsession with
a persona and what their work said about
them personaUy and what it did to their Uves
and how it changed them and what it meant
when they couldn't do it any more.
These were stories that reaUy spoke to
me, and plus, what am I supposed to do,
y'know, writing a fucking song about Ian
Curtis. There's certain stories we hear
again and again and again, these very
popular... somebody Uke Kurt Cobain,
people talk about him so much—at times
if you're not Ustening very closely you'd
think they were talking about a saint, and
it's such an over told story. Not that I don't
love Nirvana, but I wanted to teU a more
off the beaten path story.
Do you worry about you and your own
work being viewed through that lens,
about people saying, "Who is Will Sheff,
let's look through his work and see if we
can find him?"
I'm kind of indifferent to that, I guess.
I don't feel Uke anybody's ever going to
expose me... I don't reaUy expose myself;
to me the songs are about other people
and they're about characters and much of
what I say in the songs is stuff that I don't
beUeve, and so I don't have an attitude
about wanting to keep privacy or wanting
to expose myself through song. I just don't
reaUy think about me in terms of what
Okkervil means.
Speaking of people and how Okkervil is doing, how is the new lineup? I
know that Jonathan [Meiburg] is off to
Shearwater and doing well from what I
understand.
It's great. Jonathan hasn't played with
us for a while; Shearwater's been very
consuming for him, as it should be. It
wasn't Uke this "Oh my god, where's
Jonathan? Where's Jonathan?" thing. I
reaUy enjoy changing Uneups; I think that
every musician brings with them differences and their own sort of taste and ideas
about music, and that can only enrich the
band. I don't think that I'm right about
October 2008 everything, or maybe I do think that but
ultimately I know it's not true. I think that
people are bringing their musical sensibiU-
ties in and that's great because otherwise it
becomes an overdose on my own aesthetic
and I try to keep things loose enough that
people can fit in what they're doing.
Footnotes:
*Bruce Wayne Campbell: A forgotten
glam rocker from the 70s, CampbeU
performed under the stage name Jo-
briath. Usually remembered as the first
openly gay pop star, CampbeU's albums
never gained commercial success. After
an unsuccessful attempt to re-enter the
music scene under a different stage name,
he succumbed to AIDS in 1983. Okkervil River's song "Bruce Wayne CampbeU
Interviewed on the Roof of the Chelsea
Hotel, 1979" directly refers to not just the
persona, but also the music of Jobriath.
"John Berryman: An influential Ameri-
i§|ui poet in the early '60s, Berryman was
originaUy known as John AUyn Smith.
Berryman is often lumped in with the
Confessional poets (though he didn't agree
with the grouping) and is known for the
PuUtzer Prize winning poetry coUection
<<i 3>>77 Dream Songs. A depressive
alcohoUc, Berryman committed suicide
by jumping off the Washington Avenue
Bridge in 1972, echoing the suicide of his
father 41 years before. OkkervU River's
"John AUyn Smith Sails" is written mostly
from his perspective, and Berryman also
makes a cameo appearance in the Hold
Steady song "Stuck Between Stations."
'Shannon Wilsey: The real name of
the '90s porn actress Savannah, WUsey
is best known for her fondness for rock
stars. After working irfpornography
she attempted, but was unable to break
through to mainstream film, and was
eventuaUy known for her relationship with
Pauly Shore. After a car accident, Wilsey
committed suicide in her home in 1994.
Afterwards her family and her friends in
porn swapped angry pubUc statements of
blame. Okkervil River's "Savanriah SmUes"
and "On the Starry Stairs" are both based
on her Ufe, with "Savannah Smiles" ostensibly written from her father's point of
view and "Starry Stairs" about her Ufe after
she leaves the porn industry.
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Discorder Magazine Text By Mine Sa
Illustrations by Nicole
With summer coming to an end,
Day long weekend in Vancouver was all about
trying to squeeze in as much outdoor fun as
possible. Golfers were golfing. Sailors were sailing. The
Kits Beach UV-junkies were soaking up those last rays
of summer. All around the city, people were gearing up
for the inevitable coming months of rain by spending
time outside.
Bocce. BBQi Garden party. Singing exhibition? Sure,
why not.
This year, Vancouver's favourite sons and daughters, the
New Pornographers, introduced a new way to enjoy the
long weekend before the back-to-school, back-to-rain
season arrives. Ihe first-ever Stanley Park Singing Exhibition took place Aug. 31 and Sept. 1 in .scenic, tree-lined
Malkin Bowl.
Ihe New Pornographers acted as organizers and curators for the festival, which showcased, according to
them, "a host of bands lovingly hand picked," representing "a small sampling of what we consider some of the
best groups from not only Vancouver, but the rest of
the world.'"Ihe best part is that all of the profits from
merchandise and ticket sales went directly to two very
worthwhile causes: the ALS Society of Canada [ed. ALS
stands for Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis a.k.a Lou Gehrig's
disease] and the Urban Native Youth Association.
DAY1
By Mine Salkin    TSc^O
It was a lazy, late-summer afternoon. Most music festivals tend to generate an anxious, apprehensive tension
amongst the crowd, but the Malkin Bowl grounds were
covered with hippies, young parents, and even the occasional punk, aU sitting comfortably on the warm grass.
The Evaporators came on sharply, and stirred up the
crowd with their bare chested antics. Clad in white jumpsuits with red and blue stripes, Nardwuar the Human
Serviette treated us to a good larf, exposed his wooUy
chest, screamed about homelessness, and committed other
acts of unconventional behaviour. While the set focused
on their latest album Gassy Jack and Other Tales, after
seeing Nardwuar run through the crowd with maracas
and a demented grin on his face, or climb onto the audience to create a human piano stand, one could argue that
what the hand lacks in actual musical talent, they make
up for in hilariously eccentric body play. The Evaporators
dl with their relentless, anarchistic spirit.
After the thrash, San Francisco's Deerhoof changed the
atmosphere with their quirky alt-rock sound coupled with
the Uttle-girl voice of lead singer' Satomi Matsuzaki. The
quartet rocked out with classic songs, such as "Twin Rulers" and tunes from The Runners Four. Their aural quirki-
ness was matched by their physical gestures, as drummer
Greg Saunier and guitarist John Dietrich played and
plucked with the motions of a borderline seizure.
Destroyer's performance was weird and cacophonous, but
not in the way most people enjoy. While Dan Bejar's lyrics
of love lost and spiritual confusion are cryptic and chaUeng-
ing, his voice brings to mind a love-sick, drunken hobo.
When his voice was coupled with the guitarist's unreasonable use of tremolo, this act left much to be desired.
Andrew Bird and Neko Case had a soothing effect to counteract the fest's eccentricity. Bird, the singer/songwriter/multi-
instrumentalist from Chicago, was intoxicating as the twilight
began to set in. He sang beautiful things about intuition, against
a backdrop ofceUo strings and pizzicato violin. Bird was one of -
the best acts of the night
FoUowing him was Case, who played country songs from
her upcoming album due out next March Case can belt it
out with the New Pornographers but her solo performance
was humble and sweet. She crooned'softly and laughed at
herself between songs. She sang "I Wish I Was The Moon"
in a way that brought Patsy Cline to mind. Sad but spirited,
Case's voice was humbling and endearing, and her lyrics
touchingly revealed the wisdom of an old soul caught in the
commercialism of the 21st century.
DAY2
By Daniel Fumano
For the Singing Exhibition's second day, the crowds
were treated to beautiful, if unseasonably chiUy, weather.
Seattle's Visqueen kicked off the day in high spirits, with
their catchy brand of punk-pop. They were foUowed by
the 1900s, a New Pornos-esque indie pop seven-piece
featuring organ, violin, and layered harmonies.
Next up was Stevie Jackson, a veritable member of indie-
pop royalty by virtue of his time with the influential Scottish outfit BeUe & Sebastian. Jackson won over the hearts
and minds of most of the crowd, who were enamoured
with his "adorable Glaswegian nebbish" persona. He chatted "nervously throughout the performance, introducing
songs about pigeons, schoolgirls and telecommunications.
After Jackson's nerdy, awkward and ultimately endearing
acoustic pop, the crowd was in store for a pretty significant shift in gears with Black Mountain, the local kings
(and queen) of retro metal-groove rock. Black Mountain
has (rightfuUy) gained a shitload of attention in the local,
national and international press since the release of their
2005 debut album. Praise for Black Mountain in the
media is also inevitably accompanied by a discussion of
beards and bongs.
Last time Black Mountain performed in town, the capacity crowd at the Commodore was treated to a fantastic
show by aU accounts, but there were reports that Amber
Webber's voice wasn't in its best form. Any concerns
about her vocal performance on this night were quickly
dismissed, as she deUvered an incredible performance, by
turns haunting, captivating and beautiful.
In addition to Webber's chilUng vibrato, the rest of the
band more than deUvered. Despite minimal stage banter
(I think I caught a brief but sincere "Thanks, dudes"),
Black Mountain put so much into their music that the
audience couldn't help but connect. One fan got down
with an air guitar jam so involved that I think I noticed
P
10       October 2008 hibit
him stop to change his imaginary axe to drop D tuning
between songs. There's a reason that everybody says you
have to see these songs Uve to appreciate them.
As the sun and the temperatures went down, people
bundled up in blankets, sipped on hot cocoa and cuddled
up. As cold as it was, when hometown heroes the New
Pornographers took to the stage they were met with a
very warm welcome.
The crowd was in for a rare treat on this occasion—a
chance to see the fuH Pofnos Uneup, with Dan Bejar
and Neko Case performing, and they were even joined
onstage by sometimes-member Nora O'Connor, at which
point Newman quipped, "How many are we? Nine now?"
The set included a number of favourites, such as the
Bejar-led "Myriad Harbour," "The Laws Have Changed"
and "Jackie, Dressed
ti Cobras".
There was a poignant moment when keyboardist Kathryn Calder explained that the fundraiser for the ALS
Society of Canada has a personal significance for her, as
her mother suffers from the disease. This wras foUowed by
Newman's announcement that they are planning on doing
the whole thing again next year, which was met with a
rapturous applause.
Everyone hopes that the Singing Exhibition wiU become
a yearly Vancouver tradition, and it's hard to think of a
more pleasant way to close out the summer. Compared
with the filth-covered, booze-and-drug-fueled hedonism
of Pemberton, the Stanley Park Singing Exhibition was
a great low-key event, where famines with young kids
were able to enjoy themselves alongside aU stripes of local music fans (as weU as dozens of notable local musicians strewn throughout the crowd). There was no booze
served on site (but more than a few attendees smoking
home-roUed cigarettes), and the feeUng in the park was
overwhelmingly positive and friendly. The vibe was so
wholesome that you could sprinkle it on your morning
cereal to improve your regularity.
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 ff m
Dan And,guitarist and singer for
Vancouver metal band Bison B.C.,
took some time out of drinking
cheap Albertan beer in Medicine Hat to
speak with Discorder over the phone.
Discorder: Your new album Quiet Earth
will be released by Metal Blade Records
on Sept 30th and you wiU be playing a
show in Calgary. Is there a reason you
didn't opt for an album release party in
Vancouver that night?
We didn't do it on purpose. We just happened to have a gig on that date. We want
to have a reaUy big party when we return
to Vancouver to celebrate the release.
So will your October 2nd show at Pat's
Pub, be that party?
No, that's part of the Exclaim Tour. If we
do an album release party wq want it to
be a party with aU of our friends. We just
want to throw a reaUy big party.
. How is the move to Metal Blade? What
is it hke working with them?
It's been awesome. They've been so rad
12       October 2008
to us. We were leery of signing with any
kind of label. It wasn't something we were
going after. It just came up and they said,
"You guys just do whatever you want.
We're not going to teU you what kind of
music to make. We Uke what you're doing". But right before we started recording they said, "Just don't give us a folk
album". And they've been around 25 years
or something. Their track record is just
phenomenal.
How long was the recording process?
We took a long time to record it in comparison to the first album where we just
banged the whole thing out in four days
because that is aU we could afford. And to
be honest that is how we are aU used to
working. Everything we have recorded has
1 always been Uke that no matter what band
we were in. So it was weird to have just
even a Uttle bit of a bigger budget so we
were able to spend more time. We Uke our
sound so we didn't want to flick around
with that. We love the Hive [Studios].
It's a total institution in Vancouver. We've
known [producer] Jesse [Gander] for years
and years.
He's a total wizard to work with. It was a
lot of fun.
James was quoted as saying "Revolution
is making someone happy." Does the
band subscribe to a 'personal is political'
philosophy, and are you involved in any
. grassroots organizations?
We're not directly involved in any grassroots organizations, but for aU of us growing up, whenever something was bumming us out, we'd put on a record and get
stoked again. It's so easy to get bummed
out on your life. People who are reaUy
angry just act Uke dicks to other people.
We're aU stuck here. Everybody's Ufe has
sucked at one point or another. It's such
an easy concept. If you're nice to people
then generaUy they are going to be nice to
you. So even if you're not directly involved
in social and poUtical causes, just being
nice to people goes a long way, man.
Your MySpace lists your location as East
Van rather than Vancouver. Do you think
that differentiation will come across for
your fans outside of Vancouver? Did you
make this specification because you feel
that East Vancouver has contributed to
your sound or culturally to the development of your band?
When you see media about Vancouver,
even media that is from Vancouver, it's
reaUy focused on downtown, condos, the
Olympics. Whenever I hear something
about East Van, it's "some junkie went
crazy." We aU Uve in East Van and aU of
our friends Uve here. That kind of shit is
not going on aU of the time. Sure it does
sometimes, but there's rad shit going on
too. We're not trying to aUenate anyone.
We're just trying to stick up for where we
Uve.
You are playing a series of dates with
Baroness and Genghis Tron. As both
groups come from the east coast of
America, how did these shows come
about?
It was through Exclaim! [magazine].
They've been reaUy supportive of us. I
guess they Uke what we're doing and
wanted to get us involved with this tour.
Which is awesome, as I love Baroness,
and Genghis Tron are a super tight, good
band that we played with for one of our
first shows, almost two years ago at the LampUghter. They're super nice dudes and
they're doing some crazy shit.
Could you ever see yourself going down
that route and mixing metal with electro?
Or any other kind of genre that you don't
really associate with metal?
Probably not. I grew up Ustening to every
kind of music you can possibly imagine,
so -who knows. But I'm reaUy happy to
simplify things a bit. Take it back.
James [Farwell] was quoted in the
[Georgia] Straight as saying there are
"no good musicians in Vancouver" and
"all guitarists are dickheads". Is that a
sentiment that either he or the band still
supports?
[both laugh] The views and opinions of
FarweU are solely his own. He has moments of being a grumpy old bastard.
We bust his baUs about it aU the time.
I am sure he was just really hung over
and pissed off at-somebody and he didn't
mean that. So I am just going to say that
the statement is not true. There are some
insanely talented people in Vancouver.
sounds epic. But it can mean anything. I
have recently started teUing people that it
means BrutaUy Crucial.
Brutally Crucial, I like that. So really, it
can mean anything that you want it to?
Exactly. Just like o
interpretation.
r lyrics. It's aU open to
Can you ever see yourself going the way
of Iron Maiden and making the bison a
mascot that you take on tour with you?
[laughing] Maybe.
Really?!
I was working with a guy the_ other day
and he thought we should have a trap
door at the bottom of the stage that opens
up and releases a bison into the mosh pit.
I don't know if in reality we would ever
reaUy do it. We're not a super theatrical .
band. It's awesome if that works for your
band, but it's not reaUy us.
«I have this friend, who shall remain
nameless, but he is in a thrash/death-
metal band and his hobbies outside of
the band are bread making, interior
decorating, gardening and sailing. Does
anyone in the band have any hobbies or
interests that you wouldn't associate with
your type of music?
There are quite a few people in Vancouver
who know this, but for those who don't:
our bass player Maasa Anzai is an accom-
pUshed jazz saxophonist.
So there are no secret fashion designers
or cake decorators in your midst?
No. Not at aU. We're pretty much just a
bunch of dirtbags.
So at the time of the interview, this is
your first night on tour and you are in
Alberta.
Medicine Hat, and the beer here is very
cheap. We were in the store and there's 12
beers for 10 bucks. We were Uke "what the
heU!"
Well that's a great way to start the tour
and conclude the interview. Do you
have any wisdom or salacious tidbits you
would Uke to relay to Discorder readers
before you go?
Get rad and stay rad. If you aren't now, you
never were.
Bison B.C. plays Pat's Pub October 2nd, with
Baroness and Genghis Tron.
Is Metal Blade releasing your album
under the name Bison B.C. because
someone else legally Owns the name?
No one does. But there are sports teams in
the States, and even some bands that share
the name, which we discovered after we
were akeady using Bison. No one can le-
gaUy own the name because it's so widely
used, but there is a band caUed Bison who
released something before we did, and
they could take legal action to have us stop
using the name. So it's reaUy just a way to
save our asses.
So it's a preventative measure to protect
you from having events escalate?
You hear so many horror stories about
people being fucked over and now that
we're going to be on a bigger label, it just
seemed Uke a good idea. If you're independent it doesn't matter as much.
So is the B.C. for Before Christ or British Columbia?
We Uked the B.C. because it is open to
interpretation. We are from B.C., but I
Uke the idea of Before Christ because it
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Discorder Magazine rficouver's Annual New Forms Festival kicked off
this year with exhibitions taking place from Sept.
4 to 27. The festival's program was divided into
nine categories, each combining aspects of media arts
and technology together. This year's theme was mosaics, a
theme that embodies the notion of taking pieces of a part
to create a whole. "The theme of mosaics was the brainchild of our founding director, Malcolm Levy," said Jennifer Maksymetz, artistic director of the New Forms Media
Society. "The theme was chosen to examine relations
of cross-cultural media, through video, sound, Internet
and print. The word [mosaics] has been used in multiple
references across, literature, media, science, software, video
and religion to describe different constellations of this
phenomena."
Each category at this year's festival featured
presentations that highlighted the theme in a unique way,
and revealed the New Forms Festival's purpose of sharing
visions, and encouraging artistic growth.
Exhibitions
Several exhibitions that played on the theme
were shown throughout the festival at VIVO. POLITIC,
curated by Kika Thome, combined four artists (Allora +
Calzadilla, Michael Drebert, Siebren Versteeg and Bani
Abidi) who made room for creative ambiguity in a public
space. Digital Chile_08, organized by Claudio River-
Seguel, focused on art's current state by addressing the
influences between Canada and Chile. Active Pass to IR9,
assembled by Kate Hennessy and Richard Wilson, chose
a selection of Internet-based videos about Aboriginal
communities in Canada, the United States, and Australia.
The purpose of this display was to question new media,
how it is being represented and to spread knowledge of
indigenous cultures using technology. The Red Time of
the Three Gorges, curated by Lee Ritian, showed how
mosaics help us to reflect on our global experience by
identifying with stories from the past through modern art
forms.
Vision Division
Vision Division took place from Sept. 15 to 17
with a series of workshops that included twelve participants who created new media installations that occurred
over four days. "The idea for Vision Division was born
approximately a year ago, when I realized that the VJ/
live-video community in Vancouver is really disassociated
with itself," said Jesse Scott, a participant of Vision Division. "I work a lot within communication architectures for
artists and cultural communities, and the idea of having
a genesis for bridging and unifying this community appealed to me."
"There was three days of workshops, covering
everything from basic video engineering, to file formats
and codecs, to shooting and editing for VJing, to anti-
copyright/copyleft sampling aesthetics, to audio-visual
relations ... It was like a new media crash course!" Scott
said. The Vision Division event closed on the night of
Sept. 18 with a vibrant and powerful finale.
Cross Pollinations
The New Forms Festival not only expressed the
theme of mosaics through art, but also through music.
On Sept. 19 at Open Studios, Fond of Tigers and the
Secret Mommy Quintet joined together to challenge
ideas of structure and musical memory. The most recent
albums by each band (Fond of Tiger's Release the Saviours
and Secret Mommy's Plays) were made from samples cut
from acoustic recordings and then reinvented as two new
pieces that were Uve recreations of the electronic samples
with instrumentation.
"In these discourses around digital art and mediated art, I wanted to emphasize that the digital art is not
the end result of human creativity, but can be a great tool
to challenge this notion," stated Stephen Lyons of Fond
of Tigers. "I like moving parts around and re-approaching
music and artistic habits, so it was important for us to
work with a band that we appreciate on an artistic level,
that we felt would rise to the challenge, and whose music
would be interesting for us to use as source material."
At the end of Cross Pollinations each band had
learned about the creative process from of another band's
music and found new ways to approach their own music.
National Digital Media Day
On Sept. 25 an event for National Digital Media
Day took place in order to unite more than 32,000 digital
creators to profile the digital media industry in Canada.
The program began with a New Media B.C. networking
session and was followed by Politube. Politube, curated
by Franklin Lopez, featured a number of videos addressing poUtical issues from the past. "I've been involved
in creating poUtical content for the Internet since the
1990s," said Lopez. "Most of the people who do this,
myself included, do not do it for money, but because they
strongly beUeve in an idea. I wanted to pay tribute to
those dedicated, talented and ideaUsts out there that are
opening minds the world over."1he mixmasters of this
event included Jonathan Mcintosh, Stephen MarshaU,
TV Sheriff, Simon Robson and Ian Inaba.
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Discorder Magazine The Walkmen
Man Man
Richards on Richards
August 29
The moronic (oxy or otherwise) usage of the
term "controUed chaos" by lazy journaUsts to
describe occasionaUy erratic bands has been
bandied about so often that its intended
meaning, if any, is a misnomer at best. Man
Man's sound has been described as this far
too often. You see, the Philadelphia quintet may seem a bit primal, sUghdy savage,
perhaps even prone to foam at the mouth,
but also come across as rather restrained. .
Always decked out in white T-shirts and
variable face paint, the band straddle that
fine Une between cannibal-chic and rejects
from the Royal Vancouver Yacht Club. Like
those upper-class knucklehead kids in Lord
of the Flies, these castaways are getting back
to their feral tribal beguinings while tweaking the limits of modem indie rock, but stiU
in a frustratingly conservative and reserved
fashion.   ■.'...
To be honest, I was expecting a Uttle torn
flesh and hysteria from Man Man; instead,
their set had occasional moments of brilliance, but ultimately was too long and more
Ringling Brothers than Dormer Party.
As for the Walkmen, if you've seen
them before you know how their shows
transpire. Five former prep-school chums
(and teenaged next-big-things) don smart
attire while ably showcasing mostly new
material from their recently pressed album
(in this case, the understated and moody
You is7 Me). They throw in a few poUshed
gems for the old fans: the brassy "Louisiana" here, the raucous crowd-pleasing "The
Rat" over there. AU this and you've got
yourseU0 a by-the-numbers Walkmen show.
But no matter how many times you
may have seen them, the band consistendy
deUvers a weU-rounded and engaging
set. And if it's controUed you're after, the
Walkmen always play it very cool: barely
breaking a sweat (or smUe for that matter)
while resisting the urge to faU into typical
rock-and-roU cUches.
Adam Simpkins
Battles
Richards on Richards  ^fB$k
September 2
Richard's on Richards. 10:30. No opener.
That's the kind of confidence the N.Y.C.
math rock outfit Battles can afford now
that they've spent a year doing nothing but
getting music critics on their side. Coming
from a blessed musical background though,
who could expect anything different? After
aU, Battles are a bit of a supergroup. The
band's Ian Williams used to belong to Don
CabaUero back in the'90s,Tyondai Braxton
is the. son of legendary sax great Anthony
Braxton and drummer John Stanier used
to play for rock heroes Helmet. Obviously,
Richard's was packed baUs to the waU.
For aU that they're worth, Battles are a
sight to behold. Watching the sweat drip
from Stanier's face as he shreds his drumsticks into a fine sawdust—as he crushes your
eardrums with every snare hit—is a bit Uke
being sexuaUy violated by Hillary Clinton. It's
Uke years of pent-up passive-aggressiveness
finaUy exploding out in bursts of spasmodic
energy, and you don't really have any choice
in the matter of being stunned, even though
you're in terrible pain.
Or what about Braxton, with his underwear-model looks and fingers tapping
so fast on frets and keys that you're certain
he's never had anything short of his own
private harem waiting for him back home?
It's a shame the sound guys boned themselves as badly as they did on his vocals,
because when he started singing the bits
from "Adas," aU we heard was everything
else. You had to be at the far end of the bar
to make anything out.
And the crowd"—Jesus Christ, Battles
fans are violent. Who knew moshing was
stiU popular for kids out of high school?
You can't blame em though. Short of the
asshat sound production, Battles were near
goddamn remarkable.
Benjamin Luk
Mogwai
Commodore Ballroom
September 6
There was a time when you could expect
to leave a Mogwai show with more than
a just sUght ring in the ears. In some ways,
this was welcomed, with the gloomy Scots
turning post-rock jams into red-Uning aural assaults that would stick in your head
UteraUy for days. But with this louder-
than-thou approach the band lost the sub-
dety and tenderness often found on record,
making Mogwai shows a bit disappointing
for those who appreciate them for more
than just rock action. It was surprising then
that this far into the band's career, the five-
piece could learn a few new tricks, as they
turned their recent Vancouver stop into a
performance that, beUeve it ^ribt, was ac-
tuaUy kind of gende.
Showcasing their new The Hawk Is
Howling material, the band traded much
-of their usual harshness forlan inviting set
that drew you closer to the stage rather
than drove you away from it. This wasn't to
say the band didn't occasionaUy bring the
noise—Uke during a raucous, kick-you-
in-the-teeth rendition of their new single
"Batcat"—but they balanced it with those
tender moments, sounding looser and
warmer than you would ever expect. For
once, you could actuaUy pick out whatjvas
lg
20       October 2008 going on in the seven-minute-plus endurance exercises instead of just being clobbered with a deafening waU of distortion.
Making matters even better was Mog-
wai's Uve resurrection of their Young Team
debut, from which they deUvered several
classics such as "Tracy," "Like Herod" and
the show's highUght, a beautifuUy rendered
"Mogwai Fear Satan." In fact, the band
played Uttle other than tracks from Young
Team and those from The Hawk Is Howling, which played surprisingly weU off each
other.
IronicaUy, whUe Mogwai succeeded
by toning it down, openers Fuck Buttons
:could have pushed-it a bit more. The set by
the electronicaUy charged U.K. duo often
felt on the edge of blowing up but never
quite got there. Nevertheless, their performance was hardly a disappointment. It just
got overshadowed by what was Mogwai's
best Vancouver show by far.
Brock Thiessen
TV on the Radio
Miles Benjamin Anthony Robinson
Commodore Ballroom
September 7
The day TV on the Radio's latest album, Dear
Science, leaked, Tunde Adebimpe and friends
wowed the audience at a sold-out Commodore -BaUroom. There was a surprising
amount of talk at the show about the leak—
apparendy everyone was on the baU with
their downloads. The band tried out four or
five of the new songs, and while a few didn't
come off quite as polished as they do on the
album, each one was greeted with a rapturous
response.
ActuaUy, the crowd never wavered in their
shrieking devotion, from the first "oohs" of
"Young Liars" to the last strains of "Staring
at the Sun." And with good reason, namely
that TV on the Radio are almost impossibly
tight on stage. They owe it to a total focus
on the music, with each member immersing himself completely in the performance.
There were moments when four out of five
musicians had their eyes closed, lost in the
feeUng—a state lesser artists aspire to reach,
but that TVOTR seemingly cannot exist
without. Moreover, it meant that the elegiac
"Dreams," hard-hitting "Wolf Like Me," and
new tracks "Halfway Home" and "Dancing
Choose" were as powerful as ever.
It was fascinating to observe the contrasting but complementary personaUties within
the band Adebimpe was jovial, almost bubbly,
in interacting with his bandmates between
songs, while second vocaUst Kyp Malone was
stone-faced and stoic throughout the evening.
Meanwhile, Dave Sitek tended to stay in the
background, providing a steady undercurrent
of guitar and keyboard textures.
Before the evening's main attraction,
Miles Benjarnin Anthony Robinson presented a coUection of driving, big-sounding rock
tunes. He puUed off his yelpy vocal deUvery
weU enough, but it was clear that he was
fighting through some serious throat illness.
Admirably though, he didn't hold anything
back, leading his band in hitting a lot of the
right notes and capping it off by chugging a
beer before his final song.
Simon Foreman
The Juan MacLean
Richard's on Richards
September 9
Richard's never looked so huge. It was 9:30
p.m., and there were more staff than customers in the place. Much of the upper
section was blocked off by stools, and
only two of the bars were staffed.
Sure, it allowed time to admire
the wood grain of the normaUy
packed dance floor, or watch the
mildly confusing images on the
BarNet.tv screens, but it was
hardly a good omen for DFA
stalwarts the Juan MacLean.
ThankfuUy, the final turnout
was enough to half-fiU the
floor (at around 70 or 80
bodies), but still, the mighty
Juan deserved better.
With Less Than Human,
the  last  fuU-length  release,
hit shelves in mid-2005, interest in the group has been
slow to rebudd over the last few
months, as the lacklustre showing at Dick's plainly demonstrated.
But people obviously don't know
what they were    trussing.
The drummer pumped out deep,
steady beats; another guy worked some
vintage synth sounds; MacLean himself
worked keys and a theremin (!) with an
expert touch; and LCD SounHsystem's
Nancy Whang added vocal colour to the
mix. When aU four members going futt-
blast—which happened a lot of the time,
particularly during the shout-along chorus of "Give Me Every Little Thing"—the
party was just waiting to break out, if only
the crowd had been big enough to make it
happen.
Cuts from Less Than Human and ear-
Uer singles were interspersed with newer
material, and each song transformed into
a firebaU of New York-style dancing energy. The appropriately named disco-house
epic "Happy House"—12 minutes long in
recorded form but stretching much longer
in a Uve setting—truly launched the show
into space. The devoted fans in attendance
were left with the firm feeUng they had
made the right choice that evening.
[ed. Low attendance at the show may have
been due to the fact that the last three shows
Juan MacLean booked in Vancouver were
cancelled.]
Simon Foreman
Kellarissa
Hello, Blue Roses
Les Beyond
VIVO
September 13
Three bands came together for KeUarissa's
CD release party at VIVO and put together
a beautiful evening of relaxing music.
Larissa Loyva, a.k.a. KeUarissa, was the .
highUght of the night. She spent her performance seated in front of her Yamaha
SK-15 synth, but her quiet demeanour
masked a mesmerizing presence. VIVO
didn't have an empty seat and aU eyes were
on Loyva's performance. She plucked a few
friends from her other band, the Choir
Mogwai by Gerald Deo
^#^
SH^H^^iEIlIS
Vancouver, Richards on Richards
Victoria, Sugar Nightclub
mssmssB
Discorder Magazine Continued from pg. 21
REAL LIVE
ACTTON
Practice, to sing backup as she played
music from her new album Flamingo.
Before the backup singers joined Loyva,
she used extensive looping to provide her
own backing vocals, which made for an un-
setding—but compelUng—audio experience. She compounded the unfamiUar feelings you get while Ustening to her music
by occasionally singing songs in Finnish.
Loyva's music was strongest when she created a sound of eerie beauty using elements
of carnival music, looping effects and heavy
reverb on her vocals.
Loyva's openers were hit-and-miss, but
they complemented her performance nicely.
Les Beyond—Shearing Pinx member
Erin Jane Ward's side project—kicked the
night off with a long instrumental guitar
soundscape. It was pretty, but it would
make a better movie soundtrack than a Uve
performance.
HeUo, Blue Roses battled with technical
difficulties and what appeared to be inexperience playing their songs Uve. Though they
took a Utde too long getting from one song
to fhe next, their music was good when it
got going. Singer Sidney Vermont brought
a '60s folk aesthetic that she blended with
Dan Bejar's (of Destroyer and the New
Pornographers) glam rock styUngs. On
tracks like "My Shadow Falls" and "HeUo,
Blue Roses" this worked, but sometimes
the stylistic pairing seemed out of place.
A particular highUght of their set was a
cover of Destroyer's "Foam Hands," which
was amazing enough to forgive any lack in
other parts of their performance..
Jordie Yow '
Spiritualized
Commodore Ballroom
September 13
Not looking worse for wear, considering a
fairly recent brush with the reaper, Jason
Pierce led his seven-piece band of spiritual
conduits through a career-spanning set
at the Commodore. And with the understated ease of someone who has seen the
Ught beckoning and decided to come back
down, clearly his work amongst the Uving
is far from finished.
Even with the noticeable absence of
horns and a string section (not to mention maybe a hundred more people in the
congregation), the night was complete. The
trademark white Ught sonic freak-outs were
there, as too were the waves of feedback
and spectral washes of synth noise, inevitably breaking down to a simply strummed
acoustic guitar only to spiral back up to the
heavens. With gospel harmonies suppUed
by two visions in white, and lyrics about
the Lord, drugs, loss, redemption and love,
everything bled together to create the expected SpirituaUzed experience. The stark,
semi-circular stage arrangement (which
inr a strange way resembled a set of headphones) and the subdued yet otherworldly
lighting scheme worked in unison with the
dense, warm sounds to multiply the emotional force that is released when shamelessly baring one's demons and delusions to
the world.
AU grandiose and reUgious metaphors
aside, it surely wasn't the second coming,
it was merely a rock 'n roU show, albeit one
with true heart and soul. And it gave the
Vancouver audience a chance to do what
we do best, kind of just stand there, feet
rooted to the floor, swaying, with crooked
Uttle smUes on our faces. Amazing grace,
indeed. Amen.
Freddy Harder
Shindig #1
Against Civilization
Analog Bell Service
Zombie Pistolero and His Guns
Railway Club
September 16
It can be a daunting task for unknown bands
to secure bookings, which makes Shindig a
chance for local acts to prove they are worthy
of more exposure. On the event's inaugural
night, three bands competed with what at
times seemed Uke fierce tenacity, but in the
end only one would come home with this
night's Shindig crown.
The night started off with Against Civilization. In the beginning, they sounded as
psychedeUc as their wardrobe looked, pumping out some great bass and drums. But their
early psych tease ended up standing in sharp
contrast to the melanchoUc exercise that
dominated the concluding set.
The second band, Analog BeU Service,
possessed- a vast repertoire. Band members
mixed banjo and piano with bass and guitar,
along with some welcomed whistling. Both
lead vocaUsts sounded good and ddmonstrat-
ed great timing as they alternated back and
forth. Analog BeU Service were passionate
in their deUvery and connected weU with the
audience. Illlplii
The last performance came as a solo act.
Zombie Pistolero and His Guns demonstrated an authentic voice, as weU as a genuine conviction in his lyrics. Yet, compared to
the first two bands, Zombie Pistolero's style
and deUvery was more subdued, making the
performance more fitting for an open-mic
night than a rock show.
In the end, it was Zombie Pistolero who
came out the winner on the opening night of
Shindig. However, Analog BeU Service gave
the best performance. They played so many
different instruments, had great chemistry
and showed a lot of substance in their lyrics.
The band were adept at changing tempo between songs with Utde effort, whUe Zombie
Pistolero played the same style throughout
his performance. It would be interesting to
find out how the decision was made.
Shindig #2
Hermetic
Stephanie Lang
Mr. Chancleta & the Bitter Litter
Babies W%M&&.
Railway Club
September 23
Even though the Uneup for Shindig's second night was rumoured not to be as strong
as the previous week, the Railway Club was
stiU busy with CiTR aficionados. Hermetic, Stephanie Lang, and Mr. Chancleta 6c
the Bitter Litter Babies provided an eclectic night, but the competition was more
amusing than fierce.
Hermetic took the stage first. The two-
piece reUed mosdy on drums and guitar,
mixing in some synchronized whistling and
a harmonica here and there. They played
mosdy simple songs with catchy riffs and
soft vocals. The connection between guitarist Eric Axen and drummer Bart'New- =
man made the set easy to enjoy, but it was
the mesmerizing energy of Newman, also
a member of Vancouver s Animal Names,
that made it memorable.
Stephanie Lang and her guitar quickly
took the stage after Hermetic made 'their
exit. Although the Railway Club can feel
as cozy as a coffee shop, Lang's music felt
out of place. Her voice was strong and her
songs were weU-written, but as Shindig
values the interesting, she was not received
too warmly. She finished her set with a
Tegan and Sara cover, disqualifying her
anyway.
Mr. Chancleta & the Bitter Litter Babies were undeniably unique. The Bitter
Litter Babies added an extra Macbook,
guitar, bass and vocals to Mr. Chancleta's
turntables; however, whether or not they
were beneficial is questionable. As one
concert goer pointed out, their sound came
across as "reaUy bad international music
from 40 years into the future." Some audience members held a look of confusion
for the entirety of the set, but others were
dancing on-stage by the end.    ^-
At night's close, Hermetic took first
place. Perhaps their victory came as a result
of Lang's disquaUfication and the sheer ridiculousness of Mr. Chancleta's set, but
their performance gave hints of exceUence.
If they manage to build upon it, night two
wiU not have been in vain.
Becky Sandler
\__
22       October 2008 TTNDF.R RFVTF.W
Civet / Dandi Wind/ Steve Dawson 7 Angela Desveaux & the Mighty Ship
D.O.A. / Fembots 7 Hexes & Ohs / Like A Martyr./ Mother Mother
Rafter / Roots Manuva 7 The Sound of Animals Fighting
The Stolen Organ Family Band / Chad VanGaalen / Young Rival
Civet
Hell Hath No Fury
(Hellcat Records)
It's all in the tide: hell hath no fury like a woman
scorned, and the ladies of Civet are out to prove
it. Rage is in plentiful supply on Civet's fourth
album, their first for Tim Armstrong's HeUcat
Records. The band is clearly at home sharing
a label with the Rancid front-man, as every
one of the 13 tracks is a Mistering punk-rock
workout, with fuzzed-out guitars and breakneck
drums. Singer Liza Graves proves that she has
vocal chords of steel; grunting, growling, and
screaming herself hoarse on every song. There
are scarcely even pauses between tracks, as the
band launches from one bile-fueled diatribe to
another, most of which are unapologeticaUy directed against the opposite sex.
But for all its righteotfs anger, Hell Hath
No Fury falls a little flat. Without any dynamic
shifts, the up-tempo rockers lose some of their
punch, and the songs end up blending into one
another. After 13 tracks of the same, Civet's
formula becomes tired—there are only so many
times a band can use the "group shout-along
chorus" trick and get away with it. Even in the
rare moments when Civet lightens the subject
matter, as on the female solidarity anthem "All
I Want," the music is the same distorted power
chords and frantic rhythms. If Civet had taken
a moment to ease back, listeners would perhaps
be more inclined to join in their shout-alongs.
Alex Hudson
Dandi Wind
Yolk of the Golden Egg
(Summer Lovers Unlimited)
Dandi Wind's new album, Yolk of the Golden Egg
is a sonic journey that challenges every spectrum
of electronica. Tne album is caught somewhere
between a surreal utopic musical vision, and
something that could only have been spawned
from a ritualistic love orgy between Kate Bush,
Bjork and AphexTwin's Richard D.James. Tne
record shows no weaknesses. It opens with "Tne
Battle of Verdun," apdy catching the industrial
busde of its Quebec recording locale, and moves
through a futuristic, cacophonic scene of torture.
Raw, edgy and highly textured, the sounds take
detours through the complexity of the psyche
in a way that txrnld be likened to the spiritual
despair and disillusionment of Trent Reznor,
but with more emphasis on a clear articulation
of ugliness. Never failing to surprise, the song
"Johatsu" sounds like a late '80s dancercise tape,
while suggesting that we should aU "surrender to
the machine."The album dimaxes with the final
track entitied "Dance of the Paralytic," whose
bass-rich beat is juxtaposed with an ineffable
wet thumping noise that brings amniotic fluid
to mind. Though overtly corporeal, the album
is also introspective, as it quotes Dostoevsky
and the parable of the old dreamer rummaging
through his dreams in vain. While its message is
not always accessible, Yolk is a worthwhile musical venture for those who want something a
Utde more violent in spirit.
Mine'Salkin
Steve Dawson
Telescope
(Black Hen Music) -
Recorded at both Vancouver's the Factory Studios and in his home studio the Henhouse, Steve
Dawson's second release this year is a pedal
steel-infused instrumental ride through this
prolific B.C. songwriter's musical mind. Many
fans of Dawson's work wiU recognize long-time
collaborators Chris Gestrin, who has played
with Randy Bachman and k-os, on keyboards
and Keith Lowe, who has played with Fiona
Apple and BUI Frissel, on bass. Scott Amendola
is featured on drums and guest appearances are
made by Vancouver'jazz trumpeters J.R Carter
and Brad Turner.
Tne album opens with "Caballero's Dream,"
a moody track that sounds like it could be the
theme music to a spaghetti western. Dawson
shows that his time spent learning the pedal-
steel guitar with Greg Leisz (care of a Canada
Council grant) was not wasted. It is a wonderful addition to his already large arsenal of
stringed instruments. There are lots of intriguing sounds on this album, and Dawson's production includes both fluid improvisation and
planned song structures. Apart from the over-
' arching sound of the pedal steel, the album features an eclectic array of instruments including
Wurlitzer, Fun Machine, Moog, pump organ,
ukulele, banjo and glockenspiel. Dawson single-
handedly composed all but one of the songs on
the album. "1000 Year Old Egg" was co-written
with Gestrin. Impressive musicianship; clever
production and innovative use of instruments
make this release a gem. The melodies are so
compelUng that you often don't even notice
Telescope's absence of words. .
Linda Bull
Angela Desveaux & the Mighty Ship
Angela Desveaux & the Mighty Ship
(Sonic Unyon)
Montreal-based singer songwriter Angela Desveaux has written an eclectic.bunch of tunes,
ranging from atmospheric alt-country to folk,
pop and rock on her second and self-tided release. WhUe her first album Wandering Eyes, recorded by Howard BUerman of Arcade Fire in
2006, introduced audiences to her sultry country-tinged vocals, this new album confirms her
skill as a songsmith and band leader.
Desveaux grew up in Cape Breton and was
influenced by the rich local Irish and French
musical traditions, as weU as by the pop country
music of her parents' record coUection. You can
hear those influences throughout this release, as
. beautiful warm-voiced baUads are placed alongside jangly rock guitar tunes. The addition of a
small horn section is a lovely surprise, especially
on the opening to "Mighty Ship," a wonderful
old-time country anthem.
While the core of her band is guitarist Mike
Feuerstack, bassist Eric Digras and drummer
Gilles CastiUoux, Desveaux also adds in other
elements including pedal steel guitar, trumpet,
saxophone, keyboards and vioUns. Comprised of
aU original material written by Desveaux, this
album showcases her strong storyteUing skills
and places her as a welcome voice on the Canadian music scene.
Linda Bull
D.OA.
Northern Avenger
(Sudden Death Records)
Local punk legends D.O.A. return to their roots
for their 30th anniversary as a band, with Northern Avenger, their 12th studio album. Packed
full of energetic songs, the album was produced
by Jamey Koch and Bob Rock, the latter having
worked with Metallica, the Offspring and long
standing Vancouver punk group the Pointed
Sticks. For some punk bands, being linked to
a commercial producer might signify an artistic
crisis. But for a band as raw-edged as D.O.A.,
this is an ideal partnership, and the result is an
album that is fast, lean and dirty.
With the exception of a coyer of JohnFoga-
rtys "Who WiU Stop the Rain," all songs are
Written by singer Joe Keithly. "Poor Poor Boy" is
an interesting juxtaposition of a song with lyrics
about hunger on Hastings Street backed by ska
instrumentation. "This Machine KiUs Fascists"
(an accolade popularized by Woody Guthrie
long before it was an Anti-Flag song) is a departure from the typical D.O.A. sound, but it is
so short, that it sounds Uke an intro to the antiwar "How Long TiU The Day," which foUows it
rather than a fuUy fleshed song, which is a shame
because it's quite good. Perhaps the refrain that
symboUzes both the album and the band itself
is the anthemic "StiU A Punk," which addresses
the relevance of the movement in today's poUtical climate. In a time where punk has become
synonymous in coordinating your eyeliner With
those litde plastic bracelets (for both males and
females; mainstream "punk" having achieved
gender equality in fashion, if nothing else) the
dissenting voice of D.O.A. is as relevant" today
as it ever was.
Melissa Smith
our everyday Uves into lyrical gold and bringing
Calling Out ftdl circle.
Justin Langille
Fembots
Calling Out
(Weewerk Records)
In our techno-sawy society, seldom do we hear
about the wise proverbs of old. However, Toronto's Fembots have decided to make "one
man's trash their treasure" the theme of their
new album. Main Bots Dave Mackinnon and
Brian Poirer had initially imagined Calling Out
as a record of songs made entirely with "junk-
struments" (home-made instruments fashioned
from garbage) designed by their friend, artist Iner Souster. However, after recording the
meat of the rhythm tracks, they deemed their
project too experimental and dysfunctional to
bring to fruition. Instead of punishing themselves further, they retreated to the Sudbury
home of songwriting couple Nathan Lawr and
Kate Maki to transform their material into a full
rock n' roU opus. With Lawr on drums, Souster
rocking the junkstruments and Paul Aucoin
handling vibes and percussion, the group have
written eleven joyous, piano-driven songs that
rival the best moments of roots pop masters
Uke WUco or Buffalo Tom. Insightful tracks
like "Good Days" and the brilliant "God Keep
Our Hands Clean" stand out from the pack,
transforming the mundane subject matter of
Hexes & Ohs
Bedroom Madness
(Noise Factory Records)
Currendy touring across Canada, this Montreal
electro-pop duo has ten years of couplehood
under their belt, both romantic and musical. For
the most part, Bedroom Madness, their second
fuU-length album, reflects this bond. "H-H-
HighschooFis a perfect album opener, bringing
energy and succinct electro-pop rhythms. It is
masterfully mixed with shouts and electric bass.
The electric banjo on "Litde Birds" is a terrific
departure from the standard synth, and "In High
Places" would make an ideal choice for a second
single. Unfortunately, many other songs neglect
this sense of enthusiasm, whimsy and sheer energy, as Hexes &Ohs have taken the electronica
they employed with great success on their 2005
single "Whaddaya Know?" and focused ori it
to the detriment of musical variety. In several
songs guitars are employed just enough to reengage and reinforce the fact that Edmund Lam
and Heidi Donnelly are talented musicians, but
overaU, synthesizer blips carry every track, with
vocals that have been auto-tuned and refined
until only Donnelly sounds distinct. Lead singer
Lam often sounds very simUar to Ben Gibbard;
not untalented by any stretch, but lacking his
own identity. The lyrics on Bedroom Madness are
soUd, and the music is polished and catchy, but
the two don't fit together, and as the album progresses it begins to seem Uke too much of the
same thing. This is not to say that the album is
without high points. OveraU it showcases some
very real talent, with many enjoyable songs, but
veers too much between above-average and boring in-between.
Rose Eckert-Jontzie
Like A Martyr
The North
(Independent)
At first blush local Like A Martyr's debut album
The North sounds Uke another standard hard-
rock schlock product that sticks around for a
whUe, eventually imploding, never to be heard
from again. But first impressions can be wrong.
In this day of coundess colour-by-numbers acts
cluttering up the airwaves, straight-up unapolo-
getic hard rock can be hit or miss at best, but
Like A Martyr,have guts and could be on to
Continued on pg. 24
Discorder Magazine
23 Under Review Continued from pg. 23
something. While not necessarily my cup of
gravy, like A Martyr have a strong album with
The North. Opening with the tough-as-nails and
dirt-caked "Elizabeth," the band waste no time
in grabbing hold of your inner rocker; while the
lovely, darkly themed lovely track "Empires FaU"
offers very real introspection. AU in all, this music is a Utde bit of southern fried blues, swim-
ming in a sea of hooky hard rock goodness. Like
A Martyr have created an album that brings to
mind barroom fights, summertime drinking and
tawdry love affairs with fast women; by means of
a lyrical content that suggests a more self actualized and sensitive viewpoint. While not smashing down any great musical walls, The North is
weU poUshed, skillfuUy played and confident.
This is good time hard rock at its best, and for a
first effort, a mighty tip of the hat is in order.
Nathan Pike
MOTHER MOTHER
OMYf
vocoder-—Sweaty Magic is set apart from earUer
releases with the immediate and spontaneous
feel of this recording. Ihe project began as a
collaboration with photographer Lizeth Santos in which both artists agreed to produce one
piece of work a day for a week. The result of this
self-constraint is seven rough-and-ready songs
that seem to have one goal in mind: to make
you dance. Listening to the EP, one can almost
work backwards through the recording process,
moving through layer after layer of interwoven .
additions until the random element that was
the starting point for Rafter's studio magic is
reached. For example, the slow build of'Juicy"
takes a simple looped acoustic guitar riff and
embeUishes it into an electro-pop anthem, while
the scattered logic of ^Sweat" rides a crunchy
five-note baseline into a handful of different
musical styles in less than a minute and a half.
Clocking in under 20 minutes in total, the EP
provides a crash Course in everything that makes
Rafter's music so exciting and it's guaranteed to
get you moving as weU.
Aaron Goldsman
Like so many other outsider musicians, Tne
Stolen Organ Family Band define themselves
against their mainstream peers by keeping it
straight-up weird. Hading from Kelowna, B.C.
this three-piece has put together a debut that is
equal parts sonic slop-fest and weU conceived
album. From the abrasive guitar squawks of
"AUo Hezus Locale" to the odd jangUng hooks
of mega-cute ditty "Hans," Baby Bucket Slops
revels in the off-key singing, twisted blues and
lofi hum that characterize most zealous garage
band experiments. The arrangement and mu-
sicaUty of the songs hold their frail structures
together in a way that smacks definitively of
Ween, or the odd orchestral folk of the Magical
String Band. The trio do play mosdy within %he
vein of rock, but manage to traverse through diverse territory, such as hoUering mangled ballad
that Is "Special Boy," or near up-tempo punk,
Uke "The Beast is WUd!." Despite a couple of
drawn out numbers, and demo quality cover art,
The Stolen Organ kids have etched out an admirable draft of their vision that promises great
things for the future.
Justin Langille
and words become unnecessary. While the band
name brings to mind a 14-year-old Brooklynite
with a propensity for the words "drive-by" and
"ho," Young Rival is actuaUy comprised of four
lads from the smog-filled environs of Hamilton,
Ont. The six song EP manages to reference several distinctly odder sounds (the Yardbirds, the
Velvet Underground, Some Youth) while remaining cohesive, modern and fresh. This is unsurprising, as all of the tracks were produced by
Emery Dobyns, who has worked with the likes
of Patti Smith and Lou Reed. The first track
"Your Island" is fiUed with so much jangly power pop goodness it should be bottled and sold
over the counter. "Poisonous Moves" continues
with jangly guitars, accompanied by melodies
that wiU appeal to fans of the Britpop sound, as
wul "4:15," reminiscent of Stone Roses in their
prime. Rumour has it that the band is even more
impressive Uve, so it would be wise to catch their
only appearance in Vancouver at Pat's Pub on
Oct. 11 before-they become ridiculously huge.
Melissa Smith
Mother Mother
Oh My Heart
(Last Gang Records)
There is something so very West Coast and
homey about Mother Mother's breezy style of
musk and Oh My Heart, the Vancouver band's
freshly released second album, is no exception.
. Time, experience, and a decent studio budget
have afforded Mother Mother the means to create an album of extremely catchy tunes, along
with the sharing vocal interplay that has become part of the band's signature sound. Stand
out tracks such as "Burning Pile" speak of self-
awareness and growth, whue "Hayloft" carries
an afro-electronic feel and shows a band that is
. unafraid to experiment with new and interesting musical ideas. Lending a hand, and adding
their own sense of style are a host of guest musicians; such as Peggy Lee on ceUo and the warm,
unmistakable sound of J.P. Carter on trumpet.
At times reminiscent of the Pixies or the
Breeders, Oh My Heart is a highly respectable foUow-up that shows maturity and charm,
while staying true to a formula that works well
for them. Naturally sweetened with just the
right amount of pop-sensibUities, Oh My Heart
guides the Ustener on a musical journey that wiU
stick with them long after the CD has played
out. It seems rather suiting that fish and fishhooks grace the album artwork on the cover and
liner; acting as a forewarning of the imminent
musical hooking that new listeners may undergo.
Nathan Pike
Rafter ^^^J
Sweaty Magic
(Asthmatic Kitty Records)
In the wake of Sex Death Cassettes released
earlier this year, Rafter Roberts is back with a
new EP of his special brand of dense, bizarre
art-pop. Although most of his signature flourishes are present on the record—the kitchen
sink of bizarre production details, a quirky and
unpredictable rhythm section, Uberal use of the
Roots Manuva
Slime & Reason
(Big Dada)
When you put on a hip-hop record,,you can
generaUy count on a beat that's easy to skank
to. You rarely expect deft lyrical craftsmanship
and candid meditations on life. Once in a while,
however, you come across an album that deUv-
ers both. Roots Manuva's latest release Slime
& Reason manages to come pretty close, combining the danceable rhythms and sauciness a
dancehaU audience expects, with the haunted
pathos born of an impoverished, Christ-steeped
childhood. Rodney Smith, the mastermind behind Roots Manuva, is apparendy undergoing
some growing pains; his powerful personal insights have started to bleed into his raw, musical
instincts, producing such soul-bUstering tracks
as "Let The Spirit" and "It's Me Oh Lord."1he
subtext of spirits and emotional baggage doesn't
detract from Smith's frenetic energy and sense
of humour, which is in fine form on this album;
see "Buff Nuff," a tongue-in-cheek dancehaU
track in which Smith offers his object of desire
a ride on his bicycle in exchange for sex.
Smith can occasionally get in his own way
with the ingenuity he lavishes on his music. On
first Usten, it's easy to be distracted by production frills and Smith's own weirdness. But the
warmth of the lyrics, not to mention the near-
perfect grooves present on almost every track,
make second and third Ustenings unavoidable.
Don't let the creepy album art scare you off—
Slime & Reason is a refreshing reminder that
music designed to make you move can also have
the power to make you sit down and say, "huh."
Miranda Martini
The Stolen Organ Family Band
Baby Bucket Slops
(Babynuts Records)
Chad VanGaalen
Soft Airplane
(Flemish Eye / Sub Pop)
Recorded in his basement with the help of only
a. few friends, Chad VanGaalen has made the
most of his humble resources, crafting an album
of rich sonic textures and diverse instrumentation. "WiHowTree," Soft Airplane's banjo-driven opening track, could easily pass for a Sufjan
Stevens song, with accordion and glockenspiel
creating a lush backdrop for VanGaalen's tremulous falsetto. Elsewhere, Soft Airplane ventures
into loft electronica; the gUtchy beats and bUppy
keyboards of "Phantom Anthills" could have
been Ufted from any pre-1995 Nintendo game,
whue TMNT Mask" is a straight-ahead dance
track
Chad VanGaalen's sonic experiments alone
would make Soft Airplane worth a Usten, but
it's his songwriting chops that make the album
truly memorable, with lyrics that are poignant
and rich with imagery. "I can hear the cries of
the dead / Muffled by the ground / But stiU loud
enough to make it out" he sings on "Cries of
the Dead." The hypnotic "Bones of Man" has
an indelible hook that wiU be stuck in your head
for days, which would be annoying if the song
wasn't so damn good. "Frozen Energon," the last
track on Soft Airplane, is a four-minute assault
of angry, overdriven guitar and dense electronic
effects. And although this dissonant conclusion
is a far cry from the pop sensibiUties that inform
the rest of the songs, it is nevertheless a fitting
end to an album as eclectic and unpredictabkas
Soft Airplane.
Alex Hudson
The Sound of Animals Fighting
The Ocean And The Son
(Epitaph Records)
For their new album, The Ocean And The Sun, the
Sound of Animals Fighting has clearly studied
the prerequisite gimmicks for any prog-rock
album; the bizarre intro track; long, inscrutable tides similar to those from Of Montreal;
a majority of songs that are either under two
minutes or over six; and, of course, tons of wailing guitar noise. The Ocean And The Sun sees the
band in its most economic outfit yet, with only
five members contributing to the recording, but
that doesn't mean they are willing to skimp on
energy or power; the band's characteristic barrage of interwoven sounds is the first thing to
hit listeners the instant they press play.
The band's self-professed goal is to draw
Usteners' attention to the musical experience,
rather than to the artists themselves, and Usteners are mosdy rewarded in their effort. This esoteric approach is undeniably aUenating on first
contact—but then again, this is probably intentional. While the band frequendy veers into
senselessness, it is always tempered by a feeUng
that there is a perimeter to their madness, which
the band explores and pushes, but never strays
beyond. However, the affected anonymity of the
album does infect a few tracks with a feeUng of
scattered indifference. The Ocean And The Sun is
the product of a band whose sound is stiU maturing, but behind its pomp and bluster lurks a
nuanced, affecting commentary on human society, making this a worthy addition to the band's
oeuvre. ilippf^il
Miranda Martini
Young Rival
Young Rival
(Independent)
How many ways can you say absolute ass shaking exceUence? The question is rhetorical and an
answer is not expected. Just put on this debut EP
October 2008 Q£toher....L^.i]^n,Yffiy][	
#
Artist
Album
Label
26
The Weirdies* \
The Weirdies In 3D
Independent
Strictlv the Dovest Hits ofOctober
27
Women*
S/T
Flemish Eye
#
Artist
Album
Label
[28
D.O.A.*
Northern Avenger
Sudden Death
It n
Chswl VanGaalen*
Soft Airplane
Flemish Eye/Sub Pop
29
Ulrich Schnauss
Stars
Domino
[2
Defektors*
Hexes &^f||j||0'
ScWTnals
Bedroom Madness
Nominal
Noise Factory 1 ~.
[300
Torche
Meanderthal
HydraHead
| 31" .
Crystal Anders
S/T
Touch And Go
4
Dylan Thomas 8c The Vancouver
Fortune Tetter
Miracle Fish
Sakamano
32 .
Legendary Pink Dots ^.*^\{>V
Plutonium Blonde
Roir
nb
The ParaUels*
Arms To Hold %u
LaTiDa
33;   .
Lady Dottie &1he Diamonds
S/T
Hi-Speed Soul
6
Dandi Wind*
Yolk Of Tne Golden
Egg
Summer Lovers
Unlimited
34-
Kimya Dawson
Alphabutt
K
35
Beck
Modern Guttt
DGC
\%~i'M
Thfej^^^p
Haute/Voltage
Independent
36- -
The Royal We
S/T
Domino   -
18
What's Wrong Tohei?*
S/T
Independent
37
Twin Crystals
_/T
SLU
|9
i^^y|leii*we MiiM^
Rermk>Cube
PaperBag
38
One Hundred Dollars*-
Forest Of Tears
Independent
|lO
The Stolen Minks*
High Kicks
New Romance For Kids
39
Lustmord
Other
HydraHead
.flpl
The Clips'1
Matterhorn
Independent
40
White Lung*
Breaking Boxes/Amy 0
Hockey Dad
12
Final Fantasy*
Final Fantasy*
Spectrum, 14th
Century
Pkyf Tk Please
Blocks Recording Club
Blocks Recording Club
f41 " '
Pram
Tne Moving Frontier
Domino •
42
Fucked Up*
Year Of The Pig
Matador    g
King Khan 8c The Shrines
The Supreme Genius Of King
Khan &The Shrines
Vice
14
Bison B.C.*
Quiet Earth
Metal Blade
■^SSl
Snailhouse* -
Lies On The Prize
UnfamiUar
1.44"
Various*
JAte Your Legs
Thankless
16
Various*
Emergency Room
V61.1
Nominal
45
Young Rival*
S/T
Independent
Cancer Bats
Hail Destroyer
Distort
'■E^Ba
Coin Gut&pfef'
Pigeonkss
Vanity   J
f- 47 - •
Steve Dawson*
Telescope
Black Hen
18
Stereolab
The Wa8|ii|||%S
Chemical Chords
You St Me
4AD
Gigantic
1 48
FemBots*
Catting Out
Weewerk
4?
Tricky
Council Estate
Domino
20
FleetFoses
The Fau^fife^
Black Sejt
Sub Pop
Independent
50 .
Sonk Youth
Sonic Youthe med Mats GustatV
son og Mersi>ow
-SYFf    '
p22
The Green Hour Band*
S/T
Kingdom
kOTR
s charts reflect what's been soun on the air for the orevious month.
23
Okkervil BfBpjj '
The Stand Ins
Jagjaguwar
Rekkids with stars (*) mean they come from this great land 0' ours. Most of these phat
F24    ■
Woodpigeon*
Treasury Library
Canada
Awesome Calgary
Awesome
blatte
can't
rs can-be found at finer (read: mdependent) music stores across Vancouver. If you
ind 'em there give the Muzak Coordinator a shout at 604-822-8733. His name is
250-;
Novillero*
A litde Tradition
Mint
|comrr
lunityradio charts check out www.earshot-online.com.
Who's playing? When is it? Who's putting it on?
Where is it? Who're they? What do they sound like?
How much are tickets? Who's in that band?
Who else does he play in? Where did they play last?
When was that show? Where is that place?
What band's she from? What was his old band?
Has it been announced? Who're they playing with?
How do I get ahold of them? Did they break up?
Are they recording? Are they on tour?
Are they still looking? Where does she book shows?
What kind of music is it? Who books that kind of stuff?
When   was   that?   Where   was   it?   Who   played?
WHERE CAN I EIND OUT???
c
*_____*_._____._.
_\A _____
LiveMusicVancouver.com
comprehensive live music listings
Discorder Magazine
25 ^»            W
SUNDAY
SUNDAY           MONDAY
^____m     1
TANA RADIO (World) 9-I0am
fantastics and more.   .
I T
^
6AM
SHOOKSHOOKTA
THE RIB (Eclectic) 4-5pm
__M^^^^^^ 1
^
BBC
(Talk) 10-1 lam
A program which targets Ethiopian
Explore the avant garde world of
music with host Rotiyn Jacob on
1                 ■
w
7AM
BBC
people and aims at encouraging
The V__. From new electronic and
__tw^.k
Os
education and personal develop
experimental music to improvised
r^
8AM
ment in Canada.
jazz and new classical! So weird it
l j
Si
KOLNODEDI
could blow your mind!
NEWS 101 (News/Talk) 5-5:30pm
HH
s5
9AM
BREAKFAST
(World) \\zia-\2Vm
Beautiful arresting beats and voices
Vancouver's only live, volunteer-
TANA RADIO
WITH
emanating from all continents, cor
produced student and community
newscast. Every week, we take a
hs^H
^
^
THE BROWNS
ners, and voids.. East Asia. South
Asia. Africa. The Middle East Eu
look back at the week's local, na
10AM
SHOOKSHOOKTA
rope. Latin America. Gypsy. Fusion.
tional and international news, as
seen from a fully independent media
•"-^
11AM
§
Always rhythmic, always captivating
Always crossing borders.
perspective.
. J
*K4
KOL NODEDI
GROUND CONTROL
—
THE ROCKERS SHOW
CAREER FAST TRACK
(Talk) 5:30-pm
h^
(Reggae) 12-3pm
Reggae inna all styles and fashion.
SOME SOUND
_ ^
12PM
ALTERNATIVE RADIO
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
(Indie Rock) 6-7:30pm
SON OF NTTE DREEMS
rn
1PM
THE ROCKERS
(Roots) 3-5pm
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-boots
(Eclectic) 6-7:30pm
l    j
^
q
SHOW
—
country.
Join jolly John Tanner, radio survi
. ^^^
PARTS UNKNOWN
SHAMELESS (Eclectic) 3-5pm
vor for almost half a century now
^^__^^
Dedicated to giving any local music
heard alternating Mondays with) an
2PM
—
act in Vancouver a crack at some air
eclectic musical mix of many eras
from the '50s to today. [
\___________d
play. When not playing the PR shtick,
you can hear some faves you never
RADIO FREE GAK
|»BKSbI
3PM
LET'S GET BAKED
_
knew you liked.
(M*.RofltJ7:30-9pm
THE JAZZ SHOW
^S^
BLOOD ON
THE SADDLE
SHAMELESS
)     CHIPS WITH EVERYTHING
(Rp) 5-6pm
(Jazz) 9pm- 12am
^^^^^
P
P
g
"+»*
4PM
THE RIB
British pop music from all decades.
Oct. 6: A month of classics and essential recordings starting with the
pivotal Coltrane album: Gimt Steps.
P-H
5PM
International pop (Japanese, French,
Swedish, British, US, etc.), 60s sound
CHIPS WITH
EVERYTHING
SAINT    ;
NEWS 101
tracks and lounge. Book your jet-set
Oct 13: Vibist/composer Teddy
^^J
TROPEZ }
CAREER FAST TRACK
holiday now!
SAMT TROPEZ (Pop) 5-6pm
Charles may not be a household
name to many but his Tentet was an
____t_w^-
i^
6PM
SON OF NITE
DREEMS
Welcome to St Tropez! Playing underrated music from several decades!
important groundbreaking band. Tonight, The Teddy Charles Tentet
^H
<3
QUEERFM
SOME SOUND
<sLtwpezl01.9@gmmLcom>
Oct. 20: Bassist/composer Charles
J
^>
7PM
QUEER FM (Talk) 6-8pm
Mingus recorded this just before this
band broke up and it's one of his
most intense and creative discs...
rV
S
^
£
8PM
RADIO FREE GAK
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bisexual,
and transexual communities of Van
RHYTHMS
INDIA
All AWESOME
couver. Lots of human interest fea
Mingus Promts Mingus.
Oct. 27: Pianist/composer Theloni
tures, background on current issues,
O
and great music.
ous Monk's Brilliant Comers album
. _r> ______
Ot
9PM
MONDO TRASHO
<queerfinradw@gmaiLcom>
rescued him from obscurity and
¥     ^
RHYTHMSINDIA (World) 8-9pm
placed him at the cutting edge.
I        1
P
Rhythmsindia features a wide range
Monk with Sonny Rollins, Max
V^J
10PM
THE JAZZ SHOW
of music from India, including popu
Roach and Oscar Pettiford.
^^r
tj   ,
lar music from the 1930s to the pres
VENGEANCE IS MINE
11PM
TRANCENDANCE
ent; Ghazals and Bhajans, Qawwalis,
(Punk) 12-2am
_^t^_
p
pop, and regional language numbers.
Going on 8 years strong, this is your
_^^^\
ALL AWESOME IN YOUR EARS
home for all the best the world of
r      i
(Eclectic) 8-9pm
punk rock has to offer.
I     J
i
12AM
MONDO TRASHO  "^Pg^
(Eclectic) 9-10pm
TUESDAY
X<
^
^
VENGEANCE IS MINE
The one arid the only Mondo
PACIFIC PICKIN' (Roots) 6-8am
_^.   A
1AM
Trasho with Maxwell Maxwell—
Bluegrass, old-time music, and its
- derivatives with Arthur and the
P*
1
don't miss it!
TRANCENDANCE
lovely Andrea Berman.
ra|<3«M^V|
2AM
(Dance) 10pm-12am
<pacifapickin@iiahoo.com>
Join us iri practicing the ancient art
GIVE'EM THE BOOT
3AM
CITR RE-BROADCAST
of rising above common ideas as
. (World) 8-9:30am
^
your host DJ Smiley Mike lays down
the latest trance cuts.
Sample the various flavours of Italian folk music. Una programma
gSHI
1
CITR RE-BROADCAST
<trancendance@hotmailcom>
bilingue che esplora il mondo della
4AM
MONDAY
musica folk italiana.
THIRD TIME'S THE CHARM
BREAKFAST WITH THE
(Rock) 9:30^11:30am
SAM
BROWNS (Eclectic) 8-1 lam
Open your ears and prepare for a
shock! A harmless note may make -
Your favourite Brownsters, James
and Peter, offer a savoury blend of
you a fan! Deadlier than the most
WENER'S BARBEQJJE
ion and inanity. Not to be missed!
<cmiiabmder@hotmaaI.com>
Sweet treats from the pop un
the familiar and exotic in a blend
dangerous criminal!
(Sports) 4:30-6pm
<dJ@jackoebet.net>
FOLK OASIS (Roots) 8-10pm
derground. Hosted by Duncan,    '4.*^-"-
of aural delights, breakfastwiththe-
<borninsixtynine@hotmail.com>
Tune in each week to hear Daryl
JOP ROCKS (Pop) 10-11:30am
Two hours of eclectic folk/roots mu-
sponsored by donuts. <duncwisdonuts.
browns@hotmail.com.
MORNING AFTER SHOW
Wener talk about the world of       .     ,J
ANOIZE (Noise) 11:30am-lpm
■ sic, with a big emphasis on our local
worapress.com>
GROUND CONTROL
(Eclectic) 11:30am- lpm
sports. I'll discuss everything from          i
\n hour and a half of avant rock,
scene. C'mon in! A kumbaya-free
WE ALL FALL DOWN
(Eclectic) \\-\2pm
An eclectic mix of indie with rock,
the Vancouver Canucks to
the
loize, plunderphonic, psychedelic,
zone since 1997.
(Eclectic) l-2pm
Fun and independent music support
experimental, world, reggae, ounk
World Rock Paper Scissors Champi
ind outsider aspects of audio. An
<folkoasis@gmmlcom>
Punk rock, indie pop, and whatever
ed by a conversational monologue of
and ska from Canada, Latin Amer
onship. <ethanwener@hotmaiLcom>
.xperience for those who want to be
JUICEBOX (Talk) 10-11PM
else I deem worthy. Hosted by a
-   information, opinion and anecdote
ica and Europe. Local bands play
FLEXYOURHEAD
ducated and EARitated.
Developing sexual health, expressing
closet nerd. <wwmwea_falldo7vncitr.
focussing on the here, the now, and
live on the Morning After Sessions.
(Hardcore) 6-8pm
<lukemeat@hotmaiL com >
diversity, celebrating queerness, and
blogspot.ca>
the next week.
LAUGH TRACKS (Talk) l-2pm
Punk rock and hardcore s
rHE GREEN MAJORITY
encouraging pleasure at all stages.
INK STUDS (Talk) 2-3pm
<becktrex@gmaiLcom>
Laugh Tracks is a show about
1989. Bands and guests from
Talk) l-2pm
" <www.juiceboxradh.com>
Ink Studs focusses on underground
ALTERNATIVE RADIO
comedy. Kliph Nesteroff from the
around the world.
DEMOCRACY NOW (Talk) 2-3pm
HANS KLOSS'
and indie comix. Each week, we
(Talk) 12-lpm
'zine Generation Exploitation, hosts.
SALARIO MINIMO
RUMBLETONE RADIO
(HansKhss) llpm-lam
interview a different creator to get
Hosted by David Barsamian.
<generatumexploit@jiahoo.com, musical-
(World) 8-10pm
K GO GOjKefltj 3-5pm
This is pretty much the best thing
their unique perspective on comix
PARTS UNKNOWN (Pop) l-3pm
boot@yahoo.ca>
The best rock in Spanish show in Can
••rimitive, fuzzed-out garage mayhem!
on radio.
and discuss their own interesting
Parts Unknown, an indie pop show
REELTOREAL
ada since 2000. None of that tropical        i
\RTS REPORT (Talk) 5-5:30pm
THURSDAY
and upcoming works.
that has been on CiTR since 1999,
(Talk) 2:30-3pm
stuff here. No aceptes imitaciones!
^NADIAN VOICES
CRIMES & TREASONS
is like a marshmallow sandwich: soft
Movie reviews and criticism.
<salanammimo@fahoo.com>
*jb»'
7oftJ5:30-6:30pm
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
(Hip Hop) 3-5pm
and sweet and best enjoyed when
NATIVE SOLIDARITY NEWS
\ND SOMETIMES WHY
(Talk) 8-10am
<crimesandtreasons@grnaiLcom>
poked with a stick and held close
(Talk) 3-4pm
WiLJJiNll^LJAY      I
Top/Eclectic) 6:30-8pm
SWEET AND HOT
PEDAL REVOLUTIONARY
to afire.
' A national radio service and part of
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
"irst Wednesday of every month.
(Jazz) 10-12pm
(Talk) 5-§pm
LET'S GET BAKED (Talk) 3-4pm
an international network of informa
(Eclectic) 8- 10am
jAMSQUANTCH'S HIDEAWAY
Sweet dance music and hot jazz
<pedaheoolutimiary@gmail.cem,>
Vegan baking with "rock-stars" like
tion and action in support of indig
Live from the Jungle Rooir
Eclectic) 6:30-8pm
from the 1920s, 30s and 40s.
STEREOSCOPIC REDOUBT
Laura Peek, The Food Jammers,
enous peoples' survival and dignity.
radio host Jack Velvet for a
n eclectic       i
Ul-Canadian music with a focus on
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
(Rock) 6-7:30pm
Knock Knock Ginger, The Super-
WINGS (Talk) 4-4:30pm
mix of music, sound bites, informa-    1  l
ndie-rock/pop.
Eclectic) 12-lpm
Psychadelic, acid punk, freakbeat,
26       October 2008 TUESDAY      WEDNESDAY    THURSDAY          FRIDAY          SATURDAY
PACIFIC PICKIN'
BBC
BBC
BBC
BBC
FILLIN
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
FILLIN
THE SATURDAY EDGE
GIVE'EM THE BOOT
SYNCHRONICITY
FILL IN
SWEET AND HOT
EURD TIME'S THE CHARM
SKA-T'S SCENIC DRIVE
ANOIZE
MORNING AFTER SHOW
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
THESE ARE THE BREAKS
GENERATION
ANNIHILATION
FILLIN
THE GREEN MAJORITY
WE ALL FALL DOWN
THE BROADCAST
POWERCHORD
LAUGH TRACKS
DEMOCRACY NOW
INKSTUDS
RADIO ZERO
REELTOREAL
ATIVE SOLIDARITY NEWS
RUMBLETONE
RADIO A GO GO
CRIMES &TREASONS
CODE BLUE
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
WINGS
WENER'S BBQ.
ARTS REPORT
FILLIN
PEDAL
REVOLUTION
NEWS 101
LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
CANADIAN VOICES
STEREOSCOPIC
REDOUBT
UBC THUNDERBIRDS SPORTS
*      NASHAVOLNA
FLEXYOURHEAD
AND
SOMETIMES
WHY
SAM-
SQUANTCH'S
HIDEAWAY
SHADOW JUGGLERS
EXQUISITE CORPSE
FOLK OASIS
SALARIO MINIMO
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
JUICEBOX
RADIO HELL
RAINBOW GROOVE
HANS KLOSS'
MISERY HOUR
FILLIN
SHAKE A TAIL
FEATHER
BEATS FROM THE
BASEMENT
I LIKE THE SCRIBBLES
CITR REBROADCAST
CITR RE-BROADCAST
CITR RE-BROADCAST
AIJRALTI
:ntacles
CITR RE-BROADCAST
prog and other grotesque and socially relevant artifacts from 1965 to
today, with a particular emphasis on
Vancouver's freak flag with pride.
<wwwmjispace.com/stereoseopicredoubt>
EXQUISITE CORPSE
(Experimental) 7:30-9pm
Experimental, radio-art, sound collage, field recordingsJ"etc.
Recommended for the insane.
<artcorpse@yahoo.com>
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
(Live Music) 9-1 lpm
Featuring live band(s) every week
performing in the CiTR Lounge.
Most are from Vancouver, but sometimes bands from across the country
and around the world are nice
enough to drop by to say 'Hi.'
AURAL TEOTACLES
(Eclectic) 12-6am
It could be, global, trance, spoken
word, rock, the unusual and the
weird, or it could be something dif-'
ferent Hosted by DJ Pierre.
<awaltentacles@hotmaiLco,
FRIDAY
SYNCHRONICITY
(Talk) 9-10am
Join host Marie B and discuss
spirituality, health and feeling good.
Tune in and tap in to good vibrations that help you remember why
you're here: to have fun! This is not
your average spirituality show.
SKA-T'S SCENIC DRIVE
(Ska) 10am-12pm
Canada's longest running Ska radio
program. Email requests to
<djskaJt@hotmmLcom>
THESE ARE THE BREAKS
(HipHop) 12-lpm
Top notch crate digger DJ Avi Shack
mixes underground hip hop, old
school classics, and original breaks.
<beatstreet@tehis.net>
THE BROADCAST l-2pm
Betti Forde has been a pro DJ
for over a decade. She's deejayed
throughout the world in places like
Paris, Berlin, Rome and Malmo.
She couldn't be happier to be back
at CiTR with The Broadcast, show-
RADIO ZERO (Eclectic) 2-3:30pm
We play an international mix of
super-fresh weekend party jams
from new-wave to foreign electro,
baile, Bollywood, and whatever else
we feel like, <www.radiozero.com>
NARDWUAR
(Nardwuar) 3:30-5pm
Join Nardwuar the Human Serviette
for an hour and a half of Clam
Chowder flavoured entertainment
Doot doola doot doo... doot doo!
NEWS 101 (Talk)b-.pm
UBC THUNDERBirDS
(Sports) 6-10pm
RAINBOW GROOVE
(Dance/Electronic) 9-10:30pm
Getting you in the mood for the
weekend, DJ BFAD presents a kaleidoscope of funky grooves for your
mind, body & soul
SHAKE A TAIL FEATHER
(SouUR&B) 10:30-12am
The finest in classic soul and rhythm
& blues from the late '50s to the early '70s, including lesser known artists,
regional hits and lost soul gems.'
I LIKE THE SCRIBBLES
(Eclectic) 12-2am
Beats mixed with audio from old
films and clips from the internet
SATURDAY
THE SATURDAY EDGE
(Roots) 8am-12pm
Now in its 22nd year on CiTR, The
Saturday edge is a personal guide to
world fcroots music—with African,
Latin and European music in the
first half, followed by Celtic, blues,
songwriters, Cajun and whatever
else fits! <steveeage3@mac.com>
GENERATION
ANNELHILATION (Punk) 12-lpm
A fine mix of streetpunk and old
school hardcore backed by band
s, guest speakers, and social
<crashnburmadw@tahoo.ca>
POWERCHORD (Metal) l-3pm
Vancouver's longest running metal
show on the air. If you're into music
that's on the heavier/darker side of
the spectrum, then you'll like Power
Chord. Sonic assault provided by
Metal Ron, Gerald Rattlehead and
Geoff the Metal Pimp.   \ -J*fpa'»"if
CODE BLUE (Roots) 3-5pm
From backwoods delta low-down
slide to urban harp honks, blues,
and blues roots with your hosts Jim,
Andy and Paul.
<coaebkte@budd)i-system.org>
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
(World) 5-6pm
The best of mix of Latin American
NASHA VOLNA (World) 6-7pm
News, arts, entertainment and mus
for the Russian community, local
and abroad. <nashaoolna.ca>
SHADOW JUGGLERS
(Dance/Electronic) 7-9pm
Discorder Magazine
The show celebrates its seventh year
on the air. Come join us on Saturday October 18th for a boat cruise
party at Coal Harbour from 7-11
pm. Interested? Write to <shadow
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
(Dance/Electromc/Eclectic) 9-1 lpm
Every show is full of electro bleeps,
retrowave, computer generated,
synthetically manipulated aural
rhythms. If you like everything from
electro/techno/trance/8bit music/
retro '80s this is the show for you!
<www.synapticsandwich.net>
BEATS FROM THE BASEMENT
(HipHop) llpm-lam
Hosted by J-Boogie and Joelboy,
promising listeners the latest '
tracks, the classics, the rare and the
obscure, current events, and the
special features of peeps coming
into the studio. Most importantly
listeners can expect to be entertained... church.
<Uymkiw@gmaiLcom>
27 Final Fantasy for Buttless Chaps Zulu's nsfw sonic selections.
THE BUTTLESS
CHAPS
Cartography CD
Chances are The Buttless Chaps
aren't going to fit nicely into any
descriptor you might try and certainly I
aren't going to sound like anything
else you have on your shelf. They have a knack for defying genres.
Cartography, their sixth studio record, is an imaginative and
seamless journey that drifts from traditional country to new wave
to punk, all performed without irony or pretense and it's a good
thing. Special guest Tim Vesely of Rheostatics fame makes an
appearance on several tracks.
CD 14.98
TV ON THE RADIO
Dear Science CD
Brooklyn's finest TVOTB return wtth
their third release with one clear
modus operandi — to make an
incredible rock record out of a densely text u red aesthetic of fuzz, feed-:
back, strings, synth and beats! 9
Mission accomplished my friends! Bear Science is a cool listen
that is sure to be an instant fall fave and a critics pick come year
end. Clocking in at 11 tracks, this catchy yet highly experimental
and demanding release, finds the group in a darker and more
brooding form than the previous stellar outing Return to Cookie
Mountain. Elements of dub and glam seamlessly combine to form
a solid foundation for SKek's now even more ambitious guitar
work. On top of this vocalists Kyp Malone and Tunde Adebimpe
croon par excellence with some damn fine harmonies which provide the icing on their gloriously rich cake. Recommended.
CD 14.98
FINAL FANTASY
Spectrum, 14th Century CD
In May of 2007, Final Fantasy and members of Beirut went outdoors with instruments, microphones, and Alan Lomax's headphones for an ethnomusicological exercise in fake field recordings
that captures the culture of the fictional land of Spectrum. If you're
expecting dulcimers, Tibetan thigh bones, and fertility prayers,
you'll be surprised by the avant pop, birdsong, and hardcore chanson contained within. Spectrum, 14th Century may have top
notes of Martin Benny's exotica and the hooks of Rogers and
a, but the wit and adventurous arrangements of
m's five songs will be recognizable to any fans of Final
Fantasy's He Poos Clouds. Spectrum, 14th Century is one of two
very different EPs Final Fantasy is releasing this fall.
CD 10.98
DEERHOOF
Offend Maggie CD
On Offend Maggie, a friction
between tragic and comic, masculine and feminine, is played out in
spectacularly dramatic fashion. This
famously cheerful band can certainly
summon the thunderclouds when
needed. Like the traditional enka music of Japan 1
counts among her childhood influencesr these songs are often
haunted by heartbreak and frustration, but at the same time they're
universal, and meant to give courage4o the listener. "Chandelier
Searchlight" is a genuine pop gem, somehow simultaneously light'
and brash, giddy and apprehensive. Ultimately Deerhoof is not
about notes and rhythms, but about emotion. And while Offend
Maggie sparkles with that inimitable something-or-other for wfitch
the band's become known, what this record wearsonlfesleeve so
boldly and poignantly, is its stark humanness: of the characters in
the lyrics, of the singer in front of the mic, of the band bashing it
a room togetjhfflfiWAIJ-ABlE OCTOBER T*
band
of the
JOLIE HOULAND
The Living And The Dead CD
Jolie Holland's new ANTI- album, is quite simply a breakthrough, the album her adoring •
fans have been waning for. With a vocal style
hailed by the Village Voice as "sultry and sweet,
despairing and lonely," Jolie has experimented in
the past with various settings W her unique, jazz-'
inflected voice; this time, working with collaborators Hke M. Ward and Marc
Ribot, Ms, Holland has embraced both the rocking side of her roots heritage, and the compositional possibilities of the recording studio, multi-tracking her voice extensively for the first time. The results have intensified the
evocative moodiness that has always existed in Holland's music, but also
brought out a rollicking looseness that serves her tales of love and loss perfectly. An artist who transcends genres and demographics Jolie Holland
offers us an embrace of her own, a warm, welcoming world where The
Living and the Dead dwell side by side. Jolie collaborates with two legendary guitarists, Marc Ribot and M. Ward who also helped produce the CD.
AVAILABLE OCTOBER 7™ .     ■
CD 14.98
LAMBCHOP
OH CD
Change is a subtle thing in Lambchop s world;
Kurt Wagner is simply a great believer in the
natural" pace of life. Lambchop have evolved,
adapted,- and tested themselves over their long
. career and HH (Ohio)" follows this pattern in typically oblique but deeply satisfying ways. For
starters, it features a new producer, Roger Moutenot (Yo La
Kinney, Freedy Johnston), who splits duties with Mark
Kurt Wagner also acknowledges that the fundamental nature of the
itself has altered — the lastflve years have been about a disfJatiqn
collective into a core band. AVAILABLE OCTOBER F
CD 14.98
MOGWAI
The Hawk Is Howling CD
With the title of their new album, Mogwai
invokes the spirit of great predators of the
air and the land. Fittingly, The Hawk Is Howling
finite them hungrier than ever. All thejisual bom-1
oast is there: deafening guitars, sublime strings, I
and an unconventional (for them) injection of
laser-beam synthesizers, but they temper the fury with a meditative ar.
and a few reflective pieces as fine as anything they.ve produced since Rode
■ Action (arguably their high-water mark). Aiming high as ever in their efforts
to perfect a truly artistic form of atmospheric instrumental rock, the band are
also typically irreverent with their song titles: "I'm Jim Morrisson, Cm Dead"
is classic Mogwai. That is, a band of serious jokers tearing up old classics to
make new ones.
CD 14.98
FUCKED UP
Chemistry of Common Life
CD
picked Up are not the kind of punk band that  _
lean be easily described in a few words (or in a -
national news paper without the aid of a few
strategic asterisks). Perpetually and deliberately
shrouded in mystery, this is a band that released 25 fiercely inventive and
frequently controversial hardcore singles in theirflrst foujf years of existence
before finally breaking out with 2006's Hidden Worid, an album as packed
with orchestral grandeur as with punishing riffs. Last year's Year of the Pig
LP further confounded listeners with a furious kraut-psy|h epic about the
condition of sex workers in Canada. Now, newly signed to Matador, Pink
Eyes, 10,000 Marbles, and the rest of this weirdly-pseudonym-ed crew are
unleashing their magnum opus, an ambitious tour-de-force encompassing
life, death, religion, and science that's likely to make th^pio^oJily thefore-
Pno^punk band in Canada, but possibly the world. A^KftBtE OCTOBER 7th
CD 14.98
CD 14.98
Ji,  1
JAY REATARD
Matador Singles 08
CD
For each of the six months leading'
up to this release, Matador has
put out a limited edition 7-inch by
Memphis garage-punk boy wonder
Jay Reatard. Each generated more attention, but was released in
a progressively more limited run, starting with.3,500 copies for
the first and ending with 400 copies for the sixth. This package
collects all six (excluding the Deerhunter track on #4), plus one
extra song, to frustrate collectors and delight the general public.
The Blood Visions and In The Red singles comp by this high
school-dropout Oblivians disciple have already got people froth- .
ing at the mouth, attracting him a following well beyond the usual
circle of garage purists, and true to the hype, each tune on
Matador singles is a perfect snarling pop-punk gem. Get your
grubby little hands on this one before they're all gone!
CD 14.98
BRIGHTBLACK
MORNING UGHT
Motion To Rejoin CD
Occupying the territories between
folk-rock and psychedelic New .
Mexico's infamous crystal totem loving duo Brightblack Morning Light
return with their second release for ever-cool ever-in ever-tasteful
Matador Records. Easily the finest display of electric Rhodes
piano and reverbed tremolo guitar and ghostly voices, Motion to
Rejoin is an elegy to our planet being destroyed by the madness
of modern ennui. Peyote, Diviner's Sage, Shamanism, Mescaline
and more have all be used as entheogens, and a supplement to
various transcendence practices including in meditation, psycho-
nautics, and psychedelic psychotherapy and Motion to Rejoin is
the perfect sonic agent for your ritualistic spiritual journey. Along
the way you will meet ancestors with pink flowers in their hair,
hojpgram buffalos and beaded wise ladies — listen to what they
tell you and then dig up the roots of Brightblack s soul transforming you foi«rermorj£ka meditative listen for a meditative time!
CD 14.98
IHE OTHER STUFF WE DIG:
ELGJNCHO-AlegranzaCD
DEPARTMENT OF EAGLES - In Ear Park
CDw/7"
TOBACCO-Fucked Up Friends CQ/LP
THE ORGAN-Thieves CDEP
IHE FLESHTONES- Stocking Stuffer CD
GRANDMASTER FLASH -The Bridge CD/LP
JILL BARBER-Chances CO
JUANA MOUNA-Oh Dia CD
ZUC0103 - After The Camavai CD
JAPANESE MOTORS -s/t CD
HOWLING HEX -Earth Junk CD
DAVID GRUBBS- An Optimist Notes The Dusk
CD
SILVER JEWS -Silver Jew DVD
HIGH PLACES-s/t CD
VIVIAN GIRLS -s/t CD/LP
SUBHUMANS-Death Was Too Kind CD
OF MONTREAL - Skeletal Lamping CD
ANTONY AND THE JOHNSONS-Another Wortd
CDEP/12"
' Sale prices in effect until October 31,2008
ZULU ART NEWS: .•  iW.
October 1*3t
Promoted
Show Posters and Stuff
by Ryan Dyck
mm
Zulu Records
1972-1976 W 4th Ave
Vancouver, BC
tel 604.738.3232
www.zulurecords.com
STORE HOURS
Mon to Wed 10:30-7:00
Thurs and Fri 10:30-9.00
Sat 9:30-6:30
Sun 12:00-6:00

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