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 APOLLO GHOST
CARIBOU/BABE RAINBOW/
RYAN WALTER WAGNER / THE NEW
P0RN06RAPHERS/SXSW/
B;SO« B.C./HOW TO BE A DIPT. 2 lor. fr^e for station
212 Productions Ltd
454 W Cordova St.
604-685-2426
Antisocial
Skateboard Shop
2337 Main St.
604-708-5678
Audiopile
2016 Commercial Dr.
604-253-7453
Band Merch Canada
www. ba ndmerch .ca
Banyen Books
3608 W 4th Ave.
604-732-7912
Baru Cafe
2535 Alma St.
604-222-9171
Beatstreet Records
439 W Hastings St.
604-6S^3344
The Bike Kitchen
6138 Student Union
Blvd.
604-822-BIKE
Blim
197 E 17th Ave.
604-872-8180
Bonerattle Music Ltd
2012 Commercial Dr.
604-251-BONE
Devil May Wear
198 E 21st Ave.
604-216-2515
Dream Apparel +
Articles for People
311 W Cordova St.
604-683-7326
The Eatery
3431 W Broadway
604-738-5298
The Fall Tattooing
644 Seymour St.
604-676-3066
Flaming Angels
Boutique
644 Seymour St.
604-68^-3224
Fresh is Best Salsa
&Co
2972 W Broadway
778-737-2442
Grind house Video
2911 W 4th Ave.
604-734-7463
Gumdrops
2029 W 4th Ave.
604-733-1037
Hart and Sole
Clothing Inc
843 Granville St.
604-630-9151
Highlife Records
1317 Commreeial Dr.
604-251-6964
Hitz Boutique
316 W Cordova St.
604-662-3334
The Kiss Store
2512 Watson St.
604-675-9972
Lucky's Comics
3972 Main St.
604-875-9858
Pacific
Cinematheque
1131 Howe St.
604-6$S-8202
People's Co-op
Bookstore
1391 Commercial Dr.
604-253-6422
Prussin Music
3607 W Broadway
604-736-3036
Red Cat Records
Spank Shoes
4332 Main St.
1181 Commercial Dr.
604-708-9422
604-568-1229
&
2066 W 4th Ave.
The Regional
Assembly of Text
604-677-3583
3934 Main St.
604-877-2247
Thriller
Royce Clothing
3467 Main St.
and Shoes
604-736-5651
2817 W Broadway
604-731-4474
True Value Vintage
710Robson St.
R/X Comics
604-685-5403
2418 Main St.
604-454-5099
Twigg & Hottie
3671 Main St.
Rufus' Guitar Shop
604-879-8595
2621 Alma St.
604-222-1717
Vinyl Records
Scratch Records
726 Richards St.
319 W Hastings St.
604-488-1234
604-687-6355
The Wallflower
Spank Clothing
Modern Diner
1027 Commercial Dr.
2420 Main St.
604-255-1131
&
856 Granville St.
604-568-7554
Woo Vintage
604-677-3202
Clothing
&
321 Cambie St.
2082 W 4th Ave.
604-687-8200
778-371-1305
AFriends of QTR Carcl scores
you sweet deals at Vancouver's
finest small merchants and
supports QTR 101.9 FM.
Show it when you shop!
citr.ca  EDITOR
Jordie Yoiv
ART DIRECTOR
Lindsey Hampton
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Debby Reis
COPY EDITORS
Alison Atkinson, Liz Brant, Debby
Reis, Mine'Salkin
AD MANAGER
David Stansfield
UNDER REVIEW EDITOR
Mine'Salkin
RLA EDITOR
Steve Louie
WEB EDITOR
Reilly Wood
INTERN
Susanne Dewein
CALENDAR LISTINGS
Debby Reis
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
Corey Ratch
PROGRAM GUIDE
Bryce Dunn, Debby Reis
OFFICIAL TWEETERS
Maeaan Thomas, Debby Reis
CiTR STATION MANA6ER
Brenda Granau
PUBLISHER
Student Radio Society of UBC
COVER
Ryan Walter Wagner
EDITOR'S MOTE
Dear Discorder:
With spring just around the comer, this is time to
make plans for summ|ft*Tfiis is the time of year when
all the planning for local festivals and concerts are happening and I have a challenge for them. Ov&j&e last few
years members of Discorder and CiTR have been playing
a number of friendly softball games against groups like
Megaphone, Adbusters and CBC Radio 3. This year we
would like to extend the challenge to the entire Vancouver
music community. This is a personal challenge, butftis;^';
behalf of Discorder and CiTR. We challenge all members of.,
the Vancouver music community to defeat us in a game of
softball. For sake of simplicity we'll steal the league rules
from the Vancouver Recreational Softball League. Email me
ateditor.discorder@gmail.com to accept the challenge and
arrange a game over the course of the summer. It's just for
fun, but I have to warn you that we'll probably crush you
mercilessly and then rub it in your faces... in print.
Now, getting back to this issue: We've got some of
Vancouver's heaviest hitters talking to us: Carl Newman
from the New Pornographers dropped Dan Fumano a line
to chat about his new album on page 14, James Farwell
from Bison B.C., who's music is heavy in a different sense
of the word, discusses the maturation of their music with
Scott Lyon on page 18, Polaris award winner Dan Snaith
of Caribou talked with our Jackie Wong about his newest
endeavour on page 12, Sancho McCann met with some
of Vancouver's best promoters to work out how you can
get your start as a DJ on page 38 and you can find one of
Vancouver's best live bands, the Apollo Ghosts, gracing
our cover this month and on page 8.
Have a good month and I hope to be facing you on the
diamond soon.
Cheers,
Jordie Yow
CHECK OUfOUR WEBSITE!
DISCORDER.CA IS HOME TO LOADS OF EXCLUSIVE CONTENT YOU CAN'T FIND
IN THE PRINT ISSUE OF THE MAGAZINE, LIKE EXTRA FEATURES AffB REVIEWS.
CHECK DISCORDER.CA REGULARLY FOR NEW ARTICLES, PHOTOS AID ALL
THINGS MUSIC RELATED!
MAY
WRITERS
Sarah Berman, Kathryn Boothroyd, Nathaniel Bryce, Slavko Bucifal, Sarah Charrouf, Dan Fumano, Brenda
Grunau, Andy Hudson, Scott Lyon, DougMacKenzie, Miranda Martini, Sancho McCann, Dorothy Neufeld,
Mind Salkin, Craig Turney, Jackie Wong, Angela Yen, Jordie Yow
PHOTOGRAPHERS & ILLUSTRATORS
Merida Anderson, Tyler Crich, Bev Davies, Robert Fougere, Marlis Funk, Mike Irvine, Tamara Lee, Duncan
McHugh, TJ Reynolds, Ehren Salazar, Shaun Stander, Ryan Walter Wagner
PROOFREADERS
Susanne Dewein, Steve Devereux, Simon Foreman, Steve Louie, Debby Reis, Alec J. Ross
©Discorder 2010 by the Student Radio Society of the
University of British Columbia. All rights reserved.
Circulation 8,000. Discorder is published 11 times a
year by CiTR, which can be heard at 101.9 FM, online
at www.citr.ca, as well as through all major cable
systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White
Rock. Call the CiTRDJ line at (604) 822-2487, CiTR's
office at (604) 822-3017, email CiTR at CitrMgr®
ams.ubc.ca, or pick up a pen and write #233-6138
SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T1Z1, Canada.
CONTRIBUTE.
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illustrations, please
contact:
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SUBSCRIBE.
Send in a cheque for
$20 to #233-6138 SUB
Blvd., Vancouver, B.C.,
V6T1Z1 with your
address, and we will
mail you a years worth
ofDiscorders to your
door.
ADVERTISE.
Ad space is available
for upcoming
issues and can be
booked by calling
(604) 341-7591 or
emailing promotions.
discorder@gmail.com.
Rates are available
upon request.
DISTRIBUTE.
To distribute Discorder
in your business, email
distro.discorder@
gmail.com. We are
always looking for new
friends. TABLE OF CONTENTS // MAY 2010 // DISCORDER.CA
IN LOVING MEMORY OF
-Devon ClijjFord-
1979-2010
PHOTO BY RYAN WALTER WAGNER
J] 08/APOLLO GHOSTS
"** In this article you will read about: the Divine Prophet, a wrestler; locations;
Imm tacos; Chris-a-Riffic, a musician; Loki, a cat; identity and performance,
B10/BABE RAINBOW
^Qte Cam Reed has embarked on a musical journey as Babe Rainbow. He spoke to
AsJwl us about it and his pants. We wish him all the best in his quest
^12/ CARIBOU
**®**^ A profile of the enigmatic award-winning musician to parallel the release of
his new album, Swim.
14/THENEWP0RN0GRAPHERS
Carl Newman talks to us about his band's new album Together. He also talks
about how cool we are. No, it's true he actually does. We're as shocked as you.
We didn't pay him to do it or anything.
18/BISON B.C.
The hairy metal band has evolved beyond songs about aliens from outer space
and wizards and has begun to sing about reality and the DTES. James Farwell
took some time off on the road to discuss things with us.
34 /SXSW
A recounting of the highlights of one of North America's biggest and most
important music festivals from the eyes of our publisher.
38/H0WT0BEADJPT.2
Wanna be a DJ? Get Free drinks? Party all night? Be known for laying down
the phattest beats and the freshest mixes? Well take a look at the second and
final article in our two part series and begin your journey into the world of
record spinning.
06/TEXTUALLY ACTIVE
Appetite/or Self Destruction by Steve Knopper
07/VENEWS
*/% The ANZA / Malice Liveit
g 25 /ART PROJECT
I Art by Ryan Walter Wagner of Tight Solid, the WPP and Nurse
=> 20 /CALENDAR
ft 1
»»»# Art by Mike Irvine
LjJI
he: 22/ PROGRAM GUIDE
16/FILM STRIPPED
Bloodied But Unbowed
39 /CHARTS
|228/UNDER REVIEW
2§1P* Ryan Bourne / Ron Contour & Factor / Delhi 2 Dublin / Goldfrapp / Gorillaz /
Inhabitants / The Jessica Stewart Few / Liars / Plants & Animals / Young Rival
•31 / REAL LIVE ACTION
«m Apollo Ghosts / Fake Jazz Festival / International Record Store Day / Pierced
1 Arrows / Scatterheart / You Say Party! We Say Die! TEXTUALLY ACTIVE //
APPETITE FOR SELF-DESTRUCTION:
THE SPECTACULAR CRASH OF THE
RECORD INDUSTRY IN THE DIGITAL AGE
Sojt Skull Press 2010 (sojtcouer)
BY STEVE KNOPPER
REVIEW BY ANDY HUDSON
This is a journalist's indictment of the record industry in hard-
boiled style: the sorry, twisted tale of how big music took a big
fall at the end of the '84-'gp CD boom.
Author Steve Knopper, who now freelances for the likes of
Spin, Wired and Rolling Stone, fittingly got his start writing
obituaries. This colourful obit takes him deep into the dark hearts of CBS
Records, Sony, Warner and Universal Music, labels where the top brass were
too moneyed, too lawyered or too afraid to kick their core business of selling
shiny plastic discs.
In the course of seven, character-driven chapters, Knopper lists off eight
bullets that sent the industry spinning: the CD "longbox," pay-for-play radio,
wiping out digital audio tapes and killing the single, the RIAA lawsuits, the
Sony BMG Rootkit and whiffing on their own plan to sell music digitally before
the advent of iTunes.
It's no wonder that HBO has optioned the rights to make this book into a
feature-length film. Knopper himself suggested something along the lines of
Booflie Nights, a good match given that both star the Internet in a killing role and
feature a cast of characters who appear larger than life. Walter Yetnikoff, the
CBS Records man responsible for the success of Michael Jackson's "Thriller,"
enters the book as a "coke-addled, fast-living, bomb-throwing, disrespectful
provocateur." Tom Freston, "one of the brain trust of frustrated and slumming
music-business types," who created MTV, gets a typical summing up as "an
advertising executive who'd worked on the G.I. Joe account before fleeing the
toy business to hike through the Sahara with a girlfriend, then landed in Asia
to run a fabric-export company."
Not only HBO producers, but also music and business critics have praised
this book, usually with the one holdout that it sometimes reads like a cartoon.
I think it's fair to say Knopper sides a bit with his supporting cast, underlings
like the nuclear physicist and audiophile James T. Russell, a guy who unsuccessfully tried to shop around a prototype CD player that he single-handedly built
in 1965 after learning that vinyl records will scratch and hiss even if you play
them with a cactus needle. Knopper does set up a good guy/bad guy dynamic
Sel/-DMtructio»
The Spectacular Crash of the Record Industry
in the digital Age
Steve Knopper
where young, penniless programmers—the Fraunhofer team who first coded
MP3 files and or even Napster's Shawn Fanning—get nowhere when they try
warning or working with big music labels to prevent their impending online
doom. On the other hand, Knopper seems to share some sympathy with the
label execs who feel that Steve Jobs cut them a hard deal when he gave them
just 67 cents per track sold on iTunes.
If it's a bit cartoony, the pages of Appetite/or SelJ-Destrurtion flip faster than
the NanaMouskouri section in the Sally Anne. And it's not every label exec who
comes off looking like Sony's $io-million-in-yearly-expenses Tommy Mottola.
One of Knopper's best chapters reads like an ant versus grasshopper fable
between the two champions of the 1998-2001 teen pop bubble: Backstreet Boys
producer Clive Calder, who smartly retired his family to the Cayman Islands
after keeping his own costs low, and Backstreet Boys creator Lou Pearlman,
who now lives in jail after losing 'N Sync and getting caught racketeering.
Like a good investigative reporter, Knopper follows the money trail, detailing how labels continued to deduct vinyl-era "packaging" fees from artist's CD
royalties, illustrating how Walmart and Best Buy were allowed to take over 65
per cent of U.S. music sales, and showing righteous anger over how the labels
managed to fix CD prices at more than double the average $8.99 cost of a vinyl
LP, even when they were several times cheaper to produce.
After all the bad deals and worse music the big labels made, the final chapter
ends by pointing to a more positive future. Radiohead's pay-what-you-can In
Rainbows release gets a mention, as does Madonna's break with labels in favour
of a touring company. Knopper sides with Wired editor Chris Anderson's "Long
Tail" vision, where consumers quit collecting songs and instead subscribe to
unlimited back catalogs.
The best quote on the music industry's future comes from Mark Williams,
a long-time A&Rrep at Interscope Records. "It's going to be like in the '50s
and '60s when you had hundreds and hundreds of small labels," he said. "It's
going to be a lot of trial and error. None of us know whether it'll work right.
I laugh when people say, 'We're going to try to fix it.' They can try, but there's
no real answer. If s over. It's just done." fc VENEWS //
that better every day m«p2ine jrom CiTR 101.9Jin
ADVERTISE WITH DISCORDER. WE'LL TREAT YOU REAL NICE AND 6IVE YOU
DAMN GOOD DEAL
YOU CAN ADVERTISE WITH BOTH CiTR AND DISCORDER AND GET A DISCOUNT.
WEB ADS OK OUR BRAND NEW SITE ALSO AVAIUBU.
THEANZA CELEBRATES 75 YEARS
Congratulations to the Australia-New Zealand Association club on existing for
75 years! The down under club located at 3 West 8th Avenue has been serving
beer since 193 5. To put that in perspective that is approximately as long as canned
beer has existed, which was invented the same year. Over their 75 years the
ANZA Club has evolved from a place for expats from the southern hemisphere
to drink, to a hub of independent culture. It is the home of Psych night, the Celluloid Social Club, numerous concerts and a place where you can buy Vegemite
from a vending machine. Hope they have another 75 years in them!
MALICE UVEIT QUITS THE RICKSHAW
In a note to members of the Rickshaw Theatre Facebook group, Malice Liveit,
longtime promoter and organizer, announced that he would no longer be
working with the Rickshaw or promoting shows.
"I will be taking a break from promotion for a while and I will no longer
be doing shows or be associated with the Rickshaw at all," he wrote on April
22 after giving props to many venues in town that will be having shows the
upcoming weekend. Though he did notexplicidy mention the death ofYou Say
Party! We Say Die!'s drummer Devon Clifford, he did mention that the April 16
show where the drummer collapsed was his last show.
Liveit was a powerhouse in Vancouver's music community who previously
ran the Sweatshop. His announcement acknowledged all the artists and musicians in Vancouver, who he had utmost respect for. "We have some amazing
musicians and artists that put themselves out there," wrote Liveit. "They stand
up and follow their passions no matter what the cost"
The Rickshaw will presumably continue to be run by Iiveits partner Dave Duprey. p
CONTACT OU
PROMOTIONS.*
COM
ifeV^V*^ with guests
May£* St James Hall
Moy 9, Vogue Theafre
www.amseventsubc.com
Happy
We are proud of yoi
Love,
Mom, Dad, Nana, prandpa and Julie ITTDC APOLLO GHOSTS
BY JORDIE YOW
ILLUSTRATION BY TYLER CRICH
f**|M,°*| he Divine Prophet is a friend of the Apollo Ghosts from Nanaimo.
He is also a wrestler who casts himself as a deranged preacher
and performs in the Extreme Canadian Championship Wresding
league battling the likes of "The Loose Cannon" Kenny Lush,
„«A«W       Fast Freddy Funk, Beautiful Bruce and the Mayor. ("You can't
fight city hall!" yelled out Ghosts' singer and guitarist Adrian Teacher, after
mentioning the Mayor.)
As the interview meandered over tacos in the Apollo Ghosts jamspace next
to JC/DC studios in Gastown, we arrived upon the topic of "wrassling" (what
the Ghosts call wresding). I know that the Apollo Ghosts like wresding because
sometimes when they perform, the Divine Prophet often leaps onto the stage.
He's a well-muscled, long-haired wresder. They shot a wresding themed video
for "Angel Acres" featuring the Ghosts battling the Divine Prophet and Man-
ther. There's a good out-take floating around in which Chris-A-Riffic (the big
Nordic piano player and radio DJ with a high excited voice from Bible Belts,
CiTR's Parts Unknown, and most concerts in Vancouver) gets bodyslammed.
Amanda Panda, Adrian Teacher and Jay Oliver (not their real names, not even
Jay Oliver) are fans of the small Vancouver-based league and all the pageantry,
violence and drama that comes with it.
"I suggest going to a tables, ladders and chairs match," said Oliver.
8 M
KIND OF ME M PUFFERFISH,
f-
"Unless you don't like blood. Then I wouldn't recommend going," added Panda.
Though they're clearly fans of the sport itself, it's the colourful identities
that really get them excited.
"Kenny Lush kissed a baby!" Panda recalled excitedly from one match she
witnessed. Lush had literally played out his role of the "babyface" in matches.
The term is used in wrestling to describe a hero or classic good guy who
doesn't break the rules (the Divine Prophet plays the polar opposite of the
babyface, the heel).
Though the Ghosts' own performances don't get quite as dramatic as a
professional wrestling match, you can see a love of the dramatic costumes
and posturing in their live set. At the release party for their album Mount
Benson that was held at Little Mountain, Oliver played bass while wearing a
Mexican wresding mask, Panda beat the drums wearing a disco ball-eyed sea
monster hood and Teacher was decked out in a pirate hat while he pretty much
controlled the room.
Though the other members play their own roles, Teacher especially is a
performer. He is a force on the stage. If s an all-eyes-on-me performance and
it shows. He starts every song with a quip or story before bursting out an exuberant performance that is a whirlwind of rock and roll bravado that features
shouting, witty stage banter and a close physical performance that usually
includes a lot of crowd surfing.
Offstage, though, Teacher is the opposite. He's a mild-mannered school
teacher, a nice guy who cracks a joke now and then and laughs easily. Put him
in a full room and he'd prefer to quietly talk to a few people, unlike the commanding performer who appears on stage.
"I certainly wish I could be the person I am on stage,'" said Teacher. "Normally I'm shy and quiet around most people and in most situations. I'd say I'm
pretty socially awkward in a lot of ways. Being on stage is different, though. It's
not that I'm comfortable there—I fuck up a lot and forget lyrics and chords—but
I just feel confident and a bit ridiculous. Kind of like a pufferfish."
One time, I was riding in Chris-A-RiffiCs car, and he played me a tape of
his show, Parts Unknown. On it, a band called Lala played. Lala was a French-
Canadian band, and also a joke band, fronted by Teacher under the name
of P'tit Jean and backed by his three sisters, Marie-Michele, Marie-May and
Marie-Marie (a.k.a Amanda Panda). They were a jovial Acadian folk troupe
playing off of every stereotype imaginable through a thick thick accent It was
hilarious, but it wasn't real.
In the way that Lady Gaga, Bob Dylan and Prince aren't real, neither are
Adrian Teacher and the Apollo Ghosts. Just as the Divine Prophet is not really
the deranged villain he portrays, the Ghosts are not their stage personas.
Sitting in their jamspace and petting the floor's shared cat, Loki (made
famous by Neko Case in a picture on Pitchfork), they bring out the other side
of their personalities.
"A lot of the songs on Mount Benson were written while [Teacher] was in the
bathroom," Panda joked, when Teacher went to the bathroom. With Adrian
out of the room, Oliver would reveal a bass line, Panda would join in with a
beat and Teacher would rush back into the room shouting, "Keep doing that!"
and join in.
The band makes a point of seperating the other facets of their lives from
their work as a band.
"I like to keep my lives compartmentalized," said Oliver, which got Teacher
to voice his agreement.
Teacher is in fact a teacher. He tries not to let his students know he also
fronts a band, though as the Ghosts become more well known, he finds it
harder to keep the secret (a note to any of his students who read this: keep it
a secret, shhh!).
"I think in a few years we might see a few of [my students] coming out
to shows," he said, though he seemed conflicted about whether this was a
good thing.
Teacher's moniker originates from his time in South Korea when he and
Panda were teaching English to young children. Korea is also where he and
Panda played in their first band together, the Omokgyo Dragons.
Omokyo is the neighbourhood they lived in and is a good example of the
use of location in the band's songs. Their first album Hastings-Sunrise is named
for the Vancouver neighbourhood they live in, and Mount Benson is named for
the mountain in Nanaimo (Panda and Teacher both grew up on Vancouver
Island). Their songs are dotted with references to other places where they have
spent time: "Shanghai Alley" is in Vancouver's Chinatown and "Witchcraft
Lake" is near ML Benson.
Though the other members weren't sure why so much of their material
was about specific places, Panda mentioned that "if s a good way of situating
something in a particular time and place."
Their music, while fun, feels personal and one gets the impression they
are about significant moments in their lives. The lyrics can be listened to, but
not read because Teacher likes to "leave a bit of mystery" for the audience.
Though the songs do, for the most part, have personal meanings to the band,
they don't care if the audience interprets things differendy.
"If people get something else out of a song [than what I intended] thafs
great," said Teacher. The content of their personal lives may make up the meat
of their song lyrics, but the front they put on on stage lets them keep some
distance from their audience. Semi-professional wrestlers, musicians and all
performers have two lives at the same time: public and private. The Ghosts'
consciousness of this may be the key to their brilliance. |.  BY DOROTHY NEUFELD
PHOTO BY ROBERT FOUGERE
CAMERON REED IS PERHAPS BEST KNOWN IN VANCOUVER FOR HIS WORK WITH MUSIC
WASTE AND ONLY MAGAZINE, BUT HE IS ALSO BABE RAINBOW, A DJ RECENTLY SIGNED
TO WARP RECORDS, DISCORDER SAT DOWN WITH HIM TO TALK ABOUT DISCORDANCIES
AND SOME HIDEOUSLY AWESOME PANTS,
Discorder: How would you describe your music?
Cameron Reed: I don't know, I would just call my music dark.
D: How would you say your music reflects your personality?
CR: I've generally been into the things that are more, you know, strange or
obscure or experimental. Personally, I don't know. It's driving. I guess I've never
thought about it like that before. I guess if you met me in person you wouldn't
expect me to make the music that I make. I'm a pretty laid back guy, but I'm
totally aware my music is anything but. It's pretty urgent and ominous, creepy.
I wouldn't call myself creepy. I don't know. Maybe if s the opposite, maybe if s
kind of one of those things where an artist kind of expresses the things he can't
... in the everyday. I don't know how much of a dark side there is to me.
D: What's the story behind your name?
CR: The name, I kind of, you know, came of age with music during sort of post-
hard core years, you know a lot of Blood Brothers, a lot of stuff on Killrockstars,
a lot of that sort of post-, you know, early 'oos/late '90s hardcore. And a lot of
those bands and the second wave of bands had kind of, I always thought, silly
names, but also fun and clever at the same time. The kind of names that pull
two seemingly opposite words together and it would make a catchy name. I
don't know, my best friends all used to play in a band called Raking Bombs,
which also kinda sounds strange, but also gives you a very visceral image in your
mind. Or Twin Crystals is another local band, two words that are seemingly
different but you know when brought together bring an interesting image. I
always thought that was kind of funny and Babe Rainbow is actually a painting
by a pop artist named Peter Blake who was popular during the first wave of
pop-art, and I remember seeing that painting. I was in college and I thought
like, "Oh thafs funny, Babe Rainbow... it's a lot like those, you know other
post-hardcore band names." I always thought that it would be funny to name
something like that but uh, you know, I didn't have the opportunity. I was already
playing in a band called Hot Loins which is I guess another one of those band
names where you pull two things together and make a ridiculous band name
out of it. And then when this Babe Rainbow project came about, I realized that
I needed a name, and I think I went through a handful of names before I was
like, "Ah, screw it, I'll just go with the one I thought was funny."
D: That's awesome
CR: Kind of an accident you know. People seem to like it and I like the disparity
between the sound of the music and the way the actual namemakes you feel.
D: I like the way it feels like dub in some ways...
CR: Yeah absolutely. I mean, it's funny because I'd say it's kind of a push and
pull. I'm very much inspired by dub, by just dub music proper. But I'm definitely
using some elements of dubstep, but I don't really feel like I'm making either
style of music. I'm not saying that I'm making something wholly original or
different. But you know, I'm certainly drawing inspiration from both styles
of music.
D: How did this all start?
CR: I think the music itself is a sound that I've been wanting, you know, drony
music. Oftentimes the sound from the song that I've liked most from an album
is usually dissonant. A friend of mine gave me copy of Ableton Live and I just
ended up playing around with it. I had a MIDI controller and I had the ability
to do it all on a computer. More than anything, I had decided I was tired of
being a perfectionist and waiting too long to record.
D: What are you listening to right now?
CR: I've been really into the new Caribou album and the new Four Tet album.
A guy thafs on Warp Records as well just released his first album with Warp,
his name is Gonjasufi. It's really an amazing kind of amalgamation of so
many different styles of music. It's incredible. It's super refreshing because
often you see people try to really do all styles of music at once. And I just like
the freedom of, you know... it'll be whatever I want. It's my voice. You know
if s the voice and the production that brings you in. It's not the style at all.
So yeah he's been amazing. I'm working on a remix of his right now. I think
its one of the new singles, "Holidays." It's a fantastic song. So yeah, I always
pick up new stuff. I'm always downloading, you know, the new rap track come
out. I'm a bit of junkie for following rap blogs, so I always have whatever new
single is out for that
D: What would you say your worst fashion secret is?
CR: Well I'm not too ashamed of them, but everyone that sees them feels
that I should be. I have an awesome pair of Zooba pants, do you know what
those are?
D: Nope
CR: They look like Golds Gym pants, and they're zebra print, and they're yellow and orange and they have a big Canucks logo on them. I'm pretty proud
of them but people don't seem to like them.
D: Any future plans?
CR: I'm talking to the label about another EP. I'm trying to get together a few
collaborations with a few rappers which I'm really excited about. I got another
video coming out by a couple awesome production teams all collaborating on
it that I'm really psyched about Pve been asked if I want to do a piece for an
art opening in New York or something and the details are being worked out
right now. Yeah, just always producing, always making music, fc
11 DAN SNAITH: TINKERER, SCHOLAR, INNOVATOR, GENTLEMAN
BY JACKIE WONG
ILLUSTRATION BY EHREN SALAZAR
It was 8 p.m. on a Wednesday night in London, England, and the phone
rang five times as Dan Snaith rushed across the room to pick up the
receiver. He's just come home from a day of rehearsal in the studio, and
he's a little out of breath. "Hey, how are you?" he asked, even though
I was the one bothering him for an interview.
But Snaith is as generously kind as he is willing to expound passionately
about his musical career as the frontman and visionary for Caribou, an infectiously lush electronic outfit with roots in Snaith's hometown of Dundas,
Ontario. Snaith has performed as Caribou since 2004, when he changed his
name from Manitoba after backing down from a name-related lawsuit with
Richard "Handsome Dick" Manitoba, an American punk musician and lead
singer of the Dictators.
Snaith relocated to London in 2001 to start his PhD in mathematics at Imperial College London, which ended with the completion of his thesis, titled
Over convergent Siegel Modular Symbols, in 2005. "I loved studying mathematics.
I loved being very in depth in this kind of arcane thing, just for the sake of the
enjoyment of doing it" Snaith said. During his first four years in London, Snaith
divided his time between his studies and a burgeoning musical career that
started with the release of 2000's Start Breaking My Heart, an erudite collection
of nostalgic pieces that evoke Snaith's small-town childhood of the 1980s. "I
really can't imagine how I did both for so long, for five years," he admitted. "I
mean, mathematical research, if s just such a competitive discipline... It really
is kind of, 'You have to learn more than anybody else in order to understand the
problems and to be able to solve things.' It's exhausting, and it's particularly
exhausting if you want to do anything else."
Snaith wanted to play music, even though his scholastic pursuits followed
in the footsteps of his mother and father, both academics. "It's what I wanted
to do since I can remember wanting to do anything," he said.
While he's now left his academic career in the past, Snaith attacks his
music with the cerebral precision and veracity of any serious mathematician. A
12 perpetual tinkerer, he experiments constancy with sound, texture, and rhythm,
listening obsessively to the nuances of a wide-ranging music collection. A
live set will see him enthusiastically jumping from drum kit to microphone
to children's toy instruments and back, often to the backdrop of psychedelic
videography put together by friends.
Snaith's persistent thirst for innovation makes for a highly diverse and
prolific career thafs now spanned a decade. His album Andorra won the Polaris
Music Prize. While he's grateful for the acclaim, Snaith doesn't want critics
to define his career by one piece of work. "If s important for me that all the
albums are different. I think it would be impossible to make a similar album to
the one I've made previously, because over a year of working on it every single
day, how could you be excited?" he said, "If s the process of making music
thafs really exciting for me. That feeling that I'm going to do something that
I've never done before is an integral part of that."
Enter Swim, Snaith's fifth album released this April, a month after his 32nd
birthday. The album's lighthearted, dance-oriented production marks a strong
departure from earlier Caribou. And Snaith feels more like himself than ever.
"This time around, it was important for nie to not have [musical] influences,"
he said. "None of the songs come from listening to another particular song.
None of the songs come from listening to another particular artist. I wanted
have my own fingerprint on the aesthetic combination of sound and really
build up my own vocabulary."
Swim's first single, "Odessa," is rife with impish booty beats influenced by
Snaiths' recent return to work as aDJ and, by extension, to club music. "[It]'s
something that I hayen't really had such a focus on, although if s always been
something I've listened to," he explained. And while he'll be the first to admit
that his musical taste has changed over the decade that he's been working as
a musician, the tracks he chooses to curate his albums have also become more
diverse. Swim is a far Less unified product than 2003 's panoramic Up in Flames,
or even the recent '60s pop-tinged Andorra. In Swim, the opener "Odessa" gives
nothing away as to how the rest of the album plays csft. Snaith playfully alighted
upon the percussive precision of "Bowls," switched quickly to the pop comforts
of "Leave House" and then to the geometric "Hannibal."
"Looking back, I've made a fair amount of music, and now the thing thafs
important to me is pushing the idea of making it really as much 'me' as possible," Snaith said.
More than anything, the joy of Caribou is realizing a lifelong ambition that
Snaith previously dismissed as just a dream. "When I think back before my
first music was released, it just seemed a massive distance away. It seemed
another world that people were releasing music and playing concerts. It
seemed totally unattainable," he recalled. "So I always want to retain, [to]
remember that perspective of it seeming so impossible that I'd be doing what
I was doing right nw."
Of his career so far, Snaith said if s always had the character of a dream.
"I just feel so lucky. I never want to lose that feeling." ^
13 COME TOGETHER, RIGHT NOW
BY DAN FUMANO
ILLUSTRATION BY MERIDA ANDERSON
£fe efore Carl Newman was known as the de facto leader of the New
V Pornographers, one of the most acclaimed indie rock groups of
^ the 21st century, he was a teenager in suburban Vancouver. Before
j| he was touring around the world and making a living by playing
^ music, he was a music fan. And, just as you are now, he was reading Discorder, which first went into publication around the same time that a
young Newman began getting into music.
"I remember reading Discorder from the very beginning. I remember reading
Discorder when I was 16, which was, like 1984... If s funny, Discorder's always
had this place in... the formative years of me loving music."
On the line from his house in Woodstock, N.Y., where Newman has made
his home for the past year or so, the ginger-haired patron saint of Vancouver
indie pop discussed reading about local bands that "had, like, one cassette out,
that they sold 100 copies of," he laughed. "But maybe they were in the Top 5
in Discorder... and when I was 161 thought, 'Wow, these guys ace really it'
... I look at the bands from that time, and I still don't think of myself as being
more famous than they are, even though I guess I know I am."
A few years later, in his early twenties, Newman started playing in bands
around Vancouver. "My first-ever band was Superconductor. I think it was
1990 when we first started... I remember getting written up in Discorder and
it seemed like such a big deal to me. It was like 'Wow! We made it' We're in
Discorder!'" [ed. He said this without being paid any money at all!]
After that, Newman played in Zumpano, then in 1997 formed the New
Pornographers, pulling together enough talented people from other Vancouver
bands that someone along the way decided that this wasn't just a group—it
was a supergroup. In the current lineup, Newman (who has also enjoyed a
successful solo career as A.C. Newman) shares the lead vocal duties with Neko
Case (of Maow, Cub and her own solo career) and Dan Bejar (of Destroyer).
The band also includes Newman's niece Kathryn Calder (also of Immaculate
Machine), John Collins (of the Evaporators), Todd Fancey (a solo artist who
performs as Fancey), filmmaker Blaine Thurier and Kurt Dahle (of Age of
Electric and Limblifter).
14 WE'RE ALWAYS GOING TO
Since that time, of course, the New Pornographers have gone on to receive coverage from some publications other than Discorder (actually, pretty
much all of the other publications), including spots in Rolling Stone's "Best
Albums of the Decade" and Blender's "Best Indie Albums of All Time." Each
of the New Pornographers' first four albums of expertly crafted power pop
figured prominently on critics' "Best Albums of the Year" lists, and there's
no reason to think that their fifth album will be any different with all of the
love that they get from critics and fans at home and abroad, it was no great
surprise, then, when the New Pornographers took the top spot as the favourite
Vancouver band of the past ten years (2000-2009) in Discorder's own informal
poll. No great surprise, maybe, except to Newman. "Really? We beat Black
Mountain?" he asked. "Damn. Thafs really nice of people to say." Pressed to
name his favourite Vancouver act of the 2000s, Newman said that although
he doesn't really want to pit friends against one another, he would probably
have to pick Destroyer.
But with Newman now residing in New York and with Neko Case living
in the U.S. since the early years of the band, does that make the New Pornographers more of an international, bi-coastal group? Can we still call them a
Vancouver band?
"Of course," Newman replied, without a second's hesitation. "Just because
you find yourself going to another city, doesn't mean you're not from where
you're from. We're always going to be a Vancouver band... I never claim to be
from New York, I don't claim to be from Woodstock. People ask me where I'm
from, you know—I'm from Vancouver."
The recording of Together followed the same path as Newman himself,
beginning in Vancouver, then moving to upstate New York. Early recording
sessions for the new album were in Vancouver at both the Factory and JC/DC,
John Collins' studio where earlier New Pornos albums were recorded. Then,
the rest of the album was recorded on Newman's property in upstate New
York, where the guest cottage was set up as a recording studio. "It was good
for me because I had just moved here and I wanted to be here a lot And if s
a nice place—upstate New York in the summer is a very nice place to be. If s
just a different kind of recording atmosphere, where when you take a break,
you can go out onto the lawn and if s sunny out I know Todd [Fancey] likes
wandering through the woods, he's got that in him. We went on a couple of
hikes while we were here."
Recording at the cottage was, according to Newman, like "the typical way
we've always recorded, like a little drop-in centre." Each of the eight members were there at one time or another, but :"people weren't always here at
the same time, people kind of came and went, and there would be, like, five
people here at once."
The Together recording sessions also involved Newman and company reaching
out for a little help from their friends and the list of collaborations is |&etty
impTressive; they've got Sharon Jones' Dap Kings on the album (They're pretty
much the best horn section you could ask for," Newman clain^.pOkkej^v
River's Will Sheff singing backup on the opening track "Moves" (Newman's
favourite song from the new material), Annie Clark, a.k.a. St Vincent, contributing guitar to "My Shepherd" ("She's like Hendrix".), and, just because
Newman "thought this song needs trumpet," they've got Zach Condon of
Beirut blowing on there.
"I've always been a big fan of having as many ideas thrown around as
possible and having as many different people play on a record as possible,"
Newman explained. "People always talk about us being a 'collective' and even
though [these other collaborators] are not part of the collective, or whatever
you would call it, I always like to have a lot of musical ideas to choose from.
And when you have people like that who contribute their musical ideas, if s
nice. If s a privilege."
Asked if this sense of musical collaboration and community inspired the
title Together, Newman agreed. "I think so. To a certain extent... calling the
record Together somehow seemed right. I actually ran it past Dan first. I said,
'Dan I've gotta ask you something, I've been thinking of calling this record
Together— what do you think?' And Dan said [in Newman's best whispery Dan
Bejar impression] T think thafs an awesome tide.' And I thought 'Thafs
good enough for me.'"
This idea of togetherness seems to be important here, popping up in
Newman's discussion of the album, in a couple of the songs (notably "Your
Hands (Together)" the first sample Matador released from the album, as well
as the sweeping, epic "We End Up Together," which closes the disc) and in
the beautifully written piece that accompanied advance copies ofTogether. The
essay, by American novelist Rick Moody (who wrote The Ice Storm), includes
ruminations on the history and purpose of the popular song and considers the
New Pornographers' place within that rich tradition. Moody writes that the new
album contains "Fewer keyboard flourishes, and fewer things that sound like
they necessitated a good computer programmer, and more things that sound
like A.C. Newman and the rest of the band playing in a room."
Newman explained further that Together is "one of those generic tides thafs
been used many times before, but somehow it just seemed very appropriate. It
cames on the idea what we've always done through the years, appropriating
cliches and just trying to make them your own." This seems to go along with
Moody's musings, this idea of appropriating cliches and making them your
own; it sounds like a key element in the history of pop music, love songs or
any art And so does Newman's next comment: "It's something that it doesn't
matter how many times you say it, it still rings true. V
15 FILM STRIPPED //
SUSANNE TABATA INTERVIEWING JOEY RAMONE
BLOODIED BUT UNBOWED
INTERVIEW WITH SUSANNE TABATA
BY SARAH CHARROUF
PHOTO BY BEVDAVIES
SUSANNE TABATA, THE FILMMAKER BEHIND BLOODIED BUT UNBOWED, THE DOCUMENTARY ABOUT
VANCOUVER'S PUNK SCENE, SAT DOWN WITH ME AT ANTISOCIAL SKATE SHOP TO TALK ABOUT THE
EARLY DAYS IN VANCOUVER PUNK. AMIDST OUR CONVERSATIONS ABOUT POLITICS, SKATEBOARDING,
FILM MAKING AND THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN PUNK THEN AND PUNK NOW, WE MANAGED TO GET A
FEW INTERVIEW QUESTIONS IN
Discorder: How did you get involved in the punk scene?
Susanne Tabata: I was a university student at UBC and I had my own radio show
on CiTR. and we were very involved in promoting the music of the Vancouver
punk scene... back in those days, we used to have 45s, and in the punk scene
' in V it was *ery inexpensive to press 45s—you didn't have to have a lot of money
to put out a single and a B-side. At CiTR we were very interested in what was
going on in the punk scene. In addition to that, I have to be honest we were
also very interested in the sounds that were coming out of London at the time.
Punk had sort of come and gone, in a way, in the markets of London and New
York. But what was coming out of those areas—the biggest bang—there was
a prolific amount of great music that was being released between '77 and '79,
right through to '81. At CiTR we were very interested in this vinyl, there was no
other forum for it. Co-op radio broadcast some of it, but we were very interested in the punk scene. I mean, Iggy Pop sat in the room at CiTR, I have that
backstage pass: "Iggy Pop: SUB Ballroom." That was his dressing room, and
he ate a vegetarian plate, and that was back in 1979. So yes, I was there and I
was part of it I was also involved in the first cable television show, a live variety
show, where we played a lot of videos that were starting to come out of the U.K.
16 markets. We interviewed the local bands. It was called Night Graves.
CiTR was so important in the story because at the time, there was a concert
promoting company, called Perryscope Concerts. They had set up shop in
Vancouver and brought in all those bands. They brought in the Iggys and the
Ramones and all that and the unknowns at the time. [Local promoter] Norman
Perry used to tap into the university crowd to listen to and get a sense of what
we thought what was the good music to listen to. He was a terrific ear for what
the underground student population thought would be an interesting musical
direction. CiTR was really influential back then.
D: Do you think that punk music then was a small subculture, where it was only a few people that made the
whole scene?
ST: No way! And I don't think we ever called the Vancouver scene "the punk
scene." I think it was, at the time, what was happening. It was "the scene,"
but for a very small minority of people. It was a small population of kids—
predominantly white, overwhelmingly male—and it was an underground scene.
I don't know what I would compare it to today. You'd be able to tell me what's a
comparable scene that nobody pays attention to. This was a scene that nobody
gave a shit about. You really have to understand, no one cared. It was very underground, but punk also became a brand. Punk, over time, became something
that you actually found a section of in a record store. And then there's all the
sub-genres of punk. This story that I'm doing is even before the hardcore punk.
This story takes place in the late 1970s and sort of peters out in '81, '82. This is
when hardcore really started to grow in southern California..
D: Can you tell us a little about the movie? Are there a
lot of interviews? Who is featured in it?
ST: It is a character driven oral history of the scene. And it's driven by the people
who were there, mostly musicians. Those interviews take place, of course, in
present day. The essence of the energy of the piece is captured in a combination
of using the music tracks of the era, along with stock footage and photographs,
and a hell of a lot of work. It's been a lot of work.
D: How did you get involved in making the movie?
ST: It's not my first documentary. I've done two other subculture pieces. One
is on women's skateboarding, Skate Girl. Prior to that, the Canadian surfing
documentary, 49 Degrees, which is about the West Coast story, not the East
Coast story.
I basically went through a big upheaval in my life. It caused me to go through
my scrapbooks and I stopped at this one scrapbook I had collected while
I was a university student, which had all these pictures of CiTR and these
interviews I had done. I thought "Wow, this was a really interesting time."
Concurrent to that, about three years ago, Bev Davies was doing a show at
the Jem Gallery—144 Punk Rock Photographs. I met her at the Modernettes gig.
I brought my camera and I just started shooting all the people who showed
up and thought, "This is a really great story." I mean, if s a great music scene.
So thafs how it started. I had thought originally that the best story would be
one that is character driven, so I was looking for strong personalities to tell
the story. I think I found them. Locally we've featured Art Bergmann, Gerry
Barad, Brian Goble, Mike Graham, Joe ["Shithead"] Keithly of course, from
D.O.A., Randy Rampage, Zippy Pinhead, all the Pointed Sticks, Buck Cherry,
the Dishrags and some other people. As far as names: Henry Rollins. I don't
know if you guys know... Do you know who Henry Rollins is?
D: Yes.
ST: I justdon'tknow who people know anymore. Keith Morris from the Circle Jerks—
and he is the original singer in Black Flag. Duff McKagen from Guns & Roses.
D: You mentioned the hardcore scene. So the film caps
off when the hardcore scene started?
ST: Yeah. Intuitively, instinctively and through their own creative forces, the
Subhumans and D.O.A. had their own sound. Those sounds were part of the
punk scene; they weren't the punk scene. The scene was really eclectic. It involved many different sounds. Sounds that we would call pop or New Wave.
Maybe even post-punk, but the history in music is that punk in Vancouver
was influenced by the U.K. By 1981,1982, the centre of punk had shifted from
England to southern California. Out of that Huntington Beach area, if you had
been there you definitely know where a lot of the driving personality comes out
of that area, thafs what happened. The sound of punk changed. Certainly due
to Joe Keithly's determination and dogged persistence, most of the other bands
in Vancouver packed it up, and D.O.A. kept going and that sort of is where the
story leaves off if you will: with a tribute to the birth, the life, the death of the
original punk scene. Are you going to come and see it?
D: Of course, yeah. I'm actually really excited about it.
ST: Really, because it's so old. I was actually thinking what the average person
in the early 20s—what's relevant to your age group? I don't expect you to like
the music. And I don't expect you to be enamoured with any of the characters
necessarily in the film. But I think that what my objective would be for the
younger audience to walk away with is certainly a sense of what a scene is and
what your relevance in the scene is. That scene was certainly relevant to me.
It's probably not relevant to you. It's probably historically interesting. I just
believe that if you can tell a really good story and you can access different age
groups, which was my goal, I didn't target this for your age, and I didn't target
it for my age group. It's meant for everybody.
D: I want to ask you about the local scene today, if you're
involved in it and how do you view it?
ST: I'm not involved it it. But I've been to different gigs. I still know people,
that are tied into it. I appreciate it's going on, but I've got really little time to
take it in. It's not my scene anymore. It's your scene, if s not my scene. I see
it's valid, I see if s vital. I see the energy. I've been to some of the Cobalt shows.
I'm really interested to know what punk means today, because when we were
doing it, and I wasn't doing it I was watching it. It was really not accepted in
the mainstream. 10^s was the underclass.
D: Can you tell us a little bit about females in the punk
scene?
ST: Back in the late '70s, the attitudes toward women in general were so different than they are now. What women had to put up with to be artists, musicians, journalists or aspiring professionals in the music industry is quite a bit
different than it is today. We touch on that a litde bit in the film. You'll get it.
There was one band who was all female, the Dishrags. Their story comes out
a litde bit. I think it'll be quite enlightening. The punk scene in Vancouver at
the time was a mixture of the young white suburban kids that were coming
in to make music, and it was fused with the Vancouver art school scene. That
group of people was very much male and female, and they tended to be a little
bit older than a lot of the punks mat had come in from the suburbs. But as
far as the music, was it inclusive? No, I don't think it was. It was more male
driven. The Dishrags will tell you. They were allowed to go on the battle of
the bands as a backup band. They weren't allowed to enter as a band because
they were girls. Things did change. The punk era was a door breaking, pivotal
point in rock music. It was overtly sexist in those days, I would say. Even in a
punk scene that was quite inclusive, there could be, on the musk level, some
sense of that sexism.
Bloodied But Unbowed: Uncut will be shown May 13 at 7 p.m. at the Granville 7
theatre as part of DOXA. There will also be a television version of the film which will be
shown on the Knowledge Network. )
17 NEANDERTHAL DIRTBAGS... WITH A CONSCIENCE?
BY SCOn LYON
ILLUSTRATION BY TJ REYNOLDS
Since the release of their debut album Earthbound in 2007, Vancouver's
favourite dirt-bag sons Bison B.C. have been giving their audience
a reason to shower beer over the sweaty throngs of fellow metal-
heads alongside them at every show. Songs like "These Are My
Dress Clothes" and "Earthbound" compel you to crack several beers
and scream along. Inevitably, though, the party has to come to an end. People
"mature," tastes "refine," and before we know it, we're all fawning over the
latest vintage of Pinot Blanc from the Okanagan. But once in a while you get
that friend that achieves an amazing balance of the two. Sure, they care about
global warming and they've cut down on their salt intake-but they never ditch
on a good kegger come Friday night. Enter Bison's latest release, Dark Ages.
Following the heavy intro to opener "Stressed Elephant," Bison roll out the
jrench horn. With all apologies to "Peter and the Wolf," has the french horn
ever been cool?
Well, now it is. On Dark Ages, Bison have brought a maturity to their music
without abandoning the riffs that make you want to jump-kick through a coffee table. The arrangements are more complex, the lyrics more insightful, but
the end result remains the same. Discorder caught up with frontman James,
Farwell in Greenville, South Carolina in the middle of their tour with High on
Fire, Priestess, and Black Cobra and discussed Dark Ages, the band's seemingly
non-stop touring cycle and a shared fascination of Insane Clown Posse and
the Juggalo culture.
"The last few tours have been great," Farwell started. "We've had the opportunity to tour with some great bands and really make some lasting friendships
in every city, which is the upside of touring."
While the current tour with High on Fire will create little friction amongst
audience members given both bands' propensities to gravitate towards heavy,
chugging riffs, some of Bison's other tours have been stranger pairings—like
18 IT'S A CITY OF DREAMS. IF YOU CAN
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their recent stretch with Boston metalcore act, Shadows Fall. Yet instead of
shaking their heads at the bad match, Farwell relished the opportunity to play
for audiences unaccustomed to Bison's particular brand of heavy metal. "The
great thing about playing on an eclectic bill is you get the opportunity to possibly broaden someone's musical horizons. Worst case scenario, someone's
left in the audience thinking, 'Who were those hairy idiots jumping around? I
don't understand what they're up to.'"
Playing in smaller, more obscure markets can also bring about some amusing tour anecdotes. Those in attendance at Bison's Halloween show with Black
Mountain will remember the band dressed up as members of Insane Clown
Posse. Farwell recalls that the last time the band were in South Carolina, "a
guy pulled up beside us in this busted up Cadillac sporting the worst faded,
shitty "Hatchet Man" [one of Insane Clown Posse's logos] tattoo. I mean, it's
a whole different planet down here."
In between several tours to support their second album, Quiet Earth, Bison
recorded Dark Ages at the Hive Recording Studios in Burnaby with Jesse Gander
taking over recording and producing duties for the third time. Farwell described
the writing process for Earthbound and Quiet Earth as more "organic," but he
maintained that there was a structure and texture that he has been aiming to
bring into Bison's music—something he feels the band has achieved with
Dark Ages.
"During the recording of Quiet Earth, I started thinkingthat if you're going
to be writing an eight-minute song, it's not only the riffs that are important,
it's the arrangement. On Dark Ages, we've really stepped it up on plotting out
the songs a bit more," Farwell said.
Farwell stated that in particular, Gander's familiarity with the band helped
them improve their vocal arrangements. "I don't like having to worry about
that stuff. Jesse was a great help with that. I mean, he didn't change the way I
sing—I still pretty much yell, in key—but delivery and placement? Thafs Jesse's
thing. Me? I'm a Neanderthal. I don't fucking know, man!"
Yet for a self-professed Neanderthal, the introspective quality of Farwell's
lyrics on Dark Ages is further evidence of the band's musical evolution. Whilein
Quiet Earth and Earthbound wizards and bison-headed alien races abound, Dark
Ages sees Farwell largely abandoning fantasy in favour of the harsh realities of
poverty and drug addiction plaguing our city. On "Two Day Booze," Farwell
yells, "Vancouver's an empty bottle, our thirst causing problems," while on
"Die of Devotion" he spits out, "Die of Devotion, chasing a veiled dream / Die
of devotion / Your blood, theneedle / Your heart, the bottle." For FarwelL, this
was just another part of the band's growth, "I'm just trying to live a bit more
in reality these days, you know? Iw mean, what's happening with Vancouver,
it's the same old thing. The rich get richer, the poor get poorer. I've just never
written about it as personally before as I did on this album."
The frontman for the band that played a Fuck the Olympics gig in February
continues, "It's a city of dreams. If you can fulfill any of those dreams without
succumbing to those sort of greedy ideals that are encompassing our city right
now, if you can carve out your niche and have a good life there, then you've
done some good, honest work, because if s a hard city to hve in!"
After their current touring stretch, Bison will be returning home in early
May before embarking on another Canadian tour followed by a European tour
in the fall. They're also looking to release their catalogue on vinyl, "If s going
to happen. Our label isn't too into doing vinyl right now, so we're just looking
into alternative routes for that to happen," said Farwell.
As for taking a break, that doesn't seem very likely in the foreseeable future.
"I'm already toying with ideas for the next album," Farwell admitted. "I'd like
to take no longer than a year before our next release."
So in closing, a few suggestions then: One, buy Dark Ages, if II blow your
balls off (ladies, I'm sure if 11 tickle your ovaries or whatever the anatomical
heavy metal equivalent might be). Two, come out and see Bison when they
come home—and bring a few friends with you. Three, buy these guys a beer
or six—they've worked too hard to return to an empty bottle, fc
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O   Of
CO   tM   S // CiTR 101.9 FM PROGRAM GUIDE
DISCORDER SUGGESTS LISTENING TO CiTR ONLINE AT WWW.CiTR.CA EVERY DAY.
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Sore Throats, Clapping]
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CfTR Ghost Mix SUNDAY
TANA RADIO
(World) 9-ioam
SHOOKSHOOKTA
(Talk) io-nam
A program targeted to
Ethiopian people that
encourages education and
personal development.
KOLNODEDI
(World) nam-i2pm
Beautiful arresting beats
and voices emanating from
all continents, corners and
voids. Always rhythmic,
always captivating. Always
crossing borders.
THE ROCKERS SHOW
(Reggae) i2-3pm
Reggae inna all styles and
fashion.
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
(Roots) 3-5pm
Alternating Sundays
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-
boots country.
SHAMELESS
(Eclectic) 3-5pm
Alternating Sundays
Dedicated to giving local
music acts a crack at some
airplay. When not playing
the PR shriek, you can hear
some faves you never knew
you liked.
CHIPS WITH EVERYTHING
(Pop) 5-6pm
Alternatina Sundays
British pop music from all
decades. International pop
(Japanese, French, Swedish,
British, US, etc.), '60s soundtracks and lounge.
SAINT TROPEZ
(Pop) 5-6pm
Alternating Sundays
Welcome to St. Tropez!
Playing underrated music
from several decades!
st.tropez101.9@gmail.com
QUEER FM
(Talk) 6-8pm
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian,
bisexual and transexual communities of Vancouver. Lots
of human interest features,
background on current issues and great music.
queerfmradio@gmail. com
RHYTHMSINDIA
(World) 8-gpm
Alternating Sundays
Featuring a wide range of
music from India, including
popular music from the 1930s
to the present; Ghazals and
Bhajans, Qawwalis, pop and
regional language numbers.
ALL AWESOME IN YOUR EARS
(Eclectic) 8-9pm
Alternating Sundays
MONDO TRASHO
(Eclectic) 9-iopm
The one and the only Mon-
do Trasho with Maxwell
Maxwell—don't miss it!
TRANCENDANCE
(Dance) iopm-nam
Join us in practicing the
ancient art of rising above |
common ideas as your host
DJ Smiley Mike lays down the
latest trance cuts.
trancendance@
hotmail.com
MONDAY
PROF TALK
(Talk) 7:3o-8am
Prof Talk is a radio talk
show that brings UBC
professors in to talk about
current/past events at the
local and international
level. http://ubcproftalk.
wordpress.com
proftalk@gmail.com
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS   |
(Eclectic) 8-nam
Your favourite Brownsters,
James and Peter, offer a
savoury blend of the familiar and exotic in a blend of
aural delights.
breakfastwiththebrowns@
hotmail.com
STRANDED
(Eclectic) nam-i2pm
Join your host Matthew for
a weekly mix of exciting
sounds, past and present,
from his Australian home-    j
land. And journey with him
as he features fresh tunes
and explores the alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
ALTERNATIVE RADIO
(Talk) 12-ipm
Hosted by David Barsamian. j
PARTS UNKNOWN
(Pop) i-3pm
An indie pop show since
1999, it's like a marshmal-    i
low sandwich: soft and
sweet and best enjoyed
when poked with a stick
and held close to a fire.
THE RIB ,
(Eclectic) 4-5pm
Explore the avant-garde
world of music with host
Robyn Jacob on the Rib.
From new electronic and
experimental music to
improvised jazz and new
classical! So weird it will
blow your mind!
NEWS 101
(Talk) 5-6pm
Vancouver's only live,
volunteer-produced,
student and community
newscast. Every week, we
take a look back at the
week's local, national and
international news, as seen
from a fully independent
media perspective.
CAREER FAST TRACK
(Talk) 6-6:3opm
Join host and author
Philippe Desrochers as
he teaches you how to
dramatically INCREASE
your income doing work
you LOVE.
THIS SIDE OF MONDAY
(Eclectic) 6:30-7:3opm
Fun and independent music
supported by a conversational
monologue of information,
opinion and anecdotes
focusing on the here, the now
and the next week.
becktrex@gmail.com
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
(Eclectic) 7:30-9pm
THE 1AZZ SHOW
(Jazz) 9pm-i2am
Vancouver's longest
running prime-time jazz
program. Hosted by Gavin
Walker. Features at 11pm.
May 3: Pianist/composer
Jaki Byard and his quartet
recorded live.
May 10: Polish trumpeter/
composer Tomasz Stanko is
one of the stars of this year's
Jazz Fest. His new group and
album are called Dark Eyes.
May 17: Alto saxophone
master Jackie McLean would
have celebrated his birthday
today. We'll play Swing,
Swang, Sunngin'.
May 24: Charles Mingus
considered Let My Children Hear
Music one of his finest
May 31: Trombonist Bennie
Green and tenor saxophone
titan Gene Ammons are
both heard on our show's
theme. We'll play their
album, The Siwngin'est!
SORE THROATS, CLAPPING
HANDS
(Eclectic) i2am-iam
Sore Throats Clapping
Hands relies on simple
melodies and poignant lyricism to drive our passions.
We embrace music that
takes little production and,
for that reason, is extremely
accessible to play, share,
create and enjoy—music
that can be produced with
little more than clapping
hands and sore throats.
TUESDAY
PACIFIC PICKIN1
(Roots) 6-8am
Bluegrass, old-time music,
and its derivatives with
Arthur and the lovely
Andrea Berman.
pacificpickin@yahoo.com
SOUNDS OF AFRICA
(World) 8-g:3oam
Showcasing music, current
affairs and news from
across the African continent
and the diaspora, you will
learn all about beat and
rhythm and it will certainly
kickstart your day.
THIRD TIME'S THE CHARM
(Rock) 9:3o-n:3oam
Open your ears and prepare
for a shock! A harmless
note may make you a fan!
Deadlier than the most
dangerous criminals!
bominsixtynine@
hotmail.com
MORNING AFTER SHOW
(Eclectic) n:3oam-ipm
An eclectic mix of Canadian
indie with rock, experimental, world, reggae, punk
and ska from Canada, Latin
America and Europe. The
Morning After Show has local bands playing live on the
Morning After Sessions.
LAUGH TRACKS
(Talk) i-2pm
Laugh Tracks is a show about
comedy. Kliph Nesteroff
( from the 'zine, Generation
Exploitation, hosts.
generationexpIoit@yahoo.
com, musicalboot@
yahoo.ca
GIVE'EM THE BOOT
(World) 2-3pm
Sample the various
flavours of Italian folk
music from north to
south, traditional to
modern on this bilingual
Italian/English show. Un
programma bilingue che
esplora il mondo della
musica etnica italiana.
WINGS
(Talk) 3-3:30pm
RADIO FREETHINKER
(Talk) 3:30-4:3opm
Promoting skepticism, critical thinking and science, we
examine popular extraordinary claims and subject
them to critical analysis.
The real world is a beautiful
and fascinating place and
we want people to see it
through the lens of reality
1 to superstition.
WENER'S BARBEQUE
(Sports) 4:30-6pm
Daryl Wener talks about the
world of sports. Everything
from the Canucks to the
World Rock Paper Scissors
Championship.
ethanwener@hotmail.com
FLEX YOUR HEAD
(Hardcore) 6-8pm
Punk rock and hardcore since
1989. Bands and guests from
around the world.
LIFE ON JUMPSTREET
(Dance) 8-9pm
CRIMES & TREASONS
(Hip-hop) 9-npm
crimesandtreasons@
gmail.com
•CABARADIO
(Talk) iipm-i2:3oam
For the world of Cabaret.
Tune in for interviews,
skits, musical guests and
more. It's rwadio with sass!
WEDNESDAY
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
(Eclectic) 8-ioam
Live from the Jungle Room,
join radio host Jack Velvet
for ah eclectic mix of music,
sound bites, information and
inanity. Not to be missed!
dj@jackvelvet.net POP DRONES
(Eclectic) io-ii:3oam
ANOIZE
(Noise) ii:3oam-ipm
An hour and a half of avant-
rock, noize, plunderphonic,
psychedelic and outsider
aspects of audio. An experience for those who want to
be educated and EARjtated.
lukemeat@hotmail.com
THE GREEN MAJORITY
(Talk) i-2pm
Canada's only environmental news hour, syndicated by
CIUT 89.5 FM Toronto or
UMiu.greenmajority.ca.
DEMOCRACY NOW
(Talk) 2-3pm
RUMBLETONE RADIO
A GO GO
(Rock) 3-5pm
Primitive, fuzzed-out
garage mayhem!
ARTS REPORT
(Talk) 5-6pm
REEL TO REAL
(Talk) 6-6:3opm
Movie reviews and
criticism.
SAMSQUANTCH'S
HIDEAWAY
(Eclectic) 6:3o-8pm
Alternating Wednesdays
All-Canadian music with a
focus on indie.rock/pop.
anitabinder@hotmail.com
FOLK OASIS
(Roots) 8-iopm
Two hours of eclectic folk/
roots music, with a big emphasis on our local scene.
C'mon in! A kumbaya-free
zone since 1997.
folkoasis@gmail.com
SEXY IN VAN CITY
(Talk) io-npm
Your weekly dose of education and entertainment in
the realm of relationships
and sexuality.
sexyinvancity.com/category/
sexy-in-vancity-radio
HANS KLOSS' MISERY HOUR
(Hans Kloss) npm-iam
Pretty much the best thing
on radio.
THURSDAY
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
(Talk) 8-ioam
SWEET AND HOT
(Jazz) ioam-i2pm
Sweet dance music and hot
jazz from the 1920s, '30s
and '40s.
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
(Eclectic) 12-ipm
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by Duncan, sponsored bydonuts.
duncansdonuts.
wordpress.com
WE ALL FALL DOWN
(Eclectic) i-2pm
Punk rock, indie pop and
whatever else I deem worthy. Hosted by a closet nerd,
www.weallfalldowncitr.
blogspotca
INK STUDS
(Talk) 2-3pm
Underground and indie
comix. Each week, we interview a different creator to
get their unique perspective
on comix and discuss their
upcoming works.
JAPANESE MUSICQUEST
(World) 3-3:3opm
Syndicated from CJLY
Kootenay Co-op Radio in
Nelson, B.C.
FRENCH CONNECTION
(World) 3:30-5pm
French language and music.
NATIVE SOLIDARITY NEWS
(Talk) 5-6pm
A national radio service and
part of an international network of information and action in support of indigenous
peoples' survival and dignity.
ARE YOU AWARE
(Eclectic) 6-7:3opm
Celebrating the message
behind the music: Profiling
music and musicians that
take the route of positive
action over apathy.
EXQUISITE CORPSE
(Experimental) 7:30-9pm
Experimental, radio-art,
sound collage, field recordings, etc. Recommended for
the insane.
artcorpse@yahoo.com
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
(Live Music) 9-npm
Featuring live band(s) every
week performing in the
CiTR Lounge. Most are from
Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country and around the world.
HYPNOTIC GROOVE
(Techno) npm-i2am
AURAL TENTACLES
(Eclectic) i2-6am
It could be global, trance,
spoken word, rock, the
unusual and the weird, or it
could be something different. Hosted by DJ Pierre.
auraltentacles@hotmail.com
FRIDAY
FRIDAY SUNRISE
(Eclectic) 7:30-9am
An eclectic mix of indie
rock, hip-hop and reggae to
bring you up with the sun.
SYNCHRONICS
(Talk) 9-ioam
Join host Marie B and
discuss spirituality, health
and feeling good. Tune in
and tap into good vibrations
that help you remember
why you're here: to have
fun! This is not your average
spirituality show.
SKA-T'S SCENIC DRIVE
(Ska) ioam-i2pm
Canada's longest running
Ska radio program,
dj ska_t@hotmail. com
BARNBURNER
(Eclectic) i-2pm
The greasier side of rock
'n' roll, rhythm 'n' blues,
and country... Crack a beer,
order some BBQ, and get
your boogie on.
RADIO ZERO
(Dance) 2-3:30pm
An international mix of
super-fresh weekend party
jams from New Wave to
foreign electro, baile, Bollywood and whatever else.
www.radiozero.com
NARDWUAR
(Nardwuar) 3:30-5pm
Join Nardwuar the Human
Serviette for Clam Chowder flavoured entertainment. Doot doola doot
doo...dootdoo!
nardwuar@nardwuar.com
NEWS 101
(Talk) 5-6pm
See Monday for description.
HOT MESS
(Eclectic) 6-7:3 opm
With banging beats of rock,
funk, electro and more music
from the beautiful DJ Blonde
Tron and entertaining banter
from seasoned hosts Handsome, Jay and Eddy.
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
(Eclectic) 7:30-9pm
Your Host, David Love
Jones, plays a heavyweight
selection of classics from
the past, present and future
including jazz, soul, hip-
hop, Afro-Latin, funk and
eclectic Brazilian rhythms.
Plus interviews with local
and international artists.
Truly international flavour.
RAINBOW GROOVE
(Dance) 9-io:3opm
DJ BEAD presents a kaleidoscope of funky grooves for
your mind, body and soul.
Tune in to hear everything
from Underground Disco,
Roller Boogie, Space Funk,
Rare Groove, Jazzy House,
Dub Reggae, and anything
from Chaka Khan to the
Clash.
SHAKE A TAIL FEATHER
(Soul/R&B) io:30-i2am
The finest in classic soul
and rhythm & blues
from the late '50s to the
early '70s, including lesser
known artists, regional hits
and lost soul gems.
THE VAMPIRE'S BALL
(Industrial) i2-4am
Dark, sinister music to
soothe and/or move the
Dragon's soul. Industrial,
goth and a touch of metal
too. Blog: thevampiresball.
blogspot.com.
thevampiresball@gmail.com
SATURDAY
THE SATURDAY EDGE
(Roots) 8am-i2pm
A personal guide to world
and roots music—with
African, Latin and European
music in the first half, followed by Celtic, blues,
songwriters, Cajun and
whatever else fits!
steveedge3@mac. com
GENERATION ANIHILATION
(Punk) 12-ipm
A fine mix of streetpunk
and old-school hardcore
backed by band interviews,
guest speakers and social
commentary.
crashnburnradio@yahoo.ca
POWER CHORD
(Metal) i-3pm
Vancouver's longest running metal show. If you're
into music that's on the
heavier/darker side of the
spectrum, then you'll like
it. Sonic assault provided by
Geoff the Metal Pimp.
CODE BLUE
(Roots) 3-5 pm
From backwoods delta
low-down slide to urban
harp honks, blues and blues
roots with your hosts Jim,
Andy and Paul.
codeblue@
buddy-system.org
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
(World) 5-6pm
The best of mix of Latin
American music.
leoramirez@canada. com
NASHAVOLNA
(World) 6-7pm
News, arts, entertainment and
music for the Russian community, local and abroad,
nashavolna.ca
NOTES FROM THE
UNDERGROUND
(Electrontc/Hip-hop/More)
7-9pm
Start your Saturday night
off right with our weekly
showcase of the local
underground DJ and   f
electronic music scene.
notesundergroundradio.
blogspot.com
notesundergroundradio@
gmail.com
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
(Dance/Electronic/Eclectic)
9-npm
If you like everything frottl
electro/techno/trance/8-bit
music/retro '80s this is the
show for you!
www. synapticsandwich. net
BEATS FROM THE BASEMENT
(Hip-hop) iipm-iam
Mr. Joi, being a cinephile
as well as a DJ, will surprise
you with the likes of:
French NewWave, Golden
Age, Noir, Action, Adventure, Comedy, Coming of
age Drama, Epic/Myth,
Fantasy, Gangster, Horror,
Romantic Comedy, Science
Fiction, Social Drama,
Thriller, the Art Film, the
Black Comedy, the Musical
and the Porno.        $j0$F$
DREAMSCENE RADIO
(Dance) iam-3am
Immerse yourself in cutting edge electronic music
from every point on the
spectrum. Christoker spins
the latest tracks taking over
dance floors around the
world and introduces you to
the producers behind them.
Turn the stereo up and have
a dance party with your cat
(cats love Electro!)
24 25 ART PROJECT // RYAN WALTER WAGNER
26. 27 •LIARS-
/ UNDER REVIEW
RYAN BOURNE
SUPERMODERN WORLD OF BEAUTY
(Ktllbrat Records)
Calgary musician Ryan Bourne recently dropped his debut album with some
of the city's finest musicians helping
to make it happen. Supermodern World
of Beauty is a confident first recording that ought to take little time in
becoming a favourite for those who
enjoy the lighter end of psychedelic
folk rock. But there's more than folk
rock going on here. A litde bit of
bottom-end moody stuff goes a long
way in breaking the consistency of the
trippy psychedelic stuff. In fact, this
is a pretty diverse album all around.
The opener, "Calling From Beyond" is
a grabber for sure. Good full sound,
crisp production and some tasty piano
and horns make for a strong lead in.
What follows in the next nine tracks is
a winding road through trippy realms
of freak folkrock, atmospheric meditations of sound. The quality that ties
this music together is vintage. It's got
that '60s folk rock revival thing going
on both in me recording and music
offered. There are shades of Chad Van
Gaalen in many of these songs, which
is sensible being that Van Gaalen's
rhythm section is also Bourne's, but
this isn't a case of borrowing someone
else's sound. These are simply musical shadows cast respectively.
Some debuts come off as immature or lacking in a certain punch that
make you take notice, but this one
comes complete with punch and leftovers. Supermodern may not shake your
world to the core right away, but stay
with it There is a nice warm urgency
to this music that is definitely worth
the time spent.
—Nathaniel Bryce
RON CONTOUR & FACTOR
SAFFRON
fjtoke fern Inc.)
The mysterious and elusive MC, Ron
Contour, has returned from his hiatus
asabeekeeper sorn^^rconme^^F
ries to drop another collection of nonsensical rhymes on the masses. The
Prairies seem to have had a positive
effect on our friend with the curious
English accent. Not only did he find
the time to grow a real moustache,
he found endless inspiration in the
infinite skyline and befriended genius
Saskatoon-based producer Factor.
With the help of Ron's "cousin" Moka
Only, the new friends combined their
talents and created the 12 smooth
jams that make up Sqfjron.
With song titles like "Cheese Toast
Feast" and "Confused Nougat" it is
evident even before pressing play that
it is best to just allow yourself to get
lost in Contour's mesmerizing flow
and Factor's supreme beats. To try
and follow Contour's rhymes is as
futile as watching a fly try to escape
through a closed window; to try and
decipher them is like trying to interpret the diary of a lunatic. Like all of
Contour's previous efforts, Sqfjron is
a well produced, grooving, hip-hop
album that doesn't take itself too
seriously; it is at once musically intelligent, laughably whimsical and
completely enjoyable!
—MarkPaulHus
DELHI 2 DUBLIN
PUNET ELECTRIC
(Independent)
Depending on your perspective, Van-
couver-based Delhi 2 Dublin is either
a brilliant free-thinking experiment
in etnnornusicology, of a confused
jumble of all things "other." Mashing
up languages, instruments and styles
from several far-flung corners of the
globe into one electrified melting pot,
D2D's sophomore release Planet Electric ranges from slowed-down dubby
atmospherics to hyperactive bhangra
marathons.
The diversely talented quintet
originally formed as a one-shot
performance during Vancouver's
Celtic Festival in 2006. Such a bizarre
coupling of tabla drums, fiddle, dhol,
electric sitar and breakbeats instantly
found eager audiences in folk fans
and raver kids alike. D2D has since
blazed Canada's touring circuit,
from the steps of Parliament Hill
to the wilderness of Nelson B.C.'s
Shambhala Festival.
Quite a departure from their
lengthy and virtuosic debut, Planet
Electric is trimmed and polished.
Asian and Celtic influences seem
more naturally juxtaposed on this
record, showcasing decidedly more
"Delhi" than "Dublin." With every
song clocking under five minutes,
the album clearly strives for both accessibility and danceablility.
At times Planet Electric sounds like
an Ashley Maclsaac record—if Ashley Maclsaac were somehow raised
in Mumbai. Punjabi vocal tracks are
slick and energetic on "Tommy,"
which combines a roving drum and
bass beat with classical technicality.
Violinist Kytami's soaring riffs shine
on "Master Crowley," even through
cheesy DJ effects and lyrical themes
of intergalactic travel.
Though sometimes forced into
fusion, Planet Electric confirms that
originality comes easy for Delhi 2
Dublin.
—Sarah Berman
IfiLOFRAPP
HEADFIRST
(Mutefim®
Igwur browser may not support display of this image. Synth, sass and
style is the substance of Goldfrapp's
fifth studio album titled Head First.
Alison Goldfrapp sings alongside the
disco-electro smooth dance sounds
with a vanilla cream feel. The album
is pleasant, soft, glamourous and the
kind of pure pop you can only find
by climbing into a time machine and
setting the dial back 30 years. The
first three songs on the record will be
stuck inside your head and may cause
the grooves in your LP to be worn out.
Extremely catchy vocal hooks will have
you singing along and beautifully layered '70s and '80s synths will keep you
warm and give you an urge to dust off
your old Buggies records. There are
some excellent pieces in the later part
of the album (when you finally get
to them). "Hunt" is surprisingly the
darkest song on the album. "Shiny
and Warm" continues the dark journey
with an offering which is basic, rhythmic, repetitive and catchy. The final
song titled "Voicething" is precisely
28 that with an interesting ambient vocal
repetition circling around analogue
strings and bass sounds. Probably
the strongest and most complete
album from the UK duo, Head First
is a journey forward and backward
in time with a number of anthems
sure to become a staple in the dance
club scene.
—Slauko Bucifal
60RILLA2
PLASTIC BEACH
{Pttrlophon* Records)
i fveri ifyou^renot the biggest fan of
Gorillaz, Plastic Beach is wor± a listen
if for no other reason than its sheer
brilliance of scope. Damon Albarn,
who makes up one half of Gorillaz,
cannot be blamed for offering a
polymer-based recycled product,
pun obviously intended. Plastic Beach
is the third album by the world's most
successful virtual band, and much like
the fleshy cartoon characters that make
up this group, it is vibrant, colourful
and a bit daft. With celebrity guest
spots up the hooper and a decidedly
lighter poppier feel to this album,
Plastic Beach is a brash step forward,
not so much in a new direction, but
more in the same direction with new
shoes on. Still present is the cartoony
off the wall feel along with some great
guest spots such as Lou Reed, Mick
Jones, Mos Def, Snoop Dogg and
other heavies. One of the best tracks
here is "Stylo" featuring Mos Def and
the legendary Bobby Womack. It's a
simple but driving little number that
hangs loosely off a synch backing that
smells so strongly of Miami Vice issue
sport coats and slip on loafers that
it surpasses cool three times before
becoming even cooler. If you dig
Gorillaz and fancy a bit of hip hop,
funk, dubstep and driving '80s synth
jams, Plastic Beach will be the butter to
your bread. Like a well put together
DJ set or mix tape, it works really
well and before you know it you're
basking under its brilliant plastic sunlike warmth.
—Nathaniel Bryce
INHABITANTS
ftVAgftmOT
(Drip Audio)       **
Britannia Beach's creative music col*
lective Inhabitants have been Juno*
nominated a few times now, and if s
hard not to see why.
Like a sonic collage weaving
ethereal elements from Mogwai
and the likes of Do Make Say Think,
Inhabitants' third full-length album
is full of possibility and dark, mulling
soundscapes.
One particularly striking and
pathos-inducing track is "Journey
of the Loach," a sprawling, near
ten-minute epic where J.P. Carter's
trumpet wails like a wounded bull.
Many of the songs, in fact, encompass
a strange place falling somewhere
between the realms of jazz, space
rock and experimental noise.
That being said, guitarist Dave Si-
kula is not afraid to let distortion run
wild in "Let Youth Be Served" which
screams of urban restlessness and
spiritual disturbance. On the other
hand, songs like "Whistling Pass" explore the ideas of form and chaos, giv
ing the feeling of the impatience and
unbearable idleness felt while waiting
for a train to see your lover.
Collectively, the quartet delves
into some seriously expressive territory, and while sometimes a little
cacophonic for the tender ear, is quite
impressive.
—Mine'Salkm
Till JESSICA STUAR? FEW
KID DREAM
(Independent)
Someone should have
a conversation with
whoever made "Midgey
Ponchey," the first track
of the Jessica Stuart Few's
new album, because he
or she owes the band an
apology. The song doesn't
grab you like the firs t track
of an album should and
it would be best suited
buried somewhere in the
middle of the album. As
it is, it starts Kid Dream—
the JSF's first full-length
album—off on the wrong
foot, and the album never
quite recovers after this
stumble.
The first problem with
the album is Stuart's vocals. On its own, her voice
isn't unpleasant, but it
does the album a disservice, its crisp breathi-
ness failing to mesh with
anyone else in the band.
These songs need a voice
with slightly higher calo
rie content that will draw out the rich
textures of the other instruments.
There are some charming moments on Kid Dream. "(Don't Live
Just For The) Weekend" a cheery polemic against getting sucked into the
nine-to-five mentality, is pleasant and
hooky, if it doesn't bring much to the
table in the way of depth. The title track
makes use of Stuarf s much-touted skill
on the koto, a traditional Japanese instrument with 13 strings, to some effect
The opening instrumental bars are
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THE PACK A.D.    CAROLYN MARK carolynmark .com
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(with The Sadies)      May 28-HMVRobson {free show, 6pm)
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29 appropriately dream-like and luxurious. But, once again, the vocals chafe
against the instrumental line.
There's potential here, but it usually gets derailed when the JSF get lost
in their songs and lose sight of what
makes music stick to the brain. They
could use a refresher on the difference
between music that's a pleasure to
play and music that's a pleasure to
listen to.
—Miranda Martini
ws$)
SISTERWORLD
The Liars ate one of those bands you
^wP^iMirafeted by because wfifen
you listen to their albums, you know
you are in the presence of musical
geniuses. From the opening haunting
melodies ofSisteriuorld, their fifth studio album, the Liars continue the tradition of carefully crafting every note
to evoke intense emotions and keep
you on edge for explosions. There are
far fewer explosive moments in this
album than the anticipation would
have you believe, but the intensity and
rawness is tortuously beautiful. There
are moments when the album sounds
like it could be a darker sequel to a Joy
Division effort. There are times when
the band plays with noises and generates order out of chaos. The guitars
and drums are punchy and sound as
if they were played in a giant empty
slaughterhouse. When the band isn't
tinkering with moods, they appear to
have no remorse for the abuse placed
on their instruments. "Scissor," the
opening track, is an outstanding piece
which begins melodically then erupts
with a violent fury that rubs off on
you. "Here Comes All the People" is
one of those pieces that plays with
your head as you wait for the bi^hang..
Instead, the song seamlessly blends
into "Drip," a dark and demonic
punk electronica that makes you
jump at strange noises in the night.
"Scarecrows on a Killer Slant" is one
of the best angry songs ever. If you
like more of the classic punk sound,
"The Overachievers" will satisfy that
craving nicely.
It appears that the Liars' Sister-
world is plagued by deep psychological
issues and you will be the benefactor
of an album created from raw emotions. As a result, Sisteruwld should
be on the watch list for the album of
the year.
—-Slauko Buctfal
PLANTS & ANIMALS
LA LA LAND
(Secret Gift) Records)
•^?batdoy®tt get ifjwu'lbck8*o Mari-
timers and a French Canadian m a
room with a tape recorder? A darn
good indie rock album, that's what!
%$, i^Z4i£f£, %$&&tB% Animals Jbfiow
up to their much loved Pare Avenue,
is sure to be one this summers most
acclaimed albums.
The slow lulling of "Tom Cruz"
rolls in at a steady pace, pulling you
into the grips of this album and
steadying you for a trip through its
hazy analog atmosphere. This cohesive collection of songs sounds like
modern indie rock produced in the
'70's. The combination of traditional
recording methods combined with
a contemporary song writing style
gf COMMUNITY
DRIVEN
MUSIC LISTINGS
allows Plants & Animals to create a
very familiar, yet unique sound. This
is the kind of album that begs to be
played of a nice shiny slab of 180-gram
vinyl. Songs like "Swinging Bells" and
"Celebration" beg for you to put on a
big pair of headphones, kick back on
your bed and drift, but not for long,
because "American Idol" is sure to
make you rip out the cord and spike
the volume knob and sing along. This
jangling rocker (complete with saxophone solos from the Arcade Fire's
Colin Stenson) is sure to be a staple
on summer play lists, just as La la Land
is sure to put Plants & Animals on the
map once and for all.
—Mark PaulHus
YDlTNfiRlWtt.
YOUNG RIVAL
(Sonic Uny on)
Hailing from Hamilton,4he industrial
armpit of Ontario fed. Gross.},' Young
'gjvaPis atftmlikelygem to Surface in
the Canadian alternative rock scene.
Their debut, self-titled album is riddled with powerful electric twang and
unusually astute melodies.
With a sprawling, distorted aesthetic that brings Franz Ferdinand
and the Hives to mind, the trio's formula is much like a collage of punk-
infused, three-part melody-heavy
anthems that are catchy, progressive
and infectious.
The album opens up aggressively
with "Got What You Need," a throwback to '60s garage rock with a singer/
guitarist Aron D'Alesio sounding a bit
like Interpol's Paul Banks.
Another standout track is "Ghost
In The Park," a fast, crashing tune
that alludes to selling drugs in a shady
neighbourhood. With lyrics like "You
know I got nothing to sell / But you
still come around" the album is nostalgic for the simpler, dirtier times of
teenage rebellion.
With a gritty aesthetic that only
could have been properly cultivated
by playing years of gigs in grimy bars,
Young Rival's debut is the best album
of the summer to drain your beer to.
—Mine'Salkin
SANCTUARYPRESENIS
DspsCHs MODs
TRIBUTE PARTY
'%^Mhs PANDEMONIUM | CONTRASOMA1R-LEX f
SATURDAY, MAY 29TH
ST-PUNK180'S I NEW WAVE | ELECTRO | INDUSTRIAL | SYNTHPC
ONLYAr YOU SAY PARTY! WE SAY DIE!
FAKE JAZZ FESTIVAL
GLACIERS / ARCHIPELAfiO / RACHEL WADHAM & SHANE KRAUSE
SCANT INTONE /THE RITA
March 25 / Western F«i|"»f ,
I was sitting in a dimly \% crowded tsojemtji&t&ifs at the Western Front A guy
(Jeffery Allport, I would lai&r Jtagp& wa%ed tip to the fmti£o£$h£ stage area
and set down a floor torn and a snare drum. He sprinkled some salt on each
drum and hung a satchel full oFyiolin bows an4 rubber bs^^ghe £00$ ic$n,'
Across from him was Robert Ifedessoa* teping-outM-atf^y ofb*oken*feo^n^f
tape recorders on a,low feo& Bet^ien thernis&s £ief H&llk looking ,s% km
long floral dt®^ , .
The trio, Glaciers, proceeded to produi^sis^^tfet n$$st unearthly noise
I'd ever heardVHall let out a long, hoarse sonndu^^ihign^tc^^sh^ek, ^^^
.- naade-his drums moan and npsv^ biC^^g^sjfeint.Wttii the t#li^-MllS|tJKL
bowing a pair of cymbals witfe violin bows* B^etson dnke*ed-islth--tl^ $$&&&
tion<jf tape recorder holding an old magnetic plckii|>i^i^4~^^ ^j>eak€r and
pressing his fingers onto the exposed circuit bo^plol^iin^tef t^ jeooelef.
Industrial tape noke, high-pitched modtuatasd <dfC*|kf^d|^ck> ^ignioanfel;
drone of the drums, and the banshee vocals combined teifcjt lightening,
strange noise exploration.
Preceding this performance was one by free jazz ens^c^l^^shipelago,
who did a live score to sop^ifme work of Czech surre|^s^|^^mkmajer.
The Svankmajer short fih&N&at were chosen ranged $8Mk animated mixed
media to claymation and stor^mo^fn. They were perplexing, outlandish and
amusing. In one, various clay body parts crawled into a m^^^gt^prn, joining
together in grotesque ways until a clay man was formed, hunched over and
squashed into the tiny space.
The band matched the tone and action of the films, creating a perfect
araiosphereiWl of strange noises. Thumb pianos, cello and violin, all sound-
i^d^gtl^^pde and noisy, nothing like what you'd expect, made for a very
immersive experience.
, 4Mb*e this was the bass clarinet and prepared piano duo of Rachel Wadham
& Shane Krause. WtdJham stood, reaching into the piano and sounding it with
her hinds or a feather duster, rubbing chopsticks stuck between the strings,
isaiistogthem to vibrate, while the clarinettist blew hoarse, harsh harmonics.
HiP^Jam evolved into a free jazz workout of sharp chords interspersed with
$e*£$iBifve noise from prepared piano, coupled with twisting, unpredictable
clarinet lines.
;;v$6$!atIntone's unpredictable live electronics were very much with the tone
i^r^ei^ening, though coming from a decidedly different direction. The digital
sound design was intriguing and his face was lit eerily by his laptop.
The Rita really shook things up with a bracing set that trod a fine line
between chaotic sample-collage and bracing feedback sculpture.
V^|f% sansic front^lfenight was definitely not for everyone. I admit to cringing when l^f Hall got into the very high registers. But there is something
special about a performance when the artist is not only improvising, but also
doing so outside of bounds like musical keys or a chord progression. It shows
another angle on what we call "music" and was quite inspirational for those
Tgttjh. an open miiid^, y
—Doug MacKenzie
31 SCATTERHEART / LOS FURIOS / BIKE
The Commodore / March 2j, 2010
Three local bands playing at the Commodore? On a Saturday night? Really?
Excitement! Not something you get to see every day at the Commodore—it
was a major thumbs up for the local scene.
Bike bounced onto the stage and didn't stop bouncing their entire set. They
know how to put on a show and entertain like their lives depend on it. With
their mix of horns, frenetic vocals and awesome bass lines, it is impossible
not to be drawn into their happy, fervent, pop music.
Local Ska legends, Los Furious, took to the stage next and they were hot.
As in caliente hot. Los Furios had the rambunctious audience breaking out
into random mosh pits and there was even a crowd surfer at one point (very
2004). Their set was fast and relentless. Los Furios gave out one manic music
punch after another. Every couple of songs, a pair of burlesque zombie-kitties
took to the stage covering the front row in red glitter. They were cute but not
really necessary. Los Furios were the band of the night. Unfortunately, it went
downhill after that.
Scatterheart opened with singer Jessie Enright suspended from the ceiling.
Sporting his trademark feather shoulder pads and belting his heart out, it was
an impressive sight. The lighting and visuals were so slick they were almost
a distraction from the music rather than an enhancement. There was a lot of
strutting and posing (as in yoga) from the band and more then enough self-
empowerment love talk.
After playing "1999," "Somebody to Love" and "Pride," Scatterheart appeared
more of a covers band who played the occasional original track. They stood
out in stark contrast to Bike and Los Furios, but not for the right reasons. It
all looked good and in theory it should have worked, but it came off feeling
contrived. There was heart but no soul. It was a disappointing end to an otherwise wonderful evening.
—Katherine Boothroyd
PIERCED ARROWS / LULLABYE ARKESTRA
April 3 / Biltmore Cabaret
It was a good old fashioned power rock out at the Biltmore last Saturday night
when Lullabye Arkestra and Pierced Arrows blasted their way through an evening
that left nobody in the dark about how gritty hard music ought to be played. The
night was a taste of the old school hardened veterans mixing with the scrappy
up and comers. The uniting of the two bands on one bill was awesome.
We arrived just in time for Toronto's Lullabye Arkestra. Bathed in fog and a
couple of simple flood lights, Kat Taylor and Justin Small stood poised, ready
to rearrange faces with their hugely powerful blues thrash love songs. Taylor
plays bass and screams, bellows, wails and sings while Small slays on the kit.
Together they make a lot of glorious noise that stands mightily alongside some
of the heaviest's best. Let's just say that a duo who can lay down a convincing
death metal cover is impressive. Playing a few off the new album including
"We Fuck the Night," which is one of their best, and in a moment of touching
upon new levels of bad-ass, Small lit his snare on fire while still playing. They
thrashed, they blasted, they ruled!
After hearing so much of Pierced Arrows' history as some of the purveyors
of early garage punk, it was good to finally see the Portland band doing what
they do best Playing their last show on this leg of the tour, Pierced Arrows were
loose and clearly having a great time up there. The house was near capacity and
the feeling in the air was electric as the Arrows ripped through a good-sized set
list, rarely slowing down or pausing to catch a breath, proving that rock doesn't
leave your bones once you pass 50. Indeed, some music is just too tough to die.
But why would anyone want it to? Hail, hail rock and roll!
—Nathaniel Bryce
APOLLO GHOSTS / SHAWN MRAZEK LIVES! / DIRTY BEACHES
April 10 / Little Mountain
"Show begins at 8 p.m. Over at n p.m." Rarely does a show's description read
so true. They say Mussolini made the trains run on time. Well, Little Mountain Gallery must be run by Mussolini. Unfortunately, due to this unexpected
promptness this humble reviewer missed Dirty Beaches, but was told by another
attendee that they were "pretty dope." Shawn Mrazek, following this dope
performance, took to the floor rather than the stage, surrounding himself in
a tight throng of bobbing heads and appreciation. Listening to Shawn Mrazek
play alone with nothing but his guitar and voice, one feels immersed by his
yearning, honest lyrics and simple chords. Shawn Mrazek is not one for flair
and his simplistic style strips him of the pretension of musician, allowing you
to listen directly to his songs without the burden of flamboyant showmanship,
[ed. Discorder would like to add our congratulations to Shaiun Mrazek on the birth ojhis
son Otis, u>ho was bom shortly before this show.]
When I returned from a brief smoke break, a thick crowd seemed to have
magically appeared, filling the small room to capacity. The scent of anticipation
for the nighf s headliners was thick in the air. The show consisted mainly of
songs from their new LP, Mount Benson, interspersed with a generous serving of
crowd favourites. Despite a few difficulties and false starts, the band put on a
truly memorable display complete with crowd surfing, guest lectures pertaining
'-, J Cr- to the old western frontier and a costume contest culminating in a shirtless
wrestling match between the singer, Adrian Teacher and a few eager moshers.
And just as quickly as the night started, the clock struck n p.m. Suddenly the
music stopped and the crowd was hurriedly rushed into the crisp spring night,
giddy with the vibes of an awesome concert.
—Craig Turney
YOU SAY PARTY! WE SAY DIE!
April 161 The Rickshaw Theatre
This was a hard review to write. Most of you will know by now that Devon Clifford, drummer of You Say Party! We Say Die! collapsed on stage during their
performance at the Rickshaw and subsequently passed away. One of the most
talented and hard working bands to ever come out of the Lower Mainland had
just come home after an extensive North American tour. And those of us at the
Rickshaw were glad to have them back.
Against the back drop of an old Twin Peaks episode YSPSWSD! played
songs off their latest album XXXX. Vocalist Becky Ninkovic was charismatic
as always. She didn't miss a note and at various times expressed her delight
at being home. Guitarist Derek Adam struck power chord after power chord.
Bassist Stephen O'Shea cut a striking figure on stage, lost in each song. Krista
Loewen provided the atmosphere that comes with every YSP!WSD! song. And
Clifford belted the hell out of his drum kit.
There was a lot of confusion after they finished "She's Spoken For." It quickly
became apparent that Clifford was in distress. All we could do was watch in
stunned silence as a stream of paramedics came to his aid. The Rickshaw staff
eventually moved the audience out onto Hastings where we stood like lost
children, wondering what to do next.
This isn't supposed to happen to young people. This isn't supposed to happen to viciously talented
people on the verge of
brilliance. This isn't
supposed to happen to
a band that had already
worked through so many
problems and come out
on the other side. Too
sad for words.
—Katherine Boothroyd
BONGO BEAT NEWS
GRAHAM BROWN
Do What You Should
I Graham Brown I West Coast roots rock
1 the erame dogs j from ex-jR GONE WILD,
4T    00      ! HAPPY MAN, and
\*     Wilt I BRILLIANTORANGE.
0 -3(011    ! "4 Stars!" -
! 1      t"Sh«lldl Americana.UK
INTERNATIONAL RECORD STORE DAY SHOW
THE EVAPORATORS / THEE MANIPULATORS / PETROLEUM BY-PRODUCT
/BRAIN BOLT
April 17 / Neptoon Records
Neptoon Records hosted a whopping nine bands this year. The Vicious Cycles
got the early crowd bobbing their heads with frequent nods of approval and
dancing thanks to their brilliant use of the theremin in the ever so catchy "I
Love My Bike."
Once Thee Manipulators took the stage, the store got packed. It was the
band's record release for Ease Up on the Break Downs and itwas clear they wanted to
impress. The band worked the crowd, tossing out little maracas to get everyone
shakin' and their ecstatic fans started on the "woo o-oos," before the band got
the chance to when they broke into "(If s Gonna Be) Alright." That infectious
organ, heavy snare and an intensified cover of "Just a Little Misunderstanding"
is all that was needed to get people moving towards the shelf packed with the
band's freshly pressed LP.
Up next were the Evaporators. Nardwuar the Human Serviette couldn't
sing if his life depended on it, but boy can he make the crowd hyper. The
Evaporators are all about audience interaction. Chocolate was handed out,
two frightened teens held Nardwuar up on their shoulders, and a half naked
Nardwuar managed to get the entire store to crouch down and jump in the air.
The store turned into a gong show and people were either thinking "What the
fuck?" or grinning with excitemenL
After the Evaporators, the crowd faded and unfortunately missed a nice
set by trio Petroleum By-Product. Though their levels had to be adjusted and
they seemed bored, their simplistic, '80s New Wave tracks, proved that less
is more. A lesson that the band that followed them, Brain Bolt, should note.
They were no doubt the loudest, but it was like they were having a private jam
session that went on way too long. People were either tired or Brain Bolt seriously cleared the place out.
It was obvious that the last two bands were fillers, but the energy from
earlier on still made the show worth it. And who can complain when you also
received a free lollipop and Neptoon button.
—Angela Yen
MonthlJuCommumtwMarltet,
NEW RICK ALBUM THIS JUNE!
WWW.60NG0BEAT.COM
33 THINK ABOUT LIFE / MURAL BY DANIEL 1QNHSTON
SXSW
BY BRENDA GRUNAU
PHOTOS BY DUNCAN MCHUGH
SOUTH BY SOUTHWEST, YOU MAY HAVE HEARD OF IT. IT'S POSSIBLY THE BIGGEST MUSIC FESTIVAL IN NORTH
AMERICA—IT CERTAINLY HAS THE MOST BANDS PLAYING AT IT. OUR OWN BRENDA GRUNAU WENT DOWN TO
CHECK IT OUT AND THIS IS HER CHRONICLE.
They say (CiTR's music director Luke Meat says) that nothing
is like your first time at South By Southwest. If bands are your
addiction, then Austin is your overdose. Instead of retail, Austin
has bars. Six block of bar after bar. During SXSW, each bar is a
venue, sometimes two, and maybe even three, if they decide to
extend the party with a tent in the back alley. Many venues were outdoors, in
alleys, parks or at the back of ranch houses hosting pong tables. The sound
bleed in the street was incredible (from a showgoer perspective as well as
from a city bylaw perspective), with a different band teasing your ears every ten
paces. Two main streets were closed during the festival and filled up with music
lovers, who seemed refreshingly normal after witnessing Granville's red-clad
drunken hordes during the Olympics. There were so many bands in Austin
that bands that starting with the letter 'B' took up three pages in my pocket
program guide. Highlights of my SXSW included seeing the Muffs, Ruby Sons,
Yellow Fever, recently discovered '70s punk band Death, Winnipeg's Boats!
and Local Natives. Nashville's Turbo Fruits stunned the crowd as lead singer
Jonas Stein climbed the speakers, grabbed hold of the awning poles and hung
upside down from the middle of the tent, strumming his guitar. Goofy Das
Racist rappers reluctantly treated us to the annoyingly catchy "Combination
Pizza Hut and Taco Bell."
For our pre-SXSW event, we visited the 21st Street Coop, an undergraduate cooperative (and occasional show zone) that had the air of a combination
commune and frat house. Wooden walkways connected the buildings, making
space for beer-swilling partiers who spilled out of the small, hot, sweaty room.
If you could avoid errant pissers and beer cans, the grounds were lovely, abuzz
with the flow of students and random music industry professionals. Wounded
Lion and Thee Oh Sees were the main attractions, and transformed the room
into a mess of moshing, smelly boys.
Our SXSW ended at a Vice party in an unfinished office building. We
jumped levels in the adjoining parking garage and snuck in the back door,
catching sight of pot-bellied and shirtless Les Savy Fav, as lead singer Tim
Harrington ran into the throng and reappeared on a table top floating across
the crowd. CiTR's Duncan McHugh was one of the pallbearer-esque muscle
men underneath.
34 DUTCHESS SAYS/THEE OH SEES
 THE CONFERENCE	
SXSW also featured panels and presentations, interviews, a trade show
and a poster exhibit. Our very own Nardwuar the Human Serviette presented
his "Video Vault Part Deux," entertaining the adoring crowd with anecdotes
and amusing segues. Nardwuar chronicled his conversations throughout the
years with Courtney Love, and his intention to catch a few words with her at
SXSW. Unfortunately, she managed to give him the slip despite his excellent
star hunting skills.
The other panels delved into industry challenges and legal issues. In "Winy
Hasn't the Record Industry Sued Girl Talk?" two lawyers got into a snitover the
definition of the public domain, and in "Evaluating the New Business Models:
Benefit or B.S.?" five lawyers put a hundred people to sleep by discussing the
details of contracts.
   THE DAY PARTIES	
In addition to hourly evening showcases between the hours of 8 p.m. and
2 a.m., companies, countries, labels and media threw day parties, all free with
stellar line-ups, free food, swag and occasionally liquor. The M for Montreal
party was stacked with great Canadian bands including Besnard Lakes, Holy
Fuck, Think About life, Duchess Says, Rory Erikson and Plants & Animals.
Although we were disappointed that our beer tickets were really a raffle for a
pair of jeans, we stuck around for the afternoon to score free vegan BBQ and
pineapple/basil ice cream bars.
While the food was disappearing fast in buffet form, the music was lined
up like one of those classy ten-course tasting menus.
Duchess Sgys, a percussiire art-rock-pop outfit from Montreal, charmed
and jarred us with their edgy experimental sound. Lead vocalist Annie-Claude
Desch£nes paced the stage, punctuated the music with her body, and used her
stiff hands to chop sound into bits and pieces. Vancouver's own Edo Van Bree-
man of Brasstronaut was bobbing around in the crowd, eyes on the floor, when
Annie-Claude burst into the crowd, put her shoulders on Edo and wrestled him
down to the ground. Check out Discorder's website for the video.
Mint Records and Six Shooter Records threw a fun bash with the Pack A.D.
and Carolyn Mark, and Manitoba Music hosted an amazing BBQ in a beautiful
turn-of-the-century mansion.
 AUSTIN SIGHTS	
On recommendation by Val Cormier of CiTR's Folk Oasis, we hopped in the
car for a day of Texas county adventures. After a historical distraction and cattle
safari atL. B. Johnson National Park, we arrived atLuckenbach—population: 3,
a trading post and dance hall on Farm to Market Road 1376. Thirty odd people
were scattered around the town and the picnic tables, drinking Shiners (the
Texas brew), and singing along to covers of country songs. We were treated
to a rendition of the Waylon Jennings song that made Luckenbach famous—
"Luckenbach, Texas (Back to the Basics of Love)." Luckenbach hosts concerts
regularly, and was the site of Willie Nelson's Fourth of July Picnic in the '90s.
We enjoyed the atmosphere in relative safety, under the boughs of a hulking,
ancient tree, until one of the chickens hiding in the branches laid an egg that
dropped to the ground with a crackle and splat. %
35 "ill.I  In! ^8 I' ill
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12! II In! g9fe' HSi
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IP lit Mi?
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1
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I '•'^^■>ftmi*^h#t&;-T
'jflSfelft
Japanese Indie
Music Festival!!
@
Biltmore
Cabaret
May 22, 2010
5 killer bands from Japan,     mothercoat / andymori / OWARIKARA
Prize Giveaways. Kulu Kulu Garden / goomi
Free Japanese food & snacks (ltd supplies... be early o
Only $8(adv) $10 (door)!!
http://nextmusicfromtokyo.com PARTTWO
BY SANCHO MCCANN
ILLUSTRATION BY LINDSEY HAMPTON
In part one of this series, we looked at some of the technical aspects of
getting started as a DJ: equipment, resources, practice and developing
your style. Part two covers the rest of it: starting to play publically, getting known, show promotion and some tips for the scene in Vancouver.
Advice comes from Brad Winter, CiTR's music director, Michael Red of
Lighta! Sound and Jason Sulyma a.k.a. mylgay.'husband!
To move out of your own little space to performing in front of a live crowd
can be the hardest step to make. You can start by simply playing at parties
that you or your friends' host. Who's going to turn down an offer to have a
DJ at their party?
"There are things you'll never understand until you play somewhere live,"
Winter said. "[Like] how to keep people on their toes, giving them something
that they don't expect, getting that balance between what youiike and what
they like."
Vancouver has a really cool opportunity called Open Dex at the ANZA
club every Saturday night from 10 p.m. until 2 a.m. It's half hour sets, open
to anyone who wants to play. You'll find a relaxed lounge environment where
people aren't expecting to dance (although it's definitely not prohibited), so
less pressure than out at a club.
Winter recommends looking downtown for a few hip retail stores that have
turntables. They can be welcoming to beginner DJs and they also don't have
the pressure of having to entertain a crowd that wants to dance. Play at one of
these a few times on weekends or evenings and you just might get an invite
back to play at a special event.
If you're looking for a fun challenge, CiTR holds an annual DJ contest with
entrants ranging from beginners just stepping out of their bedrooms to those
with several years of experience behind them.
This can all be fun, so why would you want to take it further? One reason is
just to grow a scene that you think is missing. "If you don't see events going on
that fit what you want to play, then putthem on yourself," saidRed. "It'seasier
than you might think." We'll get to that, but if you're not ready to jump in and
start promoting your own events right away, you might want to try to catch the
attention of a promoter or a DJ crew that you think fits with your style.
This is where personal promotion through an online presence is essential.
Red had some advice about this. Demos, mixes and playlists are key. These
should reflect what you really want to play. They should give promoters and
other DJs an idea of how you'd fit in with what they're trying to do. Be visible
online. Use MySpace. Start a blog. "The easier you make [it] on the promoter to
sell an event with you playing, the easier it's going to be for you," said Red.
The choice between solo promotion and operating as a group has several
consequences. Red and Sulyma both acknowledged working as an individual
brings greater freedom: "You get to follow your vision, book the bands you
want, the flyers, the art, you get to decide it," Sulyma said.
Depending on how you view the conflicts that arise in a group, they're not
necessarily a negative. "We're all individuals, and we're all artists... There can
be clashes... but that can be a really great learning process provided everyone
is willing to meet at that level," said Red. There's also the financial aspect To
run an event, you'll need to pay your staff, the venue and then having to split
the small profit with a few others can make your rent hard to pay.
Some event planning tips from Red and Sulyma should be useful for any
up-and-coming promoter. Sulyma gave a step-by-step: pick a name for your silly
night, even though nobody cares about the name; get a good graphic designer
and build your graphic to fit the kind of event you want, create a flyer and get
it printed, then hustle hard. He suggests hitting the stores, the street and having a nighttime presence. "Don't just hang on the Internet the whole time and
think that's promoting. When the Cobalt closed, there were 6,000 people on
the Facebook group," said Sulyma. [ed. Point berry that it still closed.]
Red added, "It's important not to push things on people. Give them the
information and leave it in their hands to decide. Just put on a quality event,
then word of mouth will spread."
A venue for your event might seem hard to come by, but they're out there.
"Every bar is so broke here, and everybody only has weekend traffic, they would
kill to have more shows, and if you say that you can't get a show from Sunday
through Thursday, then you're not trying hard enough," said Sulyma. It does
depend on what you're trying to do, though. Underground bass music has a
particularly difficult time. Red was excited about the re-opening of 917 Main
a.k.a. the Cobalt: "Everything appeared to work there, except... for the bass
volume." He's wonders though, about mainstream venues taking more chances
on underground. "It'd be great to live in a world where Top 40 mainstream
dance music didn't dominate Vancouver's downtown scene." Perhaps it just
comes down to money.
That's what Sulyma mentioned it coming down to. "If you fill the room, the
venue can sell their liquor and then they'll let you do another show," he said.
One demographic that's under-targeted by events in Vancouver is the under
19 crowd. Sulyma's only complaints about venues in the city is that there are
not enough venues for the huge under 19 population and that all-ages shows
get the police scared and get parents scared. "Kids are sneaking into clubs
anyway. They need to get used to doing unique social things in the evenings,
not just house parties or raves where they'll get beat up or O.D.," said Sulyma.
There's a challenge for you promoters out there: build up the all-ages scene.
The Rickshaw, with their theatre licence, is one of the few great locations for
all-ages shows.
Red and Sulyma had similar final bits of advice. "Make sure that you're
playing music that you're passionate about. Make sure you're going where
you want to go," said Red.
"Do it if you want to do it," said Sulyma, "and don't worry about haters." fc
38 //CiTR 101.9 FM CHARTS
STRICTLY THE DOPEST HITZ OF APRIL
. #	
ARTIST	
ALBUM
LABEL
 i	
ARTIST
ALBUM	
LABEL
1
Apollo Ghosts*
Mount Benson
Independent
26
The Slackers
The Great
Rocksteady Swindle
Hellcat
2
The Molestics*
A Farewell to Hokum
Independent
27
Growing
Pumps!
Vice
3
Dum Dum Girls
I Will Be
Sub Pop
28
Fan Death
A Coin For The Well
Last Gang
4
Eddy Current
Suppression Ring
Rush to Relax
Goner
29
Exceptor
Presidence
Paw Tracks
5
Love Is All
Two Thousand
& Ten Injuries
Polyvinyl
30
Ghostkeeper*
s/t
Flemish Eye
6
Mark Sultan*
111
Last Gang
31
Various*
MusicWorks 106
MusicWorks Magazine
7
Charlotte
Gainsbourg
IRM
Because
32
Liars
Sisterworld
Mute
8
The Souljazz
Orchestra*
Risina Sun
Strut
33
Wooden Shjips
Vol.2
Sick Thirst
9
Harlem
Hippies
Matador
34
Jaga Jazzist
One-Armed Bandit
Ninja Tune
10
Indian Wars*
If You Want Me b/u>
Carol Anne 7"
Bachelor
35
Fanshaw*
Dark Eyes
Mint
11
Plants & Animals*
La La Land
Secret City
36
Roky Erickson w/
Okkervil River
True Love Cast
Out All Evil
Anti-
12
Happy Birthday
s/t
Sub Pop
37
Boats*
Cannonballs,
Cannonballs
Majestic Triumph
13
Loscil*
Endless Falls
Kranky
38
Moon Duo
Escape
Woodsist
14
Spoon River*
Kingdom of
the Burned
Northern Electric
39
Joanna Newsom
Have One On Me
Drag City
15
Inhabitants*
AVacantLot
Drip Audio
40
SubtractiveLAD*
Life at the End
of the World
nsMD
16
Sonny &
the Sunsets
Tomorrow is Alright
Soft Abuse
41
Young Rival*
wt
Sonic Unyon
17
Quasi
American Gong
Kill Rock Stars
42
Yeasayer
Odd Blood
Secretly Canadian
18
Jonsi
Go
XL Recordings
43
Ruby Suns
Fight Softly
Sub Pop
19
She & Him
Vol Two
Merge
44
Malachai
Ugly Side of love
Domino
20
Bonobo
Black Sands
Ninja Tune
45
TheHextalls*
Get Smashed
Independent
21
Awesome Color
Massa Hypnos
Ecstatic Peace!
46
Half Chinese*
We Were
Pretending To Be
Needs More Ram
22
Four Tet
There Is love
In You
Domino
47
Pantha Du Prince
Black Noise
Rough Trade
23
Yellow Swans
Going Places
Type
48
Gigi*
Maintenant
Tomlab
24
McRackins*
It Ain 't Over Easy
Wolverine
49
Best Coast
When I'm With You
b/w This Is Real 7"
Black Iris
25
Goldfrapp
Head First
EMI
50
Heiki*
Paper + Sound
Paper+Sound
CiTR's charts reflect what's been played on the air by CiTR's lovely DJs last month. Records with asterisks (*) are Canadian. Most of these excellent albums
can be found at fine independent music stores across Vancouver. If you can't find them, give CiTR's music coordinator a shout at (604) 822-8733. His name is
Luke Meat. If you ask nicely, he'll tell you how to find them. Check out other great campus/community radio charts at www.earshot-online.com. SUMMBI ROTS SUMMER SOUNDS
THE PACK A.D. - We |G|C^ppBters C|/L|u
\ SUBHUMANS - SaHfa»ifMiahfe D^fll^^Vfe
CD/2LP
DISAPPEARS ^L;Ux£D/LP
CARIBOU - Swi^lptpS
DESTROYER - Streettiawk IIA Seduction, Thief
CD/LP
BABY DEE - A Book Of SortffS
THE MORNING BENDERS - Big too CD/LP
BONJASUFI - A Sufl and 3 Killer CD/LP
iftOKY ERICKSON/OKKERVfiL RtVj^-True Love
fasts Out All Evil CD/LP
tJjfliW- Congratulations CO^^
WWEMENT-Quarrantine The Past CD/LP
PLANTS AND ANIMALS - La La Land CD/LP
JASON ZUMPANO - Room And Mansion CD
YUKON BLONDE-S/t CD/LP
pHHH
TIRKFTSI ZULUTJCKErfriMOTW^
I lUllL I Hi May is traditionally always an amazing
Sat May 01
Sat May 01
Sat May 01
Mon May 03
TueMay04
GLORY DAYS (EMILY CARR GRAO)
w/ LADYHAWK - RICKSHN$fc$
'ALEXKENJI-ffl^HQl
YOAV-V£||||i
THE ANTLER^^WjrJDIRiE - •
Wed May 05   PUNTS AN'd||^MM|
BfU^l^dlMUT rr^/iM^ ^
THE JJ»J$£S ^ raK|' -
D^g0yftW~i0MMODOr1F^
TtiUMay06
Thu May 06
Thu May 06
Fri May 07
Fri May 07
Fri May 07
Sat May 081
Sun May 09
Sun May 09
TueMayH
^^^^lj§fW^m ON EARTH
Wetf lliy^  #$10 ^ILlW0ftE\
: fcll»tlt:Hr|l0KHJt#^fcWPRi <
>C6lillftOb0fti ;
RfiBf^^^^KBILTMORE
'. J5 Jffdlafanjlsfroni Japan)   ;
TtorMay13 .
lilrtay-fll
.."winy.sdj
J0HAWNJOHANNSS0N- BILTMORE  «TftdMay26   BROKEN B0JD8* COMMODORE
picks for great concerts' Stop by far your tickets!
Wed May 26   GIRLS ml Dum Dum Girls - VENUE
Thu May 27    GIRLS w/ Dum Dum Girls - VENUE
ThuMay27    WHY? - BILTMORE
Thu May 27    PUBLIC ENEMY - COMMODORE
Fri May 28     THE VERY BEST - BILTMORE
|§||May28     LOCAL NATIVES - MEDIA CLUB
j|p,May29     MASSIVE ATTACK
-MALKINBOWL
^Hbiy29    VETIVER-BILTMORE
ii|(ay29     CARIBOU - RICKSHAW
^May 30    FOOL'S GOLD - BILTMORE
^W SAGE FRANCIS-BILTMORE
^^^ft | iPMMMI S HAR P E
AND THE MAGNETIC ZEROS
E-COMMODORE
Hpiy 31   BUZZCOCKS-VENUE
^P|lay31    LCD SOUNDSYSTEM
- MALKIN BOWL
I! JOIN ZULU'S VINYL APPRECIATION NIGHT
Thursday May 20th 7-9PM
Check our website for more details! We are planning a social night
lor anyone who is into the 'back to black' vinyl revival! Mark your
calendars, join us on facebook, or follow us on Twitter as we plan a
night of good times, good deals, drinks, and of course lots of wax!!
K£Cd<RV£,
Zulu Records
1972-1976 W 4th Ave
Vancouver, BC
tel 604.738.3232
www.zulurecords.com
STORE HOURS
Mon to Wed
10:30-
-1M
Thurs and Fri
10:30-
-9:00
Sat
9:30-
-6:30
Sun
12:00
-6:00

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