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  TIMBRE PRESENTS:
ffW*T$WS
SUNDAY & MONDAY J^w
NOVEMBER 5 & 6
Tibkets at all~^^^-^/ locations as well as TRACK, ZULU, BLACK SWAN, and HIGHLIFE Records.
CHARGE BY PHONE 280-4444 CONTENTS
NOVFJ1BER • 1989 Issue #82
SHINDIG
Our own intrepid Shindig reporter "The Bope" tosses darts at the band     6
HANDLES FROM HELL
The Man Sherbet's Leftovers    7
THE GIRL NEXT DOOR
Extreme, extreme, extreme: Middle of the road Debbie Jaffe - by Lloyd Uliana     8
THE SWANS
J.J. Dives in deep with The Swans - by J.J. Derrida  11
MR. MOJO RISING
Tania Alekson picks up on Mojo Nixon  12
DOING AWAY WITH DAD
Multi-media, killin' yer pa and other stuff - by Pete Lutwyche  14
THE SUMMER OF "89
Getting hassled at the docks by the cops - by Viola Funk  16
ROADKILL
Bruce McDonald underthe wheels of Marek Cieszewski and Bill Mullan  18
^■■■■■■■■■■KI^ZlJZflHBBBHHHBIHB
AIRHEAD
The letters are real, we just fake the replies     5
UNDER REVIEW
Soundgarden, Faster Pussycat, Doughboys and soooo much more  20
REAL LIVE ACTION
UK Subs, Tragic Mulatto, Silent Gathering, and Opera  22
RAG BAG
Betty Cooper wigs out, daddy  24
LOCAL MOTION
HEY! Let's get Janis...she listens to everything!   26
TAPE - A - MANIA
You supply the tape, we supply the - A - Mania  27
HELL'S KITCHEN
Supper in Surrey  31
SPINLIST
You say: "What's new, man?" We tell ya *   32
ON THE DIAL
It's like TV Guide, but it's for the radio  32
DISCORDER DATEBOOK
What's on, what's hot, what's hip and what isn't  34
HMHHHHBHHHE22II2SHiHHHHHflHHHH
EARTH GUY
Scott Fearnley     3
DANCING ON THE CLOUDS
Marc Yuill and Julian Lawrence  17
ROLAND THE HAPPY WANDERER
Geoff Coates  27
CYBERTOONS
DenLebel  30
FOR OFF CE USE ONLY
EDITOR Kevin Smith ART DIRECTOR Scott Chernoff PRODUCTION MANAGER Bill Baker EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS Viola
Funk, Michael Leduc, Lisa Marr PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Jon Jacobsen, Den Lebel, Lydla Schymansky WRITERS
Tanla Alekson, Chris Buchanan, Marek Cieszewski, Betty Cooper, Lane Dunlop, Viola Funk, Michael Klassen, Leora
Kornfeld, Pete Lutwyche, Janls McKenzle, BUI Mullan, Lloyd Uliana, Leigh Wolf GRAPHICS Geoff Coates, Scott
Fearnley PHOTOGRAPHERS Dan Andrews, Scott Chernoff, SI Lentgathering WORD PROCESSING Stefan Ellis, Alice
Lorlng, Lydla Schymansky COVER PHOTO Courtesy Debbie Jaffe SPINLIST Chris Buchanan ADVERTISING MANAGER
Mike Harding ADVERTISING PRODUCTION BUI Baker SUBSCRIPTIONS/MAIL DISTRIBUTION Robynn Iwata PROGRAM
GUIDE/DATEBOOK DUDE Randy Iwata ACCOUNTS BULLY Barb Wilson TECHNICAL SUPPORT Peter, Alex, Sue, Karina
is That Mag
, CiTR fM 102and is published monlhly by theStudent Radio Society
t wants, including the CiTR On the Dial program guide and the CiTR
i free to over 200 locations. Twelve-month subscriptions are $ 15 in
make cheques or money orders payable to Discorder Magazine.
-Killough. Discorder wants your stuff: send in stories, drawings.
© 1989 All Rights Reserved. Di
of the University of British Columbia. Discorder pri
Spinlist playlist chart. Circulation is 17,500 copies
Canada, $15 (US) to the US, and $24 elsewhere
"DISCORDER magazine: the DISCORDER of mi
comics, money, photos or what have you. If we like 'cm, well use 'em. If we don't, we'll los.
ad bookings is the 15lh of the previous month.
CiTR 101.9 fM is 1800 watts of stereophonic bliss on cable fM from UBC to Langley, Squ
to Sucia Island, but not on Shaw Cable in White Rock (if you want it, you'll find a way). CiTR
and in cars too. Office hours for CiTR, Discorder, and CiTR Mobile Sound Rental are Mon-Fri, 10am - 4pm (please avoid Friday
afternoons) Call the CiTR/Discorder Office at 228-3017, CiTR News+Sports at 224-4320, or the CiTR DJ line at 228-CiTR. Send
stuffc/oDiscorderMagazineorCiTRRadiotoRoom 233,6138 SUB Boulevard. Vancouver,BC.V6T2A5. Fax (604)228-6093.
ER.CD
INNOVATIVE HAIR SERVICES
THE PROFESSIONALS SPECIALIZING IN:
• Tasty Haircuts
• Hair Extensions
• Superior Perms
• Colours of Your Choice
NOVEMBER 1989 3 THE EMPIRE
432    HOMER   SI
VANCOUVER DAMAGE POLYGRAM?
Dear Airhead,
While I'm sympathetic
towards CiTR's boycott of Polygram, I'm puzzled as to why that
boycott extends to the advertising of
concerts by Polygram artists. While
your actions are ostensibly intended
to damage Polygram financially (and
make them see the error of their
ways), have you stopped to consider
who you're really hurting here? I
mean, how much money is Polygram going to make off the Pixies
concert? I know little about record
company contracts, but I suspect that
the companies get dick all from
So Polygram isn't negatively affected by your refusal to
advertise the Pixies show, but who
is? Obviously the Pixies, whose only
crime is to be distributed by Polygram in Canada. Additionally, their
opening act, Bob Mould, is hurt, and
he isn't even remotely connected to
Polygram.
So you're carrying out a
symbolically empty action that does
nothing to further your goals. Why?
I'll still be pondering it
when I'm enjoying the Pixies show.
Yours truly,
Larry Dudock
The boycoll of Polygram Inc. extends to all areas of possible CiTR-
Polygram interaction — on-air interviews, record airplay, Discorder
interviews, concert presentations,
Discorder advertising et cetera. The
intent is to eliminate all CiTR associated avenues of promotion and
publicity for Polygram artists. Yes,
ostensibly the boycott is meant to financially damage Polygram Inc.,
yet CUR and Discorder have no delusions regarding the negative economic affect of the boycott upon a
multi-national like Polygram Inc.
The purpose of the boycott
is to convince Polygram Inc. to
remove its record servicing fee. Of
course, by boycotting Polygram Inc.
we may hurt the individual artists as
wellas, and possibly evenmore than,
Polygram itself, since the artist is
more dependent upon its recordsales
and concert revenue than Polygram
Inc. However, any publicity that aids
a Polygram artist necessarily benefits Polygram Inc. Artists lour in
order to promote a record, to make
themselves and their music belter
known, and thereby, sell records.
And record sales do increase when
an artist plays a concert. So, in fact,
advertising a Polygramarlisl's concert does generate revenue for Polygram Inc.
Yes, the Pixies may be
adversely affected (although the
show will probably do very well
based upon the Pixies' popularity),
but all Polygram artists suffer because of the boycott. We regret any
injury to individual artists, but Polygram Inc. and its acts are inextricably linked; essentially, they are one
in the same.
Also, we hope that concert
promoters, who can not utilise the
promotion avenues of a CiTR presentation or Discorder advertising
because of the boycott, will put pressure on Polygram Inc. to drop the
servicing fee.
The strength of the boycott
depends upon the unity of the National Campus/Community Radio
Association members, and the all-
encompassing nature of the boycott.
One station can not accomplish much
but twenty-eight might be able to
succeed, and to compromise on advertising would be inconsistent,
which would weaken the boycott.
With the recent "agreement
to acquire" A&M, Bob Mould's
label, by Polygram Inc., Mould is
now more than remotely connected
with that company. And finally, at
press lime, the achievement of the
boycott's goals appeared to be in the
offing so by the time you read this the
whole thing could have been re-
KELOWNA #1
Dear Airhead,
Please twist my rubber arm
and renew my subscription (start
with Issue #80). Thank Robynn from
the dregs of my heart for her kooky
illustrations.
Please enlist more of the
services of ex-New Reality Comix
alumni like Bill 'Otto' Thompson,
'Den' Lebel, Colin Upton, Steve
Geary, Peter Raymond Haskell, et
Den Lebel has an installment of his
Cybertoons comic in this issue (p.
30). Also, we have three new ongoing comix beginning this month:
Scott Fearnley's Earth Boy (p. 3),
Dancing on the Clouds by Marc
Yuill and Julian Lawrence (p. 17),
andGeoffCoates' Roland the Happy
Wanderer (p27). Thanks to all those
who responded to our request for
comix in the October issue. If anyone is still interested in contributing
comix give us a call at (604) 228-
3017 or send your submission to
Discorder c/oCiTR, 6138 SUB Blvd.,
University of B.C., V6T2A5.
KELOWNA #2
Dear Airhead,
As an avid reader of your
magazine (I've seen + read 1 copy -
Sept/88) I am inquiring about the
whereabouts of acquiring it in
Kclowna. I've been to Vancouver
millions of times in the past year, yet
I haven't once found another copy. I
got mine at a record store downtown
last year, and since then have not had
the luck of spotting it anywhere.
"They're all gone" is the answer I
kept gelling, so any info about getting it in my hole would be grateful.
Thanks,
Kelowna, B.C.
Well, Tracy, you can subscribe to
Discorder and have "that magazine
from CiTR" delivered right to your
person and avoid any injuries that
could occur during the rush of the
masses to pick up Discorder when it
hits llxe streets. Or, you could risk
life and limb and grab a copy of the
mag in Kelowna at The Attic, located at 1530 Water St.
IT'S IN THE MAIL
Dear Airhead,
I just thought I'd like to com-
plament your station on always giving me such listening satasfaction. I
really enjoy Friday nights when you
air the "Bopatron" show. It very
"well-put-together". I think you've
done a great job at bringing your
listeners the newest and oldest selections of "rap music" of the '80's.
I was listening to your station one
Thursday night, and Iheared a show
called "Eating Vomit", I believe, it
was the best show I've ever experi-
anced the thrill of listening to. I
especially enjoyed how it was so
"uncencered". I enjoyed it so dras-
ticly that I insisted on listening for it
the following week. To my
disapoinl-ment I realized that it was
either cancelled or I could not tune it
in properly. To prevent this from
happening again, can you please send
me a programe, or pamphelel,
schcducling the shows and times of
each show. I would really be deeply
delighted.
I will always admire your station
and the variety of unique shows you
provide me with.
Thank-you,
Miss Sandra Cross
No, lhankyou. Ealing Vomit can still
be heard on Thursday evenings from
midnight until whenever in the morning. The complete listings for CiTR's
programming can be found each
month in Discorder in On The Dial.
Sandra because we like yousomuch,
we will send you one free complimentary (sic) copy of the mag, which
is available at over two hundred locations on the Lower Mainland and.
points beyond.
MGMKS
Of
]himh
&
sum
rnimrn
A Nettwerk Production 1989
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 11 -8 PM
THE ORPHEUM
TICKETS ON SALE NOW - AVAILABLE AT ALL TICKETMASTER OUTLETS
r+ry OR CHARGE BY PHONE AT 280-4444
PRODUCED BY PERRYSCOPE
850 Granville St.
Vancouver, BC
V6Z 1K3
Phone 687-2213
Open 7 days
& 7 nights e«fWi$
by Rob Boper
I o, I was sitting at the Railway last Monday, waiting for my next big
e   assignment from Mr. Ed. Where would he send me — Tibet, London,
Saskatoon? I could hardly contain myself from getting up and dancing on
 1 my table, but since a band named GLEE was playing, throwing up was
much more of a possibility than dancing. Then Mr. Ed walked in. I didn't actually see
him enter the room, but I just knew. It's not so much a smell as it is an aura of someone
looking for something to edit. He tried to pretend that he didn't know I was in the club,
but I knew he knew. Mr. Ed was looking for me.
After speaking to everyone else in the bar, he had no choice but I took pity on him and grabbed him by his flowing
to come over to my table. I sent the babes away. He had    locks, wrenching his eyes away from GLEE. I looked him
something to say. I could sense he was stalling, that he had my
next assignment, but was reluctant to tell me. I had a fear he was
sending me to Saskatoon after all. Damn.
He approached my table with caution, not making eye
contact, looking at the stage instead, watching GLEE. I knew
it hurt him to do that. Listening to them was hard enough
without actually seeing them. I began to think about what I
would take to Saskatoon with me. I hate wheat fields. And I had
lost me ski mask at the 7-11. At least I still had my ruler with
inches marked on it. I didn't know how that would help me in
'Toon Town, but it was comforting to have the imperially
scaled ruler anyway. You just never know when Tom Asnail
would pop in (refer to last month's Polygram boycott article,
Mr. Ed). Finally Mr. Ed sat down.
"So, The Bope, (that's what my close friends call me),
what do you know about this Shindig thing?" He continued to
watch GLEE. Whatever he was getting at sure had to be hurting
him deep down inside 'cause GLEE sure weren't getting any
better.
6 DISCORDER
straight in the eyes. "Look, Mr. Ed," I said, my voice wavering
and cracking, much like the singer from GLEE, "if you've got
an assignment for me then spit it out, but for god's sake quit
looking at the band called GLEE! You're young, you have a
future, kinda. Don't ruin your life now! Just give it o me
straight, I can take it But stop looking at them!"
Mr. Ed shut his eyes for a moment, muttered something
to Mohammed and relaxed. I let go of his hair, wiped my hand
on a towel from the bar, and bought him a beer. He spoke softly,
"It's this Shindig thing, Bope. It's one of the biggest events of
the year, but as soon as all the other writers heard that GLEE
was playing, they all "olunteered for assignments in Saskatoon. One even went to Regina! You're my last hope. I know
it's not like the Polygram story last month or anything, but
Bope, I need this article for the next issue or else the Evil
President of CiTR will revoke my membership at the station
and slash the Discorder budget!"
I could see the fear on his face. Or maybe it was mustard
from the hot dog he had for supper, I couldn't tell. At least he
wasn't sending me to Saskatoon. "For you, Mr. Ed, I'll do it."
The colour returned to his face, and he took out his eraser, once
again looking for something to edit. He would be okay. We
both laughed, shared a beer, and talked about how much better
the world would be if GLEE fell off a very high cliff. It was a
very satisfying though. Unfortunately, they were still playing.
I pulled a rather plump tomato out of my back pocket, the one
that I had been saving for the Grapes of Wrath show. This
would be much more satisfying. I hoped the singer wasn't
wearing a can.
Yes, it's true. Back for yet another year, Shindig is already well underway. The premise of the event is as simple as
any Arts 100 class. Seventeen of the best of the new local
bands, (it would be eighteen, but GLEE were mistakenly
allowed to enter) compete over a three month period. Every
Monday three bands play at the Railway Club vying for fame,
fortune, babes, hunks, beer, half-hearted applause, and highly
coveted, expensive studio time.
The first semi-final, in which the winners of the three
previous weeks face off against each other, took place on October 23. The second semi-final is scheduled for November
20th, and the third for November 27th. The three bands that
eventually survive, (fortunately for us all GLEE Finished dead
last in their preliminary round — if only they had just finished
dead), will compete on December 4th at the Town Pump in the
world famous Shindig Finals. Prizes galore await these three
bands. Three of the best studios in town have shown their
support for the local band scene and CiTR by donating major
chunks of studio time as prizes. The band who, in the eyes of
the esteemed panel of judges, is declared winner of this whole
event will receive, in addition to the declared winner of this
whole event will receive, in addition to the customary 8x10 of
me, 36 hours of recording time supplied by the very cool folks
at PROFILE STUDIOS. The first runner-up will be packing
their bags and heading off to the friendly confines of MUSHROOM STUDIOS for 24 hours of noise making, taking along
a 4x6 of my batde-scarred face. The third place finisher will
spend 24 hours of their life visiting the keen people at FLUID
STUDIOS and fighting over which one in the group will get the
wallet-sized photo of my mom and I at Woodstock.
And there's more to Shindig than just cool local bands
(except for GLEE). There is also the time honoured tradition
of JOKES FOR BEER, (hey, I didn't name it, okay, I'm just an
overworked journalist). Much as the name implies, you tell a
joke, you may "win a beer or two, depending upon what the
highly intelligent and slightly inebriated patrons at the Railway decide. It's not a difficult concept, a bit tasteless at times,
but still, not that difficult.
Fun and games abound at Shindig. Celebrities frequently grace the premises. People from all over the continent
come to see and be seen. Or you can hide in the back of the
Railway and toss some darts, especially if a band similar to
GLEE ever play again, (but by playing darts you would have
missed them call everyone at CiTR "a bunch of c***s." Can't
hear that on network television, can you?). Or stay up front and
toss the darts at the band instead. And remember kids, it's all
worth the price of admission — one bean if you are a member
of the Railway Club (which costs just $ 10 for an entire year),
or only three dollars if you are signed in by a member. Much
cheaper than paying $7.25 to watch incredibly stupid Dentyne
commercials at you local Cineplex. And better for you than
staying at home and listening to any useless Polygram releases
that you may have not yet thrown out.
So that's how this whole Shindig thing works. It's
kinda like CiTR's way of giving some fledgling bands some
much needed publicity and stage experience, so hopefully they
can go on to become famous and have CFOX present their
shows. It's a goal only an elite few will achieve. We're just
happy to do our part to make CFOX an even better station.
That's what we're here for. And that's why Mr. Ed and I hang
out at the Railway every Monday — to become a little bit
cooler, a little bit hipper, and to see bands like GLEE. CURE THAT HALLOWEEN HANGOVER!
CAST OUT THE DEVILS
Compiled by The Man Sherbet with Riff Randall
Vancouver's Rock Dynamos Bruno Gerussi's Medallion have turned up the burner for bands
without a good name. When Shindig organizers screened tapes for this year's competition a
trend in offensive monikers was discovered. The "Let's Slag A Vancouver Celeb" idea had gone
too far. Bands were forced to change names or get out. Let's hope that out of respect for these
established local talents this tendency just stops. Here's a list of bands whose names, though
catchy, Shindig couldn't allow...
•Pat Burns' Flask
•Liz McKinney's Leather Toys
•Terry David Mulligan's Tweezers
•Jeani Read's Vibrator
•Linden Sole's Reptile Friends
•Gord Campbell's Reckless Driving
•David Foster's Utter Pusillanimity
•Laurier Lapierre's Naughty Spatula
•Vicki Gabereau's Whipping Boys
•Murray Pezim's Nitro Prescription
•Carole Taylor's Red Corset
•Art Bergmann's Unpaid Parking
Tickets
•Harry Rankin's Secretions
•Stu Jeffries' Neon Retainer
•Bruce Allen's Electric Cattleprod
•John Turner's U.E.L. Burial Altar
•Marianne MaKenzie's Playgirl Sub
scription
•John Gray's Boil Trouble
•Tom Harrison's New Pigtails
•Tony Parsons' Contract With The
Devil
•Larry And Willy's Dominatrix
However, Toronto references are permitted, and Michael Willians - A V J. Goof will compete
at this year's Shindig
•Jack Webster's Compost Heap
• Sandy Wilson's Exciting Life Story
As Told With B.C. Taxpayer's Help
•Mike Winlaw's Last Gig
•Lily Vanderzalm's Tattoo
•Karen Campbell's Inexplicable
Lumps
•Bill Good's Private Petting Zoo
•Svend Robinson's School Years
•Bryan Adams' Hot Wheels Collec
tion
•Kerry Marshall's Curly Reds
•Mike Reno's Garage Sale
•Joe Shithead's Back Rent
•Michael J. Fox's Bastard Gypsy
Children
•Denny Boyd's Urologist
•Doug Miller's Pet Sheep
•Pamela Martin's Wanton Desires
•Dave Abbott's Crazed Insomniac
Alter Ego
•Harold Snepsts' Geraniums
•Nardwuar's Open Sores
NOVEMBER 1989 7 Will you take the pain I will give to you again
and again...and will you return it?
THE GIRL NEXT DOOR
DEBBIE
"Master!Slave Relationship is exactly as
the name implies: duality. Extreme contradiction. Extreme obsession. Emotional
bondage in addition to physical bondage.
Only through mental and emotional bondage does one feel the excitement, the torture.
The physical act of restricting someone in
some way is merely a means by which one
can create a feeling of fear or desire. Many
people live a master!slave existence without
involving themselves in the actual physical
embodiments of it."
Debbie Jaffe
Master/Slave Relationship
ebbie Jaffe is extremism personified.   As Master/Slave Rela-
Btionaship, she alone is responsible for her creations - a grinding
ebullient barrage of tense electronics and vocal accompaniment
that melds eroticism and hedonism with brutality. Through her
own label, Cause and Effect, MSR material has been made
 1 available to audiences across North America, Europe, and Japan.
She has also assisted other performers who mostly rely on the cassette medium
through the Cause and Effect. A regular fixture on Soup Stock...play lists, Jaffe
recently completed an interview-by-mail with the printed form appearing here.
Many listeners (and readers)     cian  background and your     screamed while the others
break from Viscera?
may be unfamiliar with Master I Slave Relationship, yet an
outfit that Jaffe was involved
with - Viscera - via several
dozen compilations and a
handful of their own cassette
releases is awellknown-name
to anyone interested in the
American and International
experimental electronic music scene. Would you care to
tell us a bit about your musi-
Before I worked with Mark
McGee [guest on some of
Jaffe's work as MSR - ed.], I
did some strange minimal
music with Mark's brother,
Hal. Together we were, and
still are, Viscera. Before that
I was a member of a little-
known group called Gabble
Ratchet.    In GR I mostly
played nervous, mechanistic
keyboards and rhythm boxes.
If you go back even further, I
played clarinet and bass clarinet in band at school. I'm a
technically-trained musician
but found it all too boring to
pursue. In a way, MSR is an
extension of Viscera. I started
MSR because I wanted to try
something new and so did
Hal (who formed Dog As Master). I began recording
The Desire To Castrate Father in late 1984 and it was
released in March '85. Hal
and I broke away from each
other musically at some point
due to changes in attitudes
andinterestes. I'm a very demanding person and found
more satisfaction in.doing
music myself...directing its
outcome completely, by
myself, with no one's intervention.
Does the name you chose -
Master/Slave Relationship
and all the sweaty images that
so along with it - have any
bearing on the themes you
have decided to deal with or
vice-versa?
No actually, because the first
recordings I did really weren't all that explicit. They
really didn't have that much
to so with sex. They did in a
broad sense, but I was more
interested in not just the sexual aspects of the name but
also the dualism - male/
female.. .positive/negative.
MSR reflects more what I'm
doing now that it did then.
'Cause then I had a drummer
and the music was a lot more
rock oriented. From there it
got to be a lot more noisy and
I think that's where more of
the S&M overtones came into
it I started doing more
screaming and things like
that...that people could connotate with being tied up or
tortured or whatever. I don't
mean to imply that it doesn't
have anything to do with sex
because it does. My music
has always been very emotional. That's been the bottom line to it and I've never
picked out titles just to shock.
That's never been my interest. If it were I could be a lot
more shocking than I am.
Everything I talk about - even
the S&M and the bondage -
those are all interests of mine.
I wouldn't be able to write
lyrics that weren't something
that I cared a lot about and
that's where the emotion
comes in. I've just always
been very emotional and I put
it through on the music.
Last time we spoke .which was
about a year ago, you mentioned putting together a visual package. Has that come
together?
Yes, the video is done. We
recorded enough material for
two or three videos! It's somewhat simple and it's certainly
not as explicit as it could be.
It's a good introduction to
MSR and I look at it that way.
Just a good introduction. It's
hot. It's erotic. It's S&M.
It's mostly me in bondage.
But I like it a lot, otherwise I
wouldn'thavereleasedit. The
next video will probably be a
little more explicit. I'm not
sure to what degree. I really
like the video medium. It's
really a challenge to mix the
music with the video. It's
hard work, but it's fun. The
music on this video is thirty
minutes...thirty minutes of
brand new music. I haven't
recorded much music because
I have been working on the
video so hard. But there will
be more new music coming
up. I was hoping to release an
album sometime soon but it
probably will not be until the
end of the year. It will also be
released with a CD. There
might also be some cassette
releases. I got my studio
upgraded a little bit which
was a great boost to my inspiration to buy some new equipment, play around with it, get
familiar with it. It's just really great to have brand new
things to play with. So there
will be more MSR music to
come.
Any other MSR updates?
There are so many new things
going on, I'm trying to think
of them. We will be travelling quit a bit this year and
next. When I say we, I mean
Rick Darnell and myself. He
and I live together and he's
primarily responsible for the
video itself...for the visual
images. We both collaborated but he did the actual
videotaping and he had a lot
of input when it came to the
editing and things like that
We hope to sometime work
on music together 'cause he
does play guitar but we've
just had so much else going
on but we do hope to travel.
We're going to New York
City on October 20th - 23rd.
ervation is the fact that I'm
going to be out in California
and I want to have fun. And
I don't want to be going
around with my tits in pain.
So.Idon'tknow. Ihavebeen
known to endure quite a lot of
pain and sometimes I can
"I'm just this clean-cut girl.
My biggest vice is sex and
S&M and music and film
and art in general."
The biggest reason for going
at that time of the year is
because in NYC, the Dressing for Pleasure Fashion Show
will be going on and what that
is, if you're not familiar with
it, is people who are into
leather and latex and rubber
and really just about any kind
of fetish wear will be there.
There's a fashion show with
people modelling new fashions. We were asked to model
in this show but Rick modelled in it last year - they had
him wear a pair of rubber
pyjamas. They videotape it
every year and it looks really
interesting. It'sayearlyevent
and it'll be the first I attend. I
don't think I'll be modelling.
I'd really like to but because
Rick did last year he kinda
wants to sit back and watch
the proceedings rather than
participate. And I can understand that. So that's what I'll
be doing in New York.
At the end of November and through the tenth of
December, we'll be in California - Los Angeles and San
Francisco. Mostly that trip is
to visit with friends, also
musical contacts regarding
MSR but I'm not going to
perform. I'm just gonna go
out there and talk to people,
meet people, and have fun. I
was considering the idea of
getting pierced. I don't know
if you know but I' m quite into
piercing and have been for
some time. I'm not sure if
you're familiar with Jim Ward
or the Gauntlet in Los Angeles and San Francisco. Jim
Ward is a piercer. All he does
is pierce people. He did do
my labia piercings last year. I
was thinking aboutgettingmy
nipples pierced. My only res-
enjoy it, but piercing is the
kind of pain that...I don't associate piercing with an S&M
scene. It's not play to me...like
when you get whipped or
spanked or anything that involves pain...even clothespins
on the tits. It feels good because it's all part of a sexual
scene. But I'd never do play
piercing. I know there are a
lot of people who are into
sticking needles into themselves or having other people
sticking needles into themselves and enjoy it, then take
the needles out and let it close
up. But I'm not into that. I
gure if I'm gonna have a
needle stuck into me, it's
going to be permanent. To
me the piercing is work and
it's not going to be fun. I'm
pretty much committed to the
idea of doing it, but I guess
I'll have to wear loose tops
during the trip (laughs) to be
more comfortable. We did
want to make it up to Seattle
but it looks like we're not
gonna be able to fit that in
because we just have so much
planned for California.
S&M...The notion of pleasure through pain hasn't had
the greatest public relations...
I think as far as S&M and
bondage and B&D (bondage
and discipline) and all these
strange, fringe interests that I
have and a lot of people have,
I find all these things in a precarious position. It's just so
weird because there are so
many misconceptions when
it comes to these topics.
Especially right now there
seems to be a huge crackdown not just on drugs but on
sex. I find it ridiculous. It's
really stupid that people are
so for violence even though
they don't realize ie, but they
are so anti-sex and further
they think that S&M is violent sexuality. I don't feel
that's the case. I don't know
what's so wrong about leather
atire or high-heeled shoes or
whips and all that. It just is
"Oooh, so scary" for people.
But to me there are a lot of
everyday things that are more
scary than a whip. It just
depends on your viewpoint, I
guess. But I have been at both
ends of the whip and I like
both ends. It has very much
to do with the person you're
involved with...you have to
trust the person and you have
to know what each other's
limits are. I don't advocate
beating the shit out of somebody. It's just that there is
something involved in pain
and everyone's pain threshold is different, but there is
something in just the feeling
of pain...it's a sensation...a
very intense sensation...and
if the person giving the pain
knows how to do it right and
builds up...at least for me, I
need a build up, it can be very
effective and very intense and
very enjoyable. I suppose it
would be interesting also for
me to tell you that I don't
smoke and I don't drink, I
don't take drugs, and I don't
even drink caffeine. I find it
interesting personally because I am so into S&M which
is such a taboo and is so bad
supposedly but yet, basically,
I'm so clean-cut, you know
(laughs). I'm just this clean-
cut girl. My biggest vice is
sex and S&M and music and
film and art in general. But
it's just interesting to me that
I just don't do any of those
quote 'normal' things that
people do and yet it's so bad
to be into S&M. I do hope
that attitudes change in
American and the whole
world for that matter. I hope
that people calm down. But it
doesn't look like it's going to
happen.
For a Master/Slave Relationship Catalogue write to - Debbie Jaffe - PO BOX 30383,
Indianapolis, IN, 46230,
USA. Should you want to
direct any further questions
to Ms. Jaffe, write her care of
this address as well.
NOVEMBER 1989 9 VANCOUVER'S HOTTEST BLUES NIGHTCLUB
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368 Powell St.    Vancouver, B.C.        687-8006 "Ever since I came from my mammy's womb I ain't
seen a bit of truth."
swans
"Why is it that my Father was God, and yet, I am
not Jesus?"
Michael Gira (pronounced "Jerah")
by Jean-Jacques Deirida
YOUR MISSION: To infiltrate
the Town Pump on October 11 th
and interrogate the head man of
the SWANS, Michael Gira, in
order to determine if they are
involved in any covert operations designed to instill despair,
anxiety, andmorbidity in today's
young people via [the Swans']
THE ENEMY: Michael Gira,
singer/guitarist leader of the
band, long blond hair which hides
his shifty eyes. Jarboe, singer/
keyboardist only female in the
band, blond wig hides possible
lobotomy scars. Norman West-
burg, lead guitarist: cannot place
him in any government records.
There are three other bit players,
but they definitely are not responsible for the Swans' music
and/or subliminal messages.
BE AWARE: Michael Gira will
throw at you various one-liners
in an attempt to confuse and
frighten you. Further, he will only
reply with three word answers
such as, "Of course not", unless
you are able to trick or flog him
into revealing himself and his
thoughts.
YOUR WEAPONS: Your only
protection will be your faith in
God, free enterprise, and a
woman's right to be inferior.
Oops, those are the premier's
weapons. You have at your disposal only one tape recorder and
your blissful ignorance.
IF CAUGHT: Deny any knowledge of CiTR or Discorder. Tell
them you are the Lifestyles editor from the SUN.
THE REPORT
Appearing on the New
York scene in 1982, the Swans
have become indie favorites on
both the American and European
continents because of their sty
listically discomforting wave of
dirge and emotions which they
pump out unrelentingly. Unrelentingly, that is, until 1989's
"The Burning World" lp, their
first record on a major label, and
their present seven month tour of
the world (including a 10-day
trip to Japan). Michael Gira's
discovery of melody and delicacy in an otherwise towering
Wall of Sound has changed the
Swans' approach to sound,
music, and life. But getting Gira
to speak about this change, or
anything for that matter, was a
difficult and tortuous task. I was,
however, determined to discover
if the Swans do have a desire to
spread their dark brooding emotions, so as to make everyone as
miserable as Gira seems to be.
In 1988 the Swans released their "Love Will Tear Us
Apart" EP with a faithfully sung
and arranged cover at that Joy
Division song, and on the non-
red vinyl version, a far superior,
almost soul, rendition sung by
Jarboe. Clearly, their recording
this tune was a transparent attempt at furthering the misery
and angst in the world by awakening hidden remorse from 1980.
"Not at all. I always felt
our music has more to do with
power and strength and white
light than death. I think we just
did an honorable version of a
song that no one, including New
Order, could object to. I don't
look at it like this song was by the
seminal group Joy Division.
There is merely a bunch of songs
that exist and this was a song that
I just happened to hear for the
first time in seven or eight years
walking through a supermarket
in London on the muzak system.
I remembered that it was a good
sad song, and I decided it was a
good one for us to do. It wasn't a
momentous occasion." Score one
for Gira, he managed to evade
the real question of what the
Swans' true intentions are. This
time...
Some people assume that
because the Swans sing about
GOD and POWER they are
making an inference that Gira is
the all-powerful God of regret
and anger. So what do you have
to say in your defence, Michael?
"SEX, GOD, POWER
used to be things I talked about in
the past. I was preoccupied with
the ways in which people erase
themselves in certain beliefs,
systems, and in other persons.
Whether that's good or bad I
don't know. It used to interest
me a lot because having worked
so many crummy jobs I found
that was a way of erasing yourself, working as a kind of slave
all your life. And that got me
thinking about various kinds of
fascist systems in which you lose
yourself in certain ways, religious things being part of that
Anyway, that's the kind of things
I used to think about when writing songs; now, I have much less
control over it really, it comes
from behind my head." Alas, his
first admission of guilt Gira
admits that receiving his orders
subconsciously from above.
"I have total control over
the Swans. I allow people to have
input but it's really my career. I
determine where the band goes
and what direction it takes. I
wouldn' t be a good musician if I
didn't allow other people to have
musical input. But the way it
goes is what I decide." You're
notfooling anyoneGira, youhave
already admitted it comes from
your self-conscious. But who is
controlling that vast uncharted
wasteland of gloom?
For a band that relies
upon a powerful wave of noise
and emotion, the lyrics and vocals always seem to be unusually
prominent Undoubtedly this is
an effort to bring the Swans'
message of despair upon an
unsuspecting andnaiveaudience.
"Our music has always
been centered around the voice
one way or another. It used to be
that we would make music that
was chunks of sounds and
rhythms, waves of atmosphere
without too much attention to
melody and that to me, was an
excuse to rant and become a
dictator of sorts in front of the
atmosphere I made. Now I am
making atmospheres which are
more melodic and singing with
them, but to me it's essentially
still the same thing, merely a
"Unfortunately, I
am acutely aware
of death's omini-
ous presence all
the time, it forms
almost everything
I do, really."
different approach. One if the
bands which were my earliest
heroes were early Pink Floyd,
their ability to mesmerize you
very gendy and calmly, and also
to lift you up to heaven with
incredibly powerful rising cres-
cendos. Our music, like theirs, is
powerful and transcendent and
still delicate as well." (Check
into possible collusion between
the Swans and Pink Floyd; full
analysis of Roger Waters and
David Gilmour's activities requested.)
"The change in the
Swans' sound was a desire not to
be a buffoon and imitate yourself
to death. And to keep our audience and ourselves interested. I
would feel ludicrous doing now
what we did five years ago. One
of the things we have tried to do
is to incorporate Jarboe's voice
and my own into a duet but so
far I find it incredibly corny. We
tried a couple of times and erased
it from the tapes because it was
so corny."
While the trip from Seattle to Vancouver is usually a
pleasant trip for most, and certainly will be for the Rolling
Stones, it was an experience
which almost made the Swans'
music immortal. Yes, on their
way northward they were involved in an accident in the
George Massey Tunnel which
could have transformed them into
cult heroes for eternity. Death
has the ability to propel artists
like the Swans to a higher status
ordy bestowed upon bands and
individuals who suffer great
tragedies. Thankfully for their
fans, this experience merely reinforced Gira's acknowledgement of death's dark grip on life.
"Unfortunately, I am
acutely aware of death's omini-
ous presence all the time, it forms
almost everything I do, really.
But I think it's a Northern European preoccupation with death. I
was talking to a guy from Portugal about that subject and how I
often thought about death. In fact
it seemed to rule my thinking,
not that it's negative or anything,
but it made me feel that every
last little action I made was real
important so that I thought too
self-consciously about it. He had
no idea what I was talking about
because be never thought about
death. He just lived." Ah ha, death
does play predominantly on his
mind and he attempted to spread
its affects to the sunny beaches
of Portugal. Fortunately, his
worldwide agenda has been
thwarted, now he can only concentrate on persons of Northern
European descent.
Finally, I could wait no
longer and asked Gira point-
blank if he was an existentialist
and was bent on propagationg
his values amongst today's youth.
"What do you mean by
that term? There was only one
so-called existentialist writer that
even accepted that term, that was
Sartre. The rest of them disclaimed that term entirely. Every
one of them. If you mean by
existentialist that every minute
is important to life, then yes, I
guess I am. But then again, I
don't claim to be a role model."
Nonetheless, Gira, you are a role
model for many troubled, remorseful individuals.
CONCLUSION: If you saw the
Swans at the Town Pump, you
no doubt noticed that two of its
members, Jarboe and Westburg,
looked possessed, possibly because they were under the complete control of the ringleader,
Gira. The drummer and second
guitarist were busy snarling and
looking angry, as if they were
being forced to perform by som
individual against their will. It
was quite a spectacle to behold.
Fortunately, there were only
around a hundred and fifty souls
present, so the adverse affects
will be limited. Unfortunately,
the Swans have numerous records, eps, and singles around,
corrupting the minds and souls
of many people. Throughout the
seven year history of the Swans,
there has been a predominant
theme of despair, anger, and
remorse. This is not a coincidence, it has been planned by
Gira and possibly higher powers. Continued surveillance and
further   interogation   recom-
NOVEMBER 1989 11 rising
by Tania Alekson
t's 3:15 pm an' every dang one-uv us at C-aye-T-R is gittin' cagier than a muskrat in an alligator's behind 'cause our guest o' honour this fine afternoon is Mr. Kirby MacMillan, an' he's
late! Yur probably askin', who the Sam Hill is this Kirby fella an what's all the southern backwoods dialect fer anyhoo? In case you wasn't in the know, Kirby is better known to college
radio junkies as Mojo Nixon, one half of the irrepressible Mojo Nixon and Skid Roper duo. No,
they've never beeen featured at any of the hotels on Granville but they are songsters, responsible for four
albums and an EP, including their current LP, Root Hog or Die. Meanwhile, back at the station, Mojo has
appeared, be-sideburned and guzzlin' a cola. He's quite a little critter up close, but he can by no means be
described as unassuming, especially when he's on live doin' the college radio thing.
TANIA. Mojo! up like a big bug, ya know.  I
MOJO: (please assume belting      went campin' with my son, see
voiceandNorthCarolinaaccent):      you don't even have to ask me
How ya doin', Tania?
T: Just fine, I think, at least for
now.
M: I think yer doin' just swell!
S welled up like my head, swelled
12 DISCORDER
question, I 'm just gonnago here...
T: I'll just sit back.
M: I went camping. It was the
first time in four years I took an
actual vacation this summer. I
spenta whole week and didn't
talk to anybody about the band at
all which is kinda amazing and
me and my son and my brother
went camping and we tried to
teach my son some manly stuff.
We wiped our butts with leaves,
we stirred our food with sticks,
and my mom, his grandmom, I
got him to tell her that he had
ticks onhis head that was swelled
up the size of grapes an' we ate
'em. My mom was all freakin'
out it was good.
T: So, are you glad to be back in
Vancouver, or you just don't
M: Oh no, I'm glad to be here,
we always do good h ere. We're
going toplay where? The Town...
T: The Town Pump.
M: ...the Town Dump and, uh,
we're gonna raise a big stink.
T: Bigger than last time?
M: Bigger than last time.
T: Bigger than Country Dick
Montana?
M: Oh YEAH! Ya know me an
Country Dick wrote a song together, King of Sleeze, an that
even kinda has a tick reference in
it, too. It's on the Beat Farmers'
new album, an one of the lines
goes, "I'm a sick lunatic with a
big love stick, I can suck on ya
honey like a bucket of ticks."
Now, is thatpoetry or what? Now
that Robert Penn Warren' s dead,
an' there's no poet (belch) ima-
ratus, or whatever, in America, I
think I should become it ya
know, with my new poetry.
T: So, what have you been doing
recently?
M: Well let's see, uh, we're on
the tour now, we're goin' up the
west coast, ya know, U.S., Vancouver, we're goin' across west-
em Canada, we're goin' to
Moosejaw, we'll be in that big
show, an then back down into the
U.S., and uh, Minnesota, Idaho,
Wyoming, Nebraska, ya know,
all them upper plains states or
whatever it is they call 'em,
mountain states or somthin'.
T: Is another album in the works?
M: Another album's incubating,
I'm gonna take some time off
after this tour, probably early
next year I'll make another album. It'll be coming out maybe
like next summer or somethin'. I
was telling the guy who produced our last album, Jim Dickinson, this nut from Memphis, I
was telling him I wanted to
combine the joy of "Double Shot
of My Baby's Love" with the
insurrection of "Street Fightin'
Man". What I want to see is
joyful insurgence. In fact hopefully tonight at the Town Pump,
that'd be a good place to throw
up a few baracades. I got pavin'
stones, you know the streets are
narrow, you could throw up a
few baracades, and uh, have a
little wild in the streets. The
revolution needs to start soon,
an' why not Vancouver?
T: You're hoping to get a lot of
juicy, er, controversial songs on
the next album as well?
M: Oh ya,yaknow, I don't think
they'll, uh, be, like, up front
politically songs like Billy Bragg,
they'11 just be more insane social
gonzo commentary that the illogical conclusion of which will
be "Wild in the Streets".
T: Well, your song on the last
album, "Legalize It', was pretty
straightforward commentary.
M: It was, it was, and this whole
war on drugs stuff, I mean, it's
amazing how small George
Bush's brain is. I mean, if you
were to put it up a gnat's behind,
it'd look like a b.b. in a boxcar, I
mean we're talking small (snort).
The way I see it, there's two
problems with drugs. One, people
get addicted to them and two, the
price is inflated so much that it
becomes like this big drug war.
We would have no drug war if
we legalized drugs because the
price would go back down where
it should be an' there wouldn't
be no drug kingpins, 'cause
there'd be no money involved in
makin' 'em.That's thesameway
Al Capone became, y a know, big
an' famous an' powerful in the
20's because alcohol was illegal.
Soon as alcohol was legal, Al
Capone didn't have no way to
make no money.
T: Do you think that's one of the
reasons, as well as your insulting
other artists, that MTV don't like
to deal with your videos?
M: I don't know, I mean, I think
they like it and they don't like it
yaknow, there's afine line. MTV
wants to use me to appear to be
hipper than they are, 'cause I
mean mainly what they play is
very mainstream, very pedestrian, brain-dulling, butt-licking
foolishness, ya know. But, uh, I
wanna use them to put across my
insane gibberish especially to
reach people outside of, yaknow,
Vancouver, San Fransisco, and
New York, where they know
about us, but, ya know, they
don't know about us in, say,
Nebraska and Wyoming and
Colorado and whatnot.
T: So you 're willing to have your
videos played on their airwaves?
M: Yeah, at no point did I ever
say I was going to be kind of a
troubadour . Ya know, I'm on a
giant record label, so I'm playing the commercial game but
hopefully playing it my way not
their way.
T: Are your videos being shown
on MTV?
M: We're being shown on MTV
but...we had this giant fight with
MTV about the "Debbie Gibson's Pregnant With My Two-
Headed Love Child" video. Essentially, they wouldn't play it
because they're chicken, they're
afraid of Debbie Gibson (belch),
they're afraid of Warner Brothers, they're afraid of everything,
ya know, so I'm still fighting the
evil beast. As much as people
may think that MuchMusic is commercial an' all that they at
least play it. MuchMusic and
Austrailia are the only people
that'll play the "Debbie Gibson's
Pregnant" video. England, Europe, and the United States won't
play it because they're chicken,
they go (whining) "Oh, Mojo, I
might lose my job." Ya, well you
might lose your soul in the process !: B ack to politics in the United
States, is there anything you'd
like to make a fuss over?
M: Well, this whole flag burning
thing. The issue's kinda died
do wn in the media but I think the
thing that no one really talked
about in the whole flag burning
issue is that it's such an inconsequential issue, relative to all the
otherproblems wehave. We have
probably, 236 problems in
America and in North America,
in Canada, that come before
burning the flag. Ya know, we
got cold people, we got hungry
people, we got people with no
jobs, we got people that got
AIDS, we got a giant national
debt, we got a huge military
industrial complex. We'responding a billion dollars a day on
guns, on weapons to kill people,
we 're not spending a damn dime
on a giant sex farm in Nebraska.
If we just take half that money
an' put it into a giant sex farm in
Nebraska, we could learn ho w to
create life much better, ya know.
I'm all for creating life an' all
against destroying it I think we
need to go by the pleasure principle around here. Somehow, ya
know, America was founded by
these weird Calvanist nut jobs
who came over an' beat themselves an' stuff. We gotta get rid
of this whole thing. The other
problem thatno one wants to talk
about is that too many people are
working at jobs that they hate,
an' it's makin' 'em crazy and
then they're goin' to the post
office an' killin' everybody. I
mean, I think this is our biggest
problem all together, what are
we going to do next year, ten
years from now, 50 years from
now, what kinda jobs are people
goin' to be workin' at, ya know,
does everybody need to work,
this whole idea of full employment maybe everybody doesn't
need to work, maybe everybody
only needs to work a few days.
What people need to do is work
at jobs they like, that they feel
like they're accomplishing something. Ya know, if you're making a bomb in a defence factory,
yer makin' something but no
one's gonna use it no one gets
any pleasure out of it It's not like
a house that you can sleep in or a
car you can drive, even like
Cheez-Whiz and beanie-weenies
you can eat or a go-cart you can
ride around an' have fun in. A
bomb don't do no thin' but just
sit there an' maybe go off accidentally an' kill people. It's foolish, it's foolish... DidI say enough
then?
T: You've stunned me.
M: The girl is stunned! I put the
head belt or somethin' out there,
that they messed with me, but
I'm not gonna let that slow me
down.
C: So '92!
M: '92! Nixon in '92. Has a nice
ring to it
"We're spending a billion dollars a day on guns,
on weapons to kill people, we're not spending a
damn dime on a giant sex farm in Nebraska. If
we just take half that money an' put it into a
giant sex farm in Nebraska, we could learn how
to create life much better, ya know."
At this point our operator,
Chrispy Cannon, can't keep the
ants outta his pants and jumps
C: Gee, that sounded a lot like a
political platform and I know
youranforpresidentin '88. Were
you upset with your poor showing in the standings?
M: Man, I tell ya, the CIA and
the FBI got involved, an' I got a
lot more votes than they said I
did. They just don't want to
admit that I got all them votes.
C: Was it the Bible belt?
M: I think it was the knuckle-
T: Don't you feel your name is
kind of a set-back?
M: Oh no, I say put another
Nixon in the White House'cause
Mojo's not a dick. That's what I
T: I heard about your Holy Trinity. We've been wondering,
which is the father, which is the
son and which is the holy ghost?
M: Well, golly, we got Elvis,
Foghorn Leghorn, and Otis the
drunk from The Andy Griffith
Show. Well, I guess Elvis would
be the father, an' Foghorn Leghorn would be the son, because
the son's the one who goes out
extemporaneously pontificating
a lot. He's always talking an'
Foghorn Leghorn has a lot to
say. I mean, you could have a
whole book, a new Bible, the
Foghorn Leghorn I Say, I Say
Son Bible. Ya know, "Pay attention when I'm talkin' to ya boy.
Sharp as a bowlin' ball, colder
than a nudist on an iceberg. I feel
slicker than two heels fomicatin'
in a bucket of mucus membrane.
An' then that would leave Otis to
be, he's kinda spiritual ya know,
due to his imibin' in, the Holy
Spirit
T: Andhismystical experiences,
no doubt Didyourroots inNorth
Carolina lead you to this sorry
fate?
M: I guess they did. Part of my
problem was that I grew up in a
very small town an' my parents
were very conservative, especially my mother, ya know, very
worried what the neighbours
would think. I'm still rebelling
against all that Yaknow, hadmy
parents been communists in
Greenwich Village, I'd probably
be an accountant or somethin'.
T: Any pet peeves right now,
ranting and raving kind of stuff?
M: Ya know what I really hate, I
hate goin' into bathrooms where
they got those hand blower
things, like after ya wash yer
face ya wanna wipe them off
with a towel, or yer shirt, or yer
pants or anything, except for
these handblo wing things. I think
if there should be a constitutional
amendment, it should be to outlaw these things, not to outlaw
burning the flag. I hate these
things, they're useless, worthless, they're some kinda Nazi
idea.
And so the mutton-chopped
face of Mojo Nixon got the hell
outta there, never to be seen again,
except maybe at the Town Pump
thatevenin'. An' afunny evenin'
it was, too. A personal attendee
of theMojo Nixon an' SkidRoper
doin' the rock 'n roll thing soiree, I scouted out the thus far
invisible Skid Roper, whom I
aespied doin' the 8-ball thing
upstairs before the event. After I
introduced myself as a CiTR
member and interviewer of his
pal Mojo, there was a very tense
pause before he said "Oh", after
which the tense pause continued.
Further conversation led me to
discover that the same Skid who
was, according to Mojo, "condom testing", had not actually
been informed of the interview.
"Mojo never tells me these
things" could have been the bitter words I heard, just after "I
have my own record to promote,
too". Trouble in Mojo'n'Skid
land?
NOVEMBER 1989 13 DOING AWAY WITH DAD
Jonathon Barker Interviewed by Pete Lutwyche, Neon Meate Dream Tuesday Evenings 7:00-9:00PM
One of the surprise hits at the Vancouver Fringe Festival this year was the complex and disturbring multi-media
presentation "Patricide" by Jonathon Barker. Utilizing a wide variety of formats ranging from slide projectors,
silhouettes, human voices and electronic sound effects, a baffling scenario was built up which came to a shattering climax that obviously left much pf the audience wondering what had hit them. I was lucky enough to interview
Jonathon Barker on my show, during which he explained the complex message his production was intended to convey.
rything bad with the father.
PETE: Starting right at the beginning, Jonathon, "Patricide" is
the act of killing your father.
Could you, in general terms,
explain the significance of this
tide?
JONATHON: Well, it's pretty
14 DISCORDER
obvious isn't it? Killing your
father means killing your father.
It's getting rid of the male part of
humanity in some way.
P: And you're making this statement as a man?
J: Yeah, but what are we but
citizens of one universe?
P: Well, that's true, but you
would perhaps expect to see the
father playing a more significant
role in this work.
J: Well, you know, your father's
been around for most of your
life, and after a time you just
can' t escape hating the guy and I
think this must be even more true
for women. I think women in
general must just associate eve-
Pi So this performance is simply
a straight forward condemnation
of the father?
J: Yeah, I think that if we got rid
of fatherhood we would have a
much, much better world.
P: It was not at all evident from
the scenes in this production, at
least as far as I'm concerned, that
was what you were say ing-maybe
I haven't understood fully. You had, for example, three projectors up at the back of the stage
showing words and images that
seemed to me to have very little
connection. In one part, the
projectors were showing the
words "BLOOD", "SPERM"
AND "OIL". Can you tell me
how this is related to the death of
the father?
J: What do you associate a man
with but pure, raw, physical
work? Blood is obvious, I mean,
as soon as he gets working his
blood's getting into a rage. And
sperm, well, I don't need to
explain that even to you. And oil
evokes the image of something
slimy, a bit mechanical, dirty,
not something that you'd like to
associate with. I mean, oil spills,
all the ghastly images that come
up...
P: Well, that's one explained;
how about the series that read
"SPAIN". "GIRLFRIEND", and
"AIRCRAFT"?
J: Well, you can't just expect all
the three things that appear at
any one time to be interconnected. I mean, the interrelationships between the words and the
music is something you're overlooking completely. They are so
obvious in some way, e.g. when
"SPAIN" appears, there is the
hovering sound of the helicopters that we saw during the Vietnam War; the association with
the Spanish Civil War is so obvious to anyone who has read
Ernest Hemmingway, really.
P: Yeah, obviously I had noticed
that but what about the "GIRLFRIEND"?
J: Exploitation, exploitation!
P: So that's why "Bolero" faded
in—obviously  a reference  to
Blake Edwards '"10"?
•J: Yeah. So you picked up on
that. Good, good.
P: Well I'm obviously not quite
as stupid as I appear to be. But
when the word "AIRCRAFT"
began to flash on and off, "Bolero" faded into what appeared
to be just a monotone hum that
baffled me totally.
J: Actually, Irecorded that flying
in one of those oldB-52's. I was
sitting in the tail section of the
aircraft and just put the tape recorder on and this was the humming noise you heard.
P: A piece of "found art" then?
J: Well, it's something original
you know. We got so much dead
baggage that we're carrying
around with us and so I just
wanted something new in there.
And, I suppose, aircraft, there's
destruction, there's war, there's
violence- there's the male. You
don't fight wars with females.
It's just that men are always the
soldiers. You know, like, that
other scene when this naked girl
comes on stage and opens that
cube and takes out this uniform,
this hollow uniform, and she's
instantly transformed into a male.
P: Yeah, I understand, I think,
though I thought there may have
been some inherent sexism in
this performance. For example,
there was a woman dressed only
in black underwear rhythmically
"Right, the guitar.
Here's this guy dropping the pennies and
he's just—I mean, very
slowly, and without
people noticing it,
money is taking everything out of art. Capitalism is killing art, you
see. That's basically it.
And that's why I'm so
dirt poor and I can still
make art."
hitting a rock throughout the
entire show. What was your justification for that?
J: So that people invite me into
their studios and ask me what
that was all about really. It's just
provocation, you know.
P: Well, that's, I suppose, the
artist's job- and how did that fit
in with the projected photographs
of the lawnmower, the young
ballet dancer and the lungfish?
J: You know, ever since I've
been, oh I don't know, I guess
something like seven years old,
I've always had this dream about
these lungfish being splattered
about the lawn and then Daddy
running over them with the lawn-
mower and at the same time I
was watching this old ballet you
know the Swan Lake by
Tchaikovsky, and these images
just sort of interconnect with me.
They've been around with me
for most of my life.
P: Would you say that perhaps
the lungfish was a kind of phallic
symbol and the lawnmower running over the lungfish is castration, the killing of the father?
J: Yeah, but Daddy was driving
the bloody lawnmower...
ell,
thai
obviously...pretty deep.
J: Oh...oh yeah, deep, deep...
P: So, the guy dropping pennies
on the guitar- very clever, yes,
but did it really have any point?
J: Well, there you have your
phallic symobl.
P: The guitar?
J: Right the guitar. Here's this
guy dropping the pennies and
he's just—I mean, very slowly,
and without people noticing it
money is taking everything out
of art. Capitalism is killing art
you see. That's basically it. And
that's why I'm so dirt poor and I
can still make art.
P: Yeah, and that's why it cost
$7 to get in!
J: Well, I've got to live somehow, right?
P: I suppose so. Anyway, alotof
this performance puzzled me—
the brutal poetry describing burning a man for instance...
J: Yeah, kill the bastards...
P: But is this the way forward?
Burning men on a pyre?
J: Oh well.Idon'tknow, it is one
way I suppose.
P: Well, it certainly is one way.
The final scene- the scene that
left most people gasping- was
when the stage darkened completely, apart from a single large,
white candle flickering right in
the centre, on which you then
proceeded to dump ahuge bucket
of what looked like real blood.
What's your message?
J: Well, it wasn'tjustblood, you
know. Going back to the beginning of the play, well it's technical, you see you're giving the
play a frame- if that's what you
want to call it, a play. You've got
to keep your performance together. So, what you mentioned,
the blood, sperm and oil, the
words on the screens at the beginning of the work, here they
come back, you know. And, of
course, this candle is again in
some way phallic. It's the male
light that is burning, and here
comes his blood, his sweat, his
sperm and oil, everything that is
slimy and associated with the
male, and it comes back to haunt
him and extinguishes the candle
and then he's gone and it's peace
after that Nobody knew what
was going on, nobody knew
whether the play had ended and
there was just silence. And that's
how it's going to be when you
get rid of the male.
P: Obviously this production was
a great success. How can you
possibly top this work? Where
do you go from here?
J: Oh well, I've been working on
another idea lately. You know, I
want to do another multi-media
presentation- I'm fed up with all
those pseudo-intellectuals and I
just want to do a presentation
condemning, in Freudian terms,
those misguided individuals who
are always poking fun at serious,
intellectual artists like myself.
NOVEMBER 1 The Summer Of '89
■■
Down On The Docks With Viola Funk
So, like, I'm walking along the railroad tracks somewhere east of
Main, heading west. It's getting dusk. And I hear a voice way
off in the distance, off behind me to my right. After a bit I realise
the voice is endeavouring to attract my attention: "Hey! Hey, you!"
Brought up (in Surrey) in the "Ignore 'em and they'll go away" school
of dealing with unwanted harrassment, I steadfastly continue walking. Head down, enumerating the passing railroad ties and weeds beneath my Converses. "...Hey!" Now I hear a car engine, cruising
along in time with the voice. Both getting closer. Great. A bunch of
No. 5 Orange St escapees out for a joyride or something. I pick up
the pace, thinking if worst comes to worst I can make for the hole in
the chain-link fence that affords exit from the trainyards into the
parking lot beside the Archimedes Club. And run like hell. But for
the moment I consider it expedient to just go on as if nothing is amiss.
A bit faster, maybe.
Then, footsteps, obviously those of someone of considerable
bulk, crunching and slamming across the gravel and ties toward me,
catching me up. I'm about to break into panicked run - fuck being
"cool" - when before me, rising up in all his splendiferous navy blue
uniformage, appears a cop. "Hey" (and yes, the voice is his) "You
deaf, or something? ("Yes," I reply in my best ASL.) Okay, so, no
"Stop in the Name of the Law", or Riot Act read me, or even my rights,
no nothing, just this police, wanting to know "Where you going? I've
been shouting atyou from the roadforthepastfiveminutes. What are
you doing here?" "I'm going to the park," I reply, indicating Crab up
past the Main St. overpass. "Not along the tracks you're not," he
replies, thinking quickly for a cop. "It's against the law to walk along
the trackes, or be anywhere around the trains here. Dangerous, you
16 DISCORDER
know. Could get hit by a train, or...'Gainst the law. Let you go with
just a warning this time, but..." Once he's finished spewing off this
drivel, I inquire demurely, "is it alright if I walk along the road then?"
"Oh yeah, the road's alright. Just as long as you don't go on the
railroad tracks." Just in case I missed his point the first time around.
Ya. Knees knocking as a result of still being in "Oh my God, I'm
about to be macheted to death by a slavering transient" mode, I make
my legal, road-abiding rest of the way to the park.
Port Police. Ya can't live with 'em, ya can't kill 'em.
So one other night I take an innocent little stroll down
between the Pacific Elevators at the north end of Salsbury Drive.
Noneof this once-burned, twice-shy,shit Actually, having sojourned
between these very elevators time and again, I don't give it a second
thought. Down at the dock, sunset on the lapping waves; the sea is
gorgeous; lights are coming on in the North Shore hills; a freighter
sits contentedly moored at the side of the port. Looming up in the
gathering darkness, the name of some exotic foreign place inscribed
on its helm. In the recesses of the humming, grinding, expostulating
elevator behind me I can just discern the mackinawed shapes of
smoke-breaking employees. Regarding me from beneath baseball
cap brims.
After five or ten minutes of introspection at the water's edge
(punctuated by only a temptation or two to immerse myself therein)
I turn to go. Halfway down through the elevators I espy a car approaching. Before I have too long to be indifferent aboutit the vehicle
pulls up beside me and I'm hailed by its uniformed occupant "Hey."
(Again, that fail-proof conversational gambit...) "What are you doing
here?" These guys have fairly one-track minds. "I was just down at the
dock, looking out at the sunset." "Okay, well can you just hang on for
a minute. I'd just like to ask you a few questions." Speaks into his
radio. Returns attention to me. (Having stepped out of car, in case I
try to bolt or something.) Third degree. While they're running the
security check on me, in a rather constricted effort to make conversation he asks, "So...how often do you work at this.UW H Smith'?"
(Obviously skeptical.) "Full time." His moustache digests this information, still doubtful. Anyrate, the security check checks out; the fact
that No, I've never "been in trouble with the police" before is
confirmed. With egg on his face Cop-o ventures "It's just that..you
know...this is kind of an odd place for you to be wandering around at
night...And when we see someone suspicious walking around here
after hours, we just like to check 'em out..make sure they're not a
security risk. In terms of theft, or whatever." When I point out "What
am I gonna steal - GRAIN?!" it's "Well, there's a lot of valuable stuff
around here you know...the longshoremen's equipment and stuff..."
Oh, okay. So those over-inquisitive assholes on their smoke break
rang up PP on me. Buncha dicks.
"So, you know, I'd advise you not to wander around here this
late at night..." (Huh? It's like, 9:30...) "or you might get stopped by
one of us again. Okay. Have a good evening..."
But this time, no wimpery did I evince, via knocking knees or any
other method. No, I strode boldly away, muttering to myself dis-
gruntedly as is my wont. You can bet those railroad tracks will be
hearing from me again.
Plus, I know of a secret passageway into the VanTerm
facility, and no one, be he ever so uniformed, can deprive me of that
respite. • Wholesale Retail Outlet for:
-100% Plain Cotton Fabrics
(36-88" widths)
- Broadcloth, Canvas, etc...
• Textile Paints and Dyes
• Tanks, Shorts and Sweats
• 1 Day Workshops:
"Learn to Print Textiles"
"Fabric Printing Techniques"
• Wearable Art
Mon-Fri 9:30 - 5:00 Sat 11:00 - 3:00
clothworks ^if
textile dyes and printers
132 Powell Street, Vancouver
Wobile
Sound
pental    rp,
£CUZ>r
PHONE: 228-3017 MAREK CIESZEWSKI AND BILL MULLAN CHAT WITI*BR^E
MCDONALD AND VALERIE BUHAGIAR
blowing the first Vancou-
L, ?'{
e and Mullan a
ver unspooflng or^DADKILL, ^'tfack'n'road movie
about a girl who learns to drive". Mulla#Ts ^drinking
Canadian Khd I refuse<o panake. A fe\MBk away, surrounded bjfc^n^ nymjhets and l§nos*3sTeigning interest in semiotics, a# Ira^ %e Bilmjfctojwuid^alerie,
each hokfcng |ypottlw^fcCanadiarij|B^' W
«*>
«-<
.-v..
Mullan: fro himself) It'd be nice
to actually put t£e mikeffcv
somewhere so it doesn't
noise... so it's acl
quality.
Me: (to Valen
Mullan: (to
thing I hate more
terviewed is doing intoviews
happi
lively) Yeah, v
5 that movie?
Film Festi'
Filte*
>ut£rthi
:a^-
We: «fow lo»g was iff
Bruce: One hour.
Bruce: (to us) WhrVSe you? % JMultyn: I ve neve* seen it.
We: Ahh...err,we'redoingthis>u*Me: (more aggpesmvely) YealT7
for the DisordeMfhean, Discor-    we've never seen it!
der magazin^nd CiTR v
Bruce: I thinJft racognisej^ I
was at UBC in l^fcfilm program
and did a film called Psychic
Avenger and you (Mullan) did
all the narration for us.
Mullan: That's true. Whatever
happened to that movie?
Mullan: Like d' you have a'
otape copy somewhere, or what?
Bruce:J|es, I do. I got two stars
in TV gufce. It was the first student film made at UBC to ever
recover its^udget.
Mullan: (hiding real motive of
the question) And so did you ac-
^tuaUJPbse myjj
cut?*
Bruce: Yes^ve^
k Multan: (coming fbrth witk real
rivefNind I never got paid for
^is! Look, $25,000, there'sgotta
Lleast a grancftoming to me.
otioning with my head)
v a£out it^gL^
bee: Well^fl^ paid our
fctor five thousand^ lost on it,
i I don't think I'll ever get my
ey back.
Me: (to Bruce) That's what they
all say. (and to Mullan) Keep
pressing, man.
Bruce: But it was a good experience. Actually, you should see it
or get a clip of your voice.
Mullan:   Yeah,  that...   that...
that'd be great.
18 DISCORDER Me: Geeeezes Krrrist, Mullan,
you'd burn yer mother at the
stake if that was the only way to
light up his cigar.
Bruce: Yeah, Roadkill was shot
in 16mm black'n'white, blown
up to 35. Shot forunder 5 million
dollars.
Me: (to Mullan) I can tell when
he's lying.
Bruce: We shot it in two weeks.
We began in May, we finished
on September 15th. We're putting out a soundtrack record, all
the music is Canadian, except
for the Ramones.
Mullan: (impolitely) What is the
plot in twenty-five words.
Bruce: It's a rock'n'road movie
about a girl who learns how to
drive.
Me: That's only eleven words.
Mullan: There is a discussion of
the serial killer epidemic running through America...
Me: I prefer the phrase "mass
murderer".
Mullan: ...and Canada.
Bruce: Yeah, Ramona is a timid
Maltese-Canadian girl. She lives
in Toronto, works for a Machiavellian rock promoter, Roy
Seth. He sends her to Sudbury to
bring back a band of his that's
not shown up for the last four
gigs. The Sudbury circuit is a
kind of bargain-basement
rock'n'roll circuit where bands
just beginning go get their chops
down, and bands that have faded
out go to relive their glory days.
Me: Like Nash The Slash.
Bruce: Like Nash The Slash
Me: (with satisfaction) I heard
that Sudbury looks like the
Moon?
Bruce: Yeah, Sudbury is the land
of mining and nickel and it looks
like the Moon. Actually, they
tested the Lunar Module up there.
We: Heh, heh, heh.
Bruce: It's a true story. They
tested the Moon Buggy up there.
Me: Let me buy you a beer,
Bruce!
Mullan: That brings me to my
main criticism of the film: because you shot black'n'white
Sudbury was not ugly enough.
Bruce: Right.
Me: Your camera has a deliberate, compositional coarse look
to it.
Bruce: Because we had such a
low budget, we didn't have time
to move the camera a lot or build
dolly tracks so the stress was on
composition.
Me: I read that you have a Polish
cameraman. Is it true that Polish
cameramen can only see with
one eye at a time?
Bruce: Heh, heh, very funny.
Yeah, but he was always thinking with the other eye, you know.
Me: What happens to Ramona?
Bruce: After a bungled beginning she finds herself stranded in
Sudbury without the band, without her bag, and without money.
Her search for the band crosses
the careening paths of three
ambitious men and one ambitious boy: Bruce, played by
myself, an out of control, outlaw
movie director, obsessed with
sensationalist images, in search
of a bang-up ending to his obses-
come on, they all wanted sex.
Me: (to bystander) And who
the fuck are you?
Bruce: Sure, they all wanted sex
but they all sublimated their
sexual desires.
Mullan: We should talk about
the title of the film, Roadkill,
and the fact that there were hardly
any animals killed during the
making of the film.
Bruce: That is the truth.
By-stander:  (impudently)  Oh
yeah? And what was on that
engine being fried in motor oil?
Me: {very impolitely) Fuck off.
Bruce: That was a cat.
Mullan: No, really?
Me: (to Mullan) Cats die all the
time.
Bruce: Tastes like chicken.
Mullan: Did you eat it.
road. So that involved a number
of different setups to shoot the
scene. The farmers were standing on a hill and after each take
they were under the impression
that we were killing rabbit after
rabbit and they called the police.
We looked kinda rough; we had
our leathers on.
Me: You must have come close
to shooting a remake of Easy
Rider there?
Bruce: Yeah, but luckily they
didn't pull out their Winchesters. But most people we met
were fairly receptive.
Me: How much music was written for the film?
Bruce: One or two pieces. Nash
did Roadkill which is in the Joey
Ramone scene. All theotherstuff
was already seen in gigs. I was
sive documentary; Matthew, a
disillusioned rockstar on a spiritual quest; Russell, a loner trying
to break into the competitive field
of serial killing;...
Me: I still prefer "mass murder"...
Bruce: ...and Luke, a 15 year old
boy who stole his father's car
and wants to be a man. They all
wanted something.
Me: The only one that wanted
sex was the 15 year old.
Some by-stander: (to me) Oh,
Bruce: Yeah.
By-stander:     (stubbornly)
Whose cat was it?
Me: (reaching the limits of my
patience) Blow bum!!!
Bruce: Ah... the name tag said
Fluffy, so I don'tknow. We were
accused of being a Satanic cult
from the city by a group of farmers up in Northern Ontario. We
were shooting the last scene of
the film where the main character Ramona finally dodges her
n-th rabbit that she sees on the
really trying to pick conciously
Canadian inderendent music.
Mullan: i^^s^nna be han*
dling the^o^dtraSll^
BrucerW%'re just talkmgto tv^i
different people. Yomsh(
write this dovH^but it
Virgin or WEA.   t
Me:   (philosophically)
poster looks okay to*
Bruce: This is a kind of a a^k •
thing we've whipped opjjJWftrl *
the festival and we're
working on another r
poster. Butthe album covercould
be what we have here and cassettes and video cassettes will
have this one with a splash of
blood on it.
Mullan: I gather you've contacted the Ramones?
Bruce: Yeah. The co-producer
and myself are big Ramones fans.
The co-producer was one of the
first guys to book the Ramones
at the New Yorker in 77 in
Toronto and it was the first gig
they played outside of NYC. We
didn't really know them but we
phoned them up and they were
great.
Me: Did you show them the
script?
Bruce: Yeah. We sent Joey the
script and he really liked the title
and the idea of a rock'n'roll
movie and his manager thought
it' d be a great idea for Joey to get
some exposure. Joey is no big
shakes as an actor but he's a
really cool guy.
Me: Did they see the film?
Bruce: They looked at it last
week. We sent it to them. We
just got it in on time 'cause
they're in England on a tour.
We included a bunch of t-shirts.
Joey said he'll be plugging the
film in interviews.
Me: Did he like it?
Bruce: I haven't heard from him
yet but I'm sure he'll love it.
We: Who else can you hear on
the soundtrack?
Bruce: About twenty bands. Any
independent guy would kill to
get his song in the film 'cause
it's good promotion and it's good
for them. So The Ugly Ducklings — old Toronto Rolling
Stones clone band, IT, The Paupers, Graeme Kirkland and the
Wolves with Julie Massey, ex-
singer with the Parachute Club,
Cnronic Harmonic, Teknakul-
■taAaincoats — a kinda punk-
gOTrjic^ band out of Toronto,
Cow,boy Junkies, Razor—hard-
co^^eavy metal, Leslie Spit,
'^flbrfffoi^i, Sturm
jr Machine — elec-
pyt t>f London, 10 Sec-
Over T#kyo, Razorbacks,
pTorrfltopnnors, Hand-
[uflanfHaAisome Ned is dead,
i*thel   *Vi        I
^Brucyj^eah. jpo much heroin...
We:*Hrkay "no", kids..#mless
the pricWs right.
NOVEMBER 1989 19 David  Sylvian  and   Holger
Czukay
Flux and Mutability
(Virgin)
Flux and Mutability is
the first example of the absolute
latest in commercial trends; the
twenty-one minute and two-second long single. In actual fact
this new collaboration by former
Japan singer/songwriter David
Sylvian and Can member Holger
Czukay  bears  no  relation  to
conventional pop music styles.
It consists, instead, of two pieces
of(lengthy)music which occupy
the "Flux" and "Mutability,"
sides of the record respectively.
A big, bright colourful world is
the first track on the disc. Beginning with a sample of musique-
concrete from Holger's dictaphone, this first tune instantly
settles into a relaxing groove
backed by simple percussion
parts and randomly executed bits
of keyboard, guitar, flugelhorn
and mysterious voices. Overall,
this first track, which totters
randomly forward for sixteen
minutes, is rather reminiscent of
David Sylvian's solo work. Brilliant Trees. On the flip side of
Flux and Mutability, the second
track opens with gentle string
washes. As this twenty minute
epic wears on, echoing guitar
lines and an African flute are
also introduced. Again, this piece
is stylistically very similar to
Sylvian's   early   solo   efforts.
Overall, the record sound is very
pleasant, and extremely aimless.
(Did you launder your socks? A
question to ponder while listening to this record.)
J.W.
Faster Pussycat
Wake Me When It's Over
(Electra)
Taking its name from the
1966 cult-movie classic. Faster
Pussycat Kill! Kill! (or The
Cramps song of the same title,
you decide), this quintet hit the
music scene during the metallic
revival of the mid-eighties. These
origins lead to aproblem: is Faster
Pussycat merely an untalented
hardcore band or a bombastic,
heavy-metal group being played
by underground music stations
to unwary and easily misled listeners who believe they are hearing hardcore? In fact if the listener removes the micron-thin
plating of loud, half-hearted
guitar swipes on top of an annoying voice and concentrates on
the lyrics, it becomes readily
apparent Faster Pussycat is just a
sub-standard, heavy metal
knock-off. (Incidentally, those
serious about listening to quality
hardcore should pick up Husker
Du's Metal Circus.)
Wake Me When It's
Over is the soundtrack of a pre-
adolescent wet dream. Permanently mired in Freud's phallic
phase, lead-singer Taime Do wne
works himself into a masturba-
tory frenzy, groaning about his
"Little Dove": Your high-heeled
river of love/Is drippin' down
your thighs/It seems like my
lover's/finally satisfied. One of
the most repulsive of the eleven
songs is "Where There's A Whip
There's A Way." While the title
is heinous, the lyrics are horrifying! Got you screamin' like a
pooch on a leash to let you know/
She grinds her leather like Liber-
ace rhines a stone/She rides just
like a pony gonna sign that philly
(sic) up for the rodeo. The bestial imagery is continued ad
nauseum in another song, "Slip
of the Tongue": I got a psychopathic love/that fits like a glove/
My baby bucks like a bronco/
When I start to shove/Get your,
get your, get your feet up to your
ears/Slam ithome and take me to
Rome/And watch me disappear.
The lyrics, specifically
chosen to shock the listener, are
the attraction (the mus ic certainly
isn't). Producers of so-called
"slasher movies" strive for a
similar effect with like subject
matter and undoubtedly appeal
to the same audience: twelve year
olds. One last point: in light of
the depraved lyrics, it is ridiculous that on the dust-jacket
Faster Pussycat gives "Special
thanks to all our families and
friends." Touching, isn't it?
If Faster Pussycat releases an album similar in content and style to Wake Me When
It's Over, don't wake me. I'd
rather die in my sleep.
Will Reith
Big Audio Dynamite
Megatop Phoenix
(CBS)
As I listened to Big
Audio Dynamite's latest album,
Megatop Phoenix, asinglephrase
from Simone de Beauvoir's Les
Belles Images remained fixed in
my mind and typified the album's
contents: "wholly different and
exactly the same".
Big Audio Dynamite
(B.A.D. for short) was formed in
1985 upon the collapse of The
Clash. After an ideological argument with Clash co-founder, Joe
Strummer, Mick Jones teamed
up with film-maker Don Letts,
Basement 5 bassistLeo Williams,
Greg Roberts, and Dan Donovan. With artists coming from
varied musical backgrounds,
classifying the band's style is
tricky. B.A.D. is best described
as — for lack of a better term —
ghetto-blaster funk a la reggae
hip-hop. In short ahodge-podge.
The album is a mix-mash
of seventeen songs. The group's
divergent composition is likely
its greatest weakness, rather than
strength. Megatop Phoenix (and
the other three B.A.D. albums,
for thatmatter) feature an engaging collection of sounds —
musical and otherwise. However,
lyrics and melody are inconsistent as the group switches from
one style to another.
Album composition and
order suffer too. The first three
tracks on side one are strung
together so incoherently the
group jeopardizes the impact of
an otherwise interesting social
commentary in the third song,
"All Mink, No Manners". Even
the good material is tainted. The
anthemic power of "Union,
Jack", the best song on this album, sounds undercut when
sandwiched between a bright, but
lyrically repetitive "Contact" and
"Dragon Town", a paean to the
disco era. Side two is a stylist
mosaic of eight utterly forgettable, laxative-smooth tracks
punctuated with occasionally
good instrumentation and vocals.
In light of the talent exhibited by
Jones, Letts and Williams before
the formedBig Audio Dynamite,
it seems ironic they are so mediocre as a band. However, evidence fromB.A.D.'spast albums
in general, and Megatop Phoenix in particular, indicate they
are — to use the old cliche —
"jacks of all trades and masters
at none".
Will Reith
A.C. Marias
One of Our Girls (Has Gone
comprehensible) and you've got
the A.C. Marias. In a Kleenex-
box music world of unoriginal,
lachrymose, prattle, One of Our
Girls (Has Gone Missing) makes
a welcome, yet ever-so-sullen,
alternative.
The group has created
an aural dreamscape of dark grey
skies, veiled reality, and brooding loneliness. The funereal instrumentation makes a perfect
balance to the recitation of
pseudo-Beatnik poetry. The
voice is compelling andhypnotic,
but never tranquilizing.
Good production and
intelligent selection of material
also make the album enjoyable.
No single track is superior to
another; as a result the music
flows evenly from beginning to
end, without choppy inconsistency . Particularly praiseworthy,
'Trilby's Couch" sets the tone
for the album, introducing the
listener to the isolated, ethereal
voice on the wind. The tangible
is avoided in favour of the vague
and atmospheric. The turbulent
"Give Me" features a stronger
rhythm andharder-edgedvocals.
One of Our Girls strength
lies within the A.C. Marias' ability to reinterpret a style of music
and perform it in a new and interesting manner, without making
it sound plagiarized. Other artists should note this accomplish-
Will Reith
(Mute)
Eureka! Something truly
inspired. Imagine Chris and
Cosey (but more melodic)
anaTheCoctequ Twins (butmore
Soundgarden
Louder Than Love •
(A&M)
If you like noisy, whining guitars, thundering drums,
and abrasive vocals played at
1500 decibels, you'll enjoy
Louder Than Love, recorded at
LondonBridgeStudio in Seattle.
The twelve tracks come together
to form a cohesive whole. From
beginning to end, the listener is
caught up in the austere simplicity: no gimmicks, no padding, no
filler, just solid music. The band
is not pretending to be anything
it isn't. In fact, one of the most
engaging things about this album is the "I-don' t-give-a-shit",
garage - band style. The lyrics
present a deliberately warped
tribute to self-indulgence ("Get
on the Snake" and "Loud Love").
Enough said. Go out and buy it!
Will Reith
Berurier Noir
Concerto pour Detraques
(Bondage Records, dist by New
Rose)
I just read it in the July
30 NME—Brix has left The Fall.
Iphonedheronce, gavemy name
and where I w as calling from and
she yelled out to her husband,
"Mark, it's Canada calling." I'll
say this about The Fall, if you
ever have to phone the suicide
hot line and all the operators are
busy, your best hope is that
they're using "Hip Priest" for
hold music.
The above has nothing
to do with this review except that
two weeks ago I ditched The Fall
as my favorite band in the whole
world for Berurier Noir. The band
performs wearing clown masks
and they speak in crude Parisian
street-punk argot. No matter how
many times I retake French 110,
I will not understand any of it.
Apparently their material is full
of humour, but to me it sounds
like one long, angry polemic with
a large dose of unflattering animal imagery. Take the song
"Porcherie" (Pigsty) forexample:
Flics-armee (military
police) - PORCHERIE!
Apartheid - PORCH-
ERIE!
D.S.T. - PORCH-
ERIE!
Et let PEN (right wing
politicians) - PORCHERIE!
The music comes on like fatter,
meaner, faster Deja Voodoo:
buzz saw guitar over cheesy
handclap, spoons and kneeslap
rhythm. This rhythm is almost
identical from song to song. It
would get monotonous if it were-
n't for strategically placed bells,
whistles and saxophone, the latter played by un homme named
Pascal Kung-fu.
Detragues, so I'm told,
are people who have become unpacked, distracted, or otherwise
* screwed up through spending a
year in compulsory military service. I'm not sure why I've fallen
for this stuff. LikeMarkE. Smith,
there's a noir side to these characters which remains inaccessible. To an English audience
this may be the band's biggest
asset. It's on the unseen parts
that one projects anything that
one wants to, or has to, see.
Remember kids, "Tant qu'il y a
du noir, il y a de l'espoir."
J.B. Hohm
Spacemen Three
Sound of Confusion
(Pinnacle)
The Spacemen Three's
new LP is awash in guitar fuzz
and beats like a Triumph Bonneville motorbike idling, never
altering throughout.
Lead singer Jeremy
Kember's anguished drone is a
void into whichreverb distortion
kings The Jesus and Mary Chain
would dare not tread. Kember's
bandmates follow him on a relentless drive along a highway of
drug-induced stupor, smashing
through the guardrails and plunging into a gorge of emptiness. A
group that ends side two with
"OD catastrophe" knows where
bands like the Thirteenth Floor U     fib ■ isS
i
'J
y
Elevators and The Stooges have
been, and wants to go there.
This album is a migraine
to the mind of sobriety. It's
something like a great big gnat
trapped in your speakers, buzzing relentless until its inevitable
demise.
Greg Garlick
Material
Seven Souls
(Virgin)
With a little imagination,
this album could take you on
some bizarre surrealistic trip. One
could call it "In Search of Man's
Soul". This aural adventure
consists of a mixture of Hindi
and African lyrics, and English
narration, accompanied by in-
strumentationranging from coral
sitar to electronic keyboards and
the violin textures of Shankar,
frequent collaboratoin with Material main man Bill Laswell.
Side one starts with a
funky beat Hindi lyrics and
Shankar on the violin. A mid-
tempo instrumental of percussion and synthesizers follows.
Then the English narration comes
in. Here the adventure truly
begins: the voice of William S.
Burroughs fades in and out of the
mix, narrating the story of the
"Seven Souls" throughout the
rest of the LP.
Side two is mostly instrumental but also includes a
song with African lyrics. It finishes with a slow psychedelic
pace, simulating the end of a
long trek.
This is definitely one of
those albums to be enjoyed
throughheadphones (a Walkman
would be ideal) in order to be
absorbed by the hypnotising
sounds that surround you. Categorizing this release is difficult
Try Hindi/African with a taste of
funk. A psychedelic adventure
for soul searchers.
Claude de Leseleuc
Jegsy Dodd and the Sons of
Harry Cross
Wine Bars and Werewolves/
The Jewel In The Flat Cap EP
(Probe Plus Records)
When these two records
first appeared on the CiTR play-
list I had no idea who Jegsy
Dodd and the S ons of Harry Cross
were. It turns out that Jergsy Dodd
is in fact a ranter/poet from Liverpool, England, and The Sons
of Harry Cross are his punk-folk-
reggae-pop backing band. One
listening was enough to decide
that Jegsy has a lot of talent and
pretty soon I was totally won
over by his savage observations
and dry humor.
The album "Wine Bar
and Werewolves" is a highly
personal account of life in today's Liverpool, loaded full of
bitterness and resentment. The
despair of the inhabitants as their
city crumbles into disrepair at
the hands of an uncaring government is documented painfully on
tracks like "So Here We Are"
and Downtown Birkenhead".
Liverpool has a huge heroin
problem and "Hillsview
Heights", named for a council
estate where heroin use is at
epidemic proportions, shows the
slide from the dole to addiction.
Side one closes with "The Art of
Rape", in which a rapist gets off
the charge due to the chauvinism
of the judge and jury-robbing the
victim of justice and dignity. I
put side two on, ready for more
realism and tragedy, only to find
that the guy also has a wicked
sense of humor. The first track
"Wine Bar Man" (set to the tune
of the "Spiderman" cartoon
theme) is a piss-take of the kind
of man who inhabits wine bars in
England, which are roughly
equivalent to Richards On
Richards here. Side two continues in a lighter vein on to the
hilarious final track, an account
of how he was hilarious final
track, an account of how he was
refused entry into "Atmosphere",
"a club for beautiful people",
because of a persistent zit that
only appears on Saturday nights.
The other Jegsy Dodd
release is the EP "The Jewel in
the Flat Cap". Side one is again
intensely tragic. "Always the
Bridesmaid" is a histroy of Liverpool, ending with the optimi sm
of rebirth and the Une "old lady
Liverpool must never get
screwed again".
"8,000 Miles Away" is a
poem about the Falklands war,
set to the sounds of a distant harmonica. It concentrates on the
war seen through the eyes of the
wifeof aserviceman who is killed
fighting for this worthless piece
of land on the other side of the
world. I played it in a crowded
room once and slowly all conversation stopped until, at the
end of the track, there was silence.
Most of side two of the
EP was recorded live in Briken-
head without the band, and includes a vicious send up of the
police and their tendency to wear
mustaches (in "Psycho-Nazi
Police Cadet in Where's Your
Muzzy Shock"!) as well as a
painfully accurate description of
"student types".
Jegsy Dodd and the Sons
of Harry Cross have released two
strong records, and their honest
mix of humor and pathos is a
sure sigh that there are more good
things to come.
Pete Lutwyche
Master/Slave Relationship
This Lubricious Love
(Cause and Effect)
The penchant of Debbie
Jaffe (a.k.a. Master/Slave Relationship) for extremism comes
to the fore here on her v inyl debut.
Subtitled Soundtrack to Black
Leather Bondage, This Lubricious Love serves up a dish of
unrepenting harsh electronics and
tortured vocals. No sampled
anything. It grinds. It scours. It
does all those things paint stripper is supposed to do. A cross
between 'Emily' Farynaandthe
Haters is a decent call. Fans of
Merzbow and Smersh would also
groove to the sounds of America's best-knownnoise act. While
Ministry's Land of Rape and
Honey was once referred to as
background music for hostage
takings, side two of Jaffe's Lubricious Love would be perfect
muzak for waiting rooms at
sperm banks. This side of the LP
consists of the title track, a near-
half hour "What I'm going to do
to you...what I want you to do to
me"-style lascivious dialogue
between Jaffe's electronics. Incidentally, McGee and Jaffe did
work under the name Viscera.
Canada Customs blacklisted
This Lubricious Love, so you'll
have to get it through mailorder.
(Contact Cause and EffectMai-
lorder, PO Box 30383, Indian-
US
No Limit 12"/ (Third Mind)
Delerium
Morpheus/(Dossier)
Catching just enough of
a breather between Front Line
Assembly's first-ever European
and subsequent North American tour to iron out conflicts on
their itinerary and lift the toilet
seat a couple times, locals Bill
Leeb and Michael Balch find
themselves being versed again
in TWA emergency procedure.
But that's not before Leeb
swings by CiTR to inform us of
two new releases — the first
being his second solo project
Morpheus. Employing the
moniker Delerium, Leeb's
Morpheus is made available
through Dossier-Berlin who did
Leeb's first solo Faces, Forms,
and Illusions and FLA's State of
Mind LP. Both Faces... and
Morpheus captures a very thick
and thick-on the-thick synths-
sound (whew!)... very
meditative...cerebral; again
mostly soundtracky material a
la Controlled Bleeding, SPK,
Borghesia, and In the Nursery
—particularly 'Temple", "Somnolent", "Fragments", "Faith",
and the title track. "Veracity",
"Allurance", "Requiem" and
"Coup D'etat" (which features
the only non-TV cut-up vocals
on the LP) build up on a little
more rhythm. The Cabaret
Voltaire "Kino"-influenced
"Gaza", however, is the only
reference made to the Middle
East; and while the Faces, Forms
and Illusions project relied more
on mid-Eastem, ethnic textures
("Mecca", "New Dawn",' "Certain Trust", "Sword of Islam"),
Morpheus still has a very anthe-
maic and lavish, yet unsettling
feel to it
"No Limit" is the second
remixed single from FLS's
Gashed Senses and Crossfire LP,
which, like Morpheus and Faces,
Forms, and Illusions, depends
more heavily on technical grandeur than earlier FLA material.
Ernest Angley clips, much like
those used on Front 242's "Welcome to Paradis", infiltrate the
extended instrumental tacked on
to the club mix of "No Limit":
"I'm not going to think about
unhappy things, I'm going to think
abouthappy things, andl'mgoing
to think about a journey .A journey to the skies and beyond, and
I'm going to heaven one of these
days", said the preacher to the
fool. Swirling keyboards, big bass
synth, and different clips than on
the LP. "Lethal Compound" is
the non-LP b-side. It's reminiscent of "Body Count" from the
Disorder LP. Running over eleven
minutes, it's a little excessive.
However, it kicks in halfway
through with minimal synth
rumblings, screams, Leeb's
chanting, various strings and
metallic percussion. The CD
single includes a toned-down five
minute version of "No Limit".
Lloyd Uliana
Doughboys
Home Again
(Restless)
I've heard many comparisons between Vancouver and
Toronto regarding which is the
real center of the Canadian music
scene. I don't think Toronto has
ever produced a worthwhile band
but, more importantly, the argument overlooks a third element
what about all the great bands
coming out of Montreal? Consider- The Gruesomes, The
Asexuals, Deja Voodoo, and
Mitsou.
The Doughboys are
another fine Montreal band and
they now have a second album
out entitled. Home Again. When
John Kastner defected from his
frontman/singer role with The
Asexuals he formed The Doughboys, who released an excellent
debut album called. Whatever.
Now they're sponsored by Vision Street Wear, they have a
new label. Restless, and judging
by the performance in Vancouver severalmonths ago, they have
an exciting and energetic stage
show.
Like their first album,
Home Again is characterized by
a solid, driving dual guitar sound
and strong vocals. All members
of the band sing back-ups, which
is put to good use on the sing
along choruses. Two of the better songs are "Buying Time",
and "I Won't Write You A Letter". And there's a nice classical
virtuoso guitarintro to the Husker
Du-ish "Never Sleep".
Although Home Again is quite
good overall, my only complaint
is that it's missing a bust-out
catchy hit single like "You're
Related" or "You Don't Know
Me" from Whatever. The band
has filed down some of the
harsher edges of their sound but
they still write some of the best
music in Canada. And as we
approach the 1990's with more
regurgitated poofter pop bands
on the radio and television, the
Doughboys are an even more
welcome relief from the usual
dross.
Terrorr
NOVEMBER 1989 21 UK Subs
Club Soda
Sunday, October 8th
To be truthful, for the low
low price of six dollars, (four if
you had a handy two bucks off
pass) I entered Club Soda not
expecting great things. I thought,
"the UK Subs... fast, hard, possibly even generic hardcore punk
wok." But I was wrong. Lucky
me.
The firsthand. Lost Generation, was a lost cause. The high
point of their performance was
the infamous Club Soda Smoke
Machine which atone point blanketed the entire band in dense
fog, completely blocking them
from sight. Normally this excessive smoke is an irritating habit
our friends at Club Soda have,
but in this case, it was well re-
cieved.
Then, Curious George. A
fine up n' coming group of Van-
couverites with a distinctly local
flavour. Songs included "Pit Bull
Attack", "Better Dead than
Socred", and of course their ever
tasteful cover of that old Bangles
classic, "Walk Like an Egyptian". Because they play at least
twice monthly around town, you
will have many opportunities to
see more of them. You have my
personal recomendation.
After a brief intermission, the
UK Subs took the stage by storm.
I has only heard them once before and knew none of their songs
by name. I couldn't tell you what
they played that night even if
you gave me millions and millions of dollars, but as it turned
out an intimate knowledge of
the band's repetiore was not
necessary to enjoy the show.
They had good rapport with the
audience and played requests as
well as many long encores. It
was an evening when just as you
thought it was really over this
time, they would emerge again
to whip the crowd into renewed
frenzy.
Eventually, late into the night
(if you run on Club Soda time)
they stopped, and turned their
sweaty but satisfied fans out into
the night. The Vancouver stop
on the UK Subs Killing Time
tour was a huge success.
Nit Gritty
Tragic Mulatto/Silent Gathering
Club Soda
Sunday, October 15th
Sure, they have a "No
black T-shirts except on Sunday
& Monday nights" policy; and
someone is overly keen on dry
ice, but hey, as long as they can
put on shows like this one, Club
Soda can't be all bad. Tragic
Mulatto visited their wrath, and
their curiously inspired vision,
upon the populace of Vancouver
22 DISCORDER
on Sunday, 15th October.
Said vision is one that
plumbs depths hitherto undisturbed even by those with the
strongest stomachs. Case in
point: the opening segment,
which saw one of their drummers stand demurely before the
microphone, centre stage, and
recite a paean to the joys of airing one's anus. Hey, in these
days of too-tight jeans the guy
probably has a point. Anyway,
while the musical accompaniment for this highbrow stuff was
fairly mellow bass and drums
gyrations, the pace quickly
changed when lead songstress
Gail (no last name, please) took
the stage. Quite the woman, she.
Clad in innocuous baggy cotton
trousers & top at first, she later
stripped to reveal a green Glad
garbage bag outfit emblazoned
with Mr T's glowering features
and strategically cut to reveal a
red lace brass-ear and ginch, the
latter wedged amonst resplendent rolls of cellulose. Contorted
in the vise grip of the lyrics spewing from her gullet, she whirled
and careened about the stage,
gleefully flaunting shuddering
thighs and butt. ("At last, at last,
arolemodel," thinks Viola.) Her
spells of frenzied demon-possession were accompanied with
music that by turns grated,
grooved, and gyrated straight
through one's solar plexus. Not
passing GO, not collecting $200.
(Huh?) Threatening - or promising - during one instrumental bit
to erupt into a cover of "A Quick
One While He's Away", but not
delivering on that score. Cacophony incorporated, yet boasting
varied enough tempo, rhythm and
instrumentation to keep things
intense. The hairshakers were
going at it; the skins were nodding in agreement; and the coolest of the cool just sat there and
ingested it all.
With two drummers, a
guitarist, a bass player, and Gail
of the metallic green eyeshadow
and Chi Pig locks, this in itself
was a full-time occupation. In
response to some half-witted
heckling re the band's SF origins, Gail advised "If you're
going to San Francisco, be sure
to wear a pentagram on your
bass..." (Or she might've said
"face", I'm not sure.) And the
beat-up old tuba she belaboured
was wielded metaphorically between her legs as often as at her
mouth. What's life without a little
penis envy.
To wrap up this maniacal spectacle, our horn-rimmed-
glasses wearing bass player
handed Gail his instrument and
took her place on vocals, clutching an electric razor for moral
support. As he emptied himself
of the song's lyrics he similarly
divested his head of hair with the
razor. Who says youcan'tplease
longhairs and skins at the same
gig? Overheard between two
audience members later while
leaving: "Wow, like, I thought
he was gonna shave his whole
entire head when he took out that
razor..." " — I thought he was
gonna shave his legs, personally."
As a prelude, cock-rockers - whoops, I mean hillbilly-
slash-grunge-rockers - extraordinaire Silent Gathering served
up a platter of the usual. Sunbaked, rattlesnake-bitten, sand-
encrusted Seventies stuff. Although tonight they were lean
ing more in the direction of liquor-steeped, all-out insane screa-
marama times, which they've
been doing more and more of
late. Their set was graced (or
cursed, depending on how uncomfortably close to centre stage
you happened to be) with the
presence of a severely drunk,
purple-haired, head-banging
whirling dervish who had no
qualms about charging full-force
into whatever objects, animate
or in-, stood in her trajectory.
This chick combined with the
ubiquitous Club Soda dry ice
visitations created an interesting
backdrop for SiG's prognostications of death via sex, homicide,
drink, birds, and other kooky
methods. Their set was shorter
than usual but then Tragic Mulatto had their act nipped in the
bud too. "We don't have time
left for anymore folks, sorry,"
the waitress-cum-MC announced
cheerfully over the sound system. Yeah, fuck you too. In this
happily belligerent frame of mind
I stumbled down the stairs and
out beneath the waning moon,
having had a groovy evening of
fun and perversity. Not neces
sarily in that order.
Viola Funkdom
Eek-a-Mouse/Roots Roundup
Town Pump
Monday, October 9th
What better way to round
out the holiday weekend than
working up a sweat to some
dynamic Jamaican reggae?
Obviously this idea appealed to
people as there were many in
attendance at the Town Pump.
Roots Roundup had no problem filling the dancefloor with a
solid opening set setting the
mood for the whole evening.
Eek-a-Mouse took the
stage after a short delay (probably caused by difficuties getting
his ego through the door) and
straight away slipped into some
of the tightest most exciting
reggae I've ever witnessed. Last
time I saw Eek-a-Mouse, five
years ago, he had the appearance
of a novelty act. He was dressed
as an Arabian prince, complete
with gold lame turban. His back
ing band were sloppy and amateurish. By contrast this show
was serious black leather and
sharp, punchy music laid down
by his multicultural band armed
with some of the latest electronic
equipment.
The sound was superb
throughout. The unique voice of
Eek-A-Mouse would sometimes
soar way above the backbeat
and at other times, machine-gun
tongue-tripping rhymes at the
audience. Eek-a-Mouse also had
plenty of stage presence. He
engaged in lots of posing and
tongue-in-cheek audience participation, but he would.often
move out of the spotlight to allow the band to get do wn to some
serious dub reggae. This was a
highly professional yet relaxed
show, proving that Eek-a-Mouse
is on the front line, helping to
take reggae into the nineties.
Pete Lutwyche
Hip Flip
The Gruesomes/ The Picasso
Set/The Smugglers/The Evaporators/The Roosters
West Van. Rec. Centre
Friday, October 13th
Hip Flip took a few
hundred people in West Vancouver on a time-travel trip back
to the days when a band's place
was in the garage and rock 'n'
roll dealt with the really important issues of life, like boy meets
girl. Presented by CiTR's own
John Rusltin, a.k. a. Nardwuar the
Human Serviette, his ninth concert showcased some of Canada's most enthusiastic practitioners of hip-shakin', foot-
stompin', pop-o-matic teenrock.
The Roosters, playing their first-
ever gig, ably warmed up the
audience with their harmonica-
laden barnyard boogie-woogie.
Hot on the Rooster's heels came
Nardwuar's own musical outfit,
the Evaporators. Admittedly,
the show-stealer here was
Nardwuar himself, decked out in
sixties-style garb (as were the
majority of those onstage), and
sawed-off sunglasses. A veritable
showman, Nardwuar wowed his
audience with a dance routine
that combined arthritic King Tut
maneuvers withSt. Vims' Dance.
After turning in an admirble set,
the Evaporators made way for
those "cubist groovies", the Picasso Set. And groovy tunes they
served up, indeed, paying homage to rock V roll greats like the
Dave Clark Five. Fresh from an
exhausting local club tour, the
four-piece group soon had the
walls of Cypress Gym reverberating with their happy-go-lucky
repertoire of sixties-inspired
melodies.
The audience at the front
of the stage was an indecipherable tangle of flailing human
limbs by the time the next act the
Smugglers, hadstormed through
their first number. Lead singer
Grant Lawrence belted out such
memorable lines as "I just wanna
make love to youuuu!!!" as the
crowd pogoed up and down in
sheer glee. Self-confessed "worst
guitarist inB.C", DaveDykhuis,
added some tasty "kerrangg!!"
on top of the band's pounding
rhythm section. Unfortunately,
time constraints put a premature
end to the Smugglers' set
Finally, the moment had
arrived for Montreal's premiere
garage-rock gurus, the Gruesomes, to hit the stage. Having
played at previous Nardwuar
extravaganzas, the band appeared
to be familiar favorites with the
all-ages audience. This time, the
band included a new member,
Albertan Al Boyd, on guitar. The
Gruesomes performed an enjoyable set keeping the audience,
including myself, on its dancing
toes. When the clock struck
twelve, the band was forced to
bid adieu, allowing concert patrons the hope of catching a bus
out of the wilds of West Van.
Andrea Cserenyi The Man Who Mistook His
Wife For A Hat
Opera By Michael Nyman
Vancouver   East   Cultural
Centre
Friday, October 6th
You hate opera too? All
that trojan horse stuff, lions,
gawdy scenery, boredom- a giant
spectacle one would expect to
find crammed into B.C. Place,
like a tractor pull or a retro-rock
show. The Man Who Mistook
His Wife For A Hat, by Michael
Nyman, with libretto by Christopher Rawlence, is notlike that
It is a chamber (not dungeon) opera consisting of three characters
and a small ensemble of two violinists, a violist, two cellists, a
harpist and a pianist which
clocks in at just over one hour
(thanks to the jerk who didn't
turn his hourly watch beeperoff).
This is no Wagner Ring
cycle where the last one awake in
the hall is the first one out of the
parkade, but instead a short opera about a neurological disorder. "Hat" is based on a case
study by Oliver Sacks in which
Dr. P (a professional singer)
confuses parking meters for
people, and his wife...; in other
words, he has a severe visual
agnosia. Dr. P resorts to using
melodies to help him coordinate
everyday tasks, enabling him to
live a relatively full life, instead
of "deteriorating in the shadow
of his 'deficits'." According to
Sacks, "Dr. P. and his wife have
elements of the heroic, but the
real hero is surely music- the
power of music to organize and
integrate, to knit and reknit a
shattered world into sense."
Nyman's straightforward music deals with Dr. P's
gradual deterioration, but more
importantly, it's not boring. He
overcomes the difficulty of maintaining momentum by relying on
an almost minimal style of composition with a pop influence.
Contrary to what I have read,
Nyman's writing is certainly not
avant-garde. This rendition of
Hat, put on by the Vancouver
New Music Society, was quite
successful. It was nice to see the
Society (with the help of Barry
Hegland, Phillip Tidd, and
Anne Ramsden) pay such close
attention to scenery and lighting.
Although predictable, the slides
were helpful in enhancing the
imagery of the libretto (unfortunately, one of the slide projectors was out of focus for the first
quarter of the performance on
opening night).
Hat is light, very light
and it is questionable whether
Nyman was truly sensitive to the
story (Sack's description, quoted
above, gives the expectation of a
more profound representation,
whereas Nyman seemed more
interested in exploiting thecomic
elements). Since Nyman points
out in the liner notes of the recording how quickly he composed this opera, I feel free to
comment on his craftmanship.
Gary Dahl's fine performance
was marred by the fact that
Nyman had scored the bass part
so low that it was often buried by
the strings. As well, Nyman's
insistence on scoring the soprano
so high was annoying, and the
strain showed on her face.
As far as the New Music
ensemble was concerned, performances were good, but there
were some very wonky things
happening in the string section.
Despite these few complaints, I
enjoyed this opera. Now I wish
someone in this city would present Ligeti's "Le Grand Macabre", Berio's new opera, a
Kagel music-theatre piece, Mes-
siaen's opera, or a Xenakis pol-
ytope (but please, no Phillip
Glass).
The Man Who Mistook
His Wife For A Hat was a good
start to what promises to be an
interesting 1989/90 Vancouver
New Music season. Look for the
nice posters by Joe Average
(miles better than those tacky
Vancouver Opera things I see
everywhere) advertising the upcoming concerts, the next being
on November 5, entitled Works
(Recent Discoveries).
Paul Steenhuisen
ODVttEV ililPOTO
VANCOUVER'S ALTERNATIVE RECORD STORE
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[MONDAY / TUESDAY OCT. 30-31: THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW
MONDAY NOVEMBER 6: THE LAVENDER HILL MOB
(MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13: THE AFRICAN QUEEN
[TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 14: PATHS OF GLORY (12:40,7:00,9:30)
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20: NOTORIOUS
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 27: MONTY PYTHON AND THE HOLY GRAIL
• Admission $2.50 / Annual Membership $2.00 •
WEDNESDAY NOV. 1: RABID
WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 8: FROM THE LIFE OF THE MARIONETTES
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 15: SANJURO
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22: BARRY LYNDON (8:00 ONLY)
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29: SCANNERS
NOVEMBER 1989 23 What do Andy Warhol, Phyllis
Diller and Glenn Grant of Glenn
Grant Chevrolet in Burien have
in common? Wigs, natch. Toupee, fall, piece, rug, dog, periwig, peruke, postiche; whatever
you warma call it fake hair has
been around at least as long as
the Egyptians (that's 3000 B.C.
to you and me), and it's still
going on strong today, from
bargain bins full of matted rat fur
at major thrift stores everywhere
to hi-class operations like Poor
Richard's Distributing Corp.,
where I talked to Evelyn about
the mysteries and joys of wigs.
BETTY: How much do your
wigs go for?
EVELYN: Our prices are wholesale because we sell only to wig
shops and beauty salons. They
mark them up at least twice. So
they don't sell anything under
$100.
B: Holy cow, that's pretty expensive!
E: Well, it is.
B: How much hair does it take
to make a wig?
E: Oh, I have no idea; we don't
manufacture them.
(Another source informed me that
it takes "two big bunches" of
humanhairfromoneofthe "hair
factories" to make a wig, blonde
hair of course being more expensive because "it's much more
rarer". Poor Richard's distributes hand-tied (expensive) and
machine-made (less expensive)
synthetic wigs.)
B: Do these wigs last a long
time?
E: That all depends on how
they're treated.
B: What's the best way to treat
a wig?
E: They have to be washed in
cold water— not hot that takes
the curl out. Brushed before
they're washed, turned inside out
and then squished in a solution
of shampoo and cold water and
just sort of shaken out and left to
dry.
B: How do you store It?
E: For going on a trip or things
like that, we suggest that they put
it in a ziplock bag.
B: You have over 100 styles—
that's a lot of wigs!
E: Yes it is. The most popular
styles now are ones for people
who need wigs, like working
women who don't have the time
or wherewithal to get their hair
done 2 or 3 times a week at the
hairdresser. So they can wear
wigs between shampoos. Others
wear wigs all the time because
it's just too much bother to do
their own hair. And then there
are entertainers who wear them
strictly for show and they would
get more elaborate types. And of
course there are chemotherapy
patients who lose their hair and
must wear wigs. The same with
children.
B: Do you have long hair and
short hair wigs?
E: Oh yes.
B: Are the short ones more
popular?
E Actually, yes. Most people are
in the middle age to older.
B: And what's your most popular colour?
E: For elderly ladies especially it
would be Number 56.
B: What's that?
E: That is a very gray... a silvery
gray. And those that are not gray,
the most popular colours would
be4,6and8.
B: What are they?
E: A medium brown to a chestnut brown.
B: How many colours do you
have in all?
E: Oh my goodness, my
goodness.there must be 50 colours.
B: How long have you been
working with wigs?
E: About 18 years.
B: What trends have you noticed come and go?
E: Well, I've noticed when the
curly-all-over styles came out
what they used to call The Poodle
Cut or The Wash 'N* Wear, they
were the most popular and they
have gone on being popular over
the years. But other styles have
come and gone, like the straight
ones, and no w it's the very elaborate type of spiral curls and tight
sort of wild-looking things.
B: Do you own any wigs yourself?
E: No, actually I'm blessed with
a very nice head of almost-white
hair so I don't really need one.
B: Do you ever try them on just
for fun at work?
E: Oh yes, not so much anymore,
but I used to all the time because
I used to wear them... between
perms and things.
B: Have you sold any wigs to
famous people?
E: I don't think so, not that famous. To fellas that are in bands...
a lot of transvestites,
crossdressers and entertainers.
B: And what styles do they prefer?
E: Usually the ladies' long styles.
B: How about colours?
E: The in-between browns.
B: What about wigs for men?
E: We have customized toupees:
we get them from the Orient We
send all the particulars of colour,
style and face and a pattern of the
head... made out of Saran Wrap
and Scotch Tape.
B: Saran Wrap and Scotch
Tape?!
E: Yes, Saran Wrap is stretched
over the head and then they hold
it and twirl it around and they put
Scotch Tape on it to make a little
solid dome and they they mark it
with   a   permanent-type  pen
around the area for how they
want the base to be.
And speaking of men's wigs,
let's move on over to Larry's
Hair Place, which caters especially to men and where Larry
thinks a column devoted to wigs
is "Right On".
BETTY: So who's wearing a
wig these days?
LARRY: You name it, you name
it... No limit to the age group.
B: Say someone wants to get a
wig, what happens?
L: Everything I do is custom
made   with  plaster  of  Paris
molds... We're talkin' a custom
unit— we build everything for
the person... Okay now, we have
to determine first if they want
one and what quality they want
If we're talkin' Born Again, then
I would measure them...
B: How do you measure someone's head?
L: Tape measure.
B: Really?
L: That's how the mold is made
up that determines how we make
the base... And then we go from
there and then decide what style
we're going to do and I get that
information and I send it to Salt
Lake City in the United States.
B: Why's that?
L: Because of the superior quality, and the workmanship is better.
B: How long does the process
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"New Youth" speaks
for itself far better
than any advertising
pamphlet or "staged
TV commercial."
Look Ten Years Younger
100% satisfaction or
full   refund. take?
L: Six to eight weeks.
B: And how much does it cost?
L: At least it wouldbe a thousand
and from there on up.
B: Do they last a long time?
L: Well I got one here that's been
here six years.
B: Can there be sideburns attached, or is that on your own?
L: Well, with the Born Again
unit, I build a whole unit— it can
be a complete head of hair; it'll
completely cover your own hair.
B: What about colours?
L: The colour-chart I have is
totally in depth. And each particular strand of colour, in Born
Again, has a minimum of seven
colours made out of two main
colours because like there's no
particular colour that's just one
colour. Like you're talkin' about
Asians okay and everybody says
"They've got black hair." Not
true. So each strand, each piece
that I start with, has seven colours and I go from there. And I
blend that hair in accordance to
what the colour of their hair is—
that is the most important part
because that hair has to match.
B: And do most men want it to
match their own hair or does
anybody come in wanting
something totally different?
L: Anything different, the gentleman is likely in a rock band or
something like that.
B: So you do rock stars?
L: Now I don't know where the
terminology "star" starts and
stops. I don't believe I have
anyone who just makes a living
out of music but they' ve got good
groups.
B: Any names?
L: Totally confidential.
B: So is this Born Again idea
yours?
L: Nope, I wish it was, ha ha ha.
B: Who thought it up?
L: A man named Ian Candle in
L.A., he invented the process. I
happen to be the only person in
B.C. that has it. And the unique
thing about it is when you make
it, the hair inside the hair replacement is put in place and
then is turned upside down WET,
turned upside down and
BRUSHED straight down and
that gives the hair the tendency
to stand. We have three types of
hair... it's synthetic... Each hair
shaft does a certain thing— one
is strong, the other one lays easier. Your own natural hair does
not cooperate right, and neither
does the hair replacement. I
mean, it looks fine but it has a
little bit of its own mind to make
it look natural. The wind blows
and you get wind in it, it comes
out looking natural.
B: How did you knowyou wanted
to get into this business?
L: I've been in the hair industry
for 25 years and I just thought it
would be really nice to give
people hair.
B: Are people embarrassed
when they come in?
L: Some are.
B: So I guess you have to be not
only a hair guy but a bit of a
L: Yeah, I think so. You know,
you shouldn't be selling things
to people that don't want them.
You know if a guy comes in
because his wife sent him in, a
hair replacement is not going to
solve his problem. If he doesn't
want one, I'm not interested. It's
gotta feel good to him inside
because it's gonna make a big
change in his life.
B: Do people ever come back
and say this isn't working out
or, conversely, this is the greatest thing that ever happened?
L: Mainly it's positive. I have
had some negative reactions but
most of that can be cured with
styling; generally, they don't
know—I didn't give them
enough ins miction, enough indication of how to brush it and
stuff like that. Take a guy who's
been 20 years with no hair. Put
hair on him. He forgets how to
use a comb, you know what I
mean, ha ha ha.
B: Do you think men are less
inhibited about getting wigs
since Burt Reynolds and everybody has them now?
L: Well, I think the ego of a man
is very very high. That would be
the major obstacle. They're very
embarrassed about what their
friends are going to say, right.
They think everyone is looking
which is not true. I shaved off a
guy's mustache and everybody
said "What's different about
you?" Twenty-one years of age,
he had some hair, and then he
just had a lot more.
B: So you took it away from
one place and put it somewhere
else!
L: Two weeks later, he phoned
me up and said everything was
beautiful, everything was great
and he started to grow his moustache back. But his mother noticed immediately that he had it,
I mean you couldn't fool her
with all the rice in China, moustache or no moustache!
B: How do you take care of
these wigs?
L: It's really easy. Just shampoo
itrightin the shower when you're
in there.
B: So you never take these
things off?
L: It's non-surgical— that means
we do not attach it surgically—
so you can take it off, but you can
shampoo with it on, sleep with it
on, even make love with it on,
right?
B: Okay. Anything else you
want to add?
L: Larry's Hair Place.
PLEA$EBEAWAREOFTHEFO££OWING
DEAD£INE$ FOR AD BOOKINGS IN THE
AD $PA0E FOR THE DECEMBER
l$$UE MU$T BE BOOKED NO£ATER
THAN NOVEMBER 12. A££ AD COP¥
MU$T BE $UPP£IED BY NOVEMBER 15. THE l$$UE Wl££ BE ON
THE $TAND$ B¥ NOVEMBER 24.
AD$PA0EFORTHEJANUAR¥I$$UE
MU$TBE BOOKED NO£ATERTHAN
DECEMBER 10. A££ADCOPYMU$T
BE $UPP£IED B¥ DECEMBER 13.
THE l$$UE Wl££ BE ONTHE $TAND$
BY DECEMBER 22.
FOR MORE INFO, CALL MIKE
HARDING AT 228-3017
used a old
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i West.Bavter
Vancouver
681-7654   J
CB283
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Prssakel ty HeSler#> SWGW ^ sag
The Acting Consul-General of Brazil Proudly Presents
CONTEMPORARY
BRAZILIAN
CINEMA
A Centennial Celebration of the Republic,
1889-1989
with eight provocative new films
showing November 16-23
(Free 2pm matinee Saturday, Nov. 18)
A1 s o i n N o v e m b e r
Quebec Cinema in the 1980s:
Le Matou, Au Clair de la Lune, Les Fous
de Bassan & Les Bans Debarras
Sweet Subversion:
The Fourth Man, Mauvais Sang, The
Ploughman's Lunch, Dirty Little War, In the
Realm of the Senses & Odd Obsession
Glenn Gould on Film:
The Terminal Man, The Wars
Look for our f ree bi-mo nthly  bulletin
CINEMATHEQUE
1131 HOWE ST. INFO: 688-FILM
26 DISCORDER
By the time you read this, Shindig's first set of semi-finals will
have been decided, but CiTR's
annual battle of the bands is far
from over. There may even be
room for one or two last-minute
entries, so if your band is interested, call Lane or Linda at 228-
3017, or show up at the Railway
on a Monday night to check out
the competition and talk to them
in person.
The CASBYs will be
held this month (November 7th),
and two of the nominees for
Independent Band of the Year
are from Vancouver, Nettwerk's
Skinny Puppy, and Bob's Your
Uncle (now with the up-and-
coming Culture Records). BYU
will be playing at the Town Pump
November 17th.
Another (but quite different) Culture Records band,
Memory Day, will be going into
the studio next month to record
their first album, possibly to be
produced by Bill Henderson
(that's right, of Chilliwack).
Here are this month's demo
reviews:
Freedom Press- "Shelter Me",
"Broken" Jason Clark and Mike
Taylor of the Rainwalkers play
guitar and bass for this new band,
but there's nothing on this tape
that will remind you of the Rain -
walkers' jangly guitar sound. If
anything, Freedom Press appears to have been listening to
Tangerine Dream — there's that
familiar layering of sound for
ambience — but the keyboards
don't take the place of vocals
and guitar. The inside of the
cassette cover says Freedom
Press has a "psychedelic yet
contemporary feel". There's a
fair bit happening here, but
"psychedelic yet contemporary"? I find that kind of description a litde scary.
The Open Graves-"105","Nu-
clearLove?" "105" opens with
a Japanese-sounding motorbike
revving its engine, and in fact the
title refers to how fast the bike
goes before things get outof hand.
There's a one-time Surf Hippy
in this band, and the female singer
is a former go-go dancer for kd
lang. Her motorcycle-induced
scream sounds pretty authentic,
but it' s really on "Nuclear Love?"
that she comes into her own.
When she sings low and sultry
it's not unlike Tracy Brooks of
the Hip Type. The problem is
that the tape suffers from poor
production — vocals and guitar
cut in and out and the dynamics
are bizarre. But I'd like to see
them play live.
The WardeUs - "What's So
Great About Marilyn?", "Under the Johnson St. Bridge"
The WardeUs are at their best
when they're playing classic-
style pop, and "Marilyn"has most
of the major elements — backup vocals going "bop bop" and
handclaps, not to mention good
lyrics thematically along the lines
of "My Guy" (albeit for boys to
sing). If the guitar's not as strong
as the voice, who cares? On the
other hand, "Under the Johnson
St. Bridge", while definitely
tuneful, tries to be a pop song and
a wry piece of social commentary, set in the band's place of
origin, Victoria.Itworks.butnot
as well as "Marilyn".
Speed of Life - "Election Year"
The little note that came with
this didn't say if they named
themselves after the David Bowie
song, but it does give the band's
influences as U2, Led Zeppelin,
The Who, Hendrix, and Rush.
Well, the U2 influence is pretty
apparent here, especially in a
good part of the guitar and em-
passioned lead vocals, but the
singer also does a pretty fair
Robert Plant impression here and
there. (But remember when everyone was trying to sound like
REM?)
Earthling - "Surprise Me",
"Unnatural Laws" A second
tape from Earthling, and lots
better than the first one, "Pure
Hell." What's especially impressive is that the band (with Enigmas Mike Davies and Brian
Olinek on guitar and bass) plays
hard rock while somehow sounding as if they've never heard of
Eddie Van Halen. There's no
guitar noodling here (and not
much on vocals, either), just
something like a pre-metal rock
and roll. And when he's at the
lower end of his range, the
singer's pretty powerful too.
"Unnatural Laws" has that almost epic feel, and a break that's
not unlike Roxy Music, but it's
"Surprise Me" that I like. It
sounds positively evil.
Brilliant Orange - "Always the
Same", "Love and Evolution"
To be fair, I don't think Brilliant
Orange ever intended for us to
have this tape, labeled an "Invasion S ampler," but this is the first
we've heard from them since
1985, so it's hard to resist listening to it. Unfortunately, however, the band doesn't sound
inspired here. Although the production is beautiful (the tape was
recorded in LA), the songs lack
life, and definitely don't represent the band's recent, heavier
live sound. Fans of the old Brilliant Orange, with all its harmonies and acoustic guitar, are better off with Green House, Graham Brown's new band. And
fans of the new Brilliant Orange
will have to go on seeing the
band in the clubs.
And   now,   two   tapes
available in stores:
The Dots. A self-titled 11-song
cassette on East Side Records,
this solo debut lives up to what
this mostly female, mostly rockabilly band promised us in their
appearances on earlier compilations. A single song, "Goin'
Crazy," is playlisted at CiTR,
but it's not fair just listening to
one—buy the cassette and hear
'em all, including the highly
danceable "Eeny Meeny."
Hard Rock Miners - "Making
the Bedrock" What's surprising about this tape is that, although it sounds so clean and
uncluttered, it manages to capture that 8-people-on-stage-at-
the-same-time feel. Chris Houston (remember, the Church of
the Fallen Elvis was way before
Mojo's "Elvis is Everywhere)
did one heck of a job producing
these ten songs. Good clean fun
and another recommended purchase.
IS THIS HOW YOUR OUT-OF-TOWN FRIENDS GET
DISCORDER?
- YOU SAUNTER DOWN TO YOUR FAVE STORE AND PICK UP SOME COPIES,
- YOU TROT TO THE DRUG STORE AND PURCHASE SOME LARGISH ENVELOPES,
- YOU HOP TO THE POST OFFICE AND ORDER UP SOME STAMPS,
- YOU CRAWL HOME, STUFF THE DISCORDERS INTO ENVELOPES AND STAMP 'EM,
- YOU TRUNDLE OFF TO THE MAIL BOX AND BID THEM FAREWELL
LETTHESUBSCRIPTIONSGNOMEDOALLTHATFORYOU! FOR A MEASLY $15 IN CANADA ($15US TO THE STATES,
$24 EVERYWHERE ELSE), YOUR BEST FRIEND IN THE ENTIRE WORLD CAN GET A FULL YEAR OF DISCORDER AND
YOU WONT HAVE TO RAISE A FINGER. OR A TOE. JUST SEND CHEQUE OR MONEY ORDER TO DISCORDER, 6138
SUB BOULEVARD, VANCOUVER, BC V6T 2A5. AND LEAVE THE REST TO THE GNOME TAPE-A-MANIA
We give you the tapecover.
You cut out the tapecover included here.
You tape the band at 11 pm, Thursday, November
16th.
We tell the band to stop after 45 minutes.
You stop recording the band.
You have a 45 minute cassette tape release of Video
BBQ presenting Violins in Love.
Next month: The Method
January: The Big Lie
February: Small Man Syndrome Hey, I know. You're there,
you've done it all. Travel, art,
business, love and sex- all the
things that make life enjoyable
are yours. You are way cool and
the edge is the only place that
matters, right? But are you aware
of the most intriguing medium of
the decade; not the decade just
passing but the era just about to
begin. The nineties are beckoning and the essence of the next
decade can be summed up in two
words: comic books. Whoa, what
did he say? Who is this guy trying
to kid? Well airbabes, I kid thee
not. Cartoon reality is upon us
and collectively we are changing
as fast as we become aware.
Comics today represent a powerful communications medium.
A medium in which the reader
naturally integrates the two
hemispheres of the brain (that
graphix interface thang). A
medium that can disseminate
surface information to a mass
audience as successfully as television. A medium that best showcases subjects ranging from rock/
pop social commentary to surrealistic pillow fights using psycho-sexual imagery. Finally,
comics are a medium worthy of
intelligent investigation if for no
other reason than fewhave ever
been used as such. Long relegated to the
rubbish bin after kids had
read them,
comics are
now adult oriented, political, and have
an edge that
most of popular culture
sorely lacks.
Communication is a two
way street, but
until the imminent revolution
offers up an
interactive
technology
other than the
telephone the
best we can do
is exchange our
heads. Thus,
the current
boom called the
small press ex-
plosionhastens
of thousands of
independent
publishers throwing their word
into the void and catching whispers on the winds. Through the
publishing facilities of the personal computer, the door is being
opened to more publishing from
groups and individuals than ever
before (eg. Discorder, Disco-
text, Black Pages et al).
Comicbooks? Ok. Millions of
dreams released must realise a
28 DISCORDER
goal of whole systems coming
together.
Comicbooks? Ok. Imagine your
greatest dream of a possible future. Close your eyes and visualize a future where people have
all they need to fulfill themselves
as creatures. Nations are formed,
children are born sharing the
dreams of their
worthy by the images we share
with each other.
As we all realize sooner or later,
most of popular media is controlled by a bunch of crazily
evolved organisms who have a
vested interest in maintaining
their own status. Here is where
comics enter. Easy to produce
(hand drawn or w/computer, pho-
Since the media is, as some eas-
tener once said, the massage, we
owe it to ourselves to invest in a
medium we can actually be part
of.
The political implications of new
technologies are historical fact,
just ask Gutenberg why the reformation followed the creation
of his device. If you have an
opinion, and Martin Luther surely
did, perhaps narrowcasting your
thoughts will help to open up
your world. I'm not suggesting
the political process has been
significantly altered by the comicbook. But that an examination
of the social fabric of our time
reveals the thread of comix. Who
can deny that a part of the previous generation's understanding
of itself came from their various
comix experiences. R. Crumb's
Mr. Natural and Fritz the Cat,
Gilbert Shelton's Freak Brothers and Wonder Warthog are
examples of how various social
realities (sex, drugs, violence)
can be exposed and illuminated.
The undergrounds were able to
break down the barriers of sexism, racism, and other sixties isms
simply because they were products of one of the the most accessible and uncontrolled mediums
around.
If it seems I a
mans now rekindling the spirit of
balance.
Comicbooks Ok? Any environment filled with two-eyed beings
is endless and bountiful. Imagine writers saying what is theirs
by proclaiming the art of collective action off the page and into
the air. We have for years been
told that vision creates change
and now we will prove ourselves
tocopier, recycled paper) and
easy to distribute (mailouts,
handouts, computer on-line), this
modern marriage of word and
picture is a powerful factor in
protecting our freedoms of
speech, action and thought. Comicbooks can serve to inspire,
prompt, cajole, reflect, amuse,
and generally spur on contestants in this race against time.
within the first
quarter-century. But that's another column.
So comic books serve as the
mechanism with which I will
examine the emerging information age. The medium itself and
the material it transmits both
facilitate current evolution; and,
I believe, as our awareness expands so does our collective ho- SPMWI
THE ORPHEUM THEATRE
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TICKETS AVAILABLE AT ALL TICKETMASTER OUTLETS
OR CHARGE BY PHONE AT 280-4444
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NOVEMBER 1989
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November 3/4
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November 24 / 25
From Minneapolis:
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SAL   DROPPED   BACK   As I RAnntDWY   INDUCERS   TO  MAK<
TO   £E   co/vri/vueD...
,©   peejr/gf FURREY SOOD
Well hey. Believe it or not, there
are various haunts in that tepid
backwater, Surrey, worth checking out victual-wise. Should you
ever venture across the Fraser,
gingerly clutching your trusty
Discorder in hand, here are some
favourite hangouts of mine.
NB: We're talking El
Cheap-o here. None of that La
Cote de Boeuf shit
Following a more or less
straight trajectory across the
Pattullo (given that it doesn't
collapse on you), the first eatery
ofnoteyou'll encounter is housed
in the community's bastion of
culture, Surrey Place Shopping
Centre. Yes, none other than the
legendary Smitty's Pancake
House. Enter via the main mall
entrance off the east parking lot
and don't be daunted by the
omnipresent line-up. Those
feather-haired, polyester-clad
waitresses will disperse it eventually, and within await some of
the fluffiest, lightest, thickest,
most delectable waffles on Earth.
(Within the restaurant, not the
waitresses.) The rest of the menu
consists of your basic family
restaurant fare - burgers, steaks,
chicken, salads, eck cetera. But
the waffles, which definitely give
the Elbow Room a run for the
money, are worth the one-and-a-
half hour Transit sojourn from
the city. Only thing is, in these
cholesterol-conscious times, the
chocolate-chip waffle is no
longer the sybaritic, strawberry-
syrup-smothered extravaganza I
remember from my childhood in
the Seventies. Oh well. Order
one with token nutritious blueberries thrown on top, and be
transported. Did I mention that
this place achieves a divine balance of clientele between mall-
hung-over suburban mum-dad-
and-kids ensembles and the faction of industrial-strength bikers
that reign supreme at the two or
three tables closest to the cash
desk? You bet. The graffiti in the
cans might be worth a gander
too, though whether it can equal
that found in the toilet of the
Whalley Library down the street
is doubtful.
- "Iron Maiden rules"
■ "Rockers go to the library?!"
Speaking of down the
street by the Whalley Library,
which is also where you'll find
the storied Whalley Exchange,
Evita's Donuts is your hole-in-
the-wall refuge in times of Quick-
I-need-to-shove-something-
down-my-gullet-cheap trouble.
Generally thronged with Transit
operators, this place offers soup
& san as well as the ubiquitous
donuts; none really worth writing home about but in a pinch,
they'll do. The important thing
here is the slice of genuine local
colour it affords you; the sociological contribution it has made
to the Exchange lifestyle. And
what a lifestyle that is.
Down King George
Highway in the opposite direction, south, you'll come across a
strange dichotomy. Beside the
sad and darkened shell of a small,
unassuming brown cement-brick
edifice sits alarge, assuming grey
cement-brick edifice. Tim Hor-
ton's both, the former the original, the latter its new replacement erected a year and a half
ago. "Visitournew location just
north of here" exhort the signs
shuttering the windows of the
old Horton's. I never have, but
well do I remember family outings to the original in the heyday
of the Seventies. Back then the
brown cement-brick building
was new itself; shiny red vinyl-
upholstered seats lining the harvest-gold countertop; red one-
piece molded melamine chairs
anchored to aluminum supports
at the tables (count 'em, three);
and two of those perpetually-
filtered juice-dispensing machines which were a source of
endless fascination for my tiny
11-year-old mind. Chocolate
glaze was my favourite variety
of doughnut, though I also went
for double chocolate. Or, if I was
feeling really disgusting, I'd
indulge in one of those lemon-
filled ones with icing sugar on
top. The kind that leaves your
mouth welded shut with sugar
for the next hour. C-FUN in the
days when they still played Led
Zep was piped in over the sound
system; this and the all-pervading cigarette smoke combining
to provide Mum & Dad with lots
ofgristforthebitchmill.Mum&
Dad, who always, always, ordered coffee and Dutchies. Ah,
those were the days. Why the
relocation of this venerable in
stitution? Who knows, although
Fascist plots and the proximity
of the old building to a deep
ravine (erosion?) figure prominently as possibilities. Whatever;
I always say if it ain't broke,
don't fix it. But Surrey logic is
weird. Non-existent, actually.
Yet further down the
highway, heading into the genuine, where-the-world-is-hung-
shut-with-pancakes heart of
Surrey, you'll hit the Hearty
Boy. Ensconced in one of those
long, low generic cement-block
Newton malls, ano-holds-barred
greasy-spoon diner where good
solid working-class breakfasts
and lunches are the order of the
day. (Read: cholesterolcity.) All-
day breakfasts; farmer sausage
specials; great homemade soups;
and classic smartass cooks and
waitresses are but a few of the
Barty Hoy's charms. Cheap,
plentiful chow served up on the
double. And there's always a
copy or two of the morning's
Province floating around for
perusal, to make your trip to
Surrey complete.
Now we do a bit of a
loop-the-loop back up north to
Guildford, 108th and 148th to be
precise. Here, in Riverside Shopping Centre, lurks Salty's. Best
fish & chips available, bar none.
After having ascertained its
somewhat inconspicuous whereabouts, you descend three steps
into the Stygian darkness which
is feebly pierced through by
yellowing fluorescent panels. On
either side of the gangway, long
dark varnished picnic tables are
ranged, supplemented down near
thecounterby acoupleof smaller
tables with electronic soccer
games in their tops. Tacky tourist tea-towels depicting various
British counties grace the walls
(a pretty fail-safe indicator of
good fish & chips). The fare is
unpretentious - you won't find
sharks fins on the menu here -
and truly amazing, tastebudwise.
Better than the Only, better even
than Olympia. The lightest, most
melt-in-your-mouth batter; the
biggest, most potatoey-tasting
chips; and a unique coleslaw in
clear vinegar dressing which
complements the seafood splendidly. Cheaper than any comparable place in the city too. Aces.
Also worthy of mention
for fish & chips in Surrey is
Newton Fish & Chips, in the
Safeway mall beside the Wave
Pool. Really good mushy pea;
good batter and chips; most
amicable service; and hey, it's
even cheaper than Salty's. Absurdly generous portions too.
Right across the way,
buried in the inner recesses of
another long, low, half-unten-
anted mall, is a place which,
though it changes its name of-
tener than I change my underwear, continues to make the best
damn pizza in Surrey. (Yes, this
is a compliment.) Greek Tav-
erna, is, I think, the name it currently goes by, but I could be
behind the times. (Did I change
my underwear this morning,
or...?) Anyway, genuine butt-
kicking pizza from before the
days of generic 2-for-1. IT LIVES
IN SURREY...
And hey, if by some cruel
fluke you happen to be stuck in
this lovely municipality (the largest in Canada) at an hour when
all of the above are locked up
tight, don't forget. Two convenient Bino's locations, one on
Scott Road, the other on 152nd
in Guildford.
SMITTY'S PANCAKE HOUSE
10097 Surrey Place Mall
EVITA'S DONUTS
100 -10252 135th St
TIM HORTON'S
9595 King George Hwy
THE HEARTY BOY
201 - 7093 King George Hwy
SALTY'S FISH & CHIPS
Riverside   Shopping   Centre,
108th Ave & 148th St
NEWTON FISH & CHIPS
209-7115 138th St
GREEK TAVERNA
7244 King George Hwy
BINO'S
8170 120th St
10194 152nd St
Next month (in all likelihood):
Some of the weirdest places on
Earth (well, in the Lower Mainland) to eat/procure food.
THE
BOOKS
come
EMPORIUM
50%
MOST
COMIC
ITEMS
NOVEMBER 1 - NOVEMBER 8
BOTH LOCATIONS:
1247
GRANVILLE
Phone 682-3019
3347
KINGSWAY
Phone 430-3003
NOVF.MBI'R 1989 31 ffiBSA
f^l    B^.
JjHk$^PS
9 |gy
■k   a^IH
BIG AUDIO DYNAMITE
MEGATOP PHOENIX
SOUNDGARDEN
LOUDER THAN LOVE
DOUGHBOYS
HOME AGAIN
YOUNG GODS
RED WATER
GRUESOME TWOSOME
HALLUCINATION GENERATION
24-7 SPYZ
HARDER THAN YOU
CURIOUS GEORGE
CHILDREN OF A COMMON MOTHER
VARIOUS ARTISTS
INDIE TOP 20 VOL VII
MARY'S DANISH
THERE GOES THE WONDER TRUCK
VARIOUS ARTISTS
THE NEW BEAT R/EVOLUTION
VARIOUS ARTISTS
IT CAME FROM CANADA VOL 5
FETCHIN BONES
MONSTER
ASEXUALS
DISH
NATIONAL VELVET
68 HOURS 12"
BLACK BY DEMAND
DEARLY BELOVED 12"
DINOSAUR JR.
JUST LIKE HEAVEN 12"
SUGARCUBES
REGINA 12"
JELLO BIAFRA
HIGH PRIEST OF HARMFUL MATTER
FUGAZI
MARGIN WALKER
BOOGIE DOWN PRODUCTIONS                     GHETTO MUSIC
BEAT FARMERS
POOR AND FAMOUS
STOMPIN' TOM CONNORS                         FIDDLE AND SONG
SKID ROPER & THE WHIRLING...         TRAILS PLOWED UNDER
NIRVANA
BLEACH
POGUES
PEACE AND LOVE
POP WILL EAT ITSELF
THIS IS THE DAY. THIS IS THE HOUR...
STONE ROSES
SHE BANGS THE DRUM
DANCESPEAK
NECESSARY ILLUSION 12"
SHELLEYAN ORPHAN
CENTURY FLOWER
JOHN LEE HOOKER
THE HEALER
FASTER PUSSYCAT
WAKE ME WHEN IT'S OVER
SPACEMAN 3
SOUND OF CONFUSION
JONATHAN RICHMAN
JONATHAN RICHMAN
SUNRA
BLUE DELIGHT
JEGSY DODD & SONS OF HARRY            WINES BARS AND...
VARIOUS ARTISTS
THE BRIDGE
CHRIS AND COSEY
TRUST
EPMD
UNFINISHED BUSINESS
PETER GABRIEL
MUSIC FROM THE LAST TEMPTATIO...
NURSE WITH WOUND
AUTOMATING VOL 2
COFFIN BREAK
PSYCHOSIS
LES NEGRESSES VERTES
LES NEGRESSES VERTES
NURSE WITH WOUND
COOLOORTAMOON
MARY MY HOPE
MUSEUM
MALCOLM MCLAREN
WALTZ DARLING
FUZZBOX
SELF
ALPHA BLONDY
THE PROPHETS
YARNISTAN
LORKE
A.C. MARIAS
ONE OF OUR GIRLS
JOHNZORN
SPY VS SPY
VARIOUS ARTISTS
THE SONG REMAINS THE SAME
MATERIAL
SEVEN SOUL
ADRIAN BELEW
MR. MUSIC HEAD
SALIF KEfTA
KO-YAN
RENEGADE SOUNDWAVE                          THE PHANTOM 12"
JANESIBERRY
BOUIND BY THE BEAUTY
PHRANC
1 ENJOY BEING A GIRL
BOLD MEANS CANADIAN, DONCHA KNOW.
ARE YOU SERIOUS? MUSIC 8:00AM-NOON
Wake up to Schoenberg. Varese. Berio.
Carter. Scelsl. Xenakis. Schafer. Cage.
Webem - Artistic Evel Knievels all. Nou-
veau post-modern Instrumentalcompo-
THE ROCKERS SHOW 12:1S-3:00PM
Reggae. Rock Steady and Ska w
George Barrett. Dance Hall Music!
BLUES AND SOUL SHC
Every Sunday, join Lc
I 3:0O-S:00PM
of blues, rhythm
THE CiTR NEWS MAGAZINE S:00-S:30PM
CiTR's In-depth current affairs/news
magazine show. Coverage and analysis of the days news and sports.dairy
editorial commentary, entertainment
reviews and reports on events here at
UBC. all in a comprehensive and comprehensible magazine package. And
we promise, no traffic reports.
JUST LIKE WOMEN 6:00-8:00PM
Feminist news and analysis and music
made by women for everybody. Atter-
E SIGNALS
io de la Cueva.
ELECTRONIC S
8:00PM
Information, news, interviews, political
analyis from the global cultures of resis-
Alterncrtes Sundays with Just Lil
ON ESTEP BEYOND/RADIO FREE AMERICA
10:00PM-MIDNIGHT
Join host Dave Emory for some extraordinary political research guaranteed to
make you think twice. Bring your tape
deck and two C-Ws. Originally broad-
C(Los Al
s.CA).
IN THE GRIP OF INCOHERENCY   12:00-
4:00AM
So what if Barry doesn't show up anymore? Who gives a shit? GuidoandTrini
MONDAYS
3-5:30PM
AIRA\
THEAI
N SHOW 8:00-9:30PM
THE MORNING SHOW 7:30-8:15AM
See Monday for details. Wake up wr
Kim and the Glenn Miller Orchestra.
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE 1:15-3:0OPM
Country music to scrape the cowsh'rt off
your boots to.  With yer host-poke. Jeff
CONVER-RADIO 5:30-«:00PM
Join Chris Brayshaw as he continues the
search for interesting guests, interesting
calers and inexpensive restaurantsabout
town. Topicsthis month Include the proposed GST. UBC Board of Governors,
and the Carmanah Valley.
THE BETTY ft VERONICA SHOW    6:00-
7:00PM
Join the Rrverdale Gang each week for
funandfrtvolity! Popup! Tuneinl Turn to
Betty's own column on page 18!!
NEON MEATE DREAM 7:00-9:OOPM
Likeyourworst nightmare and most erotic
With Pete Lutwych.
BEAT HEADS VERSUS WOLF AT THE DOOR
m. Mike and Lupus on the rhythm
VM^±UJ\'iM
CONVER-RADIO 7:00-7:30AM
Rebroadcast  of  Tuesday's  5:30  programme.
THE MORNING SHOW 7:30-8.15AM
See Monday for details. Wake up with
WAKE   UP   AND   SMELL  THE   COFFEE
10:30AM- 1:00PM
"Te rry Sold Spin Grind" and he's on the air
In the Kwa language of Yoruba, there are
two words for radio: "Ghohun-ghohun"
(snatcher of voices), and " A-s'oro ma gb'e
reply).
i" (that which speaks without pausing tor
The newest additions to the CiTR playlist
as well as the tortured ramblings of any
musicians that fall into the tar pit. Facilitated by MD Chris Buchanan.
The bg mouth is back, bigger and mouth-
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we know about them?
THIRTY THREE AND A THIRD 3:00-5:00PM
The latest info on local bands and strictly
Canadian tunes, along with the hottest
playlist stuff and interviews! With Spike
Stylus!
THE MORNING SHOW 7.30-8:15AM
From the famous siren t<
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The CiTR Morning Show. Information to
go: news, sports, weather and 'scenic
view" (read: radar) reports, features,
entertainment reviews and Alberta Hog
THE AFTERNOON REPORT 1.00-M5PM
Lunch goes down better with The Afternoon Report. Tune in for no frills news,
sports, and weather.
SOUND OF REALITY 3:00-S:OOPM
Experimental Radio, with Vision! Featuring environmental sounds, found noises,
information/propoganda and the worlds
primitive and experimental musics from
the auditory fringe. Live, too. Contribu-
THE RETURN OF NECRO-NEOFILE    1:15-
8th   Private Schools:    Do they better
prepare you for University life?
15th Duke's Cookies Revisited and other
Alma Mater Society news
22nd Fraternities and Sororities: Are they
on their way out?
29th   What's you biggest beef about
UBC?
B.C. FOLK «:00-7:00PM
THE CiTR NEWS MAGAZINE 5
See Sunday for details.   Join host Ian
Gunn here weekdays.
SPORTS DIGEST 5:3O-6:0OPM
Join the CiTR Sports Department for all
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nt. women, the arts, corporate domination: If these topics interest your critical and active self, tune in to
Larissa. Michael, and Andrew. Be aware.
TOP OF THE BOPS 4:00-7:OOPM
Trini Lopez. Ronnie Self, and The Phantom all love you. Marc Coulevln brings
Rock W Roll to Its roots. Note the realty
new time slot. Just for you. Claude.
can sub-continent plus/minus afewoldie
butgreatsandextras. Yourhost: Umerah
Onukwulu. Welcome.
MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
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ARTS CAFE
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THE MORNING SHOW - BBC WORLD SERVICE AT 8:00
ii
THE
SATURDAY
EDGE
9
10
ARE YOU
SERIOUS?
MUSIC
BREAKFAST
WITH THE
BROWNS
GARNET
TIMOTHY
HARRY
\         3
\         3
COMMUNITY
ADVENTURES
PEST
CONTROL
HANFORD
NUCLEAR...
11
WAKE UP
AND
SMELL THE
COFFEE
MOVING...
<*     *'*
«     A
THE VENUS
FLYTRAP
SHOW
JIGGLE
ROCKERS
SHOW
POWER
CHORD
1
2
\         ^
BLOOD
ON THE
SADDLE
NEO-
NECRO-
NEOPHILEII
%  8
NOUVEAU
POOPE
3
THE ABSOLUTE...
BLUES AND
SOUL
SHOW
SOUND
OF
REALITY
THE
UNHEARD
MUSIC
THIRTY
THREE AND
A THIRD
FLEX
YOUR
HEAD
EFFECT
NARDWUAR
4
...VALUE OF
NOISE
5
THE CiT
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6
ARTS CAFE
JUST LIKE
WOMEN/
ELECTRONIC
SMOKE
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TOP OF
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BETTY AND
VERONICA
B.C. FOLK
t          **
A    B
EVERYTHING
YOU KNOW IS
WRONG
7
8
9
HOME
TAPING
I.N.T.E.R.N.A.
T.I.O.N.A.L   .
AIR AWARE
NEON
MEATE
DREAM
SPIKE
STYLUS
PLAYLOUD
(THIS IS NOT
A TEST)
THE AFRICAN
SHOW
HOOTENANNY
SATURDAY
NIGHT
BRADY'S
DATELESS
SATURDAY
NIGHT
BEAT
HEADS
VERSUS
WOLF AT
THE DOOR
THE JAZZ
SHOW
WITH
GAVIN
WALKER
STOMP ON
THAT
BOPPA-
TRON
10
11
12
THE JAZZ IS
THE PITS
ONE STEP
BEYOND/
RADIO FREE
AMERICA
LIVE FROM
THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
RADIO FREE
IN THE GRIP
OF INCOHERENCY
AURAL
TENTACLES
PERMANENT
CULTURE
SHOCK
EATING
VOMIT
1
2
3
4
ENVIRONMENTAL
SCATOLGY
SOUP
STOCK
FROM THE
BONES OF
THE
ELEPHANT
MAN
MEGA
BLAST
i;
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
4
5
32 DISCORDER THE JAZZ SHOW 9:00PM-MIDNIGHT
Now at a new time! Vancouver's bng-
estrunnhg primetimejazzprogram. Features at 11 :00. Hosted by the ever-suave
1st The Great King Curtis is featured in a
Jazz context with Nat Addertey. Wynton
Kelty and others.
8th Mingut at Monterey, an Intense,
once in a lifetime performance by Chal-
res Mingus and Company at the Monterey Jazz Festival in 1964.
15th Freedom Now Suite by Max Roach.
This muslco-sociologicaldocument is one
of Roach's strongest recordings. Recorded in 1960. it's a mixture of Jazz and
African music still fresh today.
22nd Native Dancer, an unjustty neglected album by Wayne Shorter who
plays both soprano and tenor saxophone
in combination with the great voice of
Brazilian Milton Nasclmento. Greatcom-
posltions by Shorter. Nascimentoand Her-
29th Presenting Cannon ball was the title
of the first record date by Julian 'Can-
nonball" Addertey. one of the truly great
modem alto saxophonists. Addertey and
his brother Nat took NY by storm; this
album was the centre of that storm.
nnrs
JJEEJSH
WHITE NOISE 6:00-7:O0AM
Nova Express Mark II.   70's progressive
meets 80s electronic. Anderson. Glass.
Eno. Burroughs, prose, poetry and more.
ITS JUSTTALK WITH R.J. MOORHOUSE 7:00-
THE MORNING SHOW 7:30-8:15AM
See Monday for details. Wake up with
Kim and Chris.
HANFORD NUCLEAR PIZZA PIE    10:00-
West (you define). Note new time.
THE AFTERNOON REPORT 1:00-1:15PM
See Monday for details.
FLEX YOUR HEAD 3:00-S:00PM
—ERIC—
—JINX-
ARTS CAFE 5:30-6:00 PM
In-depth arts analysis and general miscellany of commentary on the local arts
HOOTENANNY SATURDAY NIGHT!  8:00-
10:00PM
Hootenanny Saturday Night onThursday
night. Get it? If not. we wouldn'a want ye
listenin' anyhoo.   Listen for Backwards
Song to win prizes, and Lef s Ask Valerie.
Listener's Choice. The 50e Record Hour
COMMUNITY ADVENTURES 8:15-10:00AM
JolnCiTRTraffic Director Ms Tania Alekson
for all the lowdown In activities in you
MOVING IMAGES 10:30-11:00AM
Join host Ken Macintyre as he takes you
on a tour thro ugh the silver screen'sback
lot of life with film news, reviews, interviews and soundtracks.
THE VENUS FLYTRAP SHOW    11:00AM-
1:00PM
Hi I'm Greg Elsie!
ABSOLUTE VALUE OF NOISE - PART ONE
2:30-3:30PM AND PART TWO 4:00-5:00PM
Found sounds, tape loops, compositions
of organized and unorganized aurality.
power electricians and sound collage.
Live experimental music.   100% Cana-
NARDWUAR THE HUMAN SERVIETTE PRESENTS.... 3:3O-4:00PM
i flavoured Clam Chowder-
3 Von Fluffebtein!
OUTLINES 5:30-6:OOPM
In-depth focus on a different issue each
week. Interviews with community members. UBC professors and others. If you
want us to cover a specific issue, let us
3rd Peace and as
10th   Nuclear weapons:   nuclear-free
Vancouver?
17th The future of BC kelp farming
HOME TAPING  I.N.T.E.R.N.A.T.I.O.N.A.L
6:30-9:00PM
Radio to record over. Tapein.tumon.no
dropouts.
STOMP ON THAT BOPPA-TRON 9:00-MID-
NIGHT
The latest & greatest in dance floor
grooves. DJ Micky Hard brings you the
big beat.
SOUP STOCK FROM THE BONES OF THE
ELEPHANT MAN 12:30-3:30AM
Independent music from around the
world ranging from the latest in club
tunes to hardcore and industrial grunge.
Live and pre-recorded interviews plus
experimental accordion sessions. With
Lloyd Uliana.
SATURDAYS
iY EDGE 8:00AM-NOON
Steve Edge hosts Vancouver's biggest
and best acoustic/roots/rogue folk music radio show. Now in its fifth year on
CiTR! UK Soccer Report at 11:30.
POWERCHORD 12:15-3:00PM
Vancouver's only true metal show with
the underground speed to mainstream
metal; local demo tapes. Imports and
other rarities. Gerald Rattlehead and
Metal Ron do the damage.
IN EFFECT 3:00-5:00PM
The Hip Hop Beat brought to you by Niel
Scobie-straight from the Island.
EVERYTHING YOU KNOW IS WRONG 6:00-
Brought to you by your friends from Ecrt-
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD  RADIO HELL
10:00PM-MIDNIGHT
Join Ed. Peter, and John for a real live
band in your livingroom. automobile or
WalkPerson.  Examine page 27 for the
Tape-a-Manta cassette covert
EATING VOMIT MIDNIGHT-5AM
Hours of regurgitated rock 'n' roll snipped
and glued by your favourite artists. You
must team. DJs: Darren Reiter. Pat Mul-
MEGABLAST! MIDNIGHT-3:00 AM
Improvisation in many forms. Mixes that
don't work but had to be tried. Requests
that never get played. Welcome to late
night radio. With Adam Sloaa
ETCETERA..
POOPE 1:15-2:30PM
UBC DIGEST
Four times each day. hear the rundown
on the latest events, lectures, gigs, and
fun things occuring here on that campus
next door to that world famous skin cancer site. All in an entertaining package
of fun!
CITYSCAPE
Several times a day. listings are read out
for all the hip happenings here in the city
of rain. Concerts and clubs, theatre, film
and cinema: everything you could possibly want and more. Just listen. And if
youoryourgroup wants to publicise your
event, please do drop off the details
here at CiTR!
COMMUNITY
ACCESS
CiTRprovidesfreeairtimeforCommunity
Access by groups and individuals. If you
or your group would like to say something to someone somewhere, please
call the Program Director at 228-3017.
LIVE SPORTS ON
CiTR
Join the crack CiTR Sports Unit for play-
by-play coverage of a mess o' varsity
sports both on the campus and off. from
soccer to football to ice hockey to
basketball. Find out the reason why the
TR" is in CiTR. Upcoming games carried
by CiTR which will pre-empt regular CiTR
programming:
BALL VS U OF SASKATCHEWAN.
SATURDAY THE 2ND. 1:00PM: BC HIGH
SCHOOL BOYS BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIPS.
SATURDAY THE 9TH. 1:00PM: BC HIGH
SCHOOL GIRLS BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIPS.
JANUARY
SATURDAY THE 6TH. 8:00PM: MEN'S BASKETBALL VS U OF SASKATCHEWAN.
SATURDAY THE 13TH. 7:30PM: MENS ICE
HOCKEY VS U OF REGINA
FRIDAY THE 19TH. 8:00PM: MEN'S BASKETBALL VS U OF VICTORIA.
SATURDAY THE 20TH. 8:00PM: MEN'S
BASKETBALL VS U OF VICTORIA.
FRIDAY THE 26TH. 7:30PM: MEN'S ICE
HOCKEY VS U OF MANITOBA.
SATURDAY THE 27TH, 8:00PM: MEN'S
BASKETBALL VS U OF LETHBRIDGE.
HOCKEY VS U OF BRANDON.
SATURDAY THE 17TH. 7:45PM: MEN'S
BASKETBALL VS U OF CALGARY.
VOLUNTEER
OPPORTUNITIES
CiTRwantsyouto become involved with
your friendly UBC Radio Station which
broadcasts to the campus and beyond.
Opportunities abound! Wheeee! Programming, producing, editing, writing,
engineering, operating, announcing,
hosting, etc etc etc. Come by the stu-
diosduringnormaloffice hours. We're located in Room #233 on the second floor
of the Student Union Building. Or phone
us at 228-3017.
WHOM TO
CONTACT
THE FOLLOWING FOLKS ARE THE ONES
YOU SHOULD GET AHOLD OF 'CAUSE
THEY'RE THE ONES YOU SHOULD GET
AHOLD OF.
PRESIDENT LANE DUNLOP
VICE PRESIDENT ROBYNN IWATA
BUSINESS MANAGER BARBARA WILSON
MUSIC DIRECTOR CHRIS BUCHANAN
PRODUCTION MANAGER ADAM SLOAN
PROGRAM DIRECTOR RANDY IWATA
TRAFFIC DIRECTOR TANIA ALEKSON
SPORTS DIRECTOR JEFF PATERSON
NEWS DIRECTOR STEFAN ELLIS
SECRETARY JOHANNA BLOCK
DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR    LINDA
SCHOLTEN
VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR BILL BAKER
DEMO DIRECTOR DALE SAWYER
RECORD LIBRARIAN JEROME PRINGLE
MOBILE SOUND LANE DUNLOP
HOW TO
CONTACT
BUSINESS UNE 228-3017
DJ UNE 228-2487 (228-CiTR)
NEWS UNE 224-4320
FAX UNE 228HJ093
THE SURVEY....
Don't forget to till out a Great CiTR Listen-
ers'Survey! Blank surveys are in the September and October 89 issues of this
here publication. Get yer hands on a
copy. If you submit a survey by the 10th
ol November, you could win one ol CiTR's
tunky new t-shirts, some funky new CiTR
buttons, or tome recent record releases.
Seriously. Drop off surveys at Zulu Records (1869 W4th), Scratch Records (31 7A
Cambie), Odyssey Imports (534 Seymour) and here at CiTR (6138 SUB Blvd).
Results will be In the December 89 issue.
African Superstar
Virgin Recording Artist
"the Lion"
YOUSSOUN'DOUR
WITH HIS AFRICAN DANCE BAND
PLUS SPECIAL GUESTS
 —■  '-vi"uuucai&
THE COMMODORE
THURSDAY NOVEMBER 23
AND
FRIDAY NOVEMBER 24
10 PM . DOORS 8:30
HighMeRecords. CHAFIGE BY PHONE: 280-4444.
STUDENTS - WELCOME TO
JPflRflf)ISf^
VANCOUVER'S BEST SHOW VALUE!
ENJOY THE BEST IN MOVIE ENTERTAINMENT AT THE LOWEST TICKET PRICE IN TOWN
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BUT THAT'S NOT ALL... THE PARADISE • FINEST PROJECTION AND SOUND • BEAUTIFULLY
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VISIT US SOON!... You'll Be Back!
24 HR. SHOW INFO: 681-1732
NOVEMBER 1989 33 •\.#*r
X&H&HA
AFTER
HOURS
FRI/SAT
13-5
684-3322
1108 kaMittftii bitui
1 WED Ian Coleman's Jazz Quartet at
The Classical Joint...Savoy Brown at the
Town Pump...Shroooooms (Sex, Drugs,
Rock 'n Roll...and Murder) continues at the
Firehall Arts Centre (11:00pm. $6 general,
$5 students)... Garnet Rogers at the WISE
Hall (8:30pm, ($12)...David Cronenberg
series with Rabid (7pm & 930pm) at Cinema 16... Mapantsula at the Vancouver East
i Cinema (7:30 & 9:35pm)... Hot Wednesdays
in the Pit Pub... Winston Kam's Letter to Wu
atthe Firehall Arts Centre (matinee at 100)...
2 THU Gavin Walker's Jazz Quniiet at
The Classical Joint... Shrooooomj at the
Firehall Arts Centre (11:00pm, $6 general.
$5 students)... Headlines Theatre presents
the return of Sanctuary at the Vancouver
East Cultural Centre (8pm, $8 general, $6
students)...Cool Thursdays in the Pit
Pub...Yolacamba Ita at the Vancouver East
Cultural Centre (8pm, $12)...Mapantsula at
the   Vancouver   East   Cinema   (7:30   &
3 FRI f hroooooms at the Firehall Arts
Centre (11:00pm, $6 general. $5
students)...Sons of Freedom, Caterwaul
and Walking Wounded at 86 Street... Kevin
Elashuk's Jazz Quartet at The Classical
Joint... Don Druickin concert in the Contemporary Art Gallery (8pm)...Peter Mauler's
The Top of This Head at the Van East Cinema (7:15 4 9:30)...   Letter to Wu at the
4 SAT Pro-Choice benefit for the
erywoman's Health Centre featurinr
etry, music, and dance at the Western Froi
(lor inlo, call 732-5087)...The Alarm at 8
Street... Kevin Elashuk's Jazz Quartet I
TheClassical Joint... Sanctuary at the Vai
couver East Cultural Centre (8pm, $8 get
eral, $6students)...Shrooooomsatthe Fin
hall Arts Centre (11:00pm, $6 general, $
students)... Painters and Dockers at th
Town Pump...Orford String Quartet in th
UBC Recital Hall (8pm, $10)...Peter Mettler
The Top of This Head at the Van Ea:
Cinema (7:154 9:30)... Letter to Wu at th
Firehall Arts Centre (2lor 1 matinee at 2:00)
5 SUN   RCA recording artists Hoodo
Ev-
Pump...
Centre (2:00pm matinee. $4 general
in the Pit Pub...Glenn Gould on Fil
with The Terminal Man & i
the Record (7:30pm) at Pacific Cinematheque... Peter Mettler's The Top ol This
Head al the Van East Cinema (7:15 & 9:30)...
Letter to Wu at the Firehall Arts Centre...
...The
i & Glenn
Id-Offlh
ord(730pm)atPacificCinematheque...Kate
Hammet Vaughn at The Classical Joint...
Lavendar Hill Mob at SUB Theatre (7pm 4
9:30pm)...Discover Dance continues at the
Vancouver Playhousewith Susanne Linke...
Kinoshita's The Outcast and Miyogi leki's
Half Brothers at the Vancouver East Cinema (7:00 & 9:00)...
7 TUE The Mazeltones at the Vancouver East Cultural Centre (8pm, $12)... Saul
Berson's Jazz at The Classical Joint... Discover Dance continues at the Vancouver
Playhousewith Susanne Linke...Kinoshita's
The Outcastand Miyogi leki's Hall Brothers
at the Van East Cinema (7:00 & 9:00)...
8 WED lanColem
The Classical Joint...T
bration with Oliver Lake Quartet from New
Yorkwith Lunar Adventures at the Vancou-
Rogers and Phil Cunningham at the WISE
HALL... Bergman on Relationships series
with From the Life of the Marionettes (7pm
in the Pit Pub...Peter Mettler's The Top of
This Head at the Van East Cinema (7:15 &
9:30)...
innyGoliaandRob
Frayne Quintet with the Richard Under-
hill/Tom Walsh Duo at the Vancouver East
Cultural Centre (8pm)... Phil Cunningham
and Ad Vielle Que Pourra al the WISE Hall
(8:30pm, $9)...Big Bad Wolf and Shy Thunder at the Commodore... Cool Thursdays in
the Pit Pub...Peter Mettler's The Top of This
Head at the Van East Cinema (7:154 9:30)...
10 FRI  Roberto and Mara Ballarin at
The Classical Joint... Time Flies Jazz Celebration continues with The Vinny Golia Orchestra at the Vancouver East Cultural
Centre (8pm) and Unity at TheGlass Slipper
11  SAT Roberto and Mara Ballarin at
The Classical Joint... Time Flies Jazz Celebration continues with Joanne Brackeen
Trio at the Vancouver East Cultural Centre
(8pm) and Chief Feature at The Glass Slipper (11 :00)... Judy Mowatt & the Calabash
Band and Farafinaallhe Commodore...The
Scramblers al the Town P ump...The Grapes
of Wrath with Sarah McLachlan at the Or-
,'zCe!e
The Glas:
Mr (9:00)... Mike
t   The   Classical
Joint...Morris   Tepper   at   the   Town
Pump...Glenn Gould on FilmSeries with The
Wars 4 Spheres (7:30pm) al Pacific
Cinematheque...Music in the Pit Pub...
1 3 MON  Shindig '89 at the Railway...
at the Vancouver East Cutti
4 10:00)... Kate Hammet
College (1:00)...The Wa
(7:30pm) at Pacilic Cine
African Queen at SUB _
9:30pm)...Boyfriends* Gi
Fillette at the Van East I
9:30)...
8 9:30pm. $2.50)... Boyfriends & Girlfriends
and 36 Fillette at Ihe Vancouver East Cinema (7:30 & 9:30)...
15 WED The Oyster Band at the
Commodore...Ian Coleman's Jazz Quartet
at The Classical Joint...Continuing the Kurosawa Epics Series. Cinema 16 presents
Sanjuro (7:30 & 9:30pm, $2.50) in Ihe UBC
SUB Theatre.. In Visible Colours "
eoFestiva
atSFUHc
cu.'Con
Cenfe
Nakami
I The Wife of Seishu Hanaoko
al Ihe Van East Cinema (7:00 & 10:00)...
at the Freddy Wood Thealre (8pm. $1 Oadulls.
$7 students)...
16 THU  Gavin Walker's Jazz Quartet
at The Classical Joint... Sun Rhythm Sec-
1 7 FRI   Sun Rhythm Section with The
at the Town Pump...Murray McLauchlanat
the Vancouver East Cultural Centre (8pm,
$12)...Jennifer Scott al TheClassical Joint...
In Visible Colours conlinues at SFU Har-
bourside with Celebrating Our Cinema
(10.00am), The Risks of Self-Definition
(1:30pm) and Voices and N
(3:30pm)... She Stoops to Conquer a
Freddy Wood (8pm, $10 adults, $7 stu
18 SAT Connie Kaldor at the Centennial Theatre (8:30pm. $12)...Koko Taylor &
Lonnie Brooks at the Commodore...Bob's
Your Uncle at the Town Pump...Murray
McLauchlan at the Vancouver East Cultural
Centre (8pm. $12)...Jenniter Scott at The
Classical Joint... In Visible Colours continues at SF U Harbourside with Structure and
Politics of Film and Video Industries/
Getting Started: Access and Training/
Production and Co-Productions
(10:00am), and Distribution: Existing
Structures and Alternative Models/Censorship/Women's Production Co-ops
(1:30pm)... She Stoops to Conquer at
Freddy Wood   (8pm, $10 adults, $7 stu-
19 SUN Koko Taylor at the Town
Pump.Ian Coleman's Jazz Quartet at The
Classical Joint...In Visible Colours continues at SFU Harbourside with Creating New
Aesthetics/Beyond the Exotic and Erotic/
Cinema and Community Development
(10:00am). and Plenary Session (2:00pm)..
She Stoops to Conquer at Freddy Wood
(8pm, $10 adults. $7 students)...
20 MON   Shindig '89 Round Two
at SUB Theatre... Teshigahara's The Face
of Another (7:00) and Tomu Uchida's The
Straits of Hunger (9:15) at the Van East
"   Cinema...SheStoopstoConqueratFreddy
Wood (8pm, $10 adults, $7 students)...
21 TUE Taj Mahal and The Jack Lavin
Band at the Commodore...Saul Berson's
Jazz at The Classical Joint... Teshigahara's
The Face of Another (10:10) and Tomu
Uchida's The Straits ol Hunger (7:00) at the
Van East Cinema)... She Stoops to Conquer
at Freddy Wood (8pm, $10 adults, $7 stu-
22 WED Ian Coleman's Jazz Quartet
at The Classical Joint...Continuing the
Stanley Kubrick series. Cinema 16 presents
Barry Lyndon at the SUB Theatre (8:00,
$2.50)... A Rusting of Leaves: Inside the
Revolution (7:00) and Perfurmed Nightmare (9:15) at the Van East Cinema... CiTR
it Pub...S
■ Stoops to Conquer a
23 THU Youssou N'Dour and the
Super Stars Band trom Dakar at the Commodore... Gavin Walker's Jazz Quartet at
The Classical Joint... A Rusting of Leaves:
Inside the Revolution (7:00) and Perfurmed Nightmare (9:15) at the Van East Cinema ... CiTR provides the music on Cool
Thursdays in the Pit Pub...She Stoops to
atFreddy Wood (8pm.$10adults,
$7 SI
24 FRI Youssou N'Dour and theSuper
Stars Band at the Commodore...54-40 and
Ultima Thule at the Orpheum... Freedom
Force Trio al The Classical Joint...Cane
Toads: An Unnatural History and Feathers
atthe Vancouver East Cinema (7:304 9:30)...
She Stoops to Conquer at Freddy Wood
(8pm. $10 adults, $7 students)...
25 SAT Washington's Unda Allen at the
WISE Hall (8:30pm)... Freedom Force Trio
at The Classical Joint...Cane Toads: An
Unnatural History and Feathers at the
Vancouver East Cinema (7:30& 9:30)... She
Stoops to Conquer at Freddy Wood (8pm.
$10 ac
s, $7 St.
26 SUN Judy Small at the Vancouver
East Cultural Centre... Isaac Guillory from
the USA at the Railway Club (8:30pm)...
Budge Schatche's Jazz Trio at The Classical Joint... Cane Toads: An Unnatural History and Feathers at the Van East Cinema
(7:30 4 930)...
D CARD
27 MON SHINDIG '89 V,
ROUND at the Railway with the runners-up
trom the two Semi-Final rounds competing
to advance to the finals... Kate Hammet
Vaughn at The Classical Joint...Monty Python and the Holy Grail at SUB Theatre...
Kurohara's Thirst for Love (7:00) and Ic-
hikawa's I am a Cat (9:00) at the Vancouver
East Cinema...
28 TUE   Saul Berson's Jazz at The
Classical Joint... The Purcell String Quartet
at Hycroft Manor (8:00)... Kurohara's Thirst
for Love (7:00) and Ichikawa's I am a Cat
Scanners at the SUB Theatre (7:00 4
9:30pm, $2.50)... Beirut: The Last Home
Movie at the Vancouver East Cinema (7:00
4 9:30)... CiTR provides the music for Hot
Wednesdays in the Pit Pub...
30 THU Gavin Walkers Jazz Quartet
at The Classical Joint... Pianist Roger Smal-
leyintheUBC Recital Hall(8:00pm)... Beirut:
Home Movie at the Vancouver
ia (7:00 4 9:30)... CiTR provides
ol Thursdays in thePit Pub...
The Last
SITES/VENUES/PLACES
ARTS CLUB   1181 Seymour Street  683-
0151
CAPILANO COLLEGE  2055 Purcell Way
984-4951
CENTENNIALTHEATRE23rdandLonsdale
CLASSICAL JOINT   231 Carrall Street,
Gastown 689-0667
CLUBSODA 1055 Homer Street 681-6202
COMMODORE BALLROOM 870 Granville
Mall 6
'■7838
CONTEMPORARY ART GALLERY   555
Hamilton Street
86 STREET MUSIC HALL  in the god forsaken Socred Centre. Expo Site 683-8687
FIREHALL ARTS CENTRE   280 Carrall
Street
FREDDY WOOD THEATRE 6454 Crescent
GALLERY LOUNGE Main Floor, Student
Union Building, 6138 SUB Boulevard, UBC
GLASS SUPPER 185 East 11th Avenue
GRUNTGALLERY 209East6th 875-9516
LA QUENA COFFEE HOUSE 1111 Commercial Drive 251-6626
PACIFIC CINEMATHEQUE 1131 Howe
Street 688-3456
PIT PUB  Basement of the Student Union
Building. 6138 SUB Boulevard. UBC
RAILWAY CLUB  579 Dunsmuir Street at
Seymour 681-1625
RECITAL HALL   UBC School of Music,
6361 Memorial Road, UBC 228-3113
RIDGE THEATRE 3131 Arbutus Street at
16th  738-6311
RJ CHRISTIE'S 315 East Broadway 876-
6777
SFU   HARBOUR   CENTRE     515  West
Hastings 291-3111
STATION STREET ARTS CENTRE   930
Station Street 688-3312
Floor ot SUB  228-
N PUMP  e
fjr Street. Gastown
VAN-"' ' Vf R EAST CINEMA 2290 Com-
me. 1    253-5455
VANC'jjVtHEASTCULTURALCENTRE
1895 Variables Street 254-9578
W.I.S.E. CLUB HALL  1882Adanac  736-
3022
THE YALE 1300 Granville at Drake 681-
9253
The listings in Discorder Datebook do
not cost a single stinking dime. Listings are printed based on available
space. II you would like your listings
included in this here page, just submit
any and all details to Discorder Date-
book, C/O Discorder Magazine, 6138
SUB Blvd, Vancouver, BC V6T2A5.
Oh, by the way, if you would like your
announcement aired on CiTR, send
your stufl to the above address too.
34 DISCORDER EVERY MONDAY AT THE RAILWAY
\ s
SEMI FINALS
ROUND TWO
NOVEMBER 20
ROUND THREE
NOVEMBER 27
prizes courtesy of:
36 hours studio time
- 24 hours studio time
24 hours studio time
another fine
CiTR production 

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