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 disorder
.'•.•• •»>
Biff,
Pow ♦
• • • • •
• • •••
That Magazine from CiTR 101.9 fM Wednesi>w, March l%r/$sr ^-TJ*
«SR£AT
jdm 3AN&S
SHOWTIME
is  10:00 ft**
[CiTR fm
101.9
presents
^
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&4R-
iE/flXEl
WF v ▼ r v
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* •*
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1250 RICHARDS ST. ALLEY ENTRANCE 688-2648
^j That Magazine from CITR FM 102
MARCH 1989* ISSUE #74
EDITOR Kevin Smith
EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS Viola Funk
WRITERS Janis McKenzie, Dave Watson,
Michael Leduc, Keith Parry, Randy Iwata,
Sedro Wooley II, Lane Dunlop, W.W., J.R.
French, Sheila West.
ART DIRECTOR Marty George
ARTISTS Sheila West
PHOTOGRAPHERS Mandel Ngan,
Chris Helgren
COVER Jaye Laiti
DESIGN DIRECTOR Michael Grigg
LAYOUT BY Harley McCauley, Viola Funk,
Laura Corobotiuc, Martin Richards
PROGRAM GUIDE BY Kathryn Hayashi
TYPESETTING AMS Desktop Publishing
ADVERTISING AND DISTRIBUTION
MANAGER Matt Richards
ACCOUNTS AND SUBSCRIPTION GUY
Randy Iwata
PUBLISHER Harry Hertscheg
Discorder is That Magazine from CiTR 101.9 fM/
published monthly by the Student Radio Society of
the University of British Columbia/printed in Surrey,
Canada. Discorder prints what it wants/ the CiTR
On the Dial program guide/the CiTR Spinlist record
chart/17,500 copies to over 200 spots. Twelve-month
subscriptions are $12in Canada/$ 12 (US) to the US/
$20 elsewhere/payable by cheque to Discorder Magazine. We want your stuff: send in stories, drawings,
photos/ and we won't give it back.
CiTR 101.9 fM is 1800 watts of stereophonic bliss/
on cable fM from UBC to Langley, Squamish to Point
Roberts, USA, but not on Shaw Cable in White Rock
(bug them about it) /now available on most clock
radios and in cars too.
Office hours for CiTR, Discorder, CiTR Mobile
Sound Rental are Mon-Fri, 10am - 4pm (please avoid
Fri-afts.) Call Office 228-3017/News Sports 224-
4320/DI 228-CiTR. Send stuff to Discorder Magazine or CiTR Radio/ SUB Rm 233/UBC, Vancouver,
BC/V6T 2A5 /Fax (604) 228-6093.
blank"
TAPES
■ BLANK TAPE
MANUFACTURER
■ CUSTOM LENGTH BLANK
TAPES
■ C 10 to C 100
■ CHROME + NORM
■ 1100,000 +
■ ACCURATE OTARI LOADERS
TAPE
DUPLICATING
■ REAL TIME DUPLICATING
■ HIGH SPEED DUPLICATING
■ EVERY TAPE CUT TO
LENGTH
■ NAKAMICHI 3 HEAD PRO
DECKS
■ PRINTING AND
PACKAGING
■ DIGITAL MASTERING
TAPE DUPLICATING CENTRE
#109-2182 West 12th Ave., Vancouver
(604) 734-4546
<— — — — — — — — — ——— — — — — — — -
6 8-TRACKING IN THE 80s
Cheap, Entertaining And Hip
7 HIGH POWER
Are You Receiving?
8 WOLFGANG PRESS
A Non-4AD Sounding Band. O.K.?
12 COLLEGE RADIO
What's The Point?
14 STICKDOG
They Like To Make An Impact
18 ART & ABOUT
The Artist's Life On The Margin
22 HITLERS REVENGE
What The Hell Is This Guy's Problem
4 AIRHEAD
readers who write
10 LOCAL MOTION
in a city near you
16 UNDER REVIEW
nomeansno, lyres, kiss and more
19 VIDEO EYE
looking out for your best interests
20 ON THE DIAL
even/person's guide to Citr
21 SPINLIST
the hipper sounds
21 TAPE-A-MANIA
the syndrome
DDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD
CttlN UPTON
□
□
D
□
D
D
□
□
D
D
■□
D
□
D
D
D
D
D
P
DDDDDDDDD
18 Page Comic
"Pukezine"  SI
6424 Chester
Van BC V5W 3C3   DDDDDDDDDD 6138 SUB Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C
V6T 2AS
Letter Read Please
To Discorder please twelve month subscription a send me. Japan in Canadian teacher English. Money order get a tried...understand couldn't I
saying he was. what fuck the post office at the. So cash
here is the.
O.K.?
P.S.
Ten Reasons To Live (In Japan):
1. Sushi
2. Making 50 bucks an hour teaching English
3. Making 50 bucks an hour after being on Welfare for
three years
4. People want to give you presents a lot
5. Daily front page news of the dying emperor's
bowel movements
6. Earthquakes
7. Awesome art—traditional and modem
8. Shochu (Japanes vodka)
9. Calling your students "li'l motherfuckers" and not
getting fired 'cause no one knows what it means
1 O.Japanese television—who needs LSD?
Ten Reasons To Die (In Japan):
1. Mass conformity! (Ohhhh Noooo!)
2. People assuming because you're white, you're
American
3. Not understanding if people are complimenting
you or calling you a white maggot
4. Can't order pizza after 10 PM
5. Movies are fifteen bucks
6. Men are afraid of you (except for the drunk businessmen who ask "How much?")
7. Women are subservient does
8. No Batman comics in English
9. No Welfare Wednesdays
lO.Everyone's happy in their places and if not they'll
learn to like it.
M.A. Mitchell
Rat, Man Or Studmuffln?
Dear Mr Ratman,
Regarding "Ratman's Retort" in the January issue: Take that stick out of your ass! That was a
GREAT interview (December issue). I laughed my
fucking head off. Mr Baker was just reporting what he
saw/heard. It made great reading. And yes, you do
look like a dirthead.
How can you refuse to be interviewed
because the interviewer wore a baseball cap? You're
supposed to be the majorly "alternative" studmuffin,
right? So why does a person's choice of head gear
matter? Eh? Eh? I wore a moose hat to my mother's
wedding. My sister was bit by a moose once... No
really she was carving her initials into its tail with a
pen knife...
But anyways, that's all for now...
Whole Wheat, Raisins coated with Sugar
and Hydrogenated Vegetable Oil, Wheat Bran, Sugar,
Salt, Seduced Iron, Niacinimide, Thiamine Mononi-
tate, Calcium Datothenate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Folic Acid.
I bet you, being such an expert, can tell me
what that is?
P.S. Ditch the name, Girls! Girls! Girls!—You sound
like a bunch of pre-pubes!
The Wraith
To Live And Die In Scotland
Dear Airhead,
We sit here on our loathsome spotty expatriate behinds, squeezing tartan blackheads, and not
giving a tinker's cuss for the struggling artist. We are
excrement!
Be that as it may, here's a Scottish Top
Ten from a dingy, smoke-filled, hops-reeking bedsit
in the heart of Portebello, Edinburgh:
Ten Reasons To Live In Scotland:
I   JACKLAVIN'S !      SATURDAY 3-8 pm
I JAM SESSIONS!       SUNDAY7-12pm 1. Scottish girls named Julie
2. Mario's kebabs, with extra hot sauce
3. Edinburgh is south of Oslo
4. The Bay City Rollers retired
5. Squatting nude in front of a gas fire
6. Sean Connery was a lifeguard in Por-
tobcllo
7. Fresh lobster and prawns preferred by
the Ancient Gaelic Mariner in a pub on
the Isle of Skye
8. Haven't thought of "King Bill" Van
der Zalm for months
9. Valerie Giscard d'Estaing the cat
10. Players Light priority packages from
home
Ten Reasons To Die In Scotland:
1. Scottish girls named Julie
2. Deep-fried pizza
3. Kylie Minogue, Rick Astley, Bros,
Acid House
4. Baggy jeans. Really baggy jeans
5. Hopping heaps of dog faeces on the way
down "Dog Shit Alley" in Portobello
6. Margaret Thatcher aka Maggot
Thrasher
7. "Which part of the States are you from?"
8. It constantly rains cats, dogs and air
planes
9. Eating the worm at the bottom of a New
Year's bottle of Mezcal
10. Absent friends.
Faithfully yours,
Chris Kovacs & Rick Gleason,
Portobello 4:17 AM
llts-T-TrueM
COLLEGE RADIO-WHAT IS THE POINT?
What do you think? What do we think? It seems like as
good a time as any to consider the role of college radio,
and CiTR in particular, given CiTR's recent increase in
power. Check out page 12 for an attempt at some kind
of an answer. Speaking of High Power, an update and
query regarding the subject can be found on page 8.
Upcoming CiTR concert presentations: February 25th-Country Dick's Cavalcade of Stars at the
Commodore; March lst-Michelle Shocked and
Cowboy Junkies at the Commodore and No Fun with
Four Wheel Drive at Graceland; Gobetwecns on
March 9th at the Town Pump; That Petrol Emotion
and Voice of ?.he Beehive on the 15th at 86 St.; all ages
gig with DOA on the 18th at the SUB Ballroom; and
finally (God willing), The Red Hot Chilli Peppers at
the Commodore on the 31st.
UPCOMING REAL LIVE ACTION:
Mar. 3-Sons of Freedom at the Commodore
7-© at the Town Pump
8-Damage C'est Damage at 86 St.
9-Oversoul 7 and Picasso Set at 86 St.
cw§ipt?
I— Every Fri. Live Music —
(no Cover Charge)
Feb. 24   VOYAGEURS
Flamenco Guitar
Mar. 3     IAN A. MCCONKEY
Flamenco Guitar and
Original Compositions
 on Spanish Guitar
■ GALLERY OPENING
Robert Coates
(Colour Photography)
— Starting Feb 25 —
10% DISCOUNT
For College Students
With This Ad
&s//e
Cafa
•ry       Lara      Rcsfauranf
724Nel»on S* (berw^n ftmnvi/fe 4 H*w«)
222-4444
r-\<«/i
JU-JU 939 DAVIE
clothing, accessories
MARCH 1989   5 8-TRACKING IN THE EIGHTIES
(AND BEYOND)
One of the nice things about buying
music in 1989 is the multiple formats available to us, the consumer.
One would think that with lps, cds
and cassettes available for most releases, all
you'd have to do is choose your favorite format.
Well friends, don't be duped! If music is what
you're into, take a clear look at what's available.
You'll discover the format of the smart buyer,
the best deal in town, the godsend of pre-re-
corded music. What is it? Why, the almighty 8-
track. With the unfortunate demise of this format in recent years, we can now objectively
compare 8-tracks to lps, cds and cassettes, and
understand why the 8-track rates so highly.
My fascination with 8-tracks began acouple
summers ago when I saw a complete David
Bowie collection in a friend's truck. I think it
was the buttons, the "flipping of the tracks", on
the player that really appealed to me. When I
EDDY
ARNOLD
SO YOU'RE SERIOUS ABOUT 8-TRACKS?
Places to Look Sally Ann,
Value Village,
Beethoven
^iiiSPm^^Sl
Garage Sales,
Auctions
(I once saw 10 8-track car players go
for $10. No need for that person to
buy anymore Christmas gifts that
year.)
For those lucky enough to have an 8-
track player that records, rumour
has it that certain Radio Shack stores
still carry blank 8-tracks at ridiculously low prices. Otherwise, buy a
godawful 8-track title for $.25 or
less, and tape over it.
Quadraphonic A rare breed indeed. This is a more
specialized field for the advanced 8
track connoisseur. I've come across
John Lennon's Walls and Bridges
and Helen Reddy's Greatest Hits
quad 8-tracks. Now all I need is my
quad decoder.
Yes, it did happen. When "new
wave"was coming in, 8-tracks were
going out. Yet, their paths did cross
briefly. I've seen the Stranglers'
Rattus Norvegicus, Talking
Heads 77, and the Sex Pis-
tols'Never Mind the Bollocks
on 8-track, to name but a few. I
wonder  why they didn't catch
LcH      |
CD to 8-Track Think about it. All the advantages of
modem digital technology with all
the hipness of yesteryear.
^*^
6   DISCORDER
.;..;-.■";>■'-
discovered you could obtain practically any 8-
track for less than $1,1 knew I had to purchase
some tapes for myself.
First, I picked up a player for $5 at a swap
meet. And itrecords, too. (True 8-trackers should
always look for this important feature.) Next
came the purchase of a fine collection of 8-
tracks (Deep Purple, Mott the Hoople, The
Partridge Family, The Beatles, Al Green,
etc.) for $.25 to $1 each. In no time I built up a
library of about 30 tapes for the equivalent cost
of a single cd.
8-track tapes and cds aren't as different as
you might think. Much like a cd player, an
8-track player gives you the option of advancing to another song with the press of a
button. As well, a tape will play for as long as
you have the tape in the player like the "repeat"
option available on cd players. Both cds and 8-
tracks offer many hard to get tunes, but the latter
format does so at a very affordable price. For instance, I found a Delphonics 8-track for $.25.
Try finding one of their albums. And luckily, I
don't think the demand exists, yet, to justify the
creation of exorbitantly priced "collectors" 8-
tracks.
8-tracks also possess an outstanding feature not found on cds, lps, or cassettes. It's the
"fade out-fade in" effect on songs spread over
more than a single track. Since each track on the
tape is the same length, some songs have to be
broken up and fit onto two different tracks. This
doesn't say much for the protection of artistic
integrity, but it can be a good thing, particularly
for drum solos.
Alas, 8-tracks do have problems. As most
tapes are at least 10 years old, some have an
annoying habit of snapping apart while they're
changing from one track to another. Then again,
this drawback is fitting if you believe that pop
music really is disposable. Disposable pop at an
affordable price.
All of this leads us up to modern times and
that pertinent question: What does the future
have in store for the 8-track? Well, probably not
much as far as new releases. Occasionally you'll
see an ad on late night TV for something like
Hank Snow's Greatest Hits on lp, cd, cassette
and 8-track. Our beloved format is usually reserved for long haul truck drivers into country
and western. So don't hold your breath waiting
for new pop titles. The end properly came for
rock V roll 8-track fans when the Columbia
Record Club (mail order division) ceased of-
feriing 8-tracks as a "preferred format" about a
year ago. Sigh.
Perhaps someday a label like Rhino Records will put out 8-track's Greatest Hits for that
specialized kind of consumer. My suggestion:
include essential selections from "road bands"
like The A Urn an Brothers, Uriah Heep, Mountain, BTO, Golden Earring, etc. Until that day,
good luck, keep the faith, and always stay on the
lookout for good 8-tracks. You won't regret it.
Sedro Wooley II ""
=^ja  J      fid
Elevauon and nearby tall buildings are Urn most
important influences on how reception varies from SW^fj
impo!
house to house or even froi
;ption
room to room.
If your radio has no external antenna connections (such as a typical clock radio) it might be using
the power cord as its antenna. Other than moving the
radio or its cord, adding and positioning an extension
cord just might help.
Still can't gel CiTR??? A number of cable
systems in the Lower Mainland carry CiTR with
Oh, by the way, on Groundhog Day (Fcbru- If you can't pick us up all that easily, y.
ary 2 for you ninnies), CiTR flicked on the make an external antenna or buy a ncwfanglc,
high rJJwer switch with a flou^h of bal- dad at an electronics or stereo shop. Although the T-
V loons and snowballs, presided over by an inflated shaped folded dipole type is cheap to buy, it is also
twenty-foot «gh   Evelyn   Roth   creation  named easy to make out of 3(X) ohm twin lead TV antenna
GrouiK0iodGootch. Jumping to 1800 superwatts of wire. Just make sure the top of the T is 147.2 cen-
peak radiaUffjjf power from the 49 it had livejd with for ifmetres '""fj If*'^          : %£*        mrktlw^
the past sixfyears, CiTR's signal should now stretch The best (mentation for your external antenna
as far awayjas Chilliwack, if not further, but only if ' is hard to predict; with a folded dipole, position the
the moon is in its first quarter and the dogs pee in a ;  loP Part of the T in a plane perpendicular to the drrec-
strligiMidiMW. Mike Pentz, the winner of pur t Uon of CiTR's transmitter and funky red-detailed
How Far ii Far? How Near is N*ar? Conte|t,^0O
»o»»jUS mll^Jan get CiTR loud and cle<n\anB i
°;R3B©»ki4iis iome in Rosedale. On the other hand, we
are receivin\ reports that we seem to have disap-
sd,ini Kjlsiiano and north of Hastings. This is
icause CiTR's signal is still finicky, even with our
new six million dollar bionic transmitter and antenna.
s\    Which Bfcjijgs tr\b you, our dear listener.;
^ Whaif^we. rewlly wanna know is - just where
|\_ejiactly are thejradlb^jD^jksholes and where are the
\  Z,radiomrvanas in ^e%ity? Phone us, writejus, tell us.
«wW"WeNwmna know: JusFkOwrfariii far, and how near is
X-noar?\Again.) Phone{|te-3017. Write tjo - Black
^;rHoleVr Nirvana? cfo^lTR, SUB #233, UBC,
."} Vancouver, BC/ N.y6T^A^5^^ou may even get a
ated on the top of the east tower of Gage
; on the UBC campus. Gage by the way is
t triumvirate of buildings that look suspiciously
m
rhatever type of external antenna you
choose, you will have to experiment
with its position and
sure the best reception. Since FM wav<
as easily as AM waves, anything that stands between
you and our transmitter will likely weaken our signal.
Reception may be better near a window in a building
containing a lot of steel and fluorescent tubes. Although it lies flat so that you can attach it to the wall
or even hideit under the rug, generally your antenna
will find a stronger signal the higher you position it.
More fun
than
watching
your
tap drip
UBC
Student Union Building
Main & Lower Concourse
All Ages Welcome
C£s^jw^ hook up your cable TV cable to your radio if it has
external antenna connections. And the cool thing is,
all of them carry CiTR at 101.9 cable. If in doubt,
contact your local cable company*. -'O^i ,*4 ~f-'
ROGERS CABLE (we are called "New Music/ Alternative Arts" in their listings), serves Vancouver, Richmond, Burnaby, Coquitlam, Port
Moody, Port Coquitlam, Belcarra, loco, Maple
Ridge, Pitt Meadows, Mission, Hatzic Lake, Hancy,
Whonnock, and Ruskin. WEST COAST CA-
BLEVISION ("New Music/Rock"): North
Burnaby. SHAW CABLE ("UBC Campus Radio"):
North and West Vancouver. DELTA CABLE
("New Music/Rock"): Tsawwassen, Ladner, North
Delta, North Delta, and Point Roberts. WESTERN CABLESYSTEMS ("New Wave"): New
Westminster, Surrey, Langley, Fort Langley, and
Aldergrove. LIONS BAY CABLE: Lions Bay and
Bowen Island. RELIANCE DISTRIBUTORS:
Squamish. And UBC PHYSICAL PLANT: the
lain pus.   r^x^.^"     I^^V   j    #~
If your cable service is not listed here, chances
are that we are not being carried by it. Even if you live
as far away as Kelowna, phone them and complain
about being denied the right to have access to the only \
non-commercial, high power radio station in Canada. Do this loudly while eating a bowl of cottage
cheese. Please. Thank you. And don't forget to write.
^^^!^;-»^i^£2^^1l. Randy Iwata
HOW DO YOU
SPEND YOUR
LEISURE CASH?
coming this March
the black pages
MARCH 1989  7 the   wolfgang   press
The Wolfgang Press are a rather odd
band. Actually, most of the stories
I've read about them start out with
some kind of disclaimer like that. Just
to warn people, I guess, that since the writer
can't understand the band and their music then
no one else should be able to. Well, in my case,
it's not so much trying to understand them, but
to actually describe them. Understanding a band
is no fun. You cease to be surprised by anything
a band does anymore if you understand them.
That's boring. Like Genesis or Bruce Springsteen or Simple Minds. We all understand them.
Stadium rock. Money. Babes. Fortunately, The
Wolfgang Press are nothing like that. There is
nothing that you can understand about the band,
let alone give a describe simply. Talking Heads
comparisons are frequent, but that applies only
to the tribal drums on some songs and Mick
Allen's vocal hiccups onothers. Love and Rockets guitar sounds make occassional guest appearances. As do '4AD sounds.' Hold on, hold
on, somebody has his hand up. Yes, you with the
British accent. Do you have something to say?
"We don't have a '4AD sound'. It's our own."
(I guess it's time for some introductions. Now
joining your fine scribe on this journey towards
the bottom of the page is Mick Allen, the lead
vocalist for the aforementioned non-4AD sounding band, The Wolfgang Press. The band is
currently on a North American tour with Nick
Cave — except for the Vancouver date, for
which Nick the Dick has opted out from.)
Okay, if the sound isn't 4AD (I still say it is),
then the band must have some influences, some
people that they pattern themselves after. Well,
maybe not. "It'snotreally any influence, it's just
the way you learn. You just find out what you're
good at. I think music and everything should be
as natural as it can. You know, what seems
natural to you. The way I write is simply the best
way I can and what makes sense to me."
Ah, this is where the whole understanding thing
becomes a problem. With Mick writing songs
that make sense to him, they don't nescesarily
have to make sense to anyone else. And they
don't. This is also where the Talking Heads
references are the strongest, as Allen's writing is
in the same broken up gibberish style that David
Byrne has perfected. "It's a shame people have
to pin you down and compare you to someone
else. But I'm not offended by it." Still, the
influences are there, but only in bits and pieces,
so I guess we can let Mick get away with it this
time.
The music is a different issue. Tribal drums,
distorted guitars, even funky beats. It all has to
come from somewhere. Mick has something to
say. "Rap, Public Enemy, those things are all in
the media now, and we're aware of them, but it's
not something we're trying to emulate. But it
docs affect you. We're a big fan of James Brown.
Especially the rhythms. Which are very important to us. Black tribal rhythms are very strong
and we like using them."
Influences aside, one thing blantantly obvious is
that with each record The Wolfgang Press are
exploring new territory and becoming much
more together as a band. "Every record we make
is a progression and it's because we're basically
getting better as a band — it's such an obvious
thing to say, but it's true. From Sweatbox (the
first single) to Kansas (the new single), everything has become stronger. The ideas are making more sense." Maybe to you guys, but try
writing about the band.
The band's new album, Bird Wood Cage, is a
definite progression and shows that the band is
indeed becoming stronger. Songs like Kansas,
King of Soul, and my favourite. Shut That
Door, should easily endear the band to people
everywhere.
The future of the band? Mick has but a few
words on that subject — "Fame and fortune."
But facing reality, Mick, if you weren' t in a band
or if The Wolfgang Press were to end tomorrow,
what would you do with your life? "I wish I were
a footballer, actually. I wish I were Jimmy
Greis." Oh well, so much for reality, but then
when we're talking about the Wolfgang Press.
Reality seems such a distant thing.
Lane Dunlop
DISCORDER THE RED HOT CHIU PEPPERS
MARCH 31
& Guests
tn
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tn
a
on
tf
£-■
•H
O
Doors 8pm
Commodore Ballroom 870 Granville St. tep right up, folks! Six hard-rockin' shows in only ten nights! That's right, four (originally
five—T.S.O.L. was cancelled) big name hardcore bands played a total of six gigs between
1 January 20th and 29th.
began on Fj
slightly in(
e unlikely
unbeliev,
morg
pla
hou
Dayl
dresfagn punk JPstvJWR lor "SojMHIing^
Ni£JMikiMlth th^QldbejpRntolera'
took over and fights broke outVUuys, next theme^
night stick to togas or bermudas.
Fortunately, the Dayglos stuck around to
play the Town Pump two days later. The Sunday
version was infinitely better. After being prepared by Shovelhead, an enthusiastic crowd
enjoyed what appeared to be arejuvenated Dayglo
Abortions. A flickering of social conscience shone
through an otherwise mindless show in the form
of comments on the Molson-Carling merger and
the refusal to play the popular I Want to be an
East Indian. The cretin explained that the band
isn't becoming more political, but people sometimes interpret the song as being racist, and the
Dayglos are not a racist band. But if entertainment is their goal, no one should have left the
Town Pump disappointed.
Next on the menu was Death Sentence's
Video Release Party at Club Soda on
Monday night. Their Danger Zone
video is a surprisingly sympathetic portrait of
the poor which alternates between live shots of
the band and the suffering of the down and out
on the streets of Vancouver. But the real surprise
10   DISCORDER
e played,
their first
ig to their
p-thrash'.
htcame
VocfHous, an
tour wist, had
speed-metalii
They will be
worth watcl
unfortunately cut an interesting evening short.
It is always a treat when an opening band
can keep up with the headliner, and this was
exactly the case when MudHoney opened for
NoMeansNo on Thursday, January 26th at the
Town Pump. Even though this was the first
opportunity to see NoMeansNo's new album
Small Parts Isolated and Destroyed performed
live, Mud Honey, the old Green River, attracted an equal amount if not more attention
than the Victoria veterans.
Speaking of veterans with new material,
the always entertaining D.O.A. rounded out the
week with an all-ages show at the Paramount on
the 28th and a return to Club Soda on the 29th.
D.O.A. introduced much of a new album (soon
to be released) to an uninterested crowd at Club
Soda. Songs like Guns, Booze and Sex and The
Agony and the Ecstasy and the addition of
hard-rockin', t^r-clrinkin', hockey -lovin' Chris
Hombre should keep D.O.A. alive well into the
future.
Quite a full ten days. Too bad the T.S.O.L.
show got cancelled.
The return to a normal schedule of events
brought MudHoney and Blood Circus to Club
Soda on February 5th. Just as MudHoney provided good opening entertainment for
NoMeansNo, likewise did Blood Circus for
MudHoney. A heavy bass mixed with likeable
rhythms and lyrics made for an interesting and
entertain ing overall sound.The crowd sang along
to a humourous and enjoyable song called My
Dad's a Fuckin' Alcoholic to close Blood Circus's performance. MudHoney alternated between fast and slower songs to keep the festivities alive with the unusually happy Sunday night
Club Soda crowd. Constant dancing overflowed
the dance floor until MudHoney finally wound
up their show.
Another dancable band of a different
style appeared on the 6th of February.
Tombstone Etiquettemade their Town
Pump debut after making it to CiTR's Shindig
semi-Finals lastyear. This two-year old bandhas
progressed incredibly well as they recently released their first album A Journal of the Plague
Year. A six-piece with a darker edge than most
jangly guitar bands. Tombstone Etiquette presented a good mix that should have been entertaining to all. Pangaea, a brand new folk act
from the Capilano College music program,
opened with their first ever club act. Their flute
and tambourine gives them anice 60's feel while
energetic guitar work brings the entire sound
into the 80's. Although Pangaea couldn't be
called a reggae band, they were able to do a
unique and moving version of Bob Marley's No
Woman No Cry.
The Railway Club hosted two nights of
Celebrity Drunks on February 7th and 8th.
These guys are hard to figure out. They combine
the slow, the upbeat, and the bizarre on a gaudily
decorated stage, surprisingly to the delight of
many fans. Even though they occasionally
sounded like Frank N. Furter singing for The
Dead Milkmen, Celebrity Drunks could easily
fit in playing on the Love Boat. One thing's for
sure though, for a band that hasn't played in
Vancouver in three years, they sure as hell have
a lot of T-shirts for sale.
It's a good thing that the Dayglo Abortions,
Death Sentence, Sacrifice, and Goliath all-ages
show at the New York Theatre on the 11 th is the
last to be reviewed, because my ears are still
ringing from that one. What initially appeared to
be a big hair event eventually turned into a
friendly, neighbourhood hardcore show. To the
pleasure of their followers, Goliath, a Vancouver band, presented their Bon Jovf style money-
making music first. Then the fun began. The
New York Theatre was packed when Sacrifice,
a pretty good speed metal band, transformed
individuals into a single frenzied mass of seething fury. Everyone stayed in this state throughout Death Sentence and the Dayglos, repeatedly
diving off the stage into the welcome arms and
faces of the slammers down below. Despite all
the intensity, the amount of people there, the heat
inside the York, the mixture of skins and bangers
and the girl who puked on the stairs, it was avery
successful all-ages show, and hopefully there
will be many more in the future.
W.W. Wow, when I think of all the good
gigs I've missed this month, some
because I didn't know about them
in time, some because they were too expensive,
some because, I guess, I'm just too uncool. Like
the Groovaholics, now that would've been good
to see, and I hear that the Jazzmanian Devils
played at the Penthouse, of all places. And then
a lot of surprising type bands have been at the
Metro lately. But then, I did manage to see the
glorious Tartan Haggis again, this time at a
very crowded Town Pump. So what if the joke's
wearing thin? Robbie Burns Day is but once a
year, after all.
Well, there is some bad news this month.
Ian Noble (as everyone knows already, any-
anyway.
And now, a few demos:
Applied Science—"Bunker Song" and Go
Fish—"God Given Right." Not really a demo,
but two songs from a Seattle sampler, called
Missing Link Sampler 1.1 was hoping against
hope that sJbehow
little
general JfeVWio seifife a demo quite
^me agfcajB||t, alaVftas not to be.
Pop,'
don'
who sound a little like 64 Funny Cars, maybe
even a little like Mojo Nixon. There's quite a
funny bass line, which I guess is supposed to
carry most of the song, but it's the lyrics that are
really memorable, ie. "It's your God-given right
to shout/puke all night." Wow, is it just me, or do
these sound like cool guys?%
Club Dill Dough—"Frank Heaven." Club
DD is Mark Bell of Excited First Daughter
and Steve Gibson of The Bride Stripped Bare.
The Frank of the song title is the infamous Frank
Booth of Blue Velvet. And yeah, lots of your
fave lines from the movie are here (although
maybe not the ones I would have chosen): "You
ever been to pussy heaven?", "Oh, Frank's here",
"Heineken!", etc. But the real joke here is that
there's no apparent difference between the
Thrash Mix and the Suave Mix of the song,
which appear on opposite sides of this tape.
Grizzled Greddiguts' Spectral Voices on
Tape Phenomena—"Refusal Mantra." Okay,
these guys are (or, more likely, this guy is) from
Prince George, not the most thriving music
scene in the world. Still, I can't help wondering,
don't we get enough of this stuff already? Some
pretty fast panning makes headphone listening a
little scary, which is good, as is the not-too-long
playing time. But, as far as I'm concerned, this
needs more spectral voices and less of whatever's taking up more of the space here right
now.
Also from out of town is Toronto's Black
Betty, with a song called "Candy." Sorry, but I
m
k!ing eruption;
le and^pnteres
these0]
attitude or what? Their photo is plenty scary,
and they promise a "Hypothermic Apocalypse"
to "anyone who gets in our way." And their
Thanks To list begins with "Ourselves." As for
the actual tape...well, the band's tight, all right,
but the vocals sound slowed down somehow (is
t?),
(The
The
little
fevoted^)llow-
ing, mainly, I suppose, due to the energy of their
live shows (I saw them open for Oversoul Seven
at the Commodore, surely one of the stranger
billings possible), but I don't know if this tape
captures that energy, in spite of its good production (at Profile, with Cecil English). Oh yeah,
and they cover "Sweet Emotion."
Celebrity Drunks—"Shaman Says." Oh no!
Another good show I missed—the Drunks played
at the Railway on the 7th and 8th but I didn't find
out 'til the 14th. Anyway, "Shaman Says" isn't
as weird as previous offering "Holly Jolly," and
is more melodic, but still has that same inimitable Drunks sound. Oh well, maybe I'll see
them next time they're all in Vancouver.
Janis
Dayglos at the Pumpt
photo: Mandel Ngan
Earn BIG
DISCORDER
needs an
advertising
representative
Deadline for
applications:
March 10
Earn
$1000/mo.
or more
Operators are standing by
between M-F10-4
228-3017
MARCH 1989   11 College Radio
What is College Radio? Animal,
vegetable or mineral? For the
listener, depending on one's
state of mind, it symbolizes a
bubbling cauldron of unbridled weirdness, or a
beacon of normalcy in the hazy airwaves cluttered with cheezy generic programming. It is a
DJ's wet dream, allowing him or her a public
forum to express their personal musical taste
and verbal flare. For struggling local bands, no
matter how awful they really are, college radio
is an opportunity to be heard by thousands of
listeners that would ordinarily not care enough
to spend hard earned bucks on mysterious tapes
or gigs. Yes, college radio is many different
things for many different folks. But really, why
are we here? What is the purpose of stations
such as CiTR and CJIV in a city that has dozens of fine and stylish commercial stations like...
like... you know! In essence what is the mandate
and what are the goals of college radio? How
does it survive? Why does it survive? While all
of my friends stay up late at night thinking about
hot cars, gorgeous models, and cold cash, I
dream about college radio, its raison d'etre and
why I can't get any of the aforementioned goodies.
In order to gain insight into the college
radio experience, I solicited opinions of the
friendly folk of CJIV, SFU's station, and our
very own CiTR. CJIV is a relatively young
station compared to CiTR, probably because
SFU is anewer university than UBC. The station
has only recently gone on the air with a 10 watt
signal. Formerly they relied upon cable and
carrier signal to broadcast. As for CiTR, we now
have a whopping 1800 watts of power that
should allow us to compete with your hair dryer
for your attention. This brings us to our first
point - listenership.
Who listens to college radio? Is college
radio for college people? Should college radio
TRY to please a particular segment of the listening audience? The general contention is - why
bother? Targetting an audience is the self-appointed mandate of commercial radio stations
which are dependent on advertising revenue for
survival.
First up is Norm Casler, who by his gruff
tone and defensive manner made me
imagine him to be a large, hairy, giant of
a man who enjoyed spending Sunday afternoons
amidst the serene beauty of nature snaring rabbits. As the station manager of CJIV he is generally responsible for determining how things
are run. His philosophy that "no one wants to
listen to six hours of scratch" results in a softer
blend of music than is played at CiTR. Whereas
DJs at CiTR are essentially free to play whatever
they wish apart from what is heard on commercial radio, much of CJIV's programming is
based upon strict adherence to a 200 album
playlist. The DJs there are permitted to sample
from this playlist, which in addition to including
the standard "alternative" fare, also includes
suitable top forty music such as U2, Keith
Richards and Jeff Healey. The idea is to appeal
to the students of Simon Fraser University by
finding a "middle ground" between CiTR and
commercial radio.
A variety of views on college radio are held
Son of th
LOOK - youdon'tcare aboutthe '60s
and I don't care about the '60s. Why
should we? It's the past. It's over
with. I don't remember where I was
when the CIA shot Jackie Kennedy. Who cares?
But one thing has always intrigued me about the
turbulent decade known as THE SIXTIES - that
is, RADIO. The folklore has it that radio has not
always been the wastelandof formatted pablum
that we know and love. The '60s MYTH includes tales of exciting and alive radio, and even
free form experimental radio in the early days of
FM which would seem to have much in common
with present day college radio. Is it true, or just
more post-Summer of Love, drug induced, hippie hangover nostalgia? And is there a commonality with today's college radio? The simplest
way to determine the veracity of these radio tales
is to corner someone who was there, and, most
importantly, possesses the majority of his faculties. Someone like broadcasting icon JJS.Shayne.
J.B. is a legendary Vancouver character of the
broadcasting biz who has worked at many of the
city's radio stations, including LGAM, LGFM
and CFUN during their '60s heyday. He is
probably best known to the younger of us as the
man behind the infamous Nite Dreams, Western
Canada's first and best video program. Working
in commercial or non-commercial broadcasting, J.B. has always experimented and, therefore, taken chances. As someone who looks to
the future and is usually ahead of the pack, it was
unlikely his vision of the '60s would be clouded
by acute nostalgia. So what's the word? Read
on.
12   DISCORDER
Broadcasting icon J.B. Shayne
photo: Chris Helgren
Is it a myth that '60s FM was completely free
or could you really play anything?
It was initially. 1966-67 was the pivotal year
in FM radio.It started in San Francisco with
a guy named Tom Donahue. They were capturing the music of that period — the Summer of
Love in the Bay area. And that spread. The
explosion happened in 1966-67 - '66 in California, '67 throughout all North America - The
Summer of Love. We had underground radio in
Vancouver with LGFM in '67-68. They were
playing just about anything. Terry Mulligan was
on there, John Tanner was on there. I wasn't at
that time; I didn't come until later. I'm sort of
associ ated with that period but I never really was
on FM at that time. I was on LGAM. I think what
I did at CFUN on the allnight show as Captain
Midnight probably fit into that but it wasn't FM.
Then I went over to LGFM but the Flower
Power was gone by then. But I do know that
there was freedom in '68. Much like you have at
CiTR now. Totally free except, "Please give a
time check and a station break and maybe do the
weather. And try not to swear on the air." And it
was free form which can be great and can be self-
indulgent. But the freedom to be able to do^
whatever and let the audience decide whether
they accept it or not.
Probably the funniest experience I had
during that period was in 1968 when CKLGFM
decided to meet the people, the public, so they
had an open house Sunday. I couldn't believe
what I saw when I walked in the door—incense,
dope all over the place, hash brownies. Mulligan by CiTR's music director Chris Buchanan. He
is a hate-filled young vegetarian; hate-filled
primarily because of DJs that deliberately try to
aggravate their listeners. "We're not in an ivory
tower subjecting our musical tastes onto our
audience, we're not there to annoy, but it is
important to be somewhat provoking." I find
myself agreeing with this. If I hear another
Tiffany song, I shall be annoyed enough to kill
again. Chris also prefers to call college radio
"independent radio" rather than refer to it by the
perenially popular "alternative radio" nametag
because of the negative connotations of that...
that word! 'Alternative' conjures up visions of
black clad, spikey haired, gaunt people, shouting death chants. People need to know that we
are much more than simply playing the new
Cure single. It's taking a diverse approach to
sound and music."
Tamas Revoczi, "call me Thomas for short",
is the assistant manager of CJIV. He also is the
lucky holder of one of the specialty shows on the
station. He says that it is on these shows that DJs
have the greatest freedom. As the host of a classical music program he is allowed to play his
choice of tunes. He makes a concerted effort to
play mostly little known and uncommon music
What's The Point?
that, in keeping with his idea of college radio.is
heard nowhere else. When the issue of commercial advertising at the staion is brought up, he
says that, at present, they have a system of
individual show sponsorship. Now that they are
actually on the air, the idea may be revamped to
accept the idea of advertisers. As for CiTR, the
idea that advertisers might compromise the right
to play and say anything and everything is enough
to send a chill down our collective spines.
However, I suspect that we are always open to
corporate donations.
JIV music director Iain Gregson believes that the mandate of college radio
is to do two things. Firstly, to promote
local and other Canadian artists and secondly, to
provide an alternative source of entertainment.
In their CRTC promise of performance, CJIV
has vowed to play 30% Canadian content (CiTR
promises 20%) and a large portion of this is local
demos. Iain, like many other young, idealistic
college radio types has a dream, not a big dream,
not even a really fun, bizzare one. It is more of
c
local and
a retrospective of days gone by. "Vancouver has
an extremely limited musical spectrum, there is
no one playing new music, and as a result there
has to be a counter-culture. When commercial
radio stations see college radio becoming more
and more popular, I see a movement back to the
sixties where there will be album playing rather
than a reliance upon hit singles."
With this in mind, the inevitable question
arises. Will college radio die? NEVER!! Because its mandate is to provide the alternative it
will continue to provide it when the commercial
plays the "alternative". Such a thing is unlikely
to ever happen because mainstream programming targets the lowest common denominator.
It aims to please, if you know what I mean.
Money is the motivation. In contrast, college
radio, in its various forms, provides programming of new and different music and ideas that
have a bite. It's stimulating, not stultifying. Remember that a bite on the neck can be thought
provoking, somewhat painful.and holds promise of exciting things to come. Mjchae, Leduc
e 60s FJVI
was on the air at the time. He had his dogs in the
studio. Everybody was streaming through the
place like it was a Be-in. And the general manager was out of town at the time at a convention
in Victoria but he decided to come back early.
He came walking into the station at about 5
o 'clock in the afternoon. And to this day I cannot
forget the look on his face. Here was a man
whose world had just fallen right down below
his knees. The next day Mulligan was on the
carpet. He was smacked around a little bit but
nothing happened from that. That captures the
mood of the station at the time.
They clamped down a bit but '69 was still
a pretty free year. But 1970 was like, "Alright
gentlemen, the Sixties are over. It's a whole new
ball game now." This points out what happened
in the music industry and in radio. And that is:
There's a whole new market out there, a whole
new audience, a new kind of music - album
sales. Remember, before 1966, how many albums did people buy? There were a couple here
and there - early Joni Mitchell albums, that sort
of thing. But not until '67-68 did you have the
deluge - Big Brother and the Holding Co., the
early Moody Blues albums, all of that stuff. The
conservative business ethics came into play in
'69-70. It was kindof like, "It's all over with. We
have to pull up our socks. It's a new era and
we're going out there and making money."
Can you see that scenario connecting with the
freedom of college radio nowadays?
1 think college radio is a very healthy thing.
Certainly for music it's a godsend. The fact
is it comes underneath the jurisdiction of the university, and by its own nature it's an experimental thing. Correct me if I am wrong but I assume
that the people ninning CiTR prefer to keep it as
experimental as possible. And there's not much
in the way of revenue so it's not a commercial
entity. There are maybe some spots on the air
here and there. There is maybe some money
exchanged, but not very much. That's not the
purpose of the station. The purpose of the station
is, I think, to give students, would-be broadcasters, and music people a creative spark by saying,
"This is your forum. Right or wrong, go ahead
and do it." Some things fall flat, some things
soar. But the beauty of college radio is the
experimental edge that it does have. Read at the
back of the Discorder the lineup and the way it's
written to understand that these are people who
are excited about what they're doing; whether
they happen to take the more cynical approaches
or right off the top of their head. The only
connection with the '60s FM is the experimental.
If the power increase is substantial enough
to make it available to most receivers in the
lower mainland then watch the reactions of the
other stations around town. The commercial
stations will be all for it, actually. Program
Directors in every station in town will say, "Hey,,
CiTR should be heard. They should be out
there." In the back of their minds they're saying
to themselves, perhaps, "But we know they
won't offer us any real competition because
they're all nuts out there anyways, and they
don't know what broadcasting is all about." It
would be nice if college radio could prove otherwise. And I think that's a possibility because
you have the freedom. It doesn't take a professional - professional is a bad word.
Let's assume that this happens: A meeting
is called. The higher ups at UBC who control the
purse strings to CiTR seem to leave well enough
but the time could come when more conservative forces could crack down on the creative
flow from the station. And they may say things
like, "We want a little more of a professional,
more of a responsible broadcasting attitude
emanating from our airwaves across the city.
We want UBC to be represented in such a way
that people will look upon CiTR as the voice of
UBC. And we think it should be more structured. We don't want to take away the freedom
and the creativity. We just want to have it more
controlled. Let's appeal more to the people of
UBC." And that is a possibility.
If you have the opportunity to hit the Lower
Mainland and gain more of an audience there is
a possibility that you might do things a bit
differently. Certain programs would be eliminated and other ones would come on. For right
or wrong, I don't know.
The thing for people to do who listen to
CiTR or are involved with CiTR is to remain
very loose and open. And at the same time try
and understand that if there are any kind of
changes coming about, not to be afraid of them.
But to also stand up if you think there's something wrong.
Kevin Smith
MARCH 1989   13 S
an Francisco's Stickdog is one of those rare bands that has managed to create a distinct
sound of its own. Sure, the influences are there and easily discemable: Swans, Sonic
Youth, Einsturzende Neubauten, and Pere Ubu, among others, but this is no retro-
ripoff. There is something deeply personal in Stickdog's intensely assaultive attack that
defies description and must be experienced to be understood.
different groups of people that are interested in
different music, so you have people with generally broader interests."
Stickdog recorded what would eventually
become their second album, Human, in Iowa.
They sent Alternative Tentacles' main guy
Stickdog seem quite wary and distrustful of the independent music industry.
Along with the frustrating game of
getting media attention, Reller cites the
money scamming actions and attitudes of the
whole distribution network as the reason for the
development of such an attitude. "I would say
that most people on small labels have something
bad happen to them in that market because of the
distributors' unwillingness to pay small labels
the money that they owe them. They know that
they will never get legal action taken against
them by a small label across the country for a
few hundred dollars. Most bands lose money."
14   DISCORDER
Considering the mild contempt they have
for the industry they're part of, and their gut
level lyrics of pain and betrayal, it's easy to paint
Stickdog into a comer of negativity. The group
offers, "People expect us to always be terminally depressed, going around with our heads
constantly down. I don't think that we ever tried
to create an image of any sort. That album
(Human) was made when we were all in a really
bad mood. None of us had a good year, and we
were sort of spitting when we were writing
songs, so, I don't know, that's what you get. We
don't generally suck small children's blood."
Although very happy with how Human
turned out, Stickdog promise something heavier
in a live situation. Fancy electronics? Not for
these chain wielders. "I think we're attached to
letting the audience feel and see the sounds
being made rather than processed or sampled
material. We all really like using our instruments in slightly unconventional ways. A lot of
times it's very loud and forceful; biting sounds
that have a lot more impact when you get hit with
it in the face live." Stickdog will be making an
impact Saturday, March 4th at the Industrial
Eclipse and Sunday, March 5th at Club Soda.
Keith Parry CAFE
829 Granville Street,
Telephone:  (604) 684-8900
(ACROSS FROM CAPITOL 6 CINEMAS)
Gallery Art Show By:
Jezebel and Carylann Lepke UC®E
RAZOR
Violent Restitution
(Fringe Product)
This album has 14 tracks on it! One is enough!
The lyrics are trite and the riffs are repetitive. In
fact, the same riffs can be found on many different
tracks.
Razor copies Exodus, though not very well.
There are hints of Slayer and Omen—not as influences, but as Xeroxes. This band deals with subjects
that have already been done to death by bands with
greater talent and insight.
On the brighter side, it isn't toooo horrible
musically. Rod Mills' drumming is adequate, but he
lapses into repetitive thrash beats we've all heard
before. The right attitude is there, and they maintain
control of their artistic integrity by releasing Violent
Restitution on their own label. We think they had no
choice because no real label would sign them.
G: The old line-up was better.
B: Yeah. Agirilknow met them at Guelph, the band's
home town.
G: Why do you mention that?
B: Coz it's more interesting than the album.
G: So it is...
Bruno Fruscalzo and Greg Yanke
VARIOUS
The Melting Plot
(SST Records)
Somewhere out in Hollywood (the original one)
amidst the Universals, the Orions and the Foxes, there
festers a thing called We Got Power Films. Proud
creators of such cinematic epics as The Slop Movie
and Lovedolls Superstar (which I presume to be
some sort of sequel to the 1984 classic Desperate
Teenage Lovedolls), they have released upon an
unwitting public their latest bit of anthropological
genius, The Melting Plot. And, this being the 1980's,
it's accompanied by a soundtrack record! Imagine
that. Well, I haven't seen the movie, and as long as
we're being honest here (you gotta try everything
once), I'm too young to determine whether all of the
17+ tracks on this vinyl baby are covers of moldy
sixties-and-on tunes. (Burnin' Love and S.O.S. are
kinda easy to tell, but I don't know about the rest, and
I'm too lazy to find out.) Covers or not, there are some
butt-kicking, obnoxious, turn-the-speakers-to-11
beauties on here; notably, the aforementioned Love
by I Love You, the hypnotic Algebra Suicide's
Tales of Brave Ulysses, and, best of all, I Am Right
by the only really known band on this platter, Sonic
Youth. And then there is some stupid talking, some
incredibly boring voices (these guys front bands?),
and a lot of sixties-type guitar-riffin' feedback shit
that some guy named Animal out in Port Moody will
probably go nuts over. Collectively, an experience, as
this album attempts to cover a lot of musical genres,
from late Fiftes bebop (Chemical People's It's Not
Unusual) all the way to the disco and punk of the late
Seventies. Oh yeah, there's also a band called Ledd
Kross (aka Redd Kross) doing the instrumental parts
of that song you heard played at every high school
dance, and if this is possible, it actually sounds better
than the original did blaring from those gym speakers.
Far out, man.
Annette
16   DISCORDER
DUE NORTH - STEPHEN CHATMAN
Vancouver Chamber Choir; John Washburn, Conductor
(Centredlscs)
The Canadian Music Centre exists to promote
and disseminate the music of Canadian composers.
On this, their first choral CD, they have chosen to
record the choral works of Stephen Chatman, a
Vancouver composer and pedagogue. These pieces
span an eleven year period, and mark a transition in
Chatman's style to music which is very accessible.
While new music lovers may have qualms with
Chatman's change to such simple musical language,
what undoubtedly stands out for all to see on this
recording is the high level of craftsmanship in his
writing. You Have Ravished My Heart, with its
long, smooth lines, is arguably the best piece on Due
North, but Chatman is certain to gain a wide audience
with his Five British Columbian Folk Songs; O
Come, O Come Emmanuel, and Lo In A Manger.
Despite Peter Haworth's excellent narration, I find
Love and Shapes High Fantastical to be very sectional and as a result the only disappointment on this
otherwise fine CD.
Paul B.A. Steenhulsen
KISS
Smashes, Thrashes & Hits
(Polygram)
One imagines Gene and Paul sitting around
during the formative years of Kiss, say in a bar,
sipping their cold gins. Gene leans over to Paul and
says, "We need a gimmick."
Now it's 1988. Same situation, this time maybe
in Gene's Manhattan penthouse. Gene says to Paul,
"We need a new record." And here you have it. With
a couple of new songs, courtesy of Paul Stanley and
Desmond Child, new videos and lots of old gems to
boot. Kiss were always about excess—the massive
stage productions, explosions, Gene firing laserbolts
out of his bass, and lots of 13-year-olds puking their
guts out all over the floor.
Kiss's biggest problem today is evident on
Smashes. They've overblown their importance as a
band in this decade. The new stuff sucks. The fact that
Destroyer was probably their best album, thanks to
Bob Ezrin, is reflected in that there are three songs
from that album - Detroit Rock City, Shout It Out
Loud, and a redo of Beth (they got the new guitar
player to sing over the original instrumentation).
They remembered to include Rock And Roll
All Night but forgot Black Diamond. The two new
songs Let's Put The X In Sex and You Make Me
(Rock Hard) are typical post-makeup Kiss. Otherwise, pretty much everything else is here - Love Gun,
Deuce, Calling Dr Love, Strutter, the previously
mentioned Destroyer songs, and the essential Rock
And Roll All Night.
With all the wanky bands from California, like
Poison, one can't over-emphasise the influence of
Kiss. Bands tike the Hard-Ons and even those that
stand on their own, like Redd Kross, are all members
in good standing of the Kiss Army. So if you tossed
out your Kiss albums a long time ago you might want
to pick this up to help combat that late-night adolescence withdrawal.
John Rzeczycky
THE FALL
I Am Kurlous OranJ
(Beggars Banquet)
Another product from Mark E. Smith and The
Fall, I Am Kurious Oranj is a fabulous album with
a pretty golden-orange cover in the bargain. The title
track and New Big Prinz remind you of his unrivalled
expertise. The album is the soundtrack to the ballet I
Am Curious Orange, performed last year in Europe
by the contemporary dance club, Michael Clark &
Company, with The Fall playing alongside. Although
good, I Am Kurious Oranj is more produced and
slower than the previous The Frenz Experiment.
Jen Read
THE WOOD CHILDREN
The Gods Must Be Crazy
(Black Cat)
This is a most impressive record from a British
group whose sound verges on the "jangly guitar" side
of things, but more often reminds one of The Smiths.
The singer is definitely influenced by the infamous
Manchester poet/god but the band has its own style.
Songs like Important In Your Life and I Study You
emit a lot of power and haunt one for days. A strong
and memorable album.
Jen Read
NO MEANS NO
Small Parts isolated And Destroyed
(Alternative Tentacles)
They wear glasses and corduroy pants. They're
articulate and polite (drummer John Wright once
said 'excuse me* to me). They have short, neat haircuts, are generally soberish, and probably go shopping for their grandmothers on weekends. But as
those of you who have seen them live can attest, this
Victoria trio also puts on savagely energetic and
brutally tight shows. Yet, their albums never quite
match the brilliance of their live performances. And
this new release is no exception - songs, such as Real
Love, which are so powerful on stage, can become
almost mundane on vinyl. But wait, plenty of classic
No Means No can be found on Small Parts Isolated
And Destroyed. Check out the title track and Lonely,
for instance. And true to past efforts, the album covers
the typical No Means No themes of mainstream
culture, sexual frustration, self-esteem, and anxiety.
Buy the record, but promise you'll see them live.
JB
FISHBONE
Truth and Soul
(CBS)
Upon first listening to Truth and Soul, you
might say to yourself, "Just what the heck is this??"
The first song, Freddie's Dead, is a truly funky tune
(too much so for my liking, although I was surprised
by its potential to grow on me) and slightly different
from standard Fishbone fare. This LP contains more
than its share of get-down rhythms, and a surprising
jazz influence at times. In terms of variety, the album
really delivers—from the frenetic ska meets thrash of
Subliminal Fascism to Slow Bus Movin', which has
a narrative style reminiscent of the Clash. Change,
which has an acoustic tone suspiciously similar to
(forgive me) Bon Jovi is nonetheless a good tune
(really!!!). Lyrically, Fishbone deals with alienation
and racial dilemmas—"the mayo men used firehoses
to spray the monkeys back in their cages", as well as
the rift between social classes, a recurrent theme
nowadays.
All in all, not a bad album, although not one of
my faves. Fishbone has put out more interesting
material so you might want to borrow this one before
buying it yourself.
Deborah Bach THE LYRES
A Promise is a Promise
(Star Records)
A Promise is a Promise is the newest offering
from Boston's Lyres. This righteous garage ensemble
features a clutter of 60's rhythms (faithfully recreated
in the late 80's)—manic, rough, melodious singing,
the heavenly and purse sound (real, not imagined) of
the Vox Continental Combo organ, and grungy clanging guitar sounds (no doubt produced on the two
pointed Danelectro instruments from which the band
gets their name). My particular version of this album
consisted of three groovy parts, an LP, a family tree,
and EP.
The LP features such wonderful items as Here's
a Heart, which was grungy, On Fyre, which was old,
and grungier still, and a standout track, Worried
About Nothing, which displays a melodious pseudo-
falsetto. An added bonus is a raving send-up of an
ancient Sonic's song. The Witch.
The family tree details the development of the
band, from its roots in 70s band DMZ (versions 1 thru
6) through to The Lyres (versions 1 thru 13). Despite
the fact that I couldn't read the extremely fine print on
this document, I did discern that Jeff Conolly (a.k.a
Mono Man) was the only common feature of the tree
from DMZ #2 onwards.
The final part of the package, the EP, consists of
tracks recorded Uve on a Swedish radio station.
Remarkable features include She's Got Eyes
that Tell Lies, Don't Give It Up Now, and another
Sonic'scover—Cinderella. Overall, the whole package sounds like The Animals genetically spliced with
The Standells, and mutated in Boston Harbour for
twenty years. Delightful.
J.W.
THE THREE JOHNS
The Death of Everything
(T.I.M.)
Ex-Mekons (who were, a decade ago, the poor,
silly cousins of the Gang of Four). But then who
isn't? This is just what you'd expect from The Three
Johns: plenty, lots, much, tres, big guitar noise over
a drum machine named Hugo. Three Johns songs tend
to be big heavy monster pieces that require a bit of
time to pick up speed. Sometimes they go on a bit too
long. A couple on this album are inspired by Herman
Melville's Moby Dick. The record includes a live
version of Never and Always that was not produced
by Adrian Sherwood and a version of Downhearted
Blues that was.
JB Hohm
SONS OF FREEDOM
Sons of Freedom
(Slash/WEA)
Have you ever gone to one of those show s where
you leave feeling like you've just seen God? Sons of
Freedom have yet to give me that sort of feeling.
Mind you they try, but most of it ends up looking Uke
a gimmick—the costumes, the fancy tight show at
Graceland, the three lightbulb schtick. It's not that I
don't like their music. It' s just that all that shit up there
seems to detract from the music. And come on,
blinding the audience with bright lights has been done
to hell.
What I want to see is some real fucking passion
on stage. Jim Newton seems to come across like he's
playing to some imaginary camera, looking at the
audience like they don't exist. Never breaking that
fucking deadly serious expression on his face. This
sort of thing, if done well, can be quite dramatic.
Otherwise, it's simply boring. If I may paraphrase
Jim: is it a bad thing to hate... somethings?
However, in spite of their lacklustre live performances Sons of Freedom have arrived. The music
sweats like AC/DC, and nods like the Velvet Underground. The slower songs on this album -The Holy
Rollers, This Is Tao - are infinitely more listenable
than the Swans (another band the Sons have been
compared to). And the outstanding tracks are just
about everything else. I am sick of Alice Henderson,
though. I would have preferred a beefed-up version of
Blind Children. What more can I say. Jim Newton
writes great urban despair kind of lyrics, the rhythm
section grooves, and the guitars crunch.
John Rzeczyckl
JANE'S ADDICTION
Jane's Addiction
(Triplex Records)
This is a not-so-new live album from a misunderstood band. I've seen parents' groups classify
them under the same category as Poison, Guns 'n*
Roses and other cock-rocking superstars. But no,
Jane's Addiction are good, really! Side One features
a heavy (almost funky) hard-rockin' (almost metal)
string o' hits. Don't get me wrong now, they're pretty
rough, but in a good way. And singer Perry Farrell
has perhaps THE greatest whiny, high-pitched, quivering (vibrato?) voice since the venerable Jello Biafra.
A fine guitar and riddum section back this waiting ball
o' fire. Side Two is almost all acoustic, featuring
covers of the Rolling Stones' Sympathy for the
Devil and Lou Reed's Rock 'n' Roll. So, this is cool.
Thank you for listening.
Mike Lyseng
COMPACT DISCS
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WE TRADE     SELL •  BUY
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ALL TYPES OF MUSIC
TAPES TO C.D.fS
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We accept the following
methods of payment:
1/ Your hard-earned money
2/ Your mate's hard-earned money
3/ Your Mother's money
4/ Your Grandparents' money
5/ All the money in your savings account
6/ And of course just plain money.
852 GRANVILLE ST.
VANCOUVER BC
JomFlheyog
TELEPHONE:
688-2828
MARCH 1989   17 heap rental rates, large live-in studio spaces found within warehouses
or storefronts, and a general aura of
coolness have macjg the downtown
| eastside the Art and Artists' a
r. As the arts community,whj
t of necessity, grows larger
ists are inspired to link up v
Mecca-like effect. Small gallc
tre of Vancou-
took root here
the basis of its
emerging art-
is scene. It's a
:s are abundant
well area near
ary, the Perel,
a few. Visual
iets and other
'can be found
I and the Art Speak to name ji
I artists, musicians, hat-makers,]
I un-classifiable creative tyj
I chowing at the Oval tine, roaming the alleyways,
|sketching furtively or just existing.
Fraser Valley College- and Emily Carr-
iducated Abbotsford refugee Jackie Dionne
Ken living and making ajin the area for
ll years now. A paini
compiler, and collage-maker,
to sustain her art-making thri
of pai^ime work, an abj
l^dH flwices (an art
thro ^^ sort of
her ^Hty as aj^| ^Keceni
tfhere
found-objeci
has managed
a combination
acquire ultra
and obviously
rd dedication to
led
sorts of explorations do not often work as marketable products. This means support for art via
production and selling of the same is an unrealistic proposition for most artists. Art productions vs basic living requirements wage a constant battle. "I am always surprised at the poverty of the people around here," she said. "As an
artist I experience a both forced and chosen
marginalized existance. This marginalization is
resolved by people in many different ways
depending on whether or not they want to work
within an institution (educational or commercial) or without." Having chosen the non-institutional option, her own works, primarily larger
scale oil paintings, sculptural assemblages of
found objects from the fertile grounds of the
neighborhood and recently small scale mixed
media pieces with text, are adaptable to her
fluctuating living conditions. No money = no
faint, no space = small arL etc.
It is her view that societies' marginilization
If artists is tolerated by both the artists and
ciety and thereby is allowed to continue. M$st
ople in the community appreciate the altei
studio-squatter lifestyle. It allows then
whatever manner they c\
SUPFOfsT ART!
3».'..y
18s
OHsoPOttKTep.-tU      f ULL Sopftttf
'«*>»*-iw i^ion.   *£*+*»*.x*ceeM&
Ucit of rs^er-     ££££ **^  ,0
7\
CINEMA- 16
• March 1      	
Literary Series
• Miss Julie
r March 8     	
Saura's Friend: Erice
• The Spirit of the Beehive
- March 15    	
Erotica: Fellini
• Casanova
- March 22    	
Literary Series
•The Tin Drum
Wednesday Nights
at 7:00 and 9:30
$2.50 single admission
$3.50 for double bills
($2.00 annual membership required)
Student Union Building
Theatre U.B.C.
24 Hour Info 228-3697 «now   available   at--»
HIGHLIFE- ODYSSEY-
BLACK SWAN TRACK-
MECCA • RASTAWARES-
RENT THE STUDIO
— bedouin soundtracks	
  11 W. 2nd Ave.	
— 874-3349	
VIDEO
It was a dark and stormy night, so I rented
some videos and made popcorn in the
wok, burning it in the process. Both the
wok and the popcorn.
Actually, it was a few dark and stormy
nights, and one bright and clear afternoon thai
sometime in the future I shall probably regret
wasting. But I only tried to make popcorn the
one time.
Firstly, we have The Toxic Avenger, a
low-buget cult film with absolutely no one in it
that anyone's ever heard of. But, it's humorous,
the stunts and special effects are quite good, and
this film features some of the finest Toyota
Corolla driving seen since I owned one. (I eventually sold it to one of Todd's girlfriends after I
boughttheCelica, which was before I racked up
all the speeding tickets, lost my licence for three
years, and turned the damn thing into scrap
metal. I remember thinking, "I sure hope I don't
hit that telephone pole," but fortunately a ditch
stopped me.) And the Corolla is still running,
you know. Should have kept it. However, I may
rent The Toxic Avenger again.
I also saw Aria, which is a sorta pretentious
collectionof ten opera music videos by directors
like Nicholas Roeg, Ken Russell, Jean-Luc
Godard, and Robert Altman. Despite the fascinating camera angles and mood shots, the
project is dull and rather confusing. Like, why
are three nude women with knives walking
aroundina gymnasium? If I wanted to think, I'd
read a book. Video is not for thinking.
Which is why I rented F/X, a reasonable action flick about a movie effects technician hired to fake an
assassination; then a whole bunch of different
people chase him. lust what you want to see
coming on the screen of your TV, none of that
artsy crap. F/X is easy to watch, and not too insulting to your intelligence.
Stand By Me was another choice. I 'd seen
it before, but it's a really good story about four
young boys on a journey to discover a dead
body. Although based on a Stephen King short
story, it's not a horror tale, but something a little
bit like Diner. Lots of primo male bonding and
banter.
Now, I have no intention of performing a
17-hour marathon of watching The Prisoner, a
cryptic and stylish British TV series starring
Patrick McGoohan. It's been done in these
pages, a couple of years ago, by someone else. If
you're interested, Videomatica has all 17 episodes available to reserve and rent in blocks of
up to four episodes a night for $29.95. And they
also have a formerly lost episode filmed a year
earlier than the series, a pilot version of The
Chimes of Big Ben with some minor differences in style and credits that would be of
interest to fans of the show. I liked it.
Amazon Women on the Moon is a five-
director (Joe Dante and John Landis among
them) collection of weird funny bits stuck together within a late-night TV format, using a
fictional '50's movie as the core for all kinds of
parodies. This is the sort of film that works best
on a TV. I couldn' t imagine seeing it in a theatre.
Fairly good, with some really odd ideas, most of
which work, an opening scene that features
• some paint colours there aren't even names for
and are worth the $3 just to see, and some
interesting cameo appearances, like Russ Meyer,
B.B. King, Carrie Fisher, Henry Silva, and the
Loch Ness Monster as Jack the Ripper. Hey,
I wouldn't make up something like that.
Dave Watson
The Book $ Comic EmpORium
Introducing
New Books
Best Sellers
20%
WE ALSO HAVE VANCOUVER'S LARGEST SELECTION OF ALMOST
NEW & USES PAPERBACKS & MAGAZINE BACK ISSUES.
BUY • SELL • TRADE
682-3019 • 1247 Granville St. Open 7 days a week
2nd Location 3315 Kingsway • 430-2665
MARCH 1989   19 dbatU
THE UNHEARD MUSIC 3-5:00pm
Get down with host Dale "The Saw" Sawyer for two crucial
hours of demo tapes and total CanCon.
SPORTS DIGEST 5:30-6:00pm
Join Lane Dunlop for all the latest in campus sports and sports
everywhere else for that matter.
THE AFRICAN SHOW 8:00-9:30pm
The latest in dance music from the African sub-continent plus/
minus a few oldie but greats and extras. Your host:Umerah
Onukwulu.
THE JAZZ SHOW 9:30pm-12:30am
Vancouver's longest running prime time jazz program. Features at 11:00.
9:00
10:00.
11:00
12:00
1:00
2:00
3:00
4:00
5:00
6:00
7:00
8:00
9:00
10:00
11:00
12:00
1:00
2:00-1
3:00 J
4:00 J
Breakfast
with the
Browns'
Soup de Jour
Linus
Lovelace
Pest
Control
Way Too
Early
Batter sea
Park
Gardens
Bird
Droppings
Better Hohn's
& Garlicks
Emma Peel
Fan Club
BBC WORLD REPORT CITR NEWS, SPORTS AND WEATHER —   ARTS PROFILE
fc o
The Unheard
Music
Blood On
The Saddle
Transformation
Spanish
Show
Spike
Out Through
the In Crowd
Absolute
Value of
Noise
NEWS, SPORTS, WEATHER, GENERIC REVIEW, INSIGHT AND DAILY FEATURE
Sports Digest
Hot
Pink
The
Jazz
Show
|Environmental|
Scatology
Neon Meat
Dream
Swirlin'
Vinyl
Spin
Aural
Tentacles
Spinsters
More
Dinosaurs
The
Knight
After
The
Vinyl
Frontier
Top Of
The Bops
The
Can-Con
Job
The Radio Show
Home
Taping
International
Stomp On
That
Boppa-Tron
Soup Stock
From The
Bones
of the
Elephant
Man
The
Saturday
Edge
Are you
Surrey
Us
Music?
Power
Chord
Deadly
Doom
Sat. Magazine
Radio
Infrequency
Tunes
'R'Us
Generic
Friend
The
Rockers
Show
The
Blues
and
Soul Show
FINE LINES 5:30-6:30pm
Literary criticism in a Canadian vein from the studios of UVIC
Radio, CFUV.
7th: A secret surprise feature
14th: "Not Yet" is the latest by Art Blakey & the Jazz
Messengers.
21st: "Davis Cup" - a collectors' item by New York pianist
Walter Davis Jr., on Blue Note Records with front liners
Jackie McLean (alto) and Donald Byrd (trumpet).
28th: "The Canadiana Suite" written and performed by Oscar
Peterson is a musical portrait of our vast and varied country.
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE l:15-3:00pm
Country music to scrape the cowshit off your boots to. With
yer host-poke, Jeff Gray.
IN CONTEXT 3-4:00pm
News and interviews from and about the local arts community.
THE SPANISH SHOW 1:15-3:00
Music from Espanol and community events as well.
THIRTY THREE AND A THIRD 3-5:00pr
Two hours of the Hottest Vancouver Music.
B.C. FOLK 5:30-6:00pm
Listen to the thoughts and music of B.C. folk artists.
IN THROUGH THE OUT CROWD 2:30-4:30pm
The best and hardest core/thrash around.
MOVING IMAGES 4:30-5:00pm
A whirlwind tour through the larger than life realm of the
silver screen.
2nd: UBC SUB films
9th: Polaris Productions
16th: The Outside Chance of Maximillian Glick
23rd: Oscar predictions
30th: Oscar results
IT'S JUST TALK WITH R J. MOORHOUSE 5:30-
6:00pm
A talk show committed to bringing the issues before you, the
concerned listener.
TOP OF THE BOPS 8:00-9:00pm
Fifties rock therapy heard across Canada, more or less.
CANCON JOB 910:00pm
The latest info on local bands and strictly Canadian tunes,
along with the hottest playlist stuff.
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD RADIO HELL
10:00pm-midnight
Catch a local band live in your living room.
Sun. Magazine
Just Like
Women/
Electronic
Smoke
Signals
Playloud
This Is
Not
A Test
In The
Grip
Of
Incoherency
THE NEW EXPO '6€ l:15-3:00pm
Live from the pavilions of the World's Music Fair, a tight two
hours on a singular theme.
ABSOLUTE VALUE OF NOISE 3-5:00pm
Found sounds, tape loops, compositions of organized and
unorganized aurality, power electricians and sound collage,
and live experimental music. 100% Canadian Industrialism.
THE RADIO SHOW 5:30-6:00pm
In-depth arts analysis and a general miscellany of commentary on the local arts scene with a concentration on theatre.
HOME TAPING I.N.T.E.R.N.A.T.I.O.N.A.L, 6-9:00pm
200 proof live mixes, remixes and kilomixes.
STOMP ON THAT BOPPA-TRON 9:00-midnight
House, hip hop, funk, new beat. The latest & greatest in dance
floor grooves.
SOUP STOCK FROM THE BONES OF THE
ELEPHANT MAN 12:30-3:30am
Independent music from around the world ranging from
spoken word to the latest in club tunes.
THE SATURDAY EDGE 8:00-noon
Vancouver's biggest and best acoustic/roots/rogue folk music
radio show.
POWERCHORD 12:15-3:00pm
Vancouver's only true metal show with the underground
alternative speed to mainstream metal; local demo tapes,
imports and other rarities.
20   DISCORDER ARE YOU SERIOUS? MUSIC 8:00am-noon
Schoenberg, Varese, Berio, Carter, Maxwell Davies, Bus-
sotti, Scelsi, Xenakis, Schafer, Cage, Webcm - Artistic Evel
Knievels. Nouveau post-modem instrumental compositions
in a classical vein.
THE ROCKERS SHOW 12:15-3:00pm
Reggae, Rock Steady, Soca and Ska.
THE BLUES AND SOUL SHOW 3-6:00pm
Blues, Blues, Blues and every second Sunday, the best of Post
War Chicago blues and more.
ELECTRONIC SMOKE SIGNALS 6:30-9:00pm
Information, news, interviews and political analysis from the
global cultures of resistance.
12th &26th: Creating the future today—the shape of things
to come as predicted by you, the listener. News on local
environmental and native issues.
JUST LIKE WOMEN 6:30-9:00pm
Feminist news and analysis and a broad range of women's
music.
ARTIST
VIOLENT FEMMES
'NOMEANSNO
MINISTRY
YELLO
BAD BRAINS
FOETUS INTERRUPTUS
JANES ADDICTION
•SONS OF FREEDOM
VARIOUS
-GRUESOMES
'OVERSOUL 7
BOMB THE BASS
KLAUS FLORIDE
THE FALL
RAPEMAN
SCRAWL
•ELECTROSTAnC CAT
THE DEAD MILKMEN
THE BEVIS FROND
•S.N.F.U.
VARIOUS
HAPPY MONDAYS
JULIAN COPE
STOP THE VIOLENCE
POP WILL EAT ITSELF
ROB BASE AND DI EZ ROCK
THE BEATNIGS
THE POGUES
WILUE DIXON
VARIOUS
EDIE BRICKEU AND THE NEW...
THE PRIMITIVES
THE YOUNG GODS
EUGENECHADBOURNE
TYREE
HEAVENLY BODIES
♦FRONT LINE ASSEMBLY
INSTED
THE THREE IOHNS
MUDHONEY
DEMENTED ARE GO
PAILHEAD
THE KL1NIK
THOMAS TRAUI AND HIS DARK...
SMALL PARTS ISOLATED AND...
LAND OF RAPE AND HONEY
FUG
LIVE
THAW
S/T
SONS OF FREEDOM
THE MELTING POT
HEY!
OVERSOUL7
INTO THE DRAGON
BECAUSE I SAY SO
I AM KURIOUS ORANJ
TWO NUNS AND A PACK MULE
HE'S DRUNK
DYSTELEOLOGY
BEELZEBUBBA
TRIPTYCH
BETTER THAN A STICK IN...
HUMAN MUSIC
WROTE FOR LUCK
MY NATION UNDERGROUND
SELF DESTRUCTION
DEFCON ir
IT TAKES TWO
TELEVISION ir
YEAH. YEAH. YEAH....
HIDDENCHARMS
PAY IT ALL BACK, V.II
SHOOTING RUBBER BANDS AT...
WAY BEHIND ME II"
L'ARMOURIR
I'VE BEEN EVERYWHERE
CELESTIAL
DISORDER
BONDS OF FRIENDSHIP
THE DEATH OF EVERYTHING
UPERFUZZ BIGMUFF
KICKED OUT OF HELL
TRAIT
FEVER
SPOOK SHOW
TAPE - A - MANIA
Join us for TAPE-A-MANIA on Thursday March 9th at 11pm. Get ready
to record The Syndrome live on CiTR fm 101.9. Here's your swell cassette
RECORDED LIVE THURSDAY MARCH 9
IN THE CiTR LOUNGE 2200 hrs
Sorry, Pad.
Our minds are
made up.   It's
the CiTR
SOUND
MACHINE for
OUR  HOOTENANY,
OR IT'S nothing!
It's mobile, it's
hip, and its wa7
more fun than
ant John Wayne
film festival.
228-3017
uyVJJ
ght ir«
THURSDAY4
night
THE Pi*7
y°Ur "jS^
MARCH 1989   21 HITLER'S
I'm going to search. To the day I die, I'll
search. High, low, in, out, over, under and
all around. And if I find the stupid bastard,
I'll make him wish that he had tried harder to win
the war "What the hell is this guy's problem?"
you may be thinking.
Well, thank you for asking.
How about: "DON'T FOLLOW ME, I'M
LOST TOO!"
Well, it is only a guess, but I bet the joker
that puts this on his car is trying to find a
sense of humour.
Or (For all you proud British Columbians)...
"I DROVE THE COQUIHALLA HIGHWAY"
Even better (this one makes me green with
envy)...
"I DROVE THE COQUIHALLA ON
OPENING DAY"
Then there's the yellow seventies classic...
"I FOUND IT!". Dare we ask what?
The disturbingly pointless...
"CAUTION: BABY ON BOARD"
And the list goes on. On and on. Thousands
of humourless adhesive annoyances. But that is
only the beginning. First it was the bumper
sticker (circa approx. 1941, but I'll get into its
history in a little bit), then came radio station
stickers, election stickers, motor oil stickers,
and so on. People soon got tired of stickers,
though, and tried new ways to "add a little
character" to their cars. Things like sheepskin
steering wheel covers, tinted windshield stickers with their car's name emblazoned on them
(not surprisingly, "VW BUG" was a big seller),
then came tinted windows all the way round,
fuzzy seat covers, gun racks and customized
home stereo speakers in the back seat.
Well, after many years of research, I
have been able to trace the root of all
this evil. Yes, you guessed it. The
short litde man with the one-inch mustache and
the acid-trip eyes. (And here you've been thinking that acid wasn't around until the sixties and
the Merry Pranksters. Sorry, but it doesn't
take much brains to figure out that Hitler was the
first to "spaceout". How else do you explain his
sudden urge to Rule The World?) Adolf was a
little low on cash one day, when he had a brainstorm: the bumper sticker. And what did the
sticker read?..."BUY VOLKSWAGEN: SUPPORT SYPHILLIS RESEARCH".
Yes. The first bumper sticker was both a
marketing ploy and a way of supporting medical
research. With it, Hitler was able to pre-sell
millions of the "car of the people" (i.e.
Volkswagen). Unfortunately, he never quite got
around to manufacturing the car, so the people
who had bought the car had to be happy with the
!STICK   IT   HERE!
ANY AD - ANY SIZE
$7 A SQUARE INCH
Call 873-4083/228-3017
Dsadlire; 15th cf tfe ircnrii
s^5^y§sg5
o
I
5
BRUCE A
AND THE
SECULAR ATAVISTS
Six Song Cassettes
and T-shirts
Zulu, Track,
Cabbages N' Kinks Etc.
Martin, QSC
SOUNDCRAFT
YAMAHA    *
jBL, EV       V
REVENGE
fact that they had aided Hitler's acid trip of
Running The World.
Look, I don't mind some of the more interesting bumper stickers which have been plastered all over our cars. For instance,
"IT'S OKAY TO HIT ME...NO BABY
ON BOARD" or
"BABY IN TRUNK"
but these damn things have led, recently, to
those annoying "suction-cup" animals that you
see stuck in every car window. Garfield with
that wild *n' crazy look on his face seems to be
the most frequent offender. What could possibly
be funnier than seeing Garfield's body stuck to
the window of the car in front of you in the midst
of rush hour? Why, Garfield' s body stuck upside-
down on the window of the car in front of you,
of course! Now that is funny stuff.
Those suction-cup things are almost as bad
as hanging your high-school graduation tassle
on your rear-view mirror.
Sometimes I wonder if those Garfield things
could be linked to the highway shootings down
in the States.
Anyhow, if you happen to see a short man
with a tiny grey mustache, warnhim to watch his
damned goose-step.
J. R. French
MacEWEN  ARTS  LTD.
ONE OF B.C.'S FINEST
SELECTION OF QUALITY
ARTISTS SUPPLIES:
GRAPHIC MATERIALS
BULK CANVAS
BLOCK PRINTING SUPPLIES
D    A    M     I    N    G
GLASS • DRYMOUNTING
CUSTOM STRETCHERS
331 West Pender Van. V6B1T3
685-BS2Q
WE ACCEPT ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS
434-5010
©mithCJ)
u
u
ound
PROFESSIONAL SOUND RENTALS
ONE NIGHTERS A SPECIALTY
LIGHTS AVAILABLE
. Martie Smith
22   DISCORDER *aLCJTR FM 101.9 presents Am
^THEY TRIED TO STOP US^
AND THEY FAILED AGAIN!
THOSE HARD ROCKING
LOUDMOUTHS HIT U.B.C
WITH AND
THE ICEMEN    SHE
SAT. MARCH 18
S.U.R. RALLROOM U.B.C.
ALL AGES+BEVERAGE ROOM
advance tickets *7 QAME T|ME 7;30
at the door *8
availble at: tracks,zulu,odessey imports
black swan hi-life,cabbages+kinx
am.s.box off ice.collectors r.p.m. 

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