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Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) 1990-07-01

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 THAT MAGAZINE FROM CiTR fM 102
Mfti-8*
JULY 1990 NEW MUSIC FROM MCA
JILL SOBULE
THINGS HERE ARE DIFFERENT
MARIANNE FAITHFUL
BLAZING AWAY
NINE INCH NAILS
PRETTY HATE MACHINE
CASSETTE COMPACT DISC
6.9411.94
PPJl
WORLD PARTY
WORLD PARTY
GOODBYE JUMBO
BELL BIV DEVOE
POISON
JILL SOBULE APPEARING
JULY 4 LIVE AT THE TOWN PUMP
ART BERGMANN
SEXUAL ROULETTE
ETTA JAMES
ST1CKIN' TO MY GUNS
BLUE AEROPLANES APPEARING
JULY 5 LIVE AT THE COMMODORE
THE
BLUE AEROPLANES
BLUE AEROPLANES
SWAGGER
YOUR TOTAL ENTERTAINMENT CENTRE  m
sound
DOWNTOWN VANCOUVER SOUTH VANCOUVER
556 SEYMOUR ST. 732 S.W. MARINE OR.
687-5837 321-5112
EAST VANCOUVER
2696 E. HASTINGS ST.
254-1601
METROTOWN BURNABY NORTH SURREY
4568 KINGSWAY 10280-135TH ST.
439-0223 589-7500 £_gg°as_g3
CONTENTS
JULY *1990 Issue #90
THE LLOYD ULIANA REPORT:
Consolidated vs Simon Frith  6
a;Grumh...: f_t H'3jRy teddV Bed®s t&ke note  9
Nitzer Ebb - Walking in the shadow of the 'Mode Men 12
BETWEEN THE LINES: A DAY IN MANAGUA
Coca Cola, asphalt and burned out Ladas - by Lisa Marr 22
■r____-____________-_-_____________EI_^^
AIRHEAD
They hate us, they hate us, they hate us - So can you!    5
REAL LIVE ACTION
Tom Verlaine, Consolidated, Group 49, House of Love 14
UNDER REVIEW
We listen to 'em, we write about 'em, you read 'em. Simple 14
COMIX ARE ALL I READ
Colin Upton's Big Thing and Sexy Stories from the World Religions  16
HELL'S KITCHEN
Viola reunites with her mutant friends and eats allllll she can  17
ON THE DIAL
It's like TV Guide, but it's for radio 18
SPINLIST
New names but it's the same. Sort of  18
LOCAL MOTION
Let's get Janis - she listens to everything!! 19
DISCORDER DATEBOOK
What's on, what's hot, what's hip and what isn't 21
■■_H____HIK______HHHHHBi
DANCING ON THE CLOUDS
Marc Yuill and Julian Lawrence 10
SOCIALIST TURTLE
Colin Upton 11
BORDUM
Bryce Rasmussen 20
FOR OFFICE USE ONLY
EDITOR Kevin Smith ART DIRECTOR Geoff Coates PRODUCTION MANAGER Bill Baker EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS Chris
Buchanan, Viola Funk, Brian Hohm, Lydia Schymansky PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Lydia Schymansky WRITERS
Viola Funk, Janis McKenzie, Usa Marr, Lloyd Uliana, Leigh Wolf PHOTOGRAPHERS Tonl-Lynn, Leonard Whistler
GRAPHICS Scott Feamley WORD PROCESSING Randy Iwata COVER 12 Midnite SPINLIST Randy iwata, Lloyd Uliana
ADVERTISING Uoyd Uliana ADVERTISING PRODUCTION Bill Baker LOCAL DISTRIBUTION Matt Steffich SUBSCRIPTIONS/MAIL DISTRIBUTION Lydia Schymansky PROGRAM GUIDE/DATEBOOK/DELIVERY FRIEND Randy Iwata
ACCOUNTS Unda Scholten TECHNICAL SUPPORT Ted Aussem PUBLISHER Barbara Bgood
DISCORDER Copyright C 1990 by The Student Radio Society of Ihc University of British Columbia. All Right! Reserved. Discorder is That
Magazine from CiTR fM 102, and is published twelve tines a year by The Student Radio Society of the University of Britiah Columbia. Discorder
is printed in Canada cm paper manufactured in Canada. Discorder prints what it wants to, including the CiTR On the Dial program guide and the CiTR
J15 (US) to the US. and $24 elsewhere. Please make cheques or money orders payable to Diaca-ifcr Magazine. "You have a gn_J mag.... piscorder]
is the best of its kind in this country - B. Bombay. Deadline for ads and submissions is the 15th of the month. Talk to us - we want your stuff.
CITK 101.9 fM is 1800 watts of stereoprKnic bliss on cable fM from UBC to Langley, Squamish to Point Roberts, but not en Shaw Cable in White
Rock (if you want it, you 11 find a way). CiTR is now available oo moat dock radios and in cars too. Office hours for Discorder, CiTR. and CiTR Mobile
Sound Rental are Mon-Fri, 1 Oam - 4pm (please avoid Friday aftanoooa). Call the ClTR/Discorder Office at 228-3017 for editorial, advertising, and
circulation enquiriea; CiTR News*Sports at 222-2487. or the CiTR DJ line at 228-CiTR. Write to us at 6138 SUB Blvd Vancouver BC V6T 2A_.
PROFESSIONAL QUALITY DEMOS
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n m n> © $ i
VANCOUVERS ALTERNATIVE RECORD STORE
DOWNTOWN
VANCOUVER
534 Seymour St.
669-6644
rai   [Frazil   as   m@w
RECORDS • CDS • CASSETTES
RAP » REGGAE » POP » HOUSE «■ JAZZ • SOUL • ROCK • BLUES CASSETTES        SUCK
BUT...
Dear Airhead,
This letter, my first to
Discorder, is in response to
Susan Ferran's comments
about bands putting out cassettes. I tend to agree with
her that cassettes do, in fact,
SUCK. However, I hope she
is only attacking the format,
and not the content or effort
that independent bands put
into these things. As many
would agreee, the cassette
format is good only as a medium to temporarily hold
musical information. No
matter how well you take
care of them and your equipment, the cassette loses much
of its brilliance and clarity
after repeated playings. The
CD and vinyl formats are the
only real ways to collect and
preserve the recordings
which we fanatics hold so
dear. (NB for record companies: You folks are phasing
out the wrong format! Idiots.) I really feel sorry for
the young mall rats... when
they hit thirty and want to
listen to stuff that they
grooved to when they were
teens (Bobby Brown, Paula
Abdul et al), all they'll have
is a box of muddy sounding
'cassingles.' Oh well, disposable music in a disposable format.
Getting back to the main
reason for writing this letter,
the cassette is the best medium for indie bands to get
their stuff out early. Cassettes are inexpensive, you
can record them on simple
equipment, you can do your
own cover/ liner notes on any
photocopier, you can pack
them along at gigs, etc, the
list goes on. Some of the best
music I 've ever heard was on
cassette-only releases. Does
the fact that Bruno Gerussi's
Medallion have their extremely boring music on
vinyl and CD make them a
better band? I think not. As
a host of a cassette-only radio show at our local campus
'alternative' (uh-oh, there's
that nasty word) station, I
should point out to Ms. Ferran that the next up and
coming 54-40 and NoMeansNo's ofthe West Coast scene
are now putting out excellent
music in the cassette format.
In fact, two out of every three
cassettes that our station gets
from Canadian indie bands
are from Western Canada,
and many of them make the
charts, right up there with
Camper van Beethoven and
the Stone Roses.
I suggest to Ms. Ferran
and all other Discorder readers to scrounge around for
cassettes by Jr. Gone Wild
(Folk You...), A Merry Cow,
Roots Roundup, 64 Funnycars, and absolutely any of
the half-dozen put out by the
heaviest    unsigned    band
around, MARY!
Happy listening,
Carl Jorgenson
Sudbury.Ontario
P.S. When's the next Reid
Fleming comic coming out?
Our inside sources inform us
that Reid Fleming #5 is only
half drawn. So it will probably be awhile yet.
THE MAN FOX
Dear Airhead,
Re: "Man Scan" by
Lomm Sorbay, June 1990
edition.
Reply: "Verdict - #1
Moming Show in Vancou-
Thanks for the support!
Not guilty!"
Regards,
Jim Johnston
Judge & Director of
Programming
99.3 The Fox
DISCORDER HATE
CLUB
O Hated Discorder Staff,
Please oh please sign me
up for the Discorder Hate
Club. I've been reading that
loathsome rag for more than
a year now and I hate it! I
hate your record reviews,
which never review albums
by good bands like Tiffany
or the New Kids on the
Block. I hate your new format, which only increases the
amount of paper I have to
cram into the bird cage. I
hate your use of foul language, which is a goddam
ned affront to christian decency. I hate your "Roland"
cartoon, which ridicules such
honourable persons as movie
stars, advertising tycoons,
and television game show
hosts.
And I especially hate the
mindless people who write
letters to such a revolting
magazine.
Contemptuously yours.
Dan Reed
Prince George, B.C.
P.S. the $15 is enclosed.
Yes, you too can join Dan
and the rest ofthe elite group
of Discorder Hate Club members. Just send us$15 (Canadian residents), US$15
(Yankees), or $24 (Other) of
your hard-earned cash and
tell us what you hate about
Discorder. Youwill receive a
one year subscription to this
magazine as well as an authentic hate club membership card.
ERRATA
The incomparable Leigh R.
Wolf should have been credited for the Psychic TV piece
in the June Discorder.
Presents
I From Toronto
Capitol Recording Artiste
i special guests .^^'
FRIDAY JULY 20
86 STREET MUSIC HALL
§[_(_®__[o) ff_f__ mm mnm§n
BOOKINGS
&INFO
c/o
NINTH CONFIGURATION
2523A 17ave S.w.
CALGARY. AB. CANACA
T3E0A2
(403) 246 1706
EVE 244 2056
FAX  246 8916
SEND $10.00 PLUS $1.00 POSTAGE 8 HANDLING TO ABOVE ADDRESS -- KJ£Y-CRfXJ5 OMY PLEASE
■i- The purpose of our meeting today is precisely to fit art and literature properly into the
whole revolutionary machine as one of its component parts, to make them a powerful
weapon for uniting and educating the people and for attacking and annihilating the
enemy with one heart and one mind.
- Mao Tse-Tung, Talks atthe Yenan Forum on Art and Literature (May 23,1942) (Peking: Foreign Language Press, 1956)
Consolidated are a group of individuals Irom San Francisco (lyricist, MC and vocalist Adam
Sherburne; drummer, electronic percussionist and video creator Philip Stair; and keyboard
operator and audio technician Mark Pistel) who create electronic dance music with an industrial
bent which is almost exclusively created from samples of rap acts such as Public Enemy and NWA.
But they aren't merely doing this. On top of their technology-driven beat, political messages are
set in motion.
In the white trunks is Lloyd Uliana's conversation with Adam Sherburne. In the grey trunks is how
Mr. Sherburne stacked up against Simon Frith's "Sound Effects: Youth, Leisure, and the Politics
of Rock '■' Roll," a second year arts textbook. Let's begin.
Discorder: Are you in the middle of a tour right now?
Sherburne: No, the show in Vancouver will be the first date of it.
0:You haven't done anything yet?
S:Well, we've played a few gigs around the Bay Area but no extensive travelling yet.
D: Where does the Myth of Rock Tour intend on taking you?
5; Probably to hell and back given that it's in the U.S. and that we don't have the kind of draw that will
fit us into rooms that we need to be in from city to city. We're just gonna have to take our chances with
immense drives and cut off as much territory as possible but I'm sure we'll get to the east coast around
the time of the New Music Seminar. Fucked-up American kids from huge out of the way sheep fucking
Klan towns in the deep south or in the remote corners of the country will hopefully come out and see us.
D: How well is the LP doing for you or is the matter really insignificant?
S: I talk to people who tell me that it's going up and that it's going down. It's really the most secondary
concern for us. Our record company seems to be happy with the mileage it's getting and we're pleasantly
surprised with the shows that we've played where it has been receiving a little airplay. The shows have
been well attended. So that's about the only gauge I have for it. Charts (laughs) are a joke.
D: Much of the questioning of popular music comes from the outside... academia... Where do you see
yourselves fitting into the whole picture of questioning again what you call the "myth of rock"?
S: I don't know if the picture has been fully drawn out or realized yet. I would say we fit in the picture in
that no matter who we think we are, for every grain of success that we may have with people individually, in the community or just in our audience we have an entire sea of analytical failure in terms of getting
our point across or our undeveloped points across along with other bands, music, entertainment or
cultural figures trying to question the myth of their discipline or discourse or whatever. It just simply is
insubstantial to be a successful culture industry producer.
If we happen to have a career as musicians that's unacceptable. If we happen to fail heavily at music
and have to strike out for like full time 9-to-5 jobs, that's unacceptable. We have to keep striving to find
some kind of balance in the midst of all the chaos and so just to be recognised as musicians or as people
in this tiny little subgenre of critique-oriented music. I don't think there's a whole lot standing out anyway.
It's no different than what any other politically-based protest singer of the 60's or 70's is doing.
The suggestion that musicians can be
placed in two groups-"those who want to
make it more than anything else, and those
who care more about their music than they
do for money or adulation"- and that by the
mid 1970s the former had taken rock over
from the latter. (Chapter 5: "Making Records," page 91)
I
S: There's little bits and pieces that are quite self-explanatory about
the general contradictory nature of white guys in a rock band who
have a serious problem with the legacy of white people in rock
music. So these are easy points for listeners to catch on to but I'd
say the times when people best understand us is in our live
performance when at the end of the show we put ourselves on the
spot to answer to the audience and we let them make any comments, critiques or suggestions or ask any question they want. It's
at that point where they become part of our project. And that's when
everybody understands what's up. Otherwise we're trying to make
the points clear in some ways and point out the contradictions when
there can't be a black and white point. I think it remains to be seen
whether we have any success or whether people in the press or
people who listen to our records understand what we are saying.
Radical music critics usually analyze rock not
in terms of form and content but in terms of
production and consumption: the argument is
either that the ideological meaning of music
lies in the way it is commercially produced, in
its commodity form, or that consumers create
their own meanings out ofthe commodities offered. (Chapter 3: "Rock and Mass Culture,"
page 56)
I
D: At what point in your lives or working careers did you decide to pick
up this form of protest?
S: At different points in our lives. We've all been involved in different
areas of our community in terms of working at whatever small or insignificant level to somehow try to impact social conditions. The other
question of have we always made this form of protest in the music: obviously not. We're all coming from musical experiences that are wholly
exploitive and negative and really unacceptable and that was our fault and
we're trying to learn from them now.
One of the points of our experiment is to see if we can possibly make
music that we feel is somewhat fulfilling or challenging or at least willing
to challenge the hegemony or hegemonic status of the industry whereas
in the past we had been really resigned; either resigned in a chemically dependent way or resigned in a profiteering way enough to buy into the
system and be on huge corporate nazi labels, and try to make music and
realise that there's not a whole lot of difference from any major or any
indie or any type of guitar you play. The point being that we were very resigned in terms of what we could accomplish. Now I think in terms of the
nature of the protest that we have allows for the listener, the audience, to
participate.
Historians of A
popular music argue that
musical innovation has always come from outside the
major record companies.
"Independent" companies
have been the outlet for the
expression of new ideas and
interests, and only when
such ideas have been shown
to be popular have the major
companies used their financial advantages to take them
over, to turn them into new,
"safe" products. (Chapter
5: "Making Records,"page
89)
I
6 DISCORDER D: The art process requires that audiences be active, informed, critical. Does that make the music of Consolidated "art" per se or still a commodity?
S: No, I'd say that we would definitely perceive ourselves
as absolutely more commodification than art. Obviously
one has been totally qualified, and defined by the other
for well over 300 years now. So it's important for us to
always point out the fact that there's no such thing as art
that other people receive without it being a commodity.
These are old points that everybody, as you said, in aca-
demia or in different realms understand.
In the music biz especially in the business of recreating old crap and calling it alternative or new, or industrial
or electronic it is totally dependent on the fact that people
keep somehow masking the idea that this is simply a
commodity and trying to create new definitions of its authenticity. So we're always pointing out at first that we
are a commodity-based and within commodity-based
economy and a commodity society we just have to keep
putting out images and musical images that make people
aware of that and aware of maybe the possibility they do
have once they realize that this art stuff that they've
bought into is not going to give them any of the liberation
or freedom from their enslavement that art is supposed
to promise.
The belief in a i
ing struggle between
music and commerce is
the core of rock ideology. At certain moments
artists and audiences
break through the system, but most ofthe time
business interests are in
control. (Chapter 3:
"Rock and Mass Culture," page 40-41)
u
D: Do you think roadside buskers point more towards a genuine art form than most popular music?
S: They just rid themselves of the trappings and artifices of the industry which is great if they can do that. I know
a lot of people who busk because they're simply sick ofthe constraints of having to make music underthe competitive
conditions that the culture industry puts on them.
Z7: Is that what "Josephine the Singer" is all about: the notion of the singer buckling under external pressures? (lyric:
"Josephine the singer illustrates the final stage of the capitalist amusement industry's expropriation and manipulation of the role of the musician in society.")
S: No. It's a very short song and sort of an introduction to all the ideas that we're hopefully going to put forth over
the course of the next records about what the contradiction of being a musician in a competitive society is. There's
a lot of other points.
There's potential value in playing music if you do things in a way that is positive and growth oriented and helps
you out or helps someone else out through your music. There's a million other aspects of the nature of "Josephine
the Singer" about the horribly negative and exploitive aspect of attempting to play music in competitive society. But
I'd say the term "Josephine the Singer," taken from a Kafka story, is supposed to indicate that in spite of huge
corporate evolution and control of culture, a lot of things remain fundamentally the same. Simply, that is when you
make music as a commodity you're still going to be subject to the same constraints and the same parameters within
which anybody is trying to produce culture either on a corporate scale or down on the sidewalks below your flat.
The technology of rock has contradictory implications: amplification and
recording, the basic means of rock expression, enable the businessman to
take control. As local live performers,
musicians remain a part of their community, subject to its values and needs,
but as recording artists they experience the pressures ofthe market; they
automatically become "rock '«' roll
imperialists," pursuing national and
international sales. (Chapter 3:
"Rock and Mass Culture," page 51)
D: Did you get MTV's blessing for use of the "on MTV" clip
on the "Product" track?
S: Good question. The people at the record company went
to all the different publishing companies to have the rights
to whatever drops we used from different songs on the
"Myth of Rock" LP. We got attacked by some and got clearance from others but we haven't heard anything from them
on that particular bit. I think the lawyer and the people in
legal positions at the record company are probably more
fearful of MTV than they are of any other cumulative sort of
(laughs) attacks from all these other publishing companies. So, I don't know what's happening.
Simon Frith, "Sound Effects:
Youth Leisure, and the Politics of Rock 'n' Roll" (New
York: Pantheon, 1981). VERY BIG
VERY BLACK
VERY COTTON
VERY COOL
AND IN VERY LIMITED
QUANTITIES
ONLY 15 DOLLARS
(BY MAIL PLEASE ADD $2
POSTAGE AND INCLUDE
YOUR COMPLETE
ADDRESS) Who's got the right to spoil
one's life?
Love is no Danger Zone
Who's got the right to spoil
one's health?
Protect yourself
Use your eyes
Use your mouth
Use your hands
Use them all
Create a new kind of sexpres-
Lovt
9 Danger Zone!
■ "Danger Zone" from A
Hard Day's Knight
We never wanted to promote homosexuality because there's one gay in
the band which actually is me. The
other members of the band are
straight or bisexual men. We never
wanted to promote homosexuality,
just as we never wanted to promote
heterosexuality. We think everyone
has their own choice. You can
choose what you want but you have
to be informed of all the possible
choices. Sexuality is like religion: if
you want to choose a religion you
should be able to choose it when you
are 18 or able to make responsible
decisions for yourself and then to
choose between Buddhism or anything you want. But you have to be
informed. You have to know the
choices. The same for sexuality.
Maybe in a way everybody should
try everything before choosing. It's
the only way we try to push our listeners. We emphasise that everyone
is free of their choice.
- S03
From Charleroi, Belgium
emerged what Dave Henderson of
Sounds Magazine called "the
world's most militantly hardcore gay
dance group" a;GRUMH.... In existence for nearly a decade, ihe trio of
J07 Cram-Naej (vocals), Jerry WX
(video and percussion) and originator S03 (synth and guitar) haven't
enjoyed the level of recognition from
North American audiences that has
befallen contemporaries Young
Gods, Cassandra Complex, and
compatriots Front 242, but still
managed to trudge onto these shores
just this past spring in support of
their "Hard Day's Knight" LP.
Discorder: It has been said that the
addition of disease and death to the
homosexual identity defined by right
wing society as being "deviant,"
combined with a decade of conservatism have made the prospect of
"coming out" even more difficult/
intimidating.
S03: We saw the difference first in
the gay ghettos; in the saunas and the
bars, you could meet less and less
people. It was more and more difficult to meet new people because they
were afraid to come into gay ghettos.
They were afraid of disease. I will
say that the problem of the disease in
the gay community is solved. Almost solved. Very quickly, the gay
community and the drug addicts'
community understood that they had
to use preservatifs and that they had
to use clean needles and things like
that to avoid disease. So all these
people on the front line learned very
quickly how to protect themselves
against this disease. Now, it's a
problem of straight people. Maybe
in Europe they have become convinced that they have to use preservatifs, especially the young people,
but older people still don't consider
AIDS as something they should be
concerned with. They still think it's
more a problem of gay people,
That's a big mistake.
It's of course even more diffj
cult for homosexuals to come
accept themselves and to tell
parents and their friends that
gay because you are imm^BRely
considered   a   possible
flicted person.   But I
more about this beca|
don't have examples.
tionship sexually and affectionately.
Apart from that we like to go to the
cinema and to restaurants. Sometimes we also like to go and fuck
some men. All this is done in a very
safe way because we don't want disease to spoil our relationship. We try
to be very careful.
In my opinion I'm not really
interested that gay people should be
totally free because then we would
be mixed everyjjhere, straight and
gay people inifi^Land discos. It
would be as _H^<^V cruise a man
for a gay dK as _^k difficult to
cruise a gi^Rr a boy^kause when
a boy cjgHfs a girl, fifHfeprccnt of
the tiij^Ku have to go M-trestau-
5 have to talk ana)
S then maybe go to bMg_ven
Ing the whole time you n
fand talked and s<
fca you have on your mind and \
(Bnly idea she has on her mind 1
f "let's go to bed!" We prefer firstly^
to go to bed with somebody that attracts us physically then maybe start
a friendship or a spiritual relationship      with him if he's
this i
my •
among my friendsjj
D:   It has also_f
been said that.:
feminists^
and black.
activists
fough
foifiM
d  oM
but for
according to one
gay student
union spoke;
person. "Idon't
think we're necessarily        breaking
free," he says.   Rather       *t
"we're   breaking   down
people's preconceived ideas."
What would you add to this?
S03: It's maybe more important
that people should change their ideas
of gay people than that gays should
reach a sort of liberty or freedom. In
fact I'm quite glad of the non-freedom of homosexuality because I like
to cruise a lot. If there weren't ghettos, if there weren't bars and saunas
especially for gays, it would be more
difficult to find men to get laid with.
I have very different ideas and
very separate ideas of sex and love. I
love somebody, I live with him, but
we are both free to go and get some
sex anywhere else if we want. We
have a very good balance in our rela-
^jSJJfty
about it all the time. Just as Mick
Jagger doesn't speak about his
straightness or whatever all the time.
Straight singers do not sing about
straightness and heterosexuality, so
I don't see why gay people should
speak and sing about their homosexuality. In this case I should say
no, but of course if somebody sees
me I'm not really looking like a
queen with cosmetics about my face.
If people are still foolish enough to
have this view of homosexuality
maybe I'm helping to destroy this
stereotype.
D: Frontline Assembly and Ministry
to a degree call for violence as a
means against systems of oppression. Ministry, I believe, calls for
civil disobedience and the destruction of the corporate infrastructure.
a;GRUMH has been referred to as
'radical," "militant," "reaction-
Are you nihilistic to any
c? What are your feelings on
: of violence as a means to an
opinion personally is that
is totally unuseful. Vio-
shouldn't be used in
situation. Of course,
i for ex-
nple,     violence
a be used to
ite freedom
don'l
know if
interesting: the body first, the spirit
afterwards. That's perhaps something that would be shocking to
straight, conservative people but it's
our way of thinking and my way to
think.
D: Do you feel a;GRUMH have any
responsibilities or commitments to
breaking down stereotypes and preconceived heterosexual views of
homosexuality?
S03: I should say yes and no because we don't want, as I said before,
to promote homosexuality or to talk
people  to  vio-
our songs. I think
discussion is always
positive because it's an exchange of opinions which leads
to solutions. We don't call for revolution or anarchy in any way. I
deeply think that we live quite well
in our respective countries. If you
; just think that people die from hunger in other parts of the world, if you
just think that people are not able to
write or express themselves in several other parts of the world, we
should be happy to be in a land where
people can work and if they don't
work they get money for doing nothing. Some people try to find work
and other people don't try at all, they
just live on the expenses of the government. So, we should be happy to
live in this kind of situation even if
there are people dying from hunger
in the street; but in many instances
people want to get out from the society and deny themselves the possibility of help and assistance. Maybe I'm
wrong on some points, but we do live
in quite good conditions.
D: Right wing homophobia and the
AIDS hysteria have pushed the topic
of legalised homosexual marriage to
the forefront in North America as it is
probably viewed as a public health
measure. Overall, the gay movement
has avoided the issue primarily out of
fear of division. Much of the gay
leadership supports the notion of gay
life being essentially outsider... anti-
bourgeois... radical. Marriage in reality is seen as a co-optation into
straight society. What are your views
on homosexual marriage?
S03: I don't generally promote any
kind of radical way of living. People
have to feel right to do what they
want. I don't care personally about
weddings and marriage. I don't see
why I should ask permission, authorisation or any kind of regulation about
my decision to live with somebody or
not to live with somebody. It just
concerns him and me and that's all.
Of course, homosexual people living
together should have the same rights
as heterosexual people living together but this has nothing lo do with
marriage in itself. Rights of people
living together should be something
totally separate from the wedding organisation.
D: a;GRUMH may be opposed to
complete assimilation into (hetero)
society, yet with corporate gay acts
like Erasure, Dead or Alive, Communards, Bronski Beat, etc, whose
homosexuality is not overt in the
music itself. Their convictions are so
diluted that they are mainstream culture. Would you care to discuss your
views on this?
S03: Well, I just think that Bronski
Beat at the beginning was a very
strong homo-militant band but I don't
really think homosexuality needs
militantness anymore because the
majority of the public is aware of
what is homosexual: what it looks
like, what it is supposed to do or not
to do, and I hope that it is just a
question of time beforfrpeople accept
homosexuality just as they accept
uality.
D: Any last words?
S03: The last thing I want to say is
that I'm very interested in meeting
any kind of hairy teddy bears from
the USA that can write me at the
address of the band: BP 1649, B-
6030 Charleroi, Belgium. You can
write if you are very hairy and very
fat (laughs).
(Catalogue and mail-order enquiries also welcomed through this address.) &
JULY 1990 9 That local band competition is back.
10  DISCORDER ^SnCJAIlSTTURTrF*
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WITH HIMIHE'S
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5ILINGCALISM   DOW/V YOUR THROAT  WHILE"
FORCING  EVERYONE IN QUEBEC TO  BE
FRENCH   ONLY! YOUVE HAD IT WITH THIS
COUNTRY  BEING RUM BY A CLTQCC OF
QUEBECERS  IN  OTTAWA, A&OUT TIME
THEY LISTENED TO YOU INSTEAD! DAMN
PROGS WONT BE HAPPY TTLL WE ALL
•9PEAK   FRENCH.'/
TO/ST THOSE ANGLO-REDNECKS ?
TO GO BACK ON THIER WORD Atp
DENY QUEBEC THE PROTECTION *X)
NEED FOR SOUR CULTURE!! WHY
CAN*! THEY ACCEPT YOU?THEY'RE
STILL TRYING TO KEEP YOU AS
2WP CLASS  CITIZENS AND YOU
WONT STAND FOR THf/R BULLYIH&
SEPARATION 15 THE ONLY may/!
O/V NOUTHB AMERICANS  ARE  GOING
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AGAIN, RIGHT GUYS ! COME ON
SHAKE   HANDS  NOW! BE    '
PALS.'? GUYS.,. GUYS? / have a theory (it will probably be
proclaimed fanciful) that the Essex
countryman's character owes at
least something of its quality to the
nature of his landscape. Clay and
sky are all-the heavy clay that tears
the soles off a man's boots and the
wide open sky where he hears the
larks singing. And my theory is that
just this combination helps to give
the Essex countryman his odd mixture of harsh realism and tender poetry.
Essex, 1950
,S*
"I don't think our music particularly reflect;, our environment. It
was rural. It was very conservative.
It was very safe. We were alw«v«
very bored and
reacti*
12 DISCORDER
energetic and
is more a reflection of cur
1 against whal was going on
;. We were like the an tip a
.indings. We're a
i. omplute reac I ion against it. The aggressiveness, the energy level, it's
almost a total mirror of where wc
came f**_________________. itmm
Those words came from the mouth
of Bon Harris, one half of Ch
elmsford, Essex's Nitzer Ebb, the
region's second most celebrated
contribution to post-chlorofluoro-
carbon-comuming society, ranking
closely behind the annual Epping
Forest Stag Hunt. Harris and cohort
Doug McCarthy plus various percussionists have redefined electronic-based underground dance
music with their distinctive hardcore
punk hyper-aggression fused with
the precision, discipline and the
inhuman-border ing-on-sado-maso-
chistic unrelenting rhythms of machines. Discorder introduces you
to... Nitzer fob.
Discorder: So you're on tour with
Depeche Mode. They've finally
been accepted whole-heartedly by
the MTV generation. Are you at all
turning off their fans?
Bon Harris: No, precisely the opposite. I'd say that a lot of people
who perhaps hadn't heard of us before or weren't familiar wilh our
music are going the other way, relating to it and getting into it.
D: What has been the biggest complaint that Nitzer Ebb have received?
For instance, an article on
a;GRUMH states that the band has
been accused, as have Depeche
Mode, of "being less spontaneous or
instinctual" because of your employment of technology and machines. Is
that something that Nitzer Ebb has
run up against?
B: The way we look at it as a band is
that electronic music is still relatively infant. It's the newest style of
music that there is and consequently
people are constantly finding new
ways to do things. There's a lot of
new parameters involved when
you're making electronic music.
Quite a lot of the bands in the past
have perhaps settled for the constrictions and limitations. We feel that
perhaps we are part of a new breed of
electronic band that are skirting
around the limitation of using machines. We free ourselves as much
as we can. We do the most physical
things that wc can on stage. We put
the sponyiQgilj^BfUMgpergy in
Obviously the tact that some of
it has to be programmed does take
away a certain improvisational as-
:. but then «gain we're not
.ny into that anyway. There
are ways of doing that, which we
haven't explored yet, but I don't
think it's really a fair accusiitron.
It's just a different way to make
music. There are different parameters involved. There's also a lot of
constrictions with a standard rock-
type format bul nobody likes to talk
about them; everybody knows it and
they're familiar with it. So, people
don't consider the limitations there
either.   :-*^^B
D: "Showtime" has on it some jazz
and swing elements, specifically on
"Nobody Knows." "One Man's Bur
den," and the percussion, wind instruments and brass on "Lightning
Man."
B: Yeah, it's just showing more of
our influences and more of the different emotional feels that we want
to get across in our music; trying to
reemphasize the fact that we are a
band, an individual band whereas a
lot of people like to throw you in
some kind of category which we're
very wary of. There's more than one
side to our music. Plus we wanted to
attack more traditional songwriting
structures. It's just moving on to different challenges within what you
do.
We're known for doing the sort
of quite stark hard dance music. But
there are other things that influence
us. We've always been intrigued by
whether wc could combine all these
different things that we see and hear
around us and still have a Nitzer Ebb
identity, which 1 think we did on
"Showtime." It's quite pleasing for
us to be able to draw on those influences as diverse as swing and blues
music but slill sound like ourselves.
D: It demands more of an active role
from the listener vis-a-vis "That
Total Age" and "Belief."
B: It's more challenging, I think.
There's a lot of raised eyebrows
when people hear it for the first time
if they're familiar with our music.
But I haven't particularly met anyone who thinks it's bad. They take a
while to adjust but once they're adjusted, they can see the logic. They
can see exactly what we're doing
and most people sort of admit that it
is more lis tenable than the other
ones. The first two were more sort of
"doing music"; they made you get up
and dance. There are tracks on here
that are more listenable, that you
think about a little bit more.
That to us is like a positive thing
because if we had just put out something that people would listen to and
go "Oh yeah, Nitzer Ebb, good, file
under Nitzer Ebb," then we're not
Ballenging them as lis-
re not moving on
|tists, so for us it's a
: people don't par-
Ire fact that they have
I re-evaluate because
^comfortable with identify-
s and how they know us as
BPfezcr Ebb. We have to be interested
in making music and wc have to
makeilhonestly and impulsively and
so that means that wc have to think
aboutit. If we're constantly thinking
about andre evaluating it, then there
are going to be changes. There are
going to be different sides of us that
we want to show
D: How and why did you hook up
with Ralph Dorper of Die Krupps
and re-do "Fair Day's Work"?
B: Well, when we were working on
the "BelieF' album, Ralph phoned us
up and said he was thinking about
doing this track, would we be interested in (a) remixing it for them, or
(b) actually perform on it. Die
Krupps had been one of the bands
that wc used to listen to when we
were quite into German electronic
music in the early 80's and picked up
a few Die Krupps tracks. We were
quite into them, so for us it was a real
nostalgic thing and sort of flattering
to be asked to do it although we were
under no illusions why they wanted
us to do it but from our point of view;
it was a nostalgic thing and we
agreed. We were on tour in Europe
with the Belief album and we
stopped by and did a few vocals and
bits of percussion on it and then we
mixed a couple of versions for them
and there it was.
D: Nitzer Ebb has also received
some heat from the media for being
tied to fascist/National Front elements. How would you set your fans
in Canada straight on this issue?
B: Well, originally a lot of the imagery that we were interested in was
very stark and very aggressive.
We've got a philosophy that if you
want to do something and you can
see a reason for doing it and you're
not stepping on anyone's toes, then
you should do it. We had an image
that I guess some people could have
found offensive but we had our reasons for doing it. We wanted to do it
so we saw no reason why we couldn' t
use and abuse images from the past
that didn' t particularly have any rele
vance to us and re-evaluate them and
re-use them for our own means and
for our own aims so we just went on
ahead with the strength of our convictions. We know our political
stance, we considered it to be moral
and right. A lot of the accusations
that were being thrown at us-being
fascists, etc.- were completely ab-
I WON'T YOU COME
AND JOIN BON IN
HIS VIOLENT
PLAYGROUND?
BY LLOYD ULIANA
were doing and just went right on
ahead.
I think a lot of the thing was in
our early days we went to great pains
to try and explain and show people
exactly what we were doing but basically if you want to see the bad side
in something then you can. We were
being ambiguous in some places and
leaving it up to people to question for
themselves what we were doing.
Some people choose to take the easy
option out and just want sensational
ism and just want to see the bad side
of things so you can't really stop
them from doing it. If they've made
up their mind that they want to see
the bad thing, it's pretty hard to dissuade people.
D: On "That Total Age" you thank
Richard 23 of Front 242. They are
obviously a major influence on
Nitzer Ebb and vice-versa. What
exactly is your relationship to them?
B: Well, the reason that Richard and
Front 242 were mentioned on that
record is when we were starting, it
was quite a struggle in England because the music industry was dominated by guitar music. Synthesizers
were a bit of a dirty word and especially the way wc Were using them;
we had this rather aggressive sort of
sound and aggressive approach and I
think one of the band members
picked up a Front 242 release and it
was a similar approach and attitude
to what we're doing. So we were
quite thankful that we weren't alone
in battling away. Eventually, our
paths crossed. I think we were doing
a concert in Belgium and Richard
presented himself to us and we had a
long chat and shared many similar
points of view and got on really well
and met the rest of the band. It was
just a way of acknowledging them.
D: Sort of like Nitzer Ebb and Front
242 vs. the world!
B: (laughs) No, it wasn't really like
that but it was just nice to know that
there are other people who appreciate what you're doing and other
people that understood what you're
doing and vice-versa.
D: You played a show with A.R.
Kane and the Swans once. What are
your impressions of the Swans? Remember, it's easy to be negative.
B: Yeah, I know. I was aware that
they're very talented, it's just that
you can listen to one or two tracks
and be quite over-awed by the power
and the intensity of the whole thing
but I happen to be one of those people
that can't take it for a long time. I
respect them immensely, I think
they're very talented, but I can't listen to their music for a prolonged
period because it gives me a headache.
D: What do you listen to? And don't
say Prince.
B: It's totally diverse. I have listened to Prince, I'll have you know
(laughs). Before I came away I was
listening to things like Red Hot Chili
Peppers, John Lee Hooker, Billie
Holliday, some classical stuff, The
Cult, loads of things, Depeche Mode,
Erasure, and Renegade Soundwave.
D: Keep plugging the Mute bands
there, Bon. Help sell some records.
B: Well, it's not a case of helping
them sell records. They happen to be
my personal taste in music.
D: They've got a good thing going.
Mute.
B: Yeah, I mean most of the artists
on Mute... I make a point of collecting their records as they appear and
most of them I think is really good
D: Do you buy import records?
B: Yeah. The last import I bought
was the Chili Peppers.
D: You didn't get Mute director and
Depeche Mode inventor Daniel
Miller to call someone in New York
to get you a copy of the CD.
B: Didn't want to. I mean, I wanted
to buy it. I work hard (laughs) and I
don't want to get it free. Iwannabuy
it.  They've got to buy their meals
and pay the rent as well, you know.
D: C'mon, Martin Gore's paying all
their bills.
B: (in disgust) Aaaah.
D: Doug has been quoted a.s saying,
"We went through the last five years
desperately trying to be something
and then we realised that all we had
to be was ourselves."
B: We perhaps had given ourselves
a few too many preconceptions and a
little bit of tunnel vision about what
we should be in regard to the band
and how wc should be when we were
working on the band. There were too
many rigid sort of guidelines that
we'd set for ourselves and then there
was like a general creeping frustration coming in and no one could
really put their finger on it.
It was just basically being able
to loosen up and being able to trust
ourselves, to express ourselves in
different ways and to just loosen up
in general and be more relaxed and
be ourselves more because obviously that shade of Nitzer Ebb was
only one very small part of our emotional spectrum. It took quite a lot of
time to reconcile ourselves to the
fact that there were other emotions
that we could express and other ways
to express them and that we could
feel comfortable with doing that. It
sounds quite simple but when you're
going through that things always do
look simple in retrospect. It's just
like part of growing up as people and
growing up as a band: letting go,
loosening up, trying to express ourselves in different ways.
D: The "Belief.LP was inspired by
some of these experiences and can
be said to cover more ground socially ("Shame," 'TWA," "Blood
Money," "Drive") than does "That
Total Age."   How do you compare
"Belief to "Showtime"?
B: I think "Showtime" is a little bit
more of a kind of personal insight.
It's a little bit more of our personal
feelings being opened up. Not so
much to do with general social comment or general political comment,
il's a lot more of an intimate-type of
view. Just more a personal thing.
D: Do you put much pressure on
yourselves?
B: I think we used lo. These days
it's probably exactly the opposite.
We're so incredibly lazy and our
attention span is so short that it's like
a built-in safety measure that wc
don't have too much pressure put on
us. We're always in pressure situations. Douglas and myself jusl
happen to be completely non-serious. In fact it's quite hard to deal
with us sometimes because wc just
joke in really serious situations.
Generally we tend to let off a lot of
pressure that would build up by just
D: And jovial...
B: Indeed.
1): Whatmood or feelings are Nitzer
Ebb attempting to create for their audience?
B: In the live performance, the main
thing that's important to us is a release of positive energy. Most of the
bands that we used to go and see and
really enjoy live were just so "up"
and so "there" and so "for the moment" that it was a real experience.
That's been an influence on us-re-
creating that sense of immediacy and
positiveness. So really, that's the
main thing that we try and get across
live is the energy.
D: The energy is all very clear in a
concert setting, but even that can be
confused with other emotions.
B: It happens. It's obvious feelings
are running high and do reach quite a
high level at our shows and sometimes that will spill over into violence. Sometimes it does in your
personal life. It's a by-product.
Sometimes people don't control
themselves the way they should.
Some people are just out there for
trouble anyway. There's a lot of
reasons why it can stop but it comes
down to the individuals to channel
their energy in a sensible and positive way. If they want to go around
and start beating up on people, it's
sad, but it's not really our responsibility. Maybe we would have done
that but we didn't. We did something else, we formed a band and got
our aggressions out in that way. We
can't be responsible if people just
see the only way out is to hit the
person standing next to him. {??
r Hose ot Low
Ite Piano Set
Town Pimp
Saturday, Jine 9th
Opening up for English hi
could buy the tape with their next song an it
yes, in AM ndio Iune!
House of Love actually suned performing tt I decent hour ind pliyed fa 70
80 minutes. Their strongest tunes were the
House of Love wis the local hand The Picasso Sel. This band possesses the currently
popular "organ-sound" of bands like Eric
Burden and the Animals and the Doors. They
combined this whine with New Order-ish
monotony (and you thought it couldn't be
done). The band's lead singer made a cheezy
plug for their tape, telling the audience we
moody "Blind" and my favourite, "Hope."
For the latter, the icy stare ofthe lead singer
comriensated for the band's minimal stage
presence. The other band members didn't
possess the same strange charisma and their
grey tones just blended in with the smokey
atmosphere of the Pump. They devoted most
of their attention to the work at hand, i.e.
playing and not pretending.
House of Love integrated a melancholy sound reminiscent of the Smiths with
harder riffs and polyrhythmic drumming.
Parts of the audience even got into a snazzy
dynamic which really pissed some people
off- nothing a few dirty looks couldn't cure-
when the big radio tune wis performed. The
pseudo psychedelic light show thing on the
back wall during "Beatles and The Stones"
nude for wild photographs. When all was
done, the tudience give t wetk cry to bring
the House of Love back for in encore which,
surprisingly, succeeded. The bind put ill
their energy into the resounding finale,
"Love in a Car."
Toni-Lym
Group 49
Pitt International Gallery
Saturday, June 16th
Saturday night concert-goers layered
deep inside the Pitt on this particular evening were greeted with the experience of becoming one with a giant hallucination machine enhanced by startling 20th Century
video images, real "Grateful Dead" incense,
and a Terminal City Ricochet/Pilot 1 rcl ic of
a stage. The men behind all this were in fact
children. Children of the fathers of psychedelia, who over twenty years ago opened
whorehouses of acid to the mind, body and
While Group 49 is no Music Machine
or Strawberry Alarm Clock, it has much in
common with these bands of yesteryear.
Loud, thrashing, rhythmic noise mixed up
with Neil Youngish drug medleys, all complemented by far out un-Dick Tracy-like use
of the primary colours.
Group 49 is five wild, beat protest
youths manipulating to the utmost a real
eirly 1970s Soft Machinesque synthesizer,
scraps of sheet metal and digital sampling,
combined with a throbbing bassline and wa
vering guitar. Anthony R , a guy in a Bon
Jovi cutoff shirt, and Bill M , who could
be described as i Cossman Graduate adorned
in i furry tie, belled out an aural onslaught of
intense tnthems for the 90s. In other words,
it wis twice the excitement ind double the
flavour of a regular gig.
The Ridge Theatre
Monday, June 18th
Review #1:  Some guy named Ver-
liine, who used to be in t bind called Television ind thea released a string of great solo
albums in the early 80's, came through town
in support of his, relatively speaking, tepid
new release. The show was a technical and
financial disaster. A paid audience of lets
than a hundredlounged through i short set of
amateurish, acoustic guitar music, the likes
of which can be beard it the comer of Granville ind Robson every night for i pocket
full of change, or less. With buskers you're
not obliged to shell out for i ticket or stick
iround for i full hour.
Verliine, who performed solo and
who paiued to tune his guitar after every
song, played as if be were fulfilling a contractual obligation to promote his new record. He put in his one hour and then fled back
his hotel, but not before playing a one song
encore in which he flayed Johnny Cash.Only
i few diehard fins (ind t sorry lot they were
too) anyone who can remember records like
"Words from the Front" and "Dreimtime"
has to be it leist 30) illowed themselves to
be conned into believing that such dreck
ictutlly constituted "entertainment" or "artfulness." The Ridge management should
have pulled Verliine, and the misapplied
stacks of amps, off the stage and resumed
screening the movie "Choeolat." Better
still, they could have gotten a print of
"Spinal Tap." An endless loop of the bath
tub interview with the spontaneously combusting drummer would have been appro-
Review #2: This will sound like age
elitism, but I'm very glad there was nobody
at the Tom Verlaine concert under 25. For
once there wis no fashion show, no battle of
the big hair, nobody talking during the
songs. Between the notes from Tom's guitar the loudest noise came from Ridge's air
conditioner. When was the last time you 've
been at a show and the room was absolutely
quiet? The audience hung on Tom's every
sound. It was as intimate an evening with a
guitar superhero as one can ever hope to ex-
The show was the very essence of
minimalism. Playing solo acoustic, Tom
shunned all the trappings of rock Y roll
schtick. The atmosphere was so close and
intense that the camera flash from a fan
taking photos was not only distracting, but
obscene and vulgar. Early on Tom instructed the sound man to stop fiddling with
the lights. His approach was antitheatrical
to the point where the obligatory, yet inane,
switching on and off of coloured lights
Dissidenten
Out of this World
(Sirc/WEA)
(The following is to be read aloud
with a fake Balkan iccenl.) When 3 Mustt-
of ours? They ilso speik of their most
popular offspring, the bind called Dissidenten, the German... how you say in English...
techno-pop meets Moroccan roll boogie
kings of Europe and ihe North African areas.
phas 3 recently came to the wildly appreciative town of Vancouver, they spoke of many
things such as the young man who goes to
the top of the mountain and howls like the
wolf because his heart has been ripped from
him by a woman, or of the things that roll
over the carpets like the tennis ball, or why
is there only one taxi in this wonderful world
14 DISCORDER
As Mustapha say, "When Dissidenten and
Mustapha go shopping in the market, Mustapha go down the different side streets, but
Dissidenten go straight to the sausage shop."
(Okay, you can stop reading in the
Balkan accent. It was a dumb idea anyway.)
The point is that on their latest release, "Out
of this World," Dissidenten have not only
gone to the sausage shop, but have gone
straight to the No Name Brand weinie
counter. Like 3 Mustaphas 3, Dissidenten
puts on a fine show. Also like the Mustaphas, Dissidenten has in the past put out a
couple of highly enjoyable albums featuring
unique, hybrid musical styles with the sympathetic use of traditional and modern instruments (but leave the playing of the inflated goat carcasses to Mustapha!). Unlike
the 3 Mustaphas 3, unfortunately, Dissiden-
ten's most recent album is a disappointment.
Despite the traditional instruments
used on "Out of this World" (notably Arabic
percussion instruments, quanounes, ouds,
mandolins, and gimbris), the songs are belaboured pop-disco, often featuring annoying
string riffs supplied by the unfortunate National Orchestra of Morocco. In fact, some
of the songs sound like rip-offs from Dis-
sidenten's debut album, whose format is
also copied on this release. Perhaps producer Marlon Klein (the group's keyboardist and drummer) was responding to pressures from Sire Records, or maybe, as Dissidenten seems to have always wanted their
music to be played in North African clubs as
much as European ones, they have tailored
their music to be acceptable to North African and Arabic youths to whom American
pop stars such as Michael Jackson, Madonna, and even the Bee Gees, are still
popular. "Out of this World" sounds like the
relentless Middle-Eastern disco music
which is blared from every cafe and car
radio whether it's in Rabat, Algiers, Cairo,
However, the short piece "Urban
Dervish" is quite superb, featuring some
wonderful gimbri playing by Abdellah El
Gourd. The gimbri is a thumping, resonating instrument originating in Eastern Africa
which sounds peat when amplified and
accompanied by Arabic percussion. The
piece is very similar to "Roots of the Tangi-
ers" on Dissidenten's first album, only faster
and more lively. If you've got gobs of cash,
you should buy the album, record "Urban
Dervish," and then relegate "Out of this
World" to a safe place in your music collec-
Jon Hassell
City: Works of Fiction
(Opal/WEA)
A Canadian, Jon Hassell is a well
known figure in the ambient, soundscape
crowd, a group which includes Brian and
Roger Eno, Daniel Lanois, Harold Budd,
Michael Brooks, Robert Fripp, and Holger
Czukay. In the past, his music has maintained i level of distinction from the "new-
igey" aural wallpaper stuff through his
exploration and serious examination of
aboriginal music and archaic rhythms and
instrumentation.
A trumpeter, Hassell plays his instrument through "electronic filters" to achieve
a variety of sounds and voices, a unique musical feature which has enriched most of his
fine recordings; the best, in my opinion, is
"Dream Theory in Malaya" which contains
some bewitching tracks. Unlike many of his
colleagues whose talents only seem to shine
in collaborative efforts (notably Brian Eno),
Jon Hassell's solo albums have always contained his best work.
"City: Works of Fiction" is a departure from his past musical styles. Jazzier,
slicker and less structured, the album could
have been quite enjoyable. Unfortunately, 1
found the album rather empty. It suffers
from over-production and over-programming and sampling, as well as a lack of
variety to the nine tracks on the album. He
has committed the worst sin of all-using
those god-awful synth horn section sounds
one bears in all those horrible beer, pop, and
jeans ads on t.v. Much of the ilbum sounds
mechanical compared to the mystic, image
invoking music of his past works. This is
unfortunate because the richness and layering of sound is quite creative, and often
extremely subtle and sensitive, especially on
the last two tracks, "Warriors" ind "Out of
Adebara." The problem is that the collection
of pieces seems cold and calculated.
The liner notes are interesting,
though—snippets of Ctlvino-lilce mythologies ind histories. Toobadthemusicdoesn't
match these intriguing images.
James Bold!
(New Albion)
Colorado-based composer Stephen
Scott has just released a digital recording of
two of his pieces for bowed piano, "Minerva's Web" and "The Tears of Niobe."
Scott's ensemble of ten performers gathers
around the insides of a grand piano (sos-
tenuto pedal depressed) and bows the strings
with horsehair usually used for the bows of
stringed instruments. The resultant timbre is
quite beautiful and often reminiscent of a
string ensemble (particularly cellos). Musi-
cally.however.thisstuffistiddley-winks. It
is not music which demands to be listened
to; rather, it will rest comfortably in the
background whilst you channel in (for a
handsome fee) to contact Michael, the spirit
who has possessed Lily the cup-reader. Yes,
too new agey, a bit like a watered-down
Scelsi (dig the segue?).
The late Giacinto Scelsi threatens to
be contemporary music's flavour-of-the-
week. This recent recording contains three
pieces for orchestra and choir: "Aion"
(1961), "Pfhat" (1974). and "Kora-om-pax"
(1969). The pitch-content of his musk is
always slight, but the music is always very
charged, often exploring the possibilities of
a single note through wonderful enveloping
timbral shifts. I'm not sure what directions
Scelsi's music will lead other composers as
it seems to be the most absolute form of
minimalism (though not in the same sense as
Reich or Glass). In itself, however, this is
one of the best recordings I've heard in a
while.
Deskee
Let there be House 12*
(BMG)
The word is hip-house. This U.K. cut
has what it takes. "Let there be House" is
jam packed with rhythms and beats that
leave you no choice but to get off your ass
and move your feet. The track to listen to is
the A-side" A2Zen Mix" by C J. Mackintosh
and Dave Darrell. Part 1 is a hip-house rap
that sounds like a DJ trying to whip the
dancefloor into a frenzy combined with the
definitive piano and keyboards house sound.
Part 2 is like the house of the past: no rap,
very infrequent vocal samples, and a lot of
Without knowing the B-side was a
"West Bam" mix, the influence was obvious; the horns reminded me of "Hold me
Back," a single by West Bam.
Noah Grant
Put Your Body In It 12*
(Infinite Beat)
As you might have guessed, this is a
dance band. EQ are Ease & Quase on the mk
with DJ D-Swift on the turntables and two
dancers, Ty-D and K-Born. Quase started
doing his thing four years ago in his home
town of Birmingham, Alabama, where he
hooked up with the Sir Mix-A-Lot tour. The
tour eventually landed at the naval base on
Whidbey Island, Washington state where
Quase met Ease, who was in the Navy. The
two joined forces and have now released The Kt included many of the songs
from Tom's latest release, The Wonder."
While this recording is decidedly weak, especially when com-
during a Socred-o-fied version of "Be Like
Us." Dave thought it might be due to God's
intervention. Pico sang "Cruise Tom
Cruiie." It goes, "My mom approves Tom
Cruise/1 want to cruise Tom Cruise." No
the Cash songs illustrate. The man in
black sings "I fell
down into a burning
ring of fire," while
the man in white sings "I keep a close watch
on this heart of mine." Tom's interpretation
of Cish's works, like his deliberate dispensing of showbiz hype was a philosophkal and
cultural tour de force!
Review #3: It's impossible to avoid
No Fun. I swear, I can't spit in a gutter
without getting a little phlegm on the hardest
working band in Sumy. I'm afraid to look in
the fridge. I'm too scared to shower. No Fun
is everywhere. Geez. Well. What was this
encounter wilh No Fun like? Kind of like the
last six or seven. Dave made a dever remark
about members of the audience who can-
expecting to see the movie "Choeolat."
During many of the songs Dave held up
signs and magazine covers and Gorgo lime-
flavoured chewy toffee. The lights failed
Fun finished iheir set with "Woodstock II."
A very small plastic guitar was battered on
stage and tossed  in the  audience.  Pas
Consolidated
Luvafair
Wednesday, June 20th
To the chant of "America No. 1" over
the Luv-a-fair P.A. system the drummer for
Consolidated held up a sign upon which is
written MYTH.
This was the theme set by San Francisco's collective known as Consolidated on
June 20th. Their music is primarily in the hip
hop vein, yet proved to be more musically
articulate than many of their peers. They ac-
compl isbed this through a diverse repertoire
of samples that, surprisingly, held my interest throughout the nighl
Consolidated were without a dull moment. The exuberance
of lead vocalist Adam
Sherburne which
spread through the
crowd with the show
opening performance
of    "Consolidated."
played video cuts from
bands, politicians,
T.V. evangelists and
other socially destructive characters.
The most interesting
part of the show came
near the end of the
encore when Consolidated turned on the
house lights and answered questions from
the audience. Most of
the questions were
concerned with the band's motives and
goals. Some people were not willing to accept Consolidated's brand of social/ economic/ political criticism. One questioner
pointed out the hypocrisy of Consolidated
continually complaining about the role of
many musicians and how the media portray
these "rock stars" as positive role models to
consumers. Adam Sherburne replied that
they understood that it was hypocritical, yet
they were willing to risk that in order to get
their message to people, as they could not
find a more prictical medium.
They closed out the night the same
way they started, playing "Consolidated"
one more time. Overall, an
appearance in Vancouver.
Braden Zmo ®>
their first single, "Put Your Body In It."
When I first heard this track I thought
it was good but still just another hip-house
cut. It seems like everyone is combining
house and hip hop. However, these guys
manage to make it sound fresh. Look for
their debut album in the record store soon.
Noah Grant
Age of Chance
Mecca
(Virgin/AAM)
What happened? The debut Age of
Chance album "1000 Years of Trouble " was
a superb piece of industrial dance. The raps
were tight and cynical and those beats! Like
being in a rhythmic air raid. The album
spawned "Don't Get Mad, Get Even," possibly their most famous track and a big hit in
clubs. All this was in '86- '87 and apart from
some tantalizing rumours about a Public
Enemy collaboration, all has been quiet.
When "Mecca" appeared a lot of
people, including me, got pretty excited
wondering how they were going to top the
energy and power of the first album. The
answer is, they didn't; and it doesn't sound
like they were even trying. The album is
filled with a kind of watered-down funk,
possibly intended as a tribute to some of
their influences, but showing that they are
only mediocre in this style. The strength of
Age of Chance lay in their assimilation of
rap, funk, industrial and dance, a mix they
had to perfection. DJ Powercut, the man
who took scratching to ridiculous proportions on "1000 years.." is here relegated to a
supporting role and is barely audible most of
The worst thing about this record is
that all the time I'm listening to it I'm expecting them to explode at any moment, but
all I get here and there is a glimpse of the
bidden talent and inspiration they possess.
Ptter Lutwyche
AndyPrieboy
...Upon My Wicked Son
(Doctor Dream)
Andy Prkboy used to sing with Wall
of Voodoo. Andy has BIG HAIR and
BLACK CLOTHING. Andy is obviously an
alternative type person. His debut solo album "....Upon My Wicked Son" is crap, as
simple as thai
He sets a lot of shallow leftish lyrics
to a bunch of lame Alternative-MOR crossover tunes and hopes to get away with it
You know that an album is bad when the best
song on it is a poorly done cover of Canned
Heat's "On the Road Again," stripped of ill
the original's character. On this record be
tackles such topics as suicide, AIDS and
homophobia all in the same formulaic "ren-
The best thing about this album was
the press kit that came with it. Laugh and
read... "It is impossible to capture the essence of Andy Prieboy with simple instruments like pen and paper. He is far too
dynamic and diverse. His music, lyrics and
personality are all products of the radically
left-of-centre instincts churning in his crafty
soul." ...whilst listening to this half-assed
trash on the turntable. In fact, if they gave
the press kit away with every copy of the
album I'd recommend buying it as the best
laugh since Spinal Tap. But perhaps I'm
being unfair. To even it up I'll leave the last
word to Jennifer Beals, who Andy has just
written some songs for. "[Andy is) a most
profound genius," she says, "the guy is a
poet"
Peter Lutwyche
Live an direct
(MCA)
I guess this is what you would call
house music. One guy presumably does all
the programming and there is an iwful lot of
it This is live performance with no vocals
(with some quick intros by somebody else),
just electronic rhythms and keyboard including electronic piano and weird synth sounds.
Repetitive? Yes. Boring? It depends on
who's listening. After a few listens I grew lo
like this recording very much. As far as I
know it is an original concept to release
house music performed live (with a mic on
the audience) and it works very well.
Adam Sloan
Consolidated
The Myth of Rock
(Nettwerk)
Publk Enemy
Fear of a Black Planet
(Def Jam/Columbia)
When I first heard Consolidated's 12*
"Consolidated" EP, I thought the title track
was brilliant but feared that they would be a
"one-hit" group because the other two tracks
weren't impressive. "The Myth of Rock"
ful fills my hopes that they would realize their
potential. This industrio political dance
music fantasy/nightmare is the number two
album, combining relevant commentary on
the rock V roll industry and racial injustice
with excellent musk. Public Enemy's Fear
of a Black Planet is number one.
Adam Sloan
Urban Dance Squad
Mental Floss for the Globe
(Arista)
The Netherlands based UDS successfully combine the good components of rap
and rock to create something danceable
which would probably be great live. Son-
songs have a tinge of Living Color in them
but most of them are hard to attach to any
other group's sound. Overall, this album is
pretty good.
Adam Sloan   (§?
JULY   CONCERTS
SUNDAY 1
CiTR presents CATERWAUL with BRUCE A &
THE SECULAR ATAVISTS
MONDAY 2
CANADA DAY AFTERMATH TANKHOG with former
SNFU members WHEAT CHIEFS and the GRAND
POOBAHS
TUESDAY 3
CATHERINE WHEEL
WEDNESDAY 4
MCA Recording Artist JILL SOBULE
THURSDAY 5
THE STOATERS with BLACKTHORN
FRIDAY 6
Rounder Recording Artists SLEEPY LA BEEF with
SATURDAY 7
HERALD NIX
SUNDAY 8
From Algeria CHABA FADELA
MONDAY 9
Showcase
TUESDAY 10
Showcase
WEDNESDAY 11
OH YEAH with guests WIDE WORLD
THURSDAY 12
STATE OF MIND
FRIDAY 13
LAST WILD SONS with guests SPIN DOCTORS
SATURDAY 14
ROOTS ROUND UP
SUNDAY 15
SMUGGLERS with guests ELVIS LOVE CHILD
MONDAY 16
From Jamaica RAS POSSE with ROOTS RADICS
and CHARLIE CHAPLIN
TUESDAY 17
Showcase
WEDNESDAY 18
From London, Ontario LEGEND KILLERS
THURSDAY 19
Timeless presents GOLIATH with JUSTIN SANE
and MAD DUCK
FRIDAY 20
SCRAMBLERS
SUNDAY 22
CiTR presents ALL
MONDAY 23
Showcase
WED-THU 25-26
LAVA HAY
FRI-SAT 27-28
BOURBON TABERNACLE CHOIR
MONDAY 30
Showcase
SUNDAY 31
THE TUBES
■"■■■■
ts                                                    m'
TnWW   D1I1UTD
1 KJ ww l¥   Mr U S¥l Mr
66 Water Street   Gastown             683-6695
JULY 1990 15 COLIN    UPTON'S    BIG
THING
Published by Kd Varney
6424 Chester Street
Vancouver, BC V5VV 3C3
SEXY   STORIES   FROM
THE WORLD RELIGIONS
Published byLast Gasp Eco-
Kunnles
P.O. Box 410067
San Francisco, CA 94141
Summer is the time when
the big blockbuster comix are
released. Much like movie theatres, the comic book shops arc
filled wilh lots of eye candy lhat
has as much nutritional value as
I:amous Players' popcorn "topping." Anticipating the fan-boy
explosion that inevitably follows
the prison break known as summer vacation, comixbook publishers load the racks wilh as
much crap as they can, hoping
that the sheer volume will deluge
the typical customer into consumption overwhelm. In that
spirit, I will offer two non-crap
reviews of two drastically differ-
where the dust settles.
Firsl up is Colin Upton, a
local chap who has self-published his way into the hearts and
minds of B.C. comix fans. Upton
is part of a new breed of cartoonist who believe that his personal
recollections and perceptions of
people and events arc worthy of
publishing and therefore docs so
himself. His latest comic is a bit
of a departure for Colin in lhat it
is printed in an oversized format
and thus is appropriately entitled
"Colin Upton's BIG THING".
That Colin Upton is a fairly
talented cartoonist is immediately obvious. His thick, bold
lines and his eye for detail allow
him to render exact representations of the episodes he is recreating. The introduction lo his
book is by Harvey Pekar ihc
writer of American Splendor.
The Pekar connection is telling
since Harvey, like Colin, writes
slice o' life comics lhat serve to
entertain and lighten the toad.
These comics can, when lhc>
show the proper characterizations, give an insight inlo the
divine comedy that is mostly
unseen in reel world media. I am
sad to say this is not always the
case in Colin Upton's latest
comic book. In fact, BIG THING
seems like the obvious continu
ation of an earlier series by Upton entitled "Self-Indulgent
Comics."
In the five years or so thai
have been aware of Upton's work
he has amused and confounded
me at various turns. All will agree
lhat the Granville Street Gallery
was wonderful. Funny, scathing,
and adroitly executed, the Gallery bode well for the future, it
being one of the original self
published pieces of ihe small
press explosion. His Socialist
Turtle, now being published here
in Discorder, has been at times
heavy-handed although sometimes insightful and of course his
infamous Happy Ned went far
beyond the realm of (
16 DISCORDER
j Ihe i
■ of wicked
Upton has proved himself a
viable storyteller wilh the modem horror tale of Artistic Licence
and equally at home in the realm
ol adventure fantasy in Buddah
on the Road,
proved Uptor
telling a
is he w
ratlin
Then somewhere
along the way he read a copy of
Pckar's American Splendor and
seemingly   became   convinced
thai
triguing than ai
al.ly
lagim-
This
nl..in
he could
nately is
always the case.
BIG THING "offers ten
pieces all featuring Colin on the
course of his daily life. Although
some of the stories are interesting, a few arc simply not worthy
of being included in this collection. Case in point, the lead story
which has Colin bootlegging
raspberry cider for some underage girls. The conflict in this talc
comes from Colin freaking out
when a ghost car cruises past him
on his way to spot ihe girls their
illicit hooch. Okay...how about
Untitled Incident where Upton is
mistaken for a UBC professor by
a member of the lost marble brigade. These stories are so devoid
of incident that one is tempted to
search for existential
mcandcrings amidst the
pen and ink.
Not that BIG
THING is without merit.
I_atcr in the book we get a
reprise of Famous Bus
Rides in which the 2 a.m.
Fraser  bus   is  dissected
e find oi
certain terms that late
night Mount Pleasant,
isn't Towards.lhe end is
another piece of social
history that would otherwise be lost. We are privy
to attend a New Year's
eve gig featuring met-
alheads Ogre and a brawl
that looks like it chewed
up the most hearty par-
tyers These two pieces
work better than most because they do not depend
solely on Upton's self-
characterization to propel the narrative. Though
while reading these entertaining anecdotes I
found my self longing for
bid, even parody.
Good things can be
said about the last major
piece in the book entitled
Loonies. In it, Upton professes to an extreme distaste for the mentally
handicapped based on
emotional stress he suffered in his childhood.
This kind of self-examination is healthy and
gives the reader an insight into the chap who
has been telling ihem
very little about himself
in ihe preceding pages. Perhaps if
Loonies led off the book instead
of being left till the end we would
have more sympathy for the
iconoclastic cartoonist who initially comes off more as a victim
than a protagonist that we can
identify wilh.
Ali told an uneven effort
from a local fan favourite. BIG
THING shows that Colin Upton
is reaching for the big leagues
(the book is priced at $4.50 cdn)
despair Colin! I predict here in
print, as I have before, lhat some
day you shall rise out of the com -
munal pool for cartoonists and
the lavish praise on the back
cover of BIG THING will repre-
the mmm nun,
AHP TH£ MAP MONK
of fAGATA TEMPl£
but cannot justify the steep cover
price with his autobiographical
tales of tension. A tale from his
imagination with revealing character development and twisting
turns would be the perfect balance for this book. But do nol
Sexy Stories From The
World's Religions is hot off the
press from Last Gasp Eco-Fun-
nies.   Rarely   has   so   heavy   a
howler come up the 1-5 and
crossed over the border. If some
of you remember my ravings
about border censorship in a previous issue, I take il all back.
How this book cleared customs I
can only guess but I am truly
grateful lhal il has.
Here we have religion al its
most repulsive brought lo you by
many angry/funny cartoonists,
including: Mario Hernandez (the
third bro), Mary Fleener (cubo
artist), Mike Matthews & Lydia
Lunch (she writes-he draws),
Steve (Dogboy) Laughler, Krys-
line Kryttre & Michael Furey (he
wriles-shc draws), Dori Seda (b.
1951 d. 1988), Aline Kominsky
(another Weirdo), Joe Sacco (hot
pencil boy), Hiromi Hiraguchi
(SM Sniper/manga master), Naz-
ario (Anarcoma), and editor Er-
ick Gilbert, who has dubbed
himself the von Stroheim of
Underground Comix. Together,
these prime candidates for hedonist engineering have masterfully plotted the downfall of the
world's bogus religions and have
cleverly chosen as their secret
weapon- comix.
Everyone here has an axe to
grind, not least of all former altar
boy Hernandez who plants the
blade firmly in the skull of his
saviour. Everyone has a wonderful time while the sparks
are flying. Leading off
the pack is Mary Fleener
who shares with the
reader the story of Pope
Sergius. Sergius, who in
the year 906 AD had a fifteen year old girl as his
lover, was a prime mover
behind the infamous
Corpse Synod. The previous Pope to Sergius,
Pope Stephen VU, was
unearthed from his grave
and his corpse made to
stand trial for his various
nefarious crimes. I won't
reveal the grizzly bils,
suffice to say that Sergius' love-making is
greatly enhanced by the
whole sordid experience.
Next up is Lydia Lunch
and Mike Matthews who
re-tell the story of St.
Dymphna- Patron Saint
of the Sexually Insane.
Lunch has a wicked way
with words, as her fans
will tell you, and her
teaming up with Matthews has produced an inspired stroke of comix.
Matthews' art stands
league and legion above
the olher artworks in this
anthology. Offering what
can best be described as
more/ better Kurtzman,
Matthews has somehow
combined the best elements of the Checkered
Demon with the hyper-
cartoony renderings
found in (early) Mad
Magazines. Sort of a tight
line merging with ob-
scuro shadow play from a light-
speed pencil. Fast? Funny? This
guy could give lessons in attitude
to S. Clay Wilson...and probably
will.
How About Divine Anarchy
or the Gospei According to Fa
ther Phlegm? Funny and yet ferocious in a howling vein. Then
comes the one-two knockout
punch from the late Dori Seda.
Kicking ass from the grave, Seda
gives the Pig People of Paraguay-
a rollicking metaphor that exposes the shameful attitudes towards ritual sexplay lhat her fellow humans have bathed themselves in. Dori, I miss you. Dori
is followed by Aline Kominsky-
Crumb who seems to be reaching
for the Most-Outrageous Housewife award.
Aline tells us the tale of the
Most Holy Couple in the West-a
couple of sixties rejects who ate
far too much acid when it still
packed a wallop. He begs on the
street sitting in the lotus position
while swallowing a towel which
he later pulls from his bum in an
attempt to cleanse himself. She is
the ultimate recycler who eats
her own shit (purify, purify)
which eventually has the consistency of chocolate pudding.
When he watches her eat her own
shit it drives him inlo a cataleptic
fit. When she eats her own shit it
makes her come. Is this comic
strange enough for you yet?
If not, how about the Ro-
mainc Slocombe image of ihe
beautiful nun and the mad monk
which turns tragic with the punishment of the monk's daughter
or there's the literal translation of
Ecclesiaslicus 9: 4-9 which includes such sage advice as "Do
not confide in a woman, so much
so she has dominion over you"
and "Do not rivet your look on a
young girl, be afraid to walk into
her condemnation's trap."
These stories are awesome
in their goal and in what they
accomplish. They proclaim "If
the end is near, so is the beginning." They announce " Hallelujah-Gobble and pass the anti-
pasto." They say "The history of
religions is peppered wilh senseless violence, pointless massacres, abusive exploitation, abstract authority figures and fantasies aboul ihe afterlife. Religion
has provided easy justifications
for the most horrible negations of
human life, organized murder,
genocide and slavery. Still, any
predator with video access rings
in big bucks and devoted followers. Will they ever learn? So
enough with the hypocrisy,
enough wilh the pious lies, here
is religion at its most repulsive
There is no doubt in my well
reasoned mind lhat this is comix
entertainment. That it is brutal
and enraged is only too true but it
is also, ultimately, compassionate and caring in its attempts to
reveal, and thus expose, this collective madness called religion.
In the Sixties comix like Tales of
the Leather Nun and Binky
Brown Meets The Holy Virgin
Mary were radical indictments of
religious intolerance and bigoted
persecution in the name of God.
Welcome to the Terrordome.
Welcome to the Nineties. If
comix like this one keep appearing on the stands at my local
comix outlet, chances are the
Nineties will make the Sixties
look and feel like an alumni pic- FIRST CHOICE STEAK &
SEAFOOD BUFFET
143 - 13757 72nd Avenue,
Surrey
Whoa. Heavy bad trip
here. Although, judging by
the massive line-ups outside,
you enter unprepared...but
there again, there's no accounting for avarice. Greed
over gastronomy any day.
I cannot adequately convey the WEIRDness here. It's
as if every last Surrey Mutant-Person simultaneously
decided to go out for dinner
and ended up at First Choice.
The lunch buffet is $5.95
a head and the dinner, $7.95.
The latter differs from the
former only in that it features
a few more items, such as
Sweet and Sour Spareribs.
Waitaminute, did I say "features"?? - I meant, um- ah...
"sustains"... "harbours"...
"breeds"... "grows" - you get
the idea.
Pop, coffee, tea (generic
bulk teabags; don't look for
Stash here), milk; all are for
the taking in the bottomless-
cup format, and a wasteland
of sad-looking desserts are
similarly unrestricted.
The main buffet consists
of one long, straight, arid
trough starting with a big tray
o' buns, all baked together in
one slab with sorta dotted
"cut-here" lines criscrossin'
it.   Sprinkled   with   sesame
HeirsfKitchen
B£ANZ
'TODAY
seeds, these buns bear a passing resemblance to foccacia...
"passing" as soon as you
chomp into dough the consistency (and flavour, I'd
reckon) of heavy-duty Styro-
foam. So, no hope for the
buns; on to the "real" food.
Ya. Cruise quickly past a
limp, festering expanse of
meat and meat-based delicacies, and DON'T, whatever
you do, try the lasagna, I warn
thee.
Right down near the end,
just   when   you've   almost
given up all hope, you hit the
Sweet and Sour Spareribs,
and THEN you completely
give up all hope. But no, after
that there's some rice thing
with cashew nuts, though
sadly, also containing meat
chunks, and after that, fried
rice with tofu bits; a curiously
blackish mess of chop suey;
and a wacky chow mein concoction. Vegetarians take
heart (at least, till you move
on to the next station which
houses the turkey and prime
rib). Oh yeah, sure, there's a
salad bar in there too somewhere - I even saw nacho
chips, though no other relevant fixin's; saves on the calories, I guess - but for the most
part it's insipid and uninspiring.
You grab a water. Head
for a table. Sit down. Start
chewing. The bun disappoints. The black chop suey,
ifyou can disregard its tint, is
edible. The fried rice 'n' tofu
doesn't make you barf.
The best of this sordid lot
turns out to be the kooky chow
mein stuff. Noodles, green
pepper slices, some kinda
cabbage-y product, and - wait
for it - a green residue on your
plate. Pale fluorescent green,
very delicate, very aesthetically-pleasing, understated,
tasteful. Yum! I even contemplated a second helping of this
luminescent ambrosia but,
being in a wildly masochistic
mood, decided on another
piece o' bun instead. Actually
it was not sexual thrills, but a
vague hope that the darned
things might taste better given
another chance, that motivated me. They didn't.
After we watched yet
another straight-outta-The-
Far-Side fellow diner gambol
past our table, my brother
remarked "It's like - every
once in a while, you see a
normal person, and then it's
back to..." "- Reality" I sup
plied. Considering this is in
Surrey, the statement wasn't
contradictory. Atmosphere,
people, ATMOSPHERE, is
what you wanna go here for.
The food certainly is a letdown, but the atmosphere is
pure unadulterated Surrey,
1990.
It's amazing, eye-opening, terrifying, to witness the
urgency your average suburbanite can be plunged headlong into by a $7.95 buffet.
"All you can eat" - perhaps
the epitaph of the 20th-century food-world?
Wacked right out by the
clientele, I was possessed of a
crazy urge to venture into the
wasteland of desserts. Green
or red jello, vanilla cake, tart
shells filled with a pale yellow, unidentifiable fruit...
Hm... Back I came with the
least despondent of the lot,
chocolate cake. Straight outta
the box and topped with a few
weakling imitation chocolate
chips. Gulped down with a
cup of coffee, not completely
guaranteed to revolt.
Okay. First Choice Steak
'n' Seafood Buffet. It's away
in the back of beyond, in one
of them new pastel malls
behind the Liquor Store in
Newton. I could call this place
the Bino's of Surrey buffet-
dom, but even that wouldn't
do it justice. I mean, heck: It's
ALL YOU CAN EAT!! tt
ATTRITION
Recollection 84-89
A 16 song 'best of.'
I INDUSTRIAL - GOTH
prqfekt
iqafoud
;cjjo8-uiooiS
jvauacpa
i jvt^jsnpui
JULY 1990 17 ■M *•] _ [r_IM :(»I»I«I»I»W»_Ti 4-«_■■
VARIOUS ARTBT5    UkeaGH.I Wart Vfou to Keep Comrig Gior no Poetry Systems
CONSOUDAIED
MythofRock
NCK CAVE a IHE BAD SEEDS       TheGoodSon
Enigma/Mute
NITZER EBB
Showtime
WEA/GefTen
PUBUC ENEMY
Fear of a Black Planet
CBS/Def Jam
PLUNDERPHOMC
Ptunderphonlc
Fun Music
ABOVE THE LAW
LMrt Like Hustlers
CBS/Epic/Ruthless
...WTTH THE THRILL KILL KULT
Confessions of a Knife
Cargo/Wax Trox
ATTRITION
Recolection 84-6*
Profekt
THE RESIDENTS
TheKingandl
Enigma
AU
TroX>kxer
THE FLUID
Glue
SubPop
FUGAZI
Cargo/Disc hord
CATERWAUL
Portent Hue
MCA/IRS
LI X1ANGTING
Chine: L'artdu On
SRI/Ocora
n.GRUMH
A Hard Days Night
;argo/Ptay It Again Sam
WEDDINGS PARTIES ANYTHIr-
K3 The Big Dont Argue
WEA
SOCIAL DISTORTION
Social Distortion
CBS
ATRIBECALLEDQUEST People'sknlinchveTravelsathePalhsotRhythm   Zomba
BOO-YAA T.R.I.B.E.
New Funky Nation
VICA/lstand/4th & B way
THE FALL
Extricate
PolyGfam/Fontana
CASSANDRA COMPLEX
Cyberpunks
Corgo/Wax Trax
LOU REED &JOHN CALE
Songs tor Drela
WE A/Sire
COFFIN BREAK
C/Z
TRIP SHAKESPEARE
Across the Universe
A&M
AFGHAN WHIGS
SubPop
NINE POUND HAMMER The
Aud. the Blood, ond the Bears                 Wangheod
THAT PETROL EMOTION
Chemlcrazy
A&M/Virgin
The Word as Law
ETTA JAMES
Stickln' to my Guns
MCA/Island
LENE LOVICH
March
Justin Time/Pathfinder
VASILISK                                               Aequo               Ml
sico Maxima Magnetica
VARIOUS ARTISTS
This is the New Beat!
EDDIE -CLEANHEAD- VINSON*... 80 ssos otthe Blues. Vok.
mell         BMG/Bluebird
PROFESSOR GRIFF 4 THE LAS1
..   Pawns in the Game
Luke Skyywalker
NOISE UNIT
Grinding into Emptiness
Cargo/Wax Trax
aUE AEROPLANES
Swagger
MCA/Chrysalis
DWINE STYLER W/THE SCHEKrf
E...     Word Power        CBS/Epic/Rhyme Syndicate
MCILWAINE * SMITH
DEAD MILKMEN
Metaphysical Graftitti
Enigma
FRIGHTWIG
Phone Sexy
Boner
HUNTING LODGE
Carnivora!           S/W
Operatlons/Permis de...
THE DAMNED
Final Domnation
3 MUSTAPHAS 3
Heart of Uncle
A&M/Ryko/Ace
ALAIN THIBAULT
SRI/Diffusion 1 Media
COTTAGE INDUSTRY
Spin
Ikon
LADYSMITH BLACK MAMBAZ
O Two Worlds One Heart
WEA
PSYCHIC TV
owords thee Infinite Beat
Wax Trax
HOUYNEAR
Sky Dances
Redwood
BIG MILER&THE BLUES MAC
IINE IVe at Athabasca Um
ersity     WEA/Stony Plain
GREEN DAY
MR. LEE
Get Busy
BMG/Jlve/Zomba
CONTROLLED BLEEDING
Cargo/Wax Trax
FRANK MORGAN
MCA/Island/An titles
THE HOUSE OF LOVE
The House of Love
PolyGram
HaveaSwig
Crypt
JAU MUSA JAWARA & MUSIC
IANS   Vbsirrako
Denon/Hannibal
CARMEN MCRAE
Carmen Sings Monk
BMG
BILL FRISSELL
Is that You?
WEA/Elektra
SADUS
Cargo/Sodus
Uveondrect
MCA
THE JACK RUBIES                  '
ee the Money in my Smile
TVT
MC. SHAN
Ploy it Again. Shan
WEA/CokJ Chain1
JAWBREAKER
Shredder
BUCKWHEAT ZYDECO       W
iere There's Smoke There's F
ire                MCA/Island
DUKE ELLINGTON
BMG/Bluebird
IN THE NURSERY
Counterpoint
Cargo/Wax Trax
MCGARRIGIE8 BOURNE
Variety Uncording, 3
CBC
VARIOUS ARTISTS
Groove Yard
MCA/Island
JIMMY SOMEIA/LLE
Reod my Lips
PolyGram/FFRR
REVERB MOTHERFUCKERS Tv*
■etve Swinging Signs of the Z
GREEN PAJAMAS
39/Smooth
Lookout!
STEEL POLE BATH TUB
Lurch
Boner
WmmmmWLm^ \ [•] l\ _M ll*I*\U «
TACKHEAD                             'D-molWon House" )2'
TVT
SKINNY PUPPY                                 -Warlock' 72*
Nettwerk
HUT                                             'Get Stuck' tr
Nettwerk
MORRISSEY                    •November Spawned a Monster'12
WEA/Ske
NEGAZIONE                 Sempre in BmcoVLo Nostra Vita'T
We Bite
PD-2                                                  Surprise- 12'
JROO
SAMIAM                   loo Many Buttons'/Iked o-Waitmg-7-
FARE                                 -Break the Grip of Shame' 12'   PolyGiam/Tommy Boy
MC 900n JESUS W/DJ ZERO   Truth is out of Style' )_*
HDV                                 -Pimp of the Microphone-7_"
l»ba
NEGAZIONE                            -Behind the Doof J_ *
WeBrte
THE MR. T EXPERIENCE            So LongSuckerVZeio?- T
AJAX                                         -Mind the Gap'TT
Cargo/Wax Trax
NINE INCH NAILS                      'HeodHke a Hole' IT
TVT
TREACHEROUS JAYWALKERS        lo -to Borvta EP
SST
AMMA                                        'Belly Dance'12"
PoryGram/Philips
EQ                                          Vut your body in if 12'
Infinite Beat
PASKA                            Super Double Mega Maxi Hits'7'
Bad Vug um
ElECTRIBE 101                          7a*ing with Myser IT
PolyG ram/Vertigo
SHINEHEAD                                     'Fornty Affair 12'
WEA/Elektra
SALT-N-PEPA                                 •Block's Magic' 12'
PotyGram/FFRR
WHITE BOY MIKE AND DJ   'Something to Dance to' TT
Jive
GAME FOR VULTURES    -Goin'my way'/'INeed Vfou'7*
SNAP                                            7he Power' \2'
BMG/Arista
EZEE POSSE                               'Love on Love' IT
A&M /Virgin
THE MONO MEN                 '1 Don't Care'/'Jezeber 7"
MENGELE                            •Senseless Extermination'T
Bod Vug um
MAIN SOURCE                             -Watch Roger' IT
Actual
PSYCHOTC TURNBUCKLES       The Goodtimes..'7'
Shake/Rattlesnake
THE SUBJECTS                                Ytord of God IT
2 World Productions
HONEST ROBBERS                     "Join to my Piano '12'
GDM/Tasmania
WOOD CHILDREN      'Sweets for the BHnd-/'Manniple' 12
REVOLTING COCKS                       -Physicor IT
Cargo/Wax Trax
ELECTR'BE 101           Tell Me When the Fever Ended' 12'
PoryGrom/Vertigo
GRANI HART                                'A. 0/My Senses' 12'
SST
INSPIRAL CARPETS                       Cool As Fuck EP
Mute/Cow
■__MU_I»7:VM___H
ARE  YOU  SERIOUS?   MUSIC  8 00AM-
1200NOON
The newest new music:    Ugetl. Dho-
morrt. Schnlttke. lutoslowski. Birtwistle.
etc   Information on concerts, recordings, composers
THE BRUNCH REPORT 12:00-12:15PM
the CiTR News. Sports and Weather Department!
THE ROCKERS SHOW 12:15-J0OPM
Reggae. Rock Steady and Ska with
George Barrett
THE SUNDAY NEWS MAC.... S 00 5 30PM
CiTRs In-depth current affairs/news
magazine show Coverage and analysis of UBC News plus news and sports,
doily editorial commentary, entertainment reviews and reports on events
here at UBC. all in a comprehensive
and comprehensible magazine package And we promise, notraffic reports.
HEARSAY 5:30.00PM
CiTRs literary arts program wants YOU
to submit your works for on-air performance or reading (you or us.your choice).
DE-COMPOSITIONS/ ELECTRONIC
SMOKE SIGNALS 4:00-8 OOPM
Information, news, interviews, political
anaryis from the global cultures of resistance hosted by Horocb de la Cueva.
alternating Sundays with electic music
and caustic alphabets/spoken word
RADIO FREE AMERICA 10PM-MIDNIGHT
Join host Dave Emory and colleague
Nip Tuck for some extraordinary political research guaranteed to make you
think twice. Bring your tape deck and
IwoC-Ws Originally broadcast on KFJC
(Los Altos.CA)
IN THE CRIP OF INCOHERENCY    12-
H..[«]_l>7_Y-s-*___i
THE MORNING SHOW 7.30-8.15AM
From the famous siren to the not-so-famous BBC Radio News Reel, wake up
with The CiTR Morning Show. Information to go: news, sports, weather and
'scenic view' (reod: rodor) reports,
features, enfertoinment reviews and
Alberta Hog prices Weekdays!
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS 8:15-
11:00AM
Are you blue? Get Brown! Your favourite brownsters James and Peter offer a savoury blend of the familiar and
exotic In an excitingly luscious blend of
aural delights! Tune in and enjoy eoch
weekly brown plate special.
THE AFTERNOON REPORT 1:00-1:15PM
Lunch goes down better with The Afternoon Report. Tune In for no frills news.
your boots to. With yer host-poke. JefT
THE UNHEARD MUSIC 3-5 00PM
Demo Director Date Sawyer provides
some   insights ir"    **
"Not for anger and despair but for peace and a kind of home."
Suicide note of Lewis Hill, Founder of KPFA Berkeley - 1957
great alto saxophonist and
with Charles Lloyd (flute and tenor sax)
recorded in the mid-60s at Shelrys
Manne-Hole. a club owned by drummer Shelly Manne.
23th Lambert-HendrickJ and Row: one
of the most popular vocal groups in
Jazz. Great singing and wonderful arrangements. From their first Columbia
album (1959-40).
30th Arlo Summit: four great alto saxophonists together: Lee Konltz. Phil
Woods, and lesser-knowns Leo Wright
ond Pony Poindexter. a wonderfully
OPEN COUNTRY JOY 12:00-4:XAM
All the tastiest LUNGBUTTER with Keith, a
confused but friendly person.  You will
be exterminated!
SPORTS DIGESTS 30-6 00PM
Join the CiTR Sports Department for an
the latest in Thunderbird varsity sports
' action and sports everywhere else for
that matter. Interviews, too!
FACING THE MUSIC 6 00-7 00PM
A musical/informational hour wtth an
emphasis on topics related to awareness and sanity.
THE JAZZ SHOW 9:00PM-12:00AM
Vancouver's longest running prime time
jazz program. Hosted by the ever-
suave Gavin Walker. Features at 11.
2th Parisian Sketch** by Max Roach
(who also wrote the title suite). This
overlooked group (3 horns. 2 rhythm)
had a fresh sound that is still relevant
9th The New Trittano: solo piano by one
of the great innovators of modem Jazz
Lennie Tristano.  Many consider this album to be a 'desert Island* record.
16th  Cannonball Addertey Uvel  The
-n Phoenix. Arizona: The Si
■___U*1>7:l.tt___
THE MORNING SHOW 7-30-8:15AM
And he s not telling you which is which!
THE CiTR DINNER REPORT 6-5 30PM
See Monday for details
B.C. FOLK 5 30-7 OOPM
The thoughts and music of B.C. folk
artists, hosted by Barb Waldern and
Wayne Davis.
AVANT-PIC 700-900PM
Avant-garde   thuggery   with   Pete
Lutwyche. First Tuesday eoch month:
World Music Exploration.
IV_*»J_|:M»J_1.K1
WHITE NOISE S:15-10:OOAM
The bastard love child of 70s progressive and 80s electronic has changed
time slots!. Improvised fusions of traditional rhythms from oround the globe.
Burroughs. FVnchon. "unreleased live
sets' and more. Hosted by Chris
Brayshaw.
MID-DAY PHALLACY 11:00-1:00PM
Daisy checked out and her evil twin
Tania now inflcts the airwaves with
eclecticism. If its phallic, it plays. Check
out special children's program July 11
for frolicking f riskiness and Happy B-Day
America, we love you.
LIVE FROM THE KNITTING FACTORY 6:00-
7:00PM
Concerts recorded in the fall of 1989 in
the heart of the New York arts district.
JIGGLE  7 00-900PM
Mikey's here. Gavin s here. Six years of
combined DJ experience; 40 years of
lovin1 experience. Games, hiking, drugs.
orgies, breakfast all day:   an odoles-
PERMANENT CULTURE SHOCK 9:00-
12:00AM
Permanent (per-md-ndnt): tasting, intended to last, indefinitely;
Culture (kdhchdr): (1) the civilisation of
a given race or nation at a give n time or
over all time: (2) the raising of microorganisms in specially prepared media
for scientific study:
Shock Cshak): (1) violent collision, concussion; (2) sudden and disturbing
mental ond physical impressions.
_BI__lJ;M»7_Y£fl_
NOW YOU HAS JAZZ 8:15-10:00AM
Join Tommy Paley now on Thursday's
with an extended one hour feature! A
morning of stories, anecdotes. JAZZ, and
18  DISCORDER HANFORD NUCtEAR PIZZA PIE    10:00-
11:00 AM
Ran outta string cheese... went to get
more... missed 3 weeks In June os a
result... forgot the Pibb... gotta go bock
and get It... not here the 19th and 26th...
stf the OR-to-AK show tho1. reaHy...
Rowena's sorry.
NOW YOU HAS JAZZ FEATURE 11:00PM-
5th Shuffle Demons
12th Charlie Mingus
19th Sonny Ro»ns
24th Jock de Johnette
-ERIC—
THE CiTR DINNER REPORT 500-630PM
See Monday for details.
ARTS CAFE 6:30-4:00 PM
Be updated, be wtth It. be Informed
about Art. theatre, fin and ony other
cultural event happening In Vancouver. With Antje!
TOP OF THE lOPS 6:0O-7OOPM
Trlnl Lopez. Ronnie Self, and The Phantom ol love you. Marc Coulevtn brings
Rock n Rol to Its roots.
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD RADIO HELL
9:00-10:30PM
Peter, Andy and sometimes Ed Introduce the »ve bands at 9:30pm.
Sth The Picasso Set
12th Toxic Jimmy
19th Dirt
26th Evan Symons Uneven Steps
SOUND OF REALITY 1030PM-1:00AM
Experimental Radio, wtth Vision! Featuring envkonmentol sounds, found noises,
information/propaganda and the
worlds ethnic and experimental musics
fromtheauditor/fringe. UvelContributions welcome. Practitioner Anthony
Roberts.
MEGABLAST1 1:00-4:00 AM
Compoct Discs and concepts on au-
torepeat. band specials, turntable feed-
backgammon courtesy uncle mlfty.
stagnating creativity: welcome to tate
night radio where the Ghetto Boys ore
considered artistic.
___■_(;•] I »J:1.K___H
MOVING IMAGES 10:30-11:00AM
Join host Ken Mocintyre as he takes you
'   jr through tl
___Kf:Ulk W:\_aM
THE SATURDAY EDGE SAM-NOON
Steve Edge hosts Vancouver's biggest
and best ocoustlc/ioots/rogue folk music radto show. Now In Its sbrth year on
CITRt Roots music from around the
world, new releases, studta guests, and
the World Cup FootboJ Report at 11:30.
POWERCHOR0 12:15-3 OOPM
Vancouver's only true metal show wtth
the underground speed to mainstream
metat local demo tapes. Imports and
other rarities  Gerald Ratttehead and
Metal Ron do the damage
IN EFFECT 3:00-6:0OPM
The Hip Hop Beat brought to you by DJs
NielScobie.ChceBafkerondBilTzotzolis.
THE YAP CAP 5:30-6 OOPM
Hear figures in the Aits world talc about
thek works, other peoples works and
Hosted by Antje Rauwerda
THE NEW AFRICAN SHOW 6:00- 10:00PM
World of Africa Dance Party
back tot of life with film n«
tunes. And Disco, too!
ITS NOT EASY BEING GREEN 1:15-2.30PM
The greenest of the CiTR DJ crop try
togerminate and take root on the air.
Ifyou ore Interested in CiTR programming possibilities, phone the Program
Director at 228-3017.
ABSOLUTE VALUE OF NOISE - PART ONE
23O-330PM AND PART TWO 4:00-5:00PM
Found sounds, tape loops, compositions of organized ond unorganized
aurallty. power electricians and sound
colloge. Live experimental music. 100%
Canadian Industrialism.
HOME   VIDEO   INTERNATIONAL   645-
HOMEBASS 9PM-12:30 AM
Turn your own home into your very own
club. Get out your flared pants and put
on your dancing shoes and prepare
yourself for 3 1/2 hours of house, new
beat and a lift le disco and.rap th rown in
to liven things up. Dope jams and fresh
beats for a groovy evening with DJ
ie wheels of steel. NewShow!
'e the chidren of
jr beautiful world
WmmWMHtt^m
CITR provides free aktime for Community Access by groups and individuals. If
you or your group would Ike to say
something to someone somewhere,
please caH the Program Dkector.
_HWT'J^fll
CITR wants you to become Involved
with your friendly UBC Radio Station
which broadcasts at 1800 watts to the
campus ond beyond. Opportunities
abound! Wheeeel Programming, pro
ducing, editing, witting, engineering.
operatlng.announclng.hostlng.etcetc
etc. Come by the studios during normal
office hours. Or phone us.
ARTS ANTJE RAUWERDA
DEMOS/CASSETTES DALE SAWYER
MOBILE SOUND LINDA SCHOLTEN
MUSIC.. LLOYD UUAMA. RANDY IWATA
NEWS KM TRAINOR
PRESIDENT ROBYNN IWATA
PRODUCTION MIKE LYSENG
PROGRAMMING RANDY IWATA
PROMOTIONS DORRITTA FONG
STATION MANAGER .. LINDA SCHOLTEN
TRAFFIC TOMMY PALEY
VICE PRESIDENT BARB ELGOOO
VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR.. BILL BAKER
BUSINESS UNE 228-3017
DJ UNE 228-2487 (228-CiTR)
NEWS UNE 222-2487 (222-CiTR)
FAX UNE 228-6093
STAND IN UNE ROOM 233. SECOND
FLOOR OF THE STUDENT UNION BUILDING. 6138 SUB BOULEVARD. UNIVERSITY
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. VANCOUVER. BC
V6T2AS.
CITR wi once ogaki be sending representatives to the National Campus/
Community Radio Association Conference, this year to be held In Calgary In
thetastweekof July. Ifyouoryourband
would like to have your music distributed to over thirty campus and community radio stations from throughout
the country, CiTR wi gladly hand-deliver your stuff to Calgary. Drop off
cassettes, ohbumms. press releases, and
other paraphernalia at CiTR offices
before Friday Jury 20 to ensure their
inclusionwtththeCiTRdelegates. Phone
Robynn at 228-3017 for more Info.
CITR presents the first annual rap contest to be held on August 31 and September 1 In the SUB Balkoom here on
the UBC campusl You can win prizes!
Categories: MC... DJ... MC&DJ... MC.
DJ & Dancers... Alogesl To register or
for mof- —
3017.
jlCiTRal
_____________fc__U<
.^^.fc^.1.1"
L-*-_____■_■
■■)
trlJtlHVOI..:
t .__■_■_■
TANKHOG
-Reptilion*
2-song demo
TOUCH - GO'S
"Beaver Inn, Bellingham"
SPECIAL ICE
■Rock-a-talk*
MARILIA
The Boat and the Volcano'
Riverboat Goddess
PAULA REMPEL
"1 Ride my..."
2-song demo
NO FUN
"Open Letter"
CROUP 49
"House of Death"
BANG TWANG
"AH of this to you"
2-song demo
BARON VON FOKKER
"Post-modem Youth"
8-song demo
MARY
"Loving Ivy"
3-song demo
TANKHOG
2-song demo
VIDEO BAR-I-QUE
"The Stegasaurus Stomp"
6-song demo
TT. RACER
"1990V
WALKING SCARECROW
"Voice that Crips"
Out ol Ihe Snakspit
RHYTHM ACTIVISM
"Polski Flat"        Perogys, Pasta, and Liberty
PLANET OF SPIDERS
"A Place 1 Found"
HOOVER EFFECT
nto Stepha nie's Room" The 18
h Wonder of the World
JOJOKA
"Dogs Awaiting"
Jojoka
DAYGLO TADPOLES
"Do 1 Dare"
Gunpowder
LIST OF MRS. ARSON
"The Load Holgen"
/90B
LAST RAY PRODUCTIONS LTD    "Imaginary love"
3-song demo
NIGHTSTAIKERS
3-song demo
NEIGHBOURS
"Footsteps*
live in '79
LUDWIGS
This in not a Demo!
9*"4! (A CARTOON SWEAR)        "Weak Link"
4-song demo
VIDEO BAR-B-QUE
"Subway 6pm*
RHYTYHM ACTIVISM
"Condo Vampire"        Ur
togement pour une...
MC TERROR T
1 -song demo
SWANYARD
"Believe"
TEN COMMANDMENTS
"She ain't no use to me"
BRUCE A A THE SECULAR
ATAVISTS "By Request"
Cheap Release
BAMFF
NOVALTONE
"A Question ol Love"
PLANET OF SPIDERS
"Carnhral"
6-song demo
BILLCOSTIN
"24 Hour Sky"
Secret of the North
DEATH SENTENCE
"Eye on You" Vancouver Rocks Compilation
EXCITED FIRST DAUGHTER             "Sand Kings"
6-song demo
ROOTS ROUNDUP
Cet Rooted
THE HERETICS
The Heretics
HOOVER EFFECT
•Zombie"      The 18th Wonder of the World
ROUTE 665
ROUGHAGE
"Jah in Vi»tnam"/"The Axe"
Mystery Dick
MARY
"Heaven's Gate"
3-song demo
HOWE SOUND
"Somebody Girl"
4-song demo
JIMMY ROY'S FIVE STAR.
"Everybody's Talkin'"
6-song demo
LAST WILD SONS
"Around Town"
THE WAMMEE
"Send you away"
SNAKESQUIRT
"Thinking of Scotch"
Songs lor Casualties
UNEVEN STEPS
"Censor the Bible"   Whoop Whoop Whoopah!
SMUGGLERS
"Up and Down"
3-song demo
LUDWIGS
"She was Real"
This is not a Demo!
WATCH CHILDREN
"Kinda Retarded"
9-song demo
Y.O.Y.
"It's too Late"
THE WORST
"The Creepy Thing"
2-song demo
«#*».! (A CARTOON SWEAR)          "Long Face"
Bright Red Paint
WHIRLEES
"Sharman Edward Johnson"
Mood Swing
MC TERROR T
"Rappin' Rhymin' Rhythm
PATRIK SAMPLER
"(What it _)"
Cut M3/(03)
WHITE PICKET FRENZY
•Acid Rain"
Big Team; Little Me
It looks as if Paizley Productions' experiment wilh the
Lux Theatre Saturday nights
has been successful-at least the
all-ages shows are now booked
through July. The doors open
at midnight and the cover is $5.
(It's worth going if only to support an alternative to the nause-
atingly frequent "showcase"
nights at certain local clubs,
where bands do their own pro-
motion-at their own expense-
and usually play on badly
planned bills.)
64 Funnycars' new 4-
song EP is just out, and fans of
flat vinyl can be assured that it
is the 7" variety (the hand-coloured sleeve is a nice touch,
too). The Funnycars also plan
to make a mail-order catalogue
available, as an insert with the
EP or on request, that will list
all kinds of local (and near-local) releases. Any bands lhat
are interested in being in the
catalogue, and having their
tapes or records sent out to potential fans, can write Eric
Lowe c/o Bruiser Boy Products,
2404 Eastdowne Road, Victoria, V8R 5P7.
And now, for this month's
tapes:
Nightstalkers-"Images."
Imagine a band made up of a
40-year-old singer, a surfer, the
drummer from Planet of Spiders, and the bassist from the
Smugglers (here on lead guitar). Now imagine that, in the
ten or so months they've been
together, they've written more
than fifty songs. After imagining all this, I found the tape to
be a pleasant surprise. It would
be going too far to swallow the
band's own description-'60s
punk/pop meets '70s punk (a la
Ramones) and creates a "fresh
new sound for the '90s"-but this
is a good song with nice production, refreshing backup
vocals and handclaps thrown in
for    emphasis. And    the
Nightstalkers sound a lol
tighter and more confident than
when I've seen them live (at
SFU with Marshmallow Overcoat and at the Cinderella Ballroom at a Nardwuar show). Perhaps Dave of the Smugglers
didn't play with them those
nights. Another selection from
this very enjoyable 3-song cassette, the authentic surf-sounding "Sombreeo Beach," gets
played on Much Music.
Intoxicators-"Death & War."
This will probably be the last
tape from the Intoxicators as
Ihey appear on this song and
their earlier offering (from this
same tape), "Mighty Idy." And
the truth is that I'm not terribly
sorry to hear about their decision. Perhaps it's only because
they haven't been together for
very long, but when I've seen
them play, I haven't thought the
band really jelled-"Death &
War" sounds much the same,
with the instruments and vocals
somehow not complementing
each other very well. The song
itself is okay and definitely fits
the "rockin"' category, but I
still think that the Intoxicators
aren't yet up to being the sum of
iheir parts.
@#*&! (Cartoon Swear)-
"Weak Link." "Weak Link" is
one of Cartoon Swear's more
memorable songs-unfortu-
nately, like the olher three
songs on this tape, it really suffers from poor production.
While they've never been an
exceptionally clean sounding
band, these songs give the impression of having been recorded in a big cement room,
which doesn't help to make
them any more memorable.
Y.O.Y.-"It*s Too Late." Once
again, a band whose description of themselves doesn't seem
quite right—in this case the
comparisons are to INXS, the
Smithereens, and Replacements. What they seem to be
lacking, in contrast with these
other bands, is a certain spark,
perhaps of originality.    These
former members of Linear B.,
Dekka Dolls, The Love Weasels and Spotlight winning Innocent HI are unquestionably
good musicians, yet don't project enough energy onto the
tape. With their thin clean
sound (even recorded, they
sound like a 3-piece), and rather
familiar lyrics, what they might
really be able to use is the addition of some noise. But I suspect that Y.O.Y. are in a difficult position-while they sound
too close to mainstream, and
not especially original, to the
"alternative" ear, they must
sound dangerously "alternative" to the Top 40 types. And
probably, like most bands in
this situation, they're not going
to care much what people like
Discorder reviewers have to
say about them.
Mary - "Loving Ivy," "Heaven's Gate." Another pleasant
surprise, the key to this tape is
production: both songs make
good use of noise without sacrificing hooks and melody, and
dynamics without losing
power. There really is a wall of
sound here, especially in "Loving Ivy," where the constant
repetition of a little riff underneath all sorts of noisy, growly
stuff makes for a dangerous
kind of pop catchiness. And in
"Heaven's Gate" some very effective feedback (reminiscent
of early Jesus and Mary Chain)
shows up just where it's
needed. It's rare to hear something sound so clean and contagious while evil and noisy.
Death Sentence-"Eye On
You." Once again, lots of well-
produced loudness, yet this
time the song itself isn't so
memorable. You've got to
expect that this song (from the
Vancouver Rocks compilation,
which is mostly metal-type
rock) should be in that ever-
increasing blurry zone between
hardcore and metal, and Death
Sentence (quite possibly with
none of its original, punk rock
members) doesn't let us down.
The snarling vocals are a vast
improvement over those way-
too-familiar falsetto shrieks
that some bands equate with
harder rock and roll, and the
guitars sound just as they
should, very loud. There is a
great deal of power here... the
only real problem is that the
song doesn't seem to really find
itself until close to the hard cold
ending.
No Fun-"Open Letter."    No
doubt the former Official Folk-
rock Duo of Expo 86 have realised that songs like "Be Like
Us" and numerous olher CiTR
hits are just too subtle for certain elected leaders, and have at
last decided to be perfectly
clear. Well, even the Zalm
couldn't possibly misunderstand this one. Dave, Paul, and
Pico make some pretty reasonable suggestions (i.e. reading,
rather than thumping, a bible)
as well as some tough criticisms. Sigh, if the premier
would only listen.... _?
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20  DISCORDER DISCORDER  DATEBOOK
1 SUNDAY CITR presents MCA/
IRS artists Caterwaul with guests
Bruce A ft the Secular Atavists at the
Town Pump... Sun City Glrlsat Arrest
Studio... Jack Lavin ft the Damons
Jam Session at the Yale... Whoever
Says tha Truth Shall Die (7:30pm) and
Accattone (8:45pm) at Pacific Cinematheque... Sleeping Beauty (2:30 &
7:30pm) and Do the Right Thing
(9:45pm) at SUBTheatre..The Best ol
the Best ol Cannes Advertising
Festival (7:30 & 9:30pm) at the Star-
2 MONDAY Canada Day Aftermath
with Tankhog with guests The Wheal
Chiels and The Grand Poobahs at the
Town Pump... Jack Lavin ft the Demons Jam Session at the Yale... Les
Amazones de Guinea at Saturno...
Whoever Says the Truth Shall Die
(7:30pm) and Accattone (8:45pm) at
Pacific Cinematheque... Jean de
Florette (7:00pm) and Manon ol
Spring (9:15pm) at the Starlight...
3 TUESDAY Catherine Wheel at
the Town Pump... Charlie Musslewhite
at the Yale... UBC Music for Summer
Evenings Concert Series with Robert
Silverman (piano) and French Tickner
(narrator) at the UBC Recital Hall (8pm,
free)... Love and Other Arrangements
at the Kitsilano Theatre... Jean de
Florette (7:00pm) and Manon of
Spring (9:15pm) at the Starlight...
4 WEDNESDAY MCA artists Jill
Sobuls at the Town Pump... Charlie
Musslewhite at the Yale... CITR Hot
Wednesdays In the Pit Pub... Love and
Other Arrangements at the Kitsilano
Theatre... Gyas Ago (Tha Way il Began) opens at the Van East Cultural
Centre (8:30pm)... Chilsu and Mansu
(7:30pm) and Ths Whale Hunter
(9:35pm) at Pacific Cinematheque...
Catch-22 (7:30 & 9:45pm) at SUB
Theatre... Kiss ol the Spider Woman
(7:00pm) and Apartment Zero
(9:30pm) atthe Starlight..
5 THURSDAY The Presentation
Hall Jazz Band ol New Orleans at the
86 Street... BMG artists The Church
with guests MCA artists Blue
Aeroplanes at the Commodore... The
Stoaters and Blackthorn at the Town
Pump... Charlie Musslewhite at the
Yale... UBC Music for Summer Evenings Concert Series featuring chamber music at the UBC Recital Hall (8pm,
free)... CiTR Cool Thursdays in the Pit
Pub... Love and Other Arrangements
at the Kitsilano Theatre... Gyas Ago
(The Way il Began) continues at the
Van East Cultural Centre (8:30pm)...
Chilsu and Mansu (7:30pm) and The
Whale Hunter (9:35pm) at Pacific Cine
matheque... Flashback (7:30 &
9:45pm) at SUB Theatre... Kiss ol the
Spider Woman (7:00pm) and Apartment Zero (9:30pm) at the Starlight...
6 FRIDAY Rounder artist Sleepy
La Beet with Herald Nix at the Town
Pump... Charlie Musslewhite at the
Yale... Grapes ol Wrath at the Commodore (7pm all ages show, 10pm drinkin'
show)... Love and Other Arrangements
at the Kitsilano Theatre... Gyas Ago
(The Way it Began) continues at the
Van East Cultural Centre (8:30pm)...
Cellica Festival opens at New Brighton
Park (12-11pm)... Forbidden Planet
(7:30pm) and 2001: A Space Odyssey
(9:25pm) at Pacific Cinematheque...
7 SATURDAY Edmonton's Ninth
Configuration at the Lux... Sleepy La
Beel with Herald Nix at the Town
Pump... Charlie Musslewhite at the
Yale... Love and Other Arrangements
at the Kitsilano Theatre... Gyas Ago
(The Way it Began) continues at the
Van East Cultural Centre (8:30pm)...
Cellica Festival at New Brighton Park
(12-11pm)... Forbidden Planet
(7:30pm) and 2001: A Space Odyssey
(9:25pm) at Pacific Cinematheque...
The Little Mermaid (2:30, 7:30 &
9:45pm) at SUB Theatre...
8 SUNDAY Chaba Fadela from
Algeria at the Town Pump... EQ at Club
Gyas Ago (The Way il Began)
the Van East Cultural
Centre (8:30pm)... La Notts Brava
(7:30pm) and The Gospel According lo
Matthew (9:20pm) at Pacific Cinematheque... The Little Mermaid (7:30
4 9:45pm) at SUB Theatre...
9 MONDAY  Chlel Osila Osadebe
at Saturno... Morgan Davis at the
Yale... Gyas Ago (The Way it Began)
continues at the Van East Cultural
Centre (8:30pm)... La Nolle Brava
(7:30pm) and The Gospel According to
Matthew (9:20pm) at Pacific Cinematheque...
10 TUESDAY Morgan Davis at
the Yale... Gyas Ago (The Way il
Began) continues at the Van East Cultural Centre (8:30pm)... Love and
Other Arrangements at the Kitsilano
Theatre...
11 WEDNESDAY CiTR presents
Twin/Tone artist Robyn Hitchcock solo
al Tom Lee Music Hall... Oh Yeahwith
guests Spin Doctors at the Town
Pump... Professor Blues Band at the
Yale... CiTR Hot Wednesdays In the Pit
Pub... Gyas Ago (The Way it Began)
continues at the Van East Cultural
Centre (8:30pm)... Love and Other Arrangements at the Kitsilano Theatre...
The Age ot Success (7:30pm)iand First
Son (9:35pm) at Pacilic Cinematheque...
12 THURSDAY State ol Mind at
the Town Pump... Tammy and the
Americans at the WISE Hall... Professor Blues Band at the Yale... CiTR Cool
Thursdays In the Pit Pub... Gyas Ago
(The Way it Began) continues at the
Van East Cultural Centre (8:30pm)...
Love and Other Arrangements at the
Kitsilano Theatre... The Age ol Success
(7:30pm) and First Son (9:35pm) at
Pacific Cinematheque...
13 FRIDAY Enigma artists DOA
with guests Spunk and T.T. Racer at
the Commodore... BMG artist Michael
Penn and Capitol artist Lloyd Cole with
guest Victoria Williams at 86 Street...
Lasl Wild Sons with guests Spin Doctors at the Town Pump... Professor
Blues Band at the Yale... Vancouver
Folk Music Festival starts at Jericho
Beach Park... Gyas Ago (The Way il
Began) continues at the Van East Cultural Centre (8:30pm)... Love and
Other Arrangements at the Kitsilano
Theatre... The Trip (7:30pm) and Blow
Up(9:15pm)atPacificCinematheque...
14 SATURDAY CiTR presents
Tropical Fever#1 atthe Commodore...
Mudwimmin from San Francisco at the
Lux... Roots Roundup at the Town
Pump... Professor Blues Band at the
Yale... Vancouver Folk Music Festival
continues at Jericho Beach Park... Gyas
Ago (The Way it Began) continues at
the Van East Cultural Centre (8:30
pm)... The Trip (7:30pm) and Blow Up
(9:15pm) at Pacific Cinematheque...
15 SUNDAY Smugglers with
Elvis Lovechild at the Town Pump...
Vancouver Folk Music Festival closes
at Jericho Beach Park... Hawks and
Sparrows (7:30pm) and Oedipus Rex
(9:15pm) at Pacific Cinematheque...
16 MONDAY Ras Posse from
Jamaica with Roots Radics and Charlie Chaplin at the Town Pump... Mute
artists Erasure with guests Mute artists
Nitzer Ebb at the Coliseum... Billy
Branch A The Sons ol Blues at the
Yale... Hawks and Sparrows (7:30pm)
and Oedipus Rex (9:15pm) at Pacific
Cinematheque...
18 WEDNESDAY London, Ontario's Legend Killers at the Town
Pump... Billy Branch ft The Sons of
Blues at the Yale... CiTR Hot Wednesdays in the Pit Pub... Surrogate Molher
(7:30pm) and Adada (9:30pm) at Pacific Cinematheque...
19 THURSDAY     Goliath with
guests Justin Sane and Mad Dirt at the
Town Pump.. Billy Branch ft The Soni
ol Blues at the Yale... CiTR Cool Thursdays In the Pit Pub... Surrogate Molhei
(7:30pm) and Adada (9:30pm) at Pacific Cinematheque...
20 FRIDAY Roots Roundup
Stoaters, Lasl Wild Sons, Sandy Scot
ield and Herald Nix at the Commodore...Scramblers at the Town Pump..
National Velvet with guests She at 86
Street... Billy Branch ft The Sons ol
Blues at the Yale... Walkabouts at the
University Sports Bar (Seattle)... Js
T'Aime, JeT'Aime(7:30pm) and Fahrenheit 451 (9:20pm) at Pacific Cinematheque...
21 SATURDAY Legend Killers al
the Railway... National Velvet at the
Paramount... Mordam artists Victims
Family with Supercaustic Fertilizer al
the Lux... Billy Branch ft The Sons ol
Blues at the Yale... Walkabouts at the
University Sports Bar (Seattle)... Js
T'Aime, JeT'Aime(7:30pm) and Fahrenheit 451 (9:20pm) at Pacific Cinematheque...
22 SUNDAY Cruz artists All at the
Town Pump... 5th Annual La Quena Fiesta at Grandview Park... Blues Guitai
War Contest at the Yale... Teorema
(7:30pm) and Pigsty (9:30pm) at Pacific Cinematheque...
23 MONDAY Enigma artists DRI
at the New York Theatre... David Raven
at the Yale... Teorema (7:30pm) and
Pigsty (9:30pm) at Pacific Cinematheque...
24 TUESDAY David Raven at the
Yale...
25 WEDNESDAY Lava Hay al
the Town Pump... David Raven at the
Yale... CiTR Hot Wednesdays in the Pit
Pub... The Given Word (8:00) at Pacific
Cinematheque...
26 THURSDAY Lava Hay at the
Town Pump... The Toasters at the
Yale... Wynton Marsalis at the Commodore... CiTR Cool Thursdays in the
Pit Pub... Dreams trom China and
House ol Unamerican Activities
(7:30pm) at Pacific Cinematheque...
27 FRIDAY Restless artists from
Los Angeles Screaming Sirens with
guests Nervous Fellas at the Commodore... Ontario's Bourbon Tabernacle
Choir at the Town Pump... Peter Os-
Iroushko and Dean Magraw at the
WISE Hall... The Toasters at the Yale...
Privilege (7:30pm) and Wild in Ihe
Streets (9:30pm) at Pacific Cinematheque...
28 SATURDAY Touch & Go
artists The Didjits at the Lux... Ontario's Bourbon Tabernacle Choir at
the Town Pump... The Toasters at the
Yale... Mission Folk Festival with An-
zanga Marimba, Back Porch Blues,
Nyetz, Dumela, Louise Rose, Roy
Forbes, Chinese Ensemble and others
at the Fraser River Heritage Park (Mission, 826-5937)... BC Amateur Danc-
ers's Association and UBC Dance
Club's Dance lor Strength 10-hour
ballroom dance-a-thon at Robson
Square (noon-10pm)... Garage Sale/
Recycling Fairat Mclnnes Field (10am-
5pm)... Privilege (7:30pm) and Wild
in Ihe Streets (9:30pm) at PacificCine-
matheque...
29 SUNDAY Notes for an Alrican
Orestes (7:30pm) and Medea
(9:00pm) at Pacific Cinematheque...
30 MONDAY Zydeco with Major
Handy at the Yale... Notes lor an African Orestes (7:30pm) and Medea
(9:00pm) at Pacific Cinematheque...
31 TUESDAY Tubes at the Town
Pump... Big Joe Duskin ft the Demons
at the Yale...
1 WEDNESDAY Big Joe Duskin
A the Demons at the Yale... Hot Wednesdays in the Pit Pub, music by CiTR...
La Notte (7:15pm) and L'Eclisse
(9:30pm) at Pacific Cinematheque...
VANCOUVER'S HOTTEST BLUES NIGHTCLUB
Jul. 1 - 2 - Jack Lavin and the Demons Jam Session
Jul. 3 - 7 - Charlie Musselwhite
Jul.9-10-Morgan Davis
Jul. 11 -14 - Professor Blues Band
Jul. 16 - 21 - Billy Branch & The Sons of Blues
Jul. 22 - SPECIAL JAM SESSION- Blues Guitar Wars Contest
Jul. 23 - 25 - David Raven
Jul. 26 - 28 - The Toasters
Jul. 30 - Zydeco with Major Handy
Jul. 31 - Aug. 4 - Big Joe Duskin & The Demons
DON'T MISS JACK LA VIN'S JAMS:
SAT. 3-8 PM / SUNDAY BLUES MARATHON JAM SUN. 3 PM-MIDNITE
OPEN EACH NIGHT FROM 9:30 pm -1:30 am OPEN WEEKDAYS FROM 11:30 am
UBC STUDENT UNION BUILDING
LOWER CONCOURSE
ALL AGES WELCOME ^TMJEgFTCUNES
 - f you really want to know any Central American city or
town or village, the thing to do Is to find the centre and then
•lowly work your way out. The centre of the centre Is a
square known as Parque Central. The centre is the heart,
the start of everything: history/ culture/ commerce/ law/
politics/ religion. If you ask someone in Managua where the
centre is, that person will shrug and smile: "There is no
centre." And if you look at a map you will see for yourself
that physically this Is so; the city is a crazy bug sticking its
gangly legs out all haphazard. Well there is the old centre
and you can go there but no one calls it the centre anymore.
One morning early in May we go there, my sister and I,
we leave our little USDOLLARSONLY hospedaje in the
Barrio Martha Quezada, a friendly residential neighborhood characterized by burned-out Ladas, sagging power
lines and a bunch of plywood houses, a few with tacked-up
homemade signs proclaiming THERE'S MILK or WE HAVE
EGGS- the Nicaraguan version of 7-11. We turn left, in the
direction of the highly polluted Lake Managua. A wide tree-
lined boulevard goes all the way to the lakeshore and we
walk along the broken bumpy sidewalk, the incredible heat
and humidity pressing fierce. There's no traffic. There's no
people. There's no apartment blocks/ stores/ bars/ gas stations/ parking lots/ schools/ offices. In other words, NOTHING. This used to be the core of the city but now there's just
empty lots stretching out on either side of the boulevard,
their burnt brown expanse littered with garbage and chunks
of metal and concrete and glass. Away off in the distance
are the charred skeletons of two or three buildings, remains
of the big earthquake of '72 and the big fighting of'78/ '79.
It's very very quiet.
Once in a while we pass a piece of wall still standing
and it is covered with either a revolutionary mural praising
Industry and Agriculture and The Worker or, more likely, it
Is covered with spraypainted political slogans/ logos/ caricatures. Most flat surfaces in Nicaragua are covered with
•lection graffiti: a smattering for the PSC, the PRT and the
communists, a few more for Chomorro's UNO party (NOW
OR NEVER!/ YES WE CAN!) but hundreds and hundreds for
Daniel (as he Is known and referred to here) and the FSLN:
FSLN FOR PEACE, FSLN FOR THE FUTURE, DANIEL FOR
CHILDREN. EVERYTHING WILL BE BETTER YET is the a big
one, along with Daniel and his running mate Sergio wearing
military garb and looking serious or Daniel and Sergio surrounded by children looking happy and confident.
Finally, suddenly, we're at the centre of this old centre,
a big asphalt square that once was called Parque Central.
On one side is a dingy park with rusting playground equipment, a fountain missing the water and a lew listless men
sprawled on dirty concrete benches to the left, on the lake-
shore, is the ugly Teatro Ruben Dario. To the right is the
colonial-style building that was the National Palace during
the Somoza years, then the Palace of Heroes of the Revolution during the Sandanista years but now is just closed,
although the giant colour portrait of Sandino is still in front.
Directly ahead is the Cathedral. There are a lot of Churches
in Central America and they are pretty but after a while they
all look pretty much the same. The Cathedral is not pretty or
pretty much the same. Blackened by bombs and dust, a
tattered red and black Sandanista flag flies from the cross
at the top of the right tower. The cross on the left one is
toppled. Some boys sit in these towers, peering out through
22 DISCORDER
the busted wooden shutters- they live here. A couple nr
lean against the cracked pillars where the door used to be.
I'll wait here, my sister says. Nicaragua gives her "the
creeps." And leave the camera.
By the time I get to the steps the boys are gone. Like the
rest of the old centre the Cathedral is quiet and destroyed.
Inside I walk through the weeds coming up through the floor
and look at the crumbling grimy statues, the wrecked altar,
the windows where the stained glass was and the pictures
of Jesus doing this and that, faded from the sun coming in
through a roof reduced to a few crossbeams. I don't go up
the crazy crooked tower stairs where the boys are waiting
silent in the dark.
I join my sister at the little stand in the park where she
is drinking a Coke. Can't Beat That Feeling even in Nicaragua, where Coca Cola is one of the few signs of overt
American influence (albeit in the old bottles). Coke is more
expensive than the local drinks but I have to have one
anyway. Nearby a few of the listless men are cluttered
around another stand. "Fucking Americans, they're all the
same!" says one, significantly loud. "Why can't they stay
out of our country and leave us the fuck alone?" My Spanish isn't that good but good enough to get it. We hastily
hand back the empties and slink off through the rubble.
On the way back to the barrio we pass a strange
USDOLLARSONLY FSLN giftshop in the middle of nowhere,
selling election posters and Daniel t-shirts and combat
boots, and further along, the half-completed Ernesto Che
Guevaro Housing Development. At the hospedaje we sit
around sweating in the courtyard with the underfed resident rat, a young Spaniard who's always running off to
mysterious appointments and was here last year when
everyone was "more open," and an old Mexican-American
hippie vegetable vendor from Florida who is trying to sell
the new government or the old government or anyone who
will just listen for five minutes on a microwave communications system. We talk, half in English half in Spanish , about
news/ rumours/ observations. The new government has
just outlawed the use of the word "campanero," the standard form of address in the country and the rough Spanish
equivalent to "comrade." On the front page of La Prensa
(founded and run by the Chomorro family), La Presidenta,
wearing white and looking oddly like a hostage, "negotiates" with camouflage-clad contra boss Franklyn and his
boys, who've just reneged on a promise to give up all arms
and men. The rest of the newspaper contains much passionate talk about Democracy and Freedom, interspersed
with fullpage Congratulations Violetta! announcements;
meanwhile the UNOs revoke the law that made it illegal to
fire an employee for political beliefs or affiliations. At the
swankiest hotel in town, the lobby newsstand sells postcards showing armed Sandanistas happily going off to
work in the fields. In the streets the mode of dress is overwhelmingly Daniel and Sergio election t-shirts or military
togs of unidentified origin. The licence plates on all vehicles say NICARAGUA LIBRE.
The old hippie and the Spaniard go off to make "telephone calls." My sister and I go out in search of cold drinks.
Just up the street, near the boarded up cinema still advertising a Mexican War movie, there's a little building with a
glowing sign that says DISFRUTE COCA COLA and TACOS.
We enter and sure enough people are sitting around the few
wooden tables eating tacos. On the walls are a Daniel
Presldente poster, a technlcolour portrait of Ernesto Che
Guevaro and a poster of the same with the caption WE
WANNA BE LIKE CHE!, a Sandanista army recruitment
poster, a sticker that says change South Africa Not Nicaragua, and a personalized British Columbia license plate with
the initials FSLN. Behind the counter a smiling middle-aged
man is cracking ice for liquados with a hammer while In the
background RADIOYA plays the standard Central American
mix of lambada, Top 40 circa 1984, salsa, and current Latin
pop which is really any Phil Spector tune with different
words. Just your basic everyday revolutionary Chok'lit
Shoppe.
We order drinks (they don't sell Coke) and tell Pop
we're from the same place as the license plate. He calls sis
out of the kitchen to meet us. Sis brings her massive currency collection (mostly Soviet/ Cuban/ Nicaraguan) and
proudly points out a couple of 1960 Cuban twenties signed
by the great guerilla himself as Presldente del Banco. Mom
takes a break from taco slinging to tell us which faces on the
bills are the "good ones" and which are the "bad ones":
forget about him, he was in the Somozas, terrible! Mom
goes back to the tacos. Sis talks about the neighborhood.
Two throats slit in the Mercado orientate last week. Suddenly there's a bunch of men with machine guns walking
around at night and no one knows why. She had to quit her
French nlghtschool classes because it's too dangerous to
be out after dark now. Her eyes dart this way and that. Pop's
already been told once by the authorities to get this commie
crap off the walls. Pop refused. There's rumours though of
a big crackdown coming soon, with all signs of Sandanista
fervor to be erased, removed. No doubt there's a law brewing right now. She leans to us confidentially: I think the
Americans are getting ready to invade.
Junior sits down at the table. Don't be stupid, he says.
They have to have a reason first. Junior studies computer
science and architecture but his passion is the revolution.
He gives us a condensed history of the Sandanistas, throwing in scientific equations, economic theory, a beginner's
revolutionary reading list (everything by Omar Cabezas
and Eduardo Galeano), production and literary figures, and
a few good socialist anecdotes: Before the revolution, if
you were thirsty and went to a door for a glass of water
they'd say "Ten centavos" but afterwards it was "Sure!
Come on in! Can we get you some coffee? How about a
sandwich?" Of course, he says, this is my whole life. It's
what my parents believe in, what all my campan- er, my
amigos have been working together for all these years. And
now it's like we're up against a brick wall; the same place we
were before the revolution. No one knows what's happening.
Junior jumps up and runs to the kitchen coming back
with a copy of El Acero de Guero O El Olivia de Paz, a
collection of Daniel's speeches. On the title page Junior
scrawls: In the knowledge that adversity will never be
stronger than our own Nicaraguan forces and with a profound security in the strength of our battles, we will fulfill
our every duty. Managua, May 1990.
He gives it to us. It's getting late: TACOS is closing up.
A song I've never heard before comes on the radio. Oh, says
Junior, smiling a little bit, I like this one. It's about the rain
of hope falling on the land. Timbre Productions Presents:
recording
Jill Sobule
WEDNESDAY
JULY 4
TOWN
PUMP
with Special Guests
Doors:8:00 pm,   Showtime: 10:30 pm
TICKETS: Zulu, Black Swan, Highlife, Razzberry (95th & Scott Rd.), & Reminiscing (Across
from the Bay at Surrey Place) and all   _______2______?_>     locations or charge by phone
280-4444 - Also available at the Town Pump.
THE CHURCH
THURSDAY
JULY 5
presents
BMG
recording
artists
With Quests
MCA record- Doors: 8:00 pm TICKETS: Zulu, Black Swan, Highlife, Razzberry (95th & Scott Rd.), & Reminiscing (Across
ing artists Bllie Aeroplanes Showtime: 9:30 pm    from the Bay at Surrey Place) and all   fsss^ssrs^     locations or charge by phone
280-4444
RAI MUSIC FROM ALGERIA
COOP
CMBA FADELA fuTfY
TOWN
PUMP
presents
JE£ 10 PERFORMERS
artist
Doors: 8:00 pm,   Showtime: 10:30 pm
TICKETS: Zulu, Black Swan, Highlife, Razzberry (95th & Scott Rd.), & Reminiscing (Across
from the Bay at Surrey Place) and all   _______^______7!irV     locations or charge by phone
280-4444 - Also available at the Town Pump.
CiTR A S0L0 EVENING WITH
101.9 fM
DOORS: 8pm SHOW: 8:30 pm
WEDNESDAY
ROBYN HITCHCOCKimy S
presents
A&M
recording
-«     TOM LEE MUSIC HALL
929 GRANVILLE
TICKETS: Zulu, Black Swan, Highlife, Razzberry (95th & Scott Rd.), & Reminiscing (Across
from the Bay at Surrey Place) and all   _______^b_____'*     locations or charge by phone
280-4444
presents
BMG
recording
MICHAEL PEI SPLLOYD COLE
with special guest ROUGH TRADE recording artist A/l/^'TORT A  AA/TT T TAIN/TS
CD |f% A \/    I      IIV    19 TICKETS: Zulu, Black Swan, Highlife, Razzberry (95th & Scott Rd.),& Reminiscing (Across
II| mJr\ I     JU LT     __L««3 from the Bay at Surrey Place) and all   _______£______?_,     locations or charge by phone
Zfa&f-
Doors:8:00 pm,   Showtime: 9:30 pm
E)_[K_
with MONDAY
□ guests JULY 23
artists
NEW YORK THEATRE TICKETS: Zulu, Black Swan, Highlife, Razzberry (95th & Scott Rd.), & Reminiscing (Across
s*r%r\ _»-i*-*_t- _r_> **¥-«-_-_ *~t*r a x    *r\-ft from the Bay at Surrey Place) and all   _______2______t_,     locations or charge by phone
639 COMMERCIAL DR,2scm444 

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