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Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) Dec 1, 1985

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 THAT MAGAZINE FROM CITR FM102 CABLE100
DECEMBER 1985 • FREE n* # men and women
SHAMPOO, CUT, BLOWDBY
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday
$Q95
-/   (reg. 1255)
CELLOPHANE COLOR
Discover our great cellophane colors
INCLUDES: shampoo, conditioner,
cut, CELLOPHANE,
and blowdry
$OQ95
29
HAIR PRODUCTS - best prices in the city!
Shampoos, Conditioners, Gels, Sprays
Christmas Gift Packs, Christmas Gift Certificates
3621 W. 4th Avenue, Vancouver, 733-3831 DiSfcORDER
THAT MAGAZINE FROM CITR FM102 CABLE100 DECEMBER 1985 • VOL. 3 NO. 11
IN THIS ISSUE
8 Shindig
The finest musical showcase known to man
or beast wraps up another round.
15 Shriekback
Jason Grant and Don Chow, confused,
converse with Barry Andrews. Suddenly, it
all makes sense.
20 Hey, Where's the Bar in
this Joint?
Dave Watson soberly explores the
boozeless bars of Vancouver.
27 Husker Du
On shattered expectations, and life without
an umlaut. By Jason Grant.
IN EVERY ISSUE
6  Airhead
Who is killing the great bands of Vancouver, press
releases, and stuff..
10   Behind the Dial
We attempt to ruin your Christmas, and explore the
fascinating world of CITR.
30   Program Guide
Save this. Staple it to your forehead.
32   Vinyl Verdict
Vinyl—Shredded and Polished. 1 hour service.
40   Demo Derby
Stacey punches out the tabs on another month's tapes.
42   Armchair Eye
The Prisoner Marathon—Reflections on a Stupid Day.
44   Spinlist
Lists of the records we play most. Exciting, informative.
Staple this to your forehead too.
46   Roving Ear
This month from Amsterdam.
Editor
Chris Dafoe
Contributors
Stacey Fruin, Peter Burns, Jay Scott,
Steve Edge, Neal Roese, Bill Mullan
Dave Watson, Jason Grant, CD,
Don Chow, Paul Scholten, Kurby Hill
Photos
Bill Jans, Jim Main, Dave Jacklin,
Ross Cameron, Vari S. Philphered-Sources
Cartoons
R. Filbrant, Susan Catherine, Ian Verchere
Chris Pearson, William Thompson
Cover
Marv Newland
Production Manager
Pat Carroll
Design
Harry Hertscheg
Layout
Pat Carroll, Karen Shea, Randy Iwata,
Toby Thiersch, CD, Alan Scales,
Bev Demchuk, Stephanie
Program Guide
H.H, CD, PC, J Mc.
Typesetting
Dena Corby
Advertising Director
Harry Hertscheg
Advertising Representative
Robin Razzell
Circulation Director
Harry Hertscheg
Distribution Manager
Mike Johal
Business Manager
Mike Dennis
DISCORDER, c/o CITR Radio, 6138 SUB Blvd.,
Vancouver, B.C., V6T 2A5. Phone (604) 228-3017.
DISCORDER Magazine is published monthly by the
Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia (CITR-UBC Radio).
CITR fml01.9 cablelOO.l broadcasts a 49-watt signal in
stereo throughout Vancouver from Gage Towers on the
UBC campus. CITR is also available via FM cable in
Vancouver, West Vancouver, North Vancouver, Burnaby,
Richmond, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody,
Maple Ridge and Mission.
DISCORDER circulates 15,000 free copies. For advertising and circulation inquiries call 228-3017 and ask for
station manager Nancy Smith.
Twelve-month subscriptions available: $10 in Canada, $10
U.S. in the U.S.A., $15 overseas. Send cheque or money
order payable to CITR Publications.
Unsolicited manuscripts, photographs, cartoons and
graphics are welcome but they can be returned only if
accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope.
DISCORDER does not assume responsibility for unsolicited material.
The offices of CITR and DISCORDER are located in
room 233 of the UBC's Student Union Building. For
general business inquiries or to book the CITR Mobile
Sound System call 228-3017 and ask for station manaser
Nancy Smith. The Music Request line is 228-CITR.
m  DISCORDER
December 1985
This Letter Is
For Real.
We Did Not Make
It Up.
Really.
Hello Discorder,
Flash!!! Los Angeles Band Sixty-
Nine just played the largest music
festival in California rock history.
The Los Angeles street scene was
a two-day event, with attendance
set at 1.5 million people, more than
double the 1983 "US" Festival.
Before an ocean of crazed fans,
Sixty-Nine blazed through a hard-
driven, fast-paced set featuring
such rockers as "Bad Situation,"
"Stand Up and Fight" and "Thun-
derlove." The audience response
was deafening!
Shortly following Sixty-Nine's
set, the crowd, demanding more,
got restless, and violence broke out
as bottles flew and fights erupted.
Suddenly, one dozen mounted
cops on horseback and two dozen
stormtroopers dressed in full riot
regalia stormed the mob, dispersing the crowd, making arrests and
closing the stage for the remainder
of the two-day event. Sixty-Nine
had literally brought down the
house!
I have enclosed some exclusive
photographs of Sixty-Nine at this
event, along with our band photograph, 3-song demo and biography
for immediate publication in your
magazine.
Do not hesitate to send over interview questions, and the Discorder issue feature Sixty-Nine; leader
of the next wave of Los Angeles
heavy metal.
Rock on,
David Yesnick
Manager
Rancho Palos Verdes, CA
rh6a£
c/o CITR Radio
6138 S.U.B. Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T2A5
Extinction
Dear Airhead,
Something ugly is going on here
in our fair city. First of all the Reptiles became extinct. Not long after,
the Flunkees took their last train to
Clarksville. Before I had time to
recover, the incredible Bags of Dirt
suddenly went poof!
My head really started spinning
last week as I discovered NG3, My
Three Sons, and the Dilletantes are
all facing the Twilight Zone. Yeow!
What's going on around here? Do
you think there's a conspiracy
afoot? Some bands get together
and produce happy, maybe even
important music and just as they
get going they suddenly go up in
one fiery rock and roll blast. Pardon my paranoia, but could there
be Blue Meanies out making sure
nobody has any fun before Expo?
Okay, there are still some groups
performing in the tradition of
"Good Time Charlie" rock and roll,
but there's an increasing influx of
glum-faced poseurs and poets as
well. Listening to these flashy
avant-garde "geniuses" reminds,
me of sitting at home with Dallas
or Dynasty: occasionally enjoyable
but very little of it actually makes
me feel good.
So all I want for Christmas is
some more crazy, happy music in
Vancouver, a one-way ticket to Iceland for the Blue Meanies, and a
protective   insurance   policy  for
Tartan Haggis. Watch your kilts,
laddies.
Your most truly,
Bongo
We're Slipping?
Dear (Mr./Mrs./Miss/Ms.) Airhead,
It has come to my attention that
some of the disc and artist reviews
in Discorder are no longer adhering to the Trouser Press Standard
of Avant-Garde Music Reviews. I
feel it is my duty to reiterate the
rules of this great standard.
1.) If the artists are obscure, the
review shall be positive.
2.) If the artists are well-known
and popular, the review shall be
negative.
3.) If the artists are well-known
and unpopular (eg: Frankie) the
review shall be positive.
4.) Each review shall compare
the artists to at least three (3)
obscure bands that only an avant-
garde DJ could possibly have
heard of.
5.) If it is necessary to compare
the artists to a well-known band,
the comparison shall be to the
"early" version of the band (e.g.
early Stranglers, early Ramones).
6.) At least one new term for a
subclass of music (e.g. "sludgeabilly") shall be invented per three
(3) reviews.
7.) Every interesting male voice
shall be called a Bowie rip-off.
I strongly urge the Discorder
reviewers to shape up and conform
to this standard at once, or your
august organ may go the way of
the late lamented Trouser Press
itself (which, in its last months,
actually started to contain some
intelligent writing). I have reason to
hope, since about 80% of the Discorder reviews are already of the
accepted format.
Hail Eris! All hail Discordia!
Jamie Andrews
More Puppy Stuff
Dear Airhead,
And now, a few nice words about
Mark Mushet's review of Skinny
Puppy's Bites LP.
Mark (knowingly) stuck his head
on the guillotine with his review
what seems to have pissed off a lot
of people is (uh oh), Mark was
right. Skinny Puppy are contrived,
pretentious, dreary, and incredibly
derivative. They do'manage to put
on a visually pleasant show, but
otherwise...oh dear. Let's face it,
the review made several valid
points; that's no reason to drop the
knife on Mark.
After reading the letters in November's Airhead, it seems the Joi-
Gel and Juicy Fruit brigade (a.k.a.
Puppy People) are unhappy that
any slagging could be done of their
heroes (gasp!) in print. That's the
World of 1985, kids. Anyone who
promotes themselves to the apex
of popularity should be ready for
a quick tumble off the hype wagon.
So take Mark's review as a decent
piece of writing—even if you hate
the content—and watch carefuly.
After all, it's all just hip today, hype
tomorrow.
Thoughtfully,
M.B. Swiger
BfcxfcHf seme PMtry s^pntes
WHMATHAveYcUGorr pfTWHp 5WPf ,
EVERY FRIDAY & SATURDAY MIDNIGHT (except Sat, Dec 14) DSCORDER
eniiww
DATELINE: VANCOUVER (NOTE TELE-
types ticking in the background). As the
inevitable climax of the Shindig finals
draws close, tension builds...Little Ratskulis
quake in anticipation of stiff competition with the
addition of the Wingnuts to the finals. Who will
the third finalist be? Throngs of eager spectators
and smug speculators pack every available
space at the Savoy each Monday night, watching
Vancouver's finest new original bands perform.
There are only three more nights remaining in
the competition. Who are these bands? Who will
the winners be? Why is it so cold outside?
Monday, December 2
A440
Craig Arnatt (guitars, backing vocals), Mark
Meyerhoff (bass, acoustic guitar, lead vocals)
Frank Penko (drums)
WITH 26 YEARS of collective musical experience between, Craig (a founding member of Images in Vogue), Frank (formerly of Rayve) and
Mark (a veteran of several music competitions
as a solo performer) boast a "back to basics
acoustical-electric sound." A440 has produced
both a three-song demo and a Cable 10 video
for their single "Ciranoush," and express a desire
to work their way up through the "ranks of the
underground."
The Zealots
Peter Mitchell (guitar, vocals), Lee Holmes (bass),
John Rule (drums)
JUDGING FROM THEIR NAME, the Zealots take
their music seriously...not your average Artful
Dodgers. Having played together only for two
months, the Zealots will make their premiere performance at Shindig. While John and Lee study
music at UBC and Capilano College respectively,
December 1985
Peter is a former Cap College music student who
hails from Nashville, Tennessee.
The Zealots claim to play "an entire ethnic
amalgamation...from bluegrass to jazz." However, Peter stresses that "we are a psychedelic
band...not a country band." The Zealots plan to
use Shindig as a stepping stone to future gigs
and eventual stardom, and, in the event of victory, to use the recording time to spread their
gospel to the yearning masses via the vinyl pulpit. Good luck.
Deadlock
Darcey Villeneuve (guitar vocals), Mike Elsinga
(guitar, vocals), Ria Eslinga (keyboard, vocals),
Steinar Skogland (bass, vocals), Joe Creegan
(drums)
"DEADLOCK HAS BEEN TOGETHER for over
two years, formed from the remainders of Fallen
Angels and the previous Deadlock. Our new
drummer, Joe, stepped in over the summer when
our last drummer came close to party corpsedom
(A party corpse is someone who does the act of
being a party viking. A party viking has no liver
and will go anywhere to party. Far more devoted
than a party animal.), and then committed
cultural suicide by moving to Calgary with our
favourite groupie. We all have a passion for driving too fast and drinking too much. Our motto:
Know your limit and stay over it. Our music is
conceptual and that's about as close as we care
to come to being categorized. The band's purpose is to serve as a creative outlet and another
reason to party. (We all have some type of mundane day activity that helps to pay for guitar
strings and patchcords and the keep the fridge
full of beer.)"
\ ^r IM it t«i
Ih* THEATRE * * I m    MAMf
Month
16th Avenue & Arbutus Street
Vancouver V6J 3Z3     738-6311
It is 1913, and Edwardian England
is about to vanish into history...
HE SHOOTING PARTY
"One of the most provocative and
compelling fttms to come out of England In
years." Roc Reed, New York Post
Starring
JAMES MASON
EDWARD FOX
JOHN GIELGUD
Showtimes 7:30 & 9:30
The Management and Staff would like
to wish you all a very Merry Christmas.
->
$00
AAM£
goring
SfcSOHB CITR fm 102 cable 100
Monday, December 9
Third Semi-Finals
FEATURED ARE: Live Bait, plus the winners of
the November 25 and December 2 Shindigs (not
available at press time). In addition, Shindig will
once again be blessed by Lou Cooper and Alice
Reed and the Commotions. Lou's apearance has
been made possible by the benevolance of the
Canadian Cough Syrup Consumers Association
in conjunction with the Canadian Cough Syrup
Manufacturers Association (a match made in
heaven). In lieu of cooperation between this
powerful coalition and CITR, any references to
our public disclosures of the recent diagnosis of
Lou Cooper—the man himself—as being brain
dead will not be published.
Certain to be an entertaining night.
Monday, December 16
THE FINALS!
FEATURING:
• The Little Ratskulls—a fast and furious
combination with great vocal harmonies set
against a backdrop of instrumental anarchy. The
Little Ratskulls are certainly the most popular of
the new bands to emerge on the hardcore-oriented side of the Vancouver music scene.
• The Wingnuts—from Walla Walla, Washington, this folk duo utilizes acoustic guitar, kazoo,
cooking pots and a wonderful sense of humour
before transforming—in mid-set—into a tight,
fast-paced electric trio. Continually changing
pace and musical styles, the Wingnuts offer
entertaining, eclectic, unpredictable energy.
• TBA—the third finalist will be decided in the
Semi-finals on December 9.
In addition to the three finalists, a return
engagement by Burnaby's Teen Sensations in
Neat Clothes and Big Hair will grace this evening's stage. Yes, it's the return of Skinny Yuppie,
featuring Part II in the lecture series—'How to
be a Death Rocker."
All three finalists will be competing for prizes
from the Universal Institute of Recording Arts (24
hours of recording time), Bullfrog Studios (24
hours of recording time), and the Music Shoppe
(a Sure microphone and stand).
There will be no advance ticket sales for the
Shindig finals. Tickets will only be available at
the door on the night of the show.
CITR and the Savoy would like to thank all of
the bands who submitted demos to Shindig.
Final selection was an extremely difficult task,
as about 70 bands applied for the 27 available
positions. Thanks also to those who have supported Shindig with their attendance and the
Savoy with their unquenchable thirst. Finally,
thanks to those musicians, industry people,
media hacks, and CITR types who have served
as judges. I have all your names—if you don't
pay up, I'll publish them in next month's issue.
Then you'll be sorry.
—Jay Scott
LATE NIGHT SCREENINGS
11:30 p.m. Fri. Nov. 29 • Dec. 13 • Dec. 27
We are introducing a 15.00 ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP
which offers considerable savings for the avid
moviegoer. The 1986 Membership card is available
NOW and expires Dec. 31, 1986. Thanks to all,
and hope this helps out.
Adults $4.50 ♦ MEMBERS $3.00
18 & Under, Seniors and Handicapped $2.00
7th AVENUE & COMMERCIAL DRIVE 253-5455
ZEN
CONTINENTAL
BREAKFAST SPECIAL $2.65
—caffe latte, croissant
or toast, juice
Mon.-Thurs.
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
8 am-10:30 pm
8 am-Midnight
11 am-Midnight
noon-7 pm
820 HOWE STREET   683-5122 BEHIND
Some Nasty Things To
Think About Santa While
You're Waiting For
Christmas.
'Any child who believes in Santa Claus has had
his ability to think permanently injured. Such a
child will become the kind of man who will
develop a sore back when there is a tough job
to do and refuse to think realistically when war
threatens."
Dr. Brock Chisolm
in The New York Times
November, 1945
• ••••••••
"Santa is the most popular hoax of the age.
Around the globe, so-called Christian parents are
deceiving their children about Santa Claus. Santa Claus is the modern equivalent of the heathen
god Nimrod, who is a defiant hater of God and
Satan's earliest effort to produce Anti-Christ."
Reverend Martin F. Clough
in The Hartford Courant
December 26, 1949
• ••••••••
Wilbur Glenn Voliva, head of the Catholic Apostolic Church in Zion City, Illinois, banned Santa
from that city in 1921.
• ••••••••
Reverend Del A. Fehsenfeld, pastor of the Argentine Baptist Church, denounced Santa Clause
as "a dirty lie."
• ••••••••
"Parents take their children, at an age when they
are easiestly deceived, to a seducing joker set
up by Satan the devil and by the unemployment
office and tell them, 'Now if you be good boys
and girls, Santa will bring presents on Christmas
Eve and put them under the Christmas tree.'
Later in life the child finds out that this was all
a hoax and a lie, so the child reasons, 'Mommy
and Daddy lied about Santa Clause etc. So they
must have lied about being good all year round
too?' "
from a pamphlet from
The Assembly of Yahowah The Eternal
4344 Fraser Street, Vancouver
DISCORDER
December 1985
DIAL
And A Little Something
To Help You Prepare For
Those Post-Christmas
Blahs.
Well, so that is that. Now we must dismantle
the tree
Putting the decorations back into their cardbord
boxes-
Some have got broken—and carrying them
up to the attic.
The holly and the mistletoe must be taken down
and burnt
And the children got ready for school. There
are enough
Leftovers to do, warmed up, for the rest of the
week—
Not that we have much appetite, having drunk
such a lot, >J
Stayed up so late, attempted—quite
unsuccessfully—to love all our relatives
and, in general
Grossly overestimated our powers.
W H. Auden
For The Time Being
• •*••••••
WARNING! This is a carefully designed ad
to lure you, the unsuspecting Xmas shoop
er, (you know who you are) into one of y
our favourite independent-music-supporti
ng record stores, (you know who they are
) and Dick up on some local releases for
all those people that already have every
thing else (do you know who you are?).,.
(I don't think they read Discorder) -Ed*
So next time you're in say, Zulu, for ex
amnle, and thinking independent, v.atch a
ut for that low-cost, high-fidelity gift
on *Teon Records: RED HERRING,Taste  Testsl
better used clothing & accessories
for ladies and men    	
fllMW^ofnri^rc?df drive   25Vr739Q
mon.-tonT-a^30   "$un. 1:00-4:Q0
— CITR fm 102 cable 100
Survey
EVER TALKED TO a pollster, Billy?
If you've successfully avoided having your prejudices probed by Decima Research, Gallup or
any of the other nosy bastards who want to use
your opinions to manipulate you, the end of the
line is near. Because soon CITR and Discorder
will be probing the deep dark recesses of your
psyche with a Listener/Reader survey. The last
survey we took, in the April/May 1983 issue of
Discorder, garnered 283 responses and lots of
swell comments that kept half the station on an
adrenalin high for six months, and sent the other
half looking for a tall building.
Since CITR is too poor to afford the services
of any of the major polling organizations, we're
doing it all ourselves. While we realize that the
results will probably have all the scientific validity
of two small boys pulling wings off flies, we're
looking forward to your responses. So start now;
think of all the things you like about CITR, and,
of course, all the things you don't like about CITR,
and get ready to put them down on the forms
available in next month's issue.
We'd like to top the total responses of the last
survey, so we're counting on all of you to blow
off lots of steam in our direction.
It'll probably be very therapeutic for all concerned.
Blackbook
AS YOU ARE NO DOUBT AWARE, there are a
number of discount coupon books making the
rounds these days, all promising to save you
thousands of dollars over the next year. Not wanting to be left out, CITR has joined forces with
Blackbook Entertainment to bring you the 1986
BLACKBOOK.
Blackbook Entertainment is, for those of you
who stay home and listen to the radio on Saturday night, probably better known as the Saturday Night Pajama Party. Hosts Mike Mines and
Robin Razzell conceived of the Blackbook as an
outgrowth of their activities with CITR and Discorder (Mines is the co-founder of the humble
little rag you hold in your hands).
"We wanted to do something with integrity,"
says Mines, "something that was geared towards
an urban audience and that would focus specifically on businesses that are trying to serve the
kind of person who might listen to CITR."
The Blackbook features 104 coupons for about
90 businesses and is available through Zulu,
Odyssey, the AMS Box Office at UBC, Cabbages
and Kinks and a number of other fine outlets. And
if you're too poor, or too cheap to shell out the
$22 a Blackbook will set you back, you can listen
to CITR for the chance to win a Blackbook.
Concert Presentations
TIME TO CASH IN all those empty beer bottles
under the sink: The Replacements are coming.
CITR is more than a little bit pleased to present
the Vancouver debut of what, if you want to
believe John Doe of X or Peter Buck of REM, may
well be the best rock n' roll band playing in the
world today. The Replacements have developed
a reputation as being an exciting, if somewhat
unpredictable (meaning they are as likely to do
an impromptu cover of "Heartbeat, It's a Love-
beat" or "Takin' Care of Business" as play one
of their own songs) live act. With a great new
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December 1985
NONFICTION
December
6/7  THE DEAD CATS with guests
13/14 SPIRIT OF THE WEST
20/21 FRANK FRINK FIVE
27/28 NO FUN with guests
31 New Year's Eve Party: I, BRAINEATER w. guests
LIVE MUSIC IN THE LOUNGE
FRIDAYS FROM 10:30 - SATURDAYS FROM 11:30 P.M.
| ARTS CLUB THEATRE   1181 SEYMOUR   683-0151 | CTR fm 102 cabe 100
album, Tim, on Sire Records, this promises to
be a great show. Mark December 4th on your
calendar, cash in those empties, and head down
to the Commodore.
AND YOU CAN WIPE AWAY those post-Christmas blahs with the Second Annual Independent
Music Festival December 26, 27, and 28th at
the New York Theatre.
Show off the new socks and underwear Grandma sent as Skinny Puppy and the Jet Corporation practice various forms of self-immolation
onstage on the 26th.
Cover yourself in silver branches torn from the
$59.98 artificial tree you bought from Sears as
you enjoy the sounds of Grapes of Wrath and
Brilliant Orange, plus special guests on December 27th.
Relieve every holiday season hangover (and
enjoy them this time around) with Poisoned.
Rhythm Mission, and Herald Nix on the 28th.
Keep the ball rolling between Christmas and New
Year's by buying a three-day pass for $20, or take
your pick of the three nights for $8 each.
Music Department News
WE'RE STILL WAITING for your calls and letters
about labels we should be hitting up for vinyl.
The deadline for submissions is December 15.
Response has been slow, does this mean you're
irresponsible?
One member of the multi-faceted music department we forgot to mention last month (only
because we never see him, he's always hunched
over a cassette deck) is Reza Sara. Reza's in
charge of evaluating demo tapes (or other cassette material) and selecting songs to be made
available to our DJs. Demos constitute about half
our Singles Spinlist, and it's not just because the
bands are local; we've been receiving some great
stuff. Drop your demo by the station (Room 233
of the Student Union Building at UBC) and Don,
Jason or Peter will make sure it gets to Reza.
Speaking of sending us things, Don and I have
a great Christmas gift idea for you. Why don't
you buy CITR an album. Yes, that's right, come
down and check out our LPs, or call ahead, and
if we don't have something, buy it for us. You too
can be a philanthropist.
As always, you can reach the Music Department by dialing 228-3017 during most office
hours.
Merry Christmas everybody.
—Jason Grant
Security For Christmas
JUST IN THyic .OH CHRISTMAS is the long
awaited release of Security: The Illusion of Organization and Authority. Back in June of this year
Fast Forward presented the third and most successful listener participation theme show of its
kind. An open invitation to artists/musicians/
poets/deviants to contribute a piece on the theme
of security. The resulting contributions were ol
such high quality that it was suggested by somebody (I can't remember who) that we actually
release the show on a 90-minute cassette. Prior
to this the idea was a long shot, I'd no idea the
interest would be so high.
Included on the cassette are a variety of exclusive tracks that will be available in no other
form. Those include pieces by Asmus Tietchens
(well known for his work with SKY records in Germany), Greg Nixon, Skree-a-bin, Clemens Ret-
tich (of Fine Tendons fame), Miginot Line, Chart-
well Inc., Mushet/Ellard (The Divine Right of
Kings), G.T Harry, and Steve Gibson. Also on the
tape will be tracks that are seeing independent
release in other forms. They include a piece by
Chris and Cosey ("Haunted Heroes" from their
upcoming album on Rough Trade called Techno
Primitive), Blair Petrie's magnum opus that is now
out on his tape called Requested Music, Kevin
Godsoe's "World Affairs" (released on Picture
Postcards cassette).
The cassette is being released on Undergrowth/Suture cassettes and will be packaged
in a silkscreened plastic bag with a set of graphics relating to each piece. As well there will be
bio information, discographies and contact addresses. So support Vancouver's thriving aural
deviance and buy a copy for your loved ones for
Christmas!
A Fond Farewell
AS DISCORDER HEADS into its fourth year of
publication, we bid a fond farewell to Harry
Hertscheg, Discorder advertising representative,
circulation manager, design coordinator, and all-
round essential human being. Harry has been
instrumental in the success of the magazine
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month) over the last year and a half, and he will
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On the other hand, he'll probably make more
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Shriekback
Jason Grant and Don Chow Explore the Wet
Fish Effect with Frontman Barry Andrews.
A MUCH DANCED-TO BAND. A LITTLE UN-
derstood band. A greatly anticipated concert.
A good chance for a good interview. All this
and more, provided by individuals who, six months
ago, were merely names on an album sleeve to most
CITR listeners. One of those names came to life on
Monday, November 18 in CITR's studios. Barry Andrews, keyboard player, lead vocalist, and spokesman
for Shriekback poured himself into a chair and enlightened Jason Grant and Don Chow, and those
listeners who happened to tune in. We'd expected
no more than one very tired musician, given the rigors
of their snow-plagued trip from Minnesota. What we
got was an eager, good-humoured bloke from Swindon who'd spent the last four days lounging on Simple Minds' luxurious tour bus. He made us look
positively cranky. Read, learn, and enjoy, not necessarily in that order.
Discorder: Let's start at the beginning, shall we? Tell me about
Sexthinkone, your first recording for Y Records.
Barry Andrews: Sexthinkone was the first thing that ever came
together as a song, properly, that was released. It came from
a bunch of sessions that we did towards the end of '81 in the
snow in the West End of London. Everybody got out of it most
nights staggering into the street really late. It was all a bit shambolic and not particularly cost-efficient, but we got a few nice
things from it.
D: How aware were you of the other members-to-be of Shriekback, when they were in their previous musical efforts?
BA: I was aware of Dave Allen because I admired the Gang of
Four so much. When I was in a group with Robert Fripp and Sara
Lee (The League of Gentlemen), she used to play the Entertainment LP all the time in the van. So when we finally went to
Leeds—Sara's a Leeds' person—I said "I must meet these intense political young men." So we all met up and went around
drinking a great deal and ranting and telling jokes, and, well, we
had a really good time. And that was it, for about another six
months. Then, when I got a postcard from Dave Allen saying,
"I am leaving. I have left. And I'm looking to do something else,"
I thought, well, maybe we would sling something together for DISCORDER
December 1985
awhile. I thought it might be interesting. At that time I was into
having a lot of different projects all bubbling away at the same
time. So we got together and it was an absolute shambles. We
had about six people, all of whom had different ideas, different
playing styles, and really all we did was party, more or less, for
about three or four months. At the end of it, the people who's
studio it was—our publishers—turned around and said, "Oh, by
the way, what about this record that you were supposed to do?"
And we said, "Oh. Oh yeah, that!" So we had to whack it all
together in the last two weeks. And that was what became Tench.
D: Do you consider Tench a full album in the development of
Shriekback?
BA: I would, yes. As far as development goes, anyway, not
actually in value for money (wimpering). It was all we could do,
I swear.
D: Now from there, we got Care.
BA: On Care we were a lot more coherent. The band had
become distilled to me, Dave Allen and Carl Marsh, and we kind
of knew where we all stood. We sacked the girl who was supposed to be singing, so everybody had a clearer idea of their
responsibilities, and the possibilities of it (Shriekback). So Care
was a lot more of a celebratory, "Oh Wow! What can we do next?!
Oh we could do that next!! Or maybe over there?!" having a good
time sort of album.
D: You certainly extend on the group concept; there's always more
than yourself, Carl, Dave and Martyn contributing to every song.
BA: It's a logistical necessity for live playing, that we need more
than just three. Certainly in the days of Carl, Dave and myself,
there wasn't a drummer. So we had to have somebody else; given
that we had to have a drummer then we might as well add a few
other, and so on... After a bit, we got to thinking that "wouldn't
it be good if me and Carl could just do singing on our particular
songs. So therefore, we're going to need another keyboard player,
another guitar player, and then, well, the backing vocals are really
good, so maybe we should get some backing singers in." So
that's how the band was shortly before we came to the States.
Then Carl left, which was a major blow, and then the guitarist,
Lu, went off with him, so we had about a week to get everything
sorted out. Basically Dave and Hugo (Burnham, ex-Gang of Four
drummer), our new manager, were just running around like mad
trying to get everything sorted out, as we were struck in New
York with a guitarless band, and only one singer where we had
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two before. We just went around frantically ringing everyone we
knew in New York, and we came across two absolutely brilliant
people, Eve Moon, who plays more of a rhythmic guitar, and a
guy called Ivan Julian, who's a complete nutcase. We just unleash
him at various points in different song.
D: Tell me about Y Records, specifically, how their demise affected your second full album, Jam Science.
BA: Basically, Y Records were nice when they kept things wierd
and cheap. Things got a bit messy when they started having delusions of being a real big record company and trying to do the
big push, actually trying to compete with the majors on their own
turf; they didn't have the money to do it, and they didn't take care
of business well enough to know that they didn't have the money.
About halfway through recording the Jam Science LP everything
crashed into the side of the mountain, and that was it. Ultimately, we went to Arista, which was basically how the directors of
Y avoided going to debtor's prison. They sold Shriekback to Arista
records and creamed off what they thought they were owed. We
continued with the album on Arista, re-recording most of it, remixing all of it, and so the Arista import is as Shriekback wanted
it. There is another disgraceful little record that was something
Y managed to smuggle out in their dying gasp which is, in fact,
the halfway stage of the album and is deeply inferior.
D: What about the progression between Jam Science and Oil
& Gold?
BA: Oil & Gold is really more of the 'son of Care,' rather than
Jam Science. Jam Science was a bit of a strange album for us,
apart form all the business things that went down. It was also
a conscious departure, it was us saying, "Well, we have this kind
of disco area of our work that's quite clinical, quite stay-up-all-
night-on-big-drugs, and what would happen if we examined that
more closely, and if Carl Marsh did all the singing, and I just produced it?" So that's what we did, and it wasn't completely satisfactory. You got a sort of jaundiced thing, an unbalanced thing,
because Shriekback are quite a lot about being organic and
messy and noisy and falling down the stairs sometimes, getting
up again and making a big row. Jam Science was us trying to
be good boys down at the disco. It has less of a place in my heart
than Care. With Oil & Gold all we really said was "Bollocks to
all that, let's just go in and do what excites us, let's follow whatever paths seem interesting." So that's what we did. We also said
we'd work with anybody and everybody, just drag people down,
whereas with Jam Science we said "No, no, no session players.
We're a proper group now. We'll do it all together, on our own,"
which was a high and.lonely destiny, and complete bullshit really.
It was nice to get back to the status of Care where you had people
coming in, a constant party going on in the back room, beer all
over the mixing desk, etc....
D: Do you write the parts for the session players?
BA: I never write anything for anybody. What i tend to do is act
like somebody who's directing one of those modern plays that
people make up as they go along. You have a role for a person,
a kind of person, a sort of personality; then you look around for
somebody who might be able to do that because that's what
they're like anyway.
There's a celebration always, not
only in the way the music comes
out of the speakers, but in the
whole process that went into it.
D: How does that affect your musical personalitv?
BA: I think that it's like having a conversation with somebody
you've never met before who's interesting. You will talk to someone and aspects of yourself will come out through that interaction. We had this guy Lu on Oil & Gold, and Lu is a completely
wild guy. He plays the most vicious, brutal guitar, he's interested
in Islam and the Middle East, he lives in a squat in South Lon- BALANCE!
f*.$[i*/*
♦ Save
74w.cor(hri*681'4632,
DISCORDER
don and he plays in a band called the 3
Mustapha 3, who wear little fezzes and feed
the audience melons halfway through the
set. When he comes into the studio he
brings all that with him. When I work with
him and listen to what he's put on our
records I get excited. I get the Lu-ness for
that and that sparks things off in me. That's
why I think our records work in a way that
perhaps isn't quite obvious. There's a celebration always, not only in the way the
music comes out of the speakers, but in the
whole process that went into it. We're not
really interested in doing stuff that's not fun
when we're doing it, because if you get run
over by a lorry before you get to mix it, it
will have been a waste of time. We tend to
work on the if-you-get-run-over-by-a-lorry
ethic.
D: Shriekback has a reputation in North
America as a cerebral band. I don't know
of too many other bands who would use
"parthenogenesis" in a pop song. At the
same time, a party atmosphere prevails.
Where do the two mesh, where's the balance, the mid point?
BA: I think you've summed it up in the
word parthenogenesis, really. Big heavy
duty word that has to do with reproduction
without a partner. Firstly, what interested
me about that was that there were only little tiny organisms, only visible through
microscopes that do that, plus God, you
know, the Virgin Mary and Christ were the
only other recorded examples of parthe-
December 1985
nogenesis apart from those microbes. I
thought there was something quite metaphysically correct about that, and the idea
of putting that into this bonehead, yob, Gary
Glitter-type chorus in this pop song that was
also concerning itself with heavyweight
issues, matters like moral choice and nature of being human, Nietschze and ethics,
Marlon Brando, Goethe, and Carpaccio; the
whole ludicrous eclecticism that struck me
as being incredibly funny. It would have to
be quite serious, because if it was just face-
tiousness then for me that wouldn't be as
funny as somebody getting really intense
and still going into great depth and being
really well-researched, but still absolutely
stupid and pointless.
D: What sort of effect are you looking to
achieve with that sort of imagery?
BA: I would like it to hit you across the
head like a wet fish, and perhaps, after being hit across the head with a wet fish you
might consider the nature of the object, but
immediately what you have is a very physical interaction with that creature. I think our
music should work like that: something that
physical that is the unarguable, that is that
unmistakable. That's why I don't really like
being called cerebral, because if we are
that, then we've failed in what we're attempting to do, and fair enough, if that's how it
comes out, then that's fair criticism. But the
things that we do best, things like "Nemesis," do actually have the wet fish effect.
D: What about technology. Have you been
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spending a lot of time with Fairlights and
such?
BA: I have, yeah, I've been spending ages
with them. I mean, I still couldn't plug one
in if I had to, but I have an instinctive feel
for these things. I just set them up and poke
around until I get a noise I like. Shriekback
generally have a pretty short way with technology. We do a lot of shortcuts, and don't
bother to read the owner's manual, and just
piss around until we get a noise that makes
us happy.
D: Technology, then, hasn't really changed
the way that you work.
BA: Well, no, I think that when really fundamental things happen in technology,
then you change what you do fundamentally, but for me, things like Fairlight have
just made it quicker to get where you were
going. On Care, if we wantd a certain kind
of effect, we'd get a bowl of water and hit
the side of the bowl, and we'd have to do
it, say, twenty-five times to get the sound
right, but eventually we'd get there, and
then we'd slow the tape down and turn it
around the other way, and all that. Now we
just do it with the Fairlight. We get a sound
that sounds a bit similar, and then we get
into the guts of the sound, change it around
a bit, put a little bit of effect on it, and we've
got it in ten or fifteen minutes. So it's made
it more efficient for us, but it really hasn't
fundamentally altered our approach.
D: When you're writing songs in the studio,
do you think much about how they're going
to turn out live?
BA: No, not at all. Which is why some
things, like "Hand on my Heart," which
works very well in the studio, we've never
been able to perform live. Which is a bit of
a pain, really, but given the limits we've set
for ourselves, there's nothing we can do
about it. So what we've said is, we'll do it
as well as we possibly can in the studio, and
then when we come to do it live, we operate
within the parameters of the people we've
got and the kind of rhythms that Martin
plays best, and we go that way. Now with
the new stuff, since that's all written from
drums anyway, there's no problem.
D: What do you mean exactly by "written
from drums?"
BA: Well, the way we always write is that
we start with the rhythm, in any event. And
that's either a drum computer rhythm, as
on the first three albums, or on Oil & Gold,
with Martin. Like, "Okay, Martin, that's a
brilliant rhythm, let's have four minutes of
that." So that goes down onto tape first, and
then all the rest of it kind of sticks to the
outside of that rhythm, like coral to a shipwreck. Then, in the end, this whole thing
grows to the point where you feel you can
put a vocal on it. So then, me or Carl, in
the past—now, only me—goes away and
says, "Alright, yeah, I'll try and sing on that."
D: Do you like black music a lot?
BA: I do really, yeah. That's been an inspiration for me for a long time now. In particular, reggae, and in particular, Lee Perry.
He's been a big influence on me in the
production side. Just the purity of how he
does things. It's a real childish kind of
"OHHAOW, wouldn't it be brilliant if you get
this thing and make it go NMMNG and get
it squelching and put it in your mouth
and..." He's just very physical in the way he
produces and the perspective is just really
extreme perspective. I can remember one
of the formative influences in my life, playing the Electric Ballroom in Manchester
with XTC. It was a horrible, dreary Manchester day, drizzling rain outside. The
Electric Ballroom's this filthy old cinema, it's
all black inside. Nobody'd bothered to do
it up in those days because it was only punk
bands that played there anyway. I remem
ber walking in there and XTC's soundman
was checking the PA and he put on "Rose-
fish and Cornbread," which is the b-side to
some Lee Perry single. And what he does
is this amazing, real, real slow groove, and
there's a bell, a little tiny chime that's made
twice as loud as anything else on the entire record, and it just goes ding, da-ding
ding-da-ding ding...ding-da ding ding-da-
ding, ding... And I was walking into this
place, it was just like I was in some huge,
black aquarium, swimming around, just
completely in this environment that Lee
Perry had created for me with the help of
the Manchester council. Things like that,
you know, have been little landmarks really. DISCORDER
Where's The Bar
In This Joint?
..
December 1985
Dave Watson's Guide to
Vancouver's Boozeless Bars
IN MY PRESENT ROLE AS VAN-
couver's sixth highest paid rock
critic (a responsible position earning me tens of dollars monthly), I go out
to lots of clubs, I see people dancing
there. They're a pain in the ass. You try
manoeuvering 20 pounds of camera
gear through a crowd of gyrating half-
drunk people. Many of them dance
with less grace than I do—a dangerous situation, to be sure.
I gave up all thoughts of dancing
long ago, in grade 7, as I recall. Coordination has never been my forte. (I
wish Knox was my forte.) I may have felt
the rhythm, but I didn't express it well
in public. By the time I hit grade 10,
disco came in. I didn't like disco. I've
never even seen Saturday Night Fever.
(There are no white suits in my closet.)
A couple of teen discos opened in
Saskatoon, where I coincidently lived.
You would be right in assuming that I
never dropped in for a quick spin on
the dance floor.
I've gradually become more and
more curious about these dance clubs.
Finally I decided to do a piece on five
of them (three are teen discos, two are
afterhours clubs technically open to all
ages). That way I could check them out
WPC (Without Paying Cover).
Courthouse Studio
Location: 759 Carnarvon, New West
Male/Female ratio: 2 girls for every boy, but
the sample was small and not necessarily
representative.
FUNNY HOW MUCH a hot pink building
stands out in a run-down area like New
Westminster. The Courthouse was very
popular when it first opened. Busloads of
punkers and big hair people would come
in from Surrey and Delta, probably to avoid
being stomped by rockers at the Whalley
Exchange. They were all tired of Bumpers,
a Surrey club which tried to play music for
too many different tastes, kind of like CFOX.
The Courthouse is a big club. You could
easily jam 600 poseurs in there, but crowds
have dropped dramatically since Bumpers
reopened as the Zone. Another factor in
declining attendance is that the punk fad
has about run its course among secondary
school students. Good. I don't extend anv
credibility to punk rockers whose biggest
problem is catching the right bus to be
home by 12:30.
For reasons that i don't fully understand
a large video screen above the dance floor
shows old movies, without supplying the
sound. A lot of people watch it while they're
dancing. Draw your own conclusions.
The music ranges from occasional Sex
Pistols' numbers for all the 'hardcore' punks
in the crowd, to wimpy new romantic for the
I don't extend any
credibility to punk rockers
whose biggest problem is
catching the right bus
to be home by 12:30.
kids in the white sweaters. Images In
Vogue, Skinny Puppy and Omnisquid have
all staged concerts there. Everyone there
despises Prince, Springsteen and Marshall
McLuhan. A clear majority prefer green
vegetables to vegetables of other colours.
What more could I say? CTR fm 102 cabe 100
They no doubt assumed
I had a closetful of black
clothes that I had obstinately
refused to wear.
The Edge
Location: 1225 Homer
Male/Female ratio: Hard to tell without looking closely, but somewhere around 50/50.
THE EDGE is an afterhours club (11
p.m. to 5 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays.
Recently they have been videotaping punk
concerts early Friday evenings). The
clientele is mainly new wave fashion-
people-who-dress -in-black. Myself, I like to
dress up by slipping into a crisp, clean
Hawaiian shirt. Several people commented
on my courage in not dressing like everyone
else. They no doubt assumed I had a closetful of black clothes that I had obstinately
refused to wear.
Right.
The crowd is basically the Luv-A-Fair/
Gandydancer fashion/gay mix, expecially
on Fridays, when the Gandy has men only
night, and after 2, when both clubs close.
For reasons that still remain vague I asked
several transvestites if they like the Three
Stooges, presumably to assess their masculinity.
Besides the usual soft drinks the snack
bar sells Winstons (yea) and poppers (boo).
Poppers are little legal bottles of a liquid a
lot like paint thinner. Poppers are the moral
equivalent of sniffing glue. The people who
frequent The Edge think they are decadent.
The washrooms at the Edge are open to
either sex. This eliminates the embarass-
ment of walking into the wrong one. Each
washroom (took the grand tour) had a large
mirror, but you had to take a number and
wait to get a space in front of it. Some guy
was selling hair gel at ridiculously inflated
prices. (I made that last part up).
The music is mostly electronic disco with
a hard edge. No pun intended. I found myself really enjoying the tunes, despite the
regular sledgehammer beat. Ballsy music
well mixed. I've gone back just for the
tunes. Easily the most interesting club to
wear a Hawaiian shirt to.
Shakers
Location: 1148 West Georgia
Male/Female ratio: .5 boys for every girl.
SHAKERS is filled with a 12 to 18 crowd
that all dream of their 19th birthday,
so they can go to Richards on Richards.
There are a lot of them, the place is packed on Fridays and Saturdays.
Most of the boys are preppies or new
romantics in white sweaters. Many of the
girls wear dresses, heels and coiffered hair.
One kid told me that the reason he liked
Shakers was that "they don't make you feel
young." This is no doubt because everyone
there is about to turn 38.
Really.
The dance floor is usually fully occupied.
On dry winter days sparks of several hundred volts have been generated by the
Going into Shakers is like
entering a parallel universe
which never had Joey Ramone DISCORDER
December 1985
sweaters worn by many of the patrons.
Just kidding.
The night I was there was Friday, Oldies'
night. I heard Tommy James and the Shon-
dels, Elvis Presley, early Beatles, Bob-
Seger's "Old Time Rock and Roll," early
Joe Jackson (with 14-year-olds anything
before 1982 is a golden oldie).
Shakers looks like a great place—provided you fit into the upwardly mobile, clean-
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cut crowd. I didn't, of course. Going into
Shakers is like entering a parallel universe
which never had a Joey Ramone.
Number 5 says: Thou shalt
be 18 to enter Heaven
Heaven
Location: 1251 Howe Street
Male/Female ratio: 1.75 girls for every boy.
HEAVEN is also an afterhours club,
open 9 p.m. to 5 a.m. Friday and Saturday, 10 to 2 a.m. on Sundays. Two huge
wooden tablets have Heaven's ten commandments. Number 5 says: Thou shalt be
18 to enter Heaven. Actually most people
there before midnight aren't even close to
18, but by 4 a.m. the average age hits about
mid twenties.
The dance floor features a smoke machine, four racks of lights, eight neon lightning
bolts and a UFO, a very rotatable circular
ring of lights.
There is a free water fountain beside the
snack bar. Most people use it because the
drinks are very expensive, $2.50 for a
booze-free 'mocktail,' $1.75 for a 16-ounce
soft drink and $1.25 for a coffee.
The music is progressive/disco/top 40.
Too mainstream for me, artificial and
without guts. After 4 a.m. the beat and
volume drop and people begin leaving like
they just remembered that they left the tub
running.
Too mellow for me.
Ever notice how 15-year-olds
don't think public necking is
gauche?
The Zone
Location: 13465 King George Highway,
Surrey.
Male/Female ratio: 1.90 girls for every boy.
THE ZONE used to be Bumpers. My
guess is before that it was a bowling
alley. Not that the roof is low or anything,
1
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430    HOMER
689-1025
Wishing you a Merry Christmas!
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but it is pretty close to the floor.
The renovations that justified the name
change consists of a respectable set of
dance floor lights (including a mini UFO, a
very rotatable circular light ring) and a concentration on a single type of music to draw
a particular crowd. The result is more
pseudo-Eurodisco than I expected, very few
punks.
I didn't recognize all of the music, but
Soft Cell's "Tainted Love" was about the
oldest ditty. The dancing was pretty lackluster, although Madonna's "Prove Your
Love" received about the biggest response.
Marvin Gay's "Sexual Healing" was a
surprise.
Gatorade is available at the snack bar.
There are four foosball games always in
use. There is a video room with couches
for two to curl up in. Ever notice how 15
year-olds don't think public necking is
gauche?
OTHER THAN OCCASIONAL TOP 40
lapses, The Zone came in about
second for music—sometimes. Shakers
was good too, but that's because I'm old
fashioned. I still think the electric guitar is
pretty nifty. Heaven and the Courthouse
don't do too much for me, too many poseurs
and wimpy music respectively. The Edge
comes out on top, but you'll get more of
a real walk on the wild side just by strolling
down the street to get there.
IRRY XMAS, TO
ALL the: #G00D
GIRLS.'
black rn„
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i CITR fm 102 cable 100
Swedish translation:
Jason Grant
1 HUSKER DU—DO YOU RE-
member? 2) Husker Du—the
fastest pop band in the world.
1 + 2 + hugely successful LPs,
critical acclaim, sold-out shows, etc.
Flip Your Wig? No way. Husker Du have
remained true to their name, never forgetting that they're just three guys from
Minnesota, despite what Rolling Stone,
Spin or any other influential music rag
says. Grant Hart, Bob Mould and Greg
Norton are the most respected hardcore band in the world today, yet
through it all they've managed to keep
their wigs attached.
"Kids that come to shows
are really impressionable,
they come to have
a good time."
Sunday section gave us a mention
Grandma's freaking out over all the
attention
And now my friends abound
They're coming back around
At the New York Theatre on October 25,
a lot of expectations were shattered. There
were three people on stage (as opposed to
Rock Gods). None of them had traditional
Punk Haircuts (drummer Grant Hart sported a mane that any Woodstocker would
have been proud of); they didn't play their
HITS! (no "Real World," no "Diane," no
"Tune On the News," no "New Day Rising,"
no "59 Times the Pain," no "Eight Miles
High"...). They didn't talk to the audience,
let alone preach to them. They improvised.
(I heard one guy mutter, "I don't know this
one," as they launched in to a 14-minute
sonic assault which began as "The Wit and
the Wisdom" and ended as "Ticket to
Ride"). Not expecting anything, I loved it.
I had been hoping that the band wouldn't
let the audience control the show, or dictate the set list, and Husker Du didn't disappoint. The impact of their non-traditional
approach to the concert far outweighed the
lack of communication between the band
and the audience. I'd rather the band not
say anthing than utter the unforgivable
"Awwright Vancouver, d'ya wanna pardy
toonight?" And for those who came to hear
some political proselytizing, Bob Mould,
Husker Du's affable guitarist is emphatic:
"I guess there's a lot of bands out there that
like to get up on stage and say, 'Well, I'm
a politician. I'm using music as a backdrop,
I'm going to get up here and I'm going to
spew out all this political rhetoric and I expect you all to believe it.' Kids that come to
shows are really impressionable, they come
to have a good time. I'm not going to sit up
here and tell somebody 'I'm a neo-socialist,
I read a lot of post-war Japanese fiction and
non-fiction, so this is my political stance and
you should all follow it because I'm in
Husker Du and you like our music' We just
want people to like our music, we don't want
people to be like us."
A hastily arranged interview followed the
performance at the York, and the obliging
Mould and Hart continued to destroy illusions of infallibility built up by four superb
LPs between appearances in Vancouver. DISCORDER
last time they played here was to aboui
50 people at Ye Olde Buddah; on this
occasion, the York was full. Grant's getting
used to this phenomenon.
"Between the release of Metal Circus and
Zen Arcade we played in L.A. at a taco
stand in front of fifty people, next time we
were back, we played the UCLA Grand
Ballroom, sold out. Things move fast, especially when stations like yourselves play
the music."
Gee thanks, Grant. That'll be fifty bucks
for sendinF//p Your Wig to #1. Even Husker
Du haven't escaped the inevitable pressures associated with the business of creating music. Bob explained how they got
together with SST Records in California
after releasing two LPs and a pair of singles
on their own Reflex Records label. "We did
a show in Chicago in mid '81. Black Flag
saw us, liked us, and said they would give
us a hand if we needed it. When it came
time to put out Metal Circus, we were having problems with Reflex, so SST stepped
in and offered to give us a hand, and that's
how that started. We never signed anything
with them, but now they're asking us to sign
things, that's for sure."
Now that Husker Du is set to release their
LP on Sire Records in the spring, the pressures are sure to increase. The title track
from their latest LP concerns this pressure.
Grant elaborates, "It's about the useless-
December 1985
ness of losing your mind in the business.
You have the choice of letting the business
run you or you run the business. A few
times a week you find the exact opposite
of what you desire going on, like the telephone answering you."
/ could be sad
I could be lonely
I could still have
Some friends if only
Didn't play
The games I had to play
I was important
When I was cool
Now it gets lonely
Playing the fool
It's a game, some game
Anyone can play
ONE GAME THAT Husker Du are
constantly asked to play involves
the "hardcore" community (I put
hardcore in quotes because Husker Du
don't feel they are a hardcore band). It involves the fashion associated with hardcore
today; what does the image have to do with
the music, or with anything? The conspicuous absence of studs or mohawks on
Messrs Mould, Hart and Norton represents
another jab at the expectations of the be-
studded audience.
"I'm not going to sit up
here and tell somebody
I'm a neo-socialist, I read
a lot of post-war Japanese
fiction and non-fiction...'"
The feeling the band generates is obvios-
ly one of self-respect, as musicians, as
individuals, as Husker Du. They refuse to
allow the perceptions of those outside the
band change their attitudes, even if those
individuals constitute a majority of their
listeners. This is why they wear 'normal'
clothes, why they refuse to make political
statements on stage, why they write songs
about things that may not appear cool to
many of their listeners.
This is also why they canned Spot, their
producer of their last five LPs, in order to
produce Flip Your Wig themselves. Mould
points out some of the reasons for this
move: "When you have somebody who is
a producer, he's supposed to be translating
your ideas onto the tape, and when you
realize that the guy you're calling the producer is not doing that, it's time to get rid
of him. With Spot he wanted this rough,
harsh, real distant kind of vocals. But we
were saying 'No, we can sing better than
that, let's try putting them up front.'
"There's really no reason to have a middleman playing arbitrator or playing babysitter. We've been in the studio enough that
we don't need one and besides, nobody
knows Husker Du like Husker Du does."
Husker Du put the vocals just where they CITR fm 102 cable 100
wanted them, which on the new LP is every
where. They zoom past you from every corner of every song (except the three instrumental, of course), building to a choral
orgy on "Find Me." Numerous guitar overlays and a pristine drum sound make their
LPs difficult to duplicate live, shooting down
another expectation, as unrealistic as it may
have been.
Husker Du's approach to the live arena
appears more shocking than it would be
were we not raised on bands who will go
to any lengths to reproduce exactly the
sound their producer gave them in the
studio. Hart lays it out very plainly: "We've
got a rough idea of what we're going to do
when we get up there live; we're playing exactly what we want to play, and we're going to do exactly what we want to do from
there. We own the bats, we own the ball,
we own the bases, we own the gloves..."
And we pay to watch them play.
Hart's statement would be a maddening
example of artistic egotism were it not
delivered by such a down-to-earth, no-nonsense individual. In any performance, the
artist has the final say, but few have the
balls to either put it so bluntly or to exercise their options. There is much made of
a raport with the audience and "audience
participation" but how many bands do we
see using the obvious device of leaving
their biggest hit for the encore? Husker Du
didn't, and that upset some people, but at
least they're honest about their reasons for
not doing it.
A cowboy or a nurse or a fireman
There's so many things that you can be.
You can set bigger goals but set your
saul
Yeah set your soul free.
Times, places and situations
Lead us to an early grave
When we get there, we see
Just what did we save.
THEIR MUSIC, to me, is energy; the
words are straightforward (Bob: "I
think it's a lot harder to tell the truth
than it is to bullshit people"), the emotions
genuine (Grant: "Everybody's responsible,
more or less, for their own happiness"),
(Didn't the guy from EST say something like
that? —Ed.) and the songs ring with melodies that reek of simpler times, yet have
a drive that speaks of the frustrations of a
disillusioned musical generation.
The critics appreciate this, the public
appreciates this, and as long as Husker Du
don't lie to themselves, we'll have more LPs
like Flip Your Wig from this band. Hart sums
it up: "My built-in bulishit detector tells me
that whatever's expected of me is the least
desirable thing for me to present. But I'm
still going to be me."
—Jason Grant
Many thanks to Kandace Karr for her help
with the interview, Julliette O'Keefe, Dave
and ? from Co-op Radio. DISCORDER
December 1985
PROGRAM
|     WEEKDAY REGULARS
7:30 am   Sign-On
8:00 am   WAKE-UP REPORT
News, sports and weather.
10:00 am BREAKFAST REPORT
News, sports and weather followed
by GENERIC REVIEW and INSIGHT.
LUNCH REPORT
News, sports and weather.
AFTERNOON SPORTSBREAK
DINNER MAGAZINE
News, sports and weather followed
by GENERIC REVIEWS, INSIGHT
and a DAILY FEATURE.
Sign-Off
1:00 pm
4:30 pm
6:00 pm
4:00 am
WEEKDAY HIGHLIGHTS
hence" radio drivel some time around 9:00.
Special orders will be taken. Your waiter: Paul
Funk.
PLAYLOUD
Late night 1:00-4:00 am
MONDAYS
ARTZMONDAY MAGAZINE
7:15-10:00 am
A three-part radio program dedicated to a
creative mix of sounds, music and words:
7:15-8:00 Cancon Music Made in Canada
8:15-9:00  Happenings/ short announcements,
short features.
9:00-10:00RadioCinema/ Words, Music and
Sounds, directed by Essy.
THE JAZZ SHOW
9:00 pm-1:00 am
Vancouver's longest-running prime time Jazz
program, featuring all the classic players, the
occasional interview, and local music news.
Hosted bv the ever-suave Gavin Walker.
02 Dec. The Jazz Feature: Charles Mingus
Presents Charles Mingus. Considered
to be Mingus' most adventurous
recordings.
09 Dec.  A portrait of Hank Mobley, the
almost forgotten modern giant of
the tenor saxophone.
16 Dec. Album Album...Jack Dejonette's best
recording by the "Special Edition"
with David Murray, Rufus Reid, John
Purcell, Howard Johnson and the
fabulous Dejohnette on drums and
keyboards.
23 Dec.  Miles Davis, Thelonious Monk, Milt
Jackson, Percy Heath and Kenny
Clarke...one of the most famous
(and infamous) all-star sessions to
take place in Jazz history.
30 Dec.  The great King of the
Vibraharp...Lionel Hampton was
given a carte blanche contract to
record for RCA Victor in the late
30s and early 40s.
Music to phone in sick by...keep the light on
in your bathroom. Headphones should be
used only as a last resort. Discipline and
I aural surgery performed by Larry Thiessen.
03 Dec.  The Culling...a monthly harvest of
new & unsavoury material.
10 Dec.  Featuring the versatile & whizzy German rock group, Spliff.
17 Dec.  A Playloud request show. Call us...
we hate everything.
24 Dec. A special 5-hour-plus attempt to
scare away Santa Claus. "Grinch
musik."
31 Dec.  Music Wars. Eating Vomit & Playloud
fight away New Year's Eve.
WARNING: THIS AD MAY CONTAIN
SUBLIMINALS.
WEDNESDAYS
VANCOUVER INSTITUTE LECTURES
7:30-8:30 am
Lectures from the Vancouver Institute's Saturday night lecture series.
Margaret Atwood (author, Ontario): Blood
and Thunder.
Prof. Irwin Shainman, Dept. of Music,
Williams College, Mass.: Mozart: Myth and
Reality.
William Golding (author, England): Thoughts
and Readings.
Dr. John F. Helliwell Dept. of Economics,
UBC: Canada's Economic Performance.
JUST LIKE WOMEN
6:20-7:30 pm
Woman, heal thyself with Ann and Lil's
remedy for the Old Boys' Network: an hour
of news, interviews, and music. A shot in the
arm for all women, and for any man who
likes them.
THE KNIGHT AFTER
Midnight to 4:00 am
Music to clobber Yuppies by—featuring radio
shows traded with alternative stations in
Europe and the U.S. This show will really
mess up your BMW!
TUESDAYS
DOG'S BREAKFAST
7:3011:00 am
A goulash of aural surprises and "Over the
THURSDAYS
UBC WEEKLY
9:00-9:30 am
A new show dealing with issues of concern
to students at UBC.
PARTY WITH ME, PUNKER!
4:00-6:00 pm
A new time slot for this two-hour show
which specializes in music described, for the
lack of a better word, as "punk rock." But it
can mean anything from the alcohol-rock of
the Replacements to the brutal thrash of
D.R.I, and anything in between. With your
hosts Mike Dennis and Andrea Gamier.
TOP OF THE BOPS
8:00-9:00 pm
Contrary to popular belief, Bob Dylan and
Handsome Dick Manitoba are not the only
great things to come out of Minnesota. The
Fendermen, in the late fifties, and the Transh-
men, in the early sixties, were just the tip of
the iceberg. There wre a plethora of bands
toiling away, recording for unrecognized independent labels or even putting it out
themselves. We'll be taking a listen to a
cross-section of the best of these on the 5th
and 12th. Buddy Holly should be familiar to
most. On the 19th, we shall be taking a
musical stroll through the bespectacled one's
early rocking sides. And on the 26th, Top of
the Bops will be presenting its first annual
Boxing Day Bonanza!; in other words the
usual selection of the finest cuts, with a little
added Christmas cheer.
Top of the Bops Christmas shopping list:
George Jones Country Classics (Time-Life box
set)
Hank Williams Country Classics (Time-Life
box set)
Bullmoose Jackson Big Fat Mammas are Back
in Style (Route 66, Sweden)
Various Artists: Buffalo Bop Volumes 37
and/or 38 (Dee Jay Schallplatten, West
Germany)
Various Artists: Alladin Sock Hop (Pathe
Marconi, France)
Patsy Cline Today Tomorrow and Forever
(MCA)
Let the Tear Drops Fall (Accord)
MEL BREWER PRESENTS
11:00 pm-Midnight
We speak with our eyes closed. You should
listen with your mouth open. It's a gabfest
presented by Mel, man. Know what's going on
locally without leaving home, especially you
agoraphobics. Watch out for black ice. Win
things. Get happy. Find out why J is the most
congenial letter in the English language. Tune in,
'cause Mel loves you. Tune in, 'cause you love
Mel. Call us, 'cause we love you too. too too
8-too for 87.
FRIDAYS
FRIDAY MORNING MAGAZINE
7:30-10:30 am
STIRRINGS: Awaken to the sense-stirring
music and interviews of CITR's Primal DJ, the
White Wolf. Psychodramatic interviews,
poetry reading, insights into the world of
ethnic music and culture, environmental territories are all part of the Wolf's habitat. This
month: the music of South Africa, the final
Stein report, guest hosts, and more. With
your host and local changling Kirby Scott
Hill.
YOUTH FOCUS
8:30-9:00 am
An examination of youth issues and concerns, hosted by Lynn Price and Jocelyn
Samson. CTR fm 102 cable 100
U
D
POWER CHORD
5:00-6:00 pm
Vancouver's only true metal show, featuring
the underground alternative to mainstream
metal: local demo tapes, imports and other
rarities, plus album give-aways.
FRIDAY NIGHT FETISH
6:20-9:00 pm
Word salad and cooking tips from habitual
guest Beverly and delinquent trends and
revelations from that Annoying Guy..Radio
for people striving for less than adequacy in
their lives. High profiles:
06 Dec.  Phone Job
13 Dec.  The Smith Conspiracy
20 Dec.  Nepotism
27 Dec.  David J
THE BIG SHOW
9:00 pm-midnight
Why pay money to get into a nightclub on a
Friday night? If Big InternationAI can't get you
dancing, no-one can.
THE VISITING PENGUIN SHOW
Late night 1:00-4:00 am
Interviews with local musicians and artists,
the newest sounds at CITR, your personal requests and even golden oldies. What more
could you want? Hosted by Andreas Kitz-
mann and Sheri Walton.
—"-*— •—-— ' ——
WEEKEND REGULARS
7:30 am   Sign-On (Saturdays)
8:00 am   Sign-On (Sundays)
Noon       BRUNCH REPORT
News, sports and weather.
8:00 pm   SAT/SUN, MAGAZINE
News, sports and weather, plus
GENERIC REVIEW, analysis of
current affairs and special features.
4:00 am   Sign-Off
WEEKEND HIGHLIGHTS
SATURDAYS
THE FOLK SHOW
10:30 am-Noon
Host Steve Edge presents a wide range of
folk music, extending from the latest U.K.
Rogue-Folk through to all kinds of traditional
music from Canada, U.S.A., the British Isles
and just about anywhere else. Plus the latest
U.K. soccer results at 11 a.m.
07 Dec.  Kate & Anna McGarrigle
14 Dec.  Special guest John Mann of Spirit of
the West brings some of his
favourite music along
21 Dec.  The Beard's Christmas Show. Zany
Rouge-Folk for this festive occasion.
28 Dec.  Hogmanay Special. Scotland's Battlefield Band recorded live' at the
Savoy
NEOFILE
Noon-4:00 pm
Join CITR's music directors as they take you
through the station's new and exciting Spin
List.
WHATEVER HAPPENED TO
GILUGAN'S ISLAND?
4:00-6:00 pm
The quest for ultimate truth continues...listen
for these philosophical blockbusters:
07 Dec. Steptoe and Son
14 Dec.  The Sound of the BRM V-16
21 Dec.  Christmas with Pinky and Perky
28 Dec.  Excerpts from 'The Art of Coarse
Drinking"
PROPAGANDA!
6:30-9:00 pm
An eclectic mix of interviews, reviews, music,
humour, High Profiles, and other features
with Mike Johal. Production: Stacey Fruin.
Hi Profiles
07 Dec. Stockholm Monsters
14 Dec.   Dub Poets
21 Dec.   Legendary Pink Dots
28 Dec.  Propaganda! '85—favourite storys
from 1985
Interviews
07 Dec.  Toots and the Maytals
14 Dec.  Love and Rockets
21 Dec.  Steven R. Gilmore, local graphic
artist
28 Dec.  Propaganda! 85-Choice clips from
interviews heard on Propaganda! in
1985.
Features
Today in History, Citizen Kane, political satire
with AEIOU.
PYJAMA PARTY
9:00 pm-1:00 am
Your hosts Mike Mines and Robin Razzell
present everything from ambient music for
snoozing to upbeat tunes for popcorn and
pillow fights.
TUNES 'R' US
Late night 1:00-4:00 am
Music, Music, Music, Handyman Bob, Music,
Music, My Favorite Album, Music, Music,
Experimental To Classical, Teddy Kelowna
presents, and yes more music. R.I.P to Music
From The Tarpits.
SUNDAYS
MUSIC OF OUR TIME
8:00 am-Noon
An aleatoric assemblage of dodecaphonic
delights and microtonal masterpieces to
titillate tonally twisted tuners-in. Paul Smith
continues his musical lexicon of the twentieth century, and is joined by Tylor Cutforth,
with his favorite cures for Sunday morning
complacency.
ROCKERS SHOW
Noon-3:00 pm
The best in reggae with host George Family
Man Barrett, Jerry the Special Selector, the
Major Operator, and Collin the Prentice.
SOUL GALORE
3:00-4:30 pm
Focusing on Black-American popular music of
this century, this program takes you from the
birth of the blues through doo-wop, soul and
funk, from Massachusetts to California and
everywhere in between.
THE AFRICAN SHOW
4:30-6:00 pm
A program featuring African music and
culture with hosts Todd Langmuir, Patrick
Onukwulu and Dido. Tune in for the latest
news from Africa, plus special features at
5:00 pm.
NEITHER HERE NOR THERE
6:30-8:00 pm
Relevance? What relevance? Music, interviews,
comedy and readings of prose and poetry
with hosts Chris Dafoe and Paris Simons.
SUNDAY NIGHT LIVE
8:00-9:00 pm
FAST FORWARD
9:00 pm1:00 am
Probably Vancouver alternative radio's most
alternative show. Mark Mushet searches the
world over for experimental, minimalist,
avant-garde, electronic, and other non-
mainstream sounds.
01 Dec.   Well, obviously by the time this
reaches you there won't be any
point to having a special show
prepared so listen in and find out
what happens when all is cast to
the wind.
08 Dec.  The Moers the Better...An eclectic
and esoteric selection of music from
one of Germany's most eclectic and
esoteric record labels.
15 Dec.  Laylah is not just the name of the
best loved song by Eric and the
Dominoes. In fact, it is a highly prolific and demanding record label
whose roster includes Nurse With
Wound, The Hafler Trio, Coil, Current 93, and many other like-minded
individuals. Larry Thiessen will serve
as co-pilot.
22 Dec.  HOLY SHIT
29 Dec.  "If the cows are united..." A
retrospective, current update, and
prognosis of Britain's United Dairies
iabel. Risen from the ashes of the
barn...
THE EARLY MUSIC SHOW
Late night 1:00-4:00 am
Join host Ken Jackson for music from the
Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque periods,
presented at an appropriately early hour.
01 Dec.   Dissonance in the Baroque period,
with repeat performances of Rebel's
The Elements and Biber's Battle in D
Major
08 Dec.  TBA
15 Dec.  Schutz Christmas Oratorio; Seasonal
music by Gabrieli, Torelli, Corelli
22 Dec.  An Early Music Christmas—Medieval
and Renaissance carols
29 Dec.  A Selection of Baroque concertos
for various instruments DISCORDER
December 1985
The Replacements
Tim
Sire Records
SOMEONE'S BEEN SENT OUT TO WIPE
the snot off their pants, to comb their hair, to
give them a Clorets to hide the smell of stale beer.
But even if the edges have been rounded off a
little, you can still tell they're The Replacements.
And for that we can be grateful.
When Sire signed The Replacements away
from Minneapolis-based Twin Tone Records
there was some concern that the major label
treatment could spoil a band whose greatest
charm lay in their inadequacies. Sure, they drank
too much. Sure, they frustrated concert-goers
with sets of Led Zep covers. And yeah, songs like
"Gary's Got A Boner" (from Let It Be) were
inexcusably dumb. But The Replacements made
records that sounded like they meant something.
They weren't polished, they weren't perfect, but
The Replacements sounded like they approached each song with the same gutsy bravado, each
album with the same charming why-the-hell-not
eclecticism.
If a song like "Boner" made you flinch with
its sheer sophomority, the contrast only served
to highlight the raw emotion of "Answering
Machine" or the brave, bouncy pop of "I Will
Dare." If the band sometimes played like life was
one great big drunken party, they were also
honest enough to tell you about the hangover
without whining too loud.
Tim finds The Replacements in fine fettle; still
a little hungover, a little hoarse from too much
cigarette smoke, but passionate, witty, and moving in spite (or perhaps because) of it all. Producer Tommy Erdelyi (formerly of the Ramones)
has turned down the volume and tightened up
the sound without turning the band into something slick, sterile and "marketable." You can now
hear some of Paul Westerberg's lyrics: moving,
brave words that were previously buried under
the exuberance of the rest of the band's determination to be the best, loudest garage band in
Christiandom.
Westerberg's growth as a songwriter continues
on Tim as he tries his hand at everything from
a teary barroom ballad ("Here Comes a Regular") to Stoogies' proto-metal ("Dose of Thunder") and a slew of styles in between that I could
describe if I wanted to hyphen you to death. The
Replacements pull off this eclecticism without
the preening, self-conscious posing so evident
when, say the Stones do a C&W or ajeggae
song. They sound more like four guys trying out
all the things they heard while punching buttons
on the AM radio in the van. Westerberg's lyrics
are in turn touching, witty, sarcastic, and nasty
and the band plays like being in this band is the
most fun they could possibly imagine.
It would be ridiculous to expect "progress"
from a band who list early 1970's AM radio as
a major influence. Nonetheless, Tim is a step forward for The Replacements, a step towards the
mainstream, perhaps, but also towards a consolidation of the things they were doing on Hootenanny and Let It Be. And if it is a step towards
the mainstream, it is an encouraging one, if only
because these guys show you can play white-
boy rock without the bombast and crotch-tugging
that seems to have dragged the genre down to
its ignomious position. The Replacements seem
to believe, however foolish, that rock and roli is
still good for something more than selling soft
drinks, beer (although I'm sure they'd probably
make a wonderful beer commercial), or T-shirts.
In spite of their self-perpetuated image as a
bunch of reckless, irresponsible drunks, The
Replacements make records that ring with heart,
numour, and courage. They may be hollering
from the bottom of an empty beer glass, but Tim
demonstrates that what they're hollering is worth
listening to.
-CD
CITR and Cat Productions present The Replacements December 4 at the Commodore.
The Cure
The Head on the Door
WEA
I CAN IMAGINE TWO REACTIONS TO THE
new Cure album: "Uugghh, they've sold out!"
or "Like, this is so cool, it just, like, rocks, y'know."
But don't despair, Smith and company haven't
been pandering to the fickle dance crowds again.
On The Head on the Door, the always interesting
and occasionally brilliant neo-psychedelic band
adopts a bouncy, upbeat, and accessible sound
which nonetheless continues in the experimental path first charted by their last studio album,
The Top. Gone, however, is the wild eclecticism,
lead singer Robert Smith's annoying whine, and
talented drummer Andy Anderson; to be replaced respectively by a more streamlined selection
of tunes, silky smooth vocals by Smith, and
competent Cureish drumming by newcomer Boris
Williams.
Vinyl
The album has an upbeat, dancy quality to it
that will no doubt alienate some Cure purists. But
even the most danceable tracks, "The Baby
Screams" and "Close to Me," are not nearly as
commercial as those on the annoyingly disco-
ish Japanese Whispers album of two years ago.
On past albums, Smith's lyrics have been acid-
drenched images of depression and loneliness,
but there was always a fine line between creative
imagery and meaningless mumbo-jumbo. Quite
often, he has been muddled in the latter, but on
Head his words are much clearer and more
coherent. Occasionally, as on the introspective
"Sinking," they actually seem meaningful:
So / trick myself
Like everybody else
I crouch in fear and wait
I'll never feel again.
That's pretty heavy stuff, even if Smith usually
lacks any direction or fluidity. But even when the
meaning is obscure, these songs have a disturbing eeriness which can be oddly compelling.
As far as experimentation goes, it is the lyrics
that are the most daring. Experiments in strange
noises and interesting harmonic structures, so
prevalent on The Top, are subordinated on Head.
There are no arty sound effects and no weird instruments, just driving guitars and economic
doses of synths. It's refreshing to hear Smith's
charged up guitar again at the fore.
Nowhere is this feeling more prominent than
on "A Night Like This," an amazing tune which
recalls earlier albums like Faith or Pornography.
It is as percussive and weighty as any classic
Cure depressant, and it is marred only by a
generic sax solo that seems very much out of
place. There is some further experimentation in
form and structure on "Six Different Ways," an
odd little tune that burps along in an awkward
6/4 meter.
The entire album is summarized on its best
track, "In Between Days." It's straightforward,
melodic, and full of gloomy thoughts. The infectious catchiness of it easily overpowers the morbid lyrics, and the whole experience is pleasantly
inocuous. The experimentation is restrained;
instead there is a streamlined sound, which is
a shame because all the way through Head contains so much promise, so many challenging
ideas that could have been fleshed into something brilliant.
Ultimately, The Top was a far better record
because it took chances on so many levels.
When it succeeded, it was more satisfying than
anything on Head. I think Head seems transi-
tionary, bridging to the next Cure opus. People
in the future may look back at it with fondness
as the middle installment of The Cure's mid-80's
experimental trilogy. But, for now, even though
The Head on the Door is a good album, it will
probably leave true inCure-ables thirsting for
something a bit more aurally challenging.
—Neal Roese CITR fm 102 cable 100
Verdict
THE MALOPOETS
The Malopoets
Capitol
FROM JOHANNESBURG AND SURROUND-
ing regions comes South Africa's Malopoets,
a band of musical revolutionaries whose songs
express joy and tribulation in face of social
upheaval and turmoil. The Malopoets are five
men from various segregated backgrounds,
some Zulus and Setwanian, some from other cultures and languages. That they have come together to create this album of African pop music
reflects the essence of the struggle in South
Africa.
Patrick, lead vocalist and writer for the Malopoets, is one of many black youths who have
been deported from the country for speaking out
against apartheid. Despite this injustice, there
is a warm fire burning in the hearts of the band.
The Malopoets' music reflects the best aspects
of the revolution.
Their music is uplifting and positive. Although
the members express an obvious weariness with
the South African turmoil, they do not promote
hatred or contempt for white capitalist societies.
Their eyes are bright with truth and love as they
strive to create music that unites blacks and
whites in a community celebration.
Unlike many of their black brothers, whose
heartfelt fire is now burning rampantly in South
Africa, the Malopoets fire is disciplined and controlled, kept in check by a respect for each other
as human beings, respect that they had been
denied under apartheid. The vision is one of unity, understanding and, perhaps, acceptance of
life as a struggle and a challenge in the face of
daunting odds. It's a struggle most Westerners
take for granted. We need a band like the Malopoets to open us up and make us realize what
we really have. It's not an album to be feared.
The music? Well it's what you might call African Pop. It knows where its roots are, yet one can
hear Western influences fused onto the stylings
and the harmonies. No raw roots at work here.
This is polished stuff.
Yet the polish hasn't out-glistened the heart
and soul of the music. Warm and strong, having
been to hell and back, the Malopoets reflect the
best in the potential of music and power. It's an
album that would sound good next to Burning
Spear and (gulp) Bryan Adams.
It's a great way to bridge the gap.
—Kirby Hill
I, Braineater
Artist, Poet, Thief
1980 More
IN AN INTERVIEW WITH JIM CUMMINS
posed the question of whether he would make
any forages into the field of literature having
already dabbled in painting, sculpture and music.
Jim replied that what he'd like to do is write a
cheap dimestore novel with his art on the cover.
It all suddenly made sense to me: I, Braineater's
art and music operate on that level.
The whole I, Braineater package is a romanticizing of the "starving artist" myth for the hip.
Check out the album cover which portrays a
Christ-like I, Braineater (or is that Frankenstein?).
The back liner notes include the phrase, "I Braineater: let the dream begin. The Renaissance of
phenomenon." However, like any cheap dime-
store novel, I doubt if anyone will remember this
renaissance. Finally, the title of the album: Artist, Poet, Thief about sums up the image I, Braineater wants to bring across.
I, Braineater probably won't be remembered
a hundred years from now, but there are doubts
in my mind whether the Velvet Underground
(check out the 1969 live album) will be remembered either (no doubts about the Beatles). I don't
think I, Braineater cares, however, as long as his
image gains him recognition as an artist, now.
What about the music? Well, taking into account that this is cheap, dimestore music, I'm
pleasantly surprised. The production on this
record is better than on any previous I, Braineater
release and a few of the songs that appeared on
that Braineater release with dollar bills on it
(which also featured Vancouer's own Johnny
Thunders: Art Bergmann) are redone.
Jim Cummins said he was trying to get a T-
Rex meets Elvis Presley sound on these songs.
He only succeeds on the song "7 Teen," however.
The rest of the record sounds kind of like a
Cramps—Alien Sex Fiend hybrid. This is interesting, since the I, Braineater personnel on Artist,
Poet, Thief consists of just Jim on guitar and
vocals and Andy Graffiti on drums. Like the
Cramps and Alien Sex Fiend, I, Braineater uses
no bass guitar. Unfortunately, I hate bands that
don't use bass.
I, Braineater gets patriotic (like Bruce Springsteen) on "Canada" and the rest of the songs
convey his hip pseudo-nihilistic world view. The
hit demo at CITR a few months back, "Wrong
World," is included, but the song to buy the
record for is "1980 More." Look around for Jim's
cartoon lyrics of "Edge" (probably at Zulu). I'm
going to go listen to my Lou Reed records.
—R. D. Harekema
Chris Carter
Mondo Beat
Conspiracy International
CHRIS CARTER AND COSEY FANNI TUTTI
are in an enviable yet precarious position.
On the one hand they are able to live and work
in a schoolhouse that they've converted into a
studio/home, oblivious to the trappings of the
record industry. They have an excellent working
relationship with Rough Trade and they are able
to release sideline collaborations and personal
projects via their own Conspiracy International
label (of which Mondo Beat is the third instalment.) As seminal members of Throbbing Gristle
they no longer feel compelled to be difficult on
any level and are able to pursue the difficult
balance that is highly creative, low-tech pop
music. On the other hand, because they remain
firmly committed to the independent sector and
wish to avoid the "biz" at all costs, they may just
cont. DISCORDER
December 1985
get swallowed up by the glut of third-rate copies
that now seem destined for recognition and, perhaps, major record deals and stardom. Mondo
Beat is a great success in terms of striking the
balance, setting the pace, and offering a variety
with only six songs.
With a title like Mondo Beat, one would expect
a string of playful dancefloor smashes that would
suit well the omnipresent urban decadence
nightclub set. Well, there is that element present
throughout, but there's so much more than the
alluring beat. Chris Carter is the master of low-
tech innovation in this field. Sampled and treated
voices and tapes are cleverly incorporated into
the deceptively simple rhythmic structure of the
songs. Surprisingly, I find the title track the least
interesting of the six. It utilizes a vocoder in the
manner of a high camp disco tune circa '77. If
that was the intention, and I suspect it was, then
it works. I just never appreciated high camp
disco. Of the six tunes, only one is completely
devoid of danceable rhythm. That one tune, called "Nobadhairdo," is without doubt the best use
of low-budget digital sampling/delay devices I've
ever heard. The voice is an equal part of the
rhythm bed, happily supplanting the synthetic
drum sound that permeates most modern electronic dance records. Speaking of synthetic drum
sounds, Chris uses them tastefully and with added invention. Much of the equipment used has
been modified in some way or another so that,
despite some stock characteristics, the sound
remains unique to Chris and Cosey.
The cover of Mondo Beat gives no clue as to
the extent of Cosey's involvement in this project.
Chris' first solo release was a 90-minute cassette
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called The Space Between. It was much sparser
and there were no signs of Cosey's trademark
guitar or cornet sound. Mondo Beat, on the
other hand, features Cosey quite prominently,
both on the cover of the disc, and for an extended guitar workout on the LP's longest track,
"Beyond Temptation." That song, to me, serves
as counterpoint to the album's two exceedingly
pleasant tunes, "Moonlight" and "No Evil."
There is a variety here and Mondo Beat has
something for everybody. Playful synthetic melodies, urban decadence disco, clever digital treatments, an exquisite guitar solo reminiscient of
TG. days. And all this in only six songs. Mondo
Beat is immense fun. Keep an eye out for future
Conspiracy International projects. You never
know...
—Mark Mushet
The Untouchables
Wild Child
1979, THE SPECIALS, MADNESS, PORKPIE
hats, rude boys and skin-heads. Ska music
was having its second coming and Brighton's
beaches were once more a battlefield. Two years
later it was but a memory as the New Romantics surged to the front.
Fads, however, don't die. They just move on
to Sunny California where the sun preserves
every aberration known to man, from the Beach
Boys to beehive hairdos.
1985, Jerry Dammer's second coming. He is
six years older and has become the producer of
a second-generation Two-Tone band from L.A.,
The Untouchables.
The Specials' first album was and still is a true
classic and yes, the world can do with more
along the same line. Even if the idea of Americans, recycling British ska is just about as sacreli-
geous, it is almost impossible not to like Wild
Child.
The whole album is extremely danceable,
especially after a few pints of ale, and fun. Fun
on the dance floor is what more music should
be about, I personally have had enough of doom,
gloom and assorted social evils too many bands
love to moan about.
When you listen carefully to the Untouchables
you can hear much more than Specials' clones.
There is also the influence of Bob Marley, James
Brown, Jimmy Page and the Dave Clark Five. Not
a bad combination.
1979 was a good year, we had never even
heard of Expo then. And I would rather have
some excellent revivalism I can dance to than
some contemorary dirge.
—Rockin' Patrick CITR fm 102 cable 100
The Pogues
Runty Sodomy & The Lash
Stiff (U.K.)
THE POGUES' DEBUT LP, RED ROSES FOR
Me, was an amusing collection of traditional
Irish songs and some of lead singer Shane
McGowan's vitriolic reflections of life in the Big
City, played with much gusto and a little expertise, but the new LP is an altogether more polished accomplishment. What could have prompted
such a rapid development, making the boys (and
one girl) one of the hottest acts in the UK and
attracting collaboration with such notables as
Elvis Costello and Alex ("Repo Man") Cox? My
only conclusion: it must be on account of The
Beard.
The Beard is a semi-legendary figure in England. A fanatical supporter of Aston Villa, The
Pogues and Richard Thompson, he is also a major source of material for CITR's own Folk Show.
Since March he has seen The Pogues on around
30 occasions, in venues as diverse as "The
Powerhouse" in Birmingham and the Vienna
Folk Festival. His affection for them may be due,
in part, to his infatuation for their manager's
daughter, but he is an expert on the seedy side
of life, so articulately described by Shane in many
of his songs. With such an auspicious advocate,
how could Costello and Cox ignore this band?
The album consists of 12 tracks, half of which
are originals. The opener, "Sick Bed of Cuchu-
lainn" (pronounced Kew-Cullern) could almost
have been written for The Beard himself and
describes the antics of a rabble-rouser, reflected
upon his deathbed. "The Old Main Drag" is a
moving account of the pitfalls awaiting a young
itinerant in a big city like London (very much the
Pogues' home town, despite their predominantly
Irish heritage). "The Wild Cats of Kilkenny" is
an entertaining instrumental and "A Man You
Don't Meet Every Day" is an interesting version
of the Tannahill Weavers' "Jock Stewart", sung
by the bass player, Cait ("Rocky") O'Riordan.
One of the outstanding cuts is "A Pair of
Brown Eyes", a fine song which has spawned a
weird video produced by Alex Cox. The eyes
appear in various amazing situations, depicting
the decay of Thatcher's Britain, inside a brown
paper bag. (Cox apparently asked Elvis to drop
his pants in a bizarre living-room scene, but was
refused.)
"Sally MacLennane" is another fine single,
and a stomping show-stopper too. "Dirty Old
Town", the old Dubliners song, is brilliantly
adapted into the Pogues' style and features
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magnificent Uillean pipes by Tommy Keane.
There are many other interesting moments on
Side Two, but the highlight is "And the Band
Played Waltzing Matilda", the Eric Bogle W.W. II
anti-war anthem featured in the movie "Gallipoli".
Shane's straining vocals adding so much feeling
that only the staunchest Socred could be unmoved by it.
The Pogues have certainly come of age. The
second LP is always a problem for any band, but
the Pogues (from the Gaelic "Pogue Mahone"
("Kiss My Arse") have set a wonderful precedent
here. Any lack of instrumental expertise is more
than compensated for by the addition of fiddle and
pipe players of the highest calibre, and Costello's
production is exemplary. I only wish a Canadian
label would exhibit the guts to release this LP
domestically. Nobody could inspire the current
folk revival more eloquently.
—Steve Edge
The Fall
This Nation's Saving
Grace Schtick
Beggars Banquet (UK)
AS I REACH FOR THE DOOR OF THE CON-
fessional booth, I take a deep breath and
close my eyes. I sit in black silence awaiting to
purge my sins and from the cathedral walls I hear
an opening hymn and I wait for the angels to
sing, but it never comes. I am feeling repentant
and I wish to cleanse my soul, but I am scorned
from the shadows from this hip priest. He
screams at the demons inside of my head, OUT,
OUT YOU BAD DEEDS! He jumps up out of
darkness and shakes my limbs and yells at me
to give up all material possessions. I quickly
throw down my watch, my wallet and my ring, he
chants, as if in Latin, an undecipherable thing.
I feel shaken and now he begins to tell me what
I need. His word is as if God himself had spoken.
He gently takes my money and makes me kneel.
I am waiting for a blessing and I softly kiss his
feet, with that he punts me into the corner and
again he jumps at me. I am spoilt, he preaches
and points at me, I huddle shaking under his
swaying shadow, too frightened to feel the wrath
he shall release. Instead, like a bolt of lightening, he drops to the floor and convulses with
demonic powers inside of him. His words are
broken and I know not what he speaks, but I feel
drugged by his reputation and I fall to sleep.
Soon I am awakened by a loud bang and he
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stands beating his Bible at his forehead urging
me to do the same. This is penance, I think to
myself, the pain is dull, but iniense, with each
blow I remove one sin. Stopping his punishment
he lowers his book and shows me a proud grin.
Opening his arms he sends my head spinning,
he welcomes me to my new house. We walk the
long halls and see dark things and sunlit rooms,
turns his head and begins to speak.
He tells me why and what he be and then with
a sigh I start to understand. Quietly he sneaks
out and leaves me to think. Suddenly he returns
with tea and begins to spin a yarn about his
previous lifetime, it is too intense not to believe
that it is nothing but the truth. He cites ancient
tongue and suddenly again he looks entranced,
turns and bows his head and heads for the door.
Muttering softly that he shall return, he hums
a farewell and turns into stone. I believe this holy
man will-return to restore faith in those who
scorn. He is a trap to tnose who venture, a passing glance will not entrance, but if you enter you
will never be let out.
The Fall have yet another album, but probably
not a hell of a lot of fans, except me.
—Paul Scholten •TO
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December 1985
WHILE READING BACK OVER THESE
demo tape and cassette reviews, I find
that I have a good opinion of most, if not all of
them. I suppose there are good months and bad
months, and I just happened to pick a good
month to review for Demo Derby. Well, sit back
and fasten your seat belts, here goes...
A Cast of Thousands
"Catch"
OKAY, I'll-be the first one to admit that I've always
liked A Cast of Thousands (previously Fear of
Falling, originally A Cast of Thousands). This
demo is well-produced material—it has some
good bass and guitar riffs in it. Unfortunately, the
band's second track, "Fear of Falling," had to
be repossessed for technical reasons. Anyhow,
after six demo tapes, A Cast of Thousands
should think of putting out some vinyl soon; they
have the ability and material at this point to produce a really good EP. What's that? A Cast of
Thousands nave changed their name again?...
The Business
"Separate Avenues"
THE BUSINESS is a four-piece band from New
York, and this demo is good for a first effort,
although the production is weak. The singer,
Anna Capasso, has a great voice, and is the moving force behind the band as she writes all the
words and music. "Separate Avenues" has the
sound of a perfect pop song—all it needs is a
stronger rhythm section and about two mintues
knocked off of the ending, as it tends to drag on
after a while.
The Subterraneans
"Tonight" "Hell is a Microwave"
"Garbagecan Boots"
THE BAND RECORDED this demo tape in five
hours one night, and they didn't do a bad job.
Musically, the band sounds like old Slow, especially "Hell is a Microwave," which is getting a fair
amount of airplay out here at CITR. This song
grew on me, but "Tonight" didn't fare so well.
Considering the lyrical, content of the song consists mostly of the word 'tonight,' it becomes
redundant after a while. My favourite off this
demo is "Garbagecan Boots." It's only 50
seconds long, and is a good parody of early
D.O.A., although I don't thing that D.O.A. could
play as fast as these guys, even when they were
younger.
Demo Derby
No Fun
"1984"
ONCE AGAIN, it appears that No Fun have outdone themselves. This cassette, which is available at your local record store, is as good as, if
not better than, the band's former releases. David
M and Paul Leahy combine their wit and musicianship, and though the final product may not
solve all the world's problems, it sure comes
close. Whether you like No Fun or not, this
cassette is definitely worth a listen, as it includes
songs like "Snog," "Paisley Brain Bolts of the
Mind," and there's even a "Tribute to No Fun."
"1984," overall, is a very enjoyable experience.
Fastbacks
"If You Want to Slow Down,
Step on the Gas"
AS THE TITLE SUGGESTS, this cassette is great
to drive to. It moves along and you move along
right with it. Although I've never really listened
to the Fastbacks for any length of time before,
I found this cassette a lot of fun—'high energy"
is the key phrase here. The Fastbacks, along with
some excellent original material, do a few covers,
including "Apologies," originally by the Pointed
Sticks, and Jefferson Airplane's "Somebody to
Love." Both the covers and originals are fantastic.
—Stacey Fruin
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*> COitUCfO/ff 4*&/rft
UNDERGROWTH '85
26 BAND 90 MIN. COMPILATION
COMP 90-1
ZULU RECORDS
V«ncouv»«, B.C. V6J 1M4
AVAILABLE SOON SHANGHAI DOG "THIS EVOLUTION" 12" L.P. U.G. 1304 DISCORDER
December 1985
ARMCHAIR EYE
- The Prisoner ~
Reflections on a Stupid Day
SOME THINGS ARE SO STUPID that they simply must be done: sitting on top of
a flagpole for several weeks for instance—riding a roller coaster for a month—walking
backward around the world-—jumping a rocket powered motorcycle across the Snake
River canyon—climbing a mountain because it's there. The list goes on. People can be imaginative beasts, particularly when they've got a lot of spare time on their hands.
Enter The Prisoner Marathon. All you need is one colour television set (it must be colour),
one VCR, one dead fish (optional), fifteen or so hours of uninterrupted spare time, the desire
to do something stupid yet memorable, and, of course, all seventeen episodes of the weirdo-
cosmie-surrealistic (i.e.: it defies description) 1960's British television series The Prisoner:
Unlike mountainclimbing, it's not physically dangerous (not even physically uncomfortable
if you've got the right chair). You can do it alone or in groups (though groups are recommended in the best interest of sanity).
What's it all about?
THE PRISONER IS the brainchild of actor
Patrtick McGoohan (he plays the title character, he directed and co-wrote some of the
episodes). It concerns the plight of an un-named
super-spy who, for apparent reasons of conscience and integrity, resigns from the British
Secret Service. He returns to his fashionable
London flat and is immediately gassed into unconsciousness by a strange looking man in black
tails and a top hat. When he wakes up again,
he's still in the same flat—or is he? Something
feels out of kilter. He looks out the window and
discovers it's a different world outside. And so
begins the Prisoner's adventure. It is dream-
scape? Drug-induced hallucination? Good ole
schizophrenia? All of the above? Or just another
planet?
The marathon begins
EPISODE ONE: THE ARRIVAL sets up the
general scenario, and introduces us to this
wonderful place called The Village, a funky-mod
(very sixties!) tourist-type resort where everybody
dresses in primary colours, and nobody has a
name (just a number). Everything has the brilliant, oddly un-natural look of a postcard. Folks
are friendly but vacant. Most of what they say
is utterly empty of conviction. They say, "Be
seeing you," a lot.
All, we quickly discover, are themselves prisoners or employees (convert or otherwise) of The
Village, which is, of course, not an adventure
holiday destination at all, but a wonderfully conceived illusion. It's a special prison for special
prisoners: ex-super-spys like our hero (whose
Village moniker is Number 6) and other more
normal folks who simply know (knew) too much.
Though there are no defined walls or barbed-
wire barriers, escape is extremely difficult if not
impossible. If Number 2 (the top bad guy who
runs The Village—and is played by a different
actor each episode) can't hold an inmate in by
messing with his mind or by sending some of
his thugs after him, he's always got Rover (I don't
know where the name comes from—I never
actually heard it in the run or the shows—but it
does appear to have stuck). Rover is a big white
blob which rises out of some kind of fluid and
stops escapees by smothering them. Sometimes
Rover kills, usually, it just knocks its victims out,
and they wake up back in their flats—still dreaming^) the same paranoid dream(?) that they've
been dreaming(?) ever since they arrived at The
Village.
Nevertheless, our hero, Number 6, does con-
"Where am I?"
"In The Village."
"What do you want?"
"Information"
"Whose side are you on?"
"That would be telling.
We want information...
Information."
"You won't get it."
"By hook or by crook we will."
tinually attempt to escape even as Number 2 and
his cronies (we're never clear as to who exactly
the bad guys are—Russians? Americans? Brits?
aliens? ourselves?) continually try to break him—
to find out why he resigned from the Secret Service, and everything else. What he knows must
be supremely important because the orders from
Number 1 ("Who is Number 1?") are always very
clear on one point: they can do whatever they
want with Number 6—drug him, beat him, confuse him, drive him insane—they just can't kill
him.
Creeping paranoia
IT'S ROUNDABOUT EPISODE #FIVE, Schizoid Man, that things get serious. Imagine
that someone (or something) wants to convince
you that you're not who you know you are, that
instead you're a hired imposter (one of the bad
guys) who happens to bear an uncanny resemblance to who it is that you think you are. Your
mission is to convince him that he isn't who he
claims he is—that he is not you, that you are you
(except, of course, you're not, because you're the
imposter). And yes, he actually does look and
act more like you than you do. You don't have
that mole on your wrist that was there a week
ago, yet he does. You're not right-handed anymore, which you were a week ago—but he is.
Schizoid Man is dangerous television. Suddenly The Prisoner isn't just this weird-trippy show
anymore. Suddenly you're noticing things like the
use of the color orange in the set design. What
does it mean? Some residents of the village wear
striped garments. Some wear pure colours. How
is this significant? Why do they call it The Village CITR fm 102 cab e 100
The Prisoner— Patrick McGoohan
anyway? Are they referring to Marshall McLuh-
an's theory of The Global Village (it was his
theory, wasn't it?), and if they are, what exactly
are they saying about it? Is this village a metaphor for the real world? Are we all prisoners
ourselves, stuck in a surreal prison from which
there is no escape, and in which, the powers that
be p/Vho is Number 1?") can and will go to any
extreme to break us, to destroy our spirit, to find
out what we know? What do we know?
"That's the stupidest thing I've ever heard,"
someone remarks. "It's just a weird TV show
made by a bunch of acid-heads in the sixties.
The special effects are cheezy, Patrick McGoo-
han's an egomaniac, and some of the concepts
are pretty trite. But it's still a lot of fun."
Things get fuzzy
FIVE HOURS LATER, episode ten, Checkmate is blurring past. This is the one where
chess has become the latest craze in The Village
(chess on a human scale with real people as
pieces). The marathon is well into its second half.
Happenings in The Village are getting reassuringly familiar in a consistently unpredictable way.
Number 6 hasn't escaped yet, but neither has
he been broken. Fact is, he appears to be getting stronger. Sure he's still in constant danger
of having his mind blown forever to pieces, but
at the same time, he's won a few small victories.
Like a virus, he grows more indestructable with
every new attempt to destroy him. You get the
feeling he's got this village figured out. Now, it's
all just a matter of time.
Things get fuzzier. Episode eleven Living in
Harmony doesn't even take place in The Village,
but in a bizarre little town (Harmony) in the
American West where Patrick McGoohan is the
marshal who won't carry a gun (marshal? Not
Marshall McLuhan again? How does Harmony fit
into it? Why are all the western accents slightly
British? Why are all the horses looking at me like
that? Fortunately, the brain is too soft by now to
explore this tangent any further).
By episode fifteen, The Girl Who Was Death,
an odd fluidity has settled into the goings-on.
Space-time has begun to bend. "Was this the
episode that began at the fitness circuit?"
"No, no, that was Change of Heart. This is
Who is No. 1?
w
the prisoner
All 17 episodes
Now on Video
SALES "=*"     RENTALS
1829 WEST 4TH AVE. AT BURRARD 734-0411
where he's following that woman in white who's
always trying to kill him, and each time he barely escapes," —and each time, it gets more ludicrous, until it hits Jerry Lewis-level slapstick—
but you're so fluid, you just continue to watch.
Until finally it ends
AND EVEN THOUGH you have a strong
hunch that it did all come together (grant-
ted, in a surreal way), you really couldn't explain
to anyone what it was all supposed to mean.
What is The Village? Who was Number 1? What
was Rover? Did Number 6 escape? Does it really matter?
What staged at exactly 1:00 p.m. one late October rainy Saturday is over at roundabout 5:00
a.m. the following rainy Sunday. You're seeing
cathode ray images and you're not even looking
at the TV set. It has been a very stupid day.
What does it all mean?
IT MEANS THAT TV as a medium, isn't a total
dud. Fact is, it's still quite young (an abused
but still hopeful child?). Hook a VCR up to it and
suddenly you've got some real control over what
comes out at you (PAUSE, REWIND, FAST FORWARD, EJECT). If you want to, you can, in one
sitting (or in as many as seventeen) watch all
seventeen episodes of arguably the best TV
series ever. No commercials. Just a five minute
break to stretch every hour. This is good.
In conclusion
REGARDLESS OF WHAT he might have
done before The Prisoner, or has done
since, Patrick McGoohan is a cool guy. Way
cooler than David Lee Roth.
Be seeing you.
—Bill Mullan DISCORDER
December 1985
fSpttfUst.. T°?3*
J\   R   T
T -T     X    T     I-   e LtKBCt-
KOKO TAYLOR
ARTISTS AGAINST APARTHEID
TOM WAITS
LOVE & ROCKETS
NOMEANSNO
SALEM 66
BIG AUDIO DYNAMITE
FELT
SHRIEKBACK
VARIOUS
U-MEN
ALIEN SEX FIEND
BRILLIANT ORANGE
KLAUS FLUORIDE
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KATE BUSH
GREEN ON RED
BROOK/ENO/LANOIS
Queen of the Blues
Sun City
Rain Dogs
Seventh Dream of Teen...
You Kill Me
A Ripping Spin
This is B.A.D.
Ignite the Seven Cannons
Oil and Gold
Shindig!
Stop Spinning
Maximum Security
Happy Man EP
Cha Cha Cha
One Pound Ninety-nine
If You Can't Please...
Visions of Excess
Hounds of Love
No Free Lunch
Hybrid
ALLIGATOR/WEA
CAPITOL
ISLAND/MCA
POLYGRAM
UNDERGROWTH
HOMESTEAD (US)
CBS
CHERRYRED (UK)
ISLAND/MCA
ZULUBIRD
HOMESTEAD'(US)
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ZULU
ALTERNTENTA (US)
BGRSBQT (UK)
SOMEBZR/CAPIT
CELLULOID (US)
CAPITOL
MERCURY (UK)
EG (UK)
cS^tiSf-   1&P4!*
i_ e      tApet
THEWOODENTOPS
It Will Come
ROUGHTRADE (UK)
THE HURT
Never
**DEMO**
ECHO & THE BUNNYMEN
Bring On The Dancing Horses
KOROVA (UK)
THE CRAMPS
Can Your Pussy Do The Dog?
BIGBEAT (UK)
FASTBACKS
Seven Days/Somebody...
**DEMO** (US)
THE SUBTERRANEANS
Hell is a Microwave
"DEMO**
THE BELGIANIQUES
Kansas/Follow the Crowd
**DEMO**
LOST DURANGOS
I've Seen the Rain/Visions
**DEMO**
ROBERT WYATT & SWAPO..
The Wind of Change/Namibia
ROUGHTRADE (UK)
SIOUXSIE & THE BANSHEES
Cities in Dust
POLYGRAM
SNAKEFINGER
I Gave Myself to You
UNDERGROWTH
FRANK FRINK 5
Sympathy for the Devil
**DEMO**
THE JESUS AND MARY CHAIN
Just Like Honey/Head
WEA (UK)
THE BILL OF RIGHTS
Surfrenzy/Urban Cowgoof
**DEMO**
THE DILETTANTES
Dunkel Augen/Theme
**DEMO**
DEATH COMET CREW
Scratching Galaxies/Dream
BGRSBQT (UK)
THE BLOW MONKEYS
Forbidden Fruit
RCA (UK)
CAST OF THOUSANDS
Fear of Falling/Catch
**DEMO**
PORCELAIN FOREHEAD
Mary Tie Your Mutant Down
**DEMO**
NICO
Waiting for the Man
AURA (UK)
FAST FORWARD NEW RELEASES
ARTIST
TITLE
LABEL
VARIOUS
Security
UNDERGROWTH
ANNEGILLIS
Aha
STEMR/
EMBRYO
With Yoruba Dun Dun Orch
SCHNEEBALL
JASPER TROUT
Pieces of Nothing
SUTURE
DIANA ROGERSONetal
The Inevitable Crystal
UNITED DAIRIES
Belle Scrodd Record
BLAIR PETRIE
Requested Music
INTERFERENCE
DAVID MOSS
Dense Band
MOERS
VARIOUS
Various Artists excerpts
FASTFUCK
CURRENT 93
Nature Unveiled
LAYLAH
CHRIS & COSEY
Techno Primitive (LIVE)
OFFTHEBOARD
c
OVMD-iia
-at MRU's tfflffl groins
*Sfkt* m* amjm* Jm ««   rmmi in the filed, of
mmfm wm forf r*ptd in JWknrf, Onym.*
>*«t9i»Ki mom coHoe, jw 9* to trfe t._..
*v frit t» shock uour body irlo doina who* it oVm'i
normcM db."
'I started a unique if fail business
from scratch fee years 090. My
wife helps. I do it all myself.* from p. 46
ween Damrak and Rokin Streets.
Before heading to a show many Amsterdamers
start the evening with a few tokes at a bar which
serves house specialties (usually Morroccan),
and for adventurous types, a varied selection
from around the world including Afghanistan and
Jamaica. These bars are not technically legal,
but the government allows them to flourish in
well-defined areas, sometimes called the hash
ghettoes. Hash is distributed throughout these
bars which range from intimate little Scandinavian-furnished coffee bars like Cafe Chocolada
serving space-cake (and offering concert videos
upstairs with big fluffy couches to flake out on),
to the more commercial hash-bars like the Bulldog (which boasts of being the biggest and the
best).
The most comfortable place to see a gig is the
Milky Way. It's an Amsterdam version of the Com-
C TR fm 102 cable 100
modore open every night and offering just about
the full gammut of fun. For a 10-guilder cover one
gets in and can explore galleries, a jazz bar, a
coffee house serving Bavarian Chocolate cake
(with a good gram in it) and the music stages
where a variety of good groups play every night...
very civilized. One night a great space-cake-
influenced play was staged, followed by a show
by the Fatal Flowers—tremendous. As part of
your own warm-up, you might include a few
rounds of kop-stotjes at a local bar. A shooter of
Genever and a glass of Heiny constitutes a kop-
stotje and since they're cheap ($2 Can.) and
beneficial they're recommended before any
escapade.
The Amsterdam scene offers quite a lot of
original music—at the forefront are Fatal Flowers,
Claw Boys Claw and Gruppo Sportivo. Fatal
Flowers are the most prolific, having risen to the
top within six months of their first live perfor
mance. After being signed to the Syndicate of
Melodies and WEA, they recorded their first mini-
album at London's Brittania Row studios with
Martin Cramer producing. The album's been
well-received for its guitar and flowers sound-
very psychedelic, very neat. Claw Boys Claw are
also neat—but draw their influence from neat
groups like Gun Club and Cramps. Released on
Hip Cat Records, Peter te Bos' vocals and John
Cameron's guitar stand out on their latest disk,
Now!
Amsterdam's the centre of Dutch music but
influences and the bands themselves are international in scope. Amsterdam provides a meeting
point for artists and musicians to come together,
so to speak. If you don't step on any dogshit, a
visit to the Dam can be fun...and stimulating. For
a good time Amsterdam is a good trip—in more
ways than one.
—Peter Burns
DISCORDER
is available
free at over 175 locations
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(Oakridge)
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Including UBC,
10 other campuses,
and all 20 Vancouver public libraries. DISCORDER
December 1985
The Roving Ear J? I
This month from Amsterdam...
WHEN I WAS TWELVE and in a small
Dutch school in a small Dutch village, some of my first impressions
of Amsterdam were formed in Master Kruezer's
geschiedenis (history) class. He told us that the
Canadian troops had liberated the battered city
and that act had liberated the whole country.
Master Kruezer then added that Holland was very
indebted to the Canadians for their liberation.
Sometime later (being the only Canuck in the
school) I would be out in the schoolyard reminding one or two girls from class of their debt to
Canadians and demanding some sort of payment. Ten years later and the strategy hasn't
changed much.
As a student of the seventh form, however, trips
into Amsterdam were limited to those with the
school and village soccer teams. The school
team's captain, Hans Groenteman, would usually
call a vote in our changing room at halftime. If
the team was being soundly beaten we'd decide
whether to take off to the few bars on Amsterdam's southside which served beer to twelve-
and thirteen-year-olds. The team puffed away on
a few shared cigarettes and voted, and with a
few ja's we were off, sneaking past the supervising teacher and running down the street to
catch tram #9, that which took us almost kitty-
corner to De Spaanse Ruiter bar and bistro (sic).
Today there is no supervising teacher—just
one's conscience, but that shouldn't stop anyone
from enjoying what Amsterdam has to offer...at
least most of it. Amsterdam has had a lengthy
reputation as Europe's most liberal city...a lot of
stuff is common here which in other locales (including the rest of Holland) would be considered
highly illegal (drugs, prostitution, gambling, bowling parties). The Dutch have taken the rather
unique approach of allowing certain activities in
areas of the larger cities like Rotterdam and
Amsterdam, and controlling activities within
those areas...thus, for example, Morroccan hash
ish is sold in these areas for less than ten guilders a gram (five dollars Canadian), and Amsterdam has become a major adult playground of
Europe's youth. Holland is quite multi-cultural to
begin with (significant Indonesian and Surinamer
populations) but Amsterdam in particular boasts
large German, Italian, Turkish and Anglo populations. The city is one of the most diverse and
cosmopolitan in the world and every Amsterdam-
er speaks one other language and a great many
speak three languages fluently. The drawing
cards for European youth are sex and drugs—
which of course goes well with liberal doses of
good music—and Amsterdam can certainly provide music.
Although Amsterdam doesn't have a CITR, it
does have significant forms of alternative radio.
Amsterdam's (and Holland's) radio waves are
controlled by the government, which offers the
commercial pop of Nederland 3 and a television
program on Wednesday nights called Avro's Top
Pop. Nederland 3 does offer transmissions of
John Peel's eclectic BBC program on Friday
nights, but for the most part state radio is staid
and uninteresting. For more revolutionary stuff,
Amsterdam's pirate radio stations are great—the
government is constantly searching for their
transmission stations in efforts to close them
down—and it's kind of fun listening to the cat and
mouse game on the airwaves as transmitters are
closed and new ones pop up on a weekly basis.
Some of the interesting stations re-surfacing and
submerging are Unique FM, Radio Decibel,
Radio Sjuul, Radio GOT, Radio X and Radio
Twist. They play varied and interesting sets—
from the Cramps and Gun Club to local giants
Fatal Flowers, Claw Boys Claw, Highway Chile
and the Plastic Dolls.
The clubs are varied and exciting with the
Paridiso and the Milky Way offering the hottest
groups. One week the Milky Way offered the
Smiths on a Tuesday night, while the same evening the Cure played the Concertgebouw. In the
same week, Echo and his Bunnies played at the
Paridiso supported by local faves Claw Boys
Claw. The scene in Amsterdam also offers significant warm-ups for those so inclined. By warm-
ups I'm referring to the many hash bars and
cafes which are littered throughout the area bet-
cont. p. 45
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admi»»ion p«r p«rton   $20.00 advance tix
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