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  'hat Kind Of
o You Wanna
Get In?
WEDNESDAY - ONE NIGHT OF SIN
99$  HI - BALLS
SPINNER:  DJ MICK HARD
THURSDAY - TOO LONG IN THE
WASTELANI
$2.50 on DOMESTIC BEER
SPINNER:   DJC.   SCOTT
FRIDAY - VICTIMS OF THE
N   I   G   H   T   L   I
SHOOTER SPECIALS ALL NIGHT
WITH   DJ   C. SCOTT
SATURDAY - PERFECT
SYMMETRY
WITH DJ MICK HARD
YOUR CiTR   FRIDAY  NIGHT BOPPATRON DJ
TwIligKl
Zonr
"EXPERIENCE
THE UNEXPECTED"
682 - 8520
682 - 1470
TO ENQUIRE ABOUT CHRISTMAS
PARTY  BOOKINGS
! MAKE YOUR  NEW
! YEAR'S RESERVATIONS
■
682-8550     !
i DANCETERIA & COCKTAIL BAR     7 Alexander St.    682-1470
I CLIP THIS COUPON FOR 2 FORI ADMISSION FRIDAY OR SATURDAY I SURE TO SELL OUT! CONTENTS
DECEMBER • 1989 Issue #83
ROBYN HITCHCOCK
Glen Kruger talks to the man with the 60 watt noggin     6
THE PIXIES
This 'Bope has gone to heaven     7
BROKEN MOULD
Husker dont anymore, but this guy du - Michael LeDuc chats with Bob Mould     8
RAT CONTROL
Proof that within the pacifist lurks the killer - a story by The Man Sherbet  11
THE JAPANESE NEW WAVE
Den Lebel discusses the epic Russian novel Japanese comicbook   18
FOR A FEW CENTIMES MORE
Swallowin' swords at Jimbo's grave   34
AIRHEAD
If you can't say anything nice, write to Airhead      5
BEATMIX
DJ Mick Hard traces the evolution of the Break Beat   16
RAG BAG
Betty Cooper gets wrapped up in leather .    17
REAL LIVE ACTION
Chiefs of Belief, Nice Strong Arm, Ludwigs, and then some   20
LOCAL MOTION
HEY! Let's get Janis...she listens to everything!   21
TAPE - A - MANIA
You supply the tape, we supply the - A - Mania  22
COMIX ARE ALL I READ
Zap#12-Dig it    24
UNDER REVIEW
You say: "What's new, man?" We tell ya   26
HELL'S KITCHEN
Only Viola could say BURRRRP so eloquently   29
ON THE DIAL
It's like TV Guide, but it's for the radio   30
SPINLIST
"WEdon't H/WEatopten list here at CiTR".....   31
DISCORDER DATEBOOK
What's on, what's hot, what's hip and what isn't  32
■■■■■■■■■■■■CiilJ£9HHHHHHI[^H...H
EARTH GUY
Scott Fearnley     3
DANCING ON THE CLOUDS
Marc Yuill and Julian Lawrence  23
ROLAND THE HAPPY WANDERER
Geoff Coates,  25
CYBERTOONS
Den Lebel  33
FOR OFF CE USE ONLY
EDITOR Kevin Smith ART DIRECTOR Scott Chernoff PRODUCTION MANAGER Bill Baker EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS Viola
Funk, Michael Leduc, Usa Marr PRODUCTION ASSISTANT Lydia Schymansky WRITERS Betty Cooper, Une Dunlop,
Viola Funk, Mike Harding, Michael Klassen, Christopher Kovacs, Glen Kruger, Michael LeDuc, Den Lebel, Janis
McKenzie, Leigh Wolf GRAPHICS Scott Fearnley PHOTOGRAPHERS Lydia Schymansky, Lome Taylor WORD PROCESS
ING Alice Hul, Alice Lorlng, Lisa Marr COVER ILLUSTRATION Scott Fearnley SPINLIST Chris Buchanan ADVERTISING
MANAGER Mike Harding ADVERTISING PRODUCTION Bill Baker SUBSCRIPTIONS/MAIL DISTRIBUTION Robynn Iwata
PROGRAM GUIDE/DATEBOOK DUDE Randy Iwata ACCOUNTS BULLY Barb Wilson TECHNICAL SUPPORT Joanne
©1989 AURightsReserved.I5iscorderisThatMagazinefromCiTRfM102and is published monthly by theStudentRadioSociety
of the University of British Columbia. Discorder prints what it wants, including the CiTR On the Dial program guide and the CiTR
Spinlist playlist chart. Circulation is 17,500 copies distributed free to over 200 locations. Twelve-month subscriptions are $15 in
Canada, $15 (US) to the US, and $24 elsewhere. Please make cheques or money orders payable to Discorder Magazine. The right
to write badly was the privilege we widely used" - Babel. Discorder wants vour stuff: send in stories, drawings, comics, money,
photos or what have you. If we like 'em, well use 'em. If we don't, we'll lose 'em. Deadline for submissions and ad bookings is
the 15th of the previous month.
CiTR 101.9 fM is 1800 watts of stereophonic bliss on cable fM from UBC to Langley, Squamish to Point Roberts, but not on Shaw
Cable in White Rock (if you want it, you'll find a way). CiTR is now available on most clock radios and in cars too. Office hours
for CiTR, Discorder, and CiTR Mobile Sound Rental are Mon-Fri, 10am - 4pm (please avoid Friday afternoons) Call the CiTR/
Discorder Office at 228-3017, CiTR News+Sports at 224-4320, or the CiTR DJ line at 228-CiTR. Send stuff c/o Discorder Magazine or CiTR Radio to Room 233,6138 SUB Boulevard, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A5.  Fax (604) 228-6093.
DECEMBER 1989 3 iCi
TR
Presents
Mercury/Creation/
Polygram Recording
Artists
Tuesday Nov. 28
with guests
THE STOATERS
The Commodore
870 Granville St.
Doors 8 pm
Showtime 9:00 pm
ut Electric Lunch presents
Elektra Recording Artists
DAVID  LINDLEY
& EL RAYO-X
CFMI
Presents Epic/CBS
Recording Artists
FRIDAY,
DECEMBER     1
TOWN P UMP
66 Water Street Gasi
Showtime:
10:30   pm
INDIGO
GIRLS
Monday Dec. 4
with guests
The Ridge Theatre
3131 Arbutus Street
Doors 7:30 pm
Showtime 8:15 pm
Sharp
Tickets available at Track, Zulu, Black Swan, Highlife and
CHARGE BY PHONE 280-4444
PRODUCTIONS OF TIMBRE '89 YOUR WISH...
Dear Airhead,
Has CITR stopped supporting our local independent
bands? Since the September issue Discorder appears to have
dropped the monthly Demo Playlist. This fact seems all the more
ludicrous when you consider
Discorder has actually INCREASED the space alloted to
Spinlist: a list, incidentally, consisting mainly of big corporate
label acts!
What's the sense in this?
For an organization that claims
to be community oriented and
supportive of independent music, CITR and Discorder have
made it increasingly impossible
for local listeners and concert-
goers to know what music is
really happening in our community. The Playlist helps to keep
your readers and listeners informed, and, presumably, is also
a source of encouragement for
local artists to keep on producing
Please don't turn a deaf
ear to the supporters of CTTR
and Vancouver's independent
music. Bring back the Monthly
Demo Playlist and let us know
what's happening.
Yours Truly,
David Reid
You can blame this on Confused
Intellectuals Terrorising Radio
(CiTR). Lazy ones. And disorganised ones. Not only have those
responsible for this downright
crummy omission been removed
from society and have had certain brain cells excised, but they
have also discovered (the hard
way) the unprecedented public
demand for the exposure of local
music through the airwaves of
Thunderbird Radio Hell and the
esteemed pages of Discorder.
Thanks for the letter, Dave.
Demo Direktor
Dale Sawyer
MISTAKE? US?
Dear Airhead,
I was pleased that you
dudes printed my letter last issue
(where I questioned your extension of the Polygram boycott to
concert advertising). I was satisfied by your reasoned response
and I felt suitably humbled, es
pecially when you responded to
my charge that you were hurting
an innocent Bob Mould. You
said that his label, A & M, is
going to be acquired by Polygram. That sounded pretty convincing until I realized something.
Mould is on Virgin, not
A&M.
1 know the boycott is over
(Congratulations), but you guys
didn't have to defend yourselves
by making up facts (an honest
mistake, I hear you say? I'm
soooo sure).
By the way, the concert
kicked ass.
Yours truly,
Larry Dudock
Well, Larry, it seems we meet
again. Yes, your statement that
Bob Mould is on Virgin not A &M
is correct. However, Virgin is a
smaller, British-based label that
is distributed in Canada by A &M.
Similarly, The Pixies are on4AD,
Love and Rockets are on Beggars Banquet, and De La Soul
arc on Tommy Boy, yet all three
are distributed in Canada by
Polygram. Thus, we consider
these groups to be on Polygram,
and Bob Mould to be on A&M.
If you desire further
clarification call our Music Di-
Chris Buchanan, at 228-
3017.
Top Twenty LPs
of the 1980s
YouVe seen the Rolling Stone 'greatest' 100 LPs of the
1980s and John Mackie's 20 'best' albums of the decade.
What a joke, right? What planet are these people from? Who
do they think they are? I know, people with good taste.
Su rely there's a better way to determine the best albums of
the beloved 1980s. Why not let the people decide, in true
democratic fashion? Let's put it to a vote.
So, here is your chance to have your say. Just send us your
choices for the best twenty LPs of the 1980s. (Do not include
compilations, re-issues, et cetera; just real albums.)
We will tabulate the votes and publish the outcome in
Discorder. We'll also publish responses from local know-it-
all 'underground' celebrities. Hurry 'cause the deadline is
December 13th. Eveyone's got an opinion, right? Power to
the People, eh.
SEND YOUR RESPONSES TO:
DISCORDER TOP TWENTY
c\oCiTR
6138 SUB Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T 2A5
DECEMBER 1989 5 Interview by Glenn Krueger
"I'm six foot two inches tall and made entirely of dead sea creatures. I have never wanted to be
anything but a singer, although I'm basically a draughtsman. My songs are simply pictures. A
song has no opinions. I want the pictures to be as intense as positive—ideally one glimpse would
detonate the spectator permanently. But, inevitably, things are lost in translation, or there is a delayed reaction. I have no ambition but I am very persistent. The great thing about human beings
is that they can walk and eat at the same time."
So said singer/ song- probably doing a few gigs. I paid for it
myself, it hasn't cost much, it'll make its
money back. It's whatl would like people
to hear.
The last two records were
all right but they were done by committee. Increasingly, the whole thing's
become a promotion machine for
myself so in a rare spasm of creativity I
manage occasionally to write a few songs
and I 'm putting them out. They're good,
it's just sort of more emotional...it's not
particularly clever. It's as close as I get
to making a human record and so much
music is inhuman now because it's controlled by machines. Rock and roll has
always gone hand in sex organ with
technology so you go around saying this
is rock and roll, anything that comes out
of a machine is rock and roll. It has an
artificial mother and a tribal father but
this one is just a very very simple organic music. I don't know why I sound
so sad when I'm saying this, I think it's
my interview voice(laughs). I'm really
pleased, I think it's going to be good. It's
coming out in March, I hope.
writer/ eccentric Robyn Hitchcock
February 1988. The guy is an interesting
character, full of words and wonder, wit
and wise. Discorder recently spoke with
the man who has written such pop-psychedelia ditties as Madonna of the
Wasps, Eaten By Her Own Dinner, and
The Man With the Lightbulb Head. We
pick up the conversation with Mr. Hitchcock explaining his reasons for presently playing without his backup group,
the Egyptians...
Robyn: I like to work on my own, I
really enjoy it. I've done a lot of stuff
with the band. Every time we go out we
take another couple of roadies and we
have to give them a raise and things like
that. So I don't actually make a lot of
money off touring. I've got a lot of telethons to support; I started a telethon
fund a couple of years ago and I've got
a lot of them. Telethons are very demanding things, they need money.
The current record is yet
untitled. It's an acoustic record. It'sbeen
mainly recorded in San Francisco and I
haven't quite finished it yet. It has no
overdubs; well, it has a few, it's fairly
simple.
Recorded on 2 track?
R: No, it's on 24 track but there's nothing spectacular about it, it just hasn't got
any bass and drums, it hasn't got a
producer; there's no fuss really about it.
It's not designed to prove anything in
marketing terms, it doesn't have any
corporate careers riding on it. It won't
have videos to go with it; it won't have
big adverts. It may even not come out on
A & M, it may come out through some
subsidiary. It will take the form of me
not really doing any
6 DISCORDER
"Well,he'sstillon about seafood." Does
it really matter whether I am or not by
now? You can't changeyour trademark,
you can't change the way people perceive you but I kind of resent it when
people try. In the end it really matters
very little. If the world is a thermometer,
music occupies the very very half of the
top degree between ninety-nine and a
half and a hundred; it's not an important
thing.
And Queen Elvis, did you have that
title and then it came from there?
R: Queen Elvis is about the descent into
stardom and that's what the song is
about. The lastrecord was about parallel
experiences. But it's nice of you to ask.
We're always very flattered when people
take an interest.
So what kinds of songs are you going
to put on this record then? More direct simple songs?
There's amazing stories you've put
on your songs. Do you actually have a
book of short stories or have them
developed into film?
R: I think that would be very expensive
and very literal to develop into films;
some things are better left to your imagination. That's what I don't like about
videos, it just limits people's imagination. There's always a visual image ti
R: Yeah, there's a song called Queeh go with the music. Thank God the Bible
wasn't written in times when they had
film around.
Elvis, which it wasn't on the album; it
wasn't written in time. I don't know,
songs, a variety of them, things like
Sweet Ghost of Light and Agony of
Pleasure and all the rest of it. Winter's
House, Glass Hotel, Mr. Thrusty 's Fruit
Club.
What's Mr. Thrusty's Fruit Club?
R: Mr. Thrusty's Fruit Club is about this
guy who destroys crabs with a knitting
needle. People will pick up on that one
because it's about seafood and say,
We may make a film with
stop frame some time. You haven't seen
our very early films The Man With the
Lightbulb Head and so on? It's all just
come out again; A & M are putting it
out. They've got all glossy new expensive promos that cost us a fortune and
done in Hollywood and they've got our
little old ones we used to do for 200
pounds in London. Needless to say I
prefer the ones done for 200 pounds.
Was it painful having all those carrots
crashing down on your head?
R: I didn't mind the carrots, it's just the
whole principle of someone else interpreting your songs. I don't have someone else interpreting my dreams, I mean,
you can if you paid. You could pay
someone S50 an hour to interpret your
dreams for you. To me that was another
way things were getting out of hand.
Does that mean you had no control
over the videos?
R: I had no ideas at all about those songs
and we were in a hurry, and they said
why don't you let us wheel in some
well-meaning left-field Hollywood
moguls. It's great, you spend all that
money with all those lighting guys, props
guys, people to come and wipe the sweat
off your top lip. You can pretend you're
Richard Nixon for an afternoon. And
again, it's flattering but ultimately you ,
ruin it. And the early ones we made from
Balloon Man back to Man With The
Lightbulb Head where we'd just do stop
frame, for those of you on radio, stop
frame involves the well known process
of moving something half an inch at a
time taking two shots of film on say 18
frames per second thing so it takes you
approximately nine seconds. No, that's
wrong, there are nine movements in
each second so it's very painstaking but
they're fun.
Like Peter Gabriel videos?
R: Yeah, that's what we did. We did the
last one. Balloon Man and they said it's
just like cheap Peter Gabriel   but the
point is it was cheap! It cost us virtually
nothing. I hate throwing all that money
around.
So you had more control over things
than people.
R: That's why kids play with inanimate
objects and when they grow up they
can' t relate to people and they have to go
to the shrink. I mean how many marriages are broken up because one person
thinks they're marrying a doll, the other
person thinks they're marrying a teddy
One person becomes married to the
television.
R: (laughs) They both do. The kids
marry the television. When you break
up the tv has custody of the kids. Yep.
Tropical Flesh Mandala, what inspires
a song like that?
R: I found one on the beach. It was this
thing, it had lots of sort of tentacle like
growths... black things squirming around
with molluscs on the end that opened
and closed like those Hoovers; those
small Hoovers for house cleaning. We
took a photograph of it and the pictures
never came out. And that was all that
was.
Do you spend much time walking on
the beach?
R: Every chance I get. 11
tween this beach in England—
Brighton?
R: No, it's down in the southwest, it's
more out of the way than that. It's a
really beautiful beach, I go there a lot.
There are things you can do in the water
there that are just fantastic.
Is it more to get away from people or
just to get in touch with nature?
R: There are people down there as well,
your involvement with them is up to
you. There's another beach that's further which is the official nudist beach.
I've got some friends that keep urging
me to get leather trousers need I say
more. I just go down there a lot. This is
nothing to do with that. It's really good,
you just sit in the pool and all sorts of
things happen.
Where do you live in England?
R: San Francisco.
San Francisco, England? You live in
San Francisco?
R:No.IfIwasa metronome, I 'd stop in
San Francisco at one end and London at
the other. I seldom go west of San Francisco or east of London. We went to
Japan once but... I've been to Sweden.
I'm a man of the world. I've got credit
cards. Basically, I'd like to either be in
S an Francisco or the Isle of Wight. That' s
where I tend to be...by the water. I wander up and down the Haight a lot in San
Francisco.
What has happened to the Egyptians?
Are you still an Egyptian?
R: I'm not dating them any more. No,
I'm sure we'll do something again, but
we're just having a break. We've done a
lot and the Egyptians are basically the
nuclear Sof tboys and the Softboys broke
up years ago. We got the Egyptians together simply for fun, to record a few
tracks and do one gig. Five years later
we'vemade something like three or four
LPs and done gigs all over the bloody
world.
Must've been fun.
R: It was fun but I don't think it's been
so much fun lately and it's been nice to
have a break for a bit. When me and
Andy and Morris got together again as
Robyn Hitchcock and the Egyptians, we
hadn't played together for four years or
something Uke that, not as the three of
How did they feel about it being you
and them?
R: Well you'd really have to ask them
about that. In some ways it would be
much nicer if the group was called one
thing and I was called another. By the
time Robyn Hitchcock and the Egyptians got going, the Softboys had been
long gone and I always hated the name
Softboys. I made the name up, I never
meant to apply it to my own group. It
was sort of these bloodless seeping
things, very English these things that
survive not on confrontation but on
manipulation, kind of like the people
who...youknow Britains famous forpro-
ducing gay commie...sorry,what's the
correct term., .commie faggot spies. You
know, gay people, well-educated gay people who defect to the a
whatever; people whose idealism is
exploited when they're young. I wasn't
thinking of communists, I was just thinking of discreet manipulative people.
Pinkos.
R: They're not pinkos, they're so subversive they don't have any feasible
creed whatsoever. They actually run the
country behind the prime minister's back
and blame the prime minister but there's
something even more, something so
deeply woven into the fibre of our society—
The backbone of trends?
R: It's like a backbone only they're
spineless, they would never confront
you, they would just manipulate you by
changing the shape of the corridors that
you walked along. You might thing you
were walking towards Heathrow but
they'd just switch corridors and you'd
go to Gatwick instead. They're intensely
manipulative. And that was the idea
behind the Softboys. Basically it was
a kind of very evil force. I started writing songs in 1970,1 got with Andy and
Morris in '76. We just met; I went up to
Cambridge and found them.
Being a cult figure, you seem to go
over better in the States than in England. Why do you think that is and
what is it like?
R: It means that I kind of commute to
work, I suppose. You know, I work over
here and a bit in Europe and Japan and
summary places, but most of it here, this
continent I mean, and I don't work in
England at all. It makes life quiet, it
means you don't get bothered too much
and then you come over here. It's rather
odd. It's going to work, you have a
differentjob. In Englandl'm effectively
unemployed but I bring the money back
over here.
But you have a very English way of
looking at the world, or do you agree
with that?
R: I don't know; I wouldn't be able to
say that. I think it's just easier for you to
define me as English. In England, people
have problems with me, over here you
can just say I'm English.
You've been away too much to be
R: No, long before then. When I was a
kid at school it wasn't right, it didn't fit.
I think maybe England is such a repressive society. They go on about how
England tolerates and cultivates eccentrics but I don't think that's so. I think
England is as uptight as you can get.
Basically, it's like when you squeeze a
bar of soap it'll just go foooom.
Do you think your sense of humour
might be a reaction to that?
R: I don't know, it seems such a generalization. Apparently, one of our traits is
supposed to be self-mockery. There are
whole areas where irony is right out, and
no metaphor; it sounds like Monty Python but Monty Python is deadly accurate in places. Someone wanted to know
whether I was ever naked or not.
Ever?
R: Yeah, they tried to imagine me. I
wrote back and said no I wasn't ever
naked.
What were you born with?
R: Clothes! What were you born with?
All British people are born with clothes.
Skin.
R: Okay. That's the big difference between the British and the rest of you.
We're bom with clothes, dammit.
Tweed?
R: If necessary. Well, some sections of
society. My lot are born with tweeds.
The Queen Mother, bom with tiara, born
at 45 she was. That's us. When you
come from something so fundamentally
horrible and pointless, as we do, what
can you do but mutate?
You have a knack writing these great
lines like "Yesterday I saw the devil in
my food..."
R: Well.obviously, if you found a devil
in your food, you wouldn't want to play
with it, you'd play with it but you
wouldn't want to eat it. But you'd play
with it maybe because you thought if
you ignored the food all together the
devil would say "What's wrong with
this then, eh, not going to finish your
bean stew? Good bean stew." So you
know, you'd say "I'm just going to the
"... hell is much more of
a reality than heaven. I
can imagine achieving
a state of hell but I can't
imagine anyone wanting to go to heaven..."
bathroom." And then you'd rush out the
back over the fence and scream away
from the restaurant and the devil still in
the bean stew going "Where's he got to
now then,eh?" And give you a half a
mile start on the devil before the devil
climbs out of the food dripping with
beans and says "Excuse me, Miss,
where's the bathroom?" And goes in
and sort of wipes off all the beans and
goes, "NOW, where's that Hitchcock
fellow? I'm going to get him."
Have you seen the devil?
R: I've seen him in the mirror, I've seen
him in my heart, I've seen him in my
relatives, and I've seen him in newspapers, I've seen him on tv, I've seen him
on airplanes, on stage with me. I've
never been to bed with him though.
Do you believe in God?
R: No, I believe in the devil. To me, hell
is much more of a reality than heaven. I
can imagine achieving a state of hell but
I can't imagine anyone wanting to go to
heaven because it would all be perfect
and you'd be bored. The devil is simply
the tendencies in yourself that you don't
want to face, that you don't want to
accept. There's nobody sitting there
manipulating the strings. Well, there is,
but they're just laughing at us.
Comparing Devil's Coachman to
Superman...
R: Superman is astud, he's avery macho
guy and he doesn't really achieve much
but he gets through dozens of women
and that's the end of it But he's tragic
really whereas the Devil's Coachman is
dealing with things in yourself that you
can't face. So I would say the Devil's
Coachman was a more painful song.
Superman's all right
though 'cause in the end, he knows he's
going to try better in the end, he's going
to make an effort, he's going to change
and develop. There's no development in
the Devil's Coachman, it's just a sort of
ghasdy reality. But there's some really
nice stuff on the new record, I mean, it's
not nearly as bad as that. It kind of
reaches here and then it gets better and
by the end of the new record it just
proves that you can always go on being
naive and innocent no matter how much
you know to the contrary.
You 'd think that after the
death camps and things like that, after
World War II everyone would have just
given up and they would've passed
around some gas that would have painlessly destroyed humanity once and for
all before anything got worse. Butpeople
just go, "Well hey!" and try again and
you know everyone wears red socks and
comes bursting out of a birthday cake
and bounces down the street and says,
"Well, here we are, there's more of us!"
When someone announces thatthey'repregnant.youdon't
write and send them condolences, "God
you've added another vermin to peril
decency, another dangerous rat to destroy our so called world." Because
we're the eyes of God, without us God
wouldn't be able to see. That's what we
were made for.
Are all your introductions between
songs totally spontaneous all the time?
R: No, it's just that things proliferate
very fast and then they bifurcate, it's
like the branches of a tree; start with one
and there's two. And then from each of
those branches there's a further two, so
there's awhole cluster. Suddenly you're
five feet into a branch; there's maybe
fifty possibilities. That's why trees can't
think too well.
How do you know which branch to
take?
R: WelL exactly, and things just blossom very fast and then die away. I'm
fueled by a good upbringing and a
healthy sense of guilt and the same old
spirals. This year they talked about
"spirals of violence", that's been the expression of the year.
And do you write your songs down?
R: I don't like writing. Whatever you
write you confine and you finish. You
have to be without fear. You have to be
prepared to let yourself do anything.
I've never achieved that but I'm sure in
principle that's how it should be. Then
everything would come out very fast.
You once told me you wrote books of
song titles, is that where they come
from?
R: Well,if I told you it must be true.
Sometimes I play the guitar and they
come out that way. It's like asking the
hen how or why it lays eggs. Logically we know we have the sexual urge
because Nature makes it pleasant for us
to do necessary things so we enjoy things
like eating and screwing and all the rest
of it. You can't really rationalize why
things are so important to you, it just
happens. We've got our impulses, we
don't know why. It's like an angel's
head on a demons body. I think that's
where the sense of guilt comes from.
Your rational self knows you're part of
the Belson generation and you just can't
take it I think humanity wants to cut its
own head off. But I believe in salvation
in the arms of my beloved. I bet you
thought I was never going to say it.
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DECEMBER 1989 7 ."» ».. - ^*JKJ
DmE;N--N>
NO MEANS NO
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>»»»»NO MEANS NO LIVE FILMING AND RECORDING AT THE
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AFTER
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Oj*>c    nvaitabl*   for
684-3322
ll08'kamU2Uit Aiieet The Pixies are not merely
a band— they are the saviours of that once proud
institution known as rock
and roll.
Jgjj§ «f,'        by Rob Boper
«jT i x i e s
Let's get a few things
out of the way before
we get into the meat
(or root, for all us vegetarians) of yet another attempt at
journalism by everybody's favourite Denny's breakfast special, Rob Boper. (You see, the
Dennny's next to where I live
named a breakfast special after
me since I was always going
there. I just had to promise to
mention it. It's not very good
though. Might I suggest the "Mr.
Ed" over easy with brown toast
and hollandaise sauce?)
First of all, if you are
looking for an objective article
on the Pixies, you'd be better off
reading one of those press releases put out by their record
company. As far as the Pixies are
concerned, objectivity and I
parted company as soon as the
first Pixies release, the Come on
Pilgrim EP, hit my technologically obsolete turntable.
Someone once said to
me, "You know, The Bope, I
don't know why people like The
Pixies so much, after all, they're
just a band." Well, let me tell
you, when the dust settied there
was only one of us standing. Sure
it took a couple of friends to help
me up, and the scars are barely
visible now, but I couldn't believe my ears. The Pixies, a mere
band! Now them's fighting words
if I've ever heard 'em, even if it
was my mom who said them. But
even my mom, The Big Boper,
now understands; The Pixies are
not merely a band—they are the
saviours of that once proud institution known as rock and roll.
And the other thing that
you, the discerning reader, should
know is — due to unforseen circumstances (it's along ugly story
involving football and dozens of
sweaty men), I was unable to
actually be at the interview with
Black Francis, lead screecher of
The Pixies. Instead, my intrepid
cat and assistant, Wiggie, went
in my place. Fortunately for us
all, Wiggie remembered to take
her tape deck and record the interview. She has also filled me in
on all the subtle details about
everybody's favorite Pixie.
(Unless you spend the majority
of your time drooling over Kim
Deal, the ultracool, yet sometimes spinny, bass player.
"We've played in Seattle before.
That's in Canada, isn't it?")
So, now that you know
the whole story, or at least as
much of it as you are ever going
to, might I suggest that you sit
back, put on your third copy of
Surfer Rosa (having worn the
first two out), and join in the
journey into Pixieland, a land of
demetia.
IMPORTANT YET REALLY
USELESS   PIXIEFACTS   —
impress your friends and woo
babes with this fine assortment
of trivia. (NOTE: Can also be
used for wooing hunks if one is
not into wooing babes.)
1. Black Francis is the Messiah
and/or The Pilsbury Doughboy.
DECEMBER 1989 9 Black Francis is a fairly relaxed
dude. He has no choice. With his
physique he couldn't be active
even if he wanted to. He does not
look like the saviour of rock and
roll, which, by the way, he is.
(But if you ever run into him on
the street, don't call him The
Messiah; like all good messiahs,
he embarasses easily. I guess we
all imagined the saviour to look
something like Ian Curtis, except maybe without the noose.
Black Francis, and I do not mean
this in ancgative way, looks more
like the Pilsbury Doughboy.
Don't believe me? Close your
eyes for a second. Okay, skip
that idea. I forgot that this is print
and you can't follow along without the benefit of sight. Imagine
then, if you will, the Pilsbury
Doughboy with long, kinda
stringy hair, wearing a dirty t-
shirt, jeans, and sneakers, with a
guitar slung over his gut, and a
voice that randomly reaches any
note of any octave at any time.
Throw in a slightly warped sense
of humour and a penchant for
writing songs that have more
hooks than 7-11 has week old
hotdogs and now you've got one
Black Francis. Not exactly the
kind of boy you'd want to take
home to meet mom, but then my
mom wouldn't be too happy if I
brought boys home anyway.
2. There arc other people in the
Don't get me wrong, The Pixies
are far more than just Black
Francis. David Lovering is by
far the coolest drummer ever to
grace this doomedplanet of ours;
just ask David Suzuki (about the
planet, not David Lovering's
drumming). Sure, he can't sing
(although he does so on La La La
Love You), but then no one ever
held that against Black Francis.
Joey Santiago is one mean guitar
god. He can get sounds out of
that six-stringed thing that I'm
sure requires a pact with Satan.
And then there is Kim. Hearts go
a-flutter. The Pixies wouldn' t be
The Pixies without her slightly
off-kilter "harmonies". Or her
monstrous bass. Kim's little girl
persona seems so fragile that you
just want to take her home and
play dolls with her. Okay, maybe
not dolls, but something else
equally stereotypical of a nine
year old little girl who also plays
the bass like all good little girls
do.
But the heart of The
Pixies, the creative controls, the
jelly in the doughnut, lies in the
mind of Francis. A scary thought
for any members of the PMRC,
but then I don't think they read
Discorder anyway — except
maybe Tipper Gore 'cause she
has such a cool name. Sounds
like a football player who's into
snuff movies.
Except for three or four
songs, Black Francis writes all
The Pixies' material. "All the
people in my band are fine
people," Francis confided to
Wiggie. 'They do what they do
very well and I enjoy playing in
a band with them. But it's not the
kind of chemistry where we write
songs together. It just does not
work out. I kind of dictate it and
I just don' t allow for other people
to grow into it a little more. This
is my first band; these are all my
tunes. I guess I'm just a little
headstrong about the whole thing.
But it will never become Black
Francis and the Pixies. It is "The
Pixies" and if any of the members ever left, I think it would
show a lot." But there'd be more
room on the tour bus.
3. My three favourite Pixies songs
will never again be played by the
band. (More of an interesting
fact if you are having aconversa-
tion with me, but then I did say
that some of these were useless.)
"I've Been Tired",
"River Euphrates", and "Here
Comes Your Man". My three
favorite songs, all banished from
The Pixies songbook, each for a
different reason.
"I've Been Tired"—To
me, this is theperfectsong. Witty,
catchy, uses the word "penis",
has a good beat, and I can dance
to it. I give it a 95, Dick. Well, the
old Blackmeister gives it a big
double zero. "We've played it
too much, and anyways, I don't
think it's that good or something.
It's embarassing to sing." Shows
what I know. I guess he doesn't
like saying "penis" in front of a
thousand people every night. I
wouldn't either.
"River Euphrates" —
One of the many jewels on the
band's first LP, "Surfer Rosa".
The 12" of this song, which
contains a revamped version of
"Gigantic", is perhaps the finest
piece of vinyl ever released in
this or any other century. But
"River Euphrates" is conspicuously missing from the set list.
"Kim smokes too many cigarettes and her harmonies really
suck at the moment. So we've
been avoiding songs like that.
She just smokes. She's an addictive personality, likes to smoke a
lot of cigarettes. It's fine by me,
it's just that, man, she cannot hit
the notes now." Nothing a ten
day visit to Schick wouldn'tcure.
At least she'll sound like Tom
Waits in a few years — or Jean
Cretien.
"Here Comes Your
Man" — Okay, so shoot me for
liking the pop song. How can
you not? Like it, I mean, not
shoot me. From the opening
chord to the big drum roll near
the end to the demented lyrics
(find me one Pixies song that
doesn't have demented lyrics),
it's all there. "Here Comes Your
Man" will be the number one
song of all time some day. It
could be; I just know it. You
should see Wiggie wag her tail to
it. But the song is cursed. You
see, The Pixies did a video for it
and it became somewhat of a hit.
Someone even told me he heard
it on an AM Top 40/Golden Oldie
radio station in Florida. And the
big guy doesn' t think they should
do it for that reason alone. At
least The Pixies can't be accused
of selling out. They can be, however, accused of selling their t-
shirts for S23, which gives anew
meaning to the song "Gouge
Away".
4. The Pixies think encores are
for masturbators.
It's true. Ever see what
Mick Jagger is doing to the microphone by the third encore?
Women and children out first,
please. Black Francis has but a
few words concerning this subject. "It's the most over-milked,
watered-down bullshit I've ever
seen, this damn encore stuff. It's
not like a rock and roll tradition
anymore, it'sjustlikesomething
well below; it's mediocre. I just
wish there were a little more class
in it. I wish it w.ere a little more
like the audience ripped the place
apart and the band came out and
did two more songs. But it's not
like that. It's like everyone just
fucking walks back out, does the
encore. How boring. There's no
balls." Gee, too bad we didn't
know this before the Commodore show. I'm sure the audience
would've ripped the place apart
for another song. It needs redecorating, anyway.
5. The guy with the world's hairiest back, pictured on the "Come
On Pilgrim" cover, is not Kim's
first husband.
They don't even know
him. He's just some guy who
looks like George "The Animal"
Steel (who is also Francis' father's hero). All The Pixies artwork is done by Vaughn Oliver
of 23 Envelope, who do all the
4AD stuff. "We just send the guy
a tape, he makes a bunch of art
and we like it. We choose not to
say anything about it. We like
this guy and what he does. He's
very laid back, not very stuffy or
intellectual, despite what some
people might think. There's not
alotof symbolism, butyoumight
look for a little clitoris or something. He always has little sex
things. Just some guy having
fun." With sex? Sounds dangerous to me. I hope Vaughn knows
about condoms. Also, Black
Francis has never dated the lady
on the cover of "Surfer Rosa".
6.Black Francis' mom's favorite
song is "Cactus".
He said so in Seattle. "I'd
like to play this one for my mom,
'cause it's her favorite song.
Sitting here wishing on the cement floor..." I guess she doesn't
like the word "penis", either.
7. You won't find the Pixies
playing at too many frat parties.
It's not anything personal, all you Phi Delts out there,
but it's just the whole college
thing doesn't appeal to Francis
to much. After three years of
university, Francis has a few
observations to make. "I didn't
like all the wimpy... there's just
so much political opinion-ating
going on and nothing much else.
It's like a lot of people not willing to go for something or do
something. I just wish there were
more types that would just say.
Tuck this. I'm going to get a
haircut I'm going to go to law
school and I'm going to become
the most ruthless motherfucker
and get into the most powerful
position I possibly can to make a
change.' Maybe there are people
doing that and you just don't see
them." A nice thought, but at
$2000 a year to attend this fine
institution the only change I'll be
making is at 7-11 so that I have
correct bus fare. But if the Pixies
would care to sponsor me, I'd be
more than happy to become a
ruthless lawyer. I can see it now
- Stickum, Zip and Boper. I've
always wanted to be an am-
bulence chaser. "No hit and run
too small.' "You need whiplash
— we got it.'  Rock on.
8. Black Francis and Adam Smith
are both proponents of laissez-
faire.
Yeah, except Adam
Smith is talking about the market
place and Black Francis is talking about drugs. Unlike most
people in today's society, the
band does not go bowling or clear
cut harvesting to relax. No, they
go the old fashioned route.
"Mostly we smoke pot. It seems
to be the trend the last six months
or so. Being heavily sedated in
our litde bus. And I'm not even
saying it to be cool, just slightly
funny. I sort of have a pro-drug
stance. I don't use a lot of drugs
or anything and I don't see myself doing it in the future. I say
laissez-faire." And I say watch
out at border crossings.
9. The new American pastime in
Europe is trying to get Canadian
tourists killed.
This one came as a surprise. And it's not exactly the
Pixies who do it, but Black's
brother, Brown. "The Canadian
guys in Europe backpacking
always have the big Canadian
flag on the back of their backpack. My brother would stay at
the youth hostels, and this is no
offense to you Canadians, but
he'd see some Canadian backpacker and he'd say, "Hey man,
you're from the States!'" A horrible thought at the best of times,
let alone when you are in Europe
where it is open season year round
on Americans. As it should be.
10. The true secret to the Pixies
success.
I know all you struggling
local bands — sorry, I forgot,
this is Vancouver, there isn't any
other kind of local band — have
been waiting for this moment for
quite sometime. It's like a world
famous chef learning just what
the eleven herbs and spices really are. Or someone finding out
just how the caramel gets inside
the Caramilk bars. I could hold
out and not tell you what makes
the Pixies different. I could publish a book and reach number
one on the New York Times bestseller list. But, no, I'm going to
share it with you, the loyal Discorder reader, right here on this
very page. And to think, this
publication is free! Tell us, oh
great leader of the revolution,
our saviour from Simple Minds
and other assorted arena rock
jack off bands, what is the secret? "It's like, you know, we're
just a bunch of guys and a girl
with some guitars, bass, and
drums trying to make some cool
songs and that's it. That's everything. There's not enough cool
rock and roll music, you know
what I mean? Too many people
with topics and I don't know, a
heart that yearns and all that shit,
you know. That's just bullshit."
What were you expecting, a major label deal on a platter? Read it a couple times. Try
reading it backwards. Translate
it into Yiddish and then cross out
every fourth consonant. Either
that or realize that simplicity and
the ability to not take yourself
seriously are the major stumbling
blocks for most bands. Not the
Pixies. It's not that they are too
stupid to get complex. No, they
are too smart. Get complex and
you start to sound like Queen, or
worse, Loverboy. There is one
other thing, though. "We stay in
tune a lot more now and we keep
beat pretty good." It's the little
things, I tell ya.
So the Pixies are here to
save us from an eternity of boring, self-absorbed rock stars, who
have morehair dressers than there
are musicians in their band.
Bands who take themselves too
seriously are a dime a dozen
(actually, it's three for adollar in
the bargain bin at Zulu Records).
There are only a handful of bands
who have a sense of humour and
are willing to take risks and actually have the talent to back up
what they do. Many bands at one
point in their careers show a flash
of brilliance, but then fade more
quickly than CiTR's signal as
you drive east on Tenth Avenue.
But the Pixies are our beacon in
a sea of wankers and wankettes.
Now if Kim would only quit
smoking so I could hear River
Euphrates. Oh well, I guess we
can't have everything, can we?
10 DISCORDER STUFF THIS IN YOUR
STOCKINGS!!
THE JAZZMANIAN DEVILS WISH TO THANK ALL OUR FRIENDS,
FANS, AND FAMILY FOR OUR SUCCESS IN 1989. ALL THE BEST
THIS HOLIDAY SEASON. CHEERS!! JAZZMANIAN DEVILS
"HAPPY HOUR' AVAILABLE AT BLACK SWAN, ZULU, NEPTOON, HIGHLIFE AND TRACK RECORDS, OR BY MAIL ORDER.
r~
~~i
ES008 HAPPY HOUR - CASSETTE - $10.00
also available:
ES009 SMOKE UP THE VALLEY (ROCKY CRAIG)
- CASSETTE - $10.00
ES007 THE DOTS - CASSETTE - $10.00
ES006 THE NERVOUS FELLAS - CASSETTE - $7.00
ES005 IT LIVES!!-$8.50
ES004 STINGING HORNETS - CASSETTE - $7.50
ES003 HERALD NTX - CASSETTE - $10.00
ES002 UPTOWN HONKYTONK - CASSETTE - $7.00
ES001 THE ROCKING FOOLS - 45 rpm EP - $2.50
SHIPPING AND HANDLING
TOTAL
■   Make cheques payable to: East Side Records, 2076 E. 3rd Ave., Vancouver, BC V5N 1H7     .
2ND SKIM
432 HOMER ST
VANCOUVER
683-7007
i  R.E.M. now has a multi-million dollar record deal and a new
legion of fans that care more
about getting a tour-shirt and a
cool seat in the hockey rink than
actually listening to the music.
The Replacements have given
up falling down and puking their
way through shows in exchange
for new found "aDulthood" and
have left many longtime fans
puking in their wake. Exene has
become yet another folksinger
on the bleak music horizon. What
Husker Du... What has be-
of the band branded as the
and fastest guys in plaid
to take to stage? Amid
[f major  substance
dissention, the
itquits in January
ig hard feelings
music scene be-
do you see as the most pressing
problems in North America?
t>: Oh... acid rain... the water
table... plastics, you know, we're
realizing that plastics will
be here longer than we will be.
The fact that there was a pretty
major earthquake this week that
no one could comprehend. We
can only see it on the news and
none of us can really understand
why it had to happen. There was
one in China this morning that
did as much damage as the one in
S an Francisco, but if we had seen
that one with out the precedent
of the one in San Fran, we could
have said "Oh, that's too
bad!",but now we are more affected, but only because we have
had one that has hit us close to
home.
D: Talking about the album now,
most of the songs on Workbook
seem to be introspective, pastoral pieces, where did jhese
come
from?
really just a matter of being something I wanted to do for myself.
One of the things I try and make
clear to people is that it's a difficult thing, but I'll never be able
to shake the fact that I was in that
band. Sure, that was my band,
and this band, and all these great
things. I'll never be able to deny
that, nor do I want to, but I don't
want to live off that either. It's
sort of fun to have the challenge
of having people say "Bob
Who?", "From what band ?" and
have people simply enjoy the
record.
D: One of your other projects is
the Singles Only Label. How did
this come about?
Bob: A couple of friends and I
started up SOL about a year ago.
It took quite a while to be in apo-
sition to start releasing records,
but we have five singles out by
people from around the country.
It's really just a way to help some
WhatfBf"happened Wfhe ^m4|HPl
inteaSfy they once were, repress
rocmmid roll was all about... an
ori^iality and sheer go for brok
the wall power. Where, oh where\
now?
BROKEN
MOULD
A CONVERSATION WITH BOB MOULD AND MICHAEL LEDUC
 wra
ack of who has the
ou also see how
turn in on itself
the machines
rto.Those things
luF perspective along
with other things, like the lack of
respect we have for the environment These are the changes that
have happened since 1982 and
they're the same changes that
you've gone through.
D: Well, I suppose that it's fairly
obvious that things seem to be
getting worse and worse, but what
touch with what was going
1th music. I had just spent
fears being bombarded with
ic non-stop.  When I left
:er Du, I left for a number of
i, one of which was to get
[y sanity back and to try and
out what I liked about mu-
because I certainly did not
like what was going on at the end
of Husker Dii. It had become
very routine and not at all what I
wanted music to be. It's not at all
a slight on anyone I worked with,
it's just a statement of fact, in my
mind. We had been working so
doing the same thing, it was
Inger exciting, so once I
discovered what I liked about
music again, I decided it was
time to make a record again.
D: Was it difficult to gain support for your new record, having
to conquer people's expectations
about what your sound should
be, and about how you had left
just as the Huskers were poised
on the edge of a commercial
breakthrough?
Bob: I really had no idea what
was going to happen. Things
certainly worked out better than
I had hoped. I didn't think that
anyone was going to care. It's
days is not what it used to be
twelve years ago. With the CD
and all that stuff, singles just
aren' t all that important anymore.
We're trying to bring this to the
forefront again and say that yes,
this is a way to get your music
D: Could you tell us about the
new artists you have on your
roster?
Bob: Well, we've got a band
from New York called The Zephyrs that do this Zydeco-Cajun
thing. It's not at all like I've
heard any where before. There's
a band called Fortune Wheel that
are a college pop band. A young
lady named Angel Dean that does
a country torch singer type thing
that's real nice. We also have a
fellow from Minneapolis named
David Postalwaite who is a solo
singer-songwriter, just him and
an acoustic guitar. And another
group from there called the Warm
Jets who are a pretty noisy bunch
of cats.
D: How do you plan on keeping
the seven inch viable with all the
forces working against you? Is
packaging important? How do
you promote a dying format?
Bob: The most important thing
is just to get them out to independent record stores. The same
way we all did it ten years ago.
Those avenues are still all there,
it's just that now it's the path of
most resistance. Whether it's
display space or shrinkage, or
you want to allot that space for
CD six by twelves or whatever.
Things have really changed a lot,
but there* s still room for the seven
inch single. It's not meant as a
commercial venture, it's more of
a co-operative and a statement
and a way to get these bands
heard.
D: Minneapolis used to be quite
a hot spot for new music with the
Replacements, Soul Asylum, and
your band. Is it still that way?
What's happening there now?
Bob: There was a real lull in
activ ity. The Replacements, Soul
Asylum, and Husker Dtl really
got a lot of attention, but now
that everyone has diversified and
gone on to do their own thing
there hasn' t really been that sense
of community there once was. I
think that all cities go through
cycles of activity. I remember
when Vancouver went through a
cycle with D.O.A. and The Subhumans and that whole rush of
bands back in '81 that were really big and popular all over
North America. Since then
there's been 54-40 and
Nomeansno and bands like that,
but I'm sure the scene is not like
it used to be up there seven or
eight years ago.
D: It seems that the term "New
Music" or "New Wave" is ten or
twelve years old now and we're
sitting around waiting for the next
big thing. Right now funk and
rap music are becoming really
popular. How does this compare
to the punk movement?
Bob: Well, that music is an interesting paradox to me. It deals
with street issues, yet it's made
in the basement with all these
machines where you're totally
isolated from it. It's an interesting conflict on an immediate
level.that people are becoming
obsessed with machines and
sound that you can make all by
yourself. I don't necessarily like
it, but I try to understand what
they are doing with it and I respect that.
D: Any closing thoughts from
Bob Mould regarding his tour
and his record?
Bob: I hope that if people come
to the show they come with an
open mind. That they come
understanding that this is 1989
and not 1984 and don't expect a
lot of the past. After all, I made
the record with an open-mind
and an eye for the present
DECEMBER 1989 13 From the Halls of Delta House
The Ultimate Frat House (J?^yM  Party
Sponsored By
Sponsored By:
orona
Extra
No Nerds
Please
PACIFIC COLISEUM
DECEMBER 9,1989 DOORS 7PM
with
special guests
WIRED
Blues Brothers Revue
THE HIGH TOPS
Vancouvers originial Classics
TANGARINE
Classic Rock
Help Break the )) guiness world record as the worlds largest toga party
featuring
OTIS DAY
AND THE
KNIGHTS
Adult Refreshments
Two Beer Gardens
PRODUCED BY:
NOTEABLE ENTERTAINMENT My friend Erna drops me off late after
our visit to the Lesbian Film Festival.
She wanted me to see the "other side", as
she called it. Frankly, the whole affair
left me a bit speechless. Did females
have the desperately overcharged libidos that the films suggested? Perhaps I
should reevaluate my notion that they
are the "quiet" sex. As a male, I feel I am
being challenged by the strength and
independence modem women possess.
A cup of tea might help.
Camomille is one of the real
joys in my life. Where its faindy fruity
aroma and taste originate from I can't
guess. It soothes one, it contains no
caffeine, it's full of vitamin C-it's an
elixir for the age.
When I am awash in emotions
and doubt -as I am now regarding the
other sex- and my temples begin to
bubble slighdy like like they do before
an exam, herbal tea works as a terrific
sedative. But not tonight - tonight it's
not enough. I'm afraid I'll need television to distract me.
Months ago, I began to resent
the power TV had over my life. These
days, with something like 500 channels
to tempt you, our TV's have begun to
take on personalities of their own.
"What'll it be tonight, son? A bit of
"Nova"? A "Cosby" spinoff? Come on,
let's just see what colour tie Ted Kop-
pel's wearing tonight, huh."
To quit television, I feel, is as
necessary and difficult as kicking a
debilitating drug habit. And as a junkie,
one must avoid the old hangouts. I have
to immediately rip up all cable company
solicitations that come in the mail. I fear
they might come up with an "Organo-
channel'', promising to use recycled v ide-
otape or something. Imagine - the
"AmnestyIntemationalHour","Mable's
Macrobiotic Cookshow", "Wheel of Reforestation"; these are programs probably being developed for TV now. It is
wise, in my opinion, to get out.
Wiggling the coat hanger on top
of my set, I hope to recieve the Letter-
man show, once a favourite of mine
before the General Electric corporation
became involved. It's a re-run - Madonna and Sandra Bernhardt, plu
macho race car driver. Are "sensitive"
men who give credenceto women's issues passe like Alan Alda and the old
Phil Donohue? I begin to reel in disillusionment. I need sleep.
SNAP! Ratde, ratde. Huh?Good
gosh, the mousetrap. I had just started to
doze off. A week ago I'd set a trap after
discovering bananas left on my kitchen
counter had been mysteriously nibbled.
I suspect the mouse had returned. That
litde trap, according to the salesman,
was guaranteed to finish the bugger off.
I switch on a few lights and stroll into the
kitchen wearing only my Stanfields.
JEEZUZZ! A RAT! A rat as big as the
yellow pages is lying stunned on my
kitchen floor next to the mouse trap which
it dwarfs. Oh God. My heart is pounding. In a minute it'll gain its wits and
crawl back in the wall. Torment! I know
it'll be there waiting. I'll have to slip on
boots every morning. I'll feel like a
fucking fireman.
£AT CONTROL
\
?Voof THAT    \NVTHlM   TH£
VAC\f\5T   UiRKS THE      //
Boots! My mud-encrusted hiking boots are right within reach. Maybe
I can steer the big bastard outdoors using
them. I reach for the mud-encrusted
trail-stompers, grab them by the backs,
then dangle them over the rat, only to
give it a gentle poke. JEEZUZZ H! The
bastard lurches at me, almost bites my
hand! I swing my arm over my head,
gripping hard. WHOMP! What am I
doing? I must look like Pete Townshend. WHOMP! Mud chips flying all
over my kitchen. Windmilling with
mucky footwear. WHOMP! Then - a
stillness. The rat is dead.
Oh, the horror. The HORROR!
The Mess! I've killed. There's dirt eve
rywhere. A rat with a flattened head
looks at me with one dull eye, his snout
bloody. The boots, cleaner now, drop to
the floor. I must vacuum. I'm all sweaty.
I've got the carcass the size of an urban
phone directory lying on my kitchen
floor. Pulling on a housecoat, I go outside in search of a shovel or rake from
my landlady's toolshed - something to
transport my prey, and get it the hell out
of my kitchen.
With the efficiency of a nurse, I
begin to tidy and dispose of the rodent.
Instinctively, I reset the mousetrap with
the same dry scrap of cheese. I imagine
it's the toil afterwards that helps killers
forget their brutal deeds. It may seem
hypocritical, since afterall, I once wasn't
a vegetarian, and, like most as a kid I'd
squashed a few insects. But I never
imagined the sensation of killing before
bashing the life out of a huge rat. My
body tingles as thoughrddrank50cups
of coffee. I'm unable to sleep, so I snack
until dawn. Gluttony is always a symptom of guilt for me.
The next day I calmly recount
the rat tale for my landlady. She pretends to be concerned, but she's sceptical that I'd killed a rat A big mouse, she
suggests. I don't bother to show her the
"big mouse" that barely fits in the garbage can; I just want to forget the whole
incident. I can understand the argument
for clemency in cases of man-slaughter.
If some poor fool accidendy kills someone, or kills out of self-defense like I
did, he or she should be able to get on
with life.
If you saw my suite you'd think
it is a pretty nice place, and in a nice
neighbourhood, as well (certainly real
estate people do these days). HonesUy,
it's not as though I live in or near a
garbage dump. If I told you I 'd had it out
with a giant rat in my kitchen, you'd
scoff. If I insist I did, and not with one
overfed rat but two, you'd check my
medical history. The sad truth is...
I KILLED AGAIN.
Late Sunday morning, I sit writing aprotestletterto Proctor andGamble
about their packaging that's crowding
our landfills. I'm daydreaming, staring
at the Save-the-Stein poster I'drecently
hung on my wall. Then - SNAP! Again.
Oh jeez. I can't deal with this. I put on
my gumboots (steel shank), then stride
anxiously to the kitchen. Another fatrat,
but this time its skull is pinched in the
mousetrap. It's eyes peer up from a
dented brow; it probably has a helluva
headache. I march upstairs to find my
landlady and delegate rat disposal to
her. Nobody home. Man! I go outside to
get a shovel, maybe I can steer this one
out; he can keep the mousetrap.
What happens next I'll attempt
to describe. I prod my intruder diplomatically with a spade. It's desperately
struggling to get out of the trap. It's
going to get out of the trap any second
and be real pissed at me. Come here you
little bastard. I'm trying to direct it with
the blade. My phone rings. I raise the
spade. (Swing) BONG! Ring! Damn
rats! (Swing) BONG! Ring! The Contras! Pinochet! (Swing) BONG! Ring!
Goddamned Lesbian Film Fests! (Vigorous deathblow) BONG! Ring! I jump
for the phone. "Hello!" "Hi, we're just
cleaning carpets in your area... " "I just
killed a fuckin' rat!" "Oh, well, maybe,
I - a rat?" "Yeah, you wanna clean that?"
(Phone solicitor hangs up)
I shake with dismay. The phone
bell had triggered a latent animal rage in
me with Pavlovian perfection. Briefly, I
pictured our rat as Ollie North, and dealt
the fatal blows. There is more blood at
the scene this time, but what would you
expect when you bludgeon enormous
rodents on linoleum? If you haven't
heard it elsewhere, take it from me, killing does feel easier the second time
around. One is not bereft of bad feelings,
however, as I proceed to eat a stack of
sandwiches in order to calm my nerves.
In the future, I'll be prepared for
any other "visitors". Three massive traps
with succulent pieces of cheddar and
yummy rat poison are set around my
place. Coincidendy, this situation helps
me to see thesense inN. A.T.O. Like Europe, I'm ready, ever mobilized for the
dread day, if it should come.
A strange consequence of all
this is thatl've become as virile as abull
moose. No more wishy-washy notions
about understanding women either. Red
meat? Gimme a burger. TV? Give me
Morey Povich any day. Hell, I'm a
hunter.
1989 15 Rap, Hip Hop, Dub, House,
Freestyle, Acid, Sample Workout New Beat This Beat, That
Beat, etc., etc. - the list goes on
and on. Yes, there are a lot of
different styles of dance music
out there these days and you, the
ever inquisitive listener, may be
asking yourself - just how did it
all start anyway? Where did it all
come from?
Well, we here at Beat
Mix seek to answer that question for you so this month we
bring you the Beat Mix condensed version of the History of
Break Beat Deejaying.
Break Beat deejaying is
THE single most influential and
innovative thing to happen to
dance music in the last twenty
years. You wouldbe hard pressed
to name me even ONE record
produced for the dance floor
these days that is not directly or
indirectly influenced by Break
Beat deejaying; and it all began
with one guy - DJ Kool Here.
Since I wasn't there
myself I'll let someone who was
tell us about it.
Afrika Bambaataa (early Hip
Hop/Break Beat DJ, founder of
the Zulu Nation, and creator of
such classic records as "Looking for That Perfect Beat" and
"Planet Rock"): "Everything
started from street gangs. I was
in a street gang called The Organisation. Besides being about
violence and jitterbugging
(rumbling), we were also into
socializing. We threw parties
and dances and also put on concerts. When the gang scene died
out what was left were different
party crews who were doing the
entertaining at parties like the
DJ's, emcees, and B-Boys. This
was in 1975. A lot of people
think it started in the South Bronx
but officially it came from the
West Bronx 'cause Kool Here
was from that area. After Here it
came over here to the South
Bronx with myself and Flash."
"The Bronx, New York was the
place
Where Here's tables spun
Yes there were DJ's in all the
other boroughs.
But like Here there were none."
D-ST from: 'The Home of Hip
Hop"(Celluloid)
Afrika: "DJ Kool Here was part
of a gang called the Black
Spades. They were from a part
of the West Bronx that had a lot
of West Indians living there.
Here, who was from a Jamaican
family himself, was the first DJ
to take the Jamaican dub style
and adapt it into a soul funk
thing. He was the first DJ to spin
Break Beat records exclusively.
Then together with the boys in
16 DISCORDER
the Black Spades, he applied raps
to the music."
Here was the one who
inspired all early hip hop DJ's
including B ambaataa, Jazzy Jay
(another early member of Barn's
Zulu Nation) and Grandmaster
Flash among others.
Afrika: "I heard Here play and I
was really inspired by him. He
knows how to throw down B-
Beats and that's how he got the
reputation of being the godfather
of hip hop rock. When I heard
Here, I heard music that he had
that I had already in my house.
So I said, I got the same thing he
got. .and when I graduated out of
school, I got my system. I started
playing in the street. I already
had a large following from the
gang era, so once I gave a party it
was automatically packed. At that
time, it was just called break
music or wild style music or
bebop music."
Afrika enlightens us
further as to what exacdy a Break
Beat is: "Break music is that
certain part of the record that you
just be waiting for to come up
and when that certain part comes,
that percussion with all those
drums, congas, it makes you
dance real wild. You just let all
your feeling go but that break is
so short in the record, you get
mad because the break was not
long enough for you to really get
down to do your thing."
Here was the one to figure out a solution to this problem. He took two copies of the
same record and with two turntables and a mixer he would
continously mix these breaks
back and forth, all the time keeping a steady beat going. Thus, he
created extended 'break versions'
of the songs, satisfying the dancers need to get down and do their
thing for as long as they wanted.
(This, of course, is where
'breakdancing' comes from).
Jazzy Jay: "We'd find these
beats, these heavy percussive
beats, that would drive the people
on the floor to break dance. A lot
of times it would be a two-second spot, a drum beat, a drum
break and we'd mix that back
and forth, extend it, make it
twenty minutes long."
Of course  these  DJ's
didn't stop at the idea of just
extendingthebreakofONEsong.      ,;" ,;
They took bits and breaks from <
various records, mixing in anti      "'.   '
out between all of them to create    ^ i$1f:
l unique mixes.
how unknown but still rocking his records were. People came
to these parties to hear certain
records that a DJ would have.
Kool Here would have his certain cuts that he would play. I
would have mine. Flash would
have his."
Jazzy Jay: "That was the whole
thing, the element of surprise,
coming out with something new.
Find a record nobody else has
got do a routine nobody else can
do. That was whatkept it going.''
Afrika: "I played whatever made
you rock no matter what it was
like TV ad jingles, the theme to
the Pink Panther or the Winnie
the Pooh song. One time the Zulu
Nation had a battie of the DJ's
with another crew. We opened
up with aspecialmix of the theme
from the Andy Griffith Show
and blew their minds away. The
Zulu Nation and I became known
for playing wild and unconventional records along with tcphits,
all without losing the beat."
Besides obvious classics
from James Brown, Parlia-
ment/Funkadelic, Sly and the
Family Stone, and Kool and
the Gang, otherrecords that were
immensely popular Break Beat
records at this time was stuff like
"Mardis Gras" by Bob James,
"Champ" by Mohawks, and
"Dance to the Drummer's Beat"
by the Herman Kelly Band
amongst many, many others.
But the all-time Break Beat classic is "Apache" by the Incredible Bongo Band from their 1973
album Bongo Rock (which oddly
enough, has a Vancouver connection. On the back of the record it states, "Special thanks to
Can Base Studios, Vancouver
for their help and the use of their
facilities." Our city's claim to
hip hop fame?)
Afrika: "One of Kool Here's B-
Bcat discoveries, which became
the Bronx National Anthem for
over eight years, is a record called
"Apache"   by   the   Incredible
their o
Afrika: "A DJ was judged not   i ;    ''
only by how well he mixed but   <\C'S!^!.,
Bongo Band which also gave us
the hit "Bongo Rock". "Apache"
came out in '73 and is still considered the top beat record of all
time. If you are a B-Beat deejay
and you don't have "Apache"
thenyouarenotaB-Beatdeejay."
The growing popularity
of break beat deejaying created a
need for every budding DJ to
constandy seek out all the right
records, the rarer the better.
Afrika: "I bought the Incredible
Bongo Band for a dollar. I made
a fortune off that. I had so many
of those albums, I just walked
down the street- twenty-two
dollars, sell 'em right off, no
problem."
Lenny Roberts (the man behind
a compilation record series of all
the best break tunes, "The Ultimate Breaks and Beats"): "I was
in Downstairs Records (early
source of Break Beat records)
once, and I was fascinated. The
guy was cleaning up on this shit.
You'd be surprised at the money
that was paid for these things -
just for what - 10 seconds, 20
seconds of a record."
Jazzy Jay: "If you weren't in or
around hip hop, you wouldn't
ever have heard of a lot of these
records. Records like "Apache",
(Magic Disco Machine's)
"Scratchin"', (Funkadelics). I'm
talkin' about records like (Perez
Prado's) "Mambo No.5" - you
could forget about it."
It was only natural that
this amazingly fresh type of new
music would become more popular so new innovations and techniques were soon brought to it
including scratching and 'quick-
cutting'.
Afrika: "Grandmaster Flash
started the quick cutting technique... he is one of the few who
can cut and scratch smoothly
enough to maintain a danceable
beat. When scratching and cutting first came out every DJ was
doing it and going wild. But what
most were doing was too hard to
follow and didn't keep a beat."
As with all innovative
movements in music, the record
companies ignored hip hop in
the beginning, so the DJ's had to
do whatever they could to get
their music around.
Afrika: "A lot of cab drivers
would buy the tapes of what we
was playing for their customers.
They would buy Grandmaster
Flash, Afrika B ambaataa or Kool
Here music. This was our first
thing of getting ourmusic spread
around."
Hip Hop started out as a
style of deejaying but soon
evolved into an entire culture of
it's own. DJ's didn't just play by
themselves at parties; they had
entire crews which included
rappers, breakdancers, graffitti
artists, and others. They developed whole intricate routines and
shows, had batdes against other
crews, and eventually started
putting out their own records. So
it went and the rest as they say,
is history.
Recordings of this early
stuff are hard to find but one
archetypal piece of Break Beat
deejaying that can be found and
should definitely be checked out
is Grandmaster Flash's "The
Adventures of Grandmaster
Flash on the Wheels of Steel"
(currently available around town
as a limited edition CD single).
This is absolute real hip hop
deejaying, live and direct - turntables and a mixer without the
use of samplers, sequencers, or
any other fancy new technology.
Flash takes eight or so different
songs and mixes them into a
mind-blowing 7 minute party of
beats, cuts, scratches, snatches,
raps andmelodies with an immediacy and feel that really makes
you dance in a way only a live
jam could. All too rare in these
days of the technological short-
Break Beat deejaying is
THE basis for every sample-
laden beat workout coming out
nowadays, from Mel and Kim
to MC Hammer to Meat Beat
Manifesto and everything in
between. All dance music in the
late '80's uses ideas from, or
owes a debt to, Break Beat
deejaying. So next time you're
out there on the dance floor get-
tin' down to do your thing and
goin' wild to your favorite beats
- think about Here, Afrika, Flash,
Jazzy Jay, and the others from
the Bronx. They are the ones
who brought the "break' beat to
your feet.
"You see - the Bronx is the Home
of Hip Hop
You don't have to believe it's
And if you don't agree, don't
listen to me
Just look what it's done to you
Now, DANCE SUCKER!"
D-ST - "The Home of Hip Hop"
(Sources: Village Voice, Jan. 19
1988 and "Breaking and the New
York City Breakers" by Michael
Holman. Also thanks to Home
Taping International).
Mick Hard deejays the Boppa-
tron Show Fridays 9:00pm to
12:30am on CiTR. Leather. Everybody loves it.
After all, what could be better
than wearing a piece of dead
animal skin, dried, stretched
and rubbed with cows' brains
(or reasonable chemical facsimile)? God knows, you can't
shake a hoof downtown these
days without poking a leather
(or "leather-look") somethin-
gorother right in the epidermis. But where do you go when
you want truly bitchin leather,
the kind that gives you piss
shi vers j ust smellin' it? Mack's,
natch. I went down to the
Granville Mall to talk with
owner Paul about leather and
other things too.
How did you get into leather?
I bought the store. Mack McKin-
non (the original owner) died a
year ago today, and I was just a
customer here every once in a
while and then my wife came in
to get something made up and
asked what was going to happen
with the store, this was after he
passed away, and someone said
it was for sale and we ended up
buying it It's a more fun business than other businesses.
How did Mack get into it?
It was his life!
So what do you like about
leather?
Leather... It's not like I have a
particular leather fetish. It's a
nice material to work with, people
look nice in it I mean, we're not
just a leather store, we're an S &
M store in alotof ways too. Now
that's a little more interesting.
Is there a big market for that in
Vancouver?
The store's still going. Big
enough market. Not only that
Mack McKinnon made a really
quality product and the store is
well-known right across North
America as one of the best leather
shops of this kind; making these
kind of articles. So our market is
not just Vancouver, our market
is, well, the Pacific Northwest
definitely, there isn't a shop like
this before you hit San Francisco. We have people come up
from Seatde and Pordand constantly buying things here. So it
isn't just a Vancouver market.
AndCalgary and Edmonton... we
get a lot of clientele from out of
town.
And what kind of people are
coming in here?
I'd say half our clientele was gay
men and the rest is a mishmash
of everything. There's a lot of
perverts out there. I should hope
so, anyway.
Is there any particular age
group?
Well we don't get a lot of people,
say, in their late teens/ early
twenties. Those people are still
unsure of their sexuality and
whatnot so they don't normally
come into the store. And also
they don't have a lot of money
and leather costs money.
What kind of leather do you
use?
It's mostly cowhide.
Is that the best?
It depends on for what purpose.
If you were going to make yourself a heavy jacket and you
wanted it to be really heavy duty,
I'd probably try to get hold of a
horse hide or a mule hide but,
generally speaking, most leather
is cowhide and it's good for what
it's used for. Lamb skin doesn't
last long but they have a million
and one different colours; people
really like that these days but it
doesn't last worth a shit
What do you think about coloured leather?
Black is coloured; black is a
colour.
Is black the best?
Well, the problem with other
colours is that they're fashion
accessories. Black is irrelevant
of fashion.
Do they use the same cows for
leather they do for meat?
Yep, it's the same. Actually in
the animal industry, producing
beef and everything else, it's one
of the few places where there
isn't much waste. Almostevery-
thing's used for one thing or
another. It's alot better thanlet's
say your alternative industries,
plastics or the likes. But animals
don't waste much.
And how many cows would it
take to make a coat?
Depends on the coat depends
how big it is, depends on the
person you're fitting. But it
wouldn't take a whole cow. You
probably can get two coats out of
a cow.
And where would the leather
come from, the back or the
sides? Can you use the legs and
everything?
Everything. The hides are taken
from the bellies and the backs.
What's your most popular
item?
Cockrings are big sellers.
Have you noticed any trends;
do you think it's going to be
different in the nineties?
Black leather's always going to
be in fashion to some degree.
There's a black leather look and
that's always going to be somewhat there.
Why do you think people like it
so much?
Well it's a macho tough thing
and whatever. It's rebellious, it's
radical, it's a lot of things. Also
looks good on lily- white bodies.
Do you have lots of leather?
Yeah, I'm starting to get quite a
collection now.
And you wear it all the time, or
do you save It for special occasions?
I usually save it for when I party.
Are there leather conventions?
Yeah. Living in Leather was just
held at the beginning October
down in Pordand. It's a big trade
convention, gathering of people
into leather and S&M.
So where's the big leather
centres in the world today?
Frisco, New York, LA, I guess
those are them. London.
Are there any really well known
leather craftspeople?
Depends   on   the   item.   Jay
Marsden's really well known as
a whipmaker. He's considered
maybe the best whipmaker in
North America anyway. Different people are known for different items. Lee Wells is very well-
known for her studwork.
Is there a newsletter you can
get to find out more about
leather?
There are groups, there are specific leather clubs here in Vancouver where you could join and
learn more or whatever.
How would you find out about
them?
H,ere at the store.
And what would you do at a
leather club?
Different things, some things I
wouldn't mention. ..because there
are groups of people who think
they should be able to tell other
people how to run there lives and
they have the say with the Conservatives in power. There's been
a rela clampdown on certain
aspects of peoples' private lives.
Some things justaren'tdiscussed.
You're not allowed to publicly
depict bondage. I'm not allowed
to put one of my dummies in
handcuffs because that's considered illegal, immoral.
Do you think that's silliness?
I don't think it should be any-
one'sbusiness whatotherpeople
do. Public depictions of bondage, there's enoughChrists hanging from crosses all the time. I
don't think it's fair but that's the
way the worldis and you've gotta
live within it's rules. If you wanna
make waves you're always gonna
suffer grief for it
But your window displays are
always pretty Interesting.
Oh yeah, we try to peak people's
interest. We try to scare people a
bit; people like that.
Do you think there's a certain
scariness inherent in leather
you're trying to bring out?
Oh, not just in leather, inBLACK
leather...And   the  lifestyle.   It
scares and titilates. It certainly
catches the public's eye.
What about piercing, how did
you get into that?
I just thought it was a rather
interesting idea.
How long have you been doing
it?
A few years now; three, four
years.
And where do you learn to do
something like this?
You learn by doing, you learn by
reading, there's videos you can
get your hands on that show you
how to do it. Having willing
friends helps.
People just let you practice on
them and weren't worried or
scared?
There's a certain level of trust
involved.
Is it getting more popular?
Oh, definitely.
Why do you think that is?
People have a body, they want to
decorate it. They 're getting away
from the idea that the only place
you can hang an earring is your
ear. Ten years ago a man with an
earring was considered really
wild and no w people are hanging
their earrings from anywhere.
People are always looking for
something new and radical to do.
Piercings are fun, they tend to
sensitize the area that pierced;
it's a way of personalizing your
body. It's not very different than
tattooing except it's not as permanent. You can always take the
ring out.
And it'll grow over for sure?
Well, it depends. You can really
stretch out your piercing so it'll
never close up completely.
Is there any health risk in this?
Well poking a hole in anybody' s
body is always a little risky. If
people take care of it there
shouldn't be any health risk.
Some people will react badly
against stainless steel or against
gold but even if you got an earring that could happen. The risk
is in the healing process; depending on the piercing it can take up
to a year.
That's a long time!
It depends on the person too. If
the person takes care of it well,
it should be all right
Who comes in to get pierced?
All kinds.
More men or women?
More men. Definitely more men.
It's more prevalent among gay
men to have piercings than probably any other group in society
but I think that will change in
time. Usually gay men do everything before everyone else does.
What's your most popular
piercing?
Nipples. Nipples are really the
most common. Genital piercings
aren't all that common.
Would you rather do someone
you know or don't know?
Sometimes I might enjoy doing
the piercing more if its a friend,
doing it for them, but pretty well
it's a job; I like doing it I guess
I enjoy piercing women more
than men but that's probably my
own sexual preferences.
Does that make your wife jealous?
No, I'm professional about it. I
can't afford to be a lech while
doing them (laughs). I have to
pay attention.
Do you need a license for doing
piercings or does anyone really know you do it?
I don't know if anyone really
knows. You can get your ears
pierced in a beauty shop and
they're not licenced any more
than anyone else is. It's just an
unlicenced area in the public. A
person can't blame me for their
own lack of care any more than if
you go in for daytime surgery at
the hospital and then proceed to
muck it up; you can't really sue
the doctor...You have a level of
responsiblility yourself to take
care of yourself. I feel as long as
I do a good job it's up to the
person themselves.
Do you get a lot of repeat customers?
Yeah, usually you have one piercing you can have a dozen.
How do people find out about
you?
I advertise. I'm not sure if that's
where theresponse is or just from
word of mouth...that's becoming increasingly true.
How much does it cost?
It costs $25 a piercing, it doesn't
matter where.
That's pretty cheap!
Uh huh. Jewellry's extra.
Is there any jewellry that's
more popular than others?
Rings are the biggest. For something like a nipple piercing,
they're the only thing to do because you have to clean it and to
clean it you have to move the
ring through. You just can't do
that with, let's say, a barbell.
How long have people been getting pierced, forever?
Yeah, pretty well as long as
they've been getting tattooed and
everything else. Some piercings
have longer histories than others.There's a particular piercing
called the Prince Albert that's
named after the consort of Queen
Victoria...it was done for fashion. They used to wear really
tight clothes back in the 1840s or
so and men's clothes would be
very tight and on the other hand
they were very puritanical sexually; you couldn't have a bulge
of genitals showing so they did a
piercing of the end of the penis to
tie back the penis so it wouldn't
show in these clothes...There's a
piercing called an ampalong that
goes right through the head of
the penis; it was done by a tribe
in Borneo and most women
wouldn't have sex with a man
unless he had one because it was
supposed to be so enjoyable for
women.
That's unusual that the men
would actually do it!
Yep.
What's the weirdest request
you've had?
We once had someone come in
who asked to be castrated and we
said no we wouldn't. We're not
in that business.
Do you find a lot of women are
doing it for their men?
People do things for other people
but if you mean are people being
browbeaten into it no, not very
often. Adominant man will come
in by himself and buy it and have
his scene at home rather than
trying to do a public scene. If
anything, it's more like we've
seen submissive men come in
with women and the woman tells
the man to buy this, buy that or
they're sent on buying expeditions by their dominatrixes.
So this whole store would be
part of someone's fantasy?
Could be, could be.
DECEMBER 1989 17 by Den Lebel
n the center of world comic production, the Japanese produce comics as a direct extension of the
television, film, and animation industries. In Japan,
there arc comics produced for everyone, ajjrl thus,
everyone reads comics. As an integi
whole entertainment industry, they display
sophistication and style seen in film, video,
sequently, success for a Japanese cartoonisj
same standards as thos
The
andlhcgrowii
ers for morej
comics cor
increasing
North AnicricV and
no comic sccniin the
The increasing f^Ml
major Japanese
best. The narratr
vated to a level ofVomplj
novels. From this fit
the current world coi
his name.
AtCIKA
This is a work of such seamless mastery, it makes storytelling look effortless and illustration, second nature to us all.
The fact is, however, that Katsuhieo Otomo is a consummate
draftsman and stupendous visual narrator.
18 DISCORDER
AKIRA tells the story of a post-holocaust society that
is unsettlingly similar to the reality of contemporary Japan.
>anese society is so unconditionally
lined even after a nuclear war.
a group of young motorcycle punks
■Tokyo led by the roguish Kaneda.
ms are entangled in an elaborate mili-
:1 movement to expose the secret of
es the military use of telekinetic mu-
:rmonuclear scale. When Kaneda's
led tribe the latest mutant, discovered in a
ith UK military and an escaped mutant,
iagb&p in the rebel movement to expose
inesij
Tously detailed fast-pace
test back alley night clubs t(
of political and military intrigue. Otomi
[wakening power is a perfect reflection of hi
le ability. Otomo reveals a path to freedoi
'olution, but through personal maturation and
if one's individual talents.
CMC WOCf * CO&
One of the first Japanese "manga" to hit utEng
guage market, this hugely successful samurai Jpic by Kazj^
Koike and Goseki Kojima has run for years in jlrpan. Ti
ries has all of the visual excitement and hisiorilalaj^TOracy of|
a good Kirosawa samurai film and explores thf^Jhilosophical
an assassin. The intensely masculine samurai ethics are both
puzzling and fascinating to us as we watch them with both admiration and anxiety.
Lone Wolf and Cub represents the tradition of cinematic historical adventure drama that has spearheaded the
narrative direction of Japanese comics for decades. The dense
line work and explosive page design make this a standard
favourite of comic professionals and mango-philes alike.
Having been produced for some twenty years in Japan, there is
a vast body of work yet to see translation.
M/»f THtF PSVCWC G1ZI
Another of the first Japanese comics brought to Amer-
by Eclipse comics, Mai, by Kazuya Kudo and Ryoichi
I is being re-released in three trade paperback editions
Fpjbpr up to, anj^ffflft, wherethe first English comics
Ided.TliisJK^^fe^eiJ^prBanJp^ middle class
|irl whosJlauSejt^frtjJhgjSdliafc^ nternational
cy invaFvfng r^cHcmnitelldJetic trt ngs.
iMai.w/ohas^vel&ldherprMrsinse ret, is caught
[strugfle Dejjpeen Mal organHations i sing psychic
fenfsjDlecureworld dormnation. 1 ai represents
nse£onveltiont0rard£fnalei otagonists in
I scierlCeTictifc aTTventure iomidEand Jb favorite of female
readers newjocojajps. Sinle the»jro i JBoung jchool girl, we
avokfa^lfleo^neStandall ad*i|urJsI)ry gniding of teeth
TTa ry dinger fl«hjj^ugjffvm^ nrrpualed by a good
numwffffggediyniPiriMr^lli!^ w|fljji*ranage to get in
and physical struggles of a disgraced samurai who has become     some flesh-rending and tooth-grinding along the way. CKE9
This was the first Japanese comic that really excited me.
The bold minimalism of its graphics and the stark futuristic
landscape of Grey, by Yoshihisa Tagami, shows what comics
can do.
Tagami's landscape is a sobering look at possible
outcomes of industrial civilization - the world as a desert
wasteland scattered with nameless cities populated by "citi
zens" and surrounded by the starving unwanted "people".
Grey and his lover, Lips, the only hope for^py into thei
is through service in the urban miutary^mjHgh a pej
service they are promoted through rarfJ^herfcey n
cific quotas of enemies killed - en«es beingMe n
each of the other cities around the vBkL Hie biflfcfeld Is tl
wasteland Earth, a stage on whichB perform'$|f perpetu.
rituals of violence and competition, gripped down to its last
resource - space itself.
Grey joins the military servialonly after Lips leaves
him to take her lottery chances for seBity in the t^febmry and
is killed on her first operation. The cofd executive ladder of
privilege and achievement is where GflBy - also the colour of
the ocean in this lifeless world - exchanHs his strugjp for suV
vival for the relentless climb to the ijpp of the industrial^
pyramid. M    Jr
Grey becomes a legendary soldier m the service of to wn
303, rising up quickly through the military ranks towards citizenship. Yet, he abandons his chances at citizenship when he
steals transportation to search for his commanding officer, lost
in combat and presumed dead. He discovers that the rebel re
sistance fighters were the attackers and targets the top of the resistance.
Grey's quest for understanding becomes a video game
gauntlet of more and more advanced military technology.
Grey, the hero, becomes only a player, who, by marring the
game, hopes to overturn the game itself. The^pHxmr Grey
is similar to winning extra video games.
the biggest^iallenge on the last le^fcne game loses%
pealJlfPifeevelauon Grey gain* that his world is merel;
tern of the game f^ndustria^civilizafic
[kind of iiMght. Tagami sho\
[it seems «vitable, that
jses it. Yet, having lost
loose death over boredor
11 the peopil
nawcaa om«e vA00C1kpp rueyftp
ft. ■ Comideimj^^liiyTto bene best fw^camic book
<8||Bmarketto^PflNASICAA mHawMiyazam^|P
storycBfcdune-like epic in which^Aung»ieftain'sd!Rnter
\eadsJfr people toward a-^^elauoAip with the now,
mutated and deadlyjod^Kpheig^HB is an intricate and
rrwciwisly deigP«™orkM(Wnavery fluid and dynamic
^boAr^pTOtunfolds aTascinating and well-conceived
TOythicaBmuiropology.
Nasicaa's village becomes caught up in the wars of the
great quasi-medieval empires that arose after the "five days of
fire". Miyazaki develops an almost overwhelmingly elaborate
post-holocaust society of royal courts, aristocratic schemes,
and great armies and fleets of flying machines. The story
hinges on the quest of the emperor to re-discover the secrets of
the war machines that, in ancient days, devestated the world in
the five-day nuclear war.
Nasicaa, wto has a psychic connection to the gigantic
nsects th^Wfcn the toxic forests spreading poisonous
prclose«to the small human settlements, hopes
'to presBl'e dphuman «e. By reversing the environmental
conflicSojJpat it is humanity that is endangered, Miyazaki
imagin JpRy and enjiKainingly alters our perspective on the
environmental issuer
Like AkJjfNasicaa represents a very intelligent and
creative use of thermic book form and explores a far wider
and more fully realizSkarrative scope than the comics of the
English-shaking wotid^oth will raise the overall awareness
of the Wea^p^world's corrimscene beyond the boundaries of
tuiush chqwslljd the mecjinical reproduction of characters
Jptat exist rHely^kgmbldRs of corporate interests.
WeMi lookvupd to seeing the influence of the nov-
•listig^l^and boldOTiemauc style of these Japanese works
%Brtievolving North American comic scene. But, in that there
currently exists no group of professional comic book artists/
writers that cut their teeth on the more expansive narrative
space of the Japanese style, it is a question of a new group of
young artists coming forth to fulfill audience expectations of
a more sophisticated comic story-telling style. This opens up
a tremendous opportunity for a new generation of creative
people to find a secure voice within contemporary media - a
wide-open avenue for cultural expression and interaction, limited only by our self-motivation.
DECEMBER 1989 19 Chiefs of Belief
Memory Day
Strange But True
Town Pump
Thursday November 9th
Three bucks to see three bands
isn' t a whack of money— you 'd
be lucky to get in a houseparty
for that sort of a cover. Even
better, free tickets can usually be
found at record stores around
town for local band showcases
such as this.
The Chiefs of Belief
opened up the night. They definitively have their own sound—
Cure-esque vocals with driving
ostinato bass and drums all
rounded out with some schlocky
keyboards. The overall effect was
pretty solid and danceworthy,
although their opening position
on the bill meant it was a little
early in the evening to expect a
mass exodus to the floor.
The band's major shortcomings are songs that are short
on textural v ariety and keyboards
that don't fully capitalize on the
absence of other treble instruments. Keyboardist Chris
McLeod relies too heavily on
generic synth patches and has a
tendency to play a bunch of sustained notes which fail to play
off the tight rhythm work of
bassist Dave Hart and drummer
Dan Hickey. A band with no
guitar or horns is basically a blank
cheque for a keyboardist.
While Dave Hart's riff
rife bass work and Tony Hazel's
vociferous vocals make for
memorable listening, the band
seems a tad too comfortable with
this formula. Whether they're
dealing with a grim matteT like
Salvadoran death squads or just
having a poke at masturbation,
the songs all sound pretty much
alike. But at least they sound
good.
The next band. Memory
Day, put on a much more traditional type of rock show, which
isn't surprising given their two
guitars, bass, drums and vocals
lineup. This band is a 70' s music
fan's dream come true. These
days, where else can you still
hear a wawa pedal guitar solo?
The band played a wide
variety of songs, few of which
were conducive to dancing.
Harps, flat-tops, harmony vocals
and fianger pedals all had a turn
on stage. The performance was
very tight and consistent although the music could hardly
be called avant-garde.
Strange ButTrue weren't much like their name, although it did seem a little odd
that their Yamaha QX-1 managed to play itself. They played
the type of hard hitting rock that's
usually heard in clubs where the
waitresses wear leatherskirts and
the customers aren't really there
to hear the music— flashy four
bar lead breaks there and gone
like a sparkler, and a singer who
knows how to best use his long
hair as a prop.
Unfortunately, the amazing wonderboards required
drummer Doug McBride to spend
the set wired into the synth click
track lest the songs were to break
down. Being charged with the
responsibility of concealing the
non-existence of the band's key
boardist seemed to have left
McBride a tad nervous— he
stared blankly ahead into space
for most of the set.
Strange But True won't win
any popularity contests with the
people who want something a
little different but the band is
more than competent at their
trade. If you've ever been to the
Midnight Express in Prince
George and enjoyed yourself, this
could be your type of music.
S.C.
Timbuk 3
Town Pump
Sunday, October 22
Timbuk 3 seemed like
the right type of performers for
this tranquil Sunday night crowd
at the Pump. No one knew how
the evening would start since the
name of the scheduled "special
guests" was unknown. It turned
out to be No Fun. Surrey's
homegrown talent was entertaining as usual, especially their hilarious "Gorgo" ads. Lead singer
David M., clothed in the unusual
attire of a bathrobe, claimed the
group was called at the last minute to play the gig.
Not requiring much of a
setup, Timbuk 3 came on shortly
after the openers, and without a
word, went right into their first
number, "B-side of Life" from
their third and latest LP, Edge of
Allegiance. The crowd cheered
as lead singer Pat MacDonald
combined guitar and harmonica
while wife Barbara K shook the
tambourine and provided backing vocals. They followed with
two more from the new album
and then the more popular
"Reverand Jack and his Roamin'
C adillac Church" from the band' s
second release, Eden Alley. But
somehow it sounded different;
no beat-box rhythms! Following
this song, Pat Macdonald an
nounced they had decided to try
a few gigs WITHOUT their
rhythm tracks as an experiment.
The crowds reaction was mixed.
Nevertheless, Timbuk 3
delivered a fine combination of
tunes from all three of their albums, including their 1986 hits,
"Life is Hard", and "The Future's so Bright I gotta Wear
Shades". Pat was lead vocal for
most of the evening, except for
"Facts about Cats" for which
Barbara took the lead.
It was a good overall
performance. The crowd's reaction was strong enough for two
encores. The group wrapped up
the show with another one of
their popular 1986 songs,
"Hairstyles and Attitudes".
With the new album
being more socio-political, I
expected a few words of wisdom
between songs. Instead, Timbuk
3 concentrated on just playing
and entertaining.
Claude de Leseleuc
Nice Strong Arm
Lubricated Goat
Club Soda
Sunday, October 29th
Yeah. Club Soda continued its ultra-cheap Sunday independent type nights with two
relatively unknown but worthwhile bands on their first swing
through town.
Australia's Lubricated
Goat opened things up with their
feedback-laden vision of some
twisted sexual apocalypse.
Singer Stu Spasm screamed gut-
teral perversities over a genuine
tribal-dischordant-grungefest.
Kinda like a slightly more coherent Pussy Galore. Onstage the
Goat was somewhat less menacing than expected judging by their
music, and the lyrics were for the
most part obliterated in the mix.
Oh well.
Considerably more
complex but no less subtie, were
Texas' Nice Strong Arm. A
three-piece with an impressive
musical wallop, NSA suffers the
same drawback as many of their
Homestead labelmates—they
make po werful, unique music but
should not be allowed remotely
close to a microphone. A bit of a
harsh judgment perhaps, as every
now and then music and voices
would merge into something
kinda special. But more often
than not it seemed like a hyperbolic exercise in preetenshun;
overly poetic lyrics delivered
with way more, angst than they
deserved.
Not to be too nasty, Nice
Strong Arm's music more than
made up for the vocal shortcomings. The interplay between guitar, bass, and drums seemed inseparably entwined but never
"too tight". Guitarist Kevin had
an amazing array of sounds; all
spastically delivered with a controlled abandon. His jumping
around and freaking out seemed
a bit forced, possibly to compensate for the fact almost nobody
was familiar with their music.
Whatever, a pretty minor complaint
Neither band managed
to command much outward respect from the audience. It
seemed the only people on the
floor were either pumpkin-wres-
ding drunks or suffering from
nosebleeds. Occasionally an
excitable female or two would
stumble up and show their appreciation with some calculated
pelvic thrusts. Mostof the crowd
were saving their attention for
the pumpkin-carving contest
results at the show's end, whereupon everyone embraced the
orange-polluted stage in search
of twenty-five bucks. A Metal-
lica pumpkin was squished,
tempers flared, and a kooky
evening ended that way.
Keith Parry
Ludwigs
Town Pump
Thursday, October 5th
Hey, I really like these
guys! They can play intensedriv-
ing rock and roll without trying
to effect a bad ass attitude. It's
great to see a group of very serious musicians with this level of
energy that know how to ride a
tight sweaty rhythm to a volcanic crescendo - then bring you
back wanting more.
The Ludwigs put on a
very strong show for a widely
mixed crowd. Sandwiched between a quite professional R&B
style bar band, who put on a good
show for the suburbanites, and
the younger pop and paisley party
mood of Second Nature, the
Ludwigs kicked the energy level
of the house into the stratosphere
for one strong, well-structured
set. It took the audience a few
tunes to catch on but they were
soon up and dancing to some
very clever funky rhythms and
some of the most outright orgiastic rock and roll I've ever heard.
An excellent show by a relatively new band already developing a bit of a reputation as
strong, experienced rr,
Den Lebel Well, Skinny Puppy won this
year's CASBY award for Best
Independent Band. Not that I'd
say anything negative aboutthem
(I've heard all about their methods of revenge), but doesn't that
make you wonder about the way
the CASBYs decide who gets
classified as "independent'?
Rockabilly fans should
watch for anew supergroup that's
just formed here in Vancouver,
Jimmy Roy and his Four Star
Hillbillies. Jimmy Roy used to
play with the Stingin' Hornets
(only then I think he was known
as Jamie), and he'll be joining up
with Randy Mair, Steve McLeva
(of Red Herring fame) and
stand-up bass-player extraordinaire Ronnie Hayward. I was
surprised to see Ronnie at the
Railway one Shindig night, since
the last I'd heard he was touring
all over the States as the newest
member of the Tailgators. Anyway, it seems that the Tailgators'
record company wanted him to
start playing electric bass, so now
he's back in Vancouver where
he has the artistic freedom to
clamber all over his instrument.
Speaking of Shindig, I
think the best night so far this
year was November 6th, when
Planet of Spiders batded it out
with Mary and Black Earth.
For a change all three really deserved to go to the semis, but it
was Black Earth who won in the
end, at least partly thanks to the
way they stayed cool and witty in
the face of technical disasters.
They may be the first band in
Shindig history to get anywhere
with adouble-kick setup and they
didn't know they'd be playing
until that afternoon. Obviously it
doesn't hurt if a band member
tells the best joke of the evening,
either (What's a cross between a
Jehovah's Witness and a
biker?)....
Mary, an angrier sort of
band, was also plagued by technical problems, and the singer
was stuck with his back-up guitar (a Kramer) for most of the set,
while Planet of Spiders (who
reminded me of a slightly harder
PicassoSet, withoutkeyboards),
though they didn't break any
strings or blow up amps, suffered a litde when the singer put
down his SG. In spite of these
litde setbacks, all in all, it was a
great night.
Now that it's really winter, Dale and I are getting buried
in demo tapes. Here's a sampling of what's come in this
month:
@#*&! (Pronounced
"Cartoon Swear") - "Shoes"
The winners of '89 Shindig's
first semi-finals, these three guys
definitely have their own sound
and a lot of energy. On the downside of their appearance at the
semis, the big physical space
between the bass player and
guitarist invited the idea that this
band needs someone to front it.
Unfortunately, the doubled vocals on this recording give a sort
of cluttered effect that doesn't
show up live, and this is a pretty
repetitive song. Catch them at
the finals.
Oh Yeah-"Daily Fear
of Dying" I thought we'd heard
the last of the Smiths-inspired
bands, but apparendy not. Although this is quite anice recording, and the band goes so far as to
include a female backup singer
and a bit of flute for prettiness.
this is really too much like Morrissey for my taste. A very controlled, subdued, and I guess you
could say professional interpretation of angst. And we know
there's a big market for that,
right?
Glee-"Nordic Prince"
This band, whose members include former (Merry) Pranksters, plays music that's about as
un-commercial as it gets. Imagine a drunken and sometimes bel -
ligerent lounge-slash-polka band
and you won't be too far from the
mark. I missed Glee at Shindig
but heard some quite differing
opinions— at least one audience
member thought they should lose
the singer, or at least get him to
tone down the misogyny. Other
people, needless to say, think
that Glee are the greatest.
Endorphins - "Zen
Bones" Just for a change, I
thought I'd review a tape from
Outer Cove, Newfoundland.
Maybe it's just that I know
they 're from the Maritimes, but I
can't help thinking that there's
someone in this band who sounds
like RitaMacNeil. Actually, their
sound is more Spirit of the West
meets the Celebrity Drunks —
pretty Celtic instrumentals with
a male singer who's loud and
sounds really loaded a good part
of the time. We don't get many
Newfoundland bands coming out
this way, though, so I guess we'll
never really know.
Shovlhed-"Great Pink
State," "I'm Slowly Dying"
This band from Victoria has a
large following, and no wonder.
They 're loud and fast and young -
sounding, they play really short
songs, and even cover songs by
Frank Zappa and Robert Fripp. I
still have a problem with the
whole concept of punk-funk-
prog-rock fusion (aren't these
forms supposed to be idealisti-
cally and musically opposed?)
but obviously lots of other people
don't. Just read the rave reviews
in their press kit, and listen to the
way CiTR and other campus
deejays praise Shovlhed to the
skies.
Nowhere Blossoms -
"Johnny and Suzie" This Edmonton band's tape sounds so
crisp and clear that the treble can
be too much. Their sound is
unique too, akindof sharp-edged
Mamas and Papas feel with dulcimer, slide guitar, and digital
delay. Actually, this works quite
better than it probably sounds,
although this song is a bit too
complex to really fit into the
"power pop" category the band
uses to describe itself.
~tri;6:
-cWeqV^ oR mo. to: cjtR »ot.*f *.
-an«4Jie*r sp«c.»( cWr. HoUtey offer.
DECEMBER 1989 21 E10 111
DO TO THE AMAZING RESPONSE TO OUR LAST SUBSCRIPTIONS AD WE HAVE
DECIDED TO EXTEND OUR LIMITED TIME SUBSCRIPTION OFFER. DON'T MISS
OUT. THERE ARE ONLY 17,500 COPIES OF DISCORDER PRINTED EACH
MONTH AND MOST OF THEM ARE ALREADY SPOKEN FOR, SO SUBSCRIBE
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MAKE CHEQUES OR MONEY ORDERS PAYABLE TO DISCORDER MAGAZINE.
THE ADDRESS IS: SUB RM 233, UBC, VANCOUVER, B.C, V6T 2A5.
*
/ a/JGUiiiauia
This month Tape-a-
mania brings to you
The Method live on
CiTR 101.9 fM on
Thursday December
22nd at 11:00pm.
Just cut out the cassette cover, record the
band's performance
onto a blank tape, and
voila (that's French), instant musical product.
Your Welcome.
8
1
£
CD -
SIDE A:                                                                                                              SIDE B:
DREAMS
TRAIN OF THOUGHT                                                     APOCALYPTIC LOVESICK BLUES
CHINATOWN                                                                              STAND YOUR GROUND
AWAKENING                                                                                           NOTHIN DOING
GLASSHOUSE                                                                                                 LESLIE AT 19
GHIS BAND) OWES MONEY TO DISCORDER      BAD RIDDENCE TO GOOD RUBBISH
Q
O
H
W
S
X
H
THE
METHOD
SAY YES
0
0
X
Ci
2
1
C. ATKINS - DRUM SET                                      SEAN M - VOCALS, GUITAR
J. DEVIOUS - GUITAR, VOCALS                                           G. HEHR - BASS
T. BELLIVEAU - EVERYTHING ELSE
RECORDED LIVE ON TAPE-A-MANIA ON CiTR 101.9 fM ON THURSDAY
DECEMBER 22ND 1989 AT 11:00M!!!
>LOW BURNIM3< THE
BOOK &
come
EMPORIUM,
VAhJCCDUVER'S LARGEST
SELECTION
OF ALMOST NEW AND USED
PAPERBACKS AND MAGAZINE
BACK ISSUES.    LARGE RANGE OF
HARDCOVERS ON SECOND
FLOOR OVER 5,000 SCI-FI TITLES
THOUSANDS OF NEW AND
COLLECTOR'S COAAICS.
OUR SELECTION OF INDEPENDENT TITLES INCLUDE:
ALIENS - APPLESEED - BADGER
BLACK KISS - BLOOD
SWORDCEREBUS - CHERRY
DRUNKEN FIST - FAUST - GREEN
HORNET - GRENDEL - LONE WOLF
& CUB - LUAA - OAAAHA
OUTLANDERS - PREDATOR
ROBOTECH - SCIAAIDAR
SHURIKEN - SLIAAER - SPICY TALES
STARBLAZERS - T.NAA.T. - TICK
TROUBLE WITH GIRLS - USAGI
YOJIAABO - VAAAPIRE LESTAT
NEXUS - DREADSTAR - WHISPER
AND IHUhE>REDS AAOREIU
1247
GRANVILLE
Phone 682-3019
3347
KINGSWAY
Phone 430-3003
M - Th: 11-7   Fri: 11-8 Sat:10-7 Sun:12-7
DECEMBER 1989 23 In the last hours of the
Nineteen Eighties, Last Gasp
(the world's most infamous
comik book publisher), offers up
a group reunion in the corridors
of the comix hall of fame in the
form of Zap #12.
In the late sixties. Zap
was the first and certainly one of
the most radical of the underground comix that crawled out
of the San Francisco Bay area
popNart scene. Such graphic
heavyweights as R.Crumb and
Spain helped define the popular
culture of their time with a unique
brand of twisted humour that
roasted sacred cows on a firey
spit.
Twenty years later
(sound familiar?) seven of that
generation's grooviest creators
have rccombincd their talents to
put forth a new issue of their
original exercise. Crumb, Spain,
Rick Griffin, Victor Moscoso,
S. Clay Wilson, Robert Williams, and Gilbert Shelton have
taken the liberty of exhuming the
corpse of comix past and in doing
so try to walk a new mile on old
turf. Do they suck seed? Well...
Some of these comix
legends survive the ordeal while
others are shown to be the cele-
brillles they always hoped they
would be. A clear example of the
fatuous is Victor Moscoso, an
artist whom you may remember
from the film Comic Book Confidential. Moscoso's piece, entitled The Artist and The Elves,
is a reworking of a classic fairy
tale with a surprise ending that
has as much impact as lint on a
windshield. His drawing style
seems vaguely reminiscent of
Spain's, with thick lines, and
heavy crosshatching, but with a
definite lack of themaster's sense
of space and movement. This
piece might have made him a star
in 1969, but time moves on and,
hopefully, so do we all.
At the other end. Trash -
man by Spainexudcs thecynical
lyricism I have come to expect
from this triffic artist. In this
comic, Spain's perverse political fable is set in a not loo distant
future where U.N. roadblocks
exist in most major American
cities. Our hero, the archetypical
Trashman, continues his unending mission as the defender of his
own truth. An exciting story
combined with elegant design
sense and attention to graphic
detail makes for one of the best
reads of this year and certifies
Spain as one of the creators
working in the comic medium
today.
If you 're into social notes
from the fringes of hell, you must
meet S. Clay Wilson. The true
heir lo William Seward Burroughs in the graphic form, S.
Clay Wilson is the strangest
person to ever pick up a pencil.
Somebody at Last Gasp got smart
and gave the maniac three single
poster pages, a two page strip of
the Checker'd Demon and a
double page poster on the staple
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page. Hoo-boy!
Wilson's world is filled
with six foot leprechauns, renegade tattoo artists, brain eating
mutants, epicurean contortionists, bat-winged mind reapers,
pre-moisturized humanoids
(female and male), and a host of
other sickly and sordid types. In
fact, the whole collection is so
warped that I'm inclined to believe that ol' S. Clay is probably
a rather, upright, moral fellow.
Wilson's eye has the
depth potential of an electron
microscope and his vison of the
world owes a lot to Dante,
whoopee cushions, cheap pornography, roller derby interviews, and vomit bags. His main
squeeze, the Checkered Demon,
might be considered a feminist
nightmare but the sexist attitudes
expressed are so juvenile and
junior G-man in rendering that
high satire is the only avenue of
escape.
Next up, Robert 'The
Blasphemer' Williams, who
supplies the project with two
clever stories that advance the
cause of libertarian paranoia and
evolving social strategies. His
first offering isThe Boned Man,
a tale involving a secret technocratic society led by seven ruling
patrones and their nemesis the
Prince of Global Bohemia. The
Boned Man is a chilling satire of
present day media technocracy
and their masters the political
elite, and as such, is a fast paced
production designed to inspire
all red blooded intellectuals to
roll up their sleeves and have a
good think. Williams' second
feature is a tricky two-page scholarly survey on the state of foul
language that seems perhaps to
clever for it's own good. All in
all, though, based on his current
work it's safe to praise Bob.
A two page artist's jam
that the creator's produced for a
group exhibition attheNew York
Gallery The Psychedelic Solution is strictly a novelty item. All
seven of the cartoonists dip their
pens and squiggle for a giggle,
butnothing signifigant emerges.
What is signifigant is the
triumph of R. Crumb who concludes this issue with a howling
inquiry into the origins of art and
artists. Cave Wimp works as
satire and critique of the negative perceptions that greet artists
as they aspire to survive in a
hostile environment Perhaps the
best eye of his time. Crumb is the
'furmybook' artist sublime, as
his technical skill with a pen is
equally matched by his ability to
tell a story (the man truly understands sex and violence, ok?).
Observations on the masturba-
tory self-loathing of the early
artist and the artist's relationship
to patronage are revealing and
affecting. The politics of art may
well have begun in neolithic
times and Crumb has managed
to recreate the process in a powerful piece.
Basically, the comic
stacks up as a careening ride on
the social cycle produced by acid
heads who havenever recovered.
Powerful yet erratic, erotic and
thus controversial, while staying
true to it's times, Zap # 12 is a
must read for the comix fan of
the near nineties.
DECEMBER 1989
December 1/2
From T.O. HIGH LONESOME and THE SMUGGLERS
December 8/9
EARTHLING with guests
December 15 /16
TIN GOD with guests
December 22 / 23
NO FUN CHRISTMAS SHOW with guests
December 29 / 30
64 FUNNY CARS with guests
December 31
The Death of 1989 with CURIOUS GEORGE and
friends
ARTS CLUB LOUNGE 1181 SEYMOUR 683-1051
DOORS OPEN 9:30 FRI., 10:30 SAT.
 SORRY, NO MINORS	 DECEMBER 1989 25 The Young Gods
L'eau Rouge
(Play It Again Sam)
This Swiss group humbly calls itself The Young Gods.
After listening to L'eau Rouge,
atheism looks better than ewer.
The album's obvious goal is to
create an apocalyptic, nerve shattering, prot-punk rendering of the
post-industrial world. The result
is a tepid, overwrought example
of contrived angst and mediocre
musicianship.
The Young Gods beckon
their disciples to wade through a
slough of chaotic, mechanical
dissonance in a bleak atmosphere
of morose fatalism. Unfortunately, the listener never attains
salvation, or enlightenment, because he/she gets stuck in a mire
of ridiculous theatrics. Everything
seems too staged in this religious
experience. We have all heard
this type of thing before, and,
apparently, so have The Young
Gods. Whereas Joy Division and
Chrome (obvious influences), for
example, sounded spontaneous
and truly desperate. The Young
Gods, who evoke the vocabulary
of hopelessness and gloom, are
merely formulistic and unimaginative.
"Lafilledelamort"(the
most original of the ten tracks)
begins with the calliope-like
sounds of a carnival, luring the
listener into a musical horror
house audible in the background.
Once inside, the show begins.
"Rue desTempctes" is paved with
an uneven concoction of grating
vocals and blundering, miscued
guitar. "L'eau Rouge" fills the
ear with a vomiting noise, and
little else. The vocals in "villc
notre", "les enfants", and
"l'amourir" depict repetitive,
hackneyed images of gruesome
reality and crumbling civilization while the guitars and drums
melodramatically climax and
decline like a poorly performed
Wagnerian opera.
This flaccid attempt at
societal deconstraction falls short
of its goal because it is a maudlin, conventionalized statement
on a cliched theme. Ca me fait
It's Beginning To and Back
Again
(Enigma)
Those familiar with Wire
know that for the past fourteen
years it has been one of the most
innovative pop groups, and gas
also had a limited degree of influence upon other pop musicians, most notably R.E.M.
However, the Wire of yesteryear
if much different than post 1987
Wire. Gone is the spontaneous
energy, and pathos of 154 (1979),
and pre-conceived genius of The
Ideal Copy (1987). It appears
that Wire is well past it's peak of
creativity, and has begun to rely
on formula. Perhaps they have
stretched their oblique strategies
to the limit. Wire's last album, A .
Bell is a Cup... simply sounded
fiat and forced. "IBTAB A", their
latest album, exemplifies this
disintegration of creativity.
Since 1987, Wire seems
to have had as their goal an album every year. For Ibtaba it
looks as if they ran out of material. For the most part, the LP is
a compilation of re-mixed live
versions of songs from the past
two albums. This re-mixing is
meant to shed new light on the
chosen compositions, but for the
most part itdoesn't succeed. The
version of "Public Place", for
example, could only be stimulating after administering a heavy
dose of halucinogens. If there is,
however, something worth hearing on "Ibtaba", it has to be Wire's
supercool "hip-hop" experiment,
"Illuminated". This song incorporates the coolest "beat-box"
sounds, and sampling, with
Wire's idiosyncratic "atmosphere" guitar, and clever
rhythms. It's perhaps fitting that
a band born of puck may have, if
only half jokingly, taken on the
UNDER REVIEW
important (movement?) of the
1980s - hip-hop. This may be a
beam of light at the end of a long,
dark tunnel for Wire to pursue.
Patrik Sampler
The Only Ones
Live in London
(Skyclad Records)
This record, released
some ten years after the fact,
features a fine band who were
swept up in the UK new wave
explosion of the seventies. While
not punk, The Only Ones delivered some extremely fine songs,
especially the single, "Another
Girl, Another Planet".
This 1977 recording
contains live performances of
songs that appeared on their Even
Serpents Shine and Baby's Got a
Gun LPs. Peter Perrett, who did
most of the song-writing, is in
fine form vocally and carries the
band well. The result is a much
betterrelease than their 1984 LP,
Remains, recorded with The
Only Ones in their death throes.
The band is considering
reforming, and with the release
of this LP, they know they'll
have to be up to snuff if they get
on stage once again.
Greg Garlick
The Wonder Stuff
Hup
(Polygram)
The Wonder Stuffs second
effort could have been a respectable EP. Instead, England's most
critically lauded Snarky Young
Men have released an album
which is seven-twelfths filler of
the most self-absorbed description. Why is it that so many bands'
second albums drag on about the
Hell of Life on the Road? "30
Years in The Bathroom," the first
song on Hup, joins two other
the LP as uninspired
into this tradition. Maybe
Polygram rushed the band into
the studio before they'd had
time to do much more than
scribble a few morose commonplaces on the room-service napkins.
"Radio Ass Kiss" recalls the
pointed commentary ofThe Eight
Legged Groove Machine and
goes some ways toward redeeming the album. This can't be said
of the first British single, "Don't
Let me Down Gently", the kind
of repetitive pop song that gets
irritatingly lodged in your corpus callosum while you're folding laundry.
The Wonder Stuff are obviously looking to expand their
range with folk-influenced songs
like "Golden Green" and Unfaithful", though the latter is
marred by banal lyrics. It's harder
to smile when you've lied to a
friend," wails Malcolm.
Hopefully, their third album
will find The Wonder Stuff back
in form as the band that produced "It's Yer Money I'm After
Baby" and "Unbearable." Hup,
though, sounds like too little
material for the vinyl it takes up.
Marsha Brady
David Byrne
Rei Momo
(Wea)
For the benefit of the three
people who have never heard of
him, David Byrne began his distinguished music career in the
mid-1970s as lead-singer, guitarist and song-writer of the
highly acclaimed and commercially successful Talking Heads.
Over the years, the scope (and
ego) of this "Renaissance Man"
(Time Magazine cover-story,
autumn 1986) has grown to in
clude solo album, an LP done in
association with Brian Eno, the
soundtrack of The Last Emperor
withRyuichi Sakamoto and Cong
Su, and writing, directing, producing, and acting in True Stories, a patronizing movie, book-
about-the-movie, album view of
life in small-town America. (But
that's another story...)
Byrne's specialty is combining elements of pop music with
that which is not. The result:
cynical lyrics on overdose social
themes underscored by a flavour -
of-the-month musical style (jazz,
synthesized, ragtime, whatever
happens to be his fancy at the
On Rei Momo, David Byrne
pays homage to the Caribbean,
stocking his album with salsa
and island (but not reggae) allusions— instrumental, layrical,
and political. Forinstance, "Make
Believe Mambo" provides the
listener with a fast-paced, danceable send-up of T.V. personali-
to the area: "He can be a macho
man/ Now he's a game show
host/ One minute hilarious comedian/ No w he' s an undercover
cop." The social commentary is
vintage Byrne: all form and no
substance. Ironically, given
Byrne's own chameleon musical tastes, is he not inadvertently
criticizing himself?
"The Call of the Wild" features a fine mingling of a strong,
entrancing bongo rhythmn,
Byrne's wobbling voice, and
background phrases sung in
Spanish. "The Dream Police"
contrasts the liveliness of amaria-
chi band with cliche lyrics on an
Orwellian theme.
While the album's most interesting component is the incorporation of the pleasant, Caribbean
style with political and social
commentary, this point is problematic. Byrne and his lyrical
studies sound overwhelmed by
the background musicians,
numbering between eleven and
twenty-four per track. The
strength of "Rose Tattoo" is the
superior guitarist; Byrne himself
is nearly buried, making an intended message imperceptible.
Likewise, the least memorable
elements—eandering lyrics, tired
subjects, etc.—of much of the
album ("Independence Day" and
"Don't Want to Be Part of Your
World" in particular) are Byrne's
own participation in the songs.
In other words, the listener leaves
Rei Momo wondering if Byrne is
integrating a Caribbean musical
style to explore a new sound for
its own end, or is Byrne masking
his own faults by producing an
album on which the focus will
surely be the novel use of that
sound and not him?
WiU Reith
Numb
Chris tmeister
(Invasion)
Remember Numb? They burst
onto the local front a couple years
back with an independently released cassette Blue Light, its
follow-up LP on Edge Records,
and some Vancouver shows to
promote the thing. The album
went to #1 on the CiTR Spinlist
in the summer of 1988. Then we
heard news of the original vocalist departing. It then seemed
Numb became just another band
sucked down into obscurity.
Their level of commitment, quite
frankly, has been lacking. So to
say Numb was nothing more than
a hobby for its members wouldn't
be at all of f base. That will change
with the release of their second
LP - Christmeister, the more
bruising and angst-exorcising of
their two releases. It's pan-Alain
Jourgensen-styledbut intelligible
skinhead ferocity force-bred with
unrelenting dancefloor big beats.
The hideous rumble (compare to
Young Gods, 1000 Homo DJs,
Pailhead) moves through all but
three songs on Christmeister -
"Balance of Terror", "Flesh", and
the title track, which like earlier
Numb ("Guilt", "Hanging Key",
"Morality of Altitude") provide
a less-rhythmic, ambient dimension. Highlights: "Eugene",
"Bliss", "Dead Inside" and the
first single/video, "Cash". "Frantic" is a dear-ringer for Ministry's "Missing". Some have to
dance. Some have to kill. The
ball's in your court, dear Numb
listener.
The "Cash" video is a combination black and white, and coloured (double exposure) slo-mo
with a montage of models in
bondage, fifty dollar bills being
tucked into cleavage, speedball
shoot-ups, crucifixes, and clips
of guitarist Don Gordon, percussionist Dave Hall, and new vocalist Blair Dobson.
In the next few months Numb
may join Front Line Assembly in
the ranks of ambassadors to the
world of the spirit of Vancouver
independence. You see, Christmeister has been concurrently
released in Europe viaNew Rose
(as was the self-titled album),
which means offers of touring.
Fucking rights they should leave
their day jobs.
Lloyd Uliana
Young Fresh Fellows
This One's For the Ladies
(Frontier)
This is the Fellows' fifth
LP (their 3rd on Frontier), and
also their first without original
member Chuck Carroll, the guitarist who used to sing the YFF
Theme. Chuck's been replaced
by Kurt Bloch of the late, lamented Fastbacks, and, sorry as
26 DISCORDER I am to see Chuck go, I guess
Kurt can take much of the credit
for the new sharper-edged sound
of a lot of these songs. And what
a lot of songs! The Fellows
squeeze sixteen onto this poor 12
inch slab of vinyl. This album's
packed with danceable, sing-
along-able tunes in the fine tradition of the Young Fresh Fellows'
first LP, The Fabulous Sounds of
the Pacific Northwest.
Really, if the addition of
Kurt has changed the band, it's
for the better. If anything. This
One's For the Ladies captures
more of their tight, hard live
sound than the other records did.
One thing the Fellows do only in
the studio, though, is manage to
gather together groovy friends to
help out - guests from Scruffy
the Cat, The Replacements, and
Dynette Set all make appearances
here.
Also adding to the fun
factor of this package (remember, this is the band who added
"bonus tracks" to the vinyl version of one of their LPs) is the
insert which portrays all the
Fellows (identified only by first
names) as playing "lead guitar,"
even though each picture shows
one of them posed up against a
Rambler, thumping at a bare-
bones drum kit. Of course the
inimitable Tad is actually play
ing from inside the car- wouldn't
that interfere with the foot pedal
action?
All in all, this is another
great addition to the ever-increasing YFF collection, and the most
excited I've been about a Fellows album since their debut
Good, solid, and fun rock and
roll. Favourite songs: "Rotation"
(this is the one with the psychedelic vocals-from-inside-a-gar-
bage-can sound) and the surf anthem, 'Taco Wagon."
Janis
The Mighty Lemon Drops
Laughter
(Wea)
Formerly the Sherbet Monsters, this neo-psychadelic band
released their first album, Happy
Head, in 1986. Laughter, the
band's fourth album, indicates
both artistic growth and stagnation.
While the sparkling acoustic,
electric, and bass guitars seem
less polished than other psychedelic bands, like The Church,
they are played with greater finesse than on previous albums.
The vocals, too, are scratchier
and more energetic, making the
album richer sounding than their
earlier works. "AtMidnight", the
first song on the LP, provides the
listerner with an earful of dreamy,
guitar chords and spirited vocals, setting the tone for the rest
of the album. "Into the Heart of
Love", a psychedelic number
having more in common with the
1960s originals than the 1980s
copies, builds gradually into fast-
paced, otherworldly melody. In
"The Real World", the voice is at
its most vibrant, the chorus at its
most harmonious, the guitars at
their most dyniamic. Nirvana.
On the down side, the drummer should use his royalties for
percussion lessons. (Honest,
using the same beat in almost
every song is boring.) Another
problem: The Mighty Lemon
Drops have not quite realized
from theirprevious three albums
that they are weakest when they
are playing slowly and sing/
speaking. In their most turgid
track, a ballad, "Where Do We
Go From Heaven", the lead
singer lacks vitality, making the
repetitive lyrics sound pointless,
unconvincing, and dull.
Will Reith
64 Funnycars
Happy Go Lucky
(Bruiser Boy Records)
At last, the long-awaited
debut from Victoria's 64 Funny-
cars. This LP was recorded over
a year ago at Conrad Uno's Egg
Studios (and the similarity to
another Uno-produced band, the
Young Fresh Fellows, is hard to
miss), and it's taken this long for
the Funnycars to manage to press
When was the
,   Last time
You Went Dancing?
j
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and get it out themselves. But it's
been worth the wait. For one
thing, how many bands can you
think of who have drawings of
Gene Simmons (from Kiss, in
case you didn't know), celery, a
rubber duck, a roll of toilet paper, a smelly sock and a guinea
pig on their album covers? Besides proving once again that
band member Eric Cottrell is a
true artiste (just look at the depictions of the four of them on
the back cover - trust me, now
you'd recognize them on the
street), this is a sure indication of
the unpretentious, good (mostly)
clean fun that's inside.
There are ten songs here,
several of which have appeared
in various forms on CiTR's playlist, all of them sincere and good
pop tunes, and some of them
absolutely great It's hard to resist titles like "I Don't Mean to
be a Prude," "Arc Weldin' Son
of a Gun," and "Dull Daddy-O,"
and even harder to resist the
catchy songs themselves. "Flat
World" and "Boathouse" also
stick in my head - these are hook-
filled melodies that almost make
you forget it's the dead of winter.
I'm only sorry that these groovy,
fun and funny pop-meisters seem
to have such a hard time getting
gigs in Vancouver.
Janis
oh baby
shrapnel
A» is full of stuff: essays
is full of stuff: essays
on aliens, stories about
sex, doom poetry, dream
comix, and more. $1.00.
You'll find it (if you
look) at bookstores, or
3535 W. 2nd Ave, V6R 1J5
in your face!!
DECEMBER 1989 27 Complete selection of "Life in Hell"
books; also "Bloom County" "Calvin
& Hobbes" "The Far Side" and others
Plus over 60 different calendars for
your Christmas gift giving.
2089 W. 4 th Ave Vancouver
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Ph. 738-8122
Mote than j'ait comic book*
We accept the following
methods of payment:
1/ Your hard-earned money
2/ Your mate's hard-earned money
3/ Your Mother's money
4/ Your Grandparents' money
5/ All the money in your savings account
6/ And of course just plain money.
■lllll^UllIN,
• Wholesale Retail Outlet for:
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(36-88" widths)
- Broadcloth, Canvas, etc...
• Textile Paints and Dyes
• Tanks, Shorts and Sweats
• 1 Day Workshops:
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"Fabric Printing Techniques"
• Wearable Art
Mon-Fri 9:30 - 5:00 Sat 11:00 - 3:00
clothworks ^f
textile dyes and printers
132 Powell Street, Vancouver
_
—
i
DISCORDER EDITOR KEVIN
"KEVIN" SMITH SEARCHES
FOR CONTRIBUTORS
e various cats, dogs, birds, and this par-
EDITOR SMITH IN HAPPIER DAYS - SEE STORY
LOTTO: How many
of your hard-earned
dollars did you lose
today?
-Page 77
Gorby!" -page 106
~C-'!2S nn
just LOOK what you made the guy
do...now if only you'd called 228-3017
and axed for him, and gaven him your
story or art or photos or whatever,
this might nott'a happened.
The  Cinematheque  in
December:
Sweet Subversion
Breakthhroughs in sex, politics and religion (Dec.l/2J8/9):
Devil In The Flesh, Salo, The Milky Way
& The Devils
Quebec Cinema in the '80s
Fascinating French-language discoveries (Dec 3/4,10/11):
La Femme de .'hotel, A Corps perdu, Le Sourd
dans la ville & Les Portes Tournante
Tribute to John Cassavetes
Foi Four of the best films by this highly independent
American actor/director (Dec 6/7,13/14):
A Child is Waiting, Love Streams,
Faces & Husbands
Tribute to Raj Kapoor
The Charlie Chaplin of India, Kapoor was the biggest star
in the world's biggest film industry (Dec 16-23 -
opening 2pm Saturday matinee FREE)
plus (Dec 15/16): Bergman's The Seventh Seal and
the premiere of Frank Cole's A Life
Bring   in   this   ad for a free small popcorn
1131 HUWtbl.       Z4 MH.INhU: bBb-l-ILM Wow. Having just OD'd on barbecued peanuts, I'm in a total
mood to write this column. This
month's topic: the weirdest,
wackiest, way-outest places
around at which you can eat and
still come out alive.
Leading the way in
myriad respects is the Bino's on
Commercial Drive. I mean, you
know you're in East Van the
minute you go into the washroom: The tanks are chained onto
the toilets. And it smells. Not
pleasantly. Of course, I'm not
suggesting you should eat in the
washroom. No, the non-smoking area is amply weird enough
for that. The two-seater tables
along one wall of it are so narrow
it's as if you've suddenly entered
a two-dimensional universe.
Then there are those kooky geometric beehive light fixtures dangling overhead, keeping a vigilant yellow eye out to ensure
everything stays strictly seventies and the conspiratorial winking of a bio-rhythm machine
smackdab in the middle of the
section. Look out for the chairs;
one false move and you're
splayed out on the floor on yer
butt. The same caution applies to
the food I guess.
Secondly, less a place to
eat than a place to be Eaten -1
mean, no, that's not what I
meant... Anyway, hell. AKA
Save-On Foods at Metrotown.
Now with the ascendance of all
these mega-colossal foodstuff
realms I suppose it's no hot shit
in comparison. But hey, upon
my first few visits to it at the
beginning of the year, it definitely seemed to warrant the "H"
moniker. Like, suburban Cali-
fomian consumers' paradise.
Automated ramps j utting up into
the stratosphere, amassive video
shop where real grocery stores
used to have windows (symbolism for the TV-blind eighties),
and bizarrity of bizarrities, this
case-lot place off to one side,
world unto itself (what is this—
Dante visits the twentieth century and discovers Save-On?!?).
Bin upon bin of ten-pound bags
of candy—crates of cigarettes—
body-bags of disposable diapers—and you don't even need
to be a member to SAVE. You
get the feeling you're in a cheap
S tar Wars set or something. Sub-
monikered "Case-Lot Hell". And
on the eighth day God sold it all
to Jimmy Pattison. No really
people, this is the place to get
food and stuff on the cheap. I
particularly remember the carrot
prices being good.
While you're halfway
along the Skytrain route anyway,
why not subject yourself to
complete purgatory and head on
out to New West Station. One
block to the north of it lurks
Pacific Cafe. An unassuming
title that does nothing to prepare
you for the hoys that await within.
Actually if you don't consider
hicks from across the Fraser and
small-time New West hoods
"joys", "joy-uh", singular, is
more accurate. I speak of the
head waitress, an ageless,
hunched-over, muttering rabid
bundle of psychoses. This chick
in action is truly something to
fear...or look up to, depending
on how many mind-fucking
drugs you've done. She is to be
found, day in, night out, weaving
her single-minded, obsessive
Way amongst the vinyl, chromium and arborite of the little
greasy spoon. It's as if the Sixties never ended here, except if
you happen to espy the Billy Idol
and Bon Jovi tunes on the jukeboxes. Atmosphere so thick you
can slice it with a knife— particularly when Psycho-Woman
is compelled to wrangle with the
blitzed-out casualties that drift
in from Columbia St. (The blind
leading the halt, or what?) On
one occasion when a few tenta
tive clouds of smoke began to
issue from the kitchen our woman
was to be seen walking absently
up and down the aisles between
booths mumbling,
"...Fire...fire...ah —
Fire... there's...uh...Fire...",
which, needless to say, did not
have theeffectof—Well, itdidn't
have any effect really, other than
to rivet customers to their seats
in awestruck contemplation of
this behaviour. Also I fondly
remember sitting in here once
lateatnightawaitinga321 White
Rock Centre, with a friend explaining to me that based on J.D.
Salinger's theory in Franny &
Zooey, this woman is Jesus. I
haven't been back here in far too
long. The menu offers "Ooli-
chans" among other delights.
Anotherearthly manifestation of grocery-shopping hell
must surely be the IG A at Kings-
gate Mall. Well, Kingsgate Mall
itself is quite the spawn of hell so
it's only to be expected that the
IGA will fit in with the general
scheme of things. And fit in it
does. Once I turned from deep
At BINO'S we listen!!
Your comments and suggestion:
Please take a moment to help u
We value your opinion.
PLEASE RATE:
Excellent
Good
Fair
Poor
Our service courtesy
Our food quality
Our decor/atmosphere
__
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PLEASE DROP IN BOX AT FRONT COUNTER.   THANK YOU.
and cosmic contemplation in the
check-out line-up to find two
Dickensian orphan-type girls
rummaging filthy little paws in
my bag a peanuts. Yuck! But on
the other hand, this being the
East Side, people are generally
eager to show goodwill toward
fellow human beings. Hence
cashiers and customers will
engage each other in long conversation bemoaning the evil
state of this society what with
money-grubbing landlords,
measly welfare cheques, and the
prohibitive cost of milk. If you
enter from the mall you have to
pass through a narrow subterranean corridor, pass the hot dog
stand and arcade on your right,
then make a 180 degree turn by
the Chinese greasy spoon and
ascend a one-person-wide rickety old escalator that deposits
you before aphalanx of red, blue,
and yellow shopping baskets.
That is, if they haven't yuppified
this route out of existence since I
moved from Mount Pleasant.
Anyway, I like to think that the
store remains its proud, grotty,
dishevelled, hellish self. Some
things just refuse to be Eighties-
ified.
Next—
Child (in a still small
puzzled voice): Is this the ferry,
Dad?
Father: No, this is a restaurant..
Funny choice of words,
that. HELL'S SNACK BAR
might be more like it. HELL'S
SNACK BAR AND WATTING
LOUNGE. We're in Fantasyland
Nanaimo, theBC Ferry terminal
waiting room. Diarrhea-beige
vinyl-upholstered chairs. Harvest
Gold melamine tabletops. The
carpet, a serviceable combination of both colours. Lining the
cement-block walls, backlitpost-
ers depicting ferryboats sailing
through typically cliche scenic
waters. Tall grey plastic rubbish
bins standing guard amongst the
rows of tables. Cowichan sweaters, vinyl car coats, and K-Mart
parkas the apparelof choice. And
should you venture up to partake
of the wonders of the Snack Bar,
lo. Bluey-grey cardboard trays
can be loaded up with your choice
of vacuum-packed sandwiches,
shrink-wrapped Danishes, or
Pepsi in styrofoam cups. They
won't let you forget you're in the
Eighties here. And a sign reading, "Hot Dogs Available. Ask
Cashier." Why does this scare
me? The kind of place in which
nothing much can happen other
than that you realize you're getting a cold sore.
So, steel your gut and
head out. There're lots more
mind-bendingly warped eateries
just waiting to be unearthed.
£^2P
albion books
523 Richards St.
Vancouver • 662-3113
M/e hjcL\re berth cjxuxll'ty
usexJ boxrks and regards
Seasons Greetings
FILM MUSIC PERFORMANCE
DECEMBER 1989 29 ARE YOU SERIOUS? MUSIC BAM-NOON
Wake up to Schoenberg. Varese. Berio.
Carter. Scelsi. Xenakb. Schafer. Cage.
Webem - Artistic Evel Knlevels all. Nou-
veau post modern instrumental compositions in a classical vein with Paul BA.
Steenhuisen and Ian Crutchley alternating weeks.
THE TWELVE OCLOCK NEWS 12-12:15PM
News, sports, weather and more with the
CiTR News. Sports and Weather Depart-
THE ROCKERS SHOW 12:15-3:O0PM
Reggae. Rock Steady and Ska with
George Barrett.
HUES AND SOUL SHOW 3-S:00PM
lochlan Murray and Kevin Rea provide
the best of blues, rhythm and blues, funk
and soul.
THE CiTR NEWS MAGAZINE 5-S:30PM
CiTR's in-depth current affairs/news
magazine show. Coverage and analysis of the days news and sports.daily
editorial commentary, entertainment
reviews and reports on events here at
UBC. all in a comprehensive and comprehensible magazine package. And
we promise, no traffic reports.
JUST LIKE WOMEN 4-800PM
Feminist news and analysis and music
made by women for everybody. After-
nates Sundays with...
ELECTRONIC SMOKE SIGNALS 4-B:00PM
Information, news, interviews, political
analyis from the global cultures of resistance. Hosted by Horacio de la Cueva.
AlternatesSundayswithJust Like Women.
RADIO FREE AMERICA 10PM-MIDNIGHT
Join host Dave Emory for some extraordinary political research guaranteed to
make you think twice. Bring your tope
deck and two C-90*s. Originally broadcast on KFJC (los Altos.CA).
INTHEGRIPOFINCOHERENCY 12-4:0OAM
So what 1 Barry doesn't show up anymore? Who gives a shrl? GuidoandTrini
THE MORNING SHOW 730-6:15AM
From the famous siren to tf
mous BBC World Service, w
The CiTR Morning Sr
go:  news, sports, weather and 'scenic
view' (read:    radar) reports, features,
entertainment reviews and Alberta Hog
prices. Wake up with Dave and Luc.
THE AFTERNOON REPORT 1-1:15PM
Lunch goes down better with The Afternoon Report.  Tune in for no frills news,
sports, and weather.
SOUND OF REALITY 3-5:00PM
Experimental Radio, with Vision! Featuring environmental sounds, found noises.
Wormotion/propoganda and the world's
primitive and experimental musics from
the auditory fringe. Live. too. Contributions welcome.  Practitioner   Anthony
THE CiTR NEWS MAGAZINE 6-6:30PM
See Sunday for details.   Join host Ian
Gunn here weekdays.
SPORTS DIGEST 5:30-4:00PM
Join the CiTR Sports Department for aD
the latest In Thunderbird varsity sports
action and sports everywhere else for
IT'S JUST TALK WITH R.J. MOORHOUSE 4-
7:00PM
The big mouth is back, bigger and mouth-
ler than ever, taking on all the issues that
are taking-onable!
TOP OF THE BOPS 7:OO-«:0OPM
Trini Lopez. Ronnie Self, and The Phantom all love you. Marc Coulevin brings
Rock n' Roll to its roots. Note the really
THE AFRICAN SHOW 8-9:30PM
The latest in dance music from the African sub-continent plus/minusafewoldie
butgreatsandextras. Yourhost: Umerah
Onukwulu. Welcome.
THE JAZZ SHOW 9:50PM-12:30AM
Returning to its old time by popular
demand. The Jazz Show is Vancouver" s
longest running prime time jazz program
None of that late night graveyard/early
weekend jazz. Features at 11:00. Hosted
by the ever-suave Gavin Walker.
Recordings of live performances at the
UBC Schoolof Music. TheComtemporary
Players. Student Composers, Guest Artists. Stage Band. World Music..andoth-
WAKE UP AND SMELL THE COFFEE 11AM-
1:00PM
Terry Sold Spin Grind" and he's on the air
today!
THE RETURN OF NECRO-NEOFILE 1:15-
3:00PM
The newest additions to the CiTR playlist
as well as the tortured ramblings of any
musicians that fall into the tar pit. Facilitated by MD Chris Buchanan.
INSIDE INFORMATION S:3I
Join Kathryn Vogt and Barbara Elgcod
for an eclectic view of UBC and the
B.C. FOLK 4-7:00PM
Listen to the thoughts and music of B.C.
folk' artists with Barb Waldem.
ITS YOUR DIME 7-9:OOPM
The latest info on local bands and strictly
Canadian tunes, along with the hottest
playlist st - —
In the Kwa language of Yoi
(snatcher of voices), and " A-s'oro ma gb1
reply). CiTR 101.9 fM is both. Listen a
great, trumpeter Don Cherry's latest.
Acoustic jazzwithCherry.Charlie Haden.
Billy Higgins and a return to recording by
Texas Tenor James Clay after an absence of almost 30 years.
1 lth Ritas of Swing, composed and arranged by also saxophone master Phil
Woods Is one of his great triumphs. A five
part jazz suite played by a smaH band of
jazzgreats.conducted by Quincy Jones
18th A Love Supreme is one of John
Coftrane's masterworks and one of his
most eloquent musical statements in
two words Tor radio: "Ghohun-ghohun"
si" (that which speaks without pausing for
d find out For yourself.
Tyner. Garrison, and
2Sth, 1st Gavin Wa
Show will not be hee
Nevertheless, have o
rrm
TUESDAY     WEDNESDAY   THURSDAY
5DAY   THURSDAY FRIDAY H i HlllrirU 11
-y| % a\ t a !1
I n: *iyi~rn t- JVi>-l»'.'^s-ii «?»:;:.•<;:::'.'•::« ■'?-■ •'.* I i»M sW.ViHTJTsM ■
THE MORNING SHOW - BBC WORLD SERVICE AT 8:00   \
E2MM  *
BLUES AND
SOUL
SHOW
JUST LIKE
WOMEN/
ELECTRONIC
SMOKE
BEYOND/
RADIO FREE
AMERICA
BREAKFAST
WITH THE
BROWNS
SOUND
REALITY
MOORHOUSE
ENVIRONMENTAL
SCATOLGY
GARNET
TIMOTHY
BLOOD
ON THE
SADDLE
NEO-
NECRO-
NEOPHILE II
THE TASTE
OF THINGS
TO COME
THE VENUS
FLYTRAP
SHOW
NEON
MEATE
DREAM
HEADS
VERSUS
WOLF AT
THE DOOR
PERMANENT
CULTURE
SHOCK
HOOTENANNY
SATURDAY
NIGHT
LIVE FROM
RADIO HEa
SOUP
STOCK
FROM THE
BONES OF
EVERYTHING
YOU KNOW rs
WRONG
W and interviews! With Spike
WHITE NOISE 4-7.00AM
Nova Express Mark II.   70s progressive
meets 80s electronic. Anderson. Glass.
Eno. Burroughs, prose, poetry and more.
SPORTS DIGEST 7-7:30AM
Rebroadcast of Monday afternoon's programme.
THE MORNING SHOW 7:30-8:15AM
See Monday for detiils. Wake up with
Kim and the Glenn Miller Orchestra.
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE 1:15-3:00PM
Country music to scrape the cowshit off
your boots to. Wrth yer host-poke. Jeff
THE UNHEARD MUSIC 3-5:00PM
Demo Director Dale Sawyer provides
some insights into the best c   '"
of the newest Canadian n
CONVER-RADIO 5:3O-4:0OPM
Join Chris Brayshaw as he continues the
search for interesting guests, interesting
calers and inexpensive restaurantsabout
THE BETTY*. VERONICA SHOW 6-7:00PM
Join the Riverdale Gang each week for
fun and frivolity! Pep up! Tune in!
NEON MEATE DREAM 7-9:00PM
Uke your worst nightmare and most erotic
dream combined.  God what a mess.
With Pete lutwych.
BEAT HEADS VERSUS WOLF AT THE DOOR
9PM-MIDNIGHT
Hosts Norm & Mike and Lupus on the
rhythm collision alternating weeks.
THE MORNING SHOW 7:30-8:15AM
See Monday for details. Wake up wi
Luc and Dave.
OUR TALENTED FAMILY 10-11:00AM
THE MORNING SHOW 7:30-8:15AM
See Monday for details. Wake up with
Kim and Chris.
HANFORD NUCLEAR PIZZA PIE 10-11:00
AM
Textbooks beckon. Which is why Tm
where I am. Still dedicated to the Northwest (you define). Send stuff please!
JIGGLE NOON- 1:00PM
Mikey has book smarts. Gav has street
smarts. Together.theboyswhoinvented
punk rock back in the 50's bring yet another new dimension to contemporary
years! Listen for our legendary Bacwards
Song (8:15) to win valuable prizes, guffaw uncontrollably during Ufa Ask Valerie (8:40). call In your votes for the Listener's Choice (9:00). then sit back and
enjoy six bucks' worth of fun on the 50C
Record Hour (9:05). M-m-m good
UVE FROM THUNDERBIRD RADIO HELL 10
PM -MIDNIGHT
Join Ed. Peter, and John for a real live
band in your Mngroom. automobile or
WalkPerson. If YOU or YOUR BAND are
interested in participating, give Ed a call
at 462-9281.
30th Nightstalkers
7th Sound Butchers
14th Hollowheaas and Hoka
21st Tape-a-Manla with The Method
28th   Juan Valdez Memorial R&B Erv
ARTSCAFE 7-7:30AM
Rebroadcast of Thursday's 5:30 programme.
THE MORNING SHOW 7:30-8:15AM
See Monday for details. Wake up with
Stefan and a yard full of smiles and
happiness.
MOVINGIMAGES10:30-11:00AM
Join host Ken Macintyre as he takes you
onatourthroughthe silver screen'sback
ITS NOT EASY BEING GREEN 1:15-2:30PM
The greenest of the CiTR DJ crop try to
germinate and take root on the air. If
you are Interested in CiTR programming
possibilities, phone the Program Director
at 228-3017.
ABSOLUTE VALUE OF NOISE - PART ONE
2:30-3:30PM AND PART TWO 4 -5:00PM
Found sounds, tape loops, compositions
of organized and unorganized auralify.
power electricians and sound collage.
Live experimental music. 100% Canadian Industrialism
trol. You can turn off the radio, you can
make your opinions heard, but you must
reailse that Nardwuar and Cleopatra
von Fluffelstein are your friends.
Parcheesyl
RADIO ACTIVE 5:3O-6:00PM
In-depth focus on a different issue each
week. Interviews with community members. UBC professors and others.  If you
HOMETAPINGI.N.T.E.R.N.A.T.I.O.N.A.L4-
9:00PM
Radio to record over. Tapein.tumon.no
dropouts.
STOMP ON THAT BOPPATRON 9:00-MID-
NIGHT
The latest & greatest In dance floor
grooves. DJ Mick Hard brings you the big
beat.
22nd BoppatronXmasBeatBash. Best of
89. Mega special guests. Stay tuned for
confirmation of date.
29th Boppatron Best Dance Music in the
80s. More mega guests.
SOUP STOCK FROM THE BONES OF THE
ELEPHANT MAN 12:30-3:30AM
Independent music from around the
world ranging from the latest In club
tunes to hardcore and industrial grunge.
Live and pre-recorded Interviews plus
experimental accordion sessions. With
Lloyd Uliana
ARTS CAFE 5:30-4:00 PM
In-depth arts analysis and general miscellany of commentary on the local arts
community.
THE NO HOST BAR 4-8:00PM
Join Pat & Lisa as they travel to exotic
lands and wrestel wtih big themes of
today's big world.
HOOTENANNY SATURDAY NIGHT! 8-10:00
THE SATURDAY EDGE BAM-NOON
Steve Edge hosts Vancouver's biggest
and best ocoustic/roots/rogue folk music radio show. Now in its fifth year on
CiTRi UK Soccer Report at 11:30.
POWERCHORD 12:15-3:00PM
Vancouver's only true metal show with
the underground speed to mainstream
metal; local demo tapes, imports and
other rarities. Gerald Rattlehead and
Metal Ron do the damage.
IN EFFECT 3-5.00PM
The Hip Hop Beat brought to you by Niel
Scoble-straight from the Island.
EVERYTHING YOU KNOW IS WRONG  t
8:00PM
Brought to you by your friends from Ea
MEGABLASTI  1-4:00 AM
Improvisation in many forms. Mixes that
don't work but had to be tried. Requests
that never get played. Welcome to late
night radio. With Adam Sloan
ETCETERA
Four times each day. hear the rundown
on the latest events, lectures, gigs, and
fun things occurlng here onthat campus
cer site. If you wanna submit stuff, by all
means do so. Simply drop em off at
CiTR's offices In SUa
30 DISCORDER Several times a day. listings are read out
for all the hip happenings here in the city
of rain. Concerts and clubs, theatre, film
and cinema: everything you could pos-
H'imi'i.iii'i..-H#i
CiTR providesfree airtime forCommunity
Access by groups and individuals. If you
or your group would like to say some-
call the Program Director at 228-3017.
WEMMEM
Join the crack CiTR Sports Unit for play-
by-play coverage of a mess o' varsity
sports both on the campus and off, from
soccer to football to ice hockey to basketball. Find out the reason why the "TR"
is in CiTR. Playoff games beckon! Upcoming regular season games carried
by CiTR which will pre-empt regular CiTR
programming:
DECEMBER
FRIDAYTHE 1ST. 8:15PM: MENS BASKETBALL VS U OF SASKATCHEWAN.
SATURDAY THE 2ND. 1:00PM: BC HIGH
SCHOOL BOYS BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIPS.
SATURDAY THE 9TH. 1:00PM: BC HIGH
SCHOOL GIRLS BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIPS.
JANUARY
SATURDAY THE 4TH. 8:00PM: MEN'S BASKETBALL VS U OF SASKATCHEWAN.
SATURDAY THE 13TH. 7:30PM: MENS ICE
HOCKEY VS U OF REGINA.
FRIDAY THE 19TH. 8:00PM: MEN'S BASKETBALL VS U OF VICTORIA.
SATURDAY THE 20TH. 8:00PM: MEN'S
BASKETBALL VS U OF VICTORIA
FRIDAY THE 24TH. 7:30PM: MEN'S ICE
HOCKEY VS U OF MANITOBA.
SATURDAY THE 27TH. 8:00PM: MEN'S
BASKETBALL VS U OF LETHBRIDGE.
HOCKEY VS U OF BRANDON.
SATURDAY THE 17TH. 7:45PM: MEN'S
BASKETBALL VS U OF CALGARY.
CiTRwantsyc
your friendly UBC Radio Station which
broadcasts to the campus and beyond.
Opportunities abound! Wheeee! Programming, producing, editing, writing,
engineering, operating, announcing,
hosting, etc etc etc. Come by the stu-
diosduringnormaloffice hours. We're located in Room #233 on the second floor
of the Student Union Building. Or phone
us at 228-3017. And yes. Jen Kelly, everyone Is welcome regardless of age! So
come on by and see for yourself!
■x-i'.aivx.y.vii
THE FOLLOWING FOLKS ARE THE ONES
YOU SHOULD GET AHOLD OF CAUSE
THEY'RE THE ONES YOU SHOULD GET
AHOLD OF.
ARTS DIRECTOR ANTJERAUWEROE
BUSINESS MANAGER . .BARBARAWILSON
DEMO DIRECTOR DALE SAWYER
DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR	
 LINDA SCHOLTEN
PRESIDENT LANE DUNLOP
MOBILE SOUND  LANE DUNLOP
MUSIC DIRECTOR ... CHRIS BUCHANAN
NEWS & CURRENT AFFAIRS DIRECTOR ...
 STEFAN ELLIS
PRODUCTION MANAGER.. ADAM SLOAN
PROGRAM DIRECTOR.... RANDY IWATA
RECORD UBRARIAN .. JEROME PRINGLE
SECRETARY JOHANNA BLOCK
SPORTS DIRECTOR JEFF PATERSON
TRAFFIC DIRECTOR TANIA ALEKSON
VICE PRESIDENT ROBYNN IWATA
VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR.. BILL BAKER
■ il'IVIW-I.V.W
BUSINESS LINE 228-3017
DJ UNE 228-2487 (228-CiTR)
NEWS LINE 222-2487 (222-OTR)
FAX LINE 228-5093
All surveys are in and are being counted
by our crack CiTR Survey Crew. Stay
tuned to these pages for the results and
BOLD MEANS CANADIAN,
DONCHA KNOW
DEMOLIST
THE ROOSTERS           PRETTY THING
THE MIMES	
 I'MSO DEPRESSED
KEMPTON DEXTER	
  LESBIAN UFE
EARTHLING	
 PURE HELL
HARD ROCK MINERS	
RAIN THEATRE	
 DK #2
64 FUNNYCARS	
ALAN DOBB & DUMELA ...
 A BUMP
PORTABLE ETHNIC TAXI...
EARTHLING	
MIND CYCLE	
 BRAZIL
 UNNATURAL LAWS
EMILYSTOP	
ELIZABETH FISCHER	
 STATES OF GRACE
FAB MAVERICKS	
SAND DANCES	
 A HERO FALLS
TOUCH N GOS	
 ANOTHER BOYFRIEND
SHOVLHED	
PUKE THEATRE	
 I'M SLOWLY DYING
THE PICASSO SET	
TOXIC OPTION SYNDROME
@#'&!	
 SOMEBODY GIRL
 SHOES
THE OPEN GRAVES	
BABYSUGARBAG	
OH YEAH	
 NUCLEARLOVE
 SPOON RIVER
 DAILY FEAR OF DYING
BRILLIANT ORANGE	
ULTERIOR MOTIVE	
   THE DEVIL LIKES ME
CELTIC BLUE	
 ASIROVEDOUT
PULL MY DAISY	
 AC-DC
ROUGHAGE 	
SHOVLHED	
SMALL MAN SYNDROME ..
THE PALM SISTERS	
 JAH IN VIETNAM
 GREAT BIG PINK STATE
 SILENCE
 THREE POEM DEMO 1989
SPINLIST
ICE-T  ICEBERG/FREEDOM OFSPEECH
BIG AUDIO DYNAMITE MEGATOP PHOENIX
CURIOUS GEORGE .... CHILDREN OF A COMMON MOTHER
RFD HOTCHII1 PFPPFRS      MOTHER'S Mil K
TEST DEPT	
DOUGHBOYS	
GOLDEN PALIMINOS	
 HOME AGAIN
JANE SIBERRY	
 BOUND BY THE BEAUTY
VARIOUS ARTISTS	
POP WILL EAT ITSELF	
STONE ROSES	
THIS IS THE DA Y. THIS IS THE HOUR...
 SHEBANGS THE DRUM
DAVID BYRNE	
 REIMOMO
MIGHTY LEMON DROPS...
D.O.C	
YOUNG M.C	
 LAUGHTER
 NO ONE CAN DO IT BETTER
 STONECOLD RHYMIN'
SOUNDGARDEN	
FUGAZI	
 LOUDER THAN LOVE
DINOSAUR JR	
NIRVANA	
 JUST LIKE HEAVEN
PRUDENCE DREDGE ...
DEPECHE MODE	
MAD DADDYS	
 APES GO WILD
KATE BUSH ...
VARIOUS ARTISTS	
JOHN LEE HOOKER	
.... THE NEW BEAT R/EVOLUTION
  THE HEALER
VARIOUS ARTISTS	
. IT CAME FROM CANADA VOL 5
SPACEMAN 3	
JEGSY DODD & SONS OF..
FETCHIN BONES	
. WINES BARS AND WEREWOLVES
 MONSTER
VARIOUS ARTISTS	
COFFIN BREAK    	
 THE BRIDGE
MALCOLM MCLAREN....
VAYA CON DIOS	
  WALTZ DARLING
  VAYA CON DIOS
SCOTT MCCAUGHFY	
MY CHARTRFUSF OPINION
CiTR welcomes musical expressions of any form with open
ears. Interested artists are encouraged to submit any and
all material to the CiTR Music Department for potential
airplay.   Please send your stuff to CiTR Music/Cassette/
Demo Department (whichever one applies), 6138 SUB Boulevard. Vancouver. BC V6T2A5. Your interest is appreciated
and welcome. Thank you very much. DISCORDER
DATEBOOK
TUE 28 CiTR presents Creation won-
dergod The Jazz Butcher at the Commodore QJ... Stephen Fearing at the Vancouver East Cultural Centre (Spm. S12)...
Jr. Gone Wild and Emily Slop at the Town
Pump (I)... Family Plot at the Railway
Club ft)... Wailin' Walker's Rock Party at
the Yale (L)... Collegium Musicum Ensemble directed by John Sawyer and
Morna Russel at the Recital Hall
(12:30pm)... Don't Sit Under the Apple
Tree continues at the Mount Pleasant
Legion Hall... Where is Kabuki? continues
at the Firehall Arts Centre (8pm)... Engaged continues at the Studio 58 (8pm.
$5)... Screwtape continues at the Vancouver Little T heatre (8:30pm. S10)... Lady
Day at the Emerson's Bar & Grill continues at the Arts C lub Revue Stage... Dead
Serious continues at the Arts Club Seymour... A Lecture Night with Keith Ralston
entitled "White Labour in a Multicultural
Society" at the Burnaby Village Museum
(7-9pm, free)... Kurahara's Thirst for Love
(7pm) and Ichikawa's I am a Cat (9pm)
at the Vancouver East Cinema... Glenn
WED 29 Family Plot at the Railway
Club ttX.. Helvis "The Dark Side" at the
Town Pump (L)... The Demons at Hogan's
Alley (I)... Joyce Poley at the Vancouver
East Cultural Centre (8pm. $10)... Jim
Byrnes at the Yale (I)... Noon hour concert with Geoffrey Michaels on violin and
Roger Smalley on piano at the Recital
Hall (12:30pm. $2 at the door)... Mas*
Appeal continues at Presentation House
(Spm. S10 adults. $7 students)... Don't Sri
Under the Apple Tree continues at the
Mount Pleasant Legion Hall... Where is
Kabuki? continues at the Firehall Arts
Centre (8pm)... Engaged continues at
the Studio 58(8pm.S5)...Screwlape continues at the Vancouver Little Theatre
(8:30pm. $10)... Lady Day at the Emerson's Bar & Grill continues at the Arts
Club Revue Stage... Dead Serious continues at the Arts Club Seymour... Neil
Arts Club Granville Island... Beirut: The
Last Home Movie at the Vancouver East
Cinema (7 & 9:30pm)... Video Against
AIDS, three evenings of video addressing the AIDS crisis opens with Robin Barnett ot the Women and AIDS Project at
the Video In (8pm. $3 members. $4 non-
members)... Cinema 16 presents David
Cronenbergs Scanners at the SUB The-
esGoodman "AfterDarl
Pianist Roger Smalley at
tal Hall(8pm)... Jim Byrnes at the
. UBCSymphony Orchestra con-
by Gerald Stanick at the Old
—  '12:30pm)...  Mass  Appeal
 Presentation House (Spm.
> 10 adults. $7 students)... Don't Sit Under
the Apple Tree continues at the Mount
Pleasant Legion Hall... Where Is Kabuki?
continues at the Firehall Arts Centre
(8pm)... Engaged continues at the Studio 58 (8pm. $5)... Screwtape continues
at the Vancouver Little Theatre (8:30pm.
$ 10)... Broadway Bound continues at the
Arts Club Granville Island... Lady Day at
the Emerson's Bar 4 Grill continues at the
Arts Club Revue Stage... Dead Serious
continues at the Arts Club Seymour... The
extraordinary journey of C.G. Jung. The
Wisdom of the Dream, at the Ridge The-
:
S12 ■:.
\e here page, just submit any and aU ck
the WISE Holl(8:30pm.$7advanceonry)...
Dangerous Liasons (7pm) and Dead Poets
Society (9:20pm) at the Vancouver East
Cinema., .deadline for submissions tothe
Annual Short Fiction Contest presented
by Prism International...
SAT 2 HighLonesomewiththeSwag-        at
ot cost a single stinking dime. Listings are printed based
Uncle at the Railway Club (L)... The Nervous Fellas and The Last Wild Sons at 86
Street (L)... David Lindley and El Rayo-X
at the Town Pump ft)... Sam Weis and
Nyetz at the WISE Hall (8:30pm. S8)... Jim
Byrnes at the Yale ft)... The Demons at
Hogan's Alley (I)... Mass Appeal continues at Presentation House (8pm. $10
adults. $7 students)... Don't Sit Under the
Apple Tree continues at the Mount Pleasant Legion Hall... Where is Kabuki? continues at the Firehall Arts Centre (8pm)...
Engaged continues at the Studio 58(8pm.
S7/S4.50 students)... Screwtape continues at the Vancouver Little Theatre
(8:30pm. $10)... Lady Day at Emerson's
Bar & Grill closes at the Arts Club Revue
Stage... Dead Serious continues at the
Arts Club Seymour... Letters Irom Yesterday and Endangered Species atthe Vancouver East Cultural Centre (7:30pm. $8
adults/$4 children)... Christmas Ceramics Sale at the Emily Carr College of Art
and Design... Annual Pottery Sale at the
West End Community Centre... Dangerous Liosons (7pm) and Dead Poets Society (9:20pm) at the Vancouver East Cin-
SUN 3 Victims Family from San Francisco at Club Soda (L)... No Fun Facing
the 1990's at the Railway Club (9:30pm)
it the A
missions to an exhibition celebrating
Black History Month '90 at the Vancouver East Cultural Centre...
with The Swagmen at the Arts Club (L)...
Bob's Your Uncle at the Railway Club
ft)... UBC Symphony Orchestra conducted by Gerald Stanick at the Old Au-
Yale (I)... The Demons at Hogan's Alley
(D... Mass Appeal continues at Presentation House (8pm. $10 adults. $7 students)...Sri Chinmoy at VancouverTrade
and Convention Centre... Vancouver
Chamber Choir performs J.S. Bach'sMag-
nificat and Benjamin Britten'sSaint Nicholas at the Orpheum (8pm)... Don't Sit
Mount Pleasant Legion Hall... Where is
Kabuki? continues at the Firehall Arts
Centre (8pm)... Engaged continues at
the Studio 58 (8pm. S7/S4.50 students)...
Screwtape continues at the Vancouver
LittleTheatre(8:30pm.$10)...LadyDayat
the Emerson's Bar & Grill continues at the
Arts Club Revue Stage... Dead Serious
continues at the Arts Club Seymour...
Vancouver Youth Theatre presents Letters from Yesterday and Endangered
Species at the Vancouver East Cultural
Centre (7:30pm. $8 adults/$4 children)...
Christmas Ceramics Sale at the Emily
Carr College of Art and Design... Annual
Pottery Sale at the West End Community
Centre... The Congress of Black Women
presents Angela Davis at the Woodward
Krew at the Town Pump (L
Flamenco in performance _.
Club Revue Stage(7pm. $20!!).. loreen_
McKennrt at the Vancouver East Cultural
Centre (8pm. $12)... Where is Kabuki?
continues at the Firehall Arts Centre
(8pm)... Annual Juried Christmas Craft
Fair at the West End Community Centre
(10am-4pm)... Christmas Ceramics Sale
at the Emily Carr College of Art and Design... Annual Pottery Sale at the West
End Community Centre... Dangerous
Liasons (7pm) and Dead Poets Society
(9:20pm) at the Vancouver East Cin-
MON 4 CiTR presents Shindig '89
Finals at the Town Pump (I) where the
three top bands in the 11 -week competition battle rt out for recording time and
fame... The Indigo Girls at the Ridge Theatre© 15pm).., Danny Tripperatthe Yale
(L)... The Vancouver City Singers at the
Canadian Memorial Church (7:30pm. $ 7.
$5 seniors)... James Bond Film Festival at
the Graduate Student Centre Fireside
Lounge (6:308:8:45pm. free)... Dead Serious continues at the Arts Club Seymour...
Kohei Oguri's Muddy River (7pm) and
Fukasaru's House on Fire (9pm) at the
Vancouver East Cinema...
TUE 5 High Lonesome at the Railway
Club (L)...JaneCoop»DeliaWallis Recital
at the Vancouver East Cultural Centre
(8pm. $12.50)... Danny Tripperat the Yale
(l)...Stevie Ray Vaughn atthe Orpheum...
Anne Murray at the Queen Elizabeth
Theatre... Concert celebrating Elliott
Weisgarber's 70th birthday at the Recital
Hall (8pm)... Engaged continues at the
Studio 58 (Spm. $5)... Screwtape continues at the Vancouver Little Theatre
(8:30pm. $10)... Dead Serious continues
atthe Arts Club Seymour... Kohei Oguri's
Muddy River(7pm)andFukasaru'sHouse
on Fire (9pm) at the Vancouver East
Cinema...
WED 6 High Lonesome at the Railway Club (D... Mass Appealcontinuesat
Presentation House (8pm. $10 adults. $7
students)... Pierre Bensusan gives a guitar workshop at the Scandalous Folk Club
(8pm)... Danny Tripper at the Yale (L)...
Engaged continues at the Studio 58 (8pm.
$5)... Screwtape continues at the Vancouver Little Theatre (8:30pm. $10)...
Deod Serious continues at the Arts Club
Seymour... the second of three evenings
of the Video Against AIDS series of video
addressing the AIDS crisis with Ken Mann
of the Vancouver PWA Coalition at the
Video In (8pm. $3 members, $4 non-
lames Harmon at the Yale(L)... After All
jt the Town Pump (L)... Moss Appeal
:ontinues at Presentation House (Spm.
' ~ adults. $7 students)... Christmas sale
le UBC Botanical Garden (1 lam-
Sue Foley Band at the Yale (D... Mass
Appeal continues at Presentation House
(8pm. $ 10 adults. $7 students)... A Hatful
of Rain continues at the Tom Lee Music
Hall (8pm)... Screwtape continues at the
    erLittleThecrtre(8:30pm.$10)...
58 (8pm, S7/S4.50 students)...Screwtape
continues at the Vancouver Little Theatre (8:30pm. $10)... Deod Serious continues at the Arts Club Seymour.., Vancouver NewMusic presents Sanctuary at
the Vancouver East CutturalCentre(8pm.
$12 general/$8 50 students).. Malpractice (7:30pm) and The Last of England
(9:30pm) at the Vancouver East Cin-
Pierre Bentust
in at the Centennial The-
aire (8pm)... t
Presentation F
iouse(8pm.$10adults.$7
f   England
East Cinema (7 8c 9:30pm)...
THU 7  High Lonesome atthe Railway
ft)... Mass Appeal continues at Presentation House (8pm, $10 adults. $7 students)... A Hatful of Rain opens at the
Tom Lee Music Hall(8pm. proceedsto St.
Paul's Hospital Care Unit for Addicted
Newborn Children)... Engaged contin-
uesatthe Studio 58(8pm, $5)..Screwtape
continues at the Vancouver Little The-
completewfthover
Seymour... Babayaga at the Vancouver
East Cultural Centre (8pm. $ 10 general/
$5 students)... Kevin Pollak at the Ridge
Theatre (9:30pm)... Spike Lee Double Bill
withShe's Gotta Have It (7:30pm) and Do
the Right Thing (9:15pm) at the Vancouver East Cinema...
SAT 16 TinGodattheArtsClub(L)...
Hardrock Miners at the Railway Club
CD... D.O.A. at the Town Pump ft).. Mark
Hummel with the Sue Foley Band at the
Yale ft)... Ranch Romance at the WISE
Hall (8:30pm, $8)... Mass Appeal contin-
adults. $7 students)... A Hatful of'Rain
continues at the Tom Lee Music Hall
(8pm)... Screwtape continues at the
Vancouver Little Theatre (8:30pm. $10)...
e UBC
BotanicalGardenO )am-7pm)... AHattuI
of Rain continues at the Tom Lee Music
Hall (8pm)... Engaged continues at the
Studio 58 (8pm, $7/$4.50 students)...
Screwtape continues at the Vancouver
Little Theatre (8:30pm. $10)... Dead Serious continues at the Arts Club Seymour...
The annual Childrens' Christmas Fair at
the Vancouver Waldorf School (10am-
3pm)... Sanctuary at the Vancouver East
Cultural Centre (8pm. $ 12general/$8.50
students)... Malproctice (7:30pm) and
The Last of England (9:30pm) at the
Vancouver East Cinema...
SUN 10 MakingSpiritsBrightwrththe
Vancouver Men's Chorus at the Arts Club
Granville   blond...   Sturm  Group  from
wrlhBrianG'Froerer. Richard Ming us. and
Michael Wall at the Recital Hall (2pm)...
A Winter Ottering with harpist Elizabeth
Volpe at the Vancouver East Cultural
Centre (2:30 &8pm, $11 general/$9
students)...Ma lpractice(7:30pm) and The
Last of England (9:30pm) at the Vancouver East Cinema...
MON 1 1 CITR presents The Picasso
Set's Cassette and Video Release Party
at the Railway Club (L)... Oliver and the
Ele ments at the Yale(L)... No Fun at Christmas at the Vancouver East Cultural
Centre (8pm. $8.50)... The Georgia Satellites at 86 Street ft)... A Hatful of Rain
continues at the Tom Lee Music Hall
(8pm)... Dead Serious continues at the
Arts Club Seymour... Malpractici
(7:30pm) and The La
(9:30pm) at the Vanc<
TUE 12 Feathered Pens with Alison
Hogan at the Railway Club ft)... Mark
Hummel with the Sue Foley Band at the
Yale ft)... A Hatful of Rain continues at
the Tom Lee Music Hall (8pm)...
Screwtape continues at the Vancouver
Little Theatre (8:30pm. $10)... Dead Serious continues at the Arts Club Seymour...
Malpractice (7:30pm) and The Last of
England (9:30pm) at the Vancouver East
WED 13 TippyA-Go-GoFolkHourat
the RailwayClub(L)... Mark Hummel with
the Sue Foley Band at the Yale ft)... Mass
Appealcontinuesat Presentation House
(Spm. $10 adults, $7 students)... A Hatful
ol Rain continues at the Tom Lee Music
Hall (8pm)... Screwtape continues at the
Vancouver Little Theatre (8:30pm. $10)...
D*pd Serious continues at the Arts Club
Seymour... the third of three evenings of
the Video Against AIDS series of video
addressing the AIDS crisis with Brian
Teixeiraof the Associate Vancouver PWA
Coalition at the Video In (Spm, $3 members, $4 non-members)... The Life and
Times of the Great Blue Heron at the
Richmond Nature Park (8-10pm. free)...
Malpractice (7:30pm) and The Last of
England (9:30pm) at the Vancouver East
Cinema...
THU 14 Hardrock Miners at the Railway Club (L)... James "Blood" Ulmer at
the Town Pump ft)..- Mark Hummel with
theSue Foley Band at the Yale ft).., Mass
Appeal continues at Presentation House
(8pm, $10 adults. $7 students)... A Hatful
Thing (9:15pm)
k Concert at the Vancouver East Cultural Centre (Bpm)... She's
Gotta Have It (7:30pm) and Do the Right
' -* "le Vancouver East
SUN17Talk-ActL .
cording at Club Soda ft)... The Sue Foley
Band at the Railway Club (I)... Making
Spirits Bright with the Vancouver Men's
Chorus at the Arts Club Granville Island...
A Hatful of Rain closes at the Tom Lee
Music Hall (8pm)... She's Gotta Have It
(7:30pm)andDotheRightThing(9:15pm)
at the Vancouver East Cinema...
MON 18 OlrverandtheElementsat
the Yale (D... The Sue Foley Band at the
Railway Club (D... B4 Charlie Mopic
(7:30pm) and Dear America: letters
Home from Vietnam (9:20pm) at the
Vancouver East Cinema...
TUE 19 Women'sJamSessionatthe
Railway Club ft)... Oliver and the Elements at the Yale ft)... 64 Charlie Mopic
(7:30pm) and Dear America: Letters
Home from Vietnam (9:20pm) at the
at the Railway Club (L)... Oliver and the
Elements at the Yale ft)... Ayn Rand restoration of We the Living (7:30pm) at the
Vancouver East Cinema...
THU 21 OliverandtheElementsatthe
Yale (L)... Les Goodman "After Dark" at
the Railway Club ft)... Ayn Rand restoration of We the Living (7:30pm) at the
Vancouver East Cinema..
FRI 22 NoFunChristmasShowatthe
Arts Club ft)... Jazzmanian Devils at the
Railway Club ft).. Oliver and the Elements at the Yale ft)... The Cult at the
Coliseum... Exhibition by Mary Scott end
at the UBC Fine Arts Gallery...
SAT 23 NoFunChristmasShowatthe
Arts Club ft)... Jazzmanian Devils at the
Railway Club (L)... Oliver and the Elements at the Yale ft)...
SUN 24 No Fun Facing the 1990's at
the Railway Club (L, 9:30pm)...
TUE 26 The Dots at the Railway Club
ft)... The Demons at the Yale COWED 27    The Dots at the Railway
Club ft)... The Demons at the Yale ft)...
SAT 30 64FunnycarsattheArtsClub
(D...
SUN 31 The Death oil 989 with Curious George and friends at the Arts Club
(I)... The Last Corvairs at the Paramount
(L)... Skaboom at the Commodore (L).
Barney Bentall at 86 Street  "
CLUB SODA (L) 1055 Homer Street 681-
8202
COMMODORE BALLROOM (L) 870 Granville Street 681-7838
86 STREET MUSIC HALL (L) former Expoo
Site 683-8687
EMILY CARR COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN Granville bland
FIREHALL ARTS CENTRE 280 East Cordova
Street 689-0926
FREDERIC WOODTHEATRE 6454Crescent
Road. UBC 228-2678
GRUNT GALLERY   209 East 6th Avenue
HOGAN'S ALLEY (L) 730 Main Street 681-
6326
k COFFEEHOUSE
.   2655
The
PLACES PLACES PLACES PLACES
ARTS CLUB REVUE STAGE Granville Island
ARTS CLUB SEYMOUR (L)   1181 Seymour
Street 683-0151
BURNABY VILLAGE MUSEUM  6501 Deer
Lake Avenue 294-1231
CANADIAN  MEMORIAL CHURCH     !5th
Avenue 8< Burrard 731-0323
CENTENNIALTHEATRE7"
MOUNT PLEASANT LEGION H
Main Street 688-8385
PACIFIC CINEMATHEQUE     1131  Howe
Street 688-3456
PIT PUB (L) Basement of SUB 228-6511
PITTINTERNATIONALGALLERIES 36Powell
Street 734-8001
RJ CHRISTIES (L) 315 East Broadway 876-
677
RAILWAY CLUB (L) 579 Dunsmuir Street
681-1625
RECITAL HALL   School of Music. 6361
Memorial Road 228-3113
RIDGETHEATRE3131ArbutusStreet 738-
SCANDALOUS FOLK CLUB  127 Lonsdale
Avenue. North Vancouver
STATION STREET ARTS CENTRE 930 Station
Street 688-3312
STUDIO 58 Main Building. Langara
Campus 324-5227
SUBTHEATRE Student Union Building.UBC
TOM LEE MUSIC HALL Sound Spectrum,
Granville Mall
TOWNPUMP(L) 66WaterStreet 683-6695
VANCOUVER EAST CINEMA 2290 Commercial Drive 253-5455
VANCOUVER EAST CULTURAL CENTRE
1895 Venables Street 254-9578
VANCOUVER LITTLE THEATRE 3102 Main
Street 876-1165
VANCOUVER WALDORF SCHOOL 2725 St
ChrbtopherRood. North Vancouver 985-
7435
VIDEO IN 1102 Homer Street 688-4336
WISE HALL 1882 Adanac Street 736-3022
WOMEN IN FOCUS STUDIO 849 Beatty
Street 875-6624
YALE HOTEL (L) 1300 Granville at Drake
681-9253
Seymour... Babayaga at the Vancouver
East Cultural Centre (8pm. $10 general/
$5students)... Malpractice(7:30pm)and
The Last of England (9:30pm) at the
Vancouver East Cinema...
FRI 15 Tin God at the Arts Club ft)...
Hardrock Miners at the Railway Club
ft),., Tippy A-Go-Go at the La Quena
Coffeehouse... Mark Hummel with the
32 DISCORDER fOflgRfffrfrfr
VANCOUVERVILLE   BOUT THE
GARGOYLE CLUB - THE FIRST
TELE -STATIC CYBER DROME IN .
>frl4fefcU
I PLAYED MY F7RST BLACK MARKET INVESTMENT
TOURNAMENT WHEN I WAS FIFTEEN. I STARTED AS A
SIDEBAR RUNNER, SLWP1H& SIGNALS THROUGH THE
FIELD PLAYERS TO  THE JAMMERS.  A MESSE/Va£R   Boy.
DECEMBER 1989 33 {or a iew centjrr.es move
The assistant swallows a sword, the
bearded man rests
his head on a bed of
nails and asks another girl to stand on
his ear, and so it goes.
The Roving Ear by Christopher Kovacs
I  t's nearly twenty years that the
Idrugged-out Lizard King has
been under dirt at Pere-La
Chaise. Still, the pilgrims come
with bouquets weeping petals,
eyes crocodile tears. They leave
their little notes and poems, all
'great golden copulations', with
 I their roaches and empty bottles.
I'm one of them, I admit, following arrows marked
"Jim" up the hill through progressively denser
webs of worshipful graffiti. Up to a litde open air
shrine, the first gravestone "O" in "Morrison" an
anarchy symbol, the second a peace sign. I stand
over his dirt, over imagined hair and bones and
leather pants, and pay my respects, and take a
I was thinking about the time he was supposed to have appeared onstage with Hendrix, remembering the recording, how excruciatingly
fucked up he was, reduced to growling obscenities
along with the occasional rousing shout of "Fuck
her up the ass!" But hey kids, he was a poet, no?
Voice of a generation, or one of 'em, right? We can
allow an artist of that stature a few indiscretions,
can't we? The meat of the poet in the stardom
pressure cooker, spiced with a horse choking load
of mind expanders, must yield up a hearty stew. Of
course, it doesn't necessarily have to leave apleas-
34 DISCORDER
ant aftertaste, nor must every bite be one to savour... what bullshit.
But that night, decked out in my own leather and
hair, I'm drunk and still unconsciously playing the
role in the red lights of Pigalle.
I won't forget the hollow eyes. I'll remember the spongy lips on mine, like bread soaked in
motor oil, a flavour of corrupt curdled time. I'll
dream of how I pulled away as the desperate
wrinkled hands fluttered birdlike around my crotch.
The dream will engorge to nightmare as the stripper lights come up for the next piece of starving
flesh and I see that face beside me. Fleshless skull
draped in loosening, loosened papyrus skin. Vous
etes tres gentil. You come with me. I give you many
more kisses. Said into my neck. All night long you
stay. Je nepense pas. Lentement, lentement. Help.
Get me away. I'd like to laugh; I'd like not to cry.
I'd like lo be untouched by all this.
But here we go ho! into the night again. Merci
Messieurs. I like you. For you, my card. That's
definitely a guy in drag. That's not. A thousand
hardcore mags, drunken, and drugged women with
various objects and body parts being pushed into
them by drunken and drugged men while the
cameraman lights a cigarette.
Then, awake quickly «s night strobes into a day
of diamond brilliance at Sacre Coeur on Butte
Montmartre. Today I'm not hit in the balls or guts
or brain. Maybe in the guts of my brain. The
brealhing rock of the cathedral stirs the little lizard
coiled tightly at the base of my skull. The one that
keeps the ancient chemical balances in check, that
pushes towards pure lust or hatred, love or anger,
worship of god and sea. The original neverchang-
ing gland we can trust. I have to leave, staggering
sober, blinking away grateful tears in the bright
hard light. The dim, soft silence of Sacre Coeur
would drive me sane, and that's a more painful
thing than to be driven mad. Look there! She's
mad.That man with the air of quiet jubilation? Him
too. Those lovers entwined? In the most happily
misguided, in the most wrong-minded but redeeming way, they're nuts. Ah, but the sour face, drawn,
closed up for the night. There! Sanity itself. All
around us now. Sooty pomegranate faces withered
and sagging, driven gently sane. All praise the mad.
Mad the grinning bearded man wearing an
immense pair of emerald boxer shorts in the water-
congealing shadows of the Centre George Pompidou. Entertaining for money. Great columns of fire
he's blowing, overpowering me 5 meters away
with the smell of petrol. Before him, shelving out
Uke a table on which he might rest his beer, grows
what appears to be an enormous tumor. It coils and
curdles under the shin like some obscene demonic
pregnancy. He smiles and tightens the muscles in
his abdomen to make the growth wiggle up and
down. He scampers. Four jolies mademoiselles to
help me. I struggle to interpret. Each woman receives four darts with tips carefully wiped with
achohol. Throw them! A moi, oui! And after a
demonstration from his assistant, who sinks one
dart to the hilt in the tumorous mass, the ladies
hesitantly comply. The crowd shudders as one. The
assistant swallows a sword, the bearded man rests
his head on a bed of nails and asks another girl to
stand on his ear, and so it goes. For a few centimes
more...
For a few centimes more, he will reach into
a hole in his side, pull out steaming organs, wet
ribbons of intestine to garland the transfixed crowd.
His wife will give birth to an octopus with the face
of a saint, which to the great delight of all assembled, will play the Marseillaise on the bagpipes. With a sweeping gesture of ingathering, the
dying old man will draw down before him the
concentrated essence of night, leaving the sky a
brilliant birthstone white, and with a breath from
cracked lips, transform the roiling mass into a
thousand tiny ravens, each clutching a grape leaf.
The asphalt will soften and all of us sink to waist
depth as he expands, grows translucent, incorporeal, ever larger, until, Uke the wind pushed before
a metro train, he will pass through us all, touch each
soul, and disappear.
A cheap show at any price, this. NEW
YEAR'S
PARTY
NO MINORS
PHONE 273-6762 --mglfeff
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