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  chameleon
*
^gmjjji Features
Praxis
Cherry Ice Cream Smile
Solex
Murder City Devils
Looking Back _,.
July,  1_>8<6
editrix: miko hoffman
art director: ken paul
ad rep: kevin pendergraft
production manager:
tristan winch
graphic design/layout:
kenny, randal mindell
production: cato
pulleyblank, richard folgar,
anna friz, ann goncalves, erin
hodge, malcolm van deist,
katrina mcgee, christa min,
randal m, siobhan
mccracken,
photography &
illustrations: jason da
silva, ted dave, richard f,
rachael kozak, katrina mcgee
contributors: barbara a,
julie c, bryce d, greg e, trevor
f, noah g, patrick g, damon
h, anthony k, christa m,
megan m, siobhan mc,
nardwuar, ken p, girish r,
dave t
programme guide:
namiko kunimoto
charts: julie colero
datebook: tristan
distribution: matt steffich
us distribution: tristie
discorder on-line: malcolm
publisher: linda scholten
Columns
Printed Matters
Basslines
Kinetoscope
Vancouver Special
Seven Inch
Under Review
Real Live Action   j
On The Dial
Charts
July Datebook
Comics
Botched Ampallang
Good Tasty Comic
9
10
4
4
4
5
5
13
14
16
18
19
14
Cover
Pushing the limits of computer communications, THIS MONTH'S COVER
WAS ACCOMPLISHED WITH THE TEAMWORK of Rachael Kozak
(centrespread star of our women's
issue, march '98) and Ken Paul.
© "DiSCORDER" 1998 by the Student Radio Society of the
University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation 17, 500.
Subscriptions, payable in advance, to Canadian residents are
$15 for one year, to residents of the USA are $15 US; $24
CDN elsewhere. Single copies are $2 (to cover postage, of
course). Please make checks or money orders payable to
DiSCORDER Magazine.
DEADLINES: Copy deadline for the August issue is July 15th. Ad
space is available until July 22nd and can be booked by calling
Kevin at (604) 822-3017 ext. 3. Our rates are available upon
request. DiSCORDER is not responsible for loss, damage, or any
other injury to unsolicited manuscripts, unsolicited artwork (including but not limited to drawings, photographs and transparencies), or any other unsolicited material. Material can be submitted on disc (Mac, preferably) or in type. As always, English is
preferred.
From UBC to Langley and Squamish to Bellingham, CiTR can be
heard at 101.9 fM as well as through all major cable systems in
the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ
line at 822-2487, our office at 822-3017 ext. 0, or our news and
sports lines at 822-3017 ext. 2. Fax us at 822-9364, e-mail us at:
citrradio@mail.ams.ubc.ca, visit our web site at http://
www.ams.ubc.ca/media/citr or just pick up a goddamn pen and
write #233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, BC, CANADA V6T 1Z1.
Printed   In Canada W
GREAT FOOD,
GREAT PLACE.
COME CHECK US OUT!
STOP BY FOR
DINNER, DESSERT, OR
SOMETHING TO DRINK.
AS THE SUMMER NIGHTS
GET LONGER SO
DO OUR HOURS...
NOW OPEN
8 AM TO 10 PM
MONDAY TO FRIDAY
9 AM TO 8 PM
SATURDAY/SUNDAY
GREAT BREAKFASTS SERVED
UNTIL 2 PM ON WEEKENDS
X
THE       XENDU
RESTAURA
&    LICENSED    P
[HIPS  £\<3tfQ®KI
©QD\J1  a   BQ©
t?Q0iS__
©LULL©   QQDLP
S@(3(3S£2
GOOD OLD STANDBY-ALWAYS FUN, ALWAYS DEPENDABLE-THE PIT!
THE STUDENT UNION BUILDING • 6138 SUB BLVD. Printed
Matters
BY GREG ELLIOTT
ARTURO PEREZ-REVERTE
The Club Dumas
(Vintage)
NORMAN DAVIES
Europe: a history
(Pimlico)
The World Cup beckons, so I'll
keep these brief.
Demonology, Dumas, and
drink. These are three preoccupations of Arturo Perez-
Reverte's protagonist, Corso.
Assigned by his friend, Ponte, to
ascertain the authenticity and
lies a scant second away from
perfection.
Consistency is not a flaw, yet
of c
ript
chapter of Dumas' The Thre
Musketeers, and by a wealthy
collector of the occult to decipher the riddle behind a 17th-
century Venetian book for summoning the devil, he finds himself embroiled in intrigue, deception, and murder. Then
there's a strange young woman
with indecipherable green eyes
who seems to be following him.
From such a fecund field comes
this unripe banana of a book.
Admittedly, slightly green bananas are the best kind, whether
metaphorically or literally, to
whet the appetite and to cleanse
the palate. This work, however,
Basslines
— maybe as a result of my ignorance of Dumas's The Three Musketeers — this novel falters. Being a mystery, there are elements
necessarily missing. Perez-
Reverte's language, even in translation, is concise yet vivid. There
is the impression, though, that this
is primarily an intellectual exercise rather than a piece of fiction.
The characters are occasionally limp, as if they have become
stereotypes of themselves.
Through his knowledge, connections, and conniving, Corso is
believable as a mercenary book-
trader, but is rather flat in his motives. His superficial friend Ponte
— who desires only sex and
profit — is more fully formed
than his compatriot. Even the
mysterious and young Irene
Adler is better grounded. Corso
lacks passion and repulsion. Perhaps fonder memories of another
much longer adaptation —
Joyce's Ulysses — colour my impressions. Still, it is a very good
It takes true intestinal fortitude, beyond that of most historians, to attempt the difficult and
controversial task of describing
o
BY Dl NOAH • dinoah@direct.ca
Do you remember what
it was that first seduced
you into the world of
electronic music? Was it the innovative sounds of Kraftwerk
and Brian Eno in the '70s?
Was it the acid house anthems
of Stakker Humanoid and
Acid Tracks in the '80s? Was
it the percussive energy of UR
and The Prodigy in the early
'90s? Whatever the case may
be, chances are that some of
you are feeling like things have
gotten a little stale.
The reason is that the music
that lured you in was new and
completely different from what
you were listening to. There was
something enticing and hypnotic about "electronic" music
in general that captivated you.
It was fresh, new, unadulterated
and innocent. It was a whole
new direction in music that
seemed limitless, especially with
the aid of computers.
For a while, that was the
case. Track after track of
groundbreaking music was being pressed and distributed
,4     July 1998
around the world and along
with the interest in the music
came the emergence of the dj
as an artist in his or her own
right. Then music started to decay slowly and before you
knew it, three years or so had
gone by, along with your interest in what drew you into the
scene.
The solution is not to look
back at what was and try to rekindle it, but to go forward and
explore new territory. It was the
mystery of unfamiliar music that
hooked you in the first place,
so to feel that way again you
have to open your ears and
minds and explore new territory. Stop thinking about that
"photo" of a point in time and
start taking new "pictures."
One ambassador of the future is CAIPIRINHA MUSIC
(www.caipirinha.com), an intense ray of sunshine on a darkening planet. Caipirinha, based
out of New York City, is dedicated to exploring German
electronica, as well as other musical evolutions. Releases this
year include 2 by UMO (Unidentified Musical Objects) and
Teenage Secretby Kerosene.
UMO is an electronica
supergroup comprised of Adel
Dior, Jammin' Unit, Khan, DJ
Terrible, and Kerosene, and are
dedicated to expanding their
musical abilities, which is evident on their mind-bending album 2. Kerosene (Roger
Cobernuss) brought his interest
in downbeat and dub to the
group and his own release,
Teenage Secret, is an explosion
of rhythmic infection with characteristics of lounge, crime jazz,
trip hop and techno (whatever
definition you want to use for
this word!).
This is just one of the many
labels that proudly bring you the
future today. The question is, do
you step into the photograph
taken when you first got into the
scene (remember that photos
deteriorate over time), or do you
add more photographs to your
album and create more memories? In the end, the choice remains yours and yours alone.*
the history of Europe in a single
volume. With about 1200 pages
(nearly 1400 with appendices),
Davies makes a truly admirable effort. Though striving to remain aloof from Eurocentrism -
which Davies defines as the belief that European civilization,
whatever that is, is fhe civilization — he falters, but slightly, in
the introduction. He does not,
however, stress the traditional
big bastards (male and female)
of history approach, but brings
in elements of chance and social
movements. Above all, it is the
style of this beastie that ought to
be applauded.
Davies places his audience
directly into the environment of
the times, with intelligent writing
that most students would do well
to emulate. While seeming to enthuse on certain societies, he
ably portrays both sides of the
question — forming his opinion
with seeming objectivity. Another
achievement is his use of capsules for concepts that require
further elaboration. These are
identified by square brackets
with the term or phrase in bold
small capitals, a technique reminiscent of hypertext within a
website. The capsules permit the
reader to see the development
of certain institutions or ideas
throughout history and outside of
national distinctions. Petty complaints aside, this work is an
ideal primer for any armchair
historian eager to comprehend
European history.•
wunmamM
MOUNTAIN BIKES
ROAD BIKES
BMX
SKATEBOARDS
IN-LINE SKATES
738-7734
I CLOTHING
LOTS OF BIKE PARTS
ACCESSORIES
NOVELTY ITEMS
I REPAIRS TO ALL MAKES
2255 WEST BROADWAY
Kinetoscope
IMy last column was attributed to some fellow
named AJ. I'm not sure
2 A couple of summers ago,
I was employed by a retail establishment on Robson Street. One night, I was working at the front counter when, all
of a sudden, there was a commotion outside on the street,
up to the counter screaming,
"CALL THE POLICEI CALL THE
POLICE! FOR THE LOVE OF
GOD, CALL THE POLICE!" I
asked her what the problem
was and she just yelled back,
"JUST CALL THE POLICE,
THEY'RE ROBBING THE
BANK!" She pointed out the
window and said, "LOOK!" I
looked out and witnessed a
number of men bolting out of
a hotel, wearing balaclavas
and brandishing weapons. As
pedestrians huddled on the
sidewalk in fear, the culprits
Moments later a couple of
cops on bikes showed up in
hot pursuit. I called the police
and handed the phone over to
the woman so that she could
provide an eyewitness account
of the robbery. When she was
done, another eyewitness
came up and gave his account
of the event. Minutes later, a
couple of police cars came flying by. Within a few more minutes, the scene on the street
had settled down somewhat -
the action seemed to have
moved elsewhere. Things returned to normal. Fifteen minutes later, I had nearly put the
robbery out of my mind when
the phone rang. It was the po-
formed that the "robbery" had
actually been a film shoot. The
crew had failed to get authori-
A couple of weeks ago,
^o cinemas here in Vancou-
*>r were subject to armed
ibberies within days of each
■her—one of these cinemas
as robbed two days in a
*w(l).
3 THE BUTCHER BOY
The latest from Neil Jor
dan is an incredibly dark
- sometimes even blue-black -
>medy of sorts. It's one of
■  fil,
,  thai
) shoe
*ch a s
it, but had evidently
decided to proceed with the
scene anyway (one can just imagine the chain of foul-ups and
rationalizations that led to
such a decision). It was only
after I got off the phone that I
realized there was no bank
across the street.
nfortably between
affection/empathy and utter
disgust for its central character. The film also situates its
viewer uncomfortably between settings which are realist, maybe even naturalist,
and settings (its domestic settings) which are warped,
over-saturated, and terribly
claustrophobic. There's also
an interesting use of an apocalyptic/Cold War/nuclear age
subtext, which serves to unite
the film's religious themes, its
socio-historical setting, its chaotic tempo, and its cruelty and
brutality.*" Vancouver
Special
things over and over again.
The end result is almost spook-
ily pleasant and often soothing, although I wonder if I
might feel differently if I managed to make out the lyrics
... Even in the increasingly
crowded field of girl-con
electronica, this EP can indeed hold its own.*
THE JONAH STONE
Kicking at the Smoke
(PEG Music)
The Jonah Stone live in
Winnipeg, yet were good
enough to send this earnest
CD all the way to us at
Discorder. After all their trouble, though, this is the kind
of band that probably won't
get much campus radio
airplay. Their music sounds
more like what the major labels might consider to be
"indie" and "alternative,"
while to me it sounds awfully
slick. Songs like "Something's
Happened Here" and "I Will
Know This By Heart" repeat
their respective pop hooks
until you can't help it, you
have to sing along, no matter
how much you may try to resist the controlled angst of the
singer's voice, the thoughtful
lyrics, the squeaky-clean production, and the goatees on
the CD cover. I don't mean to
be nasty. This would sound
great on commercial radio
and would be a great change
from The Crash Test Dummies, The Tragically Hip,
and so many of the other guy
bands that get played to
boost the CanCon numbers
out there on the "rock" stations. Go get 'em, big time
talent scouts!
THE ELECTROSONICS
Rampion EP
(Drive-In)
From the Grand Rapids, Michigan label that has brought us
such sweet and sour pop as Super Falling Star, The Cat-
Miaow, and The Steinbecks,
here's the second CD from Vancouver's own hard-working
Electrosonics. Just in case
you love or hate this sort of
thing, I feel obliged to tell you
that the cover art is all taken
from Beatrix Potter's Squirrel
Nutkin (a children's book
where a squirrel's pride leads
him to an ugly run-in with a
grumpy old owl), although the
somewhat psychedically al
tered versions of the images
that appear here put a slightly
different spin on those childhood memories. It's this spin
rather than the famous squirrel himself that hints at the
contents: Wish You Were
Here-era Pink
Floyd    and
^v^.r^ng'TP vw/a ^.t?j^
Book: July 22 * Streets: July 31
Book: August 19 * Streets: August 28
Call Kevin @ 822-3017 exl. 3 for info
7
inch
laire and her favorite
I alter-ego now being
^^^ menial stiffs in the
rambunctious yet repetetive
service industry, let's all of us
sing a few choruses of the
Internationale in their honour.
Don't know the words? Make
them up as you go along.
Britain's PRIMADON-
NAS specialize in evil-wave
disco punk (eyeliner included).
The music is synthesized, the
lyrics are horror-movie (Rosemary's Baby, The Omen), and
the trousers — well, the trousers are just amazing. It frequently seems as if they are
trying to enjoy some of the
perks of goth without losing
any "cred" in the indie/punk
world. A delicate balancing
act and, apart from Otto
Matik's dreadful yappy voice,
they do it quite well. I would
recommend a little less sarcasm and a little more flounce.
(Peek-A-Boo, PO Box 49542,
Austin, TX, 78765)
Crust/grind? Grind/crust?
Can't tell the difference, don't
r^■.-.■■■■•■ <m-?>:    .   v
BY THE INVISIBLE CLAIRE
know if it matters. Damaging
eardrums all the way from the
frozen wastes of Hokkaido, Japan, YOUTH ENRAGE are
probably grind, though there
may be a dash of (or more than
a dash of) crust somewhere in
the mix. I believe the lyrics are
in English, but it's quite impossible to tell. The record is called
Destructive Progress and features seven songs, all of which
sound exactly the same. (Vinyl
Japan, 98 Camden Rd., London, NW1 9EA, UK)
Boozy skinheads UNITED
BLOOD stir up some medium-
paced, punky Oi for the
masses on The Marco Sessions. Their singer's name is
Ox and if the photograph can
be trusted, he deserves it. They
also have a Chelsea-sporting
lady guitarist who looks really
strong and could probably
crush me under one knee. All
in all, however, they seem like
a pretty laid-back bunch of
folks. (Cold Front, PO Box
8345, Berkeley, CA, 94707)
If you dream of a delin
quent handbag scene where
kissing is an act of political
resistance, then you will eventually find the KISS-OFFS'
How To Deliver the Kiss That
Kills 7" under your pillow. The
vinyl fairy favours noisy young
gamines. Neither as cheeky
nor as Dionysian as their last
release, this record is still very
hip and staticky, spinning commentary on the sociology of
hair, the political economy of
smoking, and the anatomy of
the kiss. The back cover art
owes much to Huggy Bear's
Melody Maker photo session
of yore and I'll reckon that the
Kiss-Offs owe a little to the
Huggys themselves. Why complain? They could have chosen
much less admirable backsides
to smooch. (Peek-A-Boo, see
Primadonnas.)
The Cocktail Series endeavours to promote Calgarian underground music. This month,
two singles from two bands,
each with a different schtick.
"The Fuck You Say, Jim Dandy"
is CURSE OF HORSEFLESH
doing two songs ot signature
cowboy rock. "Bad Day At
Black Rock" is instrumental spaghetti and I like it. THE FORBIDDEN DIMENSION try
very hard on "I Kiss Yer
Shadow," but their brand of
kitschy horror garage seems
rather forced and, uh, stupid.
I've said it before and I'll say
it again: a gimmick is not the
same as an idea! (Note: Mr.
Kitty Poulin is highly encouraged to argue the contrary and
prove me wrong. A battle of
wits played out on the pages of
Discorder, perhaps? En garde!)
(Ship Rec'd, #534-17 Ave SW,
Calgary, AB, T2S OBI)
THE GO-DEVILS 'End 7"
is a single PVC go-go boot that
lost its mate in the shuffle of a
drunken evening. This local
combo, featuring the excellent
vocal stylings of guitarist and
songwriter Natalie Beaulieu,
makes melodic downtown
punk rock for clubsters. On
sexy red vinyl with five-inch
stilletto heels. (Feline, #1203-
1225 Cardero St, Vancouver,
BC, V6G 2H8)
"Overwhelming," the b-
side of BELL's latest single, is
about the inability to complete
a duty. As I struggle through
this overdue column, I'm beginning to sympathize with the
sentiment. Lyrical themes aside,
the song is a slow, sweet slide
through the sunny hallways of
the Institute For the Advancement of Pop Music. The other
song,  "Already There,"  is
equally good. Bell's singer,
Vanessa Veselka, has a very
professional-sounding voice
which lends an extra measure
of grace to this recording, (address unknown)
A slickly packaged double
7" from Allied Recordings,
PEACEFUL MEADOWS vs.
STINK is a double dose of political pop-punk and (dare I
say) emo. Peaceful Meadows
are just great — af times (for
instance, on the song "Corporate America #1"), they sound
like Snuff at their best: clanky,
fast, and melodic. My favorite
Peaceful Meadows song is
"Shark:" hardcore! Stink sing
slightly off-key and invoke the
e-word more frequently, but
they handle their instruments
with ability and ease. (Allied,
PO Box 460683, San Francisco, C A, 94146-0683)
The five songs on enough
drama and the way things are,
a new release from Dayton,
Ohio duo SWEARING AT
MOTORISTS, were created
from the manipulation of quiet
feedback and noise under the
sleepy ballad formula. The
word that keeps coming to
mind is "tender," but I don't
want to sound too pejorative.
Perhaps Swearing At Motorists
are a different type of tender:
not tender as in teddy bear tender, but tender as in a bruise
that keeps getting bumped.
(PO Box 304 wbb, Dayton,
Ohio, 45409)• sioanaN irwiN stsrs
Ni55   TMin   5tat-5   chat5   Mi*h   Chf-i5*oph   FrmCEI.    the   intEII.GEn*   l3bPI   oUnPr
oF   Ptr-axis   REcof-d-5,   opEratBd   out   oF   London,   EnGldrtd   5ini_E   1992
Praxis has tons of releases [25]. How do peo-
become involved with the label?
jally it's people I know personally, friends of some
ascription from London or other cities, or people
/hose music I really appreciated and then got to
know. So it doesn't operate like a label where you
mo tape and you might get a contract. I
ike contracts — it's based on trust.
; a co-operative atmosphere to the
label?
been going for quite a while and I've seen a
lot of changes in the scene in the meantime. At
the beginning, like in '92, the whole techno
cene was completely different from what you
see now. It seems to continually change, but
recently there has been a good co-operative
spirit between different labels that associate
with each other [and] that help distribute
each other's releases and the djs play at parties together and stuff like that. But that is
also true of other labels in France, and a bit
in Germany, that we're in touch with and
swap records.
Is there any sort of concept or ideology behind Praxis? It seems quite
political and I was wondering what
you thought about how music and
politics intersect.
I definitely think that any cultural output is in
ial context and has a function in cer-
And I think to deny that is kind
of foolish. Obviously, people are trying to
think that what they do is completely abstract
and has no political implications, but I think
itself has political implications. Then
there's different approaches; I see Praxis as an
experimental label in general so we try different
ints of view out. But generally, what I'm inter-
pushing   boundaries,   challenging
notions of sureness. And in the context it is set in,
here [are] a lot of different levels. For example, dis-
how do you organize the production and
ibution of music? It is important that we produce
the things ourselves and distribute them ourselves, to a
large degree, and hopefully create a network of like-
inded people to help each other out. And then it also
of the sort of parties where this music
is being played. That is also a reason for me to release 1 2"
vinyl because, in a way, I don't necessarily see 1 2" records as
finished products or in the general consumer context. I think
they should be used as a tool where djs can mix those records
something new with them. And the context for that is
inly not clubs or raves and not art either; in general, it's mainly been free parties or teknivals and squat parties. Which in itself,
again, has political implications, directly or indirectly or has psychoso-
ial implications — I don't know if political is the right word. But in that
that happen outside of the normal commercial consumer cul-
idustry, thereby challenging the mechanisms and the hierarchical set-up
stream culture.
'Could you explain what is meant by teknivals, because people in
/North America might not be familiar with the history of it.
' Teknivals — [a combination of] techno and festivals — have had, well, actually, not
'that long of a history. It goes back maybe four or five years. Essentially, they gradually came
it of the festivals that happened in the early '90s in England, where people would come
together and get equipment together, big amplifiers and speakers, and go with those sound systems often to traditional hippie and traveller festivals and play hardcore techno music at the time;
e talking 1990, '91, '92. This is after the acid house and the big warehouse parties and it kind
of got inspired from that idea, but actually got out into the countryside where these festivals would happen. And then what really mushroomed that scene [was] a particularly big festival [that] happened in
'92 at Castlemorton with the consequence of people from Spiral Tribe getting arrested and taken to
court for serious offences. They all got acquitted in the end but the laws changed as a part of the new
Criminal Justice Bill in 1994, which has a lot of infringements of civil liberties. And it became pretty
much impossible to do these sort of things in England. For a lot of people it had become part of their
lifestyle to do parties in the city, in warehouses, or in the countryside in the summer. Some sound systems went to Europe and to France, where the teknival thing actually started in '93 or '94. France has
a completely different history of dance music than England. But basically, teknivals are free festivals in
the countryside, involving anything between three and twenty different sound systems coming together, sometimes over quite big areas, playing music for 24 hours a day from anything between three days
and two weeks [laughs].
As far as parties and live stuff, what's happening with the type of stuff you do or
Praxis does?
I play quite a lot and so do the other djs who are involved with a group of labels — Praxis, Ambush,
Audio Illusion and a few others — mainly at free parties in London. I personally play in different countries as well. But the normal venue for this sort of stuff at the moment is parties in London in squat warehouses that are happening every weekend. You shouldn't imagine that they are totally playing our sort
of music there; most sound systems in London are playing quite commercial sounding, boring acid
trance crap and then there's a handful of djs that are more adventurous and do things for the right reasons as well — for the music and for the culture surrounding it.
What were the Dead by Dawn parries that you did?
The Dead by Dawn parties were a series of parties that went over two years, we did twenty-three parties I think, which were on a monthly basis in a small anarchist squat in Brixton, South London. At the
time, they were really important as a meeting point for the scene because it was a very small space
and we never could do much promotion; because we couldn't do much flyering, we really depended
on word of mouth and network promotion. So a lot of people got to know each other quite well and
it was an important place to interact and to exchange ideas; the way it was laid out, it was ideal for
that because it had a very small basement where loud music could be played all night, but then it had
a ground floor where you could hear the music quite well but you could just sit around and talk, which
was a good forum for that. And they had stalls for records and magazines and then we had a bar
where we had noise, sound collage and industrial stuff, which was also quite loud, but it was more to
sit down and listen to rather than to dance or jump around. It was not, strictly speaking, a free party,
it was more programmed and controlled. We also had talks before the music would start. We'd invite
people of different groups or political stuff or cultural stuff or literature to talk or show their work, and
cause some kind of discussion, which would put the whole thing into a cultural context; we were quite
interested in putting that point across and not only have "party" music and dancing. We had this concept of making it an experimental pool for ideas and activities. It certainly was not the only thing that
spawned what's going on now, but I think it was quite crucial in bringing certain people together that
are still working together a lot.
With Praxis' records there seems to be a lot of images of resistance or subversion,
and a lot of different labels laud 'the revolution.' What do you think of this idea of
'revolution?'
I certainly would like to see what we do in the context of resistance against mind control culture that
we are exposed to by the mainstream, where everything is controlled by money and not by creative
ideas. I'd have to say different people who put out records on Praxis would have different opinions and
I would certainly respect that. I would say the word revolution has been used by advertising so much
by now that it is a difficult word to use. But what it originally means — a fundamental change in the
cultural, political structure of a given system — is a valid aim. I think there's too much control by corporations and by big money. There's too much based on a neo-colonialist world-wide system where the
west is just exploiting the rest of the world.
How has Praxis musically evolved over the years?
The concept is in a way, still the same, but the way it formulates itself is continually changing and will
continue to change in the future. At the beginning, I was interested in certain aspects of the new dance
music at the time. For example, the focus was not on the performers or individuals on a stage, but was
on everybody in the crowd or on the crowd itself. Rather than looking up to someone on the stage and
pay for that and go home, you would go into a space where a dj would be mixing somewhere — but
the dj wasn't really the centre of attention, except for some trainspotters who always existed trying to
see v/hat records he was playing. But generally, the focus of attention was different. In terms of production, all these white labels that came out at the time. I thought that was quite exciting because of
all the pseudonyms and the anonymity of the output — destroying the hierarchical pattern or structure
of entertainment. Praxis was not necessarily to be totally a part of that, but also a comment on it. I was
always interested in taking those elements that were around at a particular time by distorting them and
. making them more extreme, and feeding them back again into that pool of collective output. Praxis
went through hard techno, through gabber even, to more noisy experiments and recently more breakbeat influences.
How does your sub-label Sub/Version differ from Praxis? You o
' Sub/Version
3 label I'm
'''doing   with    DJ
** from Vienna,
the difference is
'"'that Sub/Version is a genre
•'label; it's suppose to be a tech
step label. On Praxis, I would do
maybe a record with no beats at all if
"^that is what I felt like doing — with no hesitation. With Sub/Version, I would not do that— it
has to have a certain code.
Explain your logo 'Visibility is a Trap.'
actually a quote from Foucault, from Discipline and Punish. It refers
eillance, being controlled through being visible to the authorities.
j also publish and edit Datacide. Do you deliberately take up different
media to disseminate ideas: the record label, the magazine etc.?
Yeah, definitely. I see music as a language and I see words and images as a way of putting things across.
And you can always say certain things better in one medium than the others. Music is a.very physical and
abstract medium, at the same time, whereas words are much more concrete and intellectual. Of course,
you can intellectualize music and put words into noises or something, just as approximations. I'm definitely
into using all means to get ideas across. And Datacide is quite an important project for me, as much as
the label; to have a medium for that sort of music and culture or subculture, but also to bring in different
elements that aren't necessarily connected. Datacide isn't necessarily there to say this is true, it is more
important that you feed into a discussion — again that should happen collectively.
You are doing some kind of musical installation outside of the Vienna Opera House?
It's actually going to be done as Society of Unknowns because I'm going down with Jason Skeet, who I did
Praxis 24 with. And apart from having our separate things to do there, my thing is not connected to music,
it's a talk about information, war and terrorism. We're doing an installation in front of the opera house
which is going to feed back certain elements. It is going to be a big box with a sound system in it that is
going to be connected to a transmission system, to a studio in fhe place holding the talks — it's called Public
Netbase. It's in the centre of Vienna, where there is studio equipment and computers. I see it as a psy-
chogeographical feedback device, where we try to sample things from the everyday reality of the place
and feed them back into the actual public space again. So it is not going to be music as such — [it is] a
noise thing. We are also going to have a workshop which will mainly consist in giving people recorders
and sending them out into the city and hopefully they'll come back with interesting recordings. But we'll see
how successful that is.
You have various project names?
s different names all the time. Base Force One is me, Society of Unknowns is me and Jason, Metatron
; me. Then there's some other names as well, and a concept we call the Jackal or DJ Jackal. It is a multiple name concept that basically anyone who relates to the fundamental ideas behind what we are collectively doing can use, produce or play [laughs] and use that name for whatever they are doing in that
context. Which is not an original idea in that sense, and it is not suppose to be; the idea of multiple
names has been used by other people coming from this sort of neoist movement in the '80s. Luther
Blissett is probably the most used and powerful multiple name concept at the moment, which was
instigated by a group of radical situationist-inspired people in Italy. So DJ Jackal is the multiple name
for the radical situationist-inspired people in the hardcore scene [laughs]. There is a responsibility
in using the name as well.
All these things seem to be rather Eurocentric. Is there much happening in North
America?
I would say it is mainly happening in London and in some places in France, which has'a very young and
up for it scene and is relatively big as well. Then there's people in Germany and Austria; and outside of
there, it's just isolated groups of people — little pockets, everywhere, including North America. I think it
is just a geographical gap because a lot of this particular music is just getting exposed to it in the right way,
which is in front of big sound. I think most people who are involved with it, including myself, are inspired
from going into a space or in an open field and exposed to frequencies; the experience, which is a physical experience as well, is difficult to have if you only hear the stuff at home. There's a lot of bass frequencies that do things to you.»
Praxis is planning a compilation CD to be released fall 1998 and a slate of new releases that will be available via Scratch Records. For more information, contact praxis@basenet net or Praxis, B.M.Jed, London
WC IN 3XX, England, or check hrtp//c8.com/praxis
HAVE A HOPELESS SUMMER
check www.hopelessrecords.com for daily tour updates.
jL   _A July
&  J&s^zs7^> 10th Montreal, QUE L'X
Jooe     <*f**fy*^* 11th Que. Citv, QUE Ballroom
30th London, OfVIT  Call The Ottice 12th Ottawa, ONT Liquid Monkey
July 14th Guelph, ONT Trasheteria
1st Ottawa, ONT   Liquid Monkey 16th London, ONT Call The Office
2nd Que. City, QUE Saole Sainte Esprit 17th St. Cath., ONT Frat House
3rd Montreal, QUE Rainbow Imusta!p_pVi&I te-'W -I
4th Toronto, ONT   ElMocambo
5th  St.Cath., ONT Mindhomh
Hopelessly Devoted ...
to You Too Dilhnger Four
mustard plug-™    hopelessly devoted to you too   dillmger tour .
skapcaiypse now new sampler cd, 21 songs in all. unreleased tracks from 88      aggressive, catchy punk w
four Ass The Promise 01 An Uncertain Future        tOUPinQ Canada 7/28-8/2
n 88 Fingers Louie Record out sept, stu        Check the hopeless website for citys and venues       PD „
. * mmis ,635 ,p cd cs pRiC[S: CD_S1() ipm_ MCDS8 SflMpiER CD_$4
new sampler cd, 21 songs in all. unre
lingers louie, aaa, digger, dillinger tour,
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J   %$M^
^^Kornin October of1996, Cherry
mjlce Cream Smile are (l-r) Chris
^P| (bass, vocals), Kim (guitar,
<^^/ vocals) and Tasha (drums,
vocals). They played in Vancouver
twice in one day, on International
Women's Day, 1998. Megan Mallett
managed to catch up with them in the
dj booth at CiTR after the band played
on the air as part of CiTR's IWD celebration. They play the sweetest of pop
music and are the sweetest of people.
And guess what? The interview was
short and sweet.
~ By Megan Mallett
~ Intro and photo by Miko
DiSCORDER:  Are  you  all  originally from
Portland, Oregon?
Tasha: I grew up in a town called Boring — everyone likes to joke about how I came from Boring,
Oregon. They say, 'So, what was it like there?'
And I just kind of have to humour them. But then
I did move to Portland and I've lived there for
quite a number of years.
And is one of you from Albuquerque?
Kim: I am. And I have to go back there this summer and I'm not too happy about it. It's too hot.
Did you guys have any trouble getting across
the border?
Kim: Not at all.
Tasha: See, Kim has her parents' car and it's really fancy. And we just act really sweet and we hid
our friend with the fancy gold boots and all the
funny necklaces in the back and we got through
kind of easily. Going into the States is always the
harder part.
Have you been in bands before this one?
Volunteers needed.
Are you an outgoing, spontaneous man or woman over the age of
19 with a never-say-die attitude and a good sense of humour?
We are a non-profit society that helps young offenders and children
ages 8 to 18 who are at risk of getting in trouble.
PLEA
Programs for Youth
708-2606
Chris: No.
Tasha: OK, Chris is lying. Yeah, we all have been
in other bands, playing different instruments
probably, too.
Anything we would have heard of before?
Tasha: Probably not. When I was 16, I was in a
band called Ten Four and that lasted for about
three years. And then I was in a band called
Sharks Kill and that lasted awhile and now I'm in
this band. I've never played drums before and it's
super fun and exciting.
Kim: I used to play in a band when I was really
young called the Adam Brigade and I played the
bass and I was the only girt. I stopped playing
with them when they asked me to dress up like a
boy. Then I played in another band called the
Young Astronauts, then Bratty lanet, and now
Cherry Ice Cream Smile.
Chris: When I was much younger, I played in a
band called Drippy Drawers, which is a very, very
good band, probably one of the best bands ever.
And no one will ever know about them because
we only had a couple 7"s.
Where did your name come from? Because I
have to tell you that I dont like cherry ice cream.
Chris: Me neither.
Tasha: None of us do. I don't like cherries at all.
Kim: And none of us even eat ice cream.
Chris: It came from a song that we didn't write.
It's a Duran Duran song called 'Rio.'There's a line
in it where he says 'Cherry ice cream smile I suppose it's very nice.' Our friend Joe said — before
there was even a band — he said to Kim and
Tasha, 'If you guys are in a band, you have to be
called Cherry Ice Cream Smile.' It got stuck.
I just recently discovered Ben and Jerry's ice
cream down in the States, which we don't have
here.
Tasha: You don't have Ben and Jerry's?!?
No, not in Canada.
Chris: You know, they have sorbet, in case anyone's vegan out there. They have chocolate sorbet, which is very good.
Are you guys all vegan?
Kim: Yes.
You have some punk rock connections in
Portland, right?
Chris: Oh, we know everybody.
Tasha: Are you talking about people, or things
that we do, or...
Two of you live in a punk house, don't you?
Tasha: We call it the Powerhouse because it's next
to a power plant and it's nothing to do with people
having power or anything. But there's probably
anywhere from 10-15 people there — pretty much
constantly — and in the summer, there's lots of
travellers, too. The only significant thing about the
house that I can think of is that we do Food Not
Bombs. It just recently moved because we didn't
have a van. That's something that I'm proud of.
Also, the fact that we had shows for a long time
when there wasn't any all ages shows in town.
And we let lots of people stay there. It seems kind
of like everyone might be moving out soon, which
would be a sad thing — to see it go. But I think
maybe it's served its purpose.
Do you know much about Canadian music?
Chris: Traditional Canadian music?
What's traditional...?
Chris: Well, that would be my question.
Any Canadian music.
Chris: Submission Hold is probably the extent of
my knowledge of Canadian music.
Kim: I'm a really big fan of Nerdy Girl.
Chris*, lust today, i learned something about
Canada. I learned that Regina was the capital of
whatever the hell province that is.
Saskatchewan?
Chris: OK. And I learned that, in Newfoundland
and in most of the country, when it's 6:00, it's
6:00. But the island part, it's 6:30 there! For no
apparent reason.
Do a lot of Americans have an idea of what
Canada is?
Tasha: Have you ever seen the movie, Strange
Is that the movie where they make fun of
Canada?
Chris: You look like you never saw it.
I never did.  Is that with  Bob and  Doug
McKenzie?
Chris: I watched that movie probably eight or ten
times a day one summer when I was little. So
that's what I thought of Canada.*
Cherry Ice Cream Smile have just released a follow up to their You'll Fall in Love cassette, a song
on a split 7" with Kissing Book, another great
Portland band. The cover is specially designed
and handmade by len Sbragia of Softies fame.
Write to Cherry Ice Cream Smile at 2011 HE 47th,
Portland, OR, 97213. suIdx
•ClisakebL  CsseUrtlr   ky  S.dkLati   Twiti  Stars
a very old sampler
DiSCORDER: How long have you been Solex?
Elisabeth Esselink: In January '97 I bought an eight track recorder
tion. And from that moment on I started to make music on my own.
Before this, you were in a band called Sonetic Vet. What did you play in that?
I was the singer. It was a guitar noise band and before that I was in some other bands also as a drummer.
But in most bands I was the singer.
Is Solex your alter ego or some kind of concept?
Sometimes it's me but sometimes it can also be somebody else. It is in every song title and in that way it is kind
of a persona. And every song is about Solex — it is the main character of every song — but it can change
identities. Sometimes it is a girl and sometimes it is a boy. The reason why I put 'Solex' in every song title is
the same idea as many comic strip books have. And in that way it becomes more alive, the Solex figure.
Your lyrics and the way you sing them are kind of abstract. Are your songs stories or
bits and pieces from your life?
They aren't really stories with a clear beginning, middle and end, but more detailed sketches of situations.
Sometimes the situations are real and sometimes they are fantasy.
Do you consider your voice another type of instrument?
Yeah. On Solex vs. The Hitmeister, I think the vocals are
equally as important as the drums or the samples. I don't
consider myself a singer-songwriter because first, I would
use my own name; secondly, in singer-songwriter music,
every instrument is there to support the vocals and most of
the time I don't really like it.
So how do you approach a Solex song? Do you
get samples together first or do you write the
lyrics and the melody?
Most of the time I work on about ten songs at a time; I
make it on the eight track recorder and usually I start with
a drum loop and I reserve two tracks for the vocals. As
soon as all six tracks are filled with loops and samples, I
start thinking of the melody line for the vocals. After I've
got the melody line for the vocals I write the lyrics. But I
don't really pay attention to the length of the melody for
the length of the sentences; sometimes the melody ends
but the sentence goes on, so I continue the sentence where
the next melody line begins. So I cut it up into little pieces.
Who's the Hitmeister?
I'm the co-owner of a second hand record shop in
Amsterdam. And all the samples come from the CDs from
the shop. We've got a huge pile of almost unsellable CDs;
they're very cheap and very bad. They can be CDs put
out by bands themselves because they couldn't find a
record company for good reasons or they can be jubilee CDs from high school — yeah, very shirty CDs.
For me, the challenge is to find very good fragments from very bad CDs. While the CDs that I choose samples from will never become a hit, that's why it's called the Hitmeister. Also, I think a Hitmeister is somebody
who makes songs in a very ... like a craftsman; a very conventional way of working intro, verse, chorus,
verse, chorus, solo, chorus twice and then outro. It is a very [regressional?] way of making music. When
I make music, I try to clear my head as much as I can and try to make it as intuitively as I can.
What kind of record shop do you own?
■>nly sell second-hand CDs, but we sell everything from classical music to hip hop — everything, as long
I noticed on your press sheet that of the few shows you've played, you've played with
the likes of Sleater-Kinney. Do you prefer playing with more traditional rock bands?
It's hard to find out what would fit best. We did a tour in France with Cornershop and that worked very
well because they have live musicians and samples. It is hard to find what the Solex audience would be.
Right now I'm touring in Holland with a guitar band, they are a bit like the Pixies, and that also works really well. And we've played with Stereolab ... I can imagine we could also play with more dance-oriented
bands. I've been in guitar bands all my life, so maybe I just feel more comfortable with them.
Is your eight-track and sampler the only equipment you ever use?
I don't use a computer or anything — just the stereo sampler from the '70s. We always go to the auction
in Amsterdam to buy second-hand CDs for the shop. One day there were no good CDs, but there was an
eight-track recorder and a sampler, so I raised my hand and at the first bid I had it; I was very lucky. But
it is a very limited thing because it hasn't got a memory; it used to have memory, but the floppies that you
need to put samples on, you cannot buy anymore. So the eight-track recorder is the only record I've got
for the samples. With this eight track recorder I mix it down to DAT recorder and that was my demo tape.
And I sent this demo to several record companies and, well, Matador was so pleased with the demo tape
that they wanted to just put the demo on CD. But the problem with that was it was so expensive to clear
all the samples. Sometimes it can cost $2000 a sample
[and] because I've got at least six samples a song, it could
be very expensive. I transferred the eight track recorder to
a larger tape in the studio and I asked some musicians to
play the fragments again. I made a sample of that again
and I played it by hand again. That way you don't have
to pay for all that.
Can   you   see   yourself   getting   into   more
advanced technology?
I would like to, not because I don't like the limited equipment I've got, but I would like to do some experiments with
other stuff too. It's very addictive — if you think you only
work for one hour, you are busy for four hours. One big
advantage if you work on your own [is that] you don't have
to compromise on anything. In my former band, it always
took such a long time to finish a song. It almost took more
time to talk about songs than to do actual things. And it's
also ... because I can work very fast now, I can finish a
song in about two days, including the mixing. So it's also
easier to throw away that song too. When I was in a band,
it took about three weeks to finish a song and that makes it
harder to throw away that song. If it doesn't turn out very
good you think twice before throwing it away.
What's the musical environment in Amsterdam
like?
; it almost seems like a Beatles cover contest. That's a bit
not very experimental; they are inspired by the Beatles,
I think the most interesting things are
own. But the problem with that is that
Most guitar bands are a bit boring; sometin
strange because the guitar bands over here
but the Beatles were very experimental and innovati
happening in dance music over here; people thi
e anonymous and also
e artists change their
jr the Red Light Dist
n Amsterdam.
I have to tour a lot. But l
ek in the shop. But when
s is also a guitarist comin
■ork two days a week in the shop,
;, I've got a drummer with me; my
i. We ask some friends to work for
as it's second-hand. It's very small, only 25 square metres, and
We get a lot of strange customers over there.
What's your live set-up like?
Right now it is a bit hectic because
my boyfriend works four days a we
boyfriend is also the drummer. Ther
Do you deliberately choose to play with live musicians?
Yeah, I thought it was a good thing to do. For one thing, if I were to be on my own on stage I think it would
be a bit embarrassing to force people to only look at me. And it also adds some organic aesthetic to the
music. I haven't played that [many] gigs yet. I've done a few in a very short time. But I think it is working
is one big parly.
■rybody who works c
time, it is very hard to track them dov
Any interesting labels?
There's a guitar band record label in Holland, Excelsior. The problem in Holland is that the major labels
over here only sign more mainstream music. The market is too small in Holland for more experimental
things. If you are an alternative band and you have a little bit of success, you sell maybe 2000 CDs. So
it's very hard for more independent record labels to survive. That's also why I only sent demos to English
and American record labels.
What do you see yourself doing in the near future?
I will always have the shop because it is my library of sounds. I want to work on my second album.
My aim is to let it be very different from the first — become more experimental, [use] different techniques. I've already got some ideas for it, but I'm not going to tell you [laughs] because nobody did
this thing before.*
Elisabeth Esselink, The Hitmeister and the many manifestations of Solex hope to tour North
9  Ej^§S5®ES THE
MURDERcrn
DEVILS
«_4 «_« of the ashes of Area 51, The Una!
Formed ovit ol tine n= rtovils <S™
Death Wish Kids, The Mnrder C.ty De^ls W
, «^Kr_cs: Nate, gvutan Darin, gux
foass/organ/pyrotechnics; r*a*<e, g
We been on a spree for the last year or so
hole aU across this fine continent -* *~^
^COBDER confronted the «n*n*«-« *£
^W. a tag-teaxn interview after some recent Vax
I^teirview by AA axxd Jolbxixxy
DiSCORDER: So tell me, you guys have
established some sort of rock pantheon thing, by having done a song
about   Johnny   Thunders   ['Johnny
Thunders'] as well as having done a
song about Iggy Pop ['Broken Glass'].
Could you tell me what those two
artists mean to you guys?
Derek: What they mean to me and what they
mean to Spencer are two different things.
Spencer writes the lyrics and I think that
Johnny Thunders was a fucking incredible
musician — I think that he was a total asshole/loser, but he was an incredible musician. And if it wasn't for him, then a lot of
what's going on now wouldn't be going on.
And the same goes for Iggy Pop. So I think
they're great musicians, I think they're total
junkies   ...   I   mean,   obviously,   [Johnny
Thunders] is dead ...
Yeah, and if we had to disown
every artist who'd been an asshole,
a  loser,  and   a   junky,  then  we
wouldn't have many artists left,
right? So what do you think characters like Iggy Pop and Johnny
Thunders mean to Spencer? How
do you think that he feels differently about them?
Well, they had just this huge influence on
him — they made him want to play rock
'n' roll, they made him see something different in music, instead of listening to
something like Billy Joel and whatever the
fuck I  listened  to when  I was a  kid
[laughs]. Oh, we've got a new tribute, by
the way: it's to Blondie [laughs].
What's the song called?
'Stars in My Eyes.'
So is this going to be a running
thing?
Well, you know, there's only so many
people that de:
>ut of prospects.
how do you guys think you fit
wit)vSub Pop these days? I
ith   so   many   of   the
:ontemporary music
from rock 'n' roll,
[op dabbled in elec-
when they put out
lie compilation last
here was talk that
Iry
,   I   haven't  r
To be honest,
ked anything that's been
up in a totally dif
ferent music scene — being in the Bay area I was into
Blatz and Filth and Green Day and all of those bands,
and Jawbreaker. So I didn't really have anything to do
with anything thatwas going on in Seattle.
Even at the time that grunge broke?
Yeah, I didn't pay any attention to it. I may be lame,
but the first time I heard Nirvana was when it was
being played in my high school parking lot — I was
like, 'What fhe hell is this shit?' And with electronica,
and all of that, I don't really pay attention to that, I
don't listen to the radio. I listen to my records and what
[Around this time, 'Gabe,' the super-roadie, steps in
and begins to manhandle Derek, then issues a "three
minute warning."]
Have you guys thought about going to
Europe? Do you have any plans to go there?
We'd really want to go to Japan first. We all love
Japanese bands. Teengenerate are one of the fuckin'
most incredible bands — I don't know if you've heard
the Tweezers — well, it's one of the members from
Teengenerate's new band. It just blows my mind what
the kids over there are doing with music. It's fucking
unreal!
What about Guitar Wolf and stuff like that?
Yeah ...
[Gabe steps in, puts Derek in a hammer lock and
'escorts' him off the premises.]
Bye!
PART 2, enter Johnny.
Johnny: So what was the last thing you guys
were talking about? Maybe we should start
there.
AJ: We were talking about Japanese bands
— Teengenerate, the Tweezers, etc.
Johnny:  And  you   [Derek]   got  confused
because you thought the Go-Devils tonight
[Vancouver] were going to be the Go-Devils
[Japan].
Yeah, I just picked up that single and I was really excited and then I heard that it wasn't the same Go-Devils
— but those Go-Devils [Vancouver] were all right.
Johnny: So I was wondering — on the back
of Nate's jacket it says 'Los Crudos' and Los
Crudos are a political punk band from
Chicago, aren't they? Now does that reveal
your secret 'emo' past? I mean, you guys are
going to be backing up Nashville Pussy. So,
[you'll have] a Los Crudos badge on the back
of your jacket when you're playing with
Nashville Pussy. I don't think Nashville Pussy
fans have ever heard of Los Crudos — what
is Los Crudos?
Well, they're a fucking great band. They're doing
something completely different. They're one of Nate's
favourite bands and I don't really give a fuck if the
Nashville Pussy crowd don't like Los Crudos. I don't
think they'd like most of the stuff we listen to — doesn't really bother me.
And also there's fire — the case of fire ... you xjiMlDers, &xxd The
}ncer, vox; Derek,
tar; Coady, arums)
iDXimirx' down tlie
aggering sonic riot.
well-armed Eterek
icouver gigs.
light your organ on fire, the Bomboras light their organ
on fire, the Delta 71 light their organ on fire.
They light their organ on fire?
Yeah, and they picked it up froi
No, they stole it from me! No, wai
story about Austin, TX, where Greg froi
partying with them, drinking — and he
'So, I hear you do some fire tricks.' Ani
n't even know the guy. I said, 'Yeah,
too, sometimes. Are you going to do it toni^t?' An^Mud^^aybe.
We had to play before them, so I did it [\—W\\re tri«J^othere you'
go! Who cares who did it first?! I mean J»y Lee Lewis was doing
before all of us were alive, so ... it's rocl^^rall [laughs]
OK, now is this true? You got paMnnntod stamps for"
gig?
Right. Actually, we got $13 and a foB stamp.
Where was this?
Sacramento. We played in this r<
n't do shows and so they can't c
us this bag of change and a f<
$13. And then some of the loci
lived so we decided that with thai
and we went to their house — thrj
the front — had a count off, ej
That's the end of the story.
One of your songs has I;
your band, Dann Ga\\i—W. N*
[pronounces it 'Gal-loaMy']?
Gallueci [corrects the proMlciatii
player.
Of?
The Murder City DevilsJ
Now who is Don C
That's his uncle — fro J
No, from Don andj
Mummies have <
loosey's'] Balls.'
Yeah.
Nov/ has Dann ever ]
duced The Stooges?
I'm sure he's talked to his
Would it not be the pel
Well, if you know about Thl
Gallueci made [Funhouse] -
recording at all —
Gallueci.
But that is incredible, Del
and his uncle produced thl
The Good Times, the lege!!
band, famous for "Little Sal J
Don Gallueci,   — that's
called. And you have not tri«
come Dann has not tried to$|
bad family blood?
Why don't you ask him? He doesB
fact, I've never met any of his famiH
Well, there's the answer. I am
truth. At least it's completely J
either you do it, or you don'ft|
him, or you don't. I was thinkin
for Christmas dinner and is shooting the shit with his
You
n your — sorry, Dann's
s, on the head of Dave's
ly little skull and cross-
rely skull and crossbones
Klan? Look at how he spins this
didn't confuse me. I'm still on the
sheet hood? Goblins
hey live under bridges ...
blame for the costumes goes
illage where we found the
iters over the sheets.
j have to order those things?
Louisiana!
iin' about Thee Goblins. I
|uys! OK? You saw our [The
stage. Did you see our last
saw Thee Goblins on stage,
now those guys. If you saw
vaporators, there were four
oblins on stage. I'm not in Thee
STskull and ...?
No pirates.
Johnny: Skull and ...?
No pirates.
fnd, Head, had
r tone of voice] But you guys had
the la^Hhg of TlJ
Evaporators and t
Goblins.
ig backstage and ..
Johnny: I hav^pothing to say to you but trick-or-treat!
You've donj^rmany times before ... and have fun with
Jack&^ro [slated to produce the next Murder City
album] who has produced The Makers, and the
ers are on Estrus, and Estrus is a garage label, kinda
■elated to Sympathy [for the Record Industry], and
Sympathy is kinda related to Dionysus, and Dionysus is
kinda related to the Bomboras, and the Bomboras have
apparently signed to Geffen, and now they're going to
be lighting their organ on fire on Geffen records.
AJ: And how do you feel about that?
I don't think about it at all ... wait a second! You just g
track! That was good! That was good!
Johnny: Thank you for coming to Canada. We appreciate you bringing your unique stylings of rock 'n' i
Columbia Street and Main Street, especially to Cambrian
Hall, where many a famous punk gig happened. Thank
you for playing Canada, and doot-doola-doot-doo ...
Yeah, whatever ... doot-doo.*
11 E^gSQSSS UNIVERSAL
CONCERTS CANADA
<_AT nilY 1 1TH
www.universalconcerts.ca
Canada's Biggest Rock Event Of The Year!   ''€S£.
St'98
SAT JULY 18TH
JULY 21,
EDGEFEST STAGE
Green Day
Foo Fighters
Sloan
Econoiine Crush
Holly McNarland
Bif Naked
JULY 26
0*5?     STAGE
The Watchmen
Creed
Matthew Good Band
The Killjoys
Copyright
Local Rabbits
THUNDERBIRD STADIUM
Sean Lennon
mth RUFUS
WAINWRIGHT
tix also at Zulu & Scratch
the
FIXX
FRIDAY AUG 7TH
DiArcnon r*uuwi
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Neil FtoM
TRT WHISTLING* TWS
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with special guest
EBBA   FORSBERG
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WORLD     TOUR     WORLD     TOUR    W O   R   L   D     TOUR
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Review
album with no clear aim at musical
AGAINST ALL AUTHORITY
All Fall Down
(Hopeless)
Hopeless describes this as "Political, Punk as fuck Ska" and
compares them to Operation
Ivy. Kinda, but no fucking way. I
would say Hopeless-style (Orange County) punk with horns
thrown in. Fits right in with other
Hopeless bands (Falling Sickness, Nobodys, etc.), but Operation Ivy? Maybe if you were
drunk and half-dead.
Dave Tolnai
ARAB STRAP
Philophobia
(Matador)
This is brilliant — beautiful music, music you can lose yourself
in, and ... lyrics crasser than anything I've heard! It takes a while
to notice that accompanying the
sparse sounds is a brand of storytelling found mostly in books my
mom never let me read. And, to
make things worse, it's all done
by a man with a deep, Scottish
voice, a voice so amazing that it
will send chills through all your
vital spots. It's like Belle and Sebastian, but a whole lot less
perky. It's Arab Strap and it's
a force to be reckoned with. I
Julie Colero
AVAIL
Over the James
(Lookout!)
I'm just a recent convert to this
Richmond, Virginia, based band,
but from what I've heard of their
last release, 4 A.M. Friday, and
what I've read about them being
one of best live groups going, I
had a feeling I was going to really like this new album. And I
did. The first two songs,
"Deepwood" and "New #2," literally leap out of the speakers
and grab you by the throat, forcing you to pogo to the punchy
guitar lines and sing along with
the catchy choruses. Other songs,
like "Sanctuary 1 3" and "Scuffle
Town," have you paying attention
to the lyrics; in this case, living in
Richmond, with all its shortcomings — such as having the third
highest homicide rate per capita
in North America. And what
would an Avail record be without a break-up song like "Vine?"
Under breakneck tempo, they
sing, "It's wrong I don't think
about you/is it wrong I don't think
about you?" Passion + Power +
Punk = a darn good record. Ya
gotta like that.
Bryce Dunn
THE CHARLATANS UK
Melting Pot
(Beggars Banquet)
Here is a band that has lasted a
long time. I remember them as
one of the first bands from the
new British sound to make small
waves over here in the late '80s/
early '90s. Funny, though, the
Charlatans UK never snagged
any huge hits in North America.
Some of these potential "hits" are
hiding right here on Melting Pot,
a collection of songs spanning the
bands history. The album starts
off with 1990's very danceable
"The Only One I Know" and ends
with the jangly, bluesy rocker
"North Country Boy," which was
released last year. For the most
part, these are the standard
mixes, nothing out of the ordinary
except for a Chemical Brothers mix of "Patrol." I have never
been a devoted follower of the
Charlatans, but what really stood
out for me was their 1992 album,
Between 10th and I lth —an album chock full of great songs —
but only one of its songs made it
on to this collection.
Nonetheless, Melting Pot
makes up a good collection of
songs from these English boys. If
you've always wanted a good
taste of them, then this is for you.
Ken Paul
CLOSED CAPTION RADIO
Slang X Generator
(Brickyard Music Group)
Closed Caption Radio deliver
a fine first CD on the newly
minted Brickyard Music Group.
The disc's refined and clean production struck me with its contrast
to their gritty live sound, but after
/v list
I had o
■rd's stand alone quality. The kinetics and textures of
Slang X Generator revolve
around discordant guitar work
and a fast tempo. Cacophonic
shouts give rise to a melodious
chorus as Mr. Low End Mod and
Mr. Treble Control trade off the
mic. Whether a lone guitar line,
or the force of the four players in
unison, Closed Caption Radio
know how to keep the energy
level up.
On the down side, this record
clocks in a tad short, with a coy-
pie tracks devoted to sound experiments of the not so experimental variety. But rest assured,
the boys do not disappoint —
your speakers will spell out R-O
C-K on 95% of the record.
TERRY CALLIER
Time Peace
(Polygram)
A quick bio of a very complicated
life: born and raised in Chicago;
recorded first album, The New
Folk Sound Of Terry Collier, in
1965; signed with Chess' Cadet
label in 1972, then joined Elektra
in 1978; in 1 983, he left professional music to raise his daughter and to secure a steady job.
Many years, phone calls and
plane trips later, as well as an
outcry from a handful of djs over
in England, the much exalted soul
of Terry Collier was persuaded
to record again on Mr. Peterson's
label, Talkin' Loud.
What have we now then? It's
an album you can listen to over
and over again, full of epic songs
and loaded with spirituality, moving rhythms, and love. It's a rallying call. It's a classic T.C. album which would enable him to
go into hiding and we would
never know it. Everything about
him is the same; it's like he's
never been away. Thank you,
Terry Callier. Your "new freedom
song is ringing." I hope we all
Rebel Jazz
DIESEL BOY
Venus Envy
(Honest Don's)
Diesel Boy's second album,
Venus Envy, is pretty good. Yes, I
know that's not exactly a rave
review, but compared to their
debut, this is a hell of an improvement. Ryan Green helms the
board, which can only help any
band, taking Diesel Boy's run-of-
the-mill, fast, snotty punk rock to
the next level. Venus Envy sure
isn't one to write home about, but
the good songs — notably "Dragonfly," "Rubbing the Elf," and
"Cock Rock" — do outweigh the
bad.
Trevor Fielding
ESTHERO
Breath From Another
(Work/Sony)
This debut album is diverse in
many respects and still a cohe-
- sive collection of songs. Esthero
consists of two people who do
nearly everything on the album:
Doc, who does the programming,
and Esthero, who sings. Esthero's
voice is at times similar to Lou
Rhodes of Lamb fame and at
other times surprisingly like the
vocal lines found on a Laika album. The music itself is not as experimentally extreme as that of
either Laika or Lamb, but is more
a blended mix of hip hop, drum
'n' bass and Top 40 vocal music.
The Top 40 aspect seems to be
prevalent.
The title track features a section with guest vocalists Shug and
Meesah, which is strangely reminiscent of Snoop Doggy
Dogg. Layers of jazzy piano
licks and cheesy string arrangements highlight several tracks on
this album.
The final verdict: a bearable
album of Top 40 ideas strewn
with attempts at including various
facets of other genres, Breath
From Another is a simple showcase of Esthero's obvious talents.
The vocals are not strong enough
on their own to overlook the shortcomings of the music; this is an
Patrick Gross
SEAN LENNON
Into the Sun
(Grand Royal)
My first instinct is to cuddle this
CD to death. It's just so darn
sweet! I was worried that it would
have a weird Julian flavour, but
little brother Sean Lennon
seems to have been fully Cibo
Matto-ified. The press release
that accompanies this CD is pathetic — "This CD is for my girlfriend, Yuka," or something like
that — and shows that Sean, as
competent a musician as he may
be, has yet to find his own legs,
musically. Songs like "Mystery
Juice" and "Two Fine Lovers" are
stellar pop ditties, but Sean's got
light-years to travel before he's as
good a musician as he could be.
Julie Colero
THE LUNE
On the Cutting Room Floor
(Aesthetics)
This Cambridge, MA, three-piece
works over a variety of down-
home instruments to achieve a lo-
fi, sitting-around-the-campfire
sound drenched in Americana.
Zydeco-inflected accordion and
trumpet are added to banjos,
harmonicas, fiddles, scrubbing
acoustic guitars, twangy vocals
and steady eddie drumming.
The lune are dissecting the
distinctly American genres of
country, folk and blues, but offer
less experimentation than, say,
John Fahey or Jim
O'Rourke, and don't have the
sombre tunefulness of Rex or
Palace. The lune's blend of country, folk and zydeco is fun
enough, but offers few surprises.
They still manage to get you in
an acoustic guitar and whiskey
sorta mood, and sound pretty
good doing it, but after a while,
this country bumpkin was wishin'
they'd switch gears.
da mon h.
QUASI
Featuring "Birds"
(Up)
I am consuming massive amounts
of harmonic pop music these
days. It must be the weather.
Quasi — Sam Coomes and
Sleater-Kinney's Janet Weiss
— have achieved happy-pop
heaven on this, their newest album. There are lots of keyboards
and a bit of dueting here and
there. Be forewarned, however,
that this band sounds astonishingly similar to Ben Folds Five.
If you haven't dropped this mag
and run to vomit, then go buy this
album and play it a lot.
Julie Colero
RENDER USELESS
Render Useless
(Clue #2)
One of the finest bands Victoria
has to offer is Render Useless.
A cornerstone in the all-ages
scene, they are one of the most
prolific bands in the Garden City,
as well as one of the most deservedly popular. This CD contains 24 songs, which document
four years of recording. Indeed,
this is punk rock intelligentsia at
its best, with such songs as "Bravery In a Sea of Cowards," "The
Heads of Ostriches," and "Roving Male" standing out. In smart
cardboard packaging, this CD
includes a patch, sticker, and
complete lyrics ... this really is one
you oughtn't miss.
Trevor Fielding
SNUFF
Tweet Tweet My Lovely
(Fat)
British masters of fun, Snuff, return with another batch of simply-
must-haves. Tweet is full of their
trademark thickly-layered, key-
board-and-horn-laden pop-punk
weirdness. If that sentence didn't
tell you a damn thing, I'm sorry.
Snuff is a very hard band to describe. They sort of sound like a
nuttier version of Leatherface,
of which I think Snuff comprises
a member or two. At any rate,
Tweet is exactly the kind of quality you'd expect from this very
long-running band, who are
showing no signs of slowing.
Trevor Fielding
UNTAMED YOUTH
Youth Runs Wild!
(Norton)
Just in time for summer, here's
another party platter from those
sophisticated international playboys, Da Untamed Youth,
and, while this is a great dancin'
frenzy of a record, it falls a little
short of last year's Estrus Records
extravaganza, An Invitation to
Planet Mace. Let me tell you what
I mean. Side one bursts out somewhat hesitantly with "Haunted
Castle Party," a cover of Pacific
Northwest party maestros, The
Kingsmen. A good song, but
the choreographed "party" noise
that accompanies it I could do
without. Things pick up quickly
with "I Couldn't Care Less," but
then stall with the next cut,
"Charlena." Not to worry though,
"Mace Has Got a Hot Rod Dart"
will pick up your spirits with a
woeful yet witty tale of vehicular
embarrassment on the part of
bassist Mace, who gets his turn
to shine on "They can't call it
beer," an A-bones-inspired
stamper with a great dual sax/
guitar rippin' solo break. "Folding Money" and "Lightnin' Louie"
close out the side with the vocal
(on the former) and guitar (on the
latter) talents of Derek Dickerson.
Side two starts out right with
the Elvis ode, "Girl Happy," a
wise choice where the Untamed
Youth do no wrong. Then comes
"Full Blown 426 Hemi," a subject that again the Youth know all
too well and execute with style.
"I've been wrong before" highlights once more the signature
crooning of Derek, the master of
melody. Pretty good so far, right?
Well, here's where it falls apart
a little. The instrumental, "Red
Line," doesn't quite get my attention — perhaps because of its
midtempo and lack of hooks.
Then Mace takes the mic again
for "Where Did Kono Go?" and,
while his vocal impersonation of
Kurt from Girl Trouble scores
points, the music sadly, does not.
Finally, "Iron Cross," their musical
stab at the biker code of honour,
disappoints — even with the talents of biker rock original David
Allan present for inspiration. With
only one more song left, they
make up for that tepid trio of tunes
with a slightly revised rendition
ofthe Floyd Dakil number "Dance
Franny Dance" and substitute
Sammy, their organist
extraordinare, instead, whose
fancy footwork ends the LP.
So, this is enjoyable, but not
essential, and if you've never
heard of these guys before, I encourage you to start — now!
Bryce Dunn
VARIOUS ARTISTS
Cheap Shots Volume III
(Burning Heart)
The really good thing about the
Cheap Shots comps is that the
songs they choose from the albums are usually what I'd consider the best songs. As a result,
the Cheap Shots comps are very
good and I don't need to buy the
albums. Woo hoo! Volume III features the absolute best punk rock
Sweden, Australia, and America
have to offer in Millencolin,
Raised Fist, No Fun At All,
Bodyjar, Puffball, Samiam,
and Satanic Surfers. Lest we
forget the ska element of Burning Heart, there are also Liberator, Chickenpox, the
Skalatones, and Denmark's
Ducksoup, who seem to have
learned English watching Family
Feud. All in all, this is a very fine
20+ song compilation, much like
the two which preceded it.
Trevor Fielding
VARIOUS ARTISTS
Oldies But Goodies
(Landspeed)
I really would like to say good
things about this comp CD of
punk bands playing '50s songs,
but I really can't. I didn't like a
single song on it. Maybe it's just
that I don't like '50s songs, although I always thought
"Runaround Sue" would be a
good song to play punk. Shows
what I know.
Trevor Fielding
VARIOUS ARTISTS
Selector Dub Narcotic
(K)
Cold rice, cold rice, cold rice!
How do I love Calvin
Johnson? Let me count the ways
... there are 23 of them on this,
the newest K Records compilation. How can one label possibly have so many good artists?
Make Up Beck JSPX ICU
Artists you've never heard of but
should love include Miranda
July, Jen Smith, Tommy (fea-
turing Lois Maffeo), Panties,
and Star Athena. My faves are
Nikki McClure s crazy "Procreate," about the mating process
of the dragonfly, and the
Bartlebees "Willst Du Mir Mir
Gehen?" a short-and-sweet song
in that under-appreciated language of love, German. If you're
looking for a comprehensive
guide to what's up in the Northwest indie scene, this is the album for you. If not, it's still your
best bet for summer fun.
Julie Colero
13 E[g§£a£[!S Real Live
Action
IVE MUSIC REVIEWS
JUNE OF 44
DIANOGAH
THE BOOM
FORECASTS FAREWELL
Tuesday, April 14
Crosstown Traffic
I know that this show happened
ages ago, but it was definitely
good enough to warrant a quick
review. June of 44 and
Dianogah were amazing.
There's nothing quite like the
sounds coming out of Chicago
these days, as I'm sure any indie
kid knows. I missed local band
Forecasts Farewell, unfortunately, but did make it on time to
see jazzy sorts The Boom, accompanied by some crazy drunk
guy on the harmonica. Dianogah
did their thing, double-bass style,
and definitely impressed the past-
capacity crowd. When June of
44 took the stage, they took over.
Wow. Swaying and awestruck-
ness abounded amongst the
lookers-on, as the amazing emo-
math-rock-whatever categories-
they-define/defy wonders
played. This show rocked my
world. You missed out.
Julie Colero
GET UP KIDS
BRAID
TRIAL
BY A THREAD
RESERVE 34
SELF ESTEEM PROJECT
Saturday, May 9
Seylynn Hall
I would hope that you didn't miss
the Flex Your Head anniversary
show at Seylynn. If you did, be
sad; this show was great. The
highlights of my evening were
Braid and the Get Up Kids,
two bands who do hardcore a
little less hard. It was great to see
lots of kids out (yes, Vancouver,
we need more all-ages shows),
and everybody seemed to be
enjoying themselves.
Julie Colero
DJ SOUND WAR: V
Friday, May 15
Saturday, May 16
PNE Forum
I'm no hip-hop expert. I really
don't know anything about it. The
fifth annual DJ Sound War was
advertised scarcely, so I had no
idea why it would be in the Forum. If another 500 people had
attended the show, the sound
may not have been so awful.
On Friday, the djs started the
contest with what would turn out
to be an endless night of scratching. Next, it was the mcs' turn to
show themselves off. Most were
laid back, but a few had some
anger complexes with the dj and
the sound guy. The stage was set
for the finals on Saturday.
Breakdancing is always a
crowd favourite, and the dancers came through with some
crazy moves. My mouth was
open the whole time. I wish I
could say the same about the
groups that performed. CIA eventually got the prize, but I don't
know how much better they were
than everyone else.
If you weren't right in front of
the speakers, it was hard to hear
anything but a blended mess. The
winning mc was a woman named
Dee Dee something and I'm
sorry to say that I couldn't catch
the top dj's name. He was quick
and accurate, bur how can your
body keep up to that? Maybe it's
my hip hop ignorance, but I
would've chosen Kilocee to win
%vimw mmimm ^r^©^
-reo P/iKe-98
because he had the skills and was
musical at the same time. Who
am I to argue with the judges from
Sony Music?
All in all, I think most of the
crowd, half of which were cell
phone-toting minors, were entertained. I still don't know much
about urban music, though —
hopefully next year it will be in a
smaller venue, so I can actually
hear it.
Christa Min
NASHVILLE PUSSY
GAUNT
MURDER CITY DEVILS
Saturday, May 16
Crocodile Cafe, Seattle
After hearing so, so much about
Nashville Pussy, I didn't quite
know what to expect.  Every
magazine I've opened in the past
three months has had something
on them and has gone on and
on about how great they are. I
missed their show here. Can't
quite remember why, but I did.
So I was quite pleased that I was
able to see them in Seattle.
Anyway, this show rocked.
The venue was cool, the sound
was good, and it seemed like everybody in the building actually
wanted to be there.
The Murder City Devils
were great. I can't really describe
them, but it was cool.
Fucked up distorted lyrics sung
by some weird kid. I wasn't quite
sure what to make of the keyboards, but it sounded pretty
cool. It was kinda Dischordy.
there filming something for Japanese TV during their set. Some
idiot kept yelling, "Fuck MTV"
and tried to explain to anybody
who'd listen how MTV was killing the Seattle music scene. Itwas
pretty funny.
Gaunt were so good. I
would go to a show that they
headlined, no problem. They
beat the hell out of all the Fat
Wreck bands at their own game.
Tight, cool shit.
Nashville Pussy is incredibly overrated. There, that's said.
They're like the Dennis Rodman
of music. Honestly, if you want
shock value, go see Marilyn
Manson. I almost shit my pants
laughing when the singer took
off his bill cap and displayed his
bald-ass head to the crowd. The
two girls in the band looked like
they were melting when all their
makeup started running. Musically, however, they're pretty
good. A little too metal, but whatever. That stupid show-biz crap
just doesn't belong.
Dave Tolnai
CHIXDIGGIT
GROOVIE GHOULIES
Tuesday, May 19
Starfish Room
This show somehow failed to
capture my fancy, despite the
fact that it was an officially action-packed event. The
Groovie Ghoulies played a
spirited, rather too-long set of
punky rock 'n' roll tunes and
seemed to be having a great
time doing it. I decided to experiment with earplugs at this
show (does anyone eke get an
odd sort of ringing in their ears
at random moments of the day?),
so I couldn't hear any of the
songs' lyrics. I don't believe that
I missed too much.
When Chixdiggit came on
stage, lowered their mics to rock-
star-pose level, and started rocking out, I was curious to see how
they'd do. When I eyed their 40-
song set list, I decided that I'd
rather be home in my bed. What
I did see was jock-rock at its finest — fun and stuff, but how
many two-minute songs can anyone really take in one night?
Julie Colero
TRIBE 8
JODY BLEYLE
CHE CHAPTER 127
Thursday, May 21
Starfish Room
Rebel girl, you are the queen of
my world ... Jody Bleyle blew
me away.  No theatrics were
needed to prove that this girl is
one in a million. All by herself
up on stage, Jody stole the show
from fellow queer-corers Tribe
8 and local loudies-with-a-mes-
sage Che Chapter 127. Jody
played a short set, singing and
playing the guitar. I can't wait
for the Team Dresch performance at Under The Volcano later
this summer... Che Chapter 127
did a wonderful job of getting
the audience's adrenaline pumping, perfect to lead in to Tribe
Tribe 8 were fun, but a little
difficult to take seriously, what
with all the silliness and sex. I'm
sure you've all already heard
about all the nakedness and
such, so I'll spare the fine details.
I just wish some of those big reporters could've bothered to get
out early enough to see Jody;
damn, that woman is amazing.
Julie Colero
RUBE
Friday, May 22
Isadora's
Beautiful, heartwarming experiences are hard to come by at
live performances and I was
lucky enough to be at two in the
Mr. Mark Berube is a very
young man, a local boy,' with
an old, old soul. He performed
nine self-penned songs that
night, by himself and his guitar,
with a truthful voice and with a
passion that left him legless at
the end. He sang with so much
emotion and love that I was also
airborne by the end. His songs
are deeply personal but I identified with almost all of them. We
were right there on stage with
him sharing our thoughts, feel
ings
This
what
makes a live perfo
special. His guitar playing perfectly complements his singing
and he even played a lovely
number on the piano. He's a
gem. I would love to tell you
what and how he played in more
detail, but I wouldn't be able to
give it the justice it deserves. I
can tell you how I felt — once
again — lovely, just lovely.
Rebel Jazz
TRICHUR V. RAMACHANDRAN
Trichur (Carnatic vocal),
Mullaivasal G. Chandra-
mouli (violin), Umayalpuram
J. Mali (mrdangam)
Sunday, May 24
King Edward Campus, VCC
It is difficult to express completely,
deservedly, everything that happened that night. We had in front
of us, sitting on the floor, three
shining individual performers and
one blazing ensemble. They had
the entire audience entranced for
over three hours, giving us their
permeating version of Carnatic
(South Indian) classical music.
Trichur is a totally expressive
wonder who was chiefly responsible for our captivity (I wasn't
able to leave for my 10:30 bus).
I loved his voice. His voice is love.
Its range is phenomenal and he
went from the highest pitch to the
lowest, with all the points in between at a furious pace. We
found ourselves doing one of four
things: clapping our hands,
Cheshire smiling, closing our
eyes or nodding profusely to
Trichur's oscillating voice. Something else!
Umayalpuram plays the
mrdangam — a two-ended hand
drum — very intuitively, with a
driving and complex rhythm. He
only demonstrated his solo skills
once and it soared and dived and
swerved in and out. Sublime.
Mullaivasal almost remarkably matched Trichur's voice note
for note, with the same intensity
and speed. When he performed
alone, he played with a childlike
abandonment, beautifully skipping from one emotion to another.
Together they played as one.
Their minds and hearts were one.
They fed each other, they fed off
each other, and they loved feeding us and feeding us. There was
no such thing as time for these
three — it seemed like it was being constantly bent and manipulated around them to accommodate their swerving playing. It was
an incredible performance form
start to finish that left us all glowing inside and fizzing outside.
Rebel Jazz
HAYDEN
Wednesday, June 3
Railway Club
Hayden is a character. Those
of you who have seen him play
live will know what I am talking
about. Those of you who are still
waiting for a chance to be
blown away by this Canadian
wonder are missing something
spectacular and memorable.
Hayden is the only person who
can play a solo show for a room
full of strangers as though he
were playing for a group of his
friends in someone's house. Ab-
This particular show was
"by invite only," so the general
public was not given the chance
to laugh at Hayden's singularly
unique stories between songs.
The show was a solo acoustic
show, which was a contrast
from Hayden's band-backed
current tour across Canada.
Hayden played a variety of
songs culled mostly from his first album and EP and only a few
tracks from the recently released
The Closer I Get. As always,
Hayden was not only an excellent performer but also a
humourous MC, talking to the
crowd between songs and sharing snippets of his travels.
Crowd favourites included the
single "Bad as They Seem,"
"Hardly" and "Stern." The
crowd wanted to hear "In September" and "Trees Lounge" for
an encore, but Hayden swayed
from those selections, claiming
he could only play them with the
rest of the band. Instead, he
opted for an intense version of
"We Don't Mind."
Hayden and his band will
be back on July 1 2 for those of
you who are still waiting ... and
for those of you who want to
hear "In September" and "Trees
Lounge."
Patrick Gross
VERSUS
ELEVATOR THROUGH
TREMOLO FALLS
Friday, June 5
Starfish Room
I often feel so old and jaded at
shows these days. Or just apathetic. Or maybe just sleepy. I
hate it when all I want to do is
go home and slumber instead
of watching a band that, just
hours before, I was eagerly anticipating.
This
ning,
was ecstatic. I think I caught
most of local trio Tremolo Falls
(who share their rhythm section
with other locals, the wonderful
Citroen). They were least enjoyable when playing their instrumental tunes (damn that Tortoise, anyway ...), but for the
most part, their songs were interesting and catchy.
Elevator to Hell. Elevator
Through     Hell.     Elevator
Through. Next, Elevator. Soon
enough, they'll be known as
simply,   E.   Gotta   say,
though, that all this name-
change business is more e;
citing than their music. I'v
seen them before and must
say that, due to my o
fault of comparing them to
Eric's Trip (must rem*
ber: they're missing the very
integral members of Julie
Doiron and Chris Thompson
— both of whom have solo
projects now, by the way),
I wasn't too impressed. But
this time, they impressed m
even less. Really rock. Or
grunge. Not fun. And tc
too r
jch hai
broke that rhythm. It started off
kinda slow, but by the time Versus had finished their encore, I
made the entire
evening, even week, worthwhile. Sure, I was sleepy,
but I didn't care one bit. I
was glued to the floor —
standing, too. I was even
a little dubious at first because of their new album,
Two Cents Plus Tax, which
really didn't do it for me as
much as I'd expected (after repeated listenings, it
does more for me now). But Versus are a supreme live band.
They have captured the art of live
performance. No attitude,
what it
is. They take their pop songs and
turn them into rock songs, in the
best possible way.
And they played all their
good songs! Or maybe all their
songs are good ... but, anyhow,
even old, beautiful songs like
"Forest Fire"    showed up on
their set list. I was happy. Good
Versus, so good.
Mya Lower
TORTOISE
ISOTOPE 217
Sunday, June 7
Palladium
This show, the social event of the
season, disappointed me. I was
hyped for an epiphany, but
ended up slouched against a
wall, trying to feign interest. Iso
tope 217, a jazzier version of
Tortoise, put me off right from
the start with their hip and happening musical savvy. Yes, they
are experimental. No, I do not
want to listen to some woman in
a polka-dot blouse breathe funny
into a mic and bang on muffin
tins. Oh boy. Maybe I'm just out
of my league ...
Tortoise had their moments
for me, but were just too melodic
for a tired soul. It was beautiful
Backs lit. of course:
A Post-Rock Moment with Tortoise
watching the moments when
there were multiple vibraphone
players and Jeff Parker was spectacular in both Isotope 217 and
Tortoise. Despite these highlights, the show still came off as
a rather pretentious event. I'm
sure this evening probably
changed the lives of many small
masses, but I don't feel any different. Too bad for me, I guess.
Julie Colero
WORLD   CUP   SOCCER
ROYAL TRUX
Monday, June 15
Dingwall's, London
The soccer match didn't exactly unravel — the United
States was defeated at the
sport they don't seem to talk
about. Strange opening act
i    — no matter.
Royal Trux as a live ensemble features the core of
Jennifer Herema and Neil
Haggerty, supported by
hobo/bassplayer David Pajo,
Chestnut Station attendant
Rian Murphy singing back-up,
and some drummer who did
his best to play the part of rock
drummer, complete with solos.
The songs from the recent
Accelerator album lept off the
stage info a crowd decked in
appropriate raunch attire
sons unavoidable are learnt.
Haggerty does not think structure, but he plays with gi
knowledge of his guitar
makes for a worthwhile live
June 7th AT the PalIadium • photo: RiMta Folgar On The Dial
SUNDAYS
ARE YOU SERIOUS? MUSK 8:30-
12:00PM All ol time is measured by
its art. This show presents the most
recent new music from around the
world. Ears open.
THE ROCKERS SHOW 12*00-3:00PM
Reggae inna all styles and fashion.
BLOOD ON IHE SADDLE alt. 3:00-
5:00PM Real cowshit caught in yer
boots country.
WIRELESS alt. 3:00-5:OOPM
QUEER FM 6.-00-8KX)PM Dedicated
to the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and
transsexual communities of
Vancouver and listened to by
everyone. Lots of human interest
features, background on current
issues and greatmusic from musicians
of all sexual preferences and gender
identities.
HELLO INDIA 8K)0-9-O0PM
GEETANJAU      9:00-10:00PM
Geetanjali features a wide range of
music from India, including classical
music, both Hindustani and Carnatic,
popular music from Indian movies from
the 1930's to the 1990's, semklassical
music such os Ghazals and Bhajans,
and also Quawwalis, folk songs, etc.
THE SHOW 10:00PM-12:00AM
Strictly Hip Hop — Strictly
Underground — Strictly Vinyl With
your hosts Mr. Checka, Flip Out & J
Swing on the 1 & 2's.
IN THE GRIP OF INCOHERENCY
12-O0-4:00AM Drop yer gear and
slay up late. Naked radio for naked
people. Get bent. Love Dave. Eclectic
MONDAYS
BREAKFAST WITHTHE BROWNS 8:15-
11:00AM Your favourite brown-sters,
James and Peter, offer a savoury blend of
the familiar and exotic in a blend of aural
delights! Tune in and enjoy each weekly
brown plate special. Instrumental, trance,
lounge and ambience.
THE STUPID RADIO SHOW 11:00 AM-
1*00 PM Playing a spectrum of music
from garage band to big band, acoustic
to electric.
NEEDLEPOINT 1:00-3:00PM
Mismatched flop rock, a quick ride
downlown. Don't miss the Snow White
Float. I love ihe Snow White Float.
THE MEAT-EATING VEGAN 3:00-
4:00PM I endeavour to feature deod air,
verbal flatulence (only when I speak), a
work of music by a twentieth-century
composer—can you say minimalist?—
and whatever else appeals to me. Fag
and dyke positive. Mail in your requests,
because I am not a humarvanswering
machine.
EVIL VS. GOOD 4KX)-5*00PM Who
will triumph? Hardcore/punk from
beyond the grave.
BBC WORLD NEWS SERVICE 5:00-
5:30PM
BIRDWATCHERS 5:30-6:00PM join
the Sports department for their eye
on the T-birds.
HANS KLAUS' MISERY HOUR ab.
6*00-7*OOPM Mixofmostdepressing,
unheard and unlistenable melodies, tunes
and voices.
RADIO BLUE WARSAW alt. 6*00-
7:00PM Join Library queens Helen G.
and Kim on their info quests set to only
the best music.
HIP HOP HAVOC 7KX)-9K)0PM
THE JAZZ SHOW 940PM-124QAM
Vancouver's longest running prime lime
jazz program. Hosted by the ever-suave
Gavin Walker. Features at 11.
July 6: A day in the life of Art Blakey
and the Jazz Messengers, May 1961.
July 13: Street of Dreams: Guitar great
Grant Green with organist Larry
July 20: Bass master Richard Davis,
Muses (or R.D.
July 27: The Individualism of Gil Evans.
DRUM'N'SPACE   12:00-4:00AM
Vancouver's only drum V bass show.
Futuristic urban breakbeat at 160bpm.
TUESDAYS
J-POP WONDERLAND 6:30-8:30 AM
Japanese early morning imports!
AROUND THE MIDDLE EAST IN AN
HOUR8:30-9:30AMM,ddleeastern
music for your morning drive.
THIRD TIME'S THE CHARM 9:30-
11:30AM Torrid trash-rock, sleazy
surf ond pulsatin' punkprovide the perfect
scissor kick to your head every Tuesday
morn. There's no second chance when
Kung-Fu is used for evil wilh drunken fist
Bryce. Kilfyaa!!!!
FIVE HOUR LUNCH 11:30AM-
1:00PM "Have a rock V roll
McDonald's for lunch today!"
POLYFIUiR 2H)0-3:30PM
TWO WORDS: AVANT GARDE FOLK.
LADY DEATHSTRIKE'S BENTO 3:30-
5:00PM Power to the people! Feminist
news, hiphop tracks, lesbionic rock and
sushi galore!
DIGESTIVE TRACKS 6:0O-7*00PM
Underground hip hop music. Live avoir
mixing by DJ Flipout. Old school to next
school tracks. Chew on that shit.
THE UNHEARD MUSIC 7:00-
9:00PM Meat the unherd where
the unheard and the hordes of hardly
herd are heard, courtesy of host and
demo director Dale Sawyer. Herd
up! New music, independent bands.
RITMO LATINO 9:00-10:00PM Get
on board Vancouver's only tropical
fiesta express with your loco hosts
Rolando, Romy, and Paulo as they
shake it and wiggle it to the latest in
Salsa, Merengue, Cumbia and other
fiery fiesta favourites. Latin music so
hot it'll give you a tan! jjRADIO
SABROSAI!
WITCHDOCTOR HIGHBALL alt.
10r00PM-12:00AM Noise, ambient,
electronic, hip hop, free jazz, christian
better living Ip's, the occasional amateur
radio play, whatever.
AURAL TENTACLES 12-00AM-VERY
LATE Warning: This show is moody
and unpredictable. It encourages
insomnia and may prove to be hazardous to your health. Listener discretion is
advised. Ambient, ethnic, funk, pop,
1   A
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Breakfast
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around the
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Steve G.
9   1
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love
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breaks
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Colonel Sander's
Hideout
Steve and Mike
POWER
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Justin's   time
Little
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THE UNHEARD
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9   1
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mary tyler moore show
on air with
greased hair
1    9
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16 Jul
1998 dance, punk, electronic, synth, blues,
and unusual rock.
WEDNESDAYS
SUBURBAN JUNGLE 6:30-9:00AM
Some cheese for your morning bagel
DIGITAL ALARM CHRONOMETER
10-O0AM-12-OOPM electronic.
LOVESUCKS 12*00-2:00PMMusicat
work. (Cut up mixed genres — eclectic,
electric included but not mandatory).
MOTORDADDY 3:00-5KX)PM "eat,
sleep, ride, listen to Motordaddy,
repeat."
NOOZE 5*00PM-5:30PM
On vacation.
RACHEL'S SONG 5:30-6:00PM Info
on health and the environment. From
recycling and conservation projects to
diet, health, and consumption and
sustainability in the urban context.
July 8: Michael Burgess, UBC's chair of
biomedical ethics.
July 15: John Turvey from the Downtown
Eastside Youth Activities Society.
ESOTERIK alf.6:00-7:30PMAmbient/
electronic/industrial/ethnic/
experimental music for those of us who
know about the illithids.
SOLID STATE alt. 6:00-7:30PM
Featuring the latest in techno, trance,
acid and progressive house.
Spotlights on local artists, ticket
giveaways, & live performances.
Hosted by M-Path.
AND SOMETIMES WHYalt.7:30-
9:00PM versus, godspeed you
black emperor!, nutter butters...
these are a few of our fave-oh-
writ things, la la la!
MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW alt.
7:30-9:00PM Girl music of all
shapes and sizes.
FOLK OASIS 9:00-10KX)PM The
show that's not afraid to call itself
folk. Featuring the best in local and
international acoustic-roots music:
Singer-songwriters, Cajun, Celtic and
beyond!
STRAIGHT OUTTA JALLUNDHAR
10K»PM-12K)0AMLetDJsJindwa
and Bindwa immerse you in radioactive Bhungra! "Chakkh de phutay."
Listen to all our favourite Punjabi
tunes —remixesand originals. Brraaaah!
OPEN SEASON 12:00- 4:00AM
Mixed bag of suprises coming your
THURSDAYS
THE ARMO CONNECTION 6:30-
8:30AM Bringing you the best in west
coast rap.
THE LAST DESK 8:30-10:00AM Listen
carefully as Johnny B brings you
CiTR's classical music show.
Featuring Canadian composers,
amateur hour & more. Radio con
fuoco, for the masses.
FlUBUSTERalr. 10:00-11:30AMFrom
accordion to the backwoodsvia swingin'
lounge sounds... this show is a genre
free zone.
MUSIC FOR ROBOTS alt. 10:00-
11:30AM Viva La Robotica Revolution.
Estrogen-charged robots on Planet
Noiz.
CANADIAN LUNCH 11:30AM-
1:00PM From Tofino to Gander, Baffin
Island lo Portage La Prairie. The allCanadian
soundtrack for your midday snack!
SIEVE & MIKE 1.O0-2KJ0PM Crashing
the boys' club in the pit. Hard and fast,
heavy and slow. Listen to it, baby.
(hardcore).
JUSTIN'S TIME 2KK)-3KK)PM Serving
up your weekly dose of Shirley Horn and
olher jazz-filled confections.
FLEX YOUR HEAD 3:00-5:00PM
Hardcore and punk rock since 1989.
www.geocities.com/SunsetStrip/
club/6479/
BBC WORLD NEWS SERVICE 5:00-
5:30PM
ENTERTAINMENT DESK alt. 5:30-
6:00PM Movie reviews and criticism.
OUT FOR KICKS 6KX)-7:30PM No
Birkenstocks, nothing politically correct.
We don't get paid so you're damn right
we have fun with it. Hosted by Chris B.
ON AIR WITH GREASED HAIR 7:30-
9:00PM Roots of rock & roll.
UVE FROM THUNDERBIRD RADIO
HELL 9:00-11:00PM Local muzak
from 9. Live bandz from 10-11.
SLIPPERY SLOT 11:00PM-1:00AM
Farm animals, plush toys and Napalm
Death. These are a few of my favourite
things. It's all about shootin' the shit and
rock n' roll, baby.
FRIDAYS
CAUGHT IN THE RED 6:30-8:30AM
garage rock and other things.
VENUS FLYTRAP'S LOVE DEN 8:30-
10:00AM Join Greg in the love den
for a cocktail. We'll hear retro stuff,
groovy jazz, and thicker stuff too.
See you here ... and bring some ice.
SKA-TS SCENE-IK DRIVE! 10-00AM-
12:00PM Scotty and Julie, playing
the music that gets them dancing and
singing in the DJ booth... (no, really!)
THESE ARE THE BREAKS 12:00-
2:00PM A flipped up, freaked out,
full-on sample-heavy trip. Focusses
on anything with breakbeats, be it
old or new. Your doctor of the mix will
be DJ Splice, with special guests who
drop by to spin or chat.
UTIIE TWIN STARS 2*00-3:30PM
Underground, experimental, indie and
women. Jacuzzi space rock at its finest.
NARDWUAR THE HUMAN SERVIETTE PRESENTS... 3:30-4:00PM
NOIZ 4KX)-5K)0PM self-titled.
NOOZE 5KW-5:30PM On vacation.
FAR EAST SIDE SOUNDS alt. 6:00-
9:00PM Sounds of the transpacific
underground, from west Java to east Detroit.
Sound system operator, Don Chew.
AFRICAN RHYTHMS alt. 6:00-
9:00PM David "Love" Jones brings
you the best new and old jazz, soul,
Latin, samba, bossa & African music
from around the world.
HOMEBASS 9:00PM-12:00AM The
original live mixed dance program in
Vancouver. Hosted by DJ Noah, the
main focus of the show is techno, but
also includes some trance, acid, tribal,
etc. Guest DJ's, interviews,
retrospectives, giveaways, and more
are part of the flavour of homebass.
LIMP SINK 12:00-6:30AM The show
that does not hate you. Lullabies for
the christ-child with Mister G42 and
the late Postman Pat. (Industrial-
experimental-psychedelic-noise-
gothic — complete with a German-
English dictionary and a shiny space
suit). Alternates weeks with Tobias'
Paradigm Shift (Rant, phone-in and
kiss your mother with the guests).
SATURDAYS
THE SATURDAY EDGE   8:00AM-
12:00PM   Music you won't hear
anywhere else, studio guests, new
releases, British comedy sketches,
folk music calendar, ticket
giveaways, plus World Cup
Report at 11:30 AM. 8-9AM:
African/World roots. 9AM-12PM:
Celtic music and performances.
LICORICE ALLSORTS 12:00-
1:00PM All kinds of music spoken
word, interviews. Phone in for comments
or requests.Tune in and expose yourself
to new music and ideas.
POWERCHORD 1:00-3:00PM
Vancouver's only true metal show;
local demo tapes, imports and other
rarities. Gerald Rattlehead and Metal
Ron do the damage.
LUCKY SCRATCH 3:00-5:00PM
Blues and blues roots with your hosts
Anna and AJ.
RADIO FREE AMERICA 6:00-
8:00PM Join host Dave Emory and
colleague Nip Tuck for some extraordinary political research guaranteed to
make you think. Originally broadcast
on KFJC (Los Altos, Cal.).
LIVE! AT THE HI-HAT!! alt.
10:00PM-1:00AM "Live!-shows
and bands - admission $6.00 -
Performers are subject to change."
Maximum Soul.
REBEL JAZZ alt. 10:00PM- 1:00AM
High. Low. In the middle. All around.
Sense. Nonsense. Happy. Sad.
Content. Truth. Lies. Shiva. Shava.
None of fhe above. All of the above.
And a sea of synthesis.
EARWAXalt. 1:00AM- DAWN "Little
bit of drum, bit of bass and a whole
lot of noize." Late-night radio
soundclash destined to fist you hard.
Zine features, phat experimental
chunes, and the occasional turntable
symphony. "Money, we'll rock you
on 'til the break of dawn."— G. Smiley
CiTR
101.9 fM
Full Page
Half Page H
Mag Size V
Mag Size H
Pauper H
Pauper V
(101/4,,wxl2"h)
(101/4nwx5 7/8"h)
(3 1/4"wx5 7/8"h)
(5"wx2 7/8"h)
(3 1/4" w x2"w)
(l"wx4"h)
Call Kevin at 822-3017 (ext.3) and book your space NOW!
Our annual directory, chock full of contact numbers and
addresses of bands and the businesses that support
them, will be in the September issue. The deadline for
entries is July 15,1998.
r»....-.................'_,
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BEFORE July 15, 1998
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17S^§£[DSSa CiTR
charts
July 98 Long Vinyl
1 evaporators/goblir
2 various artists
3 fugazi
4 calexico
5 various artists
6 gaze
7 versus
8 plastikman
9 miranda July
10 closed caption radio
1 1 chixdiggit!
12 perfume tree
13 dirty three
i gotta rash nardwuar/r
selector dub narcotic
end hits
the black light
pretty in pop
dischord
quarterstick
endearing
is tax
novamute
brickyard
15
16 makeup
17 massive attack
18 weakerthans
19 various artists
20 bangs
21 nomeansno
22 bomboras
23 sloan
24 donnas
25 elevator through
26 saboteurs
27 compound red
28 the beans
29 forecasts farewell
30 godspeed you ...
31 secret stars
32 rocket from the crypt
33 tullycraft
34 little red car wreck
the binet-simon tes
slang x generator
born on the first of July     honest don's
feeler world domination
ocean songs touch & go
permutation ninjatune
how memory works jade tree
in mass mind dischord
fallow g-7 welcoming committee
funkungfusion
tiger beat
dance of the headless
head shrinkin1 fun
navy blues
35
the such
espionage garage
always a  pleasure
portage
s/t
f#a#~
genealogies
rftc
motor like a mother
girl crazy!
nm-a tune
kill rock stars
alt. tentacles
■mbie a go-go
murder
lookout!
murder
american pop
desoto
zulu
independent
shrimper
interscope
cher doll
remedial
HOW THE CHARTS WORK
The monthly charts are compiled based on the number of times a CD/LP
("long vinyl"), 7" ("short vinyl"), or demo tape ("indie home jobs") on CiTR's
playlist was played by our djs during the previous month (ie, "July" charts
reflect airply in June). Weekly charts can be received via email. Send mail to
"majordomo@unixg.ubc.ca" with the command: "subscribe citr-charts"*
July 98 Short Vinyl
1 the untamed youth youth runs wild! norton
2 the kiss offs bottle blonde peek-a-boo
3 forbidden dimension i kiss yer shadow ship rec'd
4 various artists teen scene volume three       misty lane
5 icu despite the smell of colors...       n.e.w./k
6 junior varsity pep rally rock! twist like this
7 the murder city devils dancing shoes     die young stay pretty
all the news that's fit to surf luna
8 the mulchmen
9 burning airlines
10 the cannanes
12 the seculars
13 bonfire madigan
14 tight bros
15 mybourile/mad planet
16 ladies who lunch
17 bunnygrunt/rizzo
18 the go-devils
19 local rabbits
20 frigg a go-go
King
carniva/sc
seedless
social skills
s/t
take you higher
split
everybody's happy ..
split
end
pops & company
frigg-a-licious!
harriet
grand royal
kittyboo
feline
360 twist
live at th
e hi-hat! top ten
alt.    s a t u rd
ays    10:00pm    1 : 0 0 a m
1    various artists     am
irican primitive, vol.   1: raw pre-war gospel
2   charles mingus
beneath the underdog
3   king sound quartet
"space is the place"
4   sun ra and his scien
ce arkestra             "ankh" & "moondance"
5   arab strap
philophobia
6    mogwai
"summer (klute's weird summer remix)"
7   ICU
"fortune cookie"
8    barry adamson
can't get loose 12"
9   john spencer blues explosion                "blues explosion attack"
10 greg oblivion and '
nappy jack"                 side 2 of  head shop
July 98 Indie Home Jobs
1       captain cook and the nootka s
ound             i'm glad for you
2       celestial magenta
in return
3       full sketch
sketchersize
4       the hounds of buskerville
blowin' off some steam
5      jP5
fuzzyhead pills
6      the go-devils
trigger me
7       run chico run
pusha girl
8       something ska
mr. roustabout
9       dreamy angel
laundromatte queen
10    the dirtmitts
amaze me
11     london paris
unmatched sock
12    the tremolo falls
twister
13    thee pirates
the pirate song
14    closed caption radio
people of the lie
15     submission hold
ed anger
16    tickertape parade
audience  with the pope
17    verona
war towers
18    royal grand prix
damned cover band
19    the colorifics
747 (now i see heaven)
20    emulsifier
up the down side
what we listened to ...
Secret Stars (genealogies) • Dianogah (as seen from
above) • Brand New Unit (diddleysquat) • Versus (two
CENTS PLUS TAX) • SWERVEDRIVER (99th DREAM) • GODSPEED
You Black Emperor! (f#a#«*) • Various Artists (listen
up!) • Pulp (this is hardcore) • Art Bell • Rose Melberg
(portola) • Quasi (featuring "birds") • Spinanes (strand)
• Tricky Woo (the enemy is real) •
i-Wtrwo -i.frrth'jj
Jason da SlLvcl Datebook
WHAT'S HAPPENING IN JULY
JUNE FRI 26 Destroyer, Gaze, Jessie Clearwater and
the Jets@Vancouver Press Club; Jungle, Bionic, Tricky
Woo@Starfish
SAT 27 CiTR PRESENTS: Duotang, Weakerthans,
Plumtree@Starfish; Hard Rubber
Orchestra@Performance Works; Coal@South Hill Candy
Shop
SUN 28  Curve@Palladium
MON 29 Jesus Lizard, Firewater@Starfish; Grrrls with
Guitars: Calliope, Anne Leader, Monica Lee@Railway
Club; Man or Astroman@Doublewide, Bellingham
TUE   30   All,   Hagfish,   Zeke@Starfish;   Diane
Barbarash@Portside Room, North Van.
WED JULY 1  Dayglo Abortions, Lommox, JP5@Star-
fish; "Writers in the Round:" Yvonne McSkimming & Mark
Fortin,   Taylor  James,   Kim   Kuzmu   with   Katie
MacColl@ANZA      Club;       Vancouver      DMC
Eliminations@Sonar
THU 2  Coal, Auburn, Pokey Smallchange@Starfish
FRI 3    JFK & The Conspirators, Gangster Politics,
Undercovers@Starfish; Dredger, Carbon 6, Midge, Heat
16@Elgin Hall (14250 Crescent Rd, White Rock)
SAT 4   Pure, Bossanova@Starfish
SUN 5 Junk Mail, Marquise@Ridge
MON 6 Junk Mail, Marquise@Ridge
TUE 7 Junk Mail, Marquise@Ridge
WED 8 Warped Tour: Bad Religion, Rancid, NOFX,
Reverend Horton Heat, Cherry Poppin' Daddies, Save
Ferries, The Specials, Deftones, MxPx plus Pietasters,
Bouncing Souls, CIV, Strung Out, Less Than Jake, Hi-
The Abyss 315 E. Broadway (side entrance) 488 6219
Anderson's Restaurant (Jazz on the Creek) 684 3777
Anza Club 3 W. 8th (Mount Pleasant) 876 7128
Arts Hotline 684 2787
Bassix 217 W. Hastings (at Cambie) 689 7734
Backstage Lounge  1585 Johnston (Granville Island) 687 1354
Black Sheep Books 2742 VV. 4th (at MacDonald) 732 5087
The Brickyard 315 Carrall St. 685 3978
Cafe Deux Soleils 2096 Commercial (the Drive) 254 1195
Cafe Vieux Montreal 317 E. Broadway (Mount Pleasant)    873 1331
Caprice Theatre 965 Granville  (Granville Mall) 683 6099
Celebrities  1022 Davie (at Burrard) 689 3180
Cellar Jazz Cafe 3611 W. Broadway (downstairs) 738 1959
Chameleon Urban Lounge 801 W. Georgia (Downtown) 669 0806
Chan Centre for the Performing Arts 6265 Crescent Rd (UBC)
Club Mardi Gras 398 Richards St. 687 5007
CN Imax Theatre 999 Canada Place 682 4629
Columbia Hotel 303 Columbia  (at Cordova) 683 3757
Commodore Lanes 838 Granville  (Granville Mall) 681 1531
Cordova Cafe 307 Cordova  (Gastown) 683 5637
Crosstown Traffic 316 W. Hastings (downtown) 669 7573
Denman Place Cinema   1030 Denman  (West End) 683 2201
Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Garden Main Hall 578 Carrall St. 662 3207
DV8 515 Davie (downtown) 682 4388
Firehall Arts Centre 80 E. Cordova (at Main) 689 0926
Food Not Bombs Vancouver 872 6719
Frederic Wood Theatre  (UBC) 822 2678
Garage Pub 2889 E. Hastings (downtown) 822 9364
Gastown Theatre 36 Powell (Gastown) 684 MASK
The Gate  1176 Granville (downtown) 688 8701
Greg's Place 45844 Yale Rd. (Chilliwack) 795 3334
The Grind Gallery 4124 Main (Mt. Pleasant) 322 6057
SUBMISSIONS TO DATEBOOK ARE FREE!
FO HAVE YOUR EVENT LISTED, FAX ALL THE RELEVANT INFO (WHO, WHERE, WHEN) TC
822 9364, ATTENTION "DATEBOOK." DEADLINE FOR THE AUGUST ISSUE IS JULY 15TH!
Standard, Real McKenzies, Tilt, more...@PNE; Time
Waits, Spacious Couch@Starfish
THU 9 Gandharvas, Far@Starfish
FRI 10 Jar, God Awakens Petrified, Phrapp@Starfish;
Dub Narcotic@Doublewide, Bellingham; Brand New
Unit, 22 Jacks, Swingin' Utters@Bridgeview Hall, Surrey; Victor Borge@Orpheum
SAT 11 Ani DifrancO@Plaza of Nations; Edgefest@UBC
Thunderbird Stadium; Brian Evans@Gateway Theatre;
The Makers@Doublewide, Bellingham
SUN 12 Hayden@Arts Club Theatre
MON    13      John   Lee   Hooker@Rage;   Vonda
Shepard@Vogue
TUE 14  Year of the Horse, Wings of Desire@Ridge
WED   15     Dionysus,  King Friday,  Green  Eyed
Jealousy@Starfish; The Dirty Dozen Band@Yale
THU 16  Patty Griffin@Starfish
FRI 17 Strapping Young Lad@Starfish; Vancouver Folk
Music Festival@Jericho Beach Park; Yes@GM Place
SAT   18     Clutch,  Phunk Junkeez@Starfish; Josh
Wink@Sonar; Vancouver Folk Music Festival@Jericho
Beach Park
SUN 19 Gravity Kills@Starfish;Hush@Club Millenium
(5th floor, 595 Hornby St.); Vancouver Folk Music
Fesfivat@Jericho Beach Park
MON 20  Morbid Angel, Vader, lncantation@Starfish
TUE 21   Sean Lennon, Rufus Wainwright@Sonar
WED 22  Bomboras@Starfish
THU 23   Nancy Weisler@Starfish
FRI 24 Jazzberry Ram@Starfish
SAT 25   lllluminares lantern festival@Trout Lake (15th
and    Victoria,     9pm);    Justin    Hines    &    The
Dominoes@Starfish
SUN 26  The Fixx@Richard's on Richards
WED 29 Grrrls with Guitars: Calliope, Anne Leader,
Monica Lee@Railway;
THU 30 Four Letter Word, Youth Brigade, Pinhead
Circus@Starfish; Katie MacColl@South Hill Candy Shop
FRI 31   Rosie Flores@Doublewide, Bellingham
SAT AUG 1  Beastie Boys, A Tribe Called Quest, Money
Mark@PNE Coliseum
VENUES • BARS • THEATERS • RESTAURANTS • RECORD STORES
Hollywood Theatre 3123 W. Broadway (Kitsilano)
Hot Jazz Society 2120 Main (Mt. Pleasant)
It's A Secret 1221 Granville St. (downtown)
Jericho Arts Centre  1600 Discovery (Pt. Grey)
Jupiter Cafe & Billiards     1216 (near Demon St)
La Quena   1111 Commercial (the Drive)
The Lotus Club 455 Abbott (Gastown)
Lucky's 3972 Main
Luv-A-Fair  1275 Seymour (downtown)
Mars  1320 Richards (downtown)
Maximum Blues Pub  1176 Granville (downtown)
Medialuna   1926 W. Broadway
Minoru Pavillion     7191 Granville (Richmond)
Moon Base Gallery 231 Carrall St. (gastown)
Mora 6 Powell  (Gastown)
Naam Restaurant 2724 W 4th Ave (kitsilano)
Old American Pub 928 Main  (downtown)
Orpheum Theatre Smithe & Seymour (downtown)
Pacific Cinematheque  1131 Howe (downtown)
Palladium (formerly Graceland) 1250 Richards (downtown)
Paradise 27 Church  (New West)
Paradise Cinema 919 Granville (Granville Mall)
Park Theatre 3440 Cambie (South Vancouver)
Picadilly Pub 630 W. Pender (at Seymour)
Pitt Gallery 317 W. Hastings (downtown)
Plaza Theatre 881 Granville  (Granville Mall)
Purple Onion   15 Water St. (gastown)
Queen Elizabeth Theatre Hamilton & Georgia
Raffels Lounge  1221 Granville (downtown)
The Rage 750 Pacific Blvd. South  (Plaza of Nations)
Railway Club 579 Dunsmuir (at Seymour)
Richard's On Richards  1036 Richards (downtown)
738 3211
873 4131
688 7755
224 8007
251 6626
685 7777
875 9858
685 3288
230 MARS
688 8701
608.0913
689 0649
738 7151
682 3291
665 3050
688 3456
688 2648
525 0371
681 1732
876 2747
682 3221
681 6740
685 7050
602 9442
665 3050
473 1593
685 5585
681 1625
687 6794
Ridge Cinema 3131 Arbutus (at 16th Ave.)
Russian Hall 600 Campbell  (Chinatown)
Scratch Records   109 W. Cordova  (Gastown)
Seylynn Hall   605 Mountain Hwy (North Van)
Shadbolt Centre for the Arts 6450 Deer Lake Ave. (Bby)
Sonar 66 Water (Gastown)
Southhill Candy Shop 4198 Main  (at 26th)
Squish'd Knish 4470 Main (at 29th)
The Space 316 Hastings (downtown)
Starfish Room   1055 Homer (downtown)
Starlight Cinema 935 Denman (West End)
Station Street Arts Centre 930 Station  (off Main)
St. Regis Hotel 602 Dunsmiur (downtown)
Stone Temple Cabaret  1082 Granville St. (downtown)
Sugar Refinery   1115 Granville (downtown)
Theatre E  254 E. Hastings (Chinatown)
Thunderbird Ent. Centre 120 W. 16th St. (N. Van)
Vancouver E. Cultural Centre   1895Venables (at Victoria)
Vancouver Little Theatre 3102 Main  (Mt. Pleasant)
Vancouver Press Club 2215 Granville (S.Granville)
Varsity Theatre 4375 W. 10th  (Point Grey)
Vert/Washout  1020 Granville (dowtown)
Video In Studios   1965 Main  (Mt. Pleasant)
Virgin Mega Store 788 Burrard (at Robson)
Vogue Theatre 918 Granville  (Granville Mall)
Waterfront Theatre  1405 Anderson (Granville Is.)
Western Front (303 E. 8th Ave)
Whip Gallery 209 E. 6th Ave (at Main)
W.I.S.E. Hall   1882Adanac  (the Drive)
Women In Print 3566 W 4th  (Kitsilano)
Yale Blues Pub   1300 Granville (downtown)
Zulu Records 1869 W. 4th  (Kitsilano)
19
738 6311
874 6200
687 6355
291 6864
683 6695
876 7463
879 9017
682 4171
689 0096
688 3312
488 1333
683 2004
681 8915
988 2473
254 9578
876 4165
738 7015
222 2235
872 2999
872 8337
669 2289
331 7909
685 6217
876 9343
874 4687
254 5858
732 4128
681 9253
738 3232 ZULU'S JULY
TIP SHE
HANDICAPPING TODAY'S LATEST
BATCH OF GREAT NEW RELEASES!
BILLY BRAGG & WILCO
Mermaid Avenue CD
When Woody Guthrie died in 1967 he let
behind not only a recorded legacy of
folk songs but a yardstick which all other singer
songwiters might measure themselves by.
30 years later another celebrated singer songwriter, BILLY BRAGG, was given access to over
1000 complete Guthrie lyrics and was asked by
give these lyrics some music to sing themselves by. B
another celebrated singer songwriter, Jeff Tweedy and his band WILCO and
the result is a beautiful bridge between the post-war '40s and the pre-milleni-
um late '90s. Timeless songs for the times of life. VERDICT: KEY IN TO THIS
TRIED WINNER.
$16.98 CD
WILL OLDHAM
Black/Rich Music cd/ip
Where is the way to the dwelling of the light?
Can you lift up your voice to the clouds that the
floods of heaven may cover you? The answer to
these and other questions lie in the fiery organ,
the slow guitar strum, and the whirlwind
black/rich sermons of the prolific Palace
preacher. WILL OLDHAM. Save yourself brothers and sisters. Save yourself.
VERDICT: SEASONED JOCKEY— MAKES GOOD SENSE.
$10.98 CD 9.98 LP
ROBERT POLLARD
Waved Out CD/LP
Summer has finally arrived and now so has it's soundtrack. In true ROBERT
POLLARD style, the Guided By Voices chief engineer and medicine man has
combined '60s psychedelia - "Wigged Out," with 70s spacey classic rock -
"Wacked Out," and '80s Brit pop a go go - "Way Out," for a '90s sound that's...
well... Waved Out"! VERDICT: ECCENTRIC OUTSIDER/DARKHORSE!
$16.98 CD $10.98 LP
DAVE ALVIN
Blackjack David CD
"The dusty street below, the unforgiving heat,
tumbleweeds and sage, minute whirlpools of
sand, whispers, and then memories cloud your
head — high noon at Blackjack Davids
saloon." Join the original Blaster, DAVE ALVIN
for his new album of 11 beautiful postcards
from the heart of the country VERDICT: GOOD INSIDE SPEED, A FACTOR!
$16.98 CD
SPINANES
Arches And Aisles CD
With a few good ones already under her belt,
Rebecca Gates has come up with another package of swell, thoughtful pop. Working with a
larger crew, Gates' songs are worked out completely, but without ever becoming over-extended or overblown. This is a mature and solid
album, sure to satisfy many long-term fans, and convince even more new ones
to pay dutiful attention. Good luck. VERDICT: PLENTY OF POP POTENTIAL.
Jk^
RANCID
Life Won't Wait CD/LP
Combining old school 77 punk, two-tone ska, and a new
brand of energy — these Last Of The Mohicans know
the true depth of America's pop/punk inroads. A new album destined to rock
loudly — the wait is up — all that you thought would keep has now turned
RANCID! VERDICT: TAB THESE WORKHORSES FOR NOW!
$16.98 CD   $16.98 2LP   Available June 30th
NOMEANSNO
Dance Of The Headless
Bourgeoisie cd/lp
Chalk it up! This is their 15th!! full-length
release — packed with raw riffage and unmistakable trademark NOMEANSNO energy —
smarts, skill and super songs, you can't miss!
Look for local shows to be announced!
VERDICT: THESE EXPERIENCED TROTTERS = ONE SMART BET!
31   $14.98 CD   $12.98 LP   Available June 30Hi
Bluff!
Various Artists
0HCANADUH2CQ/LP
Hey, Punk! Stand up, take your hat off and pay
tribute to... yourself, eh. Yup, this second collection of classic Canadian punk rock —
covered by a bevy of contemporary, fluent and
respectful upstarts — will lift your sense of
civic interest and good natured , national pride.
Oh yes, from sweet and brilliant ocean to ocean, this Is
country. Fly the flag — then stage dive! VERDICT: ODDS ONFAVES, YES!
$14.98 CD   $11.98 LP   Available June 30th
GODSPEED YOU BLACK EMPEROR
F#A#flOCD
Recently signed to Kranky and based out of Montreal, this enigmatic, extended — 10-piece — band, produce very beatiful and evocative noise. Textured,
thematic soundscapes are interspersed here with spoken word moments and
flat out rockers. There's a lot to get into: this will appeal to fans of Chicago's
"scene" or space-rock enthusiasts as much as "chamber" indie-rock supporters (ie, Rachel's) — or to anyone adventurous, really. This is a striking first
notice from an as yet still shadowy new outfit. And we don't know what the
name means either. VERDICT: DEFINITELY DESERVES A PIECE OF THE
PRIZE.
$16.98 CD
JOEL R.L. PHELPS
The Downer Trio: 3 CD
Leaving Silkworm was the best thing that could
have happened to young MR. PHELPS. For
although Silkworm are competent in their ow
right, their more rock-centered imperative
stymied PHELPS' passionate, country-follk
inflected character. Now on this second full-
length, here with the tasteful and skilled Downer trio. PHELPS really stretches out, exploring his song's subtleties with drama, control and power. This is
a very good record by a performer who is only even going to get better.
VERDICT: LOOKS LIKE A TIMELY EARFUL.
Hi
Various Artists
USTEN UP!! CD
A must buy. This well-executed CD
showcases the wealth of talent possi-   ^
ble from a supportive learning environ-   WjfS^fjS
ment. Students from grades 3-12 of     *■
Vancouver's Fraser Academy perform
many fine original rock/pop compositions, full of genuine verve. With great production too, you
wrong with this one!
$12.98 CD
COAL
One Track Mind CD
Local faves stoke the embers for this
lustrous release, with lots of finely
crafted gems to keep any evening
simmering.
$14.98 CD
OTHER JULY FACTORS
ARAB STRAP The Weekend
Never Starts Around Here cd
(re-issue)
BOARDS OF CANADA Music Has
The Right... cd
WILL OLDHAM Little Joys cd-ep
THE SADIES Precious
ATIVIN German Water cd/lp
HIS NAME IS ALIVE Ft. Lake CD
BARRY ADAMSON As Above So
Below cd/u>
BEASTIE BOYS Intergalactic
CD-EP/12"
CAUSTIC WINDOW (Aphex Twin)
self-titled cd
DONKEY ENGINE Broke Channel
CD
VANDALS Hitler Bad, John
Good CD/LP
TRANSGLOBAL UNDERGROUND
Rejoice Rejoice co
CLOSED CAPTION RADIO Slang
X Generator cd
JOHN LURIE Fishing With John
■Soundtrack) CD
THE JESUS AND MARY CHAIN
$16.98 CD
JE3D
wjmii.uiiiii
ESI
$16.98 CD
NEW VINYL SALE Yup, lots of great
titles have just been marked down by 25%!
Come early for good one-of-a-kind pickings!
CANADA DAY COUPON
ONE DAY ONLY! WITH THIS COUPON RECEIVE
25%OFF,
I USED CDs, VINYL, AND CASSETTES I
AND RECEIVE A GRAB BAG OF CANADIANA!
CANADA DAY STORE HOURS 12 6

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