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   Features
CMJ Music Marathon
6
Liquid Soul
9
Black Market Babies Tour Diary
10
Brian Evenson
12
Cat Power
13
Pedro the Lion
14
Fantastic Plastic Machine
16
Columns
Demo Derby
4
Grumpy Old Dog
5
VideopHilter
17
Kinetoscope
17
Seven Inch
18
Staplegun Showdown
18
Real Live Action
19
Under Review
20
Charts
23
On The Dial
24
December/January Datebook
26
editrix: miko hoffman
art director: ken paul
ad rep: kevin pendergraft
production manager:
tristan winch
graphic design/layout:
kenny, atomos, robert
horsman, janet van deist
production: ann
goncalves, christa min, randal
m, janet, careyann schaefer,
tim stuart, kirsten
weisenburger
photography &
illustrations: julie colero,
jason da silva, ted dave, ann
q, lori kiessling
contributors: tania a, billy
h, cody b, don b, Joshua b,
brady c, julie c, justin c, mike
c, bryce d, jay d, jules d,
glenn d'c, david e, anna f,
trevor f, ciprian g, christine g,
steve g, lee h, maren  h, dave
j, anthony k, blaine k, namiko
k, paul k, katrina m, siobhan
m, lindsay p, mike s, dave t,
shane v, tobias v, fern w,
kirsten w,   Jerome y
programme guide:
anna friz
charts: julie colero
datebook: ann/tristie
distribution: matt steffich
us distribution: tristie
discorder on-line: janet
publisher: linda scholten
Comics
Botched Ampallang
Good Tasty Comic
4
23
Cover
Ms. Chan Marshall, aka Cat Power, is real
shy, real sweet, and does she ever have soul.
Ann Goncalves captures miss kitty in a
moment of contemplation backstage at the
Starfish Room. Kenny Paul design, as usual.
© "DiSCORDER" 1998 by the Student Radio Society of the
University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 17, 500.
Subscriptions, payable in advance, to Canadian residents are
$15 for one year, to residents of the USA are $15 US; $24
CDN elsewhere. Single copies are $2 (to cover postage, of
course). Please make checks or money orders payable to
DiSCORDER Magazine.
DEADLINES: Copy deadline for the
February '99 issue is January 1 3th. Ad space is available until January 20th and can be booked by calling Kev,n at (604) 822.3017
ext. 3. Our rates are available upon request. DiSCORDER is not
responsible for loss, damage, or any other injury to unsolicited
manuscripts, unsolicited artwork (including but not limited to drawings, photographs and transparencies), or any other unsolicited
material. Material can be submitted on disc (Mac, preferably) or
in type. As always, English is preferred.
From UBC to Langley and Squamish to Bellingham, CiTR can be
heard at 101.9 fM as well as through all major cable systems in
the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ
line at 822-2487, our office at 822-3017 ext. 0, or our news and
sports lines at 822-3017 ext. 2. Fax us at 822-9364, email us at:
citrradio@mail.ams.ubc.ca, visit our web site at http://
www.ams.ubc.ca/media/citr or just pick up a goddamn pen and
write #233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1, CANADA.
Printed In Canada
THE PENDULUM IS CLOSED
FROM DEC 19 TO JAN 3
STOP BY FOR LUNCH,
DINNER, DESSERT, OR
SOMETHING COLD TO DRINK.
OPEN   7  cam   to   7   pm
MONDAY   TO   FRIDAY
OPEN   9   cam   to   £»   pm
SATURDAY   /   SUNDAY
AKFASTS   SERVED
UNTIL   1 1    cam   ON   WEEKENDS
A WIDE SELECTION OF VEGETARIAN ENTREES
1/2 LB PASTA w/ FOCCACIA BREAD, ONLY $5
THE
T
E N D U L U M
RESTAURANT
LICENSED     PATIO
UBC • THE STUDENT UNION BUILDING • 6138 SUB BLVD. ^__r
ttaUftM
by Anna Friz
Cefekote Att'd BWJutoij with
24Hwi*'»o.Ra<U*Ail *
January 17 is art's birthday. You know art, it's always hanging around in galleries, parading
stages, and showing up on street corners. According to French artist Robert Filliou, art was born
a million years ago when someone dropped a sponge in a bucket of water. He decided art needed
a good party, so he declared January 17 art's birthday and called for it to be an international holiday of
feasting and celebration and making presents for art. Eventually, there could be two days of international celebration, then three, four and so on until a million years from now, every day is art's birthday.
This year marks the 1,000,037th birthday of art. In celebration, CiTR has teamed up with the Western
Front to celebrate art's birthday in style, with 24 Hours of Radio Art.
"Radio art?" you wonder. And just what might that dubious category include? The soothing sounds of
white noise and feedback loops? Someone gargling for half an hour?
It has been done and may be done again. But radio art is not merely an onanistic exercise designed
to alienate listeners. It is a distinct artform that is fluid and immediate; you get one chance to hear it with
no possibility to rewind. Radio art has no physicality, it happens in the space of the imagination: "I hear
voices, but there's nobody there." And in that space, all sounds are possible.
Most radio art operates less like theatre and more like cinema: a montage of sounds collaged and layered together. Sounds fade in and out, then cut suddenly to a new theme. But there might also be plays,
readings, ambient mutterings, and blatant messages. Whole geographies of sound may come to life, or
life may be reduced to minimalist tinklings. A performer might go loud, live and vicious on the mic, or they
might sidle up to your ear and talk sweet. Radio by design and radio by chance. Non-sequitors abound.
We are assaulted by sound every day — from the humming of your fridge to insidious muzak — so
everything is raw material. But what makes this different is that audio art will not try to sell you anything.
Radio art is free and public.
So when you tune in to CiTR 101.9 fM on Sunday, January 17, 1999, you will hear a host of local
and international artists surfing the radio waves for 24 hours. Jam sessions using Internet audio streaming
feeds will let us send the sounds around the globe. It's a day to retune your ears and listen up while
you're making your own present for art.*
DISCORDER IS ONLINE
CHECK    OUT    BACK    ISSUES
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US
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MAIL
www.ams.ubcca/media/citr/discord/discord.htm
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DiSCORDER, 233-6138 SUB BLVD, VANCOUVER, BC   V6T 1Z1
LJ
■"      Dec W9m 99
MMDIBXHII ty'-rai
T)lZVC
I November 4, 1998 the Uni-
I versify of Victoria Senate rejected a $2,000 Shell Canada
Recruitment scholarship. The
vote, a 25-17 victory, by the
senate came on the eve of the
third anniversary on the hanging of Ken Saro-Wiwa and
eight other Ogoni minority
rights activists by the Nigerian
military dictatorship. Shell Nigeria is complicit because it
supplied money and guns to
Nigerian state security forces.
Shell Canada is 78% owned
and controlled by its international parent, Royal Dutch/
Shell Group, which controls
Shell Nigeria. This is the first
time in memory that a scholarship has been turned down at
UVic for political reasons.
"The debate was brief and
I'm most grateful that the Senate opted to do the right and
rejected this blood money from
Shell," said John Fraser, Uvic
Science student senator who
introduced the motion to reject
the Shell Canada scholarship.
"We must consider the human
rights record of those we wish
to  honour with degrees or
"1 congratulate the Senate
scholarships."
at the University of Victoria.
Since 1958, Shell Interna
Only Shell Oil and the Nige
tional has taken $30 billion
rian dictatorship deny their en
worth of oil out of Oigoni, lo
vironmental devastation and
cated in the delta of the Niger
human    rights    abuses    in
River. Massive environmental
Ogoni," said Sid Tan, co-chair
problems in  poverty-stricken
man of the Sierra Club Lower
Ogoni communities have de
Mainland Group. "The UVic
stroyed wildlife and plant life,
senate has made a decision
poisoned the air and water,
that indicates another genera
and left many residents half-
tion is going to know that Shell
dead and prone to respiratory
is hell." The Ogoni Solidarity
Network can be reached  in
Goldman Environmental Prize
Vancouver       by       calling
recipient Ken Saro-Wiwa and
604.91 5.9600 or by e-mail at
eight  other  activists  were
<ogoni@vcn.bc.ca>.
hanged  Novem
ber 10, 1995 for
criticizing the Ni-                __^
ship   and   Shell      ^    CV^
Oil.   Nine  days      \VT)
later,  the  US Si-       ^~-^S
erra Club voted             W3^
consumer boycott
until the corpora
tion   pays  com
pensation to the
Ogoni    people
and cleans up its Grumpy
Old Dog
I hadn't been to Sonar since I
saw Bob Mould (it was the
Town Pump then) do a short
set at Music West a couple of
years ago. The night DJ Spooky
"That Subliminal Kid" was playing, I was confronted, not with
a balding Mould hunched over
his guitar, but with blinking
video screens, staccato sounds,
and a stage filled with equip-
This was not a show that I
would otherwise have seen, but
a friend recommended the
show to me. Highly. And I
trusted him. My friend, Jay, told
me that Paul Miller (DJ Spooky)
would also be lecturing the day
after the show    about music
semiotics. I became intrigued
and my awareness of the intent
and thought behind the music
made me want to see it, hear
.  DJ Spooky calls his
illbie
if blends of synthe-
pled and live vocals (ill: slightly
off-kilter). At Sonar, DJ Spooky
played the stand-up electronic
bass for much of the show and,
in talking to the band and the
audience, he kept using the
phrase "break it down." Standing there, trying to make sense
of what I was hearing, those
words finally clicked.
"Break it down" meant
deconstruction. Taking a piece
of music and dividing it into dis-
>ng, i
is constructed to
mean something. The person
who constructs the song or article is delivering a message.
By breaking the whole into a
number of parts, that meaning
becomes obscured.
What was even more fas-
s wher
talked
that when DJ  Spooky I
about "building it up," he \
referring to the reconstruction
from the pieces lefto-
r  frc
the
he   ,
:hanging the meaning of the
original music by reorganizing
its parts and even slipping in
oarts from something else en-
irely. I know this has been gong on for years, but allow me
he excitement of just figuring
BY BLAINE K
it out. Opened my eyes a little
bit.
So if DJ Spooky took some
Jean Chretien speeches, cut
them down so that instead of
an entire speech there was a
series of sentence fragments, DJ
Spooky could reorganiz
make    Jean
nything.   DJ
ng. And by
music to the
Chretien
Spooky
Chretien's
adding pie
mix, Chretien's orig
ing  could   be  blu
The really clever thing
about this process is how the
final piece — composed of
fragments — has so many layers of meaning. We understand
what Chretien meant originally,
we understand what Chretien
now that his words have been
sense of what DJ Spooky is trying to say by subverting
Chretien's voice, thoughts, and
I've become a fan because
I understand what's happening.
Mine eyes hath seen the glory.•
UNIVERSAL
lager swilling, smoMng. cursing, tattooed sex goddesses mistresses ot tr>e middle ages scene
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Prices: cd-$IO   lp/cs-$7   cd sample
All prices postage paid in the US add 25% for foreign o
5 E^gsassffi Friday,   October   30
Approximately 10 minutes before touching down at JFK airport, I
wondered if I should make some kind of a plan for what to do
once in New York. I had a phone number in my pocket and an
unopened guidebook to the city. My decision to do STUFF in New
York was rather an uninformed one, but I like leaving everything
to chance. I hopped a shuttle bus to the Port Authority Bus
Terminal, ate some crappy food, and waited for my friend AJ. to
come and rescue me from the chaos of a new place. Thank goodness for near strangers who offer up their floor for 10 days. After
dumping my too-much stuff (note for next year: one pair of pants,
one sweater, some undies and socks — that's all you really need,
kid) at A.J.'s office, we headed out to Brooklyn for a house party.
I was then introduced to my home away from home on a floor in
New Jersey. Hooray!
Saturday,   October   31
I spent most of my Hallowe'en sleeping. When we finally headed into
Manhattan, it was dark out. I was introduced to the best music store
in the city, Other Music. I gave them good business over the course of
my stay. Heading back to Brooklyn, we assembled our oh-so-clever
costume, readying ourselves for the big party at Ben from Matador's
house. Perfectly suited to the location, AJ. went as the cover of the
new Belle & Sebastian album. As I had no room to pack a costume,
I got to wear green and paste construction paper leaves all over
myself, acting as the bushes behind the scene. This was perfect for
me, as I didn't know anyone, and I didn't have to talk to anyone, hidden in the background. I met a few people, and decided I was going
to be a bomb at CMJ, since I just wanted to be a recluse.
Sunday, November 1
No vacation could be complete without a day spent solely in New Jersey.
Monday, November 2
Did I forget to mention that Belle & Sebastian were playing, and
that I had managed to weasel myself a ticket for the sold-out show? At
Thanks to the wonders of music
directoring, I got to get out of
this horrible place called
university and explore the big,
big city of New York for a
week and a half. My excuse
wos that I was attending the
CMJ Festival — / don't know
how often I "was in attendance,
though. Too much to see in so
little time made for some crazy
action-packed days and nights,
and the least amount of
business networking possible.
Here's the lowdown.
John Disco
from bis
(above);
bassist f rom
Rainer Maria
(right)
Photos    by
J u L i e
CMJ: My Holidt
by Julie Colero
The Supper Club, I was amazed at the poshness of the venue.
Guv'ner opened and did an OK dissonantly poppy set. Belle &
Sebastian took to the stage in fits and starts, looking confused and nervous. What a raggle toggle bunch this band is! Lyrics were forgotten,
piano solos plunked wrong, and stringed instruments played out of
time and tune. Bad? Nope — the most endearing show ever. There
was lots of silliness and apologizing and I was charmed. The band
played lots of songs from their EPs, whispered something about "the
waitress having piles" at the end of The Boy With The Arab Strap, and
did a little French ditty to end things off After the show, I smoked a
pink cigarette and was contented.
Tuesday,   November   3
In the evening, t headed off to an "anti-Industry" industry party and
was disturbed by the fact that no one knew what a touque wos Silfy
Americans! I met up with Rusty, the music director from Calgary, and
his assistant Elizabeth, who I ended up glomming on to for much of
my stay.
Wednesday,   November   4
I ate lunch Uptown at Tom's Diner, the inspiration for Suzanne
Vega's song and home to that flashy sign everyone sees on Seinfeld.
We heoded to Tramps for the Jade Tree showcase I'm glad I got
to the club pathetically early, as it ensured my spot front and centre for
the first and arguably best band of the night, Euphone. Ryan
Rhapsys is the best drummer I have ever seen in my whole life, ever.
He's got the skills to pay the bills, baby, ond he's o sweetie to boot.
The next three bands were less than par to the openers: Sweet
Water Freak Down were loud hardcore, Kid Dynamite were ex-
Lifetimers who screamed and jumped around a whole lot, and Jets
To Brazil ... I don't even want to talk about them. Wondering why I
stayed through all the mediocrity? Joan Of Arc. Sounds coming
from the stage were even neater than sounds from the records.
Hooray! I skipped The Promise Ring to catch a few minutes of
crazy loud Ruins-esque Uz Jsme Doma at Baby Jupiter and
then I was off again to see Cinerama. David Gedge was in fine
S      Dec 98/^ak 99
form with his new band and I was so happy that I dared to almost-sort-
of dance amongst the crowd of complete strangers.
Thursday, November 5
I was lucky enough to catch David Bozan of Pedro the Uon doing
an acoustic set on rhe CMJ stage at the conference hotel early in the
afternoon His short set was a pleasure to o fired kid like me. I
drogged myself to fhe neighboring theater fo cofch an advance
screening of Velvet Goldmine ond nearly nodded off amidst afl
the glam-rock and naked bits Somewhat refreshed, I took to the
streets to get myself over to the Knitting Factory I wonted to see
ICU, the K band, but was worried when a fellow concert-goer
informed me that it was actually I.C.U., a NY punk band, who were
playing. When I got inside, my mind was set ot ease by the presence
of a good lot of turntables I discovered fhe wonder of the theremin
when ICU got to rockin' the near-empty room and I came away much
,mpressed.
And here's where things get a bit silly —I decided to ditch fhe big
city and head for Hoboken, New Jersey, fo see my favourite rock-
gods, bis at Maxwell's. All inhibitions dropped af fhe door, I
jumped ond sang like a big geek for a good hour, going so far as to
imagine that Sci-Fi Steven winked at me. The new songs are super-
catchy, and I got stuck with a perma-grin on my face
Friday, November 6
I checked out Rainer Maria at an afternoon show at Brownies
and spent the rest of the day wishing I wasn't too cool to wear
earplugs. Those kids were loud and brilliantly dissonant. Later I hit
up the K showcase at Tramps to see Gaze, our very own wonders.
They played some really impressive new material and managed to
avoid being eaten alive by their obsessive fans. Then it was off to
Irving Plaza to see some of the Sub Pop showcase: Sunny Day
Real Estate was the band which sold the show out, but I wanted to
see Heroic Doses and the Murder City Devils. I was excited to
see that Heroic Doses was actually Euphone plus Bill Dolan of 5ive
Style, so I got to check out the masterfully blurry drumming again.
When the MCDs came on, everyone around me seemed to take about
10 big steps backward. The guy next to me looked over with a
pained expression on his face and said, "They hurt my ears!" I guess
I was the only one who could take the rock. Maybe it's a West Coast
thing ... which pant leg do I need to pull up?
Saturday,   November   7
I went to see Momus (Luna Lounge] who was suave and silfy and
witty and, well, Momus. I ran across the road to check out Spatula
(Baby Jupiter), who do good instrumental bud-soft stuff, with lots of
ffantic cello-playing. Everybody ditched me to go to some place with
free beer where I wasn't allowed to be, so I made if to Irving Plaza
early enough to catch Buffalo Daughter. Um, boring? Too thumpy.
I decided fo try and Claire Dones-spot while Ben Lee did his wimpy-
boy thing ond generally twiddled my thumbs waiting for bis to play
again, {Have you ol! picked up on my nerdiness yet?) Bis were good,
but something wasn't right — they were being way too rock. After bis,
I headed over to The Cooler to see Thee Headcoats. t caught a
sizable chunk of the Question Mark and the Mysterions set
and I enjoyed wotching people getting down When Thee Headcoats
took the stage, I realized that Paul Weller might be getting a run for
his money os my Brit-Rock-God; Billy Childish is aces!
Sunday, November 8
It was my last day, so I did my best to spend all of my remaining
money. I squeezed in one last show at Brownies before heading home
and really didn't want to leave the show. I got to see Jejune, who do
that dissonant emo thing that I love so much, and so well. I wanted to
stick around for Hot Water Music and the chaos of eight other
punk/emo bands, but no such luck. Instead, I spent my evening on a
plane, playing UNO with the women next to me (I won).* UoUCMVS
wrRt Htrrtnc the storts akd
quk ntxr tssut wta hit the
streets on January 29,1909
To 7NT5KVf?\NS
VV7TW £.©AL,
SX ST7SNNS,
UAVPSN, AN{?
AOO  N  To  X-'
ThlS SpAcE
CoULd Be
YOuRS!
OUR NEXT ISSUE HITS
THE STREETS JANUARY 29th.
BOOK SPACE BY
JANUARY 20th.
CALL 822-3017, ext. 3
We'rE ChEaP
& wE'rE gOoD.
'NufF sMD.
^-f CiTR
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Liquid
Hi°
acid jazz outfit from Chicago, Comprised
of the traditional rhythm section minus piano and
plus trombone, trumpet, saxophone, congas, a
mean-scratching dj, a rapper who only rhymes
freestyle, and a singer who is the progeny of Nino
Simone, all of these seasoned veterans settle down
into a fresh sound, staying true to their jazz gonads
by retaining an improvisational bent to their gig.
Their self-titled debut and their recent release, Make
Some Noise, on the label Ark 21 should be available at your local record store. If you like your osv
crack sweaty, then check out Liquid Soul.
DiSCORDER'S Hancunt booked up with front mon
and saxophonist Mars Williams before their
October 15th show at Richard's on Richards.
j       I ::
DiSCORDER: Welcome to Dick's on Dicksl
Mars Williams: Ah, that's v/hat it is.
You've probably played here before ...?
Yeah, we did a showcase here for EMI Records,
and one other time which didn't go too well, but...
Nq?
No.
Montreal [JazzFest '98] went really well,
Montreal was great.
I saw you guys there. Did you see any of
the funk bands who played the following
nights?
No, because we went to Quebec City the night
after that. We played two nights in Montreal and
then we went to Quebec City,
Was Montreal JazzFest a big deal for you
guys to play? I know that you've played
with everyone from The Waitresses to The
Psychedelic Furs, but still ...
Yeah, it was. This is my band, you know? This is
something new to me, being a bandleader.
Montreal is a very prestigious festival and with this
band it's just different, it's a whole different thing,■
the crowd response, that's the thing ... and, the
NRG ensemble, in Europe we go over great, the
Berlin Jazz Festival, the Munich and Switzerland
and Finland Jazz Festivals, so we've done a lot,
and it's gotten great response, but it's not, it's a
completely different thing,
You formed in Chicago in 1994. Can you
describe briefly what the scene was like
there and then?
We started off doing a freestyle kind of night on a
Sunday at the Elbo Room. It was looser, we did a lot
of freestyles, we [put different beats behind] some
jazz standards, and a couple of songs I had, but
then I started writing more specifically for this kind of
band. It was a lot looser then, but it kinda established a direction of where the band was going to
go. We had a lot more people sitting in, which was
how the band got bigger, because it started as a
teruieuj uiith Liquid Soul
then if just grew. And
certain people would come
and shine — like Ron, our trumpet player, he would come and sit in on Sundays and
so, I got spoiled
And how did you hook up with Simone
[vocalist and daughter of Nina Simone]?
We've had female vocalists off and on, throughout
the years, and it was something that I like.
Sometimes I like it without, sometimes I don't. But
it's nice lo have in a set, to break it up. And I hadn't found the right person [but] somebody said, 'You
should check out Simone, she's doing Rent, she was
Mimi in Rent.' So ! said, 'Oh yeah, like she's really going to quit Rent, making I don't know how
much money a week,' She came and sat in with us
one night and she loved the band. She said [she
wanted] to do it and I said, 'Well, are you sure?' I
tried to discourage her [but] she said, 'No this is
what I really want to do.'
So, has her mom heard what you guys
are doing?
No, I don't know if she'd like it or not. I've heard
her mother con be a tyrant.
A lot of contemporary music today could
be described as hybrid. Do you think that
this term applies to Liquid Soul?
We don't really think obout what we're doing. As
far as us using all these different musical styles and
everything, it's just because I like it. I don't really
like to think about It, you know? We start thinking
about it and analyzing what we're doing, it's just
going to be like us copying ourselves ...
What does it mean for the band to be a
collective, as mentioned on your website?
Does that ever get sketchy with ten people
in the band?
See, I really don't think it is a collective. I think it's
more of a band.
Yeah, because also on the same website
you are cited as the bandleader.
t wouldn't say that it's a collective. I don't know
why It's on the website Everybody does contribute,
especially more now, to the writing  process,
[though], I mean, what would you describe as the
difference between a collective and a band?
Well, a collective Is a group where everyone shares power equally, whereas a
band with a  bandleader has sort of,
somebody at the helm, not necessarily
enforcing their rule, but...
OK, so we kinda go into both categories in a way.
Because yes, I'm the bandleader and it was my
concept, musically.
I read about your philosophy, which consists of 'bringing jazz back to the dance-
floor.' Can you elaborate on that?
Well,
s pop n
: and n
', you
know, it got kinda snobby for awhile and it sti
a lot of ways ... You see these guys up there, one
guy takes a solo for ten minutes and another guy
takes a solo for ten rri:
fun, there's a
jozz is even rr
of the improvi:
there's some jazz feel, so
over top of hip hop beat:
sn minutes - with this,
rove behind if. The r
ioned in style, I think,
sn that happer
nwhy
But
the grooves
are all dance and it's
kinda just bringing it back to
the way it actually started, with the Big
Band dance days and Dixieland.
So, then, what do you think of this whole
'Swing Craze' shit? Does it make you mad
to see the commercialization of jazz, a lot
of white bands getting a lot of money for
ripping people off, essentially? This whole
Eric Clapton thing?
For me, it's like, OK, they're recreating something
and you said they're making money from it and
'Oh, this has really hit big now, let's do it,' you
know. It's more re-creation than creation. With us,
I don't think we're breaking down any barriers or
doing anything that's that new, but we have established our own sound and we're taking elements
of other things and using them as tools. And the
swing thing, yeah, it's kinda getting a little bit commercialized and stuff, but it's better than a lot of
other stuff out there.
Yeah, it's better than Bon Jovi. OK, of all
the jazz tunes to cover, why did you guys
choose 'Salt Peanuts' for Make Some
Noise?
It just kinda happened naturally; in fact, the second
half of it, the chocolate covered nut part of it, was
actually started first, and then we came into the
bridge and we were like, bomp ba bomp da,
we're like, ah, 'Salt Peanuts' ...
The band itself, and this is the impression
that I got from seeing y'all at Montreal
JazzFest, seems to be very active in their
own promotion. It seems to be a real do-
it-yourself thing happening with you
guys. And you also chose a comparatively low profile, although very prestigious,
label to be on. So was that decision not to
go corporate intentional?
In a way, I think that the major labels don'f know
what to do with a band like us. I could probably
right now, hold out and get a major record deal,
but in doing so, I think that you run the risk of getting shelved, of being lost in the shuffle of a thousand-band roster. Originally why I went to Ark 2 1
was becouse there were some other labels interested, and if was starting to be like, 'Wow, everybody's looking at us.' But it was the major's
going, 'Well, where's the top ten hit?' Ark 21
came to us and said, T love your CD,' which
They said, 'We want to put it
was
either lots
of drugs or    ou
guys were really...
It's not drugs, unfortunately ...
So the ability to improvise and keep
things fresh obviously results in
way more excitement for you, and
in turn, more excitement from the
audience.
I think it's everybody's individual personality which really makes the band.
Having a ten-piece band is difficult at
times but, on the other hand, all this
strong emotion and energy from
everybody is because everyone in
the band has that fiery attitude.
My last question is: who
are your favorite
Canadian jazz artists?
Uh, wow, I can't think of any.
You can't think of any?
Name   some.   There's   a
bunch of them that I know
, but I just
s, ond *
like that. You produc
ith the soloists;
ng feel, which goes
Latin flavourings.
You have so many new people ii
your   band   and   t   know   that
Stmone's   not  even   on   Make
Some Noise and Ajax is only on
four   tracks,    so   you    must
already have enough material   for   a   third   and   fourth
album.
Yeah. We have to keep it fresh for
ourselves. Playing some of the
old stuff, it's just over and over
... I don'f know
like    Elton    John    can    c
'Yellowback   Road'   ever
night...
When we saw you in
Montreal, you guys
had so much energy
on-stage. I mean, it
and I respect,
can't think of
Canadian and who'
not. I don't consider
them in terms of
nationality. •
Liquid Soul plan
Canada this
summer. Look
for them
ho's
\
I
tt
J
J
9 &mmmm DEC/JAN
LISTINGS
FRIDAY. DECEMBER 11
SHINDIG FINALS:
FEISTY
TEAM STRIKE FORCE
CLOVER HONEY
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12
NEWWAVE-AOKE
MONDAY. DECEMBER 14
THE HELLACOPTERS
WATTS
THE SPITFIRES
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15
FIVE-0 TUESDAYS
DJ's JASON HOPE
GARYPAULr**,
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16
EL VEZ
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 17
UNIT 187
DSK
PUNCH DRUNK
CAUSTIC THOUGHT
FRIDAY. DECEMBER 18
STRAPPING YOUNG LAD
RANDOM DAMAGE
TRIKE WIPE-OUT
VIBRATOR
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 19
JOHNNY CASH TRIBUTE NIGHT
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 31
NOISE THERAPY
JAR
FRIDAY, JANUARY 1
CRUST BROTHERS
JOHN FORD
SATURDAY, JANUARY 2
HEMEON
WITH GUESTS
THURSDAY, JANUARY 7
DALDILVOG
NAKED FOR JESUS
FRIDAY. JANUARY 8
POISON IDEA
WITH GUESTS
SATURDAY, JANUARY 9
ROYAL GRAND PRIX
METRONOME COWBOYS
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 13
M-STRAIN
WITH GUESTS
"'ne Nights On The ^oI^tZb^
FRIDAY, JANUARY 15
764-HERO
GAZE
SATURDAY, JANUARY 16
FRYER TUCK
WITH GUESTS
SATURDAY, JANUARY 23
KNOCK DOWN GINGER
VEAL • SATSUMA
1 Billy Hopeless' Tour Diary,
I transcribed by Rich Jones,
(Mostly) all photos by Billy
Hopeless.
;riday September 25th: EJ's, Portland OR
' v the tour's going great. Wa got past the
o problems or probing qnd
llarrived at EJ's early enough to eat all the
ie grease-enriched bar food we could
Y stomach  We had no competition on
this show,; even though the threat of
the Subhumans UK sh<?w down the
street kept getting mentioned. We kept
r   ground    knowing    that   the    real
Subhumans came from our hometown!
Tonight we (ourselves and the Murder City
Ijvils) were joined by Seattle's Hai Karate who
pad the hard taste of playing between ouf rock
ich   The
ss even though EJ's doesn't si
e (beer only!) and yours truly '
s of his element with beer in hand
II hard
^Saturday, September 26th: PCH Club, Long
soc/i, CA
*Tb some, the thought of an 18 hour drive
>ckin' rollin' night would be a
^nightmare. The van breaks down. The van
't start. The van blows a tire ... The flies
larded like vultures awaiting our demise, but
inks to our guardian angel "Gabriel,"
' the hospitality of Mount Shasta, and a
ghetto blaster full of RAWK, we make it
to the PCH Club on time.
All-ages crusty punks stand outside due to
I the unbearable heat inside. We were sweaty and
inky before we'd even played a note! But the
[kids appreciated the rawk and, as is traditional
shows, they bought lotsa t-shirts!
crawl into bed with Rob in a sleazy
Hollywood motel. Oh, this is the good life.
xlnight...
WSunday, September 27th: The Garage, Los
%Angeles, CA
%PK kids, I'm sure the thought of me and
n bed has prepared you, but now it
I gets really weird. After sitting around the
^Murder City Devils' swanky pool-side
:abana   rooms,   we're   off   to   The
Garage for a night called Club Sucker.
Club Sucker is hosted by a 7-foot
somethin'    drag    queen    named
Vaginal Davis who loves "Caucasian
:ock!" A girl comes up on-stage when
goffered a  BMB girly t-shirt,   proceeds to
e right there, and starts accosting me!
estly, all I wanted was to dance! Lots
sof boys and queens told us how much
|l they loved the show and wanted us
l»to love them back! Vaginal Davis
Toffered me her "Gonorrhea" and
I accepted graciously. It was an
.resting     drink     and     an
ing night not easily forgotten.
Needless to say, tonight nobody wants
■ to share a bed with me ...
ffi
Monday, September 28th: Cafe Du Nord, San
FratKisco, CA
Tonight is "Trash Night" at Cafe Du Nord and the
Block Market Babies and The Murder City Devils
are alone on a show at last. The atmosphere is
1940s swing/jazz, tres elegant! Every show has
been better than the last and this one is no
exception! The crowd is fully decked-out, dolled-
up, and in love with the rock 'n' roll! We meet up
with our friends in American Heartbreak and then
after the show we heed down the street to a cool
rock club called the Lucky 13 Certain members of
both bands got drunker than the rest (yes, it is
possible, barely possible] and chaos results! While
loading our gear out of the Cafe Du Nord, a
squeegee guy cleaned our van windows. They're
much meaner and more demanding here, but hey,
this is America isn't it?
The scene before leaving cannot be explained
due to its personal and graphic nature But I'm sure
we left our mark on the hangers-on who watched
in disbelief. So let me ask you a question, San
Francisco: What do you do with a drunken sailor?
Tuesday, September 29th: Al's Bar, Los Angeles, CA
So this is Al's Bar, the legendary CBGB's of LA
We've seen and heard of its cockroach-infested,
graffiti-filled room on Humpers albums, ond now
we're here. Tonight we're separated from fhe Devils
to join our allies the Streefwalkin' Cheetahs and a
band called Miss Spiritual Tramp of '48 (an offshoot
of Lutefisk) The booking agent, Toast (her name) of
the Ray-O-Vacs (her band), is a sweetheart and
keeps us drunk and drinking all night!! Not too busy
tonight, but the crowd does include international
fashion mogul to the stars Janet Planet! She loves
our style and looks forward to working with us! This
is probably our most destructive show to date, but
there ain't much thotwe could do to this place that
ain't already been done (besides clean it)! But that
would ruin its appeal!
While having a trucker-wash in the bathroom,
I rrjeet a regular named Frank who was freebasing
"something " Frank offers me a hit but I decline,
telling him that I'm already fucked-up on rock V
roll
I don't do that shit," Frank replied, a
s the worse of two evils ...
if it
Wednesday, September 30th: Paradise Lounge,
San Francisco, CA
Today we walked down Haight Street, saw some
stinky hippies, a cow with a mohawk, and Mr.
Magoo in bondage gear! But enough tourist
sights, let's talk about the ROCK!
Great club, great bands, great drinks! We're
playing with Billyclub, a great hardcore band
consisting of ex-members of Discharge, The
Exploited, UK Subs, and REO Speedealer (to name
just a few)! We're also playing with our friend Billy
Rowe (of Jetboy fame) and his band American
Heartbreak. The band had to turn down a pretty
face or two, but we met lots of great people and
connections were made.
We crashed at Billy Rowe and his beautiful
wife Mary Anne's ultra cool rock 'n' roll flat, and
discovered that some people make cookies at any
time, at any cost!
Market Babies!
Thursday,
October 1st: day off
Driving, driving and more driving. We make J
the mistake of leaving the freeway whenjf
lured by a sign promising Dairy Queen T
and The City Centre Motel just outsid
Eugene, Oregon. A long, dark road, c
creepy hotel, a house with a statue of a
witch holding a human head, animal (?)
bone windchimes and (
ancient writing on its
verandah,    but    no
Dairy Queen! At this
time, Rob, his voice
filled with terror, tells
Rich to "Get us the
hell out of here!" We I
sure were happy to I
find a Motel 6 later "
on   A few beers, a
sleqzy Malcolm
McDowell movie, and
once again I'
bed with Rob. Oooh
;   la%
Friday, October 2nd:
The Backroom, Seattle, WA
It's good to be back home! Well it
might as well be home. Tonight we
rejoin our brothers The Murder City
Devils and make new friends with NYC's
finest, The Heartdrops. The place is
packed beyond all belief and fortunately
our showmanship is at its peak. The crowd
cheers every foul word spewed from our
mouths. Once again, I attempt to give away a T-
shirt in exchange for a dance and it all goes
awry. A beautiful young lady accepts the shirt,
but she ain't fit to dance so she kisses me on the
cheek and falls off the stage! I later see her
backstage holding a bag of ice to her head, but
she's a tough cookie and so I leave her to go
dance with the boys at the merch counter.
After the Devils rock the asses off the j
crowd, it's off to a house party. We lo
Seattle and have many friends here, so vi
hate to leave, but we're really in need <
clean clothes, so tomorrow we must return
Vancouver. Besides, we still have one moi
show left on the 4th...
Saturday, October 3rd
Had a top secret meeting,  said goodbye to
Seattle, and passed the border with no probler
or probings once again. Oh, it's good to be
home. I love my bed!
Sunday, October 4th: Picadilly Pub, Vancouver,
BC
A good time was had by one and all. The
place is packed and finally I sing a duet
with Spencer from the Murder City Devils!
Overall, kids, I think that no matter    |
where you are on this earth you wish you
were somewhere else. I'm glad that I've
chosen this "career." I'll get to see a lot
of this world and I'll always love my home
when I get back. I called my Mom to t<*"
her    I    was    home    and    about    myj
adventures. She told me that I am n
I guess we all make our choices:
Frank has made his, Vaginal Davis
has made his/hers, you've made
yours, and we've made ours
Love and kisses,
Hearts and Aces,
Billy Hopeless,
A Black Market Baby by choice*. [ol
^LETS talk\ 1
_1       ABOUT        ) I
_Pg^tt_JLFEEl>N&s /B
M
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)Mw
.- • _____,--        *%~         S
I ^|                 *i              1 «^
_. «■* . ..a#   :i>-       ;                                                                         I ^^»                     \
i •> ■
FAX                       write  Por  a  Prcc  catalog  oF  records  shirts  and  shit                                                                     -*
'^FAT WRECK CHORDS PO BOX 193690 SAN FRANCISCO.
CA 94119 BRIAN EVENSON IS QUITE POSSIBLY
THE MOST DARING AMERICAN
AUTHOR fo emerge in the last few
decades.   If you're  keeping  tabs,
there've been many notable names
that have stirred controversy in and out
of the  literary community — Bret
Easfon Ellis, David Foster Wallace,
A.M. Homes, Mark Leyner, fo name a
few of the upstarts. These are all great
writers, but none of them have come
close to the true horror, fhe alarming
humour, and the audacity that Brian
Evenson   has   in   even   his   shortest
pieces. Stories about polygamy, killing
cats, killing people, discovering your
baby dead; stories about mad scientists, feverishly incestuous brothers. He
has a book of short stories called
Altmann's Tongue (Knopf), a book of
early stories, Din of Celestial Angels
(Wordcraft), and a novel ouf now
called Father of Lies (Four Walls Eight
Windows).  Check ouf his freakish
story  in   thei998 O.   Henry  Prize
anthology.   (He also has great taste
music.) The following is another
those darned e-mail interview!
humour's always present. I'd like to be
funny in the same way
as Kafka and Beckett,
funny,   but  in  a  way
you're   not  altogether
comfortable with.
Tell me about your
novel. You've written a good number
of short stories and
there's      something
very concentrated in
their delivery that I
imagine you had to
deal with when writing something larger.
The  r
/el   i
of
Fafh-
religious leader
and kills a child, and then
about the way in which the
power structure tries to protect
itself by keeping his crimes
. It's
DiSCORDER: A lot of your stories are
incited by a murder or a dead body,
which   reminds   me   of   Hitchcock
movies in that it sets the audience at
unease right off the bat. But from
there you veer away from the traditional thriller structure, to where
fewer variables are known and the
moral centre isn't as clear. How is
death a device for you?
Brian Evenson. I see death as a catalyst
that leads people to act in ways they normally wouldn't. If you begin with a death,
it's unsettling not only because there's an
inert body present but also because it wipes
away the moral centre of the world. Things
that in daily life we can count on no longer
have their stability. My characters, confronted by the absence of stability, tend to rise to
the surface of their skins, acting more often
than thinking and almost never feeling; suspending moral codes while trying to find a
non-existent stability. Once things are in that
destabilized space, you have two choices as
an author. Either you can try to re-establish
stability, which is what thrillers do, or you
can try to destabilize further, try to reach
some point of sublimity in drawing nearer to
chaos. A story like 'The Sanza Affair' is
essentially a thriller turned inside out, where
possibilities are multiple and anything you
think you know at the start dissolves and
never comes back together.
Many of your stories share a similar
sense of humour, very deadpan and
very dark. How important is humour
to your work?
It serves in some ways as a balance for (or
relief from) the darker aspects of my fiction,
in other ways as a device to augment the
darkness. It's restrained and deadpan, but
ial for
attack   on    religion   as   a
attempt to depict and analyse
the    nature    of    institutional
power, ihough along with that,
the book moves with a lot ol
velocity on the simple level of
plot. It's a sort of thriller, 1 suppose. It's probably my most readable book, at least on that simple
level, but at heart I'd like to think
it's a schematic of institutional
power that owe
Foucault and to anarchist thought.
I think what you lose when you
move from a novel to a story is that
level of concentration. Stories can
operate as plateaus, with a sustained   intensity.   They   can   also
evoke a great deal of ambiguity,
can leave the reader suspended in
the flux. A novel, by necessity, has
hills and valleys. It demands a different sort of flux, at least a few stable
spots to stand. At th<
think the novel, especially the short
novel, allows a philosophical exploration that the short story can't
age.   It  allows you  to  think  about
identity in a way that the story can only
enough   dista
see the potent
abuse of power in my
own institution and be
able fo apply that fo a
larger context.
I can't say that knowing I'm Mormon is particularly helpful to people
when they read my work.
ily it just confuses
fher
i  the
Writing a criticism of institutional
power with religion as the suspect institution, from your perspective, must carry a lot of
personal weight. How has being
Mormon affected your writing and
the way people understand your
writing?
It does carry a lot of personal weight. For
several years, 1 was in a leadership role in
the local Mormon congregation, so I had
the chance to see the way a hierarchy func-
doesn't fi:
typically Moi
fions people carry about in
their heads. Mormon culture
is so insistent about praising
the good and discarding the
bad, yet af the same time
there are a lot of blind spots
and  inconsistencies — as
there  is  in  any  institution.
Growing up, for instance, I
knew o lot of Mormons who
vouldn'f watch   an   R-rafed
if it hod sex scenes in if,
3ut had no qualms about wofch-
ig it if it was 'only violent,' al if
olence was somehow more
ible than sex. Many of my
stories, I think, attempt to resensi-
tize people (myself included) to
violence. That's a direct response
ilture.
There isn't a lot of sex ir
your      stories,      though.
she
as, which has given rr
Sometimes there seems to
be the threat of it, but it
appears almost as a cultural
transgression.
Yes,   it's often  either oblique or
grotesque or fransgressive. In the
novel, there are scenes in which
a husband and wife are in bed, but
no sex scenes except for fhe fransgressive. I have written some pieces
in which sex is more present in a more
approachable fashion, but haven't
managed to quite get it fo work the
way I want. In any case, as a writer I
nterested in the fransgressive, because I think it's in the trans-
gressive that human action comes ouf in
ifs purest, most desperate form.
I know you do work as a music
reviewer on the sly; has your
taste in music filtered into your
work? I'm thinking about the
similarities in technique between
your writing and say, the very
dark, emotionless stuff by Third
Eye Foundation or Panasonic.
Music has always been very important to
me. I listen to it when I write and revise; in
fact, I often listen fo fhe same album again
and again when I write a particular story,
and i've tended toward darker sounds and
repetitive   sounds   a   great   deal,   like
Panasonic and Third Eye Foundation and
their precursors. When I was writing sever
al of fhe stories in Altmann's Tongue (1994),
I listened fo two songs by Einsturzende
Neubauten again and again. And two of the
stories in that book take their titles from
songs by The Fall. [For] my latest book,
Father of Lies, I kept coming back fo
Kraufrock, mostly Faust and Can, but also
newer bands like Slinf.
The newest fiction I've been doing, I've
been listening to a lot of electronic stuff, both
early and contemporary. I've been listening
to Throbbing Gristle and Psychic TV. But I'm
also listening fo Luke Slater [and] DJ Spooky.
Autechre, Merzbow, everything on Colin
Newman's ~swim records label, Speedy J, a
lot of stuff on Invisible Records. Also a great,
dark, unknown band on Decibel Records
called Oneiroid Psychosis.  I'm not sure
what's going to percolate out of all that yet.
How did you get into this type of
music and what keeps you interested
in it? Most people lose interest or
can't find the time to keep up with
the velocity of change in music.
In the late-'80s, between years of college, I
temporarily stumbled info an incredibly lucrative job where I had literally no expenses. I
began buying nine or ten CDs a week. Af
first I bought only things I had heard or had
heard of, but soon it became a kind of game.
I started buying things af random, the only
rules being that I was looking for music that
I'd never heard of before. So, I bought things
on impulse or for crazy reasons. I bought
Einsturzende Neubauten's Halber Mensch
largely because there was a border of feeth
around fhe front cover. I picked up a Severed
Heads album because it was in fhe bargain
bin, and that got me interested in everything
that Nettwerk records was putting ouf at the
time, which eventually led me to contemporary electronic music.
What would you suggest as some
good reading as far as contemporary writing is concerned?
I like Beth Nugent and James Purdy's work a
great deal. I think they're both in a very original space. I like David Foster Wallace's
essays more than his stories or novels, buf
think most of his writing has something to
offer. I like Walter Abish's How German Is
It?, which I think is one of the best novels of
the last few decades. Thomas Bernhard is
one of my favourites—he's Austrian and
writes novels with no paragraph breaks. Buf
I also read people like Andrew Vachss and
James Ellroy. I think Don Delillo's novels are
very good as well, and I'm quite fond of Ben
Marcus's The Age of Wire and String. That's
at least a start.
So, why do you write?
I don't write for any grand social reasons;
my reasons are mostly subconscious and personal, perhaps selfish. It gives me a certain
satisfaction that I can't get fron*
jny other
ijoyable activity for me as an intense one
and a satisfying one that helps challenge the
way that I am in the world, what I believe. I
like the risk of that. • DiSCORDER: Let's start with some biographical information.
Cot Power; My name is C-H-A-R-L-Y-N Marie
Marshall, buf when I was in sixth grade I took
the C-H-A-N out and made it easier: Chan
[pronounced like 'Shawn']. And I was born
January21, 1972. Aquarius.
Aquariusl I hear that you went to
Africa.
That was a long time ago. It'll be two years this
January.
And apparently it was a life changing
experience.
It was different. I've never seen homeless children before, people who lived with contaminated wafer. It does something to you. You
learn something you never knew before.
So after this, you started to write the
songs for your new album?
After this, I did not ever want fo play music
again. I didn't want to play music at all, quite
the opposite. Coming back from this experience, I didn't care at all and I'm still maintaining that feeling towards the luxury of music. So
I came back and lived in the country and didn't listen to music and didn't like the association
of myself with being a musician because I
never really sought to be a musician.
Coincidental things led me to where I am right
now — it was never a conscious agenda.
Coming back from Africa, I realized that there
was no reality in the music world. A lot of the
critical perspective of what's good and what's
not good is so judgmental.
So you went to Australia with Bill
Callahan, I read. Is this true?
This seems like gossip! Yes, it's true! I love him.
Okay. So you went to Australia — is
this where you met the Tren Bros.?
No, I met them in New York two and a half
years earlier. In New York, we played a show
with Mick and Jim — from Dirty Three, the guitarist and the drummer — who are the Tren
Bros. I met them in Boston and New York and
I jokingly, without anticipating a reality behind
it, asked if they would play on my next record
and they said, 'Yeah, yeah, yeah.' But through
developing this relationship, I went crazy and
had this bad dream and wrote all these songs
after eight months of not playing music. Then I
thought maybe I should do this again, 'cause I
felt different about things.
Interlude: Sound check.
Are there going to be any Smog/Cat
Power amalgamation albums?
When we were living together in South
Carolina, sometimes we would get so bored
that there was nothing to do. I mean, we had
already gone to fhe lake, we had already gone
to the forest, we had already fed the animals,
so we would make sounds and make little
songs and stuff. I don't know if we'll ever play
together. I mean, I'd love to, of course. As he
would too!
But no plans in the works?
No, not at all.
How did you meet Steve Shelly?
Well, when I first moved to New York, I moved
in with a drummer friend of mine and we
played shows as a duo every now and then.
His friend, who I didn't know, was the boss at
Matador Records. Our shows in New York
were with this person, Glen Thrasher, and this
guy from Matador would call him and ask us if
we wanted to play shows. I didn't know that it
was the boss from Matador and I quit for a
year because this drummer friend of mine had
to leave New York. So I didn't play for a year.
I got a phone call on my answering
machine one day: I came home from work and
there was a message from Sharon Topper who
is from God Is My Co-pilot. She left a message
saying, 'Chan, you are supposed to play
tonight at CBGB's gallery.' So I opened up the
Village Voice and I saw that my name was
there and I was supposed to play in 15 minutes. There were only four people [who[ actually liked me when I used to play so I thought I
should go 'cause they're going to pay and I'm
not going to be there. So I went and played
this show by myself. I never thought I'd ever
'cause they kept on [telling] me, 'You should
really play by yourself.' I thought I would never
do that. It was like, fuck, responsibility, and it
was Cat Power solo so I went down, got my
guitar 15 minutes later, and played.
Then that night, there was a message on my
answering machine [from] Gerard, the boss at
Matador, who was saying, 'I didn't know that
you were playing tonight, I can't believe that
you didn't call me.' He said, 'Do you want fo
open up for Liz Phair? You'll get paid $200,
[but] you're not going to be on the bill. If you
want to play, you won't be advertised at all.' I
was like, wow, 200 bucks.
So I go down there and I walk [for] sound-
check. It was a huge hall wifh glamorous seats.
I never really played for more than maybe 50.
I look over when I'm soundchecking and these
girls and a couple guys [were] staring at me
[and] it made me so uncomfortable. I finished
the soundcheck and I ran away to the i
They knew everybody and they were all
er. I was a lot more shy back then.
Steve and Tim walked up to me and said,
'We really liked your song, what's the name of
your band? Where are you from? How old are
you? How long have you been playing music?
Do you live in New York? Come out for dinner.' So we all walked outside and went walking around. I'd never heard Liz Phair's music
before and I asked Sonic Youth's light person,
'Are you Liz Phair?' I totally didn't know anything and they were laughing at me and I felt
so stupid. I heard them say right after that say,
'Yeah, well Thurston and Kim.' And I thought,
'Oh, no' and then I realized that it was Steve
Shelly — Steve from Sonic Youth — so I was
like, 'Fuck.' Then I didn't talk fo anybody.
Then I went and played the show. After the
show, I get off stage and I'm trying to concentrate and Steve walks up and says, 'I wanna
put out a record.' Then the stage manager
comes out and says, 'Do you want to go back
on?' and he lifts the curtains and everybody is
standing up and banging on stuff. I started crying. I went to get my friends backstage and I
pulled back the curtain where they were and
these five guys run up and they're like, 'Can
we ask you some questions? You're so ama*
ing!' One of the guys says, 'My professor g<
me your CD and I just love it.' I said, Tm nof Liz
Phair,' and they were all like, 'Oh.' They all
turned around and walked away. All those people who paid $18.75 to go and see Liz Phair
didn't even know who she was. Isn't that sad.*
BYSHAIVAjNDERMEER
sm&mm DISCORDER: What are you hoping to
accomplish with your music?
David: I think that all the different arts have a
way that they communicate information that is
intrinsic within the art. Music has a specific way
that it communicates information, different than
a painting or a poem, approaching us on a different level. There are several ways that we
understand information, and art presents it to
our minds in a covert way. In acknowledging
that, knowing that if I'm true to the creative
process, hopefully my music will be able to
communicate with people on the level that it
has to me all my life.
Lyrically, is it important that your
beliefs be understood by your listeners? Do you think they will get more
from the music if they know where
you're coming from?
We were just talking about this today. There's
this song on the record called 'When They Really Get to Know You They Will Run,' and some
[people] have questioned what I'm trying to say
in the song. To me, it's not as important that
they know what I'm trying to say as that they
are presented with information which causes
them to think and grapple with an issue. If I can
cause them to take a second look at something
... everything's so relative these days, so open
to interpretation, that I can't hope that everybody's going to understand my point of view,
but I think that by being honest, they'll get
accosted somehow by my message, whether
they know where I'm coming from or not. I
think that it causes people to think. I've heard
lyrics in the past where I wasn't sure where the
person was coming from, but that made it more
thought-provoking, as it wasn't just easy to
agree or disagree. I'd have to think about what
they were saying and play both sides [of the
argument] to see what I think. It's not totally
important that people understand my point of
view, but it helps sometimes.
Have you had any bad press or bad
luck due to your honesty?
Sure. We had a door guy tell people at a show
that we were Christian rock and then they didn't come in. We're subject to some of that stuff,
but I think it's the lowest common denominator.
People that have a brain in their head can see
what's happening: that no one's trying to tell
anyone else what to do. The object is discussion and getting to the bottom of things. We're
not saying, 'You need to get your stuff together
in the way that [we] think is right.' For the most
part, I think people understand what's going
Do the members of your band all hold
the same belief system?
Josh: We all consider ourselves Christians. We
don't all have the same exact beliefs. A lot of
times we end up talking stuff out, not necessarily arguing, but we're not like robots who say,
'Yes.' We'll talk to each other, saying stuff like,
'I don't believe that!' or 'I really believe this!' ...
that's about anything, Christianity or otherwise.
What do you think of bands like Earth
Crisis? They're trying to get their message across ...
Josh: I've only heard things about them. I'm
sure that they're very good at hardcore and
that they're very militant.
A lot of people are offended by that.
Josh: If anyone were like that, even if I agreed
with them, I would think they were wrong in trying to impose their views on everybody. Everybody has a right to be different.
David: That's the key with any belief system. If
you have to force your beliefs on somebody, I
think it's ineffective. If you really believe in what
you're doing, you'll figure out the most effective way to bring it to people. Not to slip it in or
anything like that, or to get it in behind their
backs, but to present it to people where there's
not a smokescreen. If I'm yelling at somebody,
barriers go up instantly, and any chances of
speaking rationally with them are over, unless
you back off and present your case in a less-
offensive way It just boils down to believing in
what you're doing and wanting to see it pros
per. If your orientation towards an issue is hostile and hard-line, it's usually ineffective. If they
want someone to know where they're coming
from, they should lower their voices.
You had an EP on Tooth & Nail
Records. What is your experience with
that label?
David: We were never technically on the
label, we just did a one-off. We talked to them
for a little while about being on their label, but
ultimately, there were a few things, business-
wise, that made us nervous. There wasn't a lot
they could say to ease our minds on certain
issues, so we tried to distance ourselves from
them business-wise and just remain friends. I
have thoughts about what they do, but that's
not ultimately important. We didn't sign with
them because we were nervous about the busi-
What do you have in common with
your tour-mates [Jets to Brazil, Promise
Ring]?
David: We're only doing a few shows with
them ... not a whole lot!
Josh: I think that we appeal to the same kids.
If we don't now, after the show most of them
go away happy. We're not like the other bands
stylistically, but I think that all three bands are
fairly thoughtful bands, lyrically and musically.
We're not three-chord pop or distortion, not that
that's bad ...
David: We can't really pull off the energy and
the rock that the other bands do.
Josh: So far it's been good. All the crowds
have been really receptive and supportive. I
thought that maybe half the people would walk
away, or ask, 'When's Promise Ring gonna
play?' but it hasn't happened.
David: Last night, we went out on a limb and
opened with a really mellow song and everybody stuck around. I'm not really sure why,
though. If I was a kid, I may not have.
Do you consider religion fashionable
right now? There are bands like MxPx
doing it punk-style who are getting
decent reactions ...
David: With that band, their popularity grows
the more they distance themselves from religion.
I think that world religions are fashionable, but
Christianity is never fashionable.
Josh: You can never be accepted, really, by
everybody, as a Christian.
David: I think that it's because the Christian
Church has probably been the most offensive
organized institute in American history to anybody. Contrary to what scripture has to say, it's
so exclusive and judgemental. I've had a problem with it because you just feel like you're
going to get hammered for stuff and that's contrary to what the Bible actually says. Somehow,
Christians have been getting it wrong for years
and years, so there's a good reason why
[Christianity] is never going to be accepted by
the nation at large.
I was wondering where you're at, spiritually. I admire the fact that you can
refer to God as 'Dad' in your songs;
that's something a lot of Christians
would not ever really be able to do. Is
this something you've worked
through?
David: With most of those songs, there are a
lot of parallels and metaphors and most of it
has been based on factual events. In the Bible,
there's such a clear picture of Him as a paternal
and also maternal figure. The ultimate goal with
what the Bible claims as Christianity is a personal intimacy. This relationship is in many different forms and one of those is definitely a
maternal/paternal relationship.
Is 'Big Trucks' your own version of a
parable?
David: Yeah, in a lot of ways. I enjoyed the literary tool of a parable as it appears in the
Bible and I think it's a great way to deal with
things that are hard to pin down. It can make
things more practical. 'Big Trucks' has a father
trying to explain something to his son in terms
he might understand. The kid still doesn't get it,
which is generally the way things happen.
i. 1 if y iCi 11 rii jri
:        |
14    Dec 98/Jak 99 Josh: But 'Big Trucks' is your dad ...
David: Well, yeah, it is more horizontal, having more to do with a specific situation that my
dad and I went through that I turned into a fictional story.
Who are your musical role models?
Did you listen to Christian music growing up?
Josh: I never did. I didn't know anything about
Christian music until I came out to Seattle about
four years ago. There were all these '80s
bands that I liked, like Rick Springfield, but the
first thing I remember really caring about was
Def Leppard.
David: Hysteria?
Josh: Pyromania. I'm a little older...
David: In the house that I grew up in, we
weren't allowed to listen to non-Christian
music. By Grade nine or ten, there wasn't really anything that turned my crank. When I got
into high school, I got a bit of a reprieve as far
as that rule went. The first bands that I remember listening to and caring about were Fugazi
and the Violent Femmes. My girlfriend had this
Fugazi record and I was really intrigued by it.
Without ever really knowing anything about
the music, I started playing in hardcore bands.
I played the drums and my friends always
needed a drummer, so I played and I enjoyed
it. A lot of the people I know are Christian and
have issues with Christian culture. I've come to
grips, working through my ideology, and have
come to the opinion that there's nothing valid
or good about a separate Christian culture.
[The Christian music scene] is not a healthy
subculture at all and I think it's to the detriment
of most Christians, contrary to what most think.
In your song where you deal with
your experiences with the Church
['Secret of the Easy Yoke'], where are
you coming from?
David: This particular experience is fictional,
but is based so closely on feelings that I had.
Basically, what I projected on God for so many
years is what I saw around me and what every
body else seemed to be buying into, and I
ended up with a really distorted view of God,
one that I was unhappy with. In the song, it's
like, 'This is messed up;' it's personal, in that it
deals with me not being able to get past Chris-
I sat through your CD with my ultra-
Baptist brother and in this song you
talk about bracelets ... are those the ...
David: WWJD bracelets? Yeah. It's been a
struggle, because I don't want to offend people, but at the same time, in a parallel that I'd
need to wear a bracelet to remind me that I
love my girlfriend and to do what she asks me
to do, as far as treating her well ... It boggles
my mind — it's not reality! According to what
the Bible says, our relationship wilh Him is supposed to be a lovers' relationship. Intrinsically,
if it's real, if that doesn't move me to live how I
should, then how will a bracelet, a marketing
ploy, [do it]? It's just such a slap in the face to
me, a picture of duty, of things to keep track of
and things to help remind you of them...
'You're not really ever going to get to know
Him or talk about stuff, so don't worry and just
use this' — it drove me crazy that this idea is
so widely accepted by people. It broke my
heart. It can't be like that. It's not what I want,
and I don't think that's what He wants. That's
what drove that song, [asking] am I serving a
god that is based on a bracelet? The answer I
came up with is no; there's got to be something
else.
In 'Promise,' you're talking about
wanting a belief 'with long sleeves'
because it's 'unpredictable.' Where are
you coming from?
David: I was using the metaphor [to express]
keeping my bases covered. Everybody's
always trying to keep their bases covered. It's
a picture of wishy-washiness.
Informed that they're playing in 5 minutes,
without a soundcheck, I skip to the chase a
Before you go, do you have a
favourite book or verse of the Bible?
David: At this point, the book of Romans, ond
the book of Galatians have been so helpful to
me, in seeing my way through all of the
untruths that I was passed on while growing
up. The misunderstandings that I had about
how things worked, having to keep all my stuff
together — those two books helped me to see
the real order of operations, as far as faith in
Jesus Christ goes. They've been immensely
helpful in seeing what everything else says, in
how righteousness is not about us performing
by a set of rules.
So you'd be more an advocate of self-
motivated religion? You're not into
organized religion?
I need other people around me with similar
beliefs. Clinging to any sort of denominational
lines I think is totally bogus, but getting together with people who have similar beliefs is just
natural. It's about being honest with people
and not being in conflict all of the time. People
are coming from totally different directions —
you need to be with people who are coming
from the same foundations so that you can
work towards a better understanding It's
important to hang out with other Christians,
because they have an understanding about certain things. But it's also important for us to get
away from that too, as it can get wear ing
[because] certain Christians don't have that
understanding, confusing things that could be
so clear if they took off the blinders of culture.*
! I , ??>**f"{« 9 • y**f * *> * 9-»» k
W/'fh the recent explosion of Japanese pop, Fantastic Plastic Machine becomes one of the large
pieces of shrapnel to slice right
through the conventional ideas of
what pop should sound like. Fantastic Plastic Machine is the brainchild of one Tomoyuki
Tanaka. An experienced dj and mu-
'80s, Tanaka
has always
been ahead of
his time for is
it behind the
times?). His
continual devotion to film soundtracks from the '60s
and an affection I
modern electronic sounds
makes for a musical lovechild
that's somewhere between Astrud
Gilberto and early '80s Kraftwerk
with the recent album, By Fantastic Plastic Machine. Much like
Japanese contemporaries Pizzicato Five, Fantastic Plastic is
adept at making exceptionally
cool kitsch to tap your toes to that
isn't quite lounge and not neces-
sarily
<FANTASTIC PLASTIC MACHINE>
you listening to back then?
I enjoyed bossa nova, soundtracks, and some soul mu-
fck^     sic. Not really much different than the things
I listen to now.
How      about
new wave?
Of course!
I remember a
Japanese new
wave      band
from the '80s
called The Plastics ...
Yes. They were great!
There's a record in progress
right now, which is a tribute to
The Plastics. Various [Japanese]
bands are recording their versions
of the songs.
When did you begin dj'ing?
When I was in Margarine Strikes
Back, I bought a turntable to use
for related band things and itwas
at that point I started dj'ing. I had
done some dj'ing in some clubs
else, but it's not at all hard to find
in Shibuya-ku.
What are some of your favourite soundtracks?
There are so many, it's difficult for
me to decide. The Thomas Crown
Affair ['60s film starring Steve
McQueen and Faye Dunaway]
and Raumpattroille ['60s German
sci-fi TV series] are some great
ones. However, right now, I'm
looking for soundtracks from TV
broadcasts, music that's made for
movie companies, TV and movie
library music. It's very difficult to
find. Some of it was written by
very famous people, but it just
wasn't known by the public.
How do you feel about your
Japanese contemporaries,
bands like Pizzicato Five,
Cornelius, Buffalo Daughter,
etc.?
It's not as if we stick together and
we're bosom buddies, but we do
keep in touch and respect each
other. We do follow each others'
bands are you listening to?
Everything! I like Brit-pop, drum
V bass ... you name it!
How about punk?
Yeah, one of my favourites is the
British punk band, Snuff. Sometimes when I'm dj'ing, I'll play one
of their records.
How has the reception to
your shows been on this
North American tour, so
far?
This is my first time in North
America [and] I was honestly
thinking that the reception would
be very cold and the audiences
and the atmosphere would be a
bit cheesy. But I was pleasantly
surprised to see my music well-
Speaking of cheesy, you appeared on MuchMusic's
Electric Circus when you
were in Toronto — how did
that go?
It WAS cheesy! But it was a lot of
fun because you don't often get
to experience something like that.
At one point, the dancers stopped
dancing because they couldn't understand or relate to a certain
song I was playing. During the
show I kept on thinking to myself,
'What am I doing here?'
[laughs] Well, at least it
was good exposure, even
if a few people caught the
show and really got into
your music and then went
and bought your record.
Can you briefly explain
how you create your music?
There's several ways of doing it.
Basically, I take older music and
reconstruct it into segments and
make it into pop songs. There's
no real rule of thumb and that's
where the difficulty is in testing
different methods to produce that
type of sound.
Are there some parts of the
songs where you use real
instruments as opposed
to samples?
In some of the songs there are no
samples at all. Synthesizers and
other instruments are used as well.
Right now, Fantastic Plastic
Machine's style of music
seems to be very popular -
- it has that retro feel to it.
Is that just a passing fad,
or if it isn't, how do you
think it will evolve?
Retro is kind of a tricky word here.
If you're talking about retro in
terms of '60s and now early '70s
music being used a lot, this will
probably continue. So when you
talk about the word retro, it's a
different type of retro. On the
other hana, you also get people
who are listening to the music for
the first time and to those people,
it is new music. Even though music from the past is used, it is still
new and rignt now and in the future, I will continue to concentrate
on making music sound new.*
<by Christine Gfroerer>
>w, and
this tete-a-tete transpired:
DiSCORDER: Tell me about
the Shibuya-ku scene in Japan.
Fantastic Plastic Machine:
Shibuya-ku is the name of a city
[it's a ward of Tokyo — there are
23 wards in Tokyo], It's a very
special and unusual place, not
only in Japan but in the world.
For example, if there was a record
you have been looking for for ten
years, you would find it there as
long as you have the money.
Shibuya-ku has music, fashion
and information from any age,
any type, and any country. There
are at least a hundred record
shops within a very small area.
The music that is produced by the
people who live there and buy
their music from there is considered Shibuya-ku type of music.
This style is influenced by the diverse cultures and music from that
location. Shibuya-ku is the focal
point of music within Japan as
they have all the resources there,
and from that point the different
types of music that are produced
tnere make it to the other parts of
Japan.
You were in a band in the
'80s called Margarine
Strikes Back. What were
they like?
It was a band I was involved in
1 2 years ago. The concept was
very similar to Fantastic Plastic
Machine; however, we did more
live concerts and I was the bassist. We would play soundtracks
from French movies, but in a
funky way. At the time, it was a
bit too early to be doing that sort
of thing.
I like the name of the band.
Was it your idea?
Yes, it was. I always choose really long names for my bands
[laughs].
What kind of music were
16    Dec 98/Jam 99
and disc
;    but
Afthat time, I wa
ing the type of
peopl
didn't start do-
ally until 1992.
ted to start play-
nusic that other
playing so I
started a sound system \
djs called Sound Impossible,
where we played only soundtracks from the '60s.
It sounds, perhaps, as if it
only appealed to a certain
audience ...
At first it was something new and
it took time to catch on. It didn't
have the rhythm that people are
accustomed to nowadays because it's the music from generations ago. But what I'm doing now
with Fantastic Plastic Machine is
taking music from back then and
adding present beats to it.
What were the other djs in
Japan playing in 1992?
Acid
Jc
actions and support each other
in our respective styles as we become known in other parts of the
world.
Japanese pop bands seem
to be becoming more and
more popular with North
American and European audiences. What are your
views on the recent interest
and the 'exportation' of
Japanese music?
I've played in Europe about five
times now and one thing I feel is
that it's not about nationalities or
difference of countries when writing or performing music. It's more
about when I'm traveling to cities
like Berlin or Amsterdam — that
it's just a plane ride away — and
I'm not really concentrating on
Japanese culture or the Japanese
aspect of it or that I create Japa-
<Photo by Bar
popular,
we'd be looking for all sorts of
soundtracks, Brazilian jazz, and
easy listening records. Now a
lot of people are into that sort
of music and look for those
records, but back then nobody
was really into it.
What is it about '60s music
that you enjoy?
It's not only the music but the fashion and the pop culture from that
Is '60s music quite popular
and accessible in Japan currently?
It is perhaps the easiest place to
get your hands on that type of music than anywhere else in the
world. Japanese buyers are constantly buying from everywhere
and everything just accumulates.
For example, the soundtrack from
Barbarella [cool sci-fi film from
mid-'60s starring Jane Fonda] is
a tough one to find anywhere
. It's just music that
like and produce. You will find
that other Japanese bands such
as Pizzicato Five, Cornelius, Buffalo Daughter, feel the same
way. The music they create is just
the music of the time and they
just happen to be from Japan.
One common thing I've noticed about Japanese pop
bands is that they can create really cool, stylish, almost fashionable music
without losing their musical credibility. Even if it's
really fluffy pop, there's a
certain freshness to it and
nobody seems to take
themselves too seriously.
Yes, I agree. Those comments
might be an indication of the style
of music that is Japanese.
What   kinds   of   current Video Philter
BY TANIA BOLSKAYA
"It shrinks my liver, doesn't it, Nat? It pickles my kidneys,
yeah. But what it does to the mind? It tosses the sandbags
overboard so the balloons can soar. Suddenly, I'm above
the ordinary. I'm competent. I'm walking a tightrope over
Niagara Falls. I'm one of the great ones ... I'm William
Shakespeare. And out there it's not Third Avenue any
longer, it's the Nile. Nah, it's the Nile and down it moves
the barge of Cleopatra." (Ray Milland as Don Birnam in
The Lost Weekend)
As the festive seasor
creeps up and hits u:
over the head with Yule
logs and Toblerone, escape
becomes a theme in all lives, save
maternal ones. Brother's obliviou:
while his kids are eating Draino
Sister's doing the disappearinc
act every time someone mention:
"help in the kitchen," Dad':
beefing about Mom and hei
and  Mom':
"All I
3 Burl
screaming,
Ives Christmas!" Ihere are two
things which I can always count
on to relieve my suffering when
my nearest and dearest are too
near and far from dear - a couple
of good flicks and a whole lot of
Bucking the new release
section and the current climate of
temperance propaganda, this
month I bring you tidings of great
drinking movies of the past 65
years. A good drinking movie is
here defined as one that
accurately portrays the hellish
joys of 40 proof elixir or that
makes you want to fix yourself a
stiff one and join the on-screen
party. The best do a bit of both.
Though it's a dish with a large
side of ham, The Lost
Weekend (1945) does a fine
job of elaborating on the pitfalls
of drinking as a means of
procrastinating life. Don Birnam
a promising writing career
'ered that chugging a fifth
3 great way to get over
writer's block. Alcohol doesn't
exactly prompt the stymied
novelist's muse, but it sure helps
get rid of hours, days, weeks,
months, and years that he had
planned to fill with work. Birnam's
dignity as a character must be
credited to actor Ray Milland,
who won an Oscar for his
performance as an alcoholic who
can't quit for fear of the life he'd
have to face in sobriety. "Most
men lead lives of quiet
desperation. I can't take quiet
desperation!"
For a dose of inebriety mixed
with a life of modest literary
success, there's no better place
to spend a few hours than in the
company of the wittiest American
who ever lived, Dorothy Parker.
Mrs. Parker and the Vicious
Circle identifies not fear of
professional failure but absolute
personal failure as the root of a
good woman's desire for drink.
"I never liked a man I didn't meet"
is one of the perennially dumped
and smashed Mrs. Parker's more
telling bon mots. Unlike The Lost
Weekend, this boozy biography
of the mistress of the Algonquin
Table and her crowd of jazz-age
pleasure-seekers has more than
one consistently inebriated soul.
Knowing the identities of the real
people behind the on-screen
characters is in noway necessary
to enjoy the dysfunctional group
dynamics of this set of alcoholic
literati. Though at times in need
of a swift kick in the pacing, Alan
Parker's splicing of the young
Dorothy, her hoary older self, and
her sublimely searing poetry work
well to round out a character that
f    Brandy Alexander
I i A OBICIOUS ALTERNATIVE TO  f
NASTY CUD RUM AND
EGGNOG
1 /2 OZ. BRANtDY *
I      1/2 oz. Cremeoe      I
Cacao
1 OZ. MiLK
1 Shake with ice and strain jj
I WEU INTO A BOWL-STYLE j
I CHAMPAGNE GIASS OR A \
I MARTINI GIASS. SPOON THE f
|: FOSAM FROM THE SHAKER j
V     ON TOP.
Jennifer Jason Leigh breathes
bourbon-soaked life into.
Where The Lost Weekend
stumbles (the "evils" of drinking,
including some Delirious Tremens
bats, look a little silly from a
modern vantage point) and Mrs.
Parker and the Vicious Circle
distances (however much I wish I
were a fabulously smart New
Yorker in the 1920s, I'm not) The
Days of Wine and Roses hits
the shot glass soundly. Jack
Lemmon and Lee Remmick are an
average couple who meet, fall in
love, drift into average middle-
class lives, and seek alcohol as
a refuge from the boredom of
Eisenhower-era America. The film
is a little didactic in the final
quarter, with Jack Klugman as a
preachy AA rep. However,
sticking with me until my liver
corrodes into a galvanized puck
in my abdomen and I keel over
while watching reruns of Maude,
Lee Remmick's parting speech is
one of the truest bits of acting and
dialogue ever to grace the classic
Hollywood screen. Check it out
and see what I mean.
Of course, the festive season
can be, er ... festive and a
healthy dose of celebratory
drinking movies is required to
truly get into the spirit. The best
of this sort of booze-up just
happens to be a mystery, a
comedy, and a Christmas movie
all in one The Thin Man
(1934) is the tender story of an
ex-detective who has married an
heiress and on a holiday vacation
to New York finds his habitual
drinking frustratingly interrupted
by a murder-mystery. If you're
looking for a few quick lessons
on how to drink with style and
how to maintain a loving
marriage with only a dog, twelve
martinis and a couple of million
dollars to support you, this is the
film to study.
It's time to go shake a few
Brandy Alexanders and
disappear with a little Drunken
Master II (Jackie Chan never
fought so good until he downed
a jug of China's finest cooking
wine). I'll leave you with a slightly
slurred Happy Holidays and a
glorious Woody Allen quote
you can pilfer in a few months
for your own perfidious purposes:
Helen's Agent: You're a star
because you are great and are
a great star, but in the past few
years you are better known as
an adulteress and a drunk.
Helen Sinclair: Please. I
haven't had a drink since New
Year's Eve.
Helen's Agent: You're talking
Chinese New Year.
Helen Sinclair: Naturally. Still,
that's two days! Do you know
how long that is for me?*»
•»n
f Nick   Charles   on
I Mixology:
The important thing
is the rhythm.
Always have rhythm :
IN   YOUR   SHAKING,
Now a Manhattan
you a1ways shake to
fox-trot time, a
Bronx to two-step
time, a dry martini
you always shake to
wai.tz time.
Kinetoscope
303
COLUMBIA ST
GASTOWN
683-3757
CotuinUa
EVERY
NIGHT
IS TWONEY
NITE
FILMS • VISUAL MEDIA BY A. NALPAS
HAPPINESS
a) I don't really know anything
about the story behind Happiness, but in my mind the film's
poster art (flat, disaffected cartoons of the film's characters)
was absolutely perfect. You
see, the film seemed to me like
something akin to an adaptation of Daniel Clowes' Eight
Ball, shot with real live actors,
"the real world." Eight Ball
was not only riotously funny, it
was also relentlessly black,
with a knack for drawing attention to some of the darkest regions of life, and especially the
human psyche, in a way that
could be incredibly unnerving.
But as disturbing as Eight Ball
could sometimes be, it was still
just a comic — its relationship
to the "real world" was, by the
very nature of the medium,
rather detached.
What Happiness does is
that it takes the same kind of
material with the same kind of
treatments, and it stages it with
mode (a tampered realist
mode, to be sure, but nonethe
less a realist mode). The results
range from riotously funny (just
like Eight Ball] to profoundly
disturbing. I made the mistake
of having an espresso beforehand, and found myself feeling
agitated, anxiety-stricken, and
disturbed late into the night. At
least part of that was the result
of the film.
b) "Be a part of history,"
the film's advertisements read.
No matter how true the premise
(that you are not a part of history, in all likelihood) behind
such an exhortation may be,
the suggestion that you can become a part of history by shelling out your $9.00 for this particular film — as good as it may
be — is just sickening.
DIARY OF A COUNTRY
PRIEST
How many films really, truly affect you? How many films have
anything more than a superficial effect on your physical
being? Bresson, like Dreyer,
like Tarr, is a master of pace
and tone, and Diary of a Country Priest is a showcase of this
mastery. The film is subtle and
its spell is cast ever so gradually, but by the film's end I was
beginning to be convinced that
I, too, had stomach cancer.
Very few works of art have had
a similar effect on me. The one
s Crim
that comes to mi
and Punishment — every time
I've read it I've become sick,
THE VELVET GOLDMINE
Insanely, absurdly ridiculous.
Get this: within the film's first
three minutes, the viewer has
been subjected to classical allusions, a UFO flying through
the sky sprinkling some kind of
cosmic dust, and the suggestion that Oscar Wilde was
some kind of extra-terrestrial
whose brooch (is that Krypton-
ite?) would change the course
of history, or at least pop, and
that's just the beginning.
Why is Iggy Pop being
conflated with Kurt Cobain
throughout the film? Why is
the film borrowing so liberally
from Citizen Kane? Why?
Why? Why?! "Leave your expectations ot the door," indeed.
_■______■
FURIOS • CHAPTER 3 • HIGH TEST
ESQ
RvflH
SHOCK THE DAY • THE COOL OF ME • TRIM
WAYSIDE*SALTEENS • TAMMYBRIMNER
■_r__?____
Fmlri
REDE PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS
ARTHUR FUNKERELI & PAINTED BLANK
_Ej-_-I
m-iflL
M O LE ST IC S   EAST VAN CD RELEASE PARTY
K_Z3__I
R=HiFi
SADDLESORES
BEEKEEPERS • PLANTAINS
DUKE OF MEDULA • D.D. ASTOR
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ETERNAL   (TICKETS $15)
SONIC REVIVAL • RAFT OF MEDUSA • GLADYS PATCHES • DARKEST OF THE
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SWEATHOGS . LID »  MUDSLINGER . ZUMPANO » BEEKEEPERS ♦ JACK TRIPPER
FOR BOOKING INFO CALL CANDY (ALL TYPES OF MUSIC)   683-3757
it e^ssuss 7
inch
BY THE INVISIBLE CLAIRE
The half-foot high stack of 45s which greeted me on
my latest visit to the CiTR Music Department was in
deed a sight for sore eyes. Not having the money,
time, or energy to seek out reviewable items myself, I rely
upon their provisions. When the influx of short vinyl slows
to a trickle, my enthusiasm declines and with it, too, the
quality of my writing. It had been so long since I'd witnessed such a bounty of new music that my initial reaction
was suspicion — it must be crap. Strangely enough, I have
yet to find anything in this new windfall that is not, at the
very least, interesting. Out of my desire to stockpile against
a drier season, this edition of Seven Inch will be no longer
than usual. However, signal to noise is up, up, up. I sense
an imbalance in the force.
high-energy it might short out your
stereo, so be warned. (10-in-l,
508 Legion Way #4, Olympia,
WA, 98501)
Laughter is rarely invoked by
this particular medium — ennui,
yes; annoyance, yes; joy, yes.
However, nothing has made me
laugh as hard as "Hot Water
Pipe," the second song on the
CORPUSSE EP, Fan Favorite,
since, well, ever. I very nearly
gave myself a stomach ulcer listening to Corpusse (a bizarre
creature apparently hailing from
Toronto) pontificating about his
THE BANGS single Maggie the
Cat, with its extraordinarily colourful jacket and peach-hued vinyl, invites you inside for some
ultra-amplified, manic rock and
roll. The title track on this three-
songer is a tribute to Bangs bassist Maggie Vail who, if we are to
believe her praisers and fellow
bandmates, is one of the hippest
chicks around. Sarah Utter, guitarist and primary singer, yelps
and howls like she was born to
it. Co-vocals are shared on
"Lights Out" between Sarah and
drummer Jesse. This record is so
plumbing problems over moody
atmospherics. His voice ranges
from deep angsty growl to shriek-
opera falsetto, but all this dramatic detailing merely makes the
subject matter — namely, a leaky
pipe and how much it needs fixing — even funnier. The other
three songs, in particular "I Heard
the Chickens,"
which features lu-
(Corpusse, c/o
689 Queen St.
West, Box 171,
Toronto, ON,
M6J 1E6)
Ecstasy, pure
ecstasy. Yes, THE
MAKE-UP are
good; they've
cleaned up their
sound quite a bit
in the past few years and if
they're still a bunch of arrogantly
weird brats, you can't really
blame them. "Pow! To The People," on the new and absolutely
stunning Make-up/LUNGLEG
split single, is nothing short of
anthemic in all of its funky, slick
dub glory. However, the real surprise and that which brought me
Lungleg's contribution, the
marvelous "Krayola." I know
what you're thinking: "Lungleg?
Those Scottish minxes? But they
never wrote a song over one
minute forty?! They're a punk
novelty act!" Think again!
"Krayola" made me instantly envision the following scenario: the
Banshees, circa 1980, decide
to do the disco thing. Siouxsie
is requested to tone down her
vocal acrobatics and a brilliant
dance platter is born. Ecstasy,
pure ecstasy — a song to swan
around your room while lip-
synching.
(Southern, PO
its cornucopia of lyrical fixations.
Hardcore likes Big Moral Concepts: Unity, Trust, Truth, Sacrifice, Pain, Respect, Good versus
Evil. MISCONDUCT, from Sweden, treat all of these grand
themes on Signed in Blood. The
music is grandiosely hardcore,
but it is, as with most music of its
genre, merely a soundtrack for
the elucidation of moral messages. Perhaps hardcore is the
true manifestation of modern
Gothicism — after all, what could
be more Gothic than "a sacred
union signed in blood?" English
majors are encouraged to write
and refute my thesis. (Bad Taste,
Stora Sodergatan 38, 222 23
Lund, Sweden)
Winnipeg label Permafrost
present Self-Portrait, the first
in a series of 7" compilation
records SILVER SCOOTER
have improved a great deal since
I last lambasted their indie-pop
technique. "If nonsense only
knew" is an excellent pop song
and wins them a big chunk of respect in my mind. EVIE do the
scratchy, cluttery, '60s-influenced
"Before" with naive charm.
"Missed Out," by HUSHFEED,
is neat wall-of-noise indie rock
with bratty but cool vocals. ORANGE GLASS, although perhaps the best known of all these
bands, impressed me the least;
"Same Old Flame" is nice, but
hardly exceptional. This single is
on lovely clear vinyl and would
make a nice addition to any rainy
day radio program. (Permafrost,
341 Parkmanor Blvd., Winnipeg,
MB, R2V 4H5)
If you like your activist women
loud and evil, then REINA
AVEJA might be the band for
you. Bee Complex is a slow,
heavy, Melvins-inspired three-
song EP which conspires to crush
whole cities under its weight.
Reina Aveja's vocalist, who, if her
photograph is to be believed, is
a rather small, dreadlocked
woman with the eyes of a demented, rabid bat, has the voice
of death. Quite simply, I've never
heard such an astoundingly Satanic hardcore/death metal voice
come from a member of the fair
sex. (Probe, PO Box 5068,
Pleasanton, CA, 94566)
SLINGSHOT EPISODE
make exceptionally good pop-
punk in the vein of Tilt. It takes
talent to stretch the pop-punk format beyond three minutes, something this band does with ease.
Their lady singer sings very well;
moreover, she is way cute. "Dead
Air To Deaf Ear" features three
unstoppable, loud songs that
don't sacrifice intelligence to energy. (What Else? PO Box 341 1,
Dayton, OH, 45401)
Three boys from Lethbridge,
Alberta, collectively called THE
UNAMEDS (how does one pronounce that? Oo-na-meds? Un-
name-eds?), have released a single, Them and We, which represents mighty loud, cluttery, mathematical rock. Mathematical is
perhaps a somewhat misleading
i rhythmic to the
poin
of
Unameds' songs are long and
epic in scope. If you put
Nomeansno into a blender,
something this noble and fucked
up might emerge. (Unameds, c/
o 92 Lemoyne Crescent,
Lethbridge, AB, T1K4A5)*
Staplegun
Showdown
Well, cherished zine reading public, I lied. This issue's column was
going to be devoted to zines that ride the fence separating the internet and the print medium. But the influx of print zines this month has
demanded that I give them my first and foremost attention. Granted, a couple of
them have websites, but their existences rely more heavily on photocopies and
snail mail. So let's move!
MY MOON OR MORE
#1, $1, 8 1/2X5 1/2,40
pages
In the utopia that is zineland, it's
hard to justify being "ripped off,"
because really, it was this rag or
a pack of gum, right? Still, we
are all concerned with getting the
best value for our meager zine
budget, and I'm convinced that
My Moon or More, with its
card-stock cover and ace quality,
is one heck of a good deal. I always like a nice layout and this
one's so delicious, it's practically
edible. Cullen has compiled 40
pages of highly entertaining writing. You'll find a slew of well-depicted, odd characters who've
crossed paths with the MMOM
staff — from the camp counselor
friend who, by the end of the summer, is smoking up before giving
his campfire talks, to the drunken
frat boy obsessed with his presumed Irish heritage There are
lots of strange and funny reprints
from medicaLtype sources, including
a puberty manual to giggle at. Cullen
and co. ain't no wussies; there's
angst here, but it's clever, sparing
angst. In the utopia lhat is zineland,
my friends, this zine is the most exciting thing to fall from the sky in some
Hme. (c/o Cullen Carter, 824 Orange St, River Falls, Wl, 54022,
<cullen.j.carter@uwrf.edu>)
THE REAL DEAL
free!, 20 pages, 8 1/2X11
This zine really bewilders me. It's
messy, full of errors and extreme
silliness. Despite this, The Real
Deal has existed for seven issues,
count 'em, seven. Furthermore,
they have their own radio show
on, presumably, the UVic station.
With all this under their belt, I
have to give these guys some
credit, as they must be doing
something right Their report and
photo-documentation of a road
trip through BC was fairly amusing. As sloppy as this rag is,
you can tell that the "editorial
staff" get a real kick out of
making this and that's a big
part of what zine-making is all
about. Still, it's a "you had to
be there" zine that is probably
best read when intoxicated or
overtired and giggly. (1692
Chandler, Victoria, BC, V8S
1N6, <dgidney@yahoo.com>)
SLAMPIECE
#3+4, $2, 24 pages, 8 1/2
by 5 1/2 (approx)
A charming UK music fanzine
written by two girls who originally
hail from Vancouver. The computer layout is really sharp and all
the photos come out clear, something few zines can claim! Lara
and Liz's great sense of humor
makes reading about
Slampiece admirees (bands,
actors, authors and more) a very
enjoyable endeavor. With a consistent style (profiles presented as
short articles with one or two
photos) and no filler, Slampiece
is a delicious relief from the common mess and chaos of fanzines.
If nothing else, order it for the
super-goofy computer-drawn cartoon on the back cover of each
issue. I couldn't access their web
page at the time of writing this
as their server seemed to be
down, but I'd recommend seeing
it because they seem to be quite
electronically-oriented, (c/o Lara
and Liz, 28A Golhurst Terrace,
London, NW6 3HU, UK,
<slampiece@hotmail.com>,
freespace.virgin.net/
slampiece. inc/home.html)
MIDNIGHT MESSENGER:
The Underground Magazine — Music and News
Vol.1  Issue 1, $3 black &
white, $6 colour, 8 1/2 X
11, 44 pages
The Midnight Messenger is
a large music zine that lightly
covers various non-major label
bands (I wouldn't call them all
"underground"), including Bif
Naked, Sloan, Mystery
Machine,    Kittens,    The
Inbreds, and other lesser-known
groups. The information is very
general, but presented in a fairly
clean-cut and knowledgeable
fashion. I'd recommend it more
to those looking for an indie
primer than those who enjoy inside reading on what the "college
music scene" is up to. Editor Mark
Owens doesn't seem to have met
yet with the harsh realities of the
small press/underground publishing. The zine itself is generously
computer printed. He also runs
Midnight Owl Records, "the indie
label that gives a hoot," and he
heads up Midnight Owl Graphics & Promotions: "high quality
work at indie prices." Oh, and
don't forget the website, featuring more information about the
bands on his CD comp of BC
indie rock, which you can have
thrown in with your copy of MM
for $ 1 2. If you're going to order
this zine, do it now because I
have a feeling Mark may have
bitten off more than he can chew,
project-wise! (c/o Mark Owens,
Box 65-2831 Shaughnessy St.,
Port Coquitlam, BC, V3C 3H1,
Thanks ro all who've sent in zines so far!
Please keep fueling Staplegun Showdown
wtth your projects!
920 P&* Street, Kamloops, BC,
V2C3AZ
REMEMBB?, V I DON'T GET ZWES, YOU DON'T GET
REVIEWS, AND IF THERE ARE NO REVIEWS, NO ONE GETS
suggsoJ What wouuj a _»* be wtihout lots or
BAD REVIEWS BACKING IT UP?
^ Tm. next time, mock on. , Real Live
Action
BANG ON A CAN ALL-
STARS
Sunday, October 18
Arts Club Theatre
Intended to be a one-time event,
Bang On A Can was started in
1986 in New York by artistic directors/composers Julia Wolfe,
David Lang and Michael Gordon.
It originated to offer respite from
what Wolfe calls a "polarized"
and "not fun" climate for New
Music in New York City at the
time. According to Wolfe, the
present line-up, which came together in 1992, are "the best players" since the festival started, thus
the title Bang On A Can All-
Stars.
Although the All-Stars have
several recordings, they have received the most recognition for
their latest, a "live" version of
Brian Eno's 1978 ambient classic Music For Airports. I'm a huge
fan of Eno's original recording
and I had heard and mostly enjoyed the All-Stars' version on CD,
so I was looking forward to seeing them perform it live. Boy, did
they let me down: I wanted less,
they gave too much. I otherwise
like "new music," but all I really
wanted to hear was Eno's Music
For Airports. In the end, the All-
Stars performed only one part of
four and it wasn't the one listed in
the program. Instead of part 1/1
they played part 2/2. I'm fine with
Eno's version, but 2/2 is my least
favourite track on the All-Stars'
CD. Recorded, and I discovered
especially live, they add too much
flourish and character, turning
Eno's cool, programmatic mood
music into cloying, vaguely world,
music and new age softness.
While I guess it is silly to have
expected an entire evening of just
Eno, I had other problems with
the performance. The sound
mainly troubled me, getting in the
way of all the music performed.
Maybe it was the room, but
sound engineer Cotton seemed
to have trouble getting the mix
right. There was a harsh sharpness to everything, particularly the
drums. They sounded flat, thin,
and had some crappy reverb on
The other compositions, by
David Lang, Tan Dun, Evan
Ziporyn, Julia Wolfe Michael
Gordon    and    Hermento
Pascoal, were clever and certainly
expertly performed, but failed to transcend the bad sound, or my admittedly self-imposed disappointment.
Sorry to give the All-Stars such short
words here, but I'll stick to their CDs
if I want to hear them again.
Brady Cranfield
HENRY ROLLINS
Friday, October 19
Orpheum
A stool and a spotlight. Black
clothes and sweat. Screaming
poetry. That's what I pictured
when I thought of Henry
Rollins and "spoken word." Instead, I got No-neck Hank walking on stage wearing pleated
pants and "hard shoes." I saw a
stand-up comedy show.
So what the hell did he talk
about for three hours? His acting career, his affinity for jerking
off, his views on women, his adolescent memories with Ian
MacKaye, his worldly travels -
- you know, real, ordinary
things. If the anecdote he was
telling wasn't as funny as he'd
like it to be, all he'd have to say
was "dick" and the crowd would
ejaculate with laughter. He seems
like a pretty good guy. But somehow, I felt that he kept contradicting himself.
He told us how great of a
person Pamela Anderson is and
how he shouldn't judge people
by their appearances, and then
he'd tell us how all the women in
L.A. are stupid because they
have breast implants. He mocked
himself the whole time, seemingly
a humble guy, but he was so
damn confident in everything he
said.
In the few serious moments,
he tried to get the inner beauty
point across by using a gold
buddha encased in plaster
ogy. He told us not to be apathetic — to live, to move, to read.
He asked us why we would
to poison our bodies with drug:
and drink. He never got all
gelistic though.
I guess I have to admire
Henry Rollins. He talked for three
hours straight without a lapse of
memory, without any awkward
moments, without even sitting
down. I could've done without his
African safari finale and I wish
he didn't sound like he was trying to suck up to women so much
— aw hell, I'm just trying to bring
him down.
Christa Min
YOUNG AND RESTLESS
READING
Writers Festival
Thursday, October 22
Arts Club Revue
Touted as young, edgy Canadian
voices, Andre Alexis, Lynn
Coady, Miriam Toews, and
Russell Smith claimed to be
anything but representatives of
the marquee which unified them
at this year's Readers and Writers festival at Granville Island.
The four novelists are Canada's
newest generation of published
writers. Young? Well, maybe in
relation to the nation's graying
literary establishment. Restless?
Jaded, black-clad, perhaps, but
not one of the four would take
personal responsibility for the
LIVE REVIEWS
reading's veneer of youthful rebellion.
Alexis read from Childhood,
his most recent work, which was
nominated for the 1998 Ciller
Prize. Coady read from her novel
Strange Heaven. Toews MC'ed
the event and read a passage
from Summer of my Amazing
Luck, and Smith shared a passage
from his new work, Noise.
Smith affirmed that he does
not deliberately cultivate an attitude in his writing. He blamed the
"young and restless" label on
pure hype. "The media is obsessed with this idea of edge,"
Smith said. He was emphatic that
if edge is apparent in his latest
novel, it is merely a reflection of
how he sees and experiences
things, rather than the result of a
contrived plan to write a certain
The other three authors
agreed with Smith, questioning
the youth label as much as the
restless one. Nonetheless, the passages read by three of the authors
revolved around the experiences
of youth, and none presented
young in Canada: there was no
Hockey Sweater, nor waxing poetic about maple sugar. Whether
it is Alexis describing a young boy
meeting the man who may or may
not be his father surrounded by
women who may or may not
actually be men dressed up as
women; or whether we meet
Coady's protagonist and her
ironic take on Christmas in a children's psych ward, the reluctant
young and restless are giving us
the work of a new, suspicious
generation. In an era when everything is labelled and categorized before it even knows itself,
it is natural that these latest writers just want to be left alone to
be novelists in their own right
rather than some subcategory of
pop culture.
So how then did the four find
themselves on the same stage if
they renounce the title assigned
to them at this year's Writers Festival? Despite being literary newcomers (again relatively speaking), all four novelists were able
to use dark humour to illuminate
normal events. Alexis, Coady,
Toews and Smith presented characters who took a detached view
of circumstances which, however
huge or small, were beyond their
control. Much like four writers on
a literary circuit scorning the very
tag intended to identify and sell
Kirsten Weisenburger
FIREWATER
P.W. LONG
Wednesday, November 4
Starfish Room
P.W. Long, as far as I'm con
cerned, is one of those guys
who's obviously got talent and
taste, but who'll never quite "get
there." He's a proficient guitarist, but not a great one; he's an
OK vocalist, but not an exceptional one; and he doesn't have
the charisma to be the kind of
performer that truly moves you.
His set picked up a little steam
when he brought out "the kid"
to do some skin-pounding for
him. "The kid" looked like he
was about 14 and he was one
of those deceiving types that
doesn't really look like he's doing much of anything, but he
certainly lent a little misty mountain hop to the proceedings.
Firewater came out soon
afterwards and rocked the
house even harder and more
convincingly than they had a
few months ago when they
opened for The Jesus Lizard,
but unfortunately there were
very few on-hand, and for some
reason there were even fewer
by the show's end. Fuck, seeing shows in Vancouver can be
frustrating sometimes and this
was definitely one of those
shows. Firewater pulled out all
the stops, throwing down that
intoxicating blend of "Bucharest
meets the Bowery" in the most
seductive manner, urging,
pleading with the audience to
take up their promise, to join in
the communion, to let go, if only
for a moment ... but to no avail.
Napoleon McKay
DIAMANDA GALAS
Saturday, November 7
Starfish Room
The set was stark drama, like
Miss Diamanda Galas herself. Simply a HUGE, glossy
Steinway grand piano, occupying nearly the whole of the Starfish Room's tiny, battered stage,
a mic, and the Lady herself, resplendent in black (naturally)
and purple glamour. No band
— nothing superfluous.
This was the "Prayer and
Malediction" tour, which, according to the live album of the
me name, has been going on
ice 1996. I don't really want
say that the growing impor-
lce of covers in Galas' reper-
re indicates the dulling of her
edge (though I wonder), espe
cially since she executes such
numbers as "I'm Gonna Live the
Life I Sing About in My Songs"
with such extraordinary passion
and intensity. She performed a
song in Italian ... beautiful, as
was her rendition of "Gloomy
Sunday." She seemed considerably more blues-inflected in style
at this stage in her career, having moved a distance from the
shrieking, funereal madwoman
of "Plague Mass" and "Litanies
of Satan," perhaps more of an
accomplished musician, but still
with the same burning core, still
the same vocal range that
reaches to Heaven while standing in Hell (indulge me).
The audience was extraordinary. I've seen that venue as
crowded before, but rarely filled
with an air of such worshipful
adulation. My prime source of
discontent with the evening lay
in the extreme brevity of the
performance, starting at the
crack of 8pm and clocking in
at exactly 55 minutes. For her
to make an appearance i
city is
I felt -a
lehow cheated to ha\
had
it so truncated.
Kobalt
THE SALTEENS
SPEEDBUMP
PEEPHOLE
Friday, November 20
Vancouver Press Club
Vancouver needs more venues
like the Press Club. The intimacy
of the club allows an unfamiliar
band to quickly connect with
and hold the attention of the audience. Peephole was impressively tight for their very first
show. Sticking to what they
know, the simplicity of the set
matched that of the venue.
A strong performance by
Speedbump was unfortunately hidden behind a plethora
of sound and equipment problems. In another venue, this
might have been a disaster, but
instead it turned into the interactive portion of the evening
with the audience playing
sound engineer.
With the sound problems at
bay, The Salteens bounced
through a set of punk-tinged pop
tunes. An impromptu encore/
singalong, including "Let It Be,"
with the band swapping instruments, was a fun way to end
the evening. The whole night
was an enjoyable opportunity
to drink suds, hang with friends,
and enjoy live music — something that is sadly rare in this
Justin Callison
ROCK AGAINST APEC II:
FOLK THE POLICE
Tuesday, November 24
Pit Pub, UBC
Rock and activism united at the
APEC legal defense fundraiser,
"Rock Against APEC II: Folk the
Police." A sizable audience
turned out to hear a varied mix
of musical acts that included
The Raging Grannies, Full
Sketch, Scum Element, Hog
Tied, MOTORAMA, The
Malchiks and The Flying
Folk Army. Organized by
Nathan Allen and Caleb
Sigurgeirson, the event earned
nearly 1,000 dollars for the independently-funded student activists embroiled in the RCMP's
public complaints commission
The Raging Grannies
opened the show with their musical brand of political-satire.
The costumed, singing group
got right into the spirit of the
event, taking musical shots at
both the RCMP and CSIS and
contributing 500 dollars to the
defense fund.
Full Sketch played a set of
"postminimalist" instrumental
numbers that blended kitsch and
pop-culture elements into an understated rock and roll manifesto. This college-core band is
getting some deserved attention
on the local scene.
Scum Element gave an intense performance of grunge-inflected tunes. PCC complainant
Garth Mullins, fronting Hog
Tied, yelled out punk anthems,
including the autobiographical
"Arrest Me I'm Guilty" and
"Pepper-Spray Democracy." The
Malchik's upbeat ska followed
the mechanical rhythms of
MOTORAMA. The Flying Folk
Army, a seven-piece Celtic
band, had the audience clapping along with the fiddles at
the end of the night.
D. Jago
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I9 Under
Review
BAD ASS
Word on the Streets
(Priority)
Coming straight from Long
Beach, California is Bad Ass
with his solo debut. Most West
Coast hip hop fans have heard
him before on his work with
Snoop Dogg, Warren G.,
and Tupac. Most notably, he
was a member of the LBC
Crew, who had the song "Beware of my Crew" from the Thin
Line soundtrack a couple of years
back. With his solo debut he does
OK, but doesn't really prove he
can hold his own, as the best
tracks on his album all feature
other artists. The stand-out tracks
are the ones with former Death
Row inmates: The Lady of
Rage on "A Hold on Hip-Hop"
and Snoop Dogg on "We be
Puffin' it Down." It seems like it
was only a matter of time until
someone from the West sampled
the now famous BT Express
loop, which has been used on
everything from "Northern
Touch" to "Get at me Dog." On
his version, "This Life of Mine,"
Bad Ass does a decent interpretation, but again, it's his guests
The Outlaws who shii
Duld n
mend Word on the Streets; it
doesn't suck, but it's far from
dope. If you're a hard-core Long
Beach fan then you will probably
want it. For everyone else, if
you're thinking about getting it
because of the guest appearances, it ain't worth it.
Mike S.
BUFFALO TOM
(Beggars Banquet)
Buffalo Tom just keep cranking
out pretty much the same album
over and over again. Sounds like
their recording budget has expanded, though. They seem to be
suffering from Goo Goo Dolls/
Soul Asylum syndrome; that is
to say, they've inched away from
bland indie rock and towards
bland mainstream rock. You
know you've made the leap when
you've got that big rock song with
the strings.
Singer and guitarist Bill
Janovitz did the country thing on
his 1996 solo album Lonesome
Billy, recorded in Arizona with the
Giant Sand/Calexico guys
and it was a really good album.
Janovitz should ditch the other
two Buffalo Tom chumps and do
the solo thing instead. But hey, I
guess rock 'n' roll's where the
fame and fortune is.
Fred derF
CHOCOLATE GENIUS
Black Music
(V2)
A wide range of moods and
styles appear on this album.
Songs like "Clinic" offer up me
lodic, ambient pop while
"Hangover Nine" makes its way
through a raw, laid-back funk
groove. Horns, guitar, and piano
all get their turn to shine in this
collection. Marc Anthony
Thompson penned the majority of
these songs himself with the help
of some hired hands on tracks like
"It's All Good" and "A Cheap
Excuse." The album's production
has intentionally been left to
spare, allowing the lyrical themes
of family, poverty, and lost loves
to sound that much more sincere.
Guest stars, including Chris
Wood and John Medeski from
Medeski, Martin & Wood,
lend their talents all over this
project. It's hard to categorize this
album, but the variety of styles
gives the listener lots to get into.
Cody Beales
CLUB 8
The Friend I Once Had
(March)
Indie cheeriness doesn't come
more indily cheery than with the
fresh-faced Swedish duo of
Karolina Komstedt (vocals) and
Johan Angergard (instruments)
getting over-excited with cute
chirpy vocals, harmonies, melodic guitars, tambourines, drum
machines and more. If you have
ever taken more than a passing
interest in wonderfully poppy
music, then toss out your Cardigans records and maybe one
Saint Etienne record and listen
to these jolly sometimes-verging-
on-samba, sometimes-verging-on-
Euro-disco collection of tunes
where there's "Better Days" even
though "Tomorrow Never
Comes." Some ofthe songs have
such a singalong sweetness to
them that they get lodged in your
memory, particularly tracks like
"Everlasting Love" and "Someday." The mood changes occasionally to a more mellow and
slightly sad theme, but the sun always comes out from behind the
clouds on the next track and you
know everything's going to be
okay again.
Club 8 has a special quality
and sound that makes you think
that if the indie UK label Sarah
Records hadn't folded, they'd be
at the front of queue to sign them
— but, as it happens, Club 8 are
on New York's March Records.
This is a label whose catalogue
is worth checking out, especially
if everything sounds as delightful
and tuneful as these Swedish
CG
N'DEA DAVENPORT
N'Dea Davenport
(V2)
N'Dea Davenport sets out to
distance herself from her former
band, The Brand New Heavies, with this, her debut solo venture.  However,  she has far
greater success when she sticks
to the BNH's signature formula,
namely the funk, soul, and R'n'B
that made them so popular.
When she dabbles in electronica
and other musical styles, her incredible voice can't save her,
and this leads to a lack of cohesion between songs and on the
album as a whole. And what
possessed her to cover Neil
Young's "Old Man"?
Steve Guimond
EC80R
World Beaters
(Digital Hardcore Recordings)
It's been a long time since the last
Ec8or album (not including the
Grand Royal North American
compilation) and was it worth the
wait? No. Whereas Ec8or used
to deliver some great snot-nosed
tunes with a slightly darker and
more industrial edge than their
labelmates, Atari Teenage
Riot, World Beaters does not
have the same charming ambience as the self-titled Ec8or album
or the Spex is a Fat Bitch EP.
Compare, for example, "We
are Pissed" with the new track
"Our Present is Our Piss." Gina
sounds like she's been sucking
helium on a daily basis, thus her
vocals border on unlistenable on
some of the tracks. What happened to the voice that screamed,
"Discriminate the Next Fashion
Sucker You Meet — It's a Raver!"?
Why the hell did DHR put that
ridiculous picture of Gina (sans
shirt, with stickers) on the inside
sleeve? Is this for real? Likewise,
Patric's instrumental tracks, usually slamming, are lost in a wall
of noise. Gone is the edge and
the kick — perhaps we're starting to get old, but World Beaters
needs to be "Better Better Better."
T.Star
FUNERAL ORATION
Survival
(Hopeless)
Tired of pop-punk monotony?
Sick of Fat Mike rip-offs? Looking for something a little different? This Amsterdam quartet has
one of the most original sounds
going. Peter Zirschky's distinguishing vocals backed by raw
but tight musicianship have set
Funeral Oration apart from
the punk menagerie since '83.
Their third North American full-
length is a little poppier than previous albums, but no less infectious; "You Will" and "Upstream,
Downstream" will have you singing along in no time flat. Survival
is 15 short, catchy melodies guaranteed to brighten your day.
David Evans
GEARWHORE
Drive
(Astralwerks)
This is a decently put together
package, assembled in the bedroom of Brian Natonski (the
Gearwhore himself, presumably). This is hard and fast— but
not blurringly so — with something of a harsh edge, although
that sorta varies from track to
track. Seems like the 'Whore tries
to capture a distinct sound on
each track: "Vector Tribe" has
ethnic-type drums and electric
squawks that sound like jungle
animals, "Love" is kinda slinky
and groovy, and so on. Slick artwork, too. I find the tracks somewhat monotonous at times, but
this kind of music was meant to
be a party soundtrack to dance
to, not to sit down and analyze
like I'm doing.
Not bad, but nothing that
hasn't already been done earlier
and better.
Cobalt
GOLDEN SMOG
Weird Tales
(Rykodisc)
Golden Smog's third release is
not as great an album as you'd
think it would be. I mean, listen
to the talent you've got in the
same room: Gary Louris and
Marc Perlman (The
Jayhawks), Jeff Tweedy
(Wilco), Kraig Johnson (Run
Westy Run), Dan Murphy
(Soul Asylum), and Jody
Stephens (Big Star). But think
about it; why would they use their
best songs for some side project?
Wouldn't they save them for their
Overall, the album has a kind
of '70s Rod Stewart sound and
feel to it (think a less exciting
"Maggie May") — kinda kitschy,
retro, and rootsy, with the best
stuff on Weird Tales consistently
coming courtesy of Gary Louris
and Kraig Johnson. But Weird
Tales is nothing to wet your pants
over. Save your money and buy
a Jayhawks or Wilco album
Fred derF
DAVID GRUBBS
The Thicket
(Drag City)
To my ears, David Grubbs has
moved on. His headier days
seem neatly packed up — still accessible, if now less frequented.
All this comes across on The
Thicket, Grubbs' first post-Gastr
Del Sol album. There is a confident self-justification and purpose
here. His songs seem more contained now, more finalized. This
direction is well rooted: Grubbs
has always been an extremely
careful and controlled songwriter,
clearly evident in his earlier
Bastro days.
However, on first listen The
Thicket comes across as just so
even-keeled and overt that it is
almost dry. There are some very
nice songs, good instrumentation
and smart lyrics, but few real surprises. Perhaps my expectations
were too high, but with good reason. The brilliant Camofleur
neatly finalized Gastr Del Sol and
had ideas to spare. Jim
O'Rourke's Bad Timing, a virtual homage to John Fahey
and also his first postGastr Del
Sol album, was equally accomplished.  But I can appreciate
Grubbs' decision to pare down
his efforts. After the post-production heavy Gastr Del Sol, it must
be a relief to simply perform these
barely electrified songs more in
real time (and space).
The jaunty "Fool Summons
Train" and "Orange Disaster" are
pleasant and catchy and the
horns and snappy ending on
"Two Shades of Blue" more than
make up for Grubbs' usually
weak voice, while the brooding
then frenetic "Buried In The Wall"
greatly benefits from guest vocalist Mary Lass Stewart (my favorite
track). The spare and simple quality of these recordings is enduring (or endearing??) and time
spent in the latest version of Mayo
Thompson's The Red Krayola
also seems to be an influence
(with fine result).
To be fair, The Thicket is
slowly growing on me, but it
would take an active effort or a
committed fan-ish attitude to become lost within it.
Brady Cranfield
MICKEY HART
Planet Drum Supralingua
(Rykodisc)
Back in 1991, Mickey Hart of
the Grateful Dead gathered
together a number of renowned
drummers and produced an album called Planet Drum. It went
on, deservingly, to win a
Grammy. This album is an attempt to follow up on that success.
It again gathers together well-respected drummers and, as a
drum album it succeeds, but it
could have been more. The album actually comes with an additional EP that features remixes
of four songs off the first album
by such people as Loop Guru,
Jack Dangers of Meat Beat
Manifesto, and Richie
Hawtin Too often, though, the
technology added does not improve the drumming to any great
degree. Why couldn't the digital
drummers (remix artists) partake
in the recording with the analog
drummers? Now that would be
really neat.
Paul Kundarewich
PJ HARVEY
Is This Desire?
(Island)
PJ Harvey's minimal, raw
sound makes a sharp contrast
with one smooth production. The
style is still in keeping with her
usual, though, so if you like Polly
Jean, then you'll like Is This Desire?
JBS
JULIANA HATFIELD
Bed
(Zoo)
Welcome back to the world of
bubble-gum/candy-Hard-babe-
Rock and complacently critical
lyrics. Juliana Hatfield, one of
the influences in today's solo-
Womyn-Rock boom, is staying
true to her simple style of rock-
band trio of clear-cut drums, one
guitar and a bass. And when it
comes to lyrics, you can expect
the same consistent combination
of every-day realism ("clean up
my mess" — everyone's got a
dirty room, right?), personal re-
assertion in just-as-personal
problems, and mild philosophy
of the world. This album also
doesn't disappoint the masochist
in all of us by exploring, at a
cosmic level, the enjoyment of
"going down" (generally speaking) and the other's demise ("Live
it up").
Bed is a more personal album, filled wifh rhetorical dialogues, monologues of self-determination, and the classic Juliana
Hatfield "doo-dee-doo-dee" or
"la-la-la-la-la" (pay attention to
"Bad Day"). Altogether, J.H.
made Bed a good album, style-
consistent in every way, but it
leaves me confused as to what
albur
n lis)
strange, flashing memories of
high school melodrama and Reality Bites pizza nights (which I
supposedly attended).
Ciprian Gligor
JONNY L
Magnetic
(XL)
Jonny L's new album is tech-step
for those of us who want something more rich and deep than
Photek s carefully-controlled surgical drum V bass cuts. This is d
'n' b with soul. Passion is evident
throughout the album, even with
the futurist organ stabs and floating synth lines. Among the
stylings of skyscrapers there exists a hypersense of further emotive properties beyond Photek's
minimal psychosis. "Accelerate"
features Lady Miss Keir of Dee-
lite fame. Although I can testify
that the nice Lady can't spin worth
a moose trying to produce the
four horsemen of the Apocalypse
through intravenous copulation
with a squirrel, she still has a mystical vocal quality that works well
with the calculated "break/stop"
rhythms and industrial clankings
and honkings of the traffic light
bassline Jonny L works into the
track. More dabbles into sonic
experimentation are heard on
such tracks as "PBX" and "See
Red," which reminds me of 12"
projects by Seba & Lotek.
Jump-up also gets a shout on
this album in a collaboration with
Silvah Bullet on "20 Degrees,"
which, although proficient, is
nothing special. This could be
seen as a more original adaptation of a style or a track which
doesn't necessarily work.
When all is said and done
and the speakers are on, turntable platter spinning, and the dj
max'n the wax, I think the feeling of the album is most easily
captured in the last track, "Vain,"
with its female wafting vocals
soothing the soul and Jonny L's
programming hurting the feet.
MAD CADDIES
Duck and Cover
(Fat)
Hmm. Maybe there really is
something to this ongoing revival
of horn-based music. The Mad
Caddies were even upgraded
from 2nd string Honest Don's to
full-on Fat status. And they deserve it. This is a really good album. At times I was blown away.
Super high energy. Super cool horn riffs. Mostly. This sort of thing
is kind of getting repetitive. Think
of it as something in between the
Voodoo Glow Skulls and
your typical Hellcat Records release. I've now stopped listening
to it, but there's still some really
cool stuff on this.
Dave Tolnai
RUSSELL MALONE
Sweef Georgia Peach
(Impulse)
I have not disliked a single album from Impulse. And the music from Russell Malone
makes me happy. You may have
heard his music before if you listen to the Diana Krall Trio His
guitar is sophisticated and fun
and adventuresome in a mature
way. His recording mates, Ron
Carter on bass, Kenny Barron on
piano, Lewis Nash on drums,
and Steven Koon, are impeccable. The whole recording has
such a positive vibe. It's a perfect late night record.
Paul Kundarewich
ASHOK MATHUR
Once Upon an Elephant
(Arsenal Pulp)
Although the exact chronology
of events is somewhat unclear,
the basic plot of this new book
seems to present itself through
the discovery near a river somewhere in present-day Canada of
a disembodied human head and
the headless body of a small elephant. As the story unfolds, the
question of "whodunnit?" gives
way to other questions such as
"what was actually done?" The
police seem to be missing an elephant head and a human body,
but because neither the elephant
nor the previous human head
owner seems to have disappeared from anywhere, the absence of the two complimentary
items is comparatively unremarkable. Less remarkable, certainly,
than the defense argument later
used which depends in part
upon the defendant being able
to catch from the witness stand
one juggling ball in each hand;
a feat itself remarkable only in
that it involves eight balls.
Clearly rooted in Hindu tradition, Once Upon an Elephant
lacks some of the tension of more
typical crime and courtroom dramatic novels, in that it is a bit of
a non-murder non-mystery. But,
upon abandoning such obvious
criteria, it is not difficult to find
a good deal of value in the humour of this book. Most of the
story is presented through brief,
personal accounts of the various
events provided by the judge,
the police officers, the lawyers,
members of the media, and the
"victim" himself, very much after the fact.
This book is very light reading and I can recommend it to
anyone who can accept the notion that, whatever else religion
is, it is, at times, funny.
Joshua C. Broyles
JANA McCALL
Jana McCall
(Up)
An impressive debut from an artist from the Pacific Northwest,
who finds herself among a stable of impressive artists on the
Up Records roster. There is a
dark, sombre and sad feel to this
album that lends well to the
dreamy and ethereal music,
which itself immediately draws
comparisons to such bands as
Lush, My Bloody Valentine
and other, for lack of a better
description, "shoegazers."
Jana McCall s haunting voice
and pain will reside in your mind
for a while after listening to this
record.
Steve Guimond
MK NAOMI
Archives
Don't go looking for this one in
stores, for as far as I know this
is only a promo of some of MK
Naomi's older, less trance-orientated projects. However,
along with other MK Naomi
material, it will soon be available by mail-order at http://
www.mknaomi.com. The CD itself is drippingly fantastic, with
well-worked Orb-ish ambient
dub pieces remnant of Orbvs
Terrervm. Those familiar with the
ambient dub sound may question this similarity. Remember,
though, that these tracks were
produced from 1 995-1997, the
same time period as Orbvs
Terrervm. Floating through my
mind are the drums of the first
track, "Extropia I," which showcases Naomi's harder, more tribal
roots, and the slow subtle beginning harmonics of Mancini. Cascading sound that pierces through
definition as the rain falls down,
down here in Vancouver ... and
probably also in Toronto, where
ex-Vancouverite MK Naomi now
resides. Check out http://
www.interlog.com/~mknaomi/
the_story.html for more information.
NINETY NINE
767
(Endearing)
Summary:  Suzanne Vega
sound-alike tried to be Bjork
sound-alike, while alternately
playing vibraphone against generic fuzz-guitar; though not necessarily desirable, an interesting
effect.
At the risk of coming off as a
forensic, perhaps if we examine
some songs, we might hypothesize some recurrent mechanism
whereby Lora Macfarlane creates this overall impression:
"Car Song" is short and
sweet, an ad-jingle for self-reliance, apparently. The words are
interesting, but difficult to follow.
"Vox" is one of those slow, self-
indulgent, slowly pumping, strum-
forever on-a-major-seventh-chord
songs. "Manga Girl Cut" sounds
like Tom Waits, but really short
and simple. "Dorsal" is a hit single for commercial airplay. No
joke. "Pavlov's Dog" is straight-
ahead indie rock. Why is it seemingly the only track that doesn't
use some kind of a bell? "Population 100 000" is another hit
single. No Joke. Lyrically self-destructive. The line about her doing a Ph.D. on Sonic Youth is
particularly telling.
My hypothesis: the project is
either over-introspective or under-produced, depending on
how you look at it. The lyrics are
too deep to maintain appropriate listener attention when sung
with a uniform lack of inflection,
and recorded with all the perspicuity of wallpaper. The artist
shows a great deal of promise
and if she chooses to develop
her range of expression before
making another recording, we
might all wind up kicking ourselves for not having snatched
up this collector's item.
Joshua C. Broyles
ORGY
Candyass
(Elementary)
Candyass is the latest attempt to
merge electronic music and hard
rock. While this has been done
before, Orgy's version is a bit
different. Whereas Trent
Reznor's NIN takes recordings
of the live band, chops it up on
a computer and then completely
reconstructs it into the final arrangement, Orgy has taken the
live band and only modified the
sound of some instruments,
mainly the guitars and keyboards. The result is that it
sounds fairly conventional.
While the songwriting is good,
the fact that it is not totally original and that the singer reminds
me too much of Marilyn
Manson, doesn't make me jump
and shout about this new band.
Don Bourassa
PUNCHBUGGY
My Norwegian Cousin
(Sour)
If you can get past the blatantly
sexist cover photo (scantily-clad
"Norwegian Cousin" doing the
laundry in a laundromat as the
band looks on), the music contained on this CD is
Punchbuggy's yummiest to
date.
Like fine wine, this band gets
better with age. The band has
been well-seasoned by extensive
North American touring between
albums; as a result, the musicianship (which now includes a full
horn section on a couple of tracks),
songwriting, and singing is tenfold better than on their last release, 1996's Grand Opening
Going Out of Business Sale. But
be prepared, Punchbuggy has
ditching its previous punk-pop
leanings in favour of a more '70s/
'80s-influenced rock-pop/new
wave flavour.
This four-piece is finally beginning to hit its stride. This is best
displayed in the mixed salad of
tunes such as the horn-garnished
"Smash It Up," the crunchy, driving "Around the Clock," and the
sizzling Trooper-esque lead-off
track, "Make It Up to You." Full of
chewy hooks and riffs and hearty
drum beats, My Norwegian
Cousin will keep you coming back
for seconds and thirds.
Mike Chilton
REEL BIG FISH
Why Do  They Rock So
Hard?
(Mojo)
It's about time. After a two year
period, Reel Big Fish has finally
released a full-length follow-up to
1996's Turn the Radio Off, and
it's just as hyper, if not more. Most
of the songs on this CD are brand
new, with the exception of "I'm
Cool," originally on the 1997 EP,
Keep Your Receipt, but now done
reggae-style rather than its original speedy, brassy style.
Reel Big Fish has attitude,
that's for sure. Or perhaps they
humor. But for some reason,
there are just so many lyrics expressing thoughts along the lines
of: "I'm a loser/ Nobody cares
for me..../You don't like me ...
you suck ... I suck .../1 don't care
.../I'm really cool.... Somehow,
they still manage to win me over
with their superficially happy
sounding, pumped-up ska with a
punk rock twist, despite their lame
lyrics. Maybe that's part of the
attraction — fans get a good kick
out of the words.
Some of my favorite tracks are
"Scott's a Dork," "I Want Your
Girlfriend To Be My Girlfriend,"
and "Thank You For Not
Moshing" — finally, someone has
written a song from the point of
view of a fan in the pit. Go out
and get yourself a copy of Why
Do They Rock So Hard and if
you've got real guts, check these
guys out live.
Jerome Yang
THE RHEOSTATICS
The Nightlines Sessions
(DROG)
This is recorded proof that David
Wisdom is indeed a dj/pro-
grammer/genius par excellence*.
The original broadcast of The
Rheostatics' Nightlines Sessions proved to be the last hurrah for its namesake show, but,
man, whatta way to go.
Listening to this scant 36-
minute-short session not only
makes me pine for the return of
Nightlines to the airwaves
(RadioSonic is a lacklustre alternative, unfortunately), but it also
makes one see what Mr. Wisdom
sees in the band. Quirky odes to
particular listeners of Nightlines
("The Pooby Song"), touching yet
still tongue-in-cheek love songs
("Baby, I Love You"), songs which
relay the stark realism of life
("Frank") and others that are all-
out flights of whimsy ("Henry's
Music Beard" and "Ugly Manhattan") reign supreme on The
Nightlines Sessions, much like
these qualities do on all of the
'Statics studio albums.
If you have never heard The
Rheostatics before, this is a good
primer. If you pine for those old
Nightlines weekends or simply
missed the last installment be-
;r the
death of Di and Dodi (which
weirdly coincided with the airing
of the final show), this is must
have souvenir. Nightlines, RIP!
Mike "Spike" Chilton
DUKE ROBILLARD
Stretchin' Out Live
(Stony Plain)
Stretchin' Out Live is the response to the requests Duke
Robillard has received for a
live album. For years, his live
audiences have been treated to
inspired jump-blues playing that
has not been present on his studio records. Recorded at
Richard's on Richard's in 1995,
this release has Robillard and
his band in fine form. The interplay between Robillard's electric guitar and Gordon Beadle's
tenor and baritone sax is amazing, especially on the longer
tracks. There are two tracks approaching ten minutes in length
and normally this can lead to
self-indulgent improvisation —
not so with this band. Unlike the
live version of "Freebird," the
Duke Robillard band keeps
things interesting by really listening to what the other
bandmates are doing and playing off of that. This is how live
blues is supposed to sound.
Don Bourassa
JULIE RUIN
Julie Ruin
(Kill Rock Stars)
Why not just a 7" record? It
would've made a good-7". The
'80s glam organ and adolescent vocals don't hold enough
appeal for an entire album.
Some of the songs are bad,
some are all right, but most are
pretty boring. Sometimes good
things can be done with a drum
machine and sometimes it just
makes it too easy for people to
JBS
SKINNY PUPPY
Remix DysTemper
(Nettwerk)
I must confess that I've heard
Skinny Puppy before and
might be likely to recognize SP
when I hear it, but this is the
first SP CD I've actually sat
down and listened to. What
I've noticed in general: I don't
normally turn my home stereo
up more than halfway, but this
CD sounds better the louder I
play it.
Each of the tracks is remixed
by some particular music-world
personality, some of whom I suspect may not be lifelong SP
fans. The results are variable in
extremity. "Killing Game" (the
Autechre "Bent" remix) has no
tempo or "beat" to speak of, no
evident pitch structure, or other
musically normative referents
other than something akin to an
arbitrarily articulated "phrase."
It is also refreshingly ungroovy;
the only track here immune to
dance interpretation.
"Love in Vein" (the
Neotropic "Go Girl Trio" mix)
features all the subtle-yet-juicy
harmonic enhancements my fellow Neotropic fans will recognize, making this track ironically
sweet and festive, at least in
comparison to pure SP. Let this
review serve to document that I
promise to buy more Skinny
Puppy CDs if they let Neotropic
do more of their mixing.
Other tracks are remixed by
Adrian Sherwood, Ken
"hiwatt" Marshall, Gunter
Schultz of KMFDM, Ogre and
Mark Walk, Rhys Fulber,
Chino, God Lives Underwater, Chris Vrenna, Guru,
and Josh Wink. Understandably, some are skinnier than
others, but all are puppy-flavoured.
Joshua C. Broyles
THE SLACKERS
The Question
(Hellcat)
The real question on my mind
was: will The Slackers' latest
release live up to the previous
two? After a long day of lectures, the time finally came to
answer the question. With my
greasy paws, I put the disc in
my stereo and prepared to pass
my judgment. It was not looking good; the first track,
"Manuel," just didn't cut it. With
the second track, things started
to look up: I'm a sucker for the
"Shuna-a-nuh."
The rest of the disc went the
same way, to my glee. This album has a Motown vocal feel
to it, and I like it. There is the
odd track that lost it a bit; but
that's OK, you can't win them
all. For the yet uninitiated, The
Slackers produce some of the
best new ska/rocksteady, with
a real traditional feel. So the
question has been answered:
The Slackers are still slacken'.
jayd
ELLIOTT SMITH
XO
(Dreamworks)
Good ol' Elliott Smith. He's a
good guy. If you've never heard
of him, he's the guy who played
at the Oscars for his work on
the Good Will Hunting soundtrack. XO brings us his usual
"urban folk," as I once heard it
described. This album boasts
more hi tech. production than
his previous one. It isn't just
Elliott singing and playing his
guitar any more, either. Now he
has more back-up musicians assisting him in his melodies.
All things considered, this is
a good, consistent piece of
work, still along the same lines
we expect from the old Elliott
Smith.
Katrina
SQUIRREL NUT ZIPPERS
Perennial Favorites
(Mammoth)
It's that swing thing that all the
hip kids have been listening to.
Plinky plonky banjo and bap
bap de bop horn sections. Passable Billie Holiday influence,
slow numbers (although I find
myself singing along meow
meow meow), frantic upbeat
group efforts like "The Ghost of
Stephen Foster," and even a
weirdo extended "art" number
about that favourite mythical
deep sea beast, the Kraken. I
was disappointed by the non-
sequitor-ical lyrics; better a
"Hidey Hidey Hidey Ho" than
"if ships were made of cellophane we'd all get stinking
drunk much faster," in my opinion. The packaging is nifty,
though, and if you buy it in the
stores, you get some CD-ROM
stuff which my promo copy
lacked. This album is listenable,
but not outstanding.
fiende CiTR dis' pix for the best of 1998
One Love
Fridays
8:3<M0am
1. Richard Buckner
Since
2. Whiskeytown
Stranger's Almanac
3. Superchunk Indoor
Living
4. Versus Two cents
Plus Tax
5. Son Volt Wide
Swing Tremolo
Tragic Animal
Stories
Tuesdays
11:30am-_pm
top 5 albums by bands
that broke up in '98
1. Bedhead Transaction
de Novo
2. Polvo Shapes
3. A Minor Forest
Inindependence
4. Ativin German Water
5. Roadside Monument
/ am the day of current
TASTE
Dead Air
Alt. Fridays
12.-00-3am
1. USA for Africa
"We are the World"
2. Queen "We are the
Champions"
3. Vangeus "Chariots
of Fire"
4. Helix "R-O-C-K You"
5. David Foster "Man
in Motion" [St. Elmo's
theme)
LlPGLOSS &
Cigarettes
Sundays
5:00-6pm
1. Rialto Rialto
2. St. Etienne Good
Humor
3. Manic St. Preachers
This is my Truth Tell me
Yours
4. Pulp This is
Hardcore
5. Massive Attack
Mezzanine
Caught in the Red
Fridays
6:30-8:30am
1. Andre Williams Silky
2. Murder City Devils
Empty Bottles, Broken
Hearts
3. Zeke Kicked in the
Teeth
4. ? & the Mysterians
Do you feel it Baby?
(Live)
5. The Makers
Psychopathia Sexualis
Vengeance is
Mine
Mondays
12:00-4am
1. 88 Fingers Louie
Back on the Streets
2. Frenzal Rhomb
Meet the Family
3. Strung Out
Twisted by Design
4. Less than Jake
Hello Rockview
5. Disgusteens
Nothing Personal 7"
The Chill-Out
Room
Sundays
12:00-?
top 5 songs
1. Faithless "Insomnia"
2. outkast "atliens"
3. Daft Punk "Revolution 909"
4. T.Q. "Westside"
5. Union State "The
One"
Breakfast with
the Browns
Mondays
8:00-11am
...  10  YEARS  AND
STILL  HOT DEAD ...
1. Francoize Breut
Francoize Breut
2. Perfume Tree Feeler
3. Adjusters Before the
Revolution
4. Various Orchestral
Party Act 2
5. Nils Petter Molvaer
Khmer
Live! At the
Hi-Hat!
Alt. Saturdays
10:00pm-1am
1. Godspeed you Black
Emperor F#A#°°
2. Glyn Styler Live at
the Mermaid Lounge
3. Arab Strap
Philophobia
4. The Make-Up In
Mass Mind
5. Doc Boggs Country Blues & His
Folkways Years
The Ether Table
Tuesdays
2:30-3:30pm
1. The Body Lovers
Part One of Three
2. MJ Harris &
Martyn Bates Murder
Ballads: Incest Songs
3. Various Theme:
Desire
4. Fetisch Park Alluvial
5. Various Interiors: A
Sentrax Corporation
Compilation
The Nooze
Fridays
5:00-5:30pm
1. Liz Phair
Whitechocolatespacegg
2. The Make-Up In AAass
Mind
3. Atom and his Package
4. Miles Davis Sketches
of Spain
5. Destroyer City of
Daughters
The
Onomatopoeia
Show
Thursdays
2:00-3pm
top 5 comics
1. Optic Nerve
2. Caffeine
3. Non
4. Action Girl
5. Oni Double
Feature
Ska-T's
Scenic Drive
Fridays
10:00am-12pm
1. The Adjusters Before
the Revolution
2. The Slackers The
Question
3. Dr. RingDing Ram
Di Dance
4. Gangster Politics
Gangster Politics
5. Various Ska United
Spike's Musical
Pins and Needles
Show
Wednesdays
9:00-10am
1. Len "Get Your Legs
Broke"
2. Jungle "Gunshy"
3. Cub "Oh Canaduh"
4. Grimskunk "La
Pistolera"
5. Tricky Woo "Teach
us American"
Love Sucks
Wednesdays
12:00-2pm
5 much admired recordINGS:
Plastikman Consumed
Noto Endless Loop
Edition
muslimgauze syringia
Gas Zaubergerg
Downpour Windstorms, Broken Microphones
Stand and Be
Cunted
Tuesdays
3:30-5pm
DJ Hancunt's top 5
coolest feminists
1. Bell Hooks
2. Angela Davis
3. Michelle Clinton
4. Pat Califia
5. Annie Sprinkle
Filibuster
Thursdays
10:00-11:30am
top 5 oppressed instruments (featured in
Filibuster)
1. Accordian
2. Banjo
3. Kazoo
4. One-string guitar
5. Your face
v_
Mary Tyler
Moore
Alt.Wednesdays
7:30-9pm
1. bis, live in New
Jersey
2. Bikini Kill The
Singles
3. discovering The
Go Gos
4. Ida Husik covering
The Jam's "Monday"
on Faith in Space
5. Little Red Car
Wreck Motor like a
Mother
22    Dec 9S/9m 99 CiTR
charts
WHAT'S BEING PLAYED ON
dec 98/jan 99 long vinyl
dec 98/jan 99 short
vinyl
1        murder city devils
empty bottles broken hearts     sub pop
1       disgusteens               nothing personal
longshot
2       spitfires
spitfires                                    sonic swirl
2       longstocking              will you stay?
k
3      icu
chotto matte a moment!                      k
3      various                      record number 2
magic teeth
4      mark
mark                                  independent
4      forbidden dimension   i kiss yer shadow
ship rec'd
5      various artists
cd sampler thingy      damaged goods
5       make-up/lung leg     split
southern
6      various artists
in their eyes                                    rhino
6      rondelles                   revenge
k
7       euphone
breaking parole                             hefty
7       ladies who lunch       everybody's happy ...
grand royal
8       mk naomi
tonkababy ep                    independent
8       franklin                       major taylor
tree
9       blonde redhead
in an expression of ...        touch & go
9       eric the red                life after tuesday
caulfield
10    jim carroll
pools of mercury                       mercury
10    juliedoiron/snailhouse do you remember ...
stereo-type
11     johnny favourite ..
holiday romance                     universal
11     tren brothers              gone away                sec
etly Canadian
12    pj harvey
is this desire?                                island
12    curse of horseflesh    the fuck you say!
ship rec'd
13    various artists
flaming cow disease                spawner
13    bangs                         maggie the cat
ten-in-one
14    rondelles
fiction romance ...   smells Hike records
14    rizzo                           shymaster
cher doll
15    front line assembly
monument                             roadrunner
15    capt. qitn                   i do
turducken
16    talvin singh
ok                                                island
16    the unameds              them and we
independent
17    slackers
the question                                  hellcat
17    kiss offs                      bottle blonde
peek-a-boo
18    belle & Sebastian
boy with the arab strap           matador
18    burning airlines         carnival/scissoring
de soto
19    julie ruin
julie ruin                             kill rock stars
19    small stars                  moths
up
20    electric frankenstein spare parts                                get hip
20    tight bros                  take you higher
ten-in-one
21 satan's pilgrims
22 mcface
not the green torn show       ceiling fan
23    exhaust
exhaust                             constellation
24    silver jews
american water                      drag city
favourite holiday tunes
25    beekeeper
beekeeper                               southern
discorder took an informal, random poll ...
26    cadallaca
introducing cadallaca                         k
the spinanes (den trawler) • elvis presley (i'll be home for christmas)
27    jad fair & yo la tengo strange but true                        matador
•    dr.    seuss                                               (you'r
e a mean one
28    jon spencer bx
acme                                       matador
mr. grinch)   •                                                  david bowie & bing
29    beck
mutations                                      geffen
crosby    (little                           ^.<vT^^       drummer boy) »nina
30    various artists
sampler            southern/tree/polyvinyl
simone (little boy                         P__||!r      b'Ue)
» brave combo
31     dillinger four
midwestern songs ...                hopeless
Irhestnutsl     •                **.I tamm^B^B\          vinrp
guaraldi (a
32    mojave 3
out of tune                                      4ad
rhniTif*.  hrnwn                  1^T___B____)         rhrktmn-*)   'porky
33    fireballs of freedom the new professionals                 empty
pia           (blue     rYWT       -TfflB*        christmas)   •  jose
34    stereolab
aluminum tunes                     drag city
feliciano (feliz                       ^^_H              navidad) •
35    refused
the shape of punk to come      epitaph
HOW THE CHARTS WORK .
The monthly charts are compiled based on the number of times a CD/LP ("long
vinyl"), 7" ("short vinyl"), or demo tape ("indie home jobs") on CiTR's playlist
was played by our djs during the previous month (ie, "Dec/Jan" charts reflect
airplay in November). Weekly charts can be received via e-mail. Send mail to
"majordomo@unixg.ubc.ca" with the command: "subscribe citr-charts"-»
dec 98/jan 99
indie home jobs
1       full sketch
sketchersize
2       tampax twin
swamp foam
3       bishop of battle
coldward & stormward
4       clover honey
three four
5       team strike force
lager + lime
6      sophistos
military surf magic
7      dreamy angel
laundromatte queen
8       fridge art tiara
untitled(?)
9       lamps
freedom drunk
10     leeches
donkey kong
11     capt. cook
i'm glad for you
12    the drove
he stinks
13    chick magnets
make-up girl
14    retreads
everybody wants something
15    destroyer
karen is in rome
16    mr ultra cool
mr ultra cool
17    kirby grips
mod boy
18    transvestimentals
incidental transvestimental song
19    touch & gos
campus radio boy
20    dixie's death pool
she rides a bike with an engine
what we
listened to ...
1    the aislers set
terrible things happen
2    pedro the lion
it's hard to find a friend
3    seaweed
actions and indications
4    the weakerthans
fallow
5    the butchies
are we not femme?
6    the halo benders
the rebels not in
7    rainer maria
past worn searching
8    julie ruin
s/t
9    helium
magic city
10 nick cave
the boatman's call
irtfrrnwj umt
b\j Jason txz SiIvcl
23 E^g£[I@Iffi On The Dial
SUNDAYS
ARE YOU SERIOUS? MUSIC 8:30AM-
12:00PM All of time is measured by
its art. This show presents the most
recent new music from around the
world. Ears open.
THE ROCKERS SHOW 12:0O-3KX)PM
Reggae inna all styles and fashion.
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE alt. 3:00-
5:00PM Real-cowshit-caught-in-yer-
boots country.
WIRELESS alt. 3*00-5KX)PM
QUEER FM 6.-00-8.O0PM Dedicated
to the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and
transsexual communities of
Vancouver and listened to by
everyone. Lots of human interest
features, background on current
issues and great music from musicians
of all sexual preferences and gender
identities.
HELLO INDIA 8:00-9*O0PM
GEETANJAU      9:00-10:00PM
Geetanjali features a wide range ol
music from India, including classical
music, both Hindustani and Carnatic,
popular music from Indian movies
from the 1930's to the 1990's, semi-
classical music such as Ghazals and
Bhajans, and 'also Quawwalis, folk
songs, etc.
THE SHOW lO*00PM-l:O0AM Strictly
Hip Hop — Strictly Underground —
Strictly Vinyl With your hosts
Checkmate, Flip Out & J Swing on
the 1 & 2's.
THE CHILL-OUT ROOM 01:00-
4:00AM DJ Clutch spins hip-hop. ..DJ
Decter spins techno. So chill out with
us. Have a nice day.
MONDAYS
BLUEGRASS FOR BREAKFAST 6:00-
8:00AM
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
8:15-11:00AM Your favourite brown-
sters, James and Peter, offer a savoury
blend of the familiar and exotic in a
blend of aural delights! Tune in and
enjoy each weekly brown plate special.
Instrumental, trance,  lounge and
ambience.
BLUE MONDAY alt.  11:00AM-
1:00PM
ECHOES FROM THE SUGAR CUBE
FACTORY   alt.    11:00AM-
1:00PM
SOUPE DU JOUR 1:00-3:00PM
Feeling a little french impaired?
Francophone music from around the
globe, sans Celine Dion.
THE MEAT-EATING VEGAN   3:00-
4:00PM I endeavour to feature dead
air, verbal flatulence (only when I
speak), a work of music by a twentieth-
century composer — can you say
minimalist? — ond whatever else
appeals to me. Fag and dyke positive.
EVIL VS. GOOD 4*00-5:00PM Who
will triumph? Hardcore/punk from
beyond the grave.
BBC WORLDNEWS SERVICE 5*00-
5:30PM
BIRDWATCHERS 5:30**O0PM Join
the Sports department for their eye
on the T-birds.
POLYFILLER alt. 6:00-7:00PM
MUSIC FOR ROBOTS alt 6:00-
7:00pm Viva la Robotica
Revolution. Estrogen-charged robots
on Planet Noiz.
HIP HOP HAVOC 7:00-9HX)PM
THE JAZZ SHOW 940PM-11O0AM
Vancouver's longest running prime time
jazz program. Hosted by the ever-
suave Gavin Walker. Features at 11.
Dec 14: Pianist/composer Herbie
Hancock from his early Blue Note
period. Hancock's second is called
"My Point of View" with guitaris t
Grant Green and tenor saxophone
heavy Hank Mobley.
Dec 21: Hancock's beautiful creation
Speak Like A Child.
Dec 28: Hancock with Inventions and
Dimensions.
Jan 4: The great soprano saxophonist
Sidney Bechet with boss trumpeteer
"Wild Bill" Davison.
Jan 11: Big band jazz with Stan Kenton:
Standards in Silhouette.
Jan 18: Piano giant Tommy Flanagan
Sunset ond the Mockingbird.
Jan 25: One of the most popular groups
in jazz in the 1950's led by baritone
saxophonist/composer    Gerry
Mulligan with Chet Baker.
VENGEANCE IS MINE    12:00-
4:00AM Hosted by Trevor. It's punk
rock, baby! Gone from the charts but not
from our hearts — thank fucking Christ.
TtJBSDAYS
THE MORNING AFTER SHOW 6:00-
8:00AM
THE CLASSICAL SHOW 8:00-
9:30AM Listen carefully as Johnny
B. brings you the classical music
show featuring Canadian composers,
amateur hour and more. Radio con
fuoco for the masses.
THIRD TIME'S THE CHARM 9:30-
11:30AM Torrid trashfock, sleazy
surf and pulsatin' punk provide the perfect
scissor kick to your head every Tuesday
morn. There's no second chance when
Kung-Fu is used for evil with drunken fist
Bryce. Klyaalll!
TRAGIC ANIMAL STORIES alt.
11:30AM-1:00PM Tales of puppy
love gone awry, and of baby ducks
crossing the street, all backed up by a
sad soundtrack of various inditnock
bands for your own enjoyment and
education. Cry in your beer, please.
COLONEL SANDER'S HIDEOUT
1:0O-2:30PM Canadiana trash rock
that you can pilot your Camaro to.
Chris and Jeff supply the rock, you
bring the Camaro.
ETHER TABLE 2:30-3:30PM
STAND AND BE CUNTED 3:30-
5:00PM DJ Hancunt urges women
to get down with their cunts while
listening to women in jazz, funk, rap,
soul, worldbeat, disco and beyond.
BBC WORLDNEWS SERVICE 5:00-
6:00PM
RADIO ACTIVE 5:30-6:00PM
Activism, issues and fucking up the
corporate powers that be. FLEX YOUR HEAD 6:00-8:00PM
Hardcore and punk rock since 1989.
http://flexyourhead.
vancouverhardcore.com/
SAREGAMA 8:00-9:00PM
Featuring traditional (classical, light
and folk) and contemporary South-
Indian music.
LA BOMBA 9:00-10:00PM La
Bomba (the bomb) explodes with the
best salsa and merengue, with your
papi DJ Papilicious.
WITCHDOCTOR HIGHBALL alt.
10:00PM-12:00AM Noise,
ambient, electronic, hip hop, free
jazz, Christian better living LP's, the
occasional amateur radio play,
whatever.
VENUS FLYTRAP'S LOVE DEN alt.
10:00PM-12:00AM Join Greg in
the love den for a cocktail. We'll
hear retro stuff, groovy jazz, and
thicker stuff too. See you here... and
bring some ice.
AURAL TENTACLES 12:00AM-VERY
LATE Warning: This show is moody
and unpredictable. It encourages
insomnia and may prove to be hazardous to your health. Listener discretion is advised. Ambient, ethnic,
funk, pop, dance, punk, electronic,
synth, blues, and unusual rock.
WEDNESDAYS
SUBURBAN JUNGLE 7:00-9:O0AM
A perfect blend of the sublime and
absurd, with your refined and exotic
hosts Jack Velvet and Carmen Ghia.
SPIKE'S MUSICAL PINS AND
NEEDLES 9:00AM-10:00AM
Spike spins Canadian tunes
accompanied by spotlights on local
artists. Weekly "Vintage Vancouver"
segment takes a look back at this
city's musical past.
BOTH SIDES 10:00AM- 12:00PM
Jose Luis discusses free trade and
other issues in the Americas.
LOVE SUCKS 12:00-2:00PM Music
at work. (Cut up mixed genres —
eclectic, electric included but not
mandatory).
AUDIO SPROCKET 2:00-3:00PM
MOTORDADDY 3:00-5:OOPM "eat,
sleep, ride, listen to Motordaddy,
BBC WORLDSERVICE 5:00-5:1 OPM
RACHEL'S SONG 5:10-6:00PM Info
on health and the environment. From
recycling and conservation projects to
diet, health, and consumption and
sustainability in the urban context.
SOLID STATE 6:00-7:30PM
Featuring the latest in techno, trance,
acid and progressive house.
Spotlights on local artists, ticket
giveaways, & live performances.
Hosted by M-Path.
AND SOMETIMES WHY alt. 7:30-
9:00PM barbara manning, the
make-up, cat power, sushi ... these
are a few of our fave-oh-writthings. la
la la!
MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW alt.
7:30-9:00PM Girl music of all
shapes and sizes.
FOIKOASIS 9*00-10:30PM Featuring
the latest local and international
releases in folk/roots/world music,
phone interviews, in-studio guests and
more. Requests always welcomed!
STRAIGHT OUTTA JALLUNDHAR
10:30PM-12KX)AMLetDJsJindwa
and Bindwa immerse you in radioac
tive Bhungra! "Chakkh de phutay."
Listen to all our favourite Punjabi tunes
— remixes and originals.
HANSKLOSS'MISERYHOUR 12:00-
4:00AM Mix of most depressing,
unheard and unlistenable melodies,
tunes and voices.
THURSDAYS
RADIO EUINIKATHIKO 6:30-8:30
AM Wake up to the sounds of Greece
with Elena and Niko.
REEL MUSIC 8:30-10:00AM
Soundtracks and classical.
FILIBUSTER 10:00-11:30AM
Part accordion-tinged musical
meanderings, part experiemental
weirdness, with a little bad hill blood
thrown in for good measure. This
show is a genre-free zone.
CANADIAN LUNCH 11:30AM-
1:00PM From Tofino to Gander, Baffin
Island to Portage La Prairie. The all-
Canadian soundtrack for your midday
snack!
STEVE&MKE 1O0-2O0PM Crashing the
bays' club in the pit. Hard and fast, heavy
and slow. Listen to it, baby, (hardcore).
ONOMATOPOEIA 2:00-3:00PM
Comix
IX oh
yah and some music.With Robin and
Jules.
BOMBSHELL alt 3:00-5:00PM
RHYMES AND REASONS alt 3:00-
5:00PM
COUNCIL CRAP 5:00-5:30PM
SHAPE UP alt 5:30-6:00PM
ENTERTAINMENT DESK alt. 5:30-
6:00PM Movie reviews and criticism.
OUT FOR KICKS 6r00-7:30PM No
Birkenstocks, nothing politically correct. We don't get paid so you're
damn rightwe have fun with it. Hosted
by Chris B.
ON AIR WITH GREASED HAIR 7:30-
9:00PM Roots of rock & roll.
UVE FROM THUNDERBIRD RADIO
HELL 9:00-11:00PM Local muzak
from 9. Live bandz from 10-11.
SLIPPERY SLOT alt. 11:00PM-
1:00AM One step beyond logic.
PLUTONIAN NIGHTS 1:00-
4:00AM Late nightvinyl. Occasional
skips. Cheers.
FRIDAYS
CAUGHT IN THE RED 6:30-8:30AM
Garage rock and olher things.
ONE LOVE 8:3O-10:O0AM Anything
and everything from the wonderful
world of music, as long as harmonies
can be sung, and the melodies be
SKA-TS SCENE-IK DRIVE! 10:00AM-
12:00PM Listen in to win a date with
one of the co-hosts!
THESE ARE THE BREAKS 12:00-
2:00PM DJ Splice brings you a
flipped up, freaked out, full-on,
funktified, sample heavy beat-lain trip,
focusing on anything with breakbeats.
Versatile at any style.
UTTUE TWIN STARS 2-OO-3:30PM
Underground, experimental, indie and
women. Jacuzzi space rock at its finest.
NARDWUAR THE HUMAN SERVIETTE PRESENTS... 3:30-4:00PM
NOIZ 4K»-5KX)PM self tided
BBC WORLDSERVICE 5:00-5:30PM
FAR EAST SIDE SOUNDS alt. 6:00-
9:00PM
AFRICAN RHYTHMS alt. 6:00-
9:00PM David "Love" Jones brings
you the best new and old jazz, soul,
Latin, samba, bossa & African music
from around the world.
HOMEBASS    9:00PM-12:00AM
Hosted by DJ Noah, the main focus of
the show is techno, but also includes
some trance, acid, tribal, etc. Guest
DJ's, interviews, retrospectives,
giveaways, and more.
UMP SINK alt. 12:00-6:00AM
Rant, phone-in and kiss your mother
with the guests.
DEAD AIR alt. 12:00AM-LATE
Exceptionally interesting girl talk.
SATURDAYS
THE SATURDAY EDGE 8:00AM-
12:00PM Studio guests, new
releases, British comedy sketches, folk
music calendar, and ticket giveaways.
8-9AM: African/World roots. 9AM-
12PM: Celtic music and performances.
ON THE CORNER 12:00-1:00PM
Julz spins classic experimental jazz
with forays into the lands of funk,
acid jazz and trip hop.
POWERCHORD 1:00-3:00PM
Vancouver's only true metal show;
local demo tapes, imports and other
rarities. Gerald Rattlehead and Metal
Ron do the damage.
LUCKY SCRATCH 3:00-5:00PM
From backwoods delta low-down
slide to urban harp honks, crooners
and tunesters in the blue degree.
Blues and blues roots with your hosts
Anna and AJ.
RADIO FREE AMERICA 6:00-
8:00PM Join host Dave Emory and
colleague Nip Tuck for some extraordinary political research guaranteed to
make you think. Originally broadcast
on KFJC (Los Altos, Cal.|.
LIVEI AT THE HI-HAT!! alt.
10:00PM-1:00AM "Sho nuff
bumpin'I "-Popular Music. Phone,
write or call for reservations. Dance
10 till 1. Admission $6.00.
PIPEDREAMs alt. 10:00-1:00AM
SOUL TREE alt. 1:00-4:30AM
EARWAX alt. 1:00AM- 4:30AM
Noiz terrorism cut thru raw rhythms/
as punk rock dissects Detroit
minimalism/my Motor City madness
runs tragic/my Jungle-ism spawns
breakbeat sporadics/while the
hardcore be open to these lyrics I
flash/Da truth will be found bound in
sounds/locked in my ears like
Earwax. Word. -Guy Smiley
REGGAE LINKUP 4:30-8:30AM
with Sister B.
WHOM
HOW
/V\BANWH\LB, IN RAQ\OLAND....
advertising thafs
built to last
Itook Space January 10
*jr| Artwork; January 26
*»    On the Streets: January Z9
SZZ-3017(ext.3) for info
25 nm&°Mmz Datebook.
AT'S HAPPENING IN DECEMBER & JANUARY
FRI DEC 11 CiTR PRESENTS SHINDIG! FINALS: Clover Honey,
Team Strike Force, Feisty@Starfish; Chris Isaak, Jude@Orpheum;
Deftones, Quicksand, Snapcase@Croatian Cultural Centre; Molestics
CD release party@Railway Club; Squeeze: A Duet for Musician and
Dancer@Cultch; Jon Moritsugu's Fame Whore@Blinding Light; Furios,
Chapter 3, High Test@Columbia; View New@Maindance (828 E. Hastings); The Lounge Cats, Splitting Adam@Pic Pub
SAT 12 Saturnalienation: one-day independent publishing extravaganza, presented by Small Press Action Network; all-day zine fair,
Lonesome Monsters, Deadcats in evening ($5)@Grandview Legion
#179 (2205 Commercial); 54-40@Whistler Conference Centre; Coop Radio Benefit: Pigment Vehicle, Soukous Rythyms, Solarbaby,
Motorama, Cathode Ray@Brickyard; Hissy Fit, Strong Like Tractor,
Chick Magnets@Railway; New Wave-Aoke@Starfish; Broun
Fellinis@Chameleon; Maxx Average Corporation, Rootes Group,
Disgusteens@Pic Pub; Squeeze: A Duet for Musician and
Dancer@Cultch; Video Rampage@Video In, Rock for Bread@Langley
Vineyard (5708 Glover Rd., Langley); View New@Maindance (828
E. Hastings); Blue Plate Special@Richard's on Richards
SUN 13 Ian Tyson@Cultch; Gone with the Wmd@Ridge; Jamie
Clark@Naam; Time Stands Still, Somewhere in _urope@Cinematheque;
The Preservatives@WISE Hall
MON 14 CiTR PRESENTS: The Hellacopters, Watts,
Spitfires@Starfish; Mediaeval Babes@Vogue; Slam & Funk
D'Void@Sonar; Rocksteady Ska@Gate; Saving Private Ryan@Ridge,
The Ducktape Platypus X-mas Special@Van Press Club
TUE 15 Tales of Ordinary Madness@Bukowski's; The Lion, The Witch
& The Wardrobe@Pacific Theatre; Martin Humphreys@Ryerson United
Church (W. 45th @ Yew)
WED 16 El-Vez@Starfish; Alexander Browne's Swing Pararde@Hot
Jazz Club; Sub-Terrain Magazine: Evening of Readings@Vancouver
Press Club; PC.P. Art Exhibit@Brickyard; Wayside, Salteens,
Tammybrimner, the Special Guests@Columbia
THUR 17 Unit 187, DSK, Punchdrunk, Caustic Thought@Starfish,
Billy Nasty (UK)@Sonar; Chinese Box, Raise the Red Lantern@Ridge,
Jon Moritsugu's Fame Whore@Blinding Light; Arthur Funkereli, Painted
Blank@Columbia
FRI 18 Veda Hille, Thermos@Railway; Strapping Young Lad, Random Damage, Wipeout, Vibrator@Starfish; Red Psalm, Ten Thousand
Suns@Cinematheque; Mike Hoolboom's Panic 8od/es@Blinding Light
SAT 19 Veda Hille, Thermos@Railway; Johnny Cash Tribute@Starfish;
The Abyss 315 E. Broadway (side entrance) 488 6219
Anderson's Restaurant (Jazz on the Creek) 684 3777
Anza Club 3 W. 8th (Mount Pleasant) 876 7128
Arts Hotline 684 2787
Bassix 217 W. Hastings (at Cambie) 689 7734
Backstage Lounge  1585 Johnston  (Granville Island) 687 1354
Black Sheep Books 2742 W. 4th  (at MacDonald) 732 5087
Blinding Light     36 Powell St. 878 3366
The Brickyard 315 Carrall St. 685 3978
Cafe Deux Soleils 2096 Commercial (the Drive) 254 1195
Cafe Vieux Montreal 317 E. Broadway (Mount Pleasant)     873 1331
Caprice Theatre 965 Granville (Granville Mall) 683 6099
Celebrities  1022 Davie (at Burrard) 689 3180
Cellar Jazz Cafe 3611 W. Broadway (downstairs) 738 1959
Chameleon Urban Lounge 801 W. Georgia (Downtown) 669 0806
Chan Centre for the Performing Arts 6265 Crescent Rd (UBC)
Club Mardi Gras 398 Richards St. 687 5007
CN Imax Theatre 999 Canada Place 682 4629
Columbia Hotel 303 Columbia  (at Cordova) 683 3757
Commodore Lanes 838 Granville  (Granville Mall) 681 1531
Cordova Cafe 307 Cordova  (Gastown) 683 5637
Denman Place Cinema   1030 Denman  (West End) 683 2201
Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Garden Main Hall 578 Carrall St. 662 3207
DV8 515 Davie (downtown) 682 4388
Firehall Arts Centre  80 E. Cordova  (at Main) 689 0926
Food Not Bombs Vancouver 872 6719
Frederic Wood Theatre (UBC) 822 2678
Garage Pub 2889 E. Hastings  (downtown) 822 9364
Gastown Theatre 36 Powell  (Gastown) 684 MASK
The Gate   1176 Granville (downtown) 688 8701
The Good Jacket 225 E. Broadway (at Main) 872.5665
The Grind Gallery 4124 Main  (Mt. Pleasant) 322 6057
26    Dec 98/9ak 99
SUBMISSIONS TO DATEBOOK ARE FREE!
TO HAVE YOUR EVENT LISTED, FAX ALL THE RELEVANT INFO (WHO, WHERE, WHEN) TO
822 9364, ATTENTION "DATEBOOK." DEADLINE
FOR THE FEBRUARY ISSUE IS JANUARY 15TH!
Lhasa@Vogue; Joey Keithley@Sugar Refinery; Saddleson
ers, Plantains@Columbia; Crash@Chameleon; Paperboys@Cultch;
Dance for Children of Poverty@Hot Jazz Club; The Black Market Babies, The Firecrackers, The Spitfires, The Catheters@Pic Pub
SUN 20 Holly Cole w/ Vancouver Symphony@Orpheum; The Falcons, Currenr@Cinematheque; Mike Hoolboom's Panic
8od/es@Blinding Light
MON 21 Holly Cole w/Vancouver Symphony@Orpheum; Rocksteady
Ska@Gate; Smoke Signals, S/am@Ridge
TUE 22 Holly Cole w/ Vancouver Symphony@Orpheum; DJ IZ (aka
Josh)@Chameleon; X-mas Odd/t/es@Blinding Light; Tales of Ordinary
Madness@Bukowski's
WED 23 The Lion, The Witch & The Wardrobe@Pacific Theatre; X-
mas Odd/t/es@Blinding Light; Duke of Medula, DD. Astors, Aqua
Velva@Columbia; Damien Azriel@Naam
THUR 24 Sonar X-mas@Sonar
FRI 25   IT'S CHRISTMASI
SAT 26 Spearhead@Richard's on Richards; Socratic Method, Vinyl,
Dog Eat Dogma@Columbia
SUN 27 Leesun@Naam; World's Best Commercials@Ridge
MON 28 Rocksteady Ska@Gate; World's Best Commerc/'a/s@Ridge
TUE 29 Tales of Ordinary MadnessOBukowski's
WED 30 The Lion, The Witch & The Wardrobe@Pacific Theatre; Slam-
Bam-Jam-a-Rama@Marine Club; Miriam Davidson@Naam; Team Strike
Force@Columbia; Urceus Exit@DV8
THUR 31 slide your eyes over to that black box to the right ...
FRI JAN  1 The Crust Brothers, John Ford@Starfish; The Lion, The
Witch & The Wardrobe@Pacific Theatre
SAT 2 The Lion, The Witch & The Wardrobe@Pacific Theatre
SUN   3   Scrambled   Angst@Sugar   Refinery;   World's   Best
Commerc/a(s@Ridge
MON 4 Vancouver Poetry Slam@Vancouver Press Club; Rocksteady
Ska@Gate
TUE 5 Tales of Ordinary Madness@Bukowski's; A Merry War, Withnail
and /©Ridge
WED 6 Slam-Bam-Jam-a-Rama@Marine Club; Happiness, Welcome
to the Dollhouse@R\dge
THUR 7 Dal Dii Vog, Naked For Jesus@Starfish; BY08@Blinding
Light
FRI 8 Superhero Shorfs@Blinding Light; Poison ldea@Starfish; Lawn
Dogs, Modulations@Ridge
SAT 9 Royal Grand Prix, Metronome Cowboys@Starfish
SUN 10 Superhero Shorts@Blinding Light
MON 11 Rocksteady Ska@Gate; Lawn Dogs, Modu/ations@Ridge
TUE 12 Cinema of Phil Hoffman@Blinding Light; Tales of Ordinary
Madness@Bukowski's
WED  13 Slam-Bam-Jam-a-Rama@Marine Club; Cinema of Phil
Hoffman@Blinding Light; M-Strain@Starfish
THUR 14 Birds and Buildings: the films of Patrick Halm@Blinding
Light
FRI  15 764-HERO, gaze@Starfish; Todd Verow's Little Shots of
Happ/ness@Blinding Light
SAT 16 Fryer Tuck@Starfish; The Imposters, Big Nighl@Ridge
SUN 17 Solo 2 Trio@Cultch; The Imposters, Big Nighf@R\dge
MON 18 Rocksteady Ska@Gate; Wizard of Oz, Big Ch///@Ridge
TUE 19 Tales of Ordinary Madness@Bukowski's
WED 20 Slam-Bam-Jam-a-Rama@Marine Club
THUR 21 Todd Verow's Little Shots of Happmess@Blinding Light;
Pecker, Cry 8aby@Ridge
: Nick Zedd@Blinding Light; Flamenco
FRI 22 Transgressive Cin
(premiere)@Ridge
SAT 23 Knock Down Ginger
SUN 24 Transgre
, Veal, Satsuma@Starfish
ia: Nick Zedd@Blinding Light
MON 25 Galactic Cowboys, Kings X@Starfish; Rocksteady Ska@Gate
TUE 26 Tales of Ordinary Madness@Bukowski's; Halifilms: new
shorts@Blinding Light
WED 27 Halifilms: new shorts@Blinding Light; Slam-Bam-Jam-a-
Rama@Marine Club
THUR    28    New(Cine)Works@Blinding    Light;    Flamenco
(premiere)@Ridge
FRI 29 Transgressive Cinema: Nick Zedd@Blinding Light; Strapping
Young Lad@Starfish; Velvet Goldmine, Boogie Nights@Ridge
VENUES • BARS • THEATERS • RESTAURANTS • RECORD STORES
Hollywood Theatre 3123 W. Broadway (Kitsilano)
Hot Jazz Society 2120 Main  (Mt. Pleasant)
It's A Secret 1221 Granville St. (downtown)
Jericho Arts Centre   1600 Discovery (Pt. Grey)
Jupiter Cafe & Billiards      1216 (near Deman St)
La Quena  1111 Commercial (the Drive)
The Lotus Club 455 Abbott (Gastown)
Lucky's 3972 Main
Luv-A-Fair  1275 Seymour (downtown)
Mars   1320 Richards (downtown)
Maximum Blues Pub  1176 Granville  (downtown)
Medialuna   1926 W. Broadway
Minoru Pavillion      7191 Granville (Richmond)
Moon Base Gallery 231 Carrall St. (gastown)
Naam Restaurant 2724 W 4th Ave (kitsilano)
Old American Pub 928 Main  (downtown)
Orpheum Theatre Smithe & Seymour  (downtown)
Pacific Cinematheque   1131 Howe  (downtown)
Palladium (formerly Graceland) 1250 Richards (downtowi
Paradise 27 Church  (New West)
Paradise Cinema  919 Granville  (Granville Mall)
Park Theatre  3440 Cambie  (South Vancouver)
Picadilly Pub 630 W. Pender  (at Seymour)
Pitt Gallery 317 W. Hastings  (downtown)
Plaza Theatre  881 Granville  (Granville Mall)
Purple Onion   15 Water St. (gastown)
Queen Elizabeth Theatre  Hamilton & Georgia
Raffels Lounge   1 221 Granville  (downtown)
The Rage 750 Pacific Blvd. South  (Plaza of Nations)
Railway Club 579 Dunsmuir  (at Seymour)
Richard's On Richards   1036 Richards  (downtown)
Ridge Cinema  3131 Arbutus  (at 16th Ave.)
738 3211
873 4131
688 7755
224 8007
251 6626
685 7777
875 9858
685 3288
230 MARS
688 8701
608.0913
738 7151
682 3291
665 3050
688 3456
688 2648
525 0371
681 1732
876 2747
682 3221
681 6740
685 7050
602 9442
665 3050
473 1593
685 5585
681 1625
687 6794
738 6311
Russian Hall 600 Campbell (Chinatown)
Scratch Records  109 W. Cordova  (Gastown)
Seylynn Hall   605 Mountain Hwy (North Van)
Shadbolt Centre for the Arts 6450 Deer Lake Ave. (Bby)
Singles Going Steady 3296 Main (at 17th)
Sonar 66 Water (Gastown)
Southhill Candy Shop 4198 Main  (at 26th)
Squish'd Knish 4470 Main (at 29th)
The Space 316 Hastings (downtown)
Starfish Room   1055 Homer (downtown)
Starlight Cinema 935 Denman  (West End)
Station Street Arts Centre 930 Station  (off Main)
St. Regis Hotel 602 Dunsmiur (downtown)
Stone Temple Cabaret  1082 Granville St. (downtown)
Sugar Refinery  1115 Granville (downtown)
Theatre E  254 E. Hastings  (Chinatown)
Thunderbird Ent. Centre 120 W. 16th St. (N. Van)
Vancouver E. Cultural Centre  1895 Venables (at Victoria)
Vancouver Little Theatre 3102 Main  (Mt. Pleasant)
Vancouver Press Club 2215 Granville (S. Grc
Varsity Theatre 4375 W. 10th  (Point Grey)
Vert/Washout   1020 Granville  (dowtown)
Video In Studios   1965 Main  (Mt. Pleasant)
Virgin Mega Store 788 Burrard (at Robson)
Vogue Theatre 918 Granville  (Granville Mall)
Waterfront Theatre   1405 Anderson  (Granville I
Western Front (303 E. 8th Ave)
Whip Gallery 209 E. 6th Ave (at Main)
W.I.S.E. Hall   1882Adanac (the Drive)
Women In Print 3566 W. 4th  (Kitsilano)
Yale Blues Pub   1300 Granville  (downtown)
Zulu Records 1869 W. 4th  (Kitsilano)
Hie)
874 6200
687 6355
291 6864
876 9233
683 6695
876 7463
879 9017
682 4171
689 0096
688 3312
488 1333
683 2004
681 8915
988 2473
254 9578
876 4165
738 7015
222 2235
872 2999
872 8337
669 2289
331 7909
685 6217
876 9343
874 4687
254 5858
732 4128
681 9253
738 3232  Clje Zulu Tomes
IT AINT OVER TIL ITS OVER ^
1998 CLOSES WITH A BANG I
VOLUME
AUSTAR
Self Connected,
Twice Elected cd
Fans of Land of the Loops and ICU probably already
know about these cute noisemakers. If not, well,
this fine second full-length is a great place to start.
Awkward in a good way, and with a fine sense of
humour, this is neat, lo-fi electronica at its best (and
we think the cute thing is probably a ruse). Lots of
catchy songs that get stuck in your head.
14.98 CD (sale)
PROPAGANDHI
Where Quantity
Is Job One cd
t:
much anticipated second release for the Winnipeg
based G-7 Records label, featuring a jam packed collection of hard to find material from this energetic and
politically focused punk band. Finish off your 1998 in
style with this urgent and thoughtful sonic blast!
12.98 CD (SALE)
I AM
SPOONBENDER
Sender/
Receiver cd
With the passing of Vancouver's legendary cub,
our good pal Robynn finally gets to demonstrate
her experimental rock side — and massive psychic
powers! Under the alias Cup, Robynn has joined
forces with highly skilled Can acolytes Dustin and
Brain, becoming I AM SPOONBENDER: a subconscious instrument/interface for deftly organized space
rock. Mo simple revival, I AM SPOONBENDER reorder
the past and present in cool ways. The human world
can only now hold them back. We dig the new sound
and obey. Recorded by that notorious Darryl Neudort.
14.98 CD (sale)
EXTENDED HOURS
THIS CHRISTMAS
SEASON
DECEMBER 15-23 OPEN TIL 9:00PM
DECEMBER 24 10:30AM-6:00PM
DECEMBER 25 CLOSED
9:00AM
■6:00PM
GOB
How Far
Shallow
Takes You cd
SHI
-spy
_E__j_j_WH[
■   u
Local punk rock noisemakers ring in the New
Year with lots of loud aggro-drunken cheer.
16 songs that have garnered these young lads
loads of attention both around the city and now
throughout the States! Check them out now
before they hit the high road with the likes of
Rancid, Drop Kick Murphy's and more!
16.98 CD (sale)
PIANO
MAGIC
BlissedOut
Vol. 13. CD
PIANO MAGIC'S spare nautically inspired
works nicely fade in and out with easy,
pleasant tones and melodies. Amidst such
careful beauty, the challenge is not succumbing
to sleep. Hmmm, on second thought, this holiday season, why not put PIANO MAGIC on and
chill totally out. Oh yes, this latest edition of the
Darla Records' Blissed Out series certainly well
fits the bill. Give in.
16.98 CD (sale)
.-/;.•:■.
Various
SAMPLING THE FUTURE cd
Boy can the kids dance nowadays! Offering a broad
cross-section of contemporary US and UK club
beats, this new Thrive Records compilation ought to
please both the seasoned and beginner electronica
enthusiast. Featuring mixes by Underworld, Bentiey
Rhythm Ace, Dub Pistols and more. Isn't it time we all
gave these new dances a try? Or even better yet, let's at
least come up with some colourful names for them!
16.98 CD (SALE)
HELLACOPTERS
Payln' Dues cd
Super Shitty To
The Max cd
Awesome, these guys rock so
tough and heavy that we're
putting both of these massive titles ; ""^||
on sale. No kidding, we think          f--*M.
they're the hardest act around,        ^--fi'      ■
they're from Sweden, and we're      '***'■'«■» .'iil.x..*. i
totally scared of them. They're fucking terrifying.
Supposedly, the singer used to be the drummer in the
grind-core metal band Entombed. The drummer, damn
it! Not to say too much, but Iggy also used to be a
drummer. All right! Rock is coming back, man!
16.98 each CD (sale)
SEASONAL SOUNDS
A SELECTED REVIEW OF SOME COOL YULE FOR Y'ALL
BOOKER T& THE MGs In the Christmas Spirit
$16.98 CD (IMPORT)
JAMES BROWN Funky Christmas $24.98 CD
(IMPORT)
JOHNNY CASH Personal Christinas Collection
$16.98 CD (IMPORT)
BOBBY DARIN The 25th Day Of December $16.98
CD (IMPORT)
JOHN FAHEY Christmas Guitar $24.98 CD
(IMPORT)
ELLA FITZGERALD Wishes You A Swinging
Christmas $16.98 CD
VINCE GUARALDI TRIO A Charlie Brown Christmas
$20.98 CD
BORIS KARL0FF How the Grinch Stole Christmas
$12.98 CD
ETTA JAMES 12 Songs of Christmas $17.98 CD
ARTHUR LYMAN With A Christmas Vibe $14.98 CD
(IMPORT)
LOUVIN' BROTHERS Christmas With the Louvin'
Brothers $20.98 CD(IMPORT)
MOJO NIXON Homy Holidays $20.98 (IMPORT)
BUCK OWENS Christmas With Buck Owens $18.98
CD (IMPORT)
PARTRIDGE FAMILY A Partridge Family
Christinas Card $18.98 CD (IMPORT)
JIMMY SMITH Christmas Cookin' $18.98 CD
(IMPORT)
SQUIRREL NUT ZIPPERS Christmas Caravan
$19.98 CD
VANDALS Christmas with the Vandals $20.98 CD
(IMPORT)
VENTURES Christmas Album $20.98 CD
(IMPORT)
Various HAPPY BIRTHDAY BABY JESUS $29.98.
2CD (IMPORT)
Various HARDCORE HOLIDAY $20.98 CD
Various HAVE YOURSELF A JAZZY LITTLE
CHRISTMAS $16.98 CD
Various HIPSTER'S HOLIDAY $22.98 CD (IMPORT)
Various JUST SAY NOEL $19.98 CD
Various PUNK ROCK CHRISTMAS $19.98 CD
(IMPORT)
Various REGGAE CHRISTMAS $16.98 CD
Various SANTA'S GOT A GTO $20.98 CD (IMPORT)
Various YOU SLEIGH ME $22.98 CD (IMPORT)
Various YULE BE BOPPIN' (BLUE NOTE) $19.98 CD
TOPTENSREVEALED!
NEW POLLING DATA JUSTIN f
BRADY
2. ARAB STRAP Philophobia
3. BEANS Portage
4. REFUSED The Shape 01 Punk To Come
5. STARS OF THE LID . JON MCCAFFERTY Per
Aslera Ad Aslra
6. PLASTIKMAN Consumed
7. SLICKER Confidence in Dubber
8. TIED AND TICKLED TRIO Tied And Tickled Trio
JOEL R.L. PHELPS The Downer Trio EP
BEDHEAD Transaction De Novo
CAT POWER Moon Pix
ARAB STRAP Philophobia
BEANS Portage
Soundtrack BUFFALO 66
VERSUS Two Cents Plus Tax
BOXHEAD ENSEMBLE The Lasl Place To Go
MIRANDA JULY The Binet-Simon Test
10. THE AISLERS SET Terrible Things Happen
10. KOTO LOOPS: Infinity Edition (vinyl only)
CHRISTINE
1. SAINT ETIENNE Good Humor
2. PULP This Is Hardcore
3. RIALTO s/t
4. AIR Moon Safari
5. FANTASTIC PLASTIC MACHINE By Fantastic
Plastic Machine
6. DIVINE COMEDY Fin Oe Siecle
7. MONO Formica Blues
8. SERGE GAINSBOURG Histoire De Melody
Nelson (reissue)
9. DAVID HOLMES Essential Mix 98/01
10. Various ULTRA CHICKS VOL. 3 BABY POP!
GRANT H.
1. MARKHOLLIS Ma r* Hoi lis
2. GODSPEED YOU BLACK EMPEROR F# A#
Infinity
3. BEDHEAD Transaction De Novo
4. REFUSED The Shape Ot Punk To Come
5. SHUDDER TO THINK High Art (soundtrack)
6. CAT POWER Moon Pix
7. PINETOP SEVEN Rigging The Toplights
8. PJ HARVEY Is This Desire?
9. ARAB STRAP Philophobia
10. BLONDE REDHEAD In An Expression Of The
Impressionable
NIC
1. ARAB STRAP Philophobia
2. BELLE a SEBASTIAN The Boy W
ire You Becomes You
NAOMI Playback Singers
REFUSED The Shape Of Punk To Come
ROCKET FROM THE CRYPT RFTC
P.W. LONG WITH REELFOOT Push Me Again
SLOAN Navy Blues
TRICKY WOO T he Enemy Is Real
JAMES BROWN Say II Loud Say It Prou
I 08.26.68
CALEXICO The Black Light
MORCHEEBA Big Calm
H H
HIS NAME IS ALIVE FI. Lake
MONEY MARK Push The
BOBBY CONN Rise Upl
BEASTIE BOYS Hello Nasty
BECK Mutations
LUCINDA WILLIAMS Car
Wheels On A Gravel Road
AIR Moon Safari
JLIE
ARAB STRAP Philophobia
3. JUNE OF 44 4 Greal Points
4. PEDRO THE LION It's Hard To Find A Friend
5. MURDER CITY DEVILS Empty Bottles
SHAHERA
1. HOLLY GOLIGHTLY The Good Things
2. TRICKY WOO The Enemy Is Real
3. BOBBY CONN Rise Upl
4. MURDER CITY DEVILS Empty Bottles
5. THE SMUGGLERS Growing Up Smuggler
6. PULP This Is Hardcore
The Inexpressionable
THEA
1. BELLE & SEBASTIAN The Boy With The
Arab Strap
2. Soundtrack BUFFALO 66
3. BLONDE REDHEAD In An Expression Of
The Inexpressionable
4. BEDHEAD Transaction De Novo
5. BOXHEAO ENSEMBLE The Last Place To Go
6. TINOERSTICKS Donkeys 92-97
8. DO MAY SAY TH
9. ICU Chotlo Mi
10. FLIN FLON s/t
( s/t
10. GET-UP KIDS 4-MinuteMile
KEVIN
1. PERNICE BROTHERS Overcome By Happiness
2. BILLY BRAGG * WILCO Mermaid Avenue
3. HELLACOPTERS Payin' The Dues
4. APRIL MARCH & LOS CINCOS  s/t
5. TRICKY WOO The Enemy Is Real
6. SHUDDER TO THINK First Love, Last Rites
(
7. t
BOXING DAY
AT ZULU?
Our continuing story:
After much speculation,
a detailed announcement will
be made in the pre-Christmas
issues of the Georgia Straight
and Terminal City magazines.
"Read for details, and see you
here," is the quote that best
sums it up!

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