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 *
ONASU
/CURE&
LOVE/
/ DJ STATIC #§t^
g\
4
J_P%
MAD
CADDIES
»«»««« THE JOHNSTOHES
November 4 Venue
f__*
IT'S HINT RECOR9S'
Ri^lCULOUSLV EAftLV
XHAS PARTIES.'  a.
'Kati
■o. ko o
titet better cvmfday magazinejrom CiTR loi.gjfat
AOVEITFlSi WITH OISOORIMEIt. WE'LL MAT YOU REM. NICE AND $WE YOU A DAMN
«■*», 1^     GOOD DIAL.
YOU CAN ADVERTISE WITH BOTH CiTR AND DISCORDER AND GET A DISCOUNt WEB
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2535 Alma St.
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726 Richards St.
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citr.ca EDITOR
Jordie You?
ART DIRECTOR
Lindsey Hampton
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Debby Reis
COPY EDITORS
Liz Brant, Debby Reis, Mine'
Salkin, Al Smith
AD MANAGER
David Stanjield
UNDER REVIEW EDITOR
Mine Salkin
RU EDITOR
Al Smith
WEB EDITOR
Reilly Wood
CALENDAR LISTINGS
Discorder StajF
PROMOTIONS DIRECTOR
Leanna Orr
PROGRAM GUIDE
Bryce Dunn
DISTRIBUTION
Jamie Anstey
CiTR STATION MANAGER
Brenda Grunau
PUBLISHER
Student Radio Society of UBC
COVER
Image by Sean Maxey
EDITOR'S NOTE
Dearest Discorder Reader:
From Nov. 12 to Nov. 26 it's HUadrive at CiTR 101.9 FM. Our
magazine comes out because CiTR feels thatil's important
that Discorder provide coverage of Vancouver's independent music scene, as it has been for the last £$ "fears or so.
CiTR provides us with an office to work out of and funding
to keep this magazine on the street. Discorder and CiTR
are a crucial voice in Vancouver and if you appreciate the
coverage ofVancouver's vibrant music and culture thatwe
provide, you should consider donating. CiTRprovides programming for music that could never get on mainstream
radio, but CiTR also provides a home for experimental,
classical, punk, metal, reggae, bluegrass, folk and hiphop just to name a small smattering of the genres on the
station. CiTR's DJs are dedicated volunteers who do their
radio shows out of a simple desire to impart some of their
vast music knowledge onto the general public.
Ihaven'teven mentionedthe talk programsthat are on
CiTR, which allow listeners to hear unique shows about
everything from comedy and the arts to news and sports.
If you want to see all of them check out CiTR's program
guide on page 22.
CiTR and Discorder help you learn about tbethings that
you want to know about. We try to maintain an ongoing
dialogue with you, our readers about what you want to
see in the magazine. If you feel like you are a part of the
CiTR and Discorder community than you should consider
donating to this year's fund drive. The money you donate
is going to go back $0 pfflviMng quality coverage of bands
and issues that you feel are important.
Not only is a contribution to CiTR during this fund
drive a valuable contribution to your community, but it is
also one that comes with prizes! Ifyoudonate $30 you get
a "Friends of CiTR" card that gets you discounts at great
local businesses (for a list of all of them see page 3). If
you donate the special $101.9 you will be given a limited
edition CiTR Fundrive T-Sbitt These shirts will only be
available to people who donate during the fund drive. Last
fear's were designed by Sean Maxey, whose art is currently
on the cover of Discorder. There's more prizes for bigger
donations, but I won't spend all of this note listing them.
Tune in to CiTR during the fundraiser for more details.
Since CiTR is registered as a charitable organization, if
none of the prizes appeal to you, you can still get a nice
tax deduction $n any donation over $10.
If these amounts seem big, think about how much
that is for a whole year of quality radio programming. A
It^b donation is only eight cents a day over a whole year
of listening.
Finally and most importantly, CiTR is the sole reason
Discorder exists and ever existed. If you love this magazine
please don't .hesitate to donate during the fund drive. Say
you're doing it just for us and let CiTR know you care!
Cheers,
JordieYow
OCTOBER CONTRIBUTORS
WRITERS
Sarah Berman, Dashiell Brasen, Nathaniel Bryce, Bryce Dunn, Dan Fumano, Brenda Grunau, Ben Johnstone,
Tamara Lee, Douglas Mackenzie, Adam Mannegren, Miranda Martini, AlexMcCarter, Sean Nelson, Leanna
Orr, MarkPaulHus, Mine Salkin, Al Smith, Shaun Stander, Trey Taylor, Reilly Wood
PHOTOGRAPHERS & ILLUSTRATORS
Me'rida Anderson, Val Cormier, Aisha Davidson, Gerald Deo, Robert Fougere, Kate Henderson, Nathan
Matthews, Sean Maxey, TJ Reynolds, Chrisrorpher Smith, Shaun Stander
PROOFREADERS
SIMON FOREMAN, MAXWELL MAXWELL, KIT WATSON
©DiSCORDER 2009 by the Student Radio Society
of the University of British Columbia. AU rights
reserved. Circulation 8,500. Discorder is published
11 times a year by CiTR, which can be heard at 101.9
FM, online atwww.citr.ca, as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except
Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTRDJ line at (604)
822-2487, CiTR's office at (604) 822-3017, email
CiTRat CitrMgr@ams.ubc.ca, or pick up a pen and
write #233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T
1Z1, Canada.
CONTRIBUTE.
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//REGULARS
06/RIFF RAFF
Buzzer / The James T. Kirks / The Mojomatics / Psyched To Die
17/VENEWS
Fortune Sound Club I Funky Winkerbeans / Goonies / Safe Amplification Site
Society/Smileys
20/CALENDAR
by Christopher Smith
22/PROGRAM GUIDE
38 /CHARTS
08 / NEVER ON A SUNDAY PART 1
Looking for a night out on the town? Discorder sent out a team of reviewers
to report back on just some of Vancouver's weekly happenings.
12 /TRANSMISSION: TNG
Interested in working in the music biz? This article will let you know how
the newest people in the industry are getting started. It may depress you a
litde bit.
14 /BOOGIE MONSTER
A cartoon frightfest of a band, tf0i*l«o is one of the best noisy acts you can
find at any local bar. They played at our monthly night last month. Were you
there? You should have been.
15 / DJ CURE & HEXADECIBEL
Discorder checks on the activities of two of Vancouver's premiere dubstep DJs
in this piece on big bass music.
17 / MORE INSTRUMENTAL LOVE
Dan Fumano continues to Discorder's exploration of the relationship musicians
have with their instruments by interviewing Bison BC, MT-40 and Fine Mist
25 / DJ STATIC
Straight from Montreal, DJ Static of the WeFunk collective is bringing us the
funkiest of beats for rumpshaking good times.
26/ART PROJECT: SEAN MAXEY
Sean Maxey is a member of the Doers. He's also an artist with a penchant for
line and ink drawings of people and animals and donating part of the proceeds
from his art sales to charitable organizations.
37/POP MONTREAL 2009
Robert Fougere checked out Pop Montreal and took some awfully nice
photos. You can find a small sample of them here.
// REVIEWS *
29/UNDER REVIEW
Cougar / Ikandi Disterheft / Do Make Say Think /
The Fury / Grand Archives / The Laundronauts / Man
Your Horse / The Rain & the Sidewalk / T-Train / You
Say Party! We Say Die!
32/REAL LIVE ACTION
Matthew Barber / Brasstronaut / GZA / Rose Melberg
/ Pink Mountaintops / Quadruple Dare / Shindig 2
& 4 / You Say Party! We Say Die! // RIFF
RAFF
The Mojomatics: Doucheraaster Records {www.rayspace.com/douchemasterrecords)
Psyched To Die: Dirtnap Records (www.dirtaaprecs.coni)
Buzzer: Tic Tac Totally Records (www.ttctactotaIly.com)
The James T. Kirks: Eat Shit & Die Records (www.myspace.com/eatehitanddierecordings)
Hark! Do you hear what I hear? 'Tis the scratch & pop of vinyl records my
friends. Another month has passed and we have more delights from the
world of wax to tell you about.
A day of musical mayhem recently rained down on Portland in the form of
the Scion Garage Fest and yours truly saw an absurd amount of hip shakin'
combos from all over the planet. One band of note (and there were many that
received my adoration) that kept me buzzing was the Mojomatics from Italy,
who should have busts in their likeness adorning many a great hall by the
time you read this. Their take on the traditional blues formula is diluted with
punk, country and pop that can only be described as amazing. For only two
dudes (guitar and drums) this is a feat in and of itself. Their latest single is a
perfect introduction to the push and stomp of this duo (even though they have
released at least two full-length albums and a boatload of 45s) as it displays
these subtle shifts in style quite well. "Another Cheat on Me" storms out of
the gate like the Flamin' Groovies on speed, catchy and cantankerous with
a wailin' harp bringing the track to a fever pitch. "Down By The Graveyard"
rolls and tumbles like a Spaghetti Western soundtrack complete with what
sounds like a mariachi trumpet announcing the death of another outlaw.
Highly recommended.
No visit to Portland would be complete without a trek to Green Noise Records and the home of Pacific punk label, Dirtnap Records. This great label
has churned out a ton of hits in its short career and Psyched To Die can be
duly added to the roster. Straight out of the concrete jungle of New Jersey and
featuring a member of a past Dirtnap band (the Ergs!) their Scatterbrained EP is
a shot to the gut of early '80s hardcore and late '70s punk. With bleak lyrical
leanings, "Admitting Defeat" and "Conditioned To Fail" are perfect examples
and its tough as nails delivery is sharp and fast and to the point. If you like
Minor Threat, Zero Boys and the Descendents then you'll be moshing your
heart away to Psyched To Die.
Another label that can do you no wrong lately is Tic Tac Totally Records
based in Chicago. Most bands who call this company home fall under the
"punk" moniker from the Suicide-styled Static Static to the quizzically named
troubadour known as So Cow. Everything released up to now has been the bee's
knees. Now comes Buzzer, an unabashed throwback to the proto-punk vibe of the
late '70s with their newest slab, "Teacher's Pet" backed with "Stunning Freak."
These tracks are best played at your next basement kegger, while doped-up guys
sloppily hit on all-too-knowing girls with the Rubber City Rebels and Slade
also spinning on the stereo—pizza boxes littering the cigarette-laden carpet
and the smell of cheap musk and hairspray hanging thick in the air.
I'll use the last remaining space I have to talk up Edmonton's bad-ass
ambassadors of surf rock swagger, the James T. Kirks. After numerous years
of splitting time between cities and band members, the brothers Wright (Ted
on guitar and Rob on bass) do no wrong on their latest effort for the faithful
who've been shining up their rods and greasing their boards in anticipation of
this release. "Theme From the Twilight Living Room" immediately conjures
up Calgary's much-revered instrumental combo Huevos Rancheros, with
a high guitar crunch factor and ball-busting bottom end. "Deadwood" and
"Dragstrip Deathtoll" are cut from the same cloth as Link Wray by-way-of
Social Distortion's twang-infused punk vibes. This takes the checkered flag
on all accounts and you can help celebrate their victory lap to Vancouver on
Nov. 7 at the Fairview Pub with the supercharged Jolts and fellow motorcycle
maniacs the Vicious Cycles.
As you were! More next time! //VENEWS
BY JORDIE YOW
ILLUSTRATION BY LINDSEY HAMPTON
The Safe Amplification Site Society unveiled a database of local all-ages
venues in Vancouver to the public via their website last month. This
database is in the form of a Google Spreadsheet and can be found at www.
safeamp.org/resources.
The spreadsheet contains an extensive array of information that would be
useful to someone wanting to book a show. It not only contains the basics like
contact info for booking, addresses, and how venues like to break down the
money, but also almost anything else a show promoter might be interested in
knowing about a prospective venue. This includes information such as volume
and genre limitations, sound system specifics and the amount of staff they
have available to help things run smoothly.
"Hopefully it will be useful to people," Ryan McCormick, a director at Safe
Amp. who spearheaded the project, said over the phone.
McCormick said the young society, dedicated to running the ideal all-ages
venue in town, had been working on this project "off and on" for about six
months. It contains about 50 venues in total, though some of them are a little
difficult for your average promoter to book. The Secret Space is so secretive
about their information that the only info in the database is their name, and
BC Place is a little on the large side for most people looking to book a show
in town.
"If ever I fulfill my dream of getting Bryan Adams to play a Safe Amp. show
we'll have that information," joked McCormick.
The existence of this database does show that there's no shortage of all-ages
venues in town, but McCormick said that there is no all-ages venue in town
that provides everything someone throwing a show might want.
McCormick pointed out that there are lots of venues on the list that can be
booked, but that each of them has its drawbacks, whether it's that the venue
"only allows blues bands or [doesn't] have a PA or costs $600 a night."
McCormick also pointed out that, before it was hassled by bylaw inspectors
into shutting down, "Hoko's was pretty much the closest to perfect we had."
McCormick hopes this database will serve a second purpose—to use it as a
piece of evidence when they are pleading their case for funding—to show that
there is no venue out there that will fill the void that Safe Amp. hopes to fill.
For more info on Safe Amp. or to get involved or donate visit their website at
www.safeamp.org. If you would like to have something added to the database
or if you find any inaccuracies, send an email to secretary@safeamp.org.
IN OTHER NEWS:
We are sad to announce that Goonies, the Downtown Eastside art gallery
and sometimes music venue, has closed its doors.
"Itwasn'tas collective as I thoughtitwas going to be," said Merida Anderson,
who ran Goonies up until its closure. Anderson enjoyed running Goonies, but
found it too difficult to sustain entirely on her own.
"It was inevitable without finding enough help," she said.
Anderson will continue to keep herself busy running a supper club and the
occasional show from her house and is part of a banjo duo with Discorder's art
director, Lindsey Hampton, currently known as the Friendship & the Fawn.
Funky Winkerbeans will also be hosting many fewer shows in the future
as both their weeklies (which hosted bands), No More Strangers and Good
Burger, decided to leave the venue on Oct 22. The promoters for the nights
left after the owners of Funky Winkerbeans attempted to impose new conditions on them.
Tristan Orchard indicated that the venue owners wanted to make more money
and wanted to take the door cover and guest list spots from the promoters.
"I give the venue respect for having live bands and I understand this happens
all the time with venues wanting to make money," said Orchard.
" [No More Strangers] isn't even something that we've been making money
on," he went on, pointing out that it would be impossible to run the event
without the money they were bringing in from the door.
No More Strangers seems to have at least found a temporary home at the
newly opened Smiley's in Vancouver's downtown financial district. "We're going
to try it out and see how we like it and how the venue likes it," Orchard said.
Keep your eyes on the No More Strangers Facebook page or on winniecooper.
net for updates on their venue changes.
Good Burger has moved at least one show to their old home, Babar, in the
Downtown Eastside.
The Royal Unicorn Cabaret may no longer exist, but in its location a new
bar called Fortune Sound Garden has recently opened. Though it mostly seems
to be hosting a series of DJ-based weeklies, it can still be used as a venue as is
evidenced by the No Gold release show that took place there on Oct. 27. Hopefully, they will start booking some more live acts in the future. [= —
„• -" r* O        »-0      .-'        ,'- - 4
^^^^^
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[UtxJU v.^^    * w p
IliOSTRATION BY MERIDA ANDERSON
afe
^MttttH^^^tt^^ WEDNESDAY,
MM^_^^^tvi^KM0 RISK
^^DJ^J^^tt^^MAJ^^J
Out of every bar and club night that I've ever been to in Vancouver, Ice Cream
Social would probably be my pick for the best music. At the very least, they play
the best tunes for dancing. It's pretty rare that I make an appearance on the
dance floor, but when they're playing this music-H&lnkthe Supremes, Jackie
Wilson, Chuck Berry, the Beatles—then I'm out there cutting a rug.
And so is everyone else (albeit in a much mor^^ordinated aadjrhythmic
manner). I don't think I've ever seen another club with such a high proportion
of the guests dancing—on a Mondarfjsight no less! At the nighf s swingin' peak
(around i a.m.) on my most recent visit, I would estimate that 95 per cent of the
clientele were twisting the night away and singing along. There were almost
no wallflowers in this crowd. Bonus.* thejrjplayed one of my all-time favourite
songs: Jimmy Soul's "If You Wanna Be Happy."
Ice Cream Social has been going strong for three years now and during
that time ifs moved to Honey from its original home at Shine. It caters to a
pretty diverse crowd of guys and gals (and noticeably more gals than guys; at
least on m^isit), mostly in their 20s and early 30s, but with some older than
that. It's supi. a pleasant crowd that ifs difficult to imagine a nyone not feeling
welcome. People seem to be more concerned #iti» enjoying themselves than
with looking cool (but thaf s not to say that there won't be some exceptionally
stylish hip cats, because there certainly will be).
Ifs also the only night in town that plays music that my father would like,
at least until someone starts "Tony Bennett Tuesdays."
—Dan Funwno
"fee^^eTafeW^esaB^qj^^mlWi) **
dJMJc
w
Situated closer to Main street than downtown, Psych Night is almost a neigh*
bourhood hangout tor music heads in East Van. There's less dancing at this
weekly than most as it is mote suitable for conversation over a few pints (or a
joint beforehand, ifthafs your thing). The night is a great place to go if you're
looking for somewhere to drink on a Wednesday and of course if you are interested in psychedelic music. The music is from the extensive collection of the
Joshua Magneticring an d Brother Toe, who obsessively collect old psych, music
from the '60s and '70s. They mostly play off of their computers.
"The advantage of the computer is that we can play stuff that you couldn't
even find [physical} copies of," said Magneticring.
"If you could find the record you'd be paying $1,000 for it," Magneticring
west on with a chuckle.
They play predominately psych, but aren't strict and will stray into other
related genttjfe, The night has been going for two-and-a-Ipfyears now and
readied a peak of popularity over the summer, which made the Anza enforce
a $2 cover on the night.
V/,'j£$fpe Anza had t$$tart doing that because it kinda got too crazy for awhile,*
said Magneticring. If the night dies down, the cover might disappear. Ifs Is
place to keep things from getting too busy, not to make the organizers loads
ofcash.
—-Jetiie You* €m_^}_
//anything,
2 ATTACK!
11$3.75 BEERS,
$3.75 SHOTS, $5.50 DOUBLES
Maybe ifs where society is damaged. Maybe ifs damaging boundaries.
Maybe it's the remaining damages from a party gone overboard. I don't
know, but I might have brain damage after a night of Pilsners and Jager, Fireball
and tequila. But who could resist those prices?
"It's where the poor kids come to drink," joked Damaged Goods promoter
Dustin Bromley. (More like punks meet hipsters meet... Vespa owners?) Though
not surprising, the mandate is cheap drinks, considering the night was en- \
visioned mid-bender by Bromley and co-promoters Jake Madison and Jordan
Hudson. Aside from an easy time on the wallet, Damaged Goods has some
interesting substance to it.
Like the odd array of drink specials, this night has many different personas.
The promoters are also the resident DJ team S ex Attack!, who share the decks
and play smooth mixes from what I would call the anything/everything pile.
Tunes are by Boney M, Springsteen, Queen, Little Richard and even Aqua;
they definitely don't lack imagination. Just to put in an extra component of
schizophrenia, each week also features some independent live bands. They've
had Colourbook, Defektors, Junior Major, MT-40, Fake Shark-Real Zombie
and many others.
"Our goal is to promote great Vancouver music," Bromley explained. "We
want to get exposure for unknown bands. At the same time we tie in club music
to attract that scene and show people where that music originates from."
With some great intentions and a scheifse ball of influences, Damaged
Goods becomes difficult to define musically. Bromley to tried to sum it up
thoughtfully " fun... metal.... aaand...[expletive deleted]."
He's right. Damaged Goods definitely has a good sense of humour with
a hard metal edge. And although this night's "damage" may be a multiple
personality disorder, there is something intriguing about never quite knowing
what you can expect.
—Tamara Lee
ATURDAY
UJE // FUNKY WINKERBEANS SMILEY'S l
SIC: INDIE POP AND THROWBACKS
THE WINNIECOOPER.NET DJ COLLECTIVE: TRISTAN ORCHARD,
UUNTEREVEN AND CHRISTIAN FLORES
DRINKS: $1.50 BEERS,, $3.50 JAGER SHOTS, $3.75 SINGLES, $6.50
DOUBLES, $11 PITCHERS
[ed. When we covered this No More Strangers was still happening at Funky Winkerbeans.
It has since moved, for more info on the reasons for this check out Veneu*s on pa^e 7.]
The Vancouver music scene needs more people like Tristan Orchard, the '
organizer of No More Strangers, a showcase of local bands and DJs taking place g
every Saturday night at Funky Winkerbeans. In a recent phone conversation
Orchard told me, "In the beginning the space wasn't equipped for live gigs at''
all. I was doing everything, including renting and transporting the sound gear i
to and from Long & McQuade. It was slow at first but now No More Strangers |
seems to be gathering steam. Ifs great to see."
This past Saturday was no exception. "It was the most successful No More
Strangers evening yet," said Orchard. "We had some of the local scene's best I
Uve bands playing to a packed house." Mingling with the varied crowd, it ,:
was apparent that people wanted to see fresh new music, and though a large
contingency of folks were there to witness Basketball, they were also quite
receptive to whatever was put in front of them. Whether it was the fun DJ sets
offered up by Orchard, Christian Flores in between bands, or the high energy
acts themselves, the people were there to receive. The bands were fun and all
put on a heck of a show. Boogie Monster, with its hyper-frenzied freak out
noise jazz from another planet, impressed the crowd and set the stage for a
blistering performance from electro pop-punks Gang Violence, who sounded
fantastic and gave it their all. But this night truly belonged to Basketball, a
Middle-Eastern influenced percussive dance outfit that gets bodies jumping.
If music can get you high then these bands were the stimulant on this evening,
and if interesting new music is your bag then No More Strangers is the place
to be on a Saturday night.
—Nathaniel Bryce URDAYI
y
»#OTS, $4.50 SINGLES, $6.75 D
Glory Days had club patrons bumping and grinding until wallets fell
out of back pockets. This event is great not only for pickpockets, however.
A cold PBRand swaying to the beat make for a good time. Feet flooded the
hardwood dance floor to hoof it for electro, house, oldies (but goodies),
and an immense selection of remixes by DJs My!Gay!Husband!, Sincerely
Hana, and on this night, special guest DJ Genie.
Tables fashioned out of old Pac-Man & Frogger video games were
also a great way to take a well deserved break from the sweat-mongrels
who populated the dance floor. The line-up for the bar was never too
long, and the chairs were just comfortable enough to cradle a newborn
infant. I can see why they'd have troubles ousting inebriated folk out of
their leather backed horseshoe booths come closing time. If you imagine
a comfy caravan with royal red wallpaper and an arcade game table you
might get a faint idea about the decor.
Glory Days features electronic bands, and anything from psychedelic
surf rock to the more non-chalant sounds of indie or New Wave. The stage
is quaint, tucked neatly behind the dance floor to create an intimate live
venue for music. The venue has featured such bands as the Blue Violets,
Fan Death, MYTHS and often features special guest out-of-towners. The
mood? I'd hate to stab this as a hipster hangout, it's taboo these days.
Everyone was just the right amount of friendly. The variety of people (and
ages, mind you) was a wide spectrum, and nobody would be out of place
here. Believe me—I went alone.
To experience the glory, one only needs rhythm and a small purse
of change for cheap beer. Glory Days at the Biltmore Cabaret is, as the
name states, a short trip into a hot nest of glory where there is cheap
beer and amazing music.
—Trey Taylor
>€*
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INDUSTRY    r
tronic:
i // by mtmk mmm confer
fjEft     ILLUSTRATION BY NATHAN MAFHtWS
iTHENlir
I GENERATION
ave you ever wanted to work in
the music industry? To combine
your business acumen and passion for
music with scruffy haircuts, smelly
vans, sticky venue floors and electronics? At this year's Transmission
conference in Victoria, one of the discussion topics was Next Generation
Leadership. The Transmission guide
quipped, "Are our industry's silver-
backs ready to embrace the young gorillas who are more quickly adapting
to the fundamental changes that are
effecting how the next generation is
consuming creative content?"
Transmission is an annual "boutique" music conference—an elite
gathering of music executives and
related industries. After begging admission for a second year, I had the
opportunity of listening to an eclectic
cross-section of people representing
artists, labels, internet providers,
publishers, mobile devices and other
digital media.
Transmission also quoted Vered
Koren from EMI Canada: "Music is
not just being consumed by middle-
aged men. Enough said." And, looking around, the conference room
was full of middle-aged white men.
Ironically, artiste weren't welcome at
the table, and one younger delegate
pointed out that discussing "The
Next Generation" was hard with so
few young faces in the crowd. The
exclusivity of the conference and cost
of registration prevented young entrepreneurs from attending, as well as
those slogging up the ranks in their
respective labels. Discussion circled the following ideas: the industry is currendy
shrinking, there are few footholds
for entrants, and there is no time for
mentorship. Instead ofstartingatthe
bottom, young people are bypassing
their elders bent on protecting their
empires, and starting innovative new
companies. However, a healthy industry would breach the disconnect
between the experienced industry exec
and the young innovator. And, how
does mentorship happen if newbies
have to carve out their own niches?
Upon my return to Vancouver, I
checked in with several Vancouver
companies to see how they mentor
and train young people. I started with
Bill Baker, who started Mint Records
with Randy Iwata in the halls of CiTR.
"I don't think either one of us had any
desire to work in the record indus
try. If anything we found it a little bit
grim," commented Baker.
"Randy and I had worked at CiTR
for so long, we'd become very familiar
with the industry," said Baker. "We'd
been working with record labels at the
station and it became something we
were addicted to almost... The label
was a way of finding something we
could do that felt the same and still
in the same area of interest without
being there."
Baker and Iwata had mentors from
other labels who helped explain the
nuts and bolts of the business. Baker
noted people at Cargo Records and
Nettwerk, and most importantly, an
entertainment lawyer who explained
the legal aspects of the business.
Paying it forward, Mint has had
two years of non-stop interns from
Capilano University's arts and en
tertainment management diploma
program. Mint integrates their interns
into all aspects of the business and includes them in the weekly conference
meetings. "We try to be very inclusive
with the folks that do intern with us.
All someone needs is the desire to do
something," Baker added. "We've had
so much luck with people who have
taken initiative and gone for it."
Initiative is also required to get
that first toehold. After learning
about an opening from a friend, local songwriter Katie GoGo walked
into S.L. Feldman & Associates with
her resume to snag an internship.
S.L. Feldman is one of Canada's top
three booking agencies, representing
Norah Jones, Bryan Adams and Sarah
McLachlan (and Discorder friendly
bands like Bison B.C., D.O.A. and You
Say Party! We Say Die!).
GoGo tested out the business side
of the music world in the Ucensing department with orders to find a theme
song for a show on MTV. Unfortunately, her time there was short-lived
when S.L. Feldman made cuts to the
department GoGo enjoyed the steep
learning curve, but plans to go back to
school in September before jumping
back in. "I think now's a great time to
learn about what you want to do... so
that when the economy's in a better
place they can be ready for it."
Justin Wachtel began his career
by researching entertainment companies and landing an internship
at MTV. From there, he interned at
Frontside Promotions Group and returned for a part-time position after
graduating from UBC. Wachtel's role
in the company grew and he's now a
product manager focused on radio
promotions.
"Because of the climate of the industry, it's a very difficult one to be
involved in. It takes a lot of work and
a lot of dedication and a lot of passion
for the industry. Don't be deterred or
discouraged by the initial resistance
you might get—or the hard work,"
Wachtel said in referrence to the
changing industry.
The key seems to be working for
free—getting that internship and
proving your worth. Unfortunately,
this only works if you are young and
have nothing to lose, live with your
parents or sold your stocks before the
recession.
But beware the thought that formal education will get you ahead in
the industry. A study prepared for the
Cultural Human Resources Council
of Canada entitled A National Training
Strategy/or the Canadian Music Industry
describes the need for business training in today's industry and the low
regard of the industry for education.
The study states that "the Music Industry has been largely not supportive
of or not satisfied with the efforts of
the formal education system... most
practitioners within the Music Industry attribute their knowledge and
skills acquisition to on-the-job training and/or being self-taught. They
rank formal education very low on
their list citing lack of time and high
cost." Formal education only tends
to opens doors by creating internship
opportunities.
"I think you need a general foot in
the door before you can pry and start
asking in depth questions about the
industry," Wachtel said. "You need to
earn an insider's trust before they start
giving you all this information and
introducing you to people." Echoing
Baker and GoGo, Wachtel also found
people willing to help him along the
way.
"Since I got hired at Frontside, the
owner of the company [Geoff Goddard] has become a mentor to me.
Being in the industry since he was 17,
he has this wealth of knowledge that
he's been able to pass on to me."
Once you break in, ifs all a matter of hard work—showing up and
getting the job done. "Young people
are the best people to work in the
industry because they know what's
fresh, they know what's coming up,"
GoGo added. "But ifs still a long haul
to have the payoff for it—you have to
put a lot of hard work in to reap the
benefits." Gather up your courage and
go get that internship. f( bo0^'
BY NATHANIEL BRYCE
ILLUSTRATION BY TJ REYNOLDS
ie    moos
The name Boogie Monster may suggest beefy funked out dance parties
ripe with horn sections and DJ's scratchin', but you ought not to judge
a book by its cover.
"I got Boogie Monster from a Gnarls Barkley song of the same name,"
guitarist Ben Fussell revealed. "The tide and song itself captured what I wanted
the band to sound like: something crazy, but also fun and cartoony like Looney
Toons—full of intensity and childlike enthusiasm."
These words certainly can describe the band, both in the musical department
and how they play. Though the music can be crazed and massive in sound as
Fussell pulls complex chunky riffs from his guitar and Tony Dallas' ridiculous,
energetic drumming style constantly threatens to blow the house down, there
is a light-hearted and humorous quality to the music. It really is like watching
a couple of wild cartoon children letting loose with musical instruments.
With influences steeped in the post-rock and ambient noise genre, bands
such as Godspeed You! Black Emperor and avant-garde guitarist and composer
Glenn Branca play a role in Boogie Monster's ambient guitar and drum-heavy
sound. Along with Rage Against the Machine's guitarist Tom Morello who
inspired Fussell to pick up a guitar, it was At the Drive-In that helped to shape
what Fussell wanted in a band.
"They raised my expectations more than anyone else about what I could
demand from a band in terms of live presence, musical creativity and work
ethic," said Fussell, "I'd never heard a band sound so passionate and intense
on CD, and they moved around on stage with a frenzied grace that I've never
seen matched since."
Also influential was Providence, Rhode Island noise duo Lightning Bolt,
who upon first hearing, gave Fussell the confidence that a two-piece band
could cut it. "Lightning Bolt holds a special place in my heart," Fussell shared.
"They take simple ideas and blast them into the stratosphere with unbridled
enthusiasm. They're the only band I've listened to where I feel like their virtuosity fully services the music. There's something visceral about it that I don't
feel when I listen to other technical bands."
Formed in 2007, Boogie Monster didn't actually play their first live gig
until January of 2008. Soon after that gig, then drummer Owen Lewis had
to leave Vancouver in April for university, which sent Fussell on the hunt for
a replacement. Enter Tony Dallas, who came highly recommended from the
SSRIs, a band he had previously played with and who Fussell had seen at various shows around town. After checking out a Boogie Monster show in March
at the Astoria, Dallas was down for trying out. And during that first audition
it was clear that he was a sure fit.
"The first time we rehearsed I think I laughed in disbelief. I couldn't believe
the spectacle before me," said Fussell. "He's such a charismatic and natural
performer. Sometimes at shows, especially the early ones, I'd start to laugh
during our set because his drumming overwhelmed me. It's such a privilege
to play with him and he adds so much to our performances and sound. I don't
know what I'd do without him."
Indeed, the man is something else to watch. Constandy throwing every fibre
of his being into playing, rolling and filling all over his drums, he does not stop
his hyper-kinetic energy until the end of the set. "The Sled Island Festival was
a testament to Tony's power as a performer," Fussell shared. "He ran outside
the venue and danced in the street during our set, distracting a couple of drivers
[and] causing them to crash. He was ushered back in by staff before anyone
could figure out what had happened."
With a CD in the works over November and due out in December followed
by a West Coast tour, as well as a good string of appearances in town and at
festivals such as Music Waste and Pop Montreal, it seems that Boogie Monster
is hitting ite stride with audiences. Even if they don't know what to make of
the music they still find themselves appreciating it.
"My ultimate goal is to tap into a free-spirited immediacy, taking simple
riffs and adding as much density as possible so that it sounds like a freight
train that's about to derail but never fully loses control." Fussell said. "It's
an aesthetic I like and strive for. I never intend for the band's music to be
confrontational or aggressive. Like hearing Lightning Bolt or Melt Banana's
Cell Scape records for the first time and thinking they were kick-ass, amped
up rock records. They're fun for me to listen to. That's all I've wanted Boogie
Monster to be: a fun, amped up rock band."
14 IP   vj*
II BIG BASS
BOOMING
BYOASH1EUBRASEN
ART BY AISHA DAVIDSON
Local residents DJ Cure and Hexadecibel are helping take Canadian bass
music to new heights. Together the two DJs have served up hysteria inducing dub tracks for the last year at Goldie's Lounge, turning the basement of a
Pender pizza joint into one of Vancouver's (literally) hottest night spots.
Cure and Hexadecibel are not alone in popularizing the dubstep movement.
With dubstep artiste like Rusko remixing Katy Perry and Kanye West on big
time indie electronica imprint Mad Decent and Chase & Status lending their
"Eastern Jam" out to Snoop Dogg for "Snoop Dogg Millionaire" (which was
coproduced by R&B and hip-hop mainstays Kurupt, Murs and John Legend,
and features Slumdo^ Millionaire star Tanvi Shah), yesterday's underground
subgenres are crossing over into the main stream.
"I like to try and create music that can be felt, whether someone is on the
dance floor or Ustening in headphones. I like to fuse traditional musical elements
and instruments with futuristic sounds and palettes. I want to keep the listener
interested. For this reason, I often try new techniques on different projects,
just to keep things different," he said, explaining his own style.
"When I DJ out, I go hard or go home. I like to play b\_ tunes with lots of
energy. I tend to touch down on all ends of the spectrum on my radio show on
SUB FM. I'll play anything from bangers to deep, techno influenced [music],
to hip-hop-fused weirdness," said Cure. Mirroring Cure's experimental ear,
his label Aufecf s releases are dark, techy, glitchy and unafraid of the 4/4. [ed.
Ironically in dubstep the 4/4 time signature is considered experimental.]
WhUe Aufect Recordings (www.aufect.com) is showcasing the best the
Canadian beat scene has to offer, Hexadecibel's sets for Rob Booth's Electronic
Explorations podcast (electronicexplorations.org) has attracted unprecedented
attention for Canadian dubstep. Hexadecibel first recorded a collaborative
set with Vancouver's most prominent bass crew, Lighta Sound. Booth then
selected him to mix one of his own. Both sets have been downloaded over
10,000 times.
"This podcast was very significant to me," said Hexadecibel. "It gave me the
opportunity to showcase some of my newest songs, demonstrate my mixing
skUls, and, most importantly, promote my current and future releases... Once
my release [Prism EP] on Mindset hits shelves, I wiU officially be the first dubstep
artist in Vancouver to have 12" vinyl pressed and distributed through a major
global distributor. Then the snowball really gets rolling, as I have four more
vinyl releases lined up over the next 12 months." Prism is available on websites
m //DJ CURE & HEXADECIBEL CONT'D
I ||4J
HfJ
ipHpypl^^^^S
^^^^^^^SM^»|
like Boomkat (www.boomkat.com), Juno (www.juno.co.uk), Chemical (www.
chemical-records.co.uk) and Redeye (www.redeyerecords.co.uk).
Back at home, energized by bass music's constandy merging and shifting
array of new styles, Cure envisions his label "mutating into an out of control
beast," housing a "sub-sub-genre not even invented yet." With Aufecf s digital
releases reaching the top io on electronic music website Juno's online music
downloads (www.juno.co.uk), ifs a good indicator that Cure's mutations will
be heard soon enough.
Cure owes Aufect's early success to knowing some talented producers.
DZ, who was featured in ATM Magazine's "Leaders of the Nu Skool" article,
and Loetech, of Bombaman and XI, put their faith in him and helped him get
Aufect started. "Now I run the label myself... My girl does all the accounting
and paper work, and my boy Nick Lazerface is A&R and is repping as a DJ in
Montreal," Cure said.
Cure brought his girlfriend from Ontario in 2007 with the express intention of starting a dubstep label in Vancouver. He describes the crowds here
as "real music lovers," who "just go off!" He feels the city can stake a claim
as "one of the top three cities representing dubstep in North America, maybe
even number one."
Hexadecibel agreed, "People's acceptance of the sound in general, and
willingness to hear new music, [makes Vancouver's dubstep scene unique
and special] ... The 'heads' in this city are well versed in electronic music ...
the local producers, DJs, promoters, etc. It seems like a very fertile place for
creative people, and what's better is that almost everybody involved in the scene
here is cooperative and helpful."
"I think dubstep is showing signs of going mainstream," Cure added." [But]
I've never been happier with bass music as a whole."
Hexadecibel followed up, saying: "Ifs an exciting time right now, with bass
music reaching around the globe and more and more talented people joining
the ranks daUy. I am truly amazed, literally every single day, with the level of
creativity and talent I see from younger and younger producers, not to mention
the old hate who have been at it in the music biz for years who are again hitting
their stride with a renewed interest in music. I think dubstep is a conduit, a
place where people from so many other disciplines are coming and bringing
their experience to create something totally new and fresh."
In the same vein, Hexadecibel has helped to revive the audience driven
label Pressing Issues (www.pressing-issues.com), to keep things different.
Hexadecibel is one of the label's committee heads, who are responsible for
whittling down demos presented by their online community and presenting
them to be voted on for potential pressing and releasing. The label has successfully released two 12-inch vinyls which are distributed by ST Holdings UK
and is getting a third installment going.
"We will be creating an active poU for dubstep fans to vote on in mid-
November, and the vinyl will likely hit shops in late December or early in the
new year," Hexadecibel added. "We've pre-signed our A-side for the album,
[XI's 'Gravity']. 'Tis a big tune."
In the meantime, if you want to catch Cure, he'll be at Goldie's on Nov. 6.
"Goldie's Fridays will be no longer be a crunked-out-thrust-womp-raver-
bass party spot. Not to worry, though, the night wUl still be there. Just chilled
out though with more of a house and two-step vibe," he said. On Nov. 13 he's
opening up for the Dub Police label owner, Caspa. He'll play Nov. 20 at the
Suave Assassins One Year anniversary party, and on Nov. 27 at a venue that
has yet to be announced, so keep your eyes peeled and ear to the ground. He
also has a new residency, Whatever's Dope Wednesday, every Wednesday in
the backroom at Shine, hosted by Emotionz. Check out his radio show every
Thursday 6 to 8 p.m. on SUB FM (www.sub.fin).
Hexadecibel regularly releases tracks on his website at soundcloud.com/
hexadecibel.
16 //MORE INSTRUMENTAL LOVE
PHUIUS BY SHAUN SIANDLR
WORDS BY DAN FUMANO
llllllllllllll DAN AND OF BISON BC
7 GOTTA LET
Dan And, the amiable guitarist-vocalist for Vancouver's reigning thrash
metal kings Bison BC, was more than happy to welcome us into their jam
space and show off the instruments and gear that mean so much to his band.
"As nerdy as it is, I love my gear," And said. "I think ifs probably just the fact
that we're poor as fuck and we work our asses off to buy our own gear."
If you've seen Bison BC play in the last year, you've likely noticed (and
had your face melted by) And's distinctive Gibson Flying V guitar. "I have a
[Gibson] SG that's the same colour and I kept breaking the headstock and I
had to get it repaired a bunch of times. Actually that's where it is right now,
getting repaired. So I went to rent something, and I saw this, and I said, 'That's
fucking hilarious, a cream-coloured Flying V? Totally.' Solrentedit, and these
are the original pickups that come with it and they're these super high-output
pickups. But they sound fucking great."
And gestured towards a battered brown guitar leaning against a massive
amp in the corner of the room. Ifs the one played by his fellow vocalist-guitarist
in Bison, James Farwell. "The only two Gibsons that have these pickups are
[the Flying V] and the Explorer ... We both started with SGs, with pickups
that we swapped out ourselves and then, uh, we decided to get some funny
metal guitars."
Both And and Farwell are having custom guitars buUt for them by First Act,
a Boston-based company started by a couple of former Gibson employees.
Bison's bass player, Masa Anzai is already playing a First Act bass, which he
has further customized by taking off the bottom string. "He always plays with
THE KIDS KNOW WHAT'S UP"
three strings," And explained. "When we were recording the firstalbum, Masa
busted the nut on his other bass and the string wouldn'twork, and he reaUzed,
'Wait a minute, I don't use that string anyway.' So since the first few months
that we started jamming, he's used three strings."
And has also customized his Flying V in his own way—with four small
bars of black tape, lined up parallel to each other on the body of his guitar in
a rough replication of the famous Black Flag logo. "I gotta let the kids know
what's up," he said, referring to his own punk roots. "There's this generation
of metal kids who grew up with Korn and Slipknot, and they don't know about
punk. I can't relate to them."
When asked about his favourite piece of gear, though, And didn't point
to a guitar, but to his speaker cabinets ("Fucking huge shout out to Emperor
Cabs. Super righteous dudes.") and his amp head ("The fucking raddest thing
I've ever bought."). When And saw the head, a ioo-Watt Soldano Avenger, he
knew it had to be his for two reasons: first, "It has my fucking name on it"
(he's used black tape to cover up the "SOU'of Soldano, leaving "DANO" in big
white letters on the amp). Second, in a Spinal Tap-worthy moment of heavy
metal fantasy, all the knobs turn up to n. For real.
"It actually goes one louder!" And laughed, "ifs good to know that I could
go all the way to n if I wanted to."
Bison BC is currently working on their third album, recording this winter
at the Hive in Burnaby, for a planned 2010 release. ////// REGINALD BOWLS
OF MT-40
Reginald Bowls and Sophie Sweetland rehearse in a Downtown Eastside 16ft
that acts as a work space shared by nine artiste, working in all different
mediums: painting, photography, textiles, and in Sophie and Reginald's case,
coaxing cool, weird noises out of old machines and crafting them into songs
that manage to be simultaneously danceable and sort of scary.
The gear lying around Bowls' rehearsal space/office/workshop is unique and
customized. Most of the various toys and gadgets lining the shelves have been
gutted for wires and bite and pieces for use in Bowls' mad scientist creations,
which don't appear in MT-40's stage show (yet).
The room is Uke a synthesizer version of the Island of Dr. Moreau: an
electronic drum fashioned out of a mannequin's leg. A Barbie Cassette Player.
A sampler made out of a kids' play phone. A microphone encased in a toy
bird's head.
When asked about his favourite piece of equipment, Bowls gleefully pointed
outajumbled, seemingly random mess ofwires. "It's a bitcrusher," he said. "It
takes a digital audio signal that's separated into bite... and it crushes everything
into one. So it just spits out a chunk of sound." Bowls then proceeded to play
around with the tangle ofwires—sorry, the bitcrusher—making all kinds of
bizarre (and very cool) noises.
"ALL WIS COMES FROM NOT
HAVING. MONEr
One piece of gear Sweetland and Bowls uses is an integral part of MT-40
—the duo's moniker actually comes from an instrument: the Casiotone MT-40,
a keyboard from the early 1980s that Bowls picked up for $30 at the pawn shop
next to Pigeon Park. "Pretty much every song's written on the MT-40," Bowls said
as he laid out the rest of the gear that they use in their live performances.
Bowls plays an old Commodore 64 keyboard, modified to access the Commodore's internal synthesizer. The sound it produces instantly evokes 1980s
computer games, and this is a big reason why Bowls likes the sound. "I'm
attached to the Commodore 64 just for nostalgic reasons, because I wasted
a lot of my time as a kid on a Commodore 64. So I might as well be doing
something good with it now."
In concert, Bowls sings and plays the Commodore synth (attached to a
volume pedal), Sweetland plugs away on the MT-40 and they're backed up by
pre-programmed drums on Bowls' MacBook.
Their specific instrumentation is no doubt an important part of the duo's
unique and distinctive style. "All this comes from not having money, not being
able to afford an actual synthesizer... but it sucks because if we ever lose any
of this shit, then the band would be over."
MT-40 plays the Memewar Magazine Release Party at the Railway Club,
Nov. 5 and Night Shift Nov. 14 at the Astoria with Gang Violence, Myths and
Animal Bodies.
/  /* lli§l|;;;»gg
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////////////// JAY ARNER
OF FINE MIST
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44 Twas surprised that you wanted to talk to us about our gear, because we
Xdon't even really use much gear," Jay Arner commented as he showed
us the home recording studio on the upper floor of the house he shares with
bandmate Megan McDonald. But Fine Mist's minimalist approach toward the
creation and performance of their wonderful synth-pop jams is pretty unique
and fascinating.
Arner composes the majority of the songs on the computer, which is the
central part of Fine Mist's recording studio. He uses SampUtude, an audio editing
and recording program similar to ProTools or Ableton. "Both Meg and I come
from an analogue background, and I had a four-track when I was younger, and
basically I just use [Samplitude] like a multi-track," said Arner.
Arner has also used this home studio to record a number of other bands,
such as Basketball, Mount Eerie and Shane Turner Overdrive (check out Arner's
recording studio website at tonehenge.tumblr.com). He has a keen ear for
production, and claimed he's "trying to find that middle ground between New
Order and Mariah Carey" on the almost-completed Fine Mist album.
"When we perform live, we're using the pre-recorded backing tracks on an
iPod," explained Arner." We just mute the vocals, and then I figure out which
part I want to play live on the MicroKORG, and we just mute that. So then
you've got a backing track and I just turn it into a WAV file."
So when Fine Mist performs, Arner plays on the KORG and sings harmonies
and McDonald sings lead while the tracks they've written and recorded play
on a regular, standard iPod. And that's it.
A lot of musicians develop a fetishistic desire for instruments and gear, but
Arner prefers to focus on the songwriting. "That's something that I try to avoid,
that lust for more stuff. You can just get sucked into that, and then you're not
making songs cause you're busy being Uke, 'Oh! Check out this tone!'"
All Fine Mist require for a show is the iPod and KORG ("We can play a
show any place, any time!" Arner claimed.) [ed. Someone should put this to the test.]
However, a quick look around the studio reveals guitars, basses, and other
instruments, betraying Arner and McDonald's history of playing together over
the years in a number of local projects with more traditional "rock bands," such
as Poison Dart and International Falls. "Fine Mist started as a sort of vacation
from International Falls. And that was where the minimal thing sort of comes
from, because we don't want want to lift drums to every show, and we don't
want to worry about amps dying... We take a taxi to shows. Fine Mist doesn't
drive," he laughed. "We're responsible."
That brings up another important instrument in their live show: the ever-
present glass in Arner's hand. "It's chardonnay," he said with a smile. "Fine
Mist doesn't do Riesling."
Fine Mist plays the Media Club, Nov. 9 with Little Dragon (from Sweden)
and Nina Mendoza.
CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS BY SHAUN AT WWW.SHAUNSTANDER.COM
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(1 //CiTR 101.9 FM PROGRAM GUIDE
DISCORDER SUGGESTS LISTENING TO CiTR ONLINE AT WWW.CiTR.CA, EVERYDAY.
SUNDAY
MONDAY
TUESDAY
6am
7
8
9
ie
11
12pm
1
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
Blood On
Ihe Saddle
(Roots)
CiTR Ghost Mix
Tana Radio (World)
Shoo&s&ookta (Talk)
KolNodedi (World)
The Rockers Shov
(Reggae)
Shameless
(Eclectic)
Chips
(Pop)       Pez (p°P)
IMiyt&ms j  Awesome
&fa_&       (Eel)
Mondo Trasho (Eel)
, Tpnscendance
(Dance)
CiTR Ghost Mix
CiTR Ghost Mix
Breakfast With The
Browns (Eclectic)
Alt Radio  Canadian
(Talk)        (Talk)
Parts Unknown (Pop)
Lets Get Baked
(Talk)
The Rib (Ed)
News ioi (Talk)
Career Fast Track (Talk)
This Side of Monday
(Eclectic)
Radio Free Gak
(Eclectic)
The Jazz Show (Jazz)
mS'i'mXfM/W/MM
CiTR Ghost Mix
Pacific Pickin' (Roots)
WEDNESDAY
CiTR Ghost Mix
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
Sounds of Africa
(World)
Third Time's The
Charm (Rock)
Morning After Show
(Eclectic)
Laugh Tracks (Talk)
Reel to Real (Talk)
Native Solidarity News
(Talk)
Radio Freethinker
(Talk)
Weners BBQ (Sports)
Flex Your Head
(Hardcore)
Life On Jumpstreet
(Dance)
Crimes And Treasons
(Hip-hop)
CabaRadio (Talk)
CiTR Ghost Mix
Suburban Jungle
(Eclectic)
Pop Drones
(Eclectic)
The Green Majority
(Talk)
Democracy Now (Talk)
Rumbletone Radio A
Go Go (Rock)
Arts Report (Talk)
Audiotext (Talk)
Sam-     Canadian
squantch  Way (Ecj)
Folk Oasis (Roots)
Sexy In Van City
(Talk)
Hans Kloss Misery
Hour (Hans Kloss)
CiTR Ghost Mix
CiTR Ghost Mix
End of the World
News (Talk)
Sweet And Hot (Jaiz)5
Duncan's Donuts
(Eclectic)
We All Fall Down
(Eclectic)
Japanese Musicquest
(World)
French Connection
(World)
Cafe Radio (World)
Stereoscopic Redoubt
(Rock)
Exquisite Corpse
(Experimental)
Live From Thunderbird
Radio Hell (Live)
Hypnotic Groove
(Dance)
Aural Tentacles
(Eclectic)
CiTR Chost Mix
Synchronicity (Talk)
Ska- l't» Scenic Drive
(Ska)
These Are The Breaks
(Hip-hop)
Generation Anihilation
(Punk)
Radio Zero (Dance)
Nardwuar Presents
(Nardwuar)
News 101 (Talk)
Shake A Tail Feather
(Soul/R&B)
The Vampire's Ball
.   (Wostrial)
CiTR Ghost Mix
CITR Ghost Mix
The Saturday Edge
(Roots)
Power Chord
(Metal)
Code Blue (Roots)
The Leo Ramirez Show
(World)
NashaVolna (World)
Shadow Jugglers
(Dance)
Synaptic Sandwich
(Dance/ Electronic/
Eclectic)
Beats From The
Basement (Hip~Hop)
CiTR Ghost Mix
6am
7
8
9
to   :
11
12M1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
10
11
t&rn
1
llllilili
Hi
3
4
5 Willi    1 w 1
■ u 1 m 1  nwminiii  mw
SUNDAY
RHYTHMSINDIA
THE RIB
Ben Riley is at the drums on
WINGS
(World) 8-9pm
(Eclectic) 4>5pm
Flute Fever.
(Talk) 2-2:3opm
TANA RADIO
Alternatina Sundays
Explore the avant-garde
Nov.23: Testament is a new
(World) 9-ioam
Featuring a wide range of
world of music with host
three CD set of solo impro
REELTOREAL
music from India, including
Robyn Jacob on the Rib.
vised piano works, recorded
(Talk) 2:30-3pm
SHOOKSHOOKTA
popular music from the
From new electronic and
in concert by one of the
Movie reviews and criticism.
(Talk) io-uam
1930s to the present; Ghaz-
experimental music to
geniuses of music, pianist
A program targeted to
als and Bhajans, Qawwalis,
improvised jazz and new
Keith Jarrett.
NATIVE SOLIDARITY NEWS
Ethiopian people that
pop and regional language
classical! So weird it will
Nov. 30: Evolution, by trom
(Talk) 3-4pm
encourages education and
numbers.
blow your mind!
bonist/composer Grachan
A national radio service
personal development.
Moncur in, is a classic
and part of an international
ALL AWESOME IN YOUR EARS
NEWS 101
avant-guard statement from
network of information
KOLNODEDI
(Eclectic) 8-9pm
(Talk) 5-5:3opm
the mid '60s. Jackie McLean
and action in support of
(World) nam-i2pm
Alternatina Sundays
Vancouver's only live,
on alto saxophone, trum
indigenous peoples' survival
Beautiful arresting beats
volunteer-produced,
peter Lee Morgan, vibist
and dignity.
and voices emanating from
MONDOTRASHO
student and community
Bobby Hutcherson, bassist
all continents, corners and
(Eclectic) 9-iopm
newscast. Every week, we
Bob Cranshaw and drum
RADIO FREETHINKER
voids. Always rhythmic,
The one and the only Mon
take a look back at the
master Tony Williams play
(Talk) 4-4:3opm
always captivating. Always
do Trasho with Maxwell
week's local, national and
four Moncur compositions.
Promoting skepticism, criti
crossing borders.
Maxwell—don't miss it!
international news, as seen
cal thinking and science, we
from a fully independent
TUESDAY
examine popular extraor
THE ROCKERS SHOW
TRANCENDANCE
media perspective.
dinary claims and subject
(Reggae) i2-3pm
(Dance) iopm-nam
PACIFIC PICKIN'
them to critical analysis.
Alternatina Sundays
Join us in practicing the
CAREER FAST TRACK
(Roots) 6-8am
The real world is a beautiful
Reggae inna all styles and
ancient art of rising above
(Talk)5:30-6pm
Bluegrass, old-time music,
and fascinating place and
fashion.
common ideas as your host
and its derivatives with
we want people to see it
DJ Smiley Mike lays down the
THIS SIDE OF MONDAY
Arthur and the lovely Andrea
through the lens of reality as
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
latest trance cuts.
(Eclectic) 6-7:3opm
Berman.
opposed to superstition.
(Roots) 3-5pm
trancendance@hotmail.com
Fun and independent music
pacificpickin@yahoo .com
Alternatina Sundays
supported by a conver
WENER'S BARBEQUE
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-
MONDAY
sational monologue of
SOUNDS OF AFRICA
(Sports) 4:30-6pm
boots country.
information, opinion and
(World) 8-9:30am
Daryl Wener talks about the
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
anecdotes focusing on the
Showcasing music, current
world of sports. Everything
SHAMELESS
(Eclectic) 8-nam
here, the now and the next
affairs & news from across
from the Canucks to the
(Eclectic) 3-5pm
Your favourite Brownsters,
week.
the African continent and
World Rock Paper Scissors
Alternatina Sundays
James and Peter, offer a
becktrex@gmail.com
the diaspora, you will learn
Championship.
Dedicated to giving local
savoury blend of the famil
all about beat and rhythm
ethanwener@hotmail.com
music acts a crack at some
iar and exotic in a blend of
RADIO FREEGAK
and it will certainly kick-
airplay. When not playing
aural delights.
(Eclectic) 7:30-9pm
start your day.
FLEX YOUR HEAD
the PR shtick, you can hear
breakfastwiththebrowns@
(Hardcore) 6-8pm
some faves you never knew
hotmail.com
THE JAZZ SHOW
THIRD TIME'S THE CHARM
Punk rock and hardcore
you liked.
(Jazz) 9pm-i2am
(Rock) 9:30-n:3oam
since 1989. Bands and
ALTERNATIVE RADIO
Vancouver's longest
Open your ears and prepare
guests from around the
CHIPS WITH EVERYTHING
(Talk) 12-ipm
running prime-time jazz
for a shock! A harmless note
world.
(Pop) 5-6pm
Alternatina Mondays
program. Hosted by the
may make you a fan! Dead
Alternatina Sundays
Hosted by David Barsamian.
ever suave, Gavin Walker.
lier than the most dangerous
LIFEON JUMPSTREET
British pop music from all
Features at npm.
criminals!
(Dance) 8-9pm
decades. International pop
CANADIAN VOICES
Nov. 2: In celebration of Mr.
borninsixtynine@hotmail.
(Japanese, French, Swed
(Talk) 12-ipm
Phil Woods' birthday (one
com
CRIMES & TREASONS
ish, British, US, etc.), '6os
Alternating Mondays
of the greatest exponents of
(Hip-hop) 9-npm
soundtracks and lounge.
the alto saxophone), who
MORNING AFTER SHOW
crimesandtreasons@
PARTS UNKNOWN
will be 78 and is as active
(Eclectic) ii:3oam-ipm
gmail.com
SAINT TROPEZ
(Pop) i-3pm
as ever, we'll play The Euro
An eclectic mix of Canadian
(Pop) 5-6pm
An indie pop show since
pean Rhythm Machine, Live in
indie with rock, experimen
CABARADIO
Alternatina Sundays
1999, it's like a marshmal
Frankfurt, March 1970.
tal, world, reggae, punk
(Talk) npm-i2am
Welcome to St. Tropez!
low sandwich: soft and
Nov. 9: The Cry: a classic
and ska from Canada, Latin
For the world of Cabaret
Playing underrated music
sweet and best enjoyed
date by the late Prince Lasha
America and Europe. The
Tune in for interviews, skits,
from several decades!
when poked with a stick
(flute) and Sonny Simmons
Morning After Show has lo
musical guests and more.
st.tropez101.9@gmail.com
and held close to a fire.
(alto saxophone) with two
basses and drums. Lasha
cal bands playing live on The
Morning After Sessions.
It's Radio with sass!
QUEER FM
LET'S GET BAKED
grew up with Ornette Cole
WEDNESDAY
(Talk) 6-8pm
(Talk) 3-4pm
man and this innovative
LAUGH TRACKS
Dedicated to the gay, lesbi
Now in its sixth season,
music reflects Coleman's
(Talk) i-2pm
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
an, bisexual and transexual
come bake along with Matt
influence.
Laugh Tracks is a show
(Eclectic) 8-ioam
communities of Vancouver.
& Dave and an always excit
Nov. 16: The startling debut
about comedy. Kliph
Live from the Jungle Room,
Lots of human interest
ing array of Canadian musi
album of one of the most
Nesteroff, from the 'zine
join radio host Jack Velvet
features, background on
cal talent-vegan cooking
amazing flutists: Jeremy
Generation Exploitation,
for an eclectic mix of music,
current issues and great
never sounded this good!
Steig, backed by pianist
hosts.
sound bites, information
music.
Denny Zeitlin who is also
generationexploit@yahoo.
and inanity. Not to be
queerfmradio@gmail.com
making his recorded debut.
Ben Tucker is on bass and
com, musicalboot@yahoo.ca
missed!
dj@jackvelvet.net fiiii    mr.u   ■  HIT   nvmimii   wviuh
POP DRONES
(Eclectic) io-n:3oam
ANOIZE
(Noise) n:3oam-ipm
An hour and a half of avant-
rock, noize, plunderphonic,
psychedelic and outsider
aspects of audio. An experience for those who want to
be educated and EARitated. |
lukemeat@hotmail.com
THE GREEN MAJORITY
(Talk) i-2pm
Canada's only environmental news hour, syndicated by
CIUT 89.5 FM Toronto or
iviviv.greenmajority.ca.
DEMOCRACY NOW
(Talk) 2-3pm
RUMBLETONE RADIO
A GO GO
(Rock) 3-5pm
Primitive, fuzzed-out
garage mayhem!
ARTS REPORT
(Talk) 5-6pm
AUDIOTEXT
(Talk) 6-6:3opm
The juiciest Canadian writing: poetry readings, author
interviews, short stories,
spoken word, etc.
SAMSQUANTCH'S
HIDEAWAY
(Eclectic) 6:30-8pm
Alternatina Wednesdays
All-Canadian music with a
focus on indie-rock/pop.
anitabinder@hotmail.com
THE CANADIAN WAY
(Eclectic) 6:30-8pm
Alternating Wednesdays
FOLK OASIS
(Roots) 8-iopm
Two hours of eclectic folk/
roots music, with a big
emphasis on our local scene.
C'mon in! A kumbaya-free
zone since 1997.
folkoasis@gmail.com
SEXY IN VAN CITY
(Talk) 10-11PM
Your weekly dose of education and entertainment in
the realm of relationships
and sexuality.
sexyinvancity.com/category/
sexy-in-vancity-radio
Hans Kloss' Misery Hour
(Hans Kloss) upm-iam
Preflymuch the bestthingon radio.
THURSDAY
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
(Talk) 8-ioam
SWEET AND HOT
(Jazz) ioam-i2pm
Sweet dance music and hot
jazz from the 1920s, '30s
and '40s.
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
(Eclectic) 12-ipm
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by
Duncan, sponsored by
donuts.
duncansdonuts.wordpress.
com
WE ALL FALL DOWN
(Eclectic) i-2pm
Punk rock, indie pop and
whatever else I deem worthy. Hosted by a closet nerd,
www.weallfalldowncitr.
blogspotca
INKSTUDS
(Talk) 2-3pm
Underground and indie
comix. Each week, we interview a different creator to
get their unique perspective
on comix and discuss their
upcoming works.
JAPANESE MUSICQUEST
(World) 3-3:3opm
Syndicated from CJLY
Kootenay Co-op Radio in
Nelson, B.C.
FRENCH CONNECTION
(World)3:30-5pm
French language and music.
CAFE RADIO
(World) 5-6pm
Iranian talk and music syndicated from CJSF Simon
Fraser University, Burnaby,
B.C.
STEREOSCOPIC REDOUBT
(Rock) 6-7:3opm
Psychedelic, acid punk,
freakbeat, prog and other
grotesque and socially relevant artifacts from 1965 to
today, with an emphasis on
Vancouver's freak flag with
pride.
www.myspace.com/stereo-
scopicredoubt
EXQUISITE CORPSE
(Experimental) 7:30-9pm
Experimental, radio-art,
sound collage, field recordings, etc. Recommended for
the insane.
artcorpse@yahoo.com
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
(Live Music) 9-npm
Featuring live band(s) every
week performing in the
CiTR Lounge. Most are
from Vancouver, but sometimes bands from across
the country and around the
world.
HYPNOTIC GROOVE
(Techno) npm-i2am
AURAL TENTACLES
(Eclectic) i2-6am
It could be global, trance,
spoken word, rock, the
unusual and the weird, or it
could be something different. Hosted by DJ Pierre.
auraltentacles@hotmail.
com
FRIDAY
SYNCHRONICITY
(Talk) 9-ioam
Join host Marie B and discuss spirituality, health and
feeling good. Tune in and
tap into good vibrations
that help you remember
why you're here: to have
fun! This is not your average spirituality show.
SKA-T'S SCENIC DRIVE
(Ska) ioam-i2pm
Canada's longest running
Ska radio program.
djska_t@hotmail.com
THESE ARE THE BREAKS
(Hip-hop) 12-ipm
Top notch crate digger DJ
Avi Shack mixes underground hip-hop, old school
classics, and original
breaks.
beatstreet@telus.net
RADIO ZERO
(Dance) 2-3:30pm
An international mix of
super-fresh weekend party
jams from New Wave to
foreign electro, baile, Bollywood and whatever else.
www.radiozero.com
NARDWUAR
(Narduwar) 3:30-5pm
Join Nardwuar the Human
Serviette for Clam Chowder
flavoured entertainment.
Doot doola doot doo...doot
doo! nardwuai@nardwuar.com
NEWS 101
(Talk) 5-6pm
See Monday description.
HOT MESS
(Eclectic) 6-7:3opm
On temporary hiatus. Will be
replaced with UBC Sports.
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
(Eclectic) 7:30-9pm
On temporary hiatus. Will be
replaced with UBC Sports.
RAINBOW GROOVE
(Dance) 9-io:3opm
On temporary hiatus. Will be
replaced with UBC Sports.
SHAKE A TAIL FEATHER
(Soul/R&B) io:30-i2am
The finest in classic soul
and rhythm & blues
from the late '50s to the
early '70s, including lesser
known artists, regional hits
and lost soul gems.
THE VAMPIRE'S BALL
(Industrial) i2-4am
Dark, sinister music to
soothe and/or move the
Dragon's soul. Industrial,
goth and a touch of metal
too. Blog: thevampiresball.
blogspot.com.
thevampiresball@gmail.com
SATURDAY
THE SATURDAY EDGE
(Roots) 8am-i2pm
A personal guide to world
and roots music—with
African, Latin and European
music in the first half, followed by Celtic, blues,
songwriters, Cajun and
whatever else fits!
steveedge3@mac.c0m
GENERATION ANIHILATION
(Punk) 12-ipm
A fine mix of streetpunk and
old-school hardcore backed
by band interviews, guest
speakers and social commentary.
crashnburnradio@yahoo.ca
POWER CHORD
(Metal) i-3pm
Vancouver's longest running metal show. If you're
into music that's on the
heavier/darker side of the
spectrum, then you'll like
it. Sonic assault provided by
Geoff the Metal Pimp.
CODE BLUE
(Roots) 3-5pm
From backwoods delta low-
down slide to urban harp
honks, blues and blues roots
with your hosts Jim, Andy
and Paul.
codeblue@buddy-system.
org
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
(World) 5-6pm
The best of mix of Latin
American music.
leoramirez@canada. com
NASHA VOLNA
(World) 6-7pm
News, arts, entertainment
and music for the Russian
community, local and
abroad.
nashavolna.ca
SHADOW JUGGLERS
(Dance/Electronic) 7"9pm
Broaden your musical
knowledge with DJs MP, So-
cool, Soo and their guests.
Working across music
genres including electronic'
and club-based music.
shadow.jugglers@hotmail.
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
(Dance/Electronic/Eclectic)
9-npm
If you like everything from
electro/techno/trance/8-bit
music/retro '80s this is the
show for you!
www.synapticsandwich.net
BEATS FROM THE BASEMENT
(Hip-hop) upm-iam
Mr. Joi, being a cinemaphile
as well as a DJ, will surprise
you with the likes of:
French New Wave, Golden
Age, Noir, Action, Adventure, Comedy, Coming of
age Drama, Epic/Myth,
Fantasy, Gangster, Horror,
Romantic Comedy, Science
Fiction, Social Drama,
Thriller, The Art Film, The
Black Comedy, The Musical
and the Porno. WEFUNK
Q?IQ
BY TAMARA LEE %„_^LJr"^
ILLUSTRATION BY LINDSEY HAMPTON   J|rr"T  "-
."""N
o
In the back room of Shine, an understated DJ spins for a modest crowd. He
pumps out the funkiest beats on this side of the Rockies, dropping so many
big tunes with such enormous energy and smooth mixes that you'd think there
was a crowd of 500. No one who pops in can resist getting sucked in to his
vortex of tcunk-—no rump is unshaken and no foot untapped.
This master of funkiness is the amazing Dj Static, who has recently moved
to Vancouver. The name is iconic and familiar, being a cornerstone of college
radio with the hugely popular WeFunk. Similar in format to These Are The
Breaks on CiTR, WeFunk specializes in all danceable beats on the funky side of
hip-hop, for over 13 years, DJ Static and co-host, Professor Groove produced
Wefunkfbr CKUT, McGill University's radio station in Montreal.
And luckily for us, at werunk.com, 400 of the show's 575 episodes can be
streamed. In 1998, cassette tapes were only barely extinct when Groove had the
foresight to archive the shows and produce an internet stream (a rarity then).
Being technologically sawy proved enormously useful in propelling WeFunk
to international fame, tn 2001, a relatively new iTunes created a bouse station
they called WeFunk Radio.
"We never applied to be carded by them,n Static said in a recent interview.
"We found out after the fact, which was a big break for us. Tbe nest year we
started to get emails from far away places like Russia!"
Another secret to WeFunk's success has been good connections in the
music scene. Their show has featured Montreal talents Uke Butta Beats and
Smoked Talent and international guests like Duke Eatmon (referred to by Static
as "an encyclopedia of music") and Nomadic Massive, who Static performs
witb occasionally,
When asked to comment on being so well connected, Static just laughed
and modestly replied, "Yeah, after 14 years I guess you meet some people."
The recipe for his lengthy career has been a splash of good fortune, a hint
of modern technology and some tablespoons of industry connections. But
undoubtedly the main ingredients are his great musical taste and super skilled
turntablism, saute'ed in some passion and positive attitude.
In a changing industry where turntable skills are becoming less common
and laptops are more common, one might wonder if he feels the art form
has degraded.
"Not at all! The program I use [Serato] has opened a lot of doors technically.
You can set cue points, loop your own samples, and even play your own beats
without having them pressed- Just like we learned vinyl then, I am learning to
make the most with the new interface. I have seen some DJs that are technically
better then me do some amazing stuff!"
- Baekin the early 'oos, B^sstk was attending school in Vancouver. "Hip-hop
was still underground, so CITR and CFRO had all the shows I listened to
regularly. My first break into college radio was an ad I did for the DJ Sound
War '94," Static told me.
"Hip-hop music then sampled a lot of funk and soul music. People become
interested in what came before—what's the source of all the different samples."
It was a lot of work tracing those roots in those pre-Internet days though. "I
used to read the album credits, which would usually say... James Brown, or
who ever. I started btuldiag a list when I was a teenager."
Hip-hop may have changed, but Static isn't complaining.
• "Many people complain tbat hip-hop has changed, but like anything it has
to continue to move forward," he said. "Granted, it's a commercial monster,
but there just wasn't the popularity or marketing then for artists to live off the
music. That's what tbe pioneers would have liked to do."
WeFunk has always stayed on formula and progressed with the times.
"It's a DJ's job to keep up with new music. We have our core sound but
we always look for new music that fits our mold. At the same time we look to
expose old music that has been forgotten."
Now thatDJ Static has returned to the West he enters a new chapter in his
musical career. Thanks to tbe power of technology, he will continue to do
WeFunk remotely.
Tve met some really like-minded people [in Vancouver]. I suppose I'll just
keep doing-*$ltef I'm doingand see what happens," Static explains when I ask
him what his plans for the city are.
In his first Vancouver gig Static shared his set with old friend DJ Flip Out
at a breakdancing competition. He occasionally plays at Shine and feels positive about his new connections. With his recipe of tasty beats and tantalizing
skills, no doubt he is right. DJ Static's recent migration west is a happy thing
for Vancouver's rumps!
You can follow where Static is gigging via his Facebook u*u*u*Jacebook.com/djstat-
iauefunk or his MySpace: u*u*u'.mi/space.com/djstaticu?efunk.  ni rnujLui / olhr m
MTIST m
JtfriV M4)fE/ IS.
27 ill   I   imjmi  rvunii  ifin/Yirr "of* VSf% eKIwl ';.
// UNDER
REVIEW
COUGAR
PATRIOT
^mt»ter/Ninja Tunes)
One of the nice things about instru-
mehtatmusic lsthe liberty of not getting messed around by someone else's
smarty-pants lyrics.
Ideally, good instrumental music should allow the listener to feel
something, rather than telling listeners what to feel through some tired,
pedantic ballad. Hailing from Madison, Wisconsin, Cougar is an emotive five-piece band who tell musical
stories without words, and they do
it damned well. Patriot, their second
full-length album, is thick with catchy
and tasty little electronic tunes, many
of which are feisty, unpredictable and
bordering on the schizophrenic. Exploring the outer boundaries of its
genre through random sequences and
surprising interludes, the album is
head-spinning and downright inventive at times. One standout track,
"Pelourinho" is a great example of
this. The song mixes programmed
beats and samples alongside sweet
harp-like guitar plucking, giving
way to a full-blown Middle Eastern
breakdown near the halfway point. It's
nutty and beautiful at the same time,
revealing a narrative of the romantic artistic life in the heart of Brazil.
Body movement is an inevitability in
listening to Patriot; this album's got
a real fire to it.
—Nathaniel Bryce
BRANDI DISTERHEFT
SECOND SIDE
(Justin Time)
There is a mlslottception floating
abound ttetji^is a dying fbraijthat
its depths have been plumbed to the
very bottom, and all of the great innovators have already dcaieeverything
with the genre that could be done.
If this were true, one would think
that there would be no ambitious jazz
players out there, which is where Bran-
di Disterheft neatly sucks the wind out
of naysayers' sails. The young North
Vancouver bassist is nothing if not
ambitious, as she proves with her
sophomore effort Second Side. In fact,
she is at her best when she is taking
risks and pushing the boundaries of
jazz composition and arrangement.
Disterheft often steps elegantly out
of the chains of genre in order to play
a double bass duet with kalimba (as
on sister tracks "Second Dawn" and
"Dawn"), or to pair mariachi horns
with surf guitar (on "Combien de j
Chances," a delightfully swampy
number that evokes images of Clint
Eastwood staging a showdown in a
Brazilian lounge club). These experiments result in rich, textured songs
that slink in one ear and rumba out
the other.
For all of her experimentation,
Disterheft remains firmly rooted
in jazz. Her straight jazz tracks are
smooth and smoky without becoming
"jazzy," a word generally applied to
the kind of despair-inducing ditty fit
only for elevators and airports. Strong
guest vocals from Holly Cole and Ranee Lee add elegance and variety to
Second Side, while the brief instrumental tracks dispersed throughout the
album soulfully evoke the album's
theme of love and its "associated state
of belief."
"Belief," according to the album's
liner notes, "is acceptance by the
mind that something is true or real,
often underpinned by an emotional
or spiritual sense of certainty." With
any luck, Disterheft's considerable
talent and enthusiasm will help to
revitalize the world's belief in jazz as
an art form with a long and exciting
journey ahead of it.
—Miranda Martini
DO MAKE SAY THINK
OTHER TfiyfKS
(Constellation)
Ambient post-rock veterans return to
the basics with their sixth album Other
Truths, an homage to their instrumental wall of sound tradition leading to a
psychic oblivion. Together with musicians from Akron/Family and Lullabye
Arkestra, the album sounds much like
a live exploration of humanity' s deep- j
est commonality: the process between
thought and action.
Opening track "Do" starts up
optimistically, with catchy distorted
guitar riffs, building up to a montage
of cataclysmic orchestral proportions.
The second song "Make" follows
the same structure, but is far more
emotive and thoughtful, as if it was
reaching for authenticity. Do Make Say
Think is no stranger to brass instruments, the trumpet and saxophone
add tremendous sensual texture to
"Say." Like their other albums, Other
Truths is almost entirely instrumental,
which gives a sensation of dialogue
between the passages and the instruments themselves.
The album trails off contemplatively with their fourth track "Think,"
a slow meticulous exploration of this
other and final truth—the fourth facet
of historical human consciousness.
Other Truths points to the process, the
moments in between thoughts, actions and the question of free will.
To Do, Make, Say, Think is to be human.
—Mine' Salkin 1 '' uf..Kpt~J ^
•'• GJRAN0-"-
»m^w*%JK^A, JLM,  w Juki
THE FURY
truth coME$iflJ!;;,
(Self-Meet^ -
Ttie Fury is a local unsigned rock
band, fronted by a lady with plenty of
hooks, power chords and other tricks
that certainly appeal to fans of the
hard rock bar scene. Chase Patterson
is at the helm offering a wicked set of
pipes and more than just a pretty face.
She's backed up by a band that's tight,
chunky and in charge: the Fury may
just have the guts to make a name for
themselves in a burgeoning scene full
of pretty polished poster children. The
album's intro and title track is pretty
driving and then leads into "Beauty
Queen," a bubble gum song with lyrics alluding to the typical story of a
sex symbol starlet burning out and
getting lost in "the scene." It's a call
out to women taking their power back
in a male dominated industry, which is
noble enough—even though the liner
notes feature Chase looking a bit sex
symbol-ish, midriff bared, hips flared
and lips pouting.
"Again" is nice in its power balladlike delivery and it stinks of single
status. But the rest, though decent
enough, is pretty coloured by numbers
radio rock. The truth about Truth Comes
Out is that it's easily marketable hard
rock for the masses that could do well
with proper radio play and crafty PR.
In the end, not terrible, but not very
ground breaking either.
—Nathaniel Bryce
GRAND ARCHIVES
KEEP IN MIND FRANKENSTEIN
(Sub Pop)
1$. the Ccmtinuum of shaggy dudes
currently making folk-tinged indie
rock in Seattle, Grand Archives falls
somewhere between the wistful multipart harmonies of Fleet Foxes and the
hauntingly beautiful southern rock
of Band of Horses—in fact, singer-
guitarist Mat Brooke was a founding
member of the latter group before
leaving to start Grand Archives.
Though Grand Archives certainly
shares a number of qualities with
those fellow Seattelites (and Sub
Pop labelmates), the io lovely songs
on their second album, Keep in Mind
Frankenstein, actually call to mind most
strongly the literate, baroque indie
pop of Augie March, a Melbourne
band that is unfortunately largely
unknown in this hemisphere (but
well worth looking up).
The slow build of "Topsy's Revenge" makes a brilliant opening to
the album. Brooke croons over a minimal backing of lightly plucked strings,
culminating in a soft crescendo of
backing vocals and the refrain "Some
day I will come back, and burn it all
down."
Likewise, "Willoughby" makes
a beautiful and fitting close to the
set, and in between those two songs,
the music veers between the lushly
orchestral and the hushed, warmly
intimate—sometimes within the
same track.
This is an impressive collection
that's worth spending some time
with, and it marks Grand Archives
as another group to watch coming
out of that other rainy harbour town a
couple hours south of ours.
Remember in the early '90s when
"the Seattle Sound" was fuzzed-out,
aggressive, punk-inspired grunge?
Seattle sure sounds different now, but
at least they're still sticking with the
flannel and denim.
—Dan Fumano
THE LAUNDRONAUTS
COME CLEAN
{Spinc_ck Records}
Imagine, if yon will, standing on
a black background, three men in
spotless white suits, eyes round and
black in white-rimmed sunglasses,
faces forbiddingly expressionless like
those of soldiers or gangsters. These
are the Laundronauts. The music is
garage-rock, full of fuzzy guitars, '50s
style backup vocals and dirty bass. It
is raucous but focused, especially on
those instrumental surf-rock tracks
that showcases the band's musical
presence, making sure you know they
can rock out even without their chosen
lyrical theme, which is laundry.
Yup, laundry. Their songs are
about the lonely spin cycle of love,
the charms of lovely Launder-Annette
and trying to keep clean in such a dirty
world. With some bands of this ilk,
things get gimmicky, but listening to
30 the album, it's easy to just enjoy the
rock 'n' roll and have the occasional
chuckle at the lyrics. Really, they're
like a giant washing machine of kick-
assery whomping and rattling around
the stage, and one wouldn't hesitate
to witness their fury live.
—Douglas Mackenzie
MAN YOUR HORSE
TAILS EP
(Self-Released)
Local Vancouver band Man Your
Horse's debut EP Tails presents six
dynamic &&&__$ that bring the listener
along for some some musical mental
gymnastics.
The songwriting is tongue-in-
cheek and each track is associated
with a different animal, bringing to
mind something of an indie-rock Aesop's fables. One such tale—about a
hydrophobic polar bear on a melting
ice flow—allegorically expounds on
the fear of the inevitable. The opening song, "Adult Behaviour," is about
coming to terms with one's role as
an adult and learning to cope with
the pressures of adult life—as told
from the point of view of a hunted
pubescent jaguar.
Man Your Horse channels a host of
influences, from Tom Waits to the
Mars Volta. There's a lot going on
musically on the six tracks, which
you might expect from a group who
describes their music as "math/soul."
A little ostentatious perhaps, butTails
delivers. The rhythms are complex
and varying, often going through
three or four different time signatures
over the course of a song. There are
traces of blues and prog-rock and the
the distortion-drenched guitar also
cycles through time signatures at a
rapid pace, keeping the listener on
their toes.
For a self-released first release,
this is a strong showing from the
creative rockers. Their high-energy
sound, creative musicality and entertaining lyrics blend well; the recipe for
one heck of a live show. For a healthy
dose of cerebral indie-rock, keep an
eye out for Man Your Horse.
—Adam Mannearen
THE RAIN & THE SI0EWALK
WEAKNESS
(McLean Records)
Trevor Thompson has got some issues, and he's going to let you know
gfilm^them. He boldly declares that
his mission statement is to "ruthlessly
strive^r reckless self-indulgence,
MWAHAHAHAHA..." and this statement may lead you to believe that there
is some humour involved in this double album, but you'd be mistaken.
It is densely overwritten and over-
recorded; strains of'80s post-punk
and goth can be heard in the cold-
toned, layered strata of drum machine, synth, bass and guitar, as well
as Thompson's acquired-taste vocals.
He rants in his flat, deadpan, singsong drone about everything that's
wrong in his life. The album proves
this through song titles such as "Regret," "Rejected" as well as "Repulsive
Pining" and "Inane Pining."
It's hard to recommend an album
that is so musically claustrophobic
and lyrically negative. That's not to say
that the album doesn't have its moments. On a few of the tracks, the music opens slightly and breathes. The
elements it comprises work together
more coherently, instead of crowding each other. One senses restraint.
That's what this album needs, because
you can hear some cool ideas, on say
"Abrasive Candy" and especially "A
Moment of Weakness"; it just seems     on wax, and sold it on 25th and Main,
like they get smothered instead of    There simply isn't any other explana-
showcased to their fullest.
—Douglas Mackenzie
M8AW
UNEDUCATED
{Mansterdinosaut)
Hailing from the crossroads at 25 th
and Main, local MC T-Train is somewhat ofa prodigy. The proud Van-
couverite's first full-length Uneducated
is an indie masterpiece worth all the
praise it has already garnered. Put
out by Vancouver label Monsterdi-
nosaur Records, the album serves
up 10 booming tracks of thoughtful,
masterfully produced hip-hop. There
ain't no gangsta rap here, ain't no
sex rhymes neither. This is straight
up, positive, open-minded hip-hop
crafted by someone who has had a
life long infatuation with the urban
art form.
T-Train's rhymes are tight, his flow
is smooth and his style is doused with
old school flavour and new school
consciousness. All this is backed by
serious beats and melodies laid down
by local talents such as Citizen, DJ
Haze, Authentic and J. DeCouto. What
results is a set of explosive tracks that
will get everyone bouncing. "Binge,"
the opening rhyme, serves as a traditional hip-hop prologue, with T-Train
introducing himself and proclaiming
his love for rapping. "Swept Away" is
the slow jam on the album—a tale of
love gone wrong—but T-Train takes
this up with a positive spin. "Turn It
Up" puts hard rhyming against old
school beats and loops and "Are We
There Yet" is the anthem that will
make T-Train famous.
Uneducated is an exceptional debut
by a talented MC who is sure to become legendary. T-Train put his soul
tion for his microphone skills!
—MarkPaulHus
YOU SAY PARTY! WE SAY DIE!
(PaperM$)
Red lipstick. Ace of Base. Foam parties in Cancun. These are the things
thatXXXX is made of. With their latest
album, Abbotsford quintet You Say
Party! We Say Die! make it abundandy
clear they know how to have a good
time. Like we didn't know already.
Lead singer Becky Ninkovic has
upped her chops on this record, replacing chantey riot grrrl rants of
yore with vocals strong enough to
slay dragons. With the help of some
glossy production courtesy of Howard
Redekop (who has worked with the
likes of Tegan & Sara and the New
Pornographers) Ninkovic lays down
sultry tracks that Karen O would be
proud of.
With synths to spare, the album
carries a distinctly nostalgic vibe.
"Dark Days" feels like it could be
on the soundtrack ofa John Hughes
movie, while "Glory" stands a lonely
throwback to their earlier stripped-
down dance-punk days.
Unlike in previous efforts, leftist
politics take a backseat on this record.
So does any semblance of d.i.y. charm.
But with familiar bursts of energy and
aggression, the band makes up for it
with consistent danceability.
And in case you're still wondering,
XXXX is not a reference to the adult
entertainment industry, but rather a
cheesy code word for "love." This is
worth noting, because the lyrics in
the chorus of "Laura Palmer's Prom"
could easily be mistaken to say: "my
heart needs a lap dance." Indeed.
—Sarah Bermfln ^ 1 YOU SAY PARTY! WE SAY DIE! / PHOTO BY SHAUN STANDER
// REAL LIVE ACTION
ROSE MELBERG / ANGELO SPENCER / AUNTS & UNCLES
September lS / Little Mountain Studios
Rose Melberg may have told her audience that "this is a small show for a small
record," but it definitely had a big heart. The evening started off with Melberg
and a special guest serenading early arrivals with a ukulele. The sweet island
melodies assured that smiles were placed on faces. Next, Aunts & Uncles took to
the stage to play a potent blend of indie rock and chamber pop. The four-piece
brought an amazingly full sound to such a small space with delicate interplay
between strings, guitar, xylophone and drums.
Olympia's Angelo Spencer next took listeners out of the gallery and "into
the desert" through a set of extended surf jams that would have made Link Wray
proud. Spencer brought a playful, relaxed vibe to the stage and even managed
to get some of his mostly seated audience up and dancing.
The last dance, so to speak, was saved for Ms. Rose Melberg, for whom
this record release party was thrown (Homemade Ship, out now on K Records).
Several guests joined Melberg onstage, including members of Aunts & Uncles
and Apollo Ghost's Adrian Teacher for a heartfelt rendition of "Each New Day."
The ever-talented Larissa Loyva (Kellarissa) joined her for the duration of the
set, and for several songs she had a very special guest: Rose's mom. Melberg
played a soft acoustic set (her songs are quieter now to keep her son from waking) delivered with tender vulnerability. This vulnerability was definitely felt
on one of the evening's most affecting numbers, a cover of Roy AcufPs "Blue
Eyes Crying in the Rain" performed by Melberg, her mother and Loyva. There
was an undeniable sweetness to this mellow evening, one that won't soon be
forgotten despite it only being a "small show."
-Sean Nelson
SHINDIG NIGHT 2
CATAMARAN / HALF CHINESE / NO TIME
September zz / Railway Club
Shindig Night Two at the Railway Club was like a normal'show in reverse. As
the evening wore on, the music became more experimental and the crowd got
thinner and less enthusiastic. To be fair, it was a Tuesday.
Catamaran opened the show to an enthusiastic, almost-full house. Their interesting blend of pop and dissonance made them the best band of the night and
certainly the crowd favourite. While they occasionally suffered from Inaudible
Vocal Syndrome, the rhythms and overlapping guitar figures made everyone
listen carefully. Highlights included "Apparition," "Clocks" and a tap-dance
solo. The band exuded lots of energy and seemed happy to be playing.
Half Chinese, the night's eventual winner, came next. The band specialized in the sort of instrumental compositions that are more fun to play than to
listen to. That being said, Half Chinese were tight, and proficient on multiple
instruments. The band moved skillfully between an array of styles; sometimes
they were Animal Collective, other times they were the Strokes with no singer.
Their highly polished disorder was impressive, but the slower, lyrical songs
were their most compelling.
No Time, one man's collaboration with a tape deck, was by far the most
bizarre act of the night. The guy had quirky down to a science; he wore a glorified gym strip and had stickers covering the ends of his guitar strings. Though
he shouted and played heavily distorted guitar over a lo-fi backing track, his
performance was quieter than most acoustic sets. He gave the hipsters in
attendance a taste of their own medicine. It certainly went over my head, but
Andy Warhol would've loved it.
—Ben Johnstone
%#^fc TIGERHEAD (ABOVE), HALF CHINESE (BELOW) / PHOTOS BY KATE HENDERSON
BRASSTRONAUT/AN HORSE
September 2 £ / Bflttnore Cabaret  *
When local band Brasstronaut's Old World Lies debut EP
landed in 2008, it instantly became clear that they were
something special. They'd found a Weird and great intersection between jazz, rock and classical themes, and
nobody else sounded quite like them. Most bands would
be content to keep the same sound for a while after only
one EP, but Wednesday's show at the Biltmore showed
that Brasstronaut keeps pushing forward.
Openers An Horse, a duo from Brisbane, had the task
of warming the crowd up. No small task at a show with
plenty of bearded jazz enthusiasts, but they managed
to pull it off somehow. Think catchy guitar-driven pop
reminiscent of Dog Day or Tegan & Sara. A few of their
songs sounded nearly identical, but that seems to be par
for the course in the unforgiving world of power pop.
Soon after, Brasstronaut hit the stage with plenty of
new material. To be honest, the new songs blew me away.
I was expecting more gloomy, jazzy tunes to keep me
company during any future breakups. Instead, Brasstronaut played multiple energetic art-rock songs that still
managed to retain hints of their old sound. If the Unicorns reunited and picked up some brass and woodwind
musicians, they'd sound something like this. A few new
songs were more sedated like Old World Lies, but it was
the new sound that really stuck in my head.
Brasstronaut also tried applying their newfound energy to some old tunes, with mixed results. "Old World
Lies" felt awkward with prominent bass guitar and
drums, but some extra drive for the climax of "Requiem
for a Scene" worked wonders.
This show was originally supposed to be a release
party for Brasstronaut's debut LP, but that's since been
delayed—a bit disappointing, but it looks like the album
will be well worth the wait.
—Reilly Wood
GZA
September 24 / Pit Pub
W0_w& Pit Pub is probably the last place you'd expect to see a member of the
iconic '90s hip-hop group Wu-Tang Clan. Yet, on a late September evening,
founding Clan member GZA made the trek out to the campus. The question
of the night would be whether this living legend would deliver.
Extra security was brought in for the show. Each person was briskly patted
down and had a metal detector run over them. It was obvious that this was a
mostly male crowd, ready to feed off testosterone-filled aggression fueled by
the raw hip-hop—big beats and complex lyrics sans bling and hos.
Before the GZA took the stage, Girlfight DJs Michael LaPointe and Andy
Dixon (of the Biltmore's House Party) opened with a fresh mix of'90s hip-hop
classics, throwing down just the right beats so that by the time the GZA took
stage, the crowd was ready to let loose.
When GZA and his DJ calmly came on the stage, they quickly greeted the crowd
and started rapping. Arguably, the night went downhill from here. He stock
mostly to his 2008 album, Pro Tools, but managed some older hits as well like
"Animal Planet" and nostalgically sampled some Wu-Tang, encouragingthem to chant,
"Wu-tang clan ain't nothin' to fuck with," raising the energy level in the Pit to a peak.
Although the crowd's response was intensively positive, GZA was clearly not
feeling the same. This man could have been a GZA imposter, rolling through
his lines complete monotone and rapping over the crowd. Aside from a few
handshakes, he barely acknowledged the crowd that was just one foot from
him. From this lacklustre performance, it was questionable how he reached
his level of success.
After his set, many wondered where GZA had gone. It was not till the morning after it was learned that GZA had gone upstairs in the Student Union Building
to party with a group of girls the manager had rounded up at the end of the
evening. It seemed a fitting ending for a faded star, not for a hip-hop legend,
who at 43 seems to be just a shadow of his line "ain't nothin' to fuck with."
—Alex McCarter
PINK MOUNTAINTOPS / THE PACK AD
September iff Rickshaw Theatre
With the non-ticket-holder lineup stretching down Hastings nearly to Main
Street, I thankfully breezed into the beautifully restored Rickshaw Theatre for
a holy stoner revival of the musical variety. For the last couple of years I have
been hearing rumours about the awesomeness that is the Pack AD, but it was
only hours before show time that I gave them a glance on the YouTubes to see
what they had. On screen they seemed mighty enough and definitely catered
*i*i THE PACK AD / PHOTO BY VAL CORMIER
I   t*T!
to my fondness for dirty blues metal, but gosh, all high and mighty I had no
due just how insane this local two-piece would be. Sneering, sweat drenched
and playing hard, it took about five seconds for a band crush to blossom and
another five for total adoration. Vicious awesome bluesy goodness brought
forth by two cool gals who have great chemistry together. Skin tight and loud
as hell, I shall follow this band to the ends of time.
Soon after the Pack AD bowed out, the funny smelling blue smoke started
to rise as the Rickshaw filled with an assortment of jean-jacketed longhairs,
anticipating the arrival and homecoming of Steve McBean's recently toured
"other" project, Pink Mountaintops. Opening with "Axis: Thrones of Love''
wd was hilled into a happy, rrippy state that lasted until the final notes
were played. The collective swayed and
clutched each other as they stared lovingly
through glazed out eyes while McBean and
pals delivered the sonic goods. Songs like
"I (Fuck) Mountains" got beefed up while
"Slaves" was hypnotic, picture perfect and
had people enraptured. It was a great set
played with a peaceful but powerful force
that left beards akimbo and the good vibes
flowing. And you couldn't have asked for a
better venue either. The power of awesome
music hath stoned the masses once again!
—Nathaniel Bryce
MATTHEW BARBER / JODY GLENHAM /
ROSE RANGER
September 28 / Media Club
Monday has never been the night when you
pencil "rocking out" into your calendar, [ed.
Unless you plan to attend ice Cream Social. See
page 7 for more info,) Still, it's a good night
to sit back, shake off the rain and thoughts
of the coming week, and take in some sedate tunes. The moment I stepped into the
Media Club, 1 knew that this was exactly
the experience waiting for me: a crowd of
mainly 30- and 40-somethings lounged
about on the Turkish brothel-style cushions,
sipping gin and tonics and comparing plaid
shirts while they waited for what ray friend
Tyler termed the "homely, homely sounds
of Matt Barber."
Rose Ranger kicked the eventngoffwith
a story that began with her in Berlin about
three years ago and ended with her in South
Africa with a worm in her foot. However, she
failed to build on this promising anecdote,
retreating into earnest guitar strums and flat
lyrics sung in a little-girl whisper.
Jody Glenham recovered some of the
audience energy with her charming pop
tunes. She quipped to the audience that if
you play more than three songs about drinking in a set, you're probably an alcoholic.
She proceeded to sing three, but sugared them up considerably with jangly
keyboard melodies and her Fame-esque vibrato.
It was a nice lead-in to Matt Barber, the Suspendered Splendour himself, who
quickly won over the crowd with his beardly good looks and soulful hound-dog
croon. Plus, he showed his true class by seamlessly turning an unfortunately-
timed flush from the bathroom into a toilet joke during his cover of Jill Barber's
"Chances." If I had a plaid bra, I would have thrown it.
The night was made complete by a surprise appearance from the aforementioned Jill Barber, who sang backup on a few songs. In the time-honoured
tradition of sibling duets, their harmonies were clean, tight and sweet and their
banter endearing. They finished the set with an adorable elementary school YOU SAY PARTY! WE SAY DIE! / GANG VIOLENCE
I October 2 / Biltmore Cabaret
Forget the Granville strip—You Say Party! We Say Die! brought the dance pally
I to 12th Ave. in early October. The lengthy line for the late show may hage.
t looked like it was from the aforementioned culturally-deficient entertainment
district, but this event had a charm Granville wiU never possess. Warning
up an eager crowd, Gang Violence launched into a set of nervy dance-rock
that was truly apt for the evening (a few audience members even thought the
band was YSPiWSDf). Singer Sarah Cordingley brought just the right amount
of menace to her vocals and seemed noticeably pleased to actually "mean iV
when comparing the audience to some of the band's less stellar tour dates.
She told us, "You guys are awesome."
Gang Violence may have got bands clapping and bodies moving, but itwas
You Say Tarry! We Say Die! that really worked the audience into a fervour. Ih-p
group played the most danceable rock this side of Martha & the Muffins with
a seamless mixture of older songs and material offtheir new album XXXJC, and
even some that was as-of-yet unreleased. But it was 2007's Lose All Tone tbalf
really shone. Drummer Devon Clifford commented, among other humourous repartees, that the audience members were "like rats trying to get off the
Titanic*' during crowd-pleaser "Opportunity," £&| indeed, that was how it
looked. The front row of the crowd was crushed against the raised stage by the
flailing bodies behind them, getting to the point where singer Becky Ninkovic
was telling tbe audience to "back up" mid-song. But it was during the encore
performances of "Like I Give a Care" and "The Gap (Between the Rich and
otbe Poor)*' when the crowd really exploded. The audience flooded the stage,
dancing alongside Hinkovic and company with reckless abandon. Atone point
in the nightNinkovic told her audience that she wanted the room to "be filled
with love,'--* and unlike anything on Granville, this room most certainly was.
(ea\ Do you not consider dri/humping to be love/]
"-"Sean Nelson
SHINDIG 4:
JODY GLENHAM / LENGTHY LIST OF LOVERS / TIGERHEAO
October 6 j Railway Club
I go to Shindig for the heckling. The catcalls, the boos, the barrage of noise
that host Ben Lai deflects from the stage with his wry grin as he pd&tj^bnes the
announcement of the winners until we're scratching the tables with fury. C«4«
fm absolutely certain Ben enjogs this.] To my surprise, this week's judges propelled
lengthy list of lovers into the semifinals. Reminding me of Eagle vs, Shark,
this duo sported pop synthesizer and guitar, with occasional electronic blips
and distortion. Clad in a foxy red slip and curious hat resembling a wimple, the
lead singer (emanating a softer, hazier lily Fawn) sang slow ambling melodies
to sprightly pop grooves, while the guitarist (spotting shiny silver chammail-
esoue shirt) chimed in. This awkward looking pair presented an amusing and
entertaining $e% although the songs lacked focus and melodies dragged.
The best set of the night was Tlgerhead, a quartet of underage men who
rocked out like Tortoise, This four-piece Instrumental, with occasional vocals
ot people In dark comers
! I heckle these judges on
3 pit your musical opinion
2lub next Tuesday!
—Bttnaa Grunau
QUADRUPLE DARE:
ADJECTIVE / FAKE SHARK-REAL ZOMBIE! / THE GOOD NEWS / JUNIOR
MAJOR
October 17 / Rickshaw Theatre
Four ofVancouver's premier bands—Fake Shark-Real Zombie!, Adjective^K
Good News and Junior Major—released a collaborative album on Oct. I7r'jf|i&
the ensuing album-release show can best be compared to the Celebratitt^B
light Bxcept instead of fireworks spraying across the sky, it was beer spraying.
across the audience. There was no shortage of energy (or beet, apparendy) at
the Rickshaw theatre, wlt^M four bands appearing genuinely excited by their
project. Quadruple Dan Vantcmver Mutilation is an LP (with a limited release of
^^^S $*picb the bands cover each other's material. At the release party, the
^^&^feg^f straws to determine set times. The resultwas a show bookended
bygreatperformances, with Junior Major opening, followed by Fake Shark-Real
Zombie! then Adjective, and closed by the Good News. The evening played out
like a girl with a beautiful face and ass like Beyonce's, but with a midriff that
could use a tew sit-ups.
If Junior Major's performance were to take the shape ofa female face", it
would look like baritone guitarist Katy Horsley; that is, stunning, Unfortunately,
the Quadruple Dare release party was her last show, although shel^K sticking
around for another month or so to finish their latest album. Horsley gave a
powerful, enthusiastic and sentimental final performance, proving she will
be tough to replace.
Fake Shark-Real Zombie! and Adjective followed, and neither band was
able to live up to Junior Major's impressive opening. Fake Shark gave a tight,
vigorous and well-rehearsed performance, but came off a little dated. At the
spectacular 2007 release party for Zebra! Zebra!, front man Kevin Maher was
current, exciting and had all the girls angling for a make-out While no longer
cutting edge, Maher did prove Fake Shark^pt wields sharp musical teeth that
can attracts crowd.
Adjective gave a solid, tti&emarkable performance. The sound quality was
generally exceUent throughout the evening, with s*he fine acoustics of the Rickshaw. Adffecttve, however, was slightly too loud. Bassist/vocalist Dustin John
Bromley was a^brfght spot in the set, demonstrating, as per usual, charisma
and charm on stage.
The Good News closed the evening with the assistance of many of the
other perfortners who came on stage {or sang from the floor) as the show
progressed. Bromley, perjfotming once again, dropped his pants in celebration
of the occasion. The enjoyment of the musicians was palpable, and one can
ojttly imaging the great time they had recording the album—in all likelihood,
the studio, much like this show, was drenched in beer spray,
■^l^anna Or BONGO BEAT RECORDS
PAUL HYDE
R-Jfe ~«fH
peace sign
First new album in
seven years from
Payolas singer.
It's intense.
ALTERNATIVE TV
ATV
A greatest hits live
recording with liner
notes by leader/punk
pioneer Mark Perry.
No mixing.
No overdubs.
No nothing.
Just play it loud.
P %**l»   _M___\\m4
it'll \__f \___\i__\]\'k\
Toronto hates you,
too. An oral history
of Toronto punk &
related 1977-1981:
Teenage Head,
Diodes, Viletones,
Forgotten Rebels,
Demies, and lots
more; sex, heroin,
depths of heit, etc.
4Q0 pages.
WWW.BONGOBEAT.COM
WRITE, RECORD AND MIX A
SONG WITH PEOPLE YOU'VE
NEVER MET BEFORE?
16 WEEKS. 48 MUSICIANS. 1 STUDIO.
1 GROUNDBREAKING PROJECT.
recordoftheweekciiikcom ^^^B
Mi
i. Unfamiliar records showcase poster!
2. Ira Kaplan ofYo la Tengo at Club Soda.
3. Ira Kaplan throws down one of many a guitar solo.
4. En rott|eftom VancouJefJXVR to Montreal YUL.
5. Hello Montreal.
6. Vancouver's No Gold at La Divan Orange.
7. Ldo Van Breeman substitutes Make Out Videotape for his band Brasstronaut.
If you want to see ail thephotos from Pop Montreal please check out our website at www.discorder.ca and look for the article called Pop Montreal 2009, //CiTR 101.9 FM CHARTS
STRICTLY THE DOPEST HITZ OF NOVEMBER
i
#
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
You Say Party! We
Say Die!*
Shearing Pinx*
Islands*
B-Lines*
Ohbijou*
Cranfield & Slade*
Rich Hope*
Various*
Sex Church*
Mode Moderne*
The SSRIs*
Jandek
Atlas Sound
Magneta Lane*
Chromeo*
Karl Blau
The Pains of Being
Pure at Heart
Girls
The Ex-
Boyfriends*
Lou Barlow
No Age
Duplex*
The Parlour Steps*
Puberty*
The Raveonettes
ALBUM
xxxx
Weaponry
Vapours
burnt cds 7"
Beacons
12 Sun Songs
Is Gonna Whip It
OnYa
Copyright Copyleft
Festival Sampler
s/t 7"
Ghosts Emerging
Teems
Not Hunting for
Meaning
Logos
Gambling with God
DJ Kicks
Zebra
Higher Than the
Stars
Lust for Life/Life in
San Francisco
To the Lowest
Bidder
Goodnight Unknown
Losing Feeling
Worser
The Hidden Names
First Slime
In and Out of
Control
LABEL
Paper Bag
Divorce
Anti-
Nominal
Last Gang
Or Gallery
Sandbag
Vancouver New
Music
Sweet Rot
Lust Nuevo
Independent
Corwood Industries
Kranky
Last Gang
!K7
K
Slumberland
True Panther
Sounds
Cash Fork
Merge
Sub Pop
Mint
Nine Mile
Independent
Vice
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
ARTIST
Why?
The Hidden
Cameras*
Antipop
Consortium
Digits*
Madness
The Cave Singers
The Apples in
Stereo
The Ettes
Wax Mannequin*
Peace*
Vic Chesnutt
Rick White
Album*
Flight of the
Conchords
The Dutchess
& the Duke
Vincat*
The Laundronauts"
Polvo
Nadja*
HC-B
Shonen Knife
Let's Go To War*
Os Mutantes
ALBUM
LABEL
Eskimo Snow
Anticon
Origin: Orphan
Arts & Crafts
Sing Along to Songs
You Don't Know
Euphono
Fluorescent Black
Big Dada
Hold It Close
Independent
Ihe Liberty of
Norton Folgate
Yep Roc
Welcome Joy
Matador
#1 Hits Explosion
Yep Roc
Do You Want Power
Take Root
Saxon
Zunior
Slow Children
Reluctant
At the Cut
Constellation
1-3-7
Blue Fog
Complete Punk Recordings 1977-1978
Sudden Death
I Told You I Was
Freaky
Sub Pop
Snow Blindness is
Crystal Antz
Flemish Eye
Sunrise
Hardly Art
HoiPolloi
Hive Creative Labs
The Laundronauts
Come Clean
Spincycle
In Prism
Merge
The Bungled
& the Botched
Blocks Recording
Club
Soundcheck For A
Missing Movie
Hidden Shoal
Supergroup
Good Charamel
Karmageddon
Last Gang
Haih Or
Amortecedor
Anti-
CiTR's charts reflect what's been played on the air by CiTR's lovely DJs last month. Records with asterisks (*) are Canadian. Most of these excellent albums can be found at fine independent music stores across Vancouver. If you can't find them, give CiTR's music coordinator a shout at
(604) 822-8733. His name is Luke Meat. If you ask nicely he'll tell you how to find them. Check out other great campus/community radio charts
at www.earshot-online.com.
38 DO MAKE SAY THINK
Other Truths CD/LP
The sixth full-length from Do Make Say Think
defiantly features four iong-form tracks, three
of which clock in at over 10 minutes, and ali of
which trace the inimitable musical arcs that have
made this band justly celebrated for their unique
sonic palette and vibrant distillation of compositional forms and influences into some of the past decade's most consistently
rich and rewarding instrumental rock. The four songs on Other Truths are vintage Do Make Say Think, and the album represents the first time since the
band's debut (recorded over a dozen years ago) that they have found themselves with an entire collection of songs that unfold so organically over long /
duration.
CD 16.98   LP 20.98
SUFJAN STEVENS
TheBQECD
Sufjan Stevens is proud to present The BQJE, a
eSBrtiatic suite inspired by tii8l™^^; _
Queens Expressway and the Hula-Ho»S$^
Commissioned by Brooklyn Academy of Music  s
4BAM), The BQE was original]y$$rf0rm#$ ttfctt&'"
l-tawara 6j)man Opera Hou^fccetebi^^ilm4
25th anniversary Next Wave Festival in Gc^Nrof 2||K*The BQE is also
accompped by/an idiosyncratic music^^pl|^^eomposed by S
for band and chamber orchestra), evottp wmfrt^ttd musical choreography of perpetual motion vs gridlock, B|ifi$iB$ jMwsfy from Gershwin.
Terry Riley, Charles Ives,
es skittish woodwinds wt
{to name a few), the, music showcas-
nit impressionist articulatteB'(in 7/8) and
imperial brass anthers!ft$i$?{i various incarnJbns of the music of the automobile.
CD 16.98
THE POINTED STICKS
Three Lefts Make A Right CD
Turn, turn, turn. If to everything there is a season, then the season has come for the Pointed
Sticks long-awaited second full-length album. On
November 1st, Northern Electric is proud to release
Three Lefts Make A Right, 13 new songs in the
great tradition of the band. Coming some 29 years
after the classic Perfect Youth and mixed by legendary producer Mike Fraser
at the Warehouse Studios in Vancouver, the record is already creating a buzz
with the advance release of "Wireless" which is now going out to media outlets worldwide. "It's a kilter album, i can't wait to share it with the world," said
Northern Electric's Richard Chapman of the album recorded at Mushroom and
Paramount Studios. Now is their time to share it with you!
CD 16.98
i&ftfflifts-s
M«£V\
Ir8
M k0
«4-
M        e
e*
a M*»r®
Zulu Art News!
Brace Dyck
Top Shelf
KING KHAN & BBQ SHOW
Invisible Girl CD/LP
From the instant the '60s jingle-jangle guitar line
hits you know that you are in for a real swinging
garage rawk time at the hands of everyone,?
favourite showman King Khan! Together wjjh his
BBQ Show, Khan has struck a vein of pure gold and
now goes about reconnoitering his claim and giving
us nugget after nugget of illustrious hits!
CD/LP 16.98
THE OTHBR STUFF YOU SHOULD SHAKE IfOUfrHEW WITH:
LOVE-Love lost CQ/UP
MORRISSEY- Swords C«/fco
GUIDED BY VOICES-Suitcase 3:
Up We Go Now 4CD
MELT BANANA - Lite Live: Ver.0.0
CD
KEVIN BARKER - You ami Me
LP/CD
FUNKADELIC - Standing On The
Verge CD/2LP Westbound reissue
NAAM-Naam 2LP J
COLD CAVE - Love Comes Close
LP/CD
V/A - Ghana Special-Modern
Highlife, Afro-Sounds & Ghanaian
Blues 2GD
FEUX - You Are the One I Pfck
LP/CD
JELLO BIAFRA & THE GUAN-
TANAMO SCHOOL OF MEDICINE -
The Audacity Of Hype CD/LP
DEAD MANS BONES -s/t CD/LP
ALEX OUNSWORTH - Mo Beauty CD
X-Wild Beauty LP
STAR FUCKING HIPSTERS-s/t
CD/LP
RAIN MACHINE-s/t LP
ELVIS PERKINS IN DEARLAND -
Doomsday EP 12"/CDEP
EMIUANATORRINI-Meand
Armini Gold Edition 2CD
PINK MARTINI-Splendor In The
Grass CD
LOVE-Love Lost 2LP/CD
BOB DYLAN-Self Portrait 2LP
OF MONTREAL - Coquelicot Asleep
in the Poppies MP+MP3
OF MONTREAL - Aldhils Arboretum
(180gram)LP+MP3
OF MONTREAL-The Early Four
Track Recordings LP+MP3
OF MONTREAL-The Bedside
Drama: A Petite Tragedy LP
+MP3
OF MONTREAL - The Bud Who
Continues to Eat the Rabbit's
Flower LP+MP3
JAMES HUSBAND-A Parallax I
LP/CD
THE BREAKAWAYS - Walking Out
On Love (The Lost Sessions)
il/CD
tiRVES-UvetLP   :
BRWSTONE HOWL-What's He
Done Lately? LP/CD
DAVDBOWi-Space Oddity
reisulcii
kings If convenience -
Declaration of Dependence CD
PLACE TO BURY STRANGERS-
Exploding Head CD
BROADCAST AND THE FOCUS
GROUP - investigate Witch Cults
OQ
GET BACK GUINOZZI-Carpet
Madness CD
JAMES HUSBAND-A Parralax I
CD
00100 - Armonica Hewa CD
RICHARD YOUNGS - Under Stellar
Stream CD
LEONARD COHEN-Live At The
Isle of Wight 1970 CD
JULIAN CASABLANCAS - Phrazes
for the Young CD
VARIOUS - Warp 20: Unheard CD
BLOOD BROTHERS - Various reissues on Epitaph
PRICES IN EFFECT UNTIL NOVEMBER 30. 2009
November 1-30
Zulu Records
1972-1976 W 4th Ave
Vancouver. BC
tel 604.738.3232
www.zuturecords.com
STORE HOURS
I Fri 10=30-9:00
9:30-6:30
1Q A SWELL SEASON AT ZULU
I music picks to
ATLAS SOUND
Logos CD/IP
Second solo album from Deerhunter frontman Bradford Cox, following his
debut Let The Blind Lead Those Who Can See But Cannot Feel from early
2008. Eleven delectable pop delights served up to tantalize and tickle your taste
buds. Guest appearances by Noah Lerniox (Animal Collective) and Laetitia
Sadier (Stereolab).
CD/IP 16.98
NIRVANA
Bleach 2LP
Marking the 20th Anniversary of Nirvana's debut
album, SuS^pwill re-issue the Platinum
Certified Bleach on November 3,2009. This
expanded CD/dl|We-L.P will include a never-before-
released live performance, special packaajng^and
the first run of the doubie-LP will be onfi^^^i gf/f
vinyl (the first run of the original LP was also o|Ifetty/inyl). Originally recorded over three sessions with producer Jack Endino atSeattie's Reciprocal
Recording Studios in December 1988 and JaniJ^1989t Bleach was released
in June of '89 and remains unequivocally|H^||M^i^^pj Pop's very
favourite Uirvana full-length. The album mitialtyf^^l)Q0 copies, but was
brought into the international spotlight foJlowtoi)|lie^^pe and worldwide success of their 1991 sophomore effort, Nevermind Subsequently Bleach went on
to sell 1.7 million copies in the US aJgr^t^&tog to Nielsen SoundScan. This
20th Anniversary Edition ji^b^n-n^nestered from the original tapes at
Sterling Sound in a session*8|p|ien by producer Jack Endino. This edition will
include an unreleased live recljjiing of a complete Februar^th, 1990 show at
the Pine Street Theatre in Portland, Oregon. The show features performances of
Love Buzz," About a Girl" and a cover of The Vaselines' song "Molly's Lips
and has been re-mixed from the original tapes by Endino (complete track listing
below). A 52-page CD /16-page LP booklet which includes candid photos of the
band not previously released to the public will also be included in this deluxe
edition. y
2LP 24.98
SWELL SEASON
Strict Joy CD
CONVERGE
Axe To Fall CD
Groundbreaking hardcore-metal band Converge
will release their long anticipated new studio
album, Axe lb Fall, on October 20 via Epitaph (vinyl j
on Deathwish). Considered one of the most intense,
important, and influential metal/hardcore bands
ever, Converge continue their uncompromising evolution, experimenting and manipulating the fiercest form of music with the most
aggressive album of the year, Axe To Fall. Fitting like a puzzle piece in their all
but flawless catalog, Axe To Fail is an undeniable progression in the band's
canon of cacophonous sound, dexterous skill and ingenious art, as thirteen of
the most viciously powerful songs Converge has ever written reign down on listeners in a surge of sonic fury.
CD 16.98
FUP THE PAGE!
i Swell Season are Glen Hansard (from the Irish
I band the Frames) and Marketa Irglova (classically
trained Czech pianist and vocalist). In 2007, Once, a
film about two people meeting and falling in love on the
streets of Dublin, became an indie phenomenon, as
audiences everywhere responded to the unassuming
charm of the two leads, Glen and Marketa, and the beafitifufmusic they made
together. On the way to going gold, the Once soundtralfebought the Swell
Season onto the stage of the Academy Awards, where tltaband won the Best
Original Song award, and into the hearts of the audience and host Jon Stewart.
Since then they have toured to sold-out venues as the Swell Season, Once has
become a perennial top DVD rental and seller, and now the film is in deyejfproent
for a Broadway musical to openlarly in 2010. Nowjsomes the much anticipated
follow-up, Strict Joy, and from the first notes of first track "Low Rising ' the musical magic audiences found in Jjwce is back; The band returns to map the rocky
peaks and valleys of relatiot^hipsjn songs like the haunting "I Have Loved Yon
Wrong," a Marketa feature, and^e,djving, anthemic "The Rain." A feature documentary will make the festival roMl^mi|Ml) (^^feglhe making of Oncejpd*'
Glen and Marketa's musical Coming together, but in the'meantime, the beauiful
songs of Strict Joy will tel! ^^M^^
CD 16.98
FUCK BUTTON^
Tarot Sport CO/LP
Fuck Buttons burst back into action with the release"
of their blistering new album, Tarot Sport. The B
album was preceded by the release of a single, Surf
Solar, on September 14th. Fuck Buttons, the duo of
Andrew Hung and Benjamin John Power, recorded
Tarot Sport at Rotters Golf Club Studio in Londor| with
the legendary DJ, producer and remixer Andrew Weatherall on production duties.
The results of this pairing are astounding. Tarot Sport is an album in which Fuck
Buttons continue to refine, craft, explore and devet^the experimental aesthetic of
last year's critically acclaimed debut album, Street Horrrsin. However, they also
take proceedings to another level through a combination of their own ambitious
aims and the application of Weatherall's clear-sighted, rule-defying precision and
attention to sonic detail. The seven tracks on the album reflect a new-found complexity of sound and a more layered depth to the recordings; recordings that
pushed everyone to the limit of their abilities. As Power says, "I think it sounds a
lot thicker than our previous work...our brains kind of went into meltdown."
CD16.98   LP 22.98
PRICES IN EFFECT UNTIL NOVEMBER 30, 2009
Zulu Records     I store hours
1972-1976 W 4th Ave      MontoWed i0:3o-7:00
Vancouver. BC Thurs and Fri 10:30-9:00
tel 604.738.3232 Sat 9:3°-6:3°
, , Sun 12:00-6:00
www.zulurecords.com I	

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