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 ligh Power/
DiSfcORDER1
[JUNE 19851
A guide to CITR &
102
100
eNOes
: CENTS =£=
J
w
w Ministry- TheNature of Love
-All Day
(Two dance-oriented 12" singles available exclusively through Odyssey)
Metaflica - Whiplash
Slayer - Live Undead
(]Tw& limited edition EP's from two of the heaviest metal acts)
Various Artists- La Vie en Rose
Various Artists - The Enigma Variations
(A collection of bands recording for France's New Rose label
and a double album from America's notorious Enigma label)
Frank Zappa - Thing-Fish
Bill Nelson - Trial by Intimacy
(Frank's new three album box set and a four album
collection of unreleased material from Mr. Nelson)
^m^'
ODVttc? ililPOTO
866 GRANVILLE STREET, VANCOUVER, B.C. V6Z 1 K3 • (604) 669-6644 DISCORDER     a guide to CITR fm 102 cable 100
\|o\
DlScORDER
A  •   G       U       I
E  •   T      O   •   C
In This Issue
High Power Low Budget... 6
24 bands, 2 poets, and a bunch of drunks come out to support CITR's bid to be heard
Allen Ginsberg... 8
CITR's Paris Simons and Mike Johal talk to the Bard of the Beat.
Skinny Puppy... 12
Dave Watson ventures into the grisly world of the Puppy people.
In Every Issue
Airhead... 4
kvetch, kvetch, kvetch; our readers shoot back.
CITR Program Guide... 14
A month's programming in one easy glance
Vinyl Verdict... 17
Working Week, Go Four 3, The Nomads, and more ...
Singles ...20
Frisbee File.
Wombat ...22
I       T       R
FM102 cable 100
Editor
Chris Dafoe
Contributors
Jay Scott, Dave Watson,
Paris Simons, Sukhvinder Johal,
Rob Simms, Larry Thiessen, Kevin
Smith
Photos
Jim Main, Dave Jacklin,
Kevin Smith
Cartoons
R. Filbrant, Susan Catherine
Production Manager
Pat Carrol
Layout
Dorothy Cameron, Pat Carrol, Chris
Dafoe, Randy Iwata, Harry
Hertscheg, Dave Ball, Janis
MacKenzie
Typesetting
Dena Corby, Dorothy Cameron
Cover
Jim Main
Advertising/Circulation
Harry Hertscheg
228-3017
Discorder, c/o CITR Radio, 6138 S.U.B. Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T 2A5. Phone (604) 228-3017.
Discorder, a guide to CITR, is published monthly by the Student Radio Society of UBC. CITR/m 101.9 cable 100.1 broadcasts 49-watt signal in stereo throughout Vancouver from Gage Towers on the
UBC campus. CITR is also available via cable in Vancouver, West Vancouver, North Vancouver, Burnaby, Richmond, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Maple Ridge, and Mission. Discorder
circulates 12,000 free copies. To advertise in Discorder or to have copies dropped of call 228-3017. Yearly subscriptions available in Canada, $9.00, outside Canada, $ 12.00. Send Cheque or money order
payable to Discorder. Unsolicited manuscripts, photographs, cartoons, and graphics are welcome but they can be returned only if accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Discorder does
not assume responsibility for unsolicited material. Discorder and CITR offices are located in room 233 of the UBC Student Union Building. For CITR Mobile Sound bookings and general inquiries call
228-3017. The Music Request line is 228-CITR.
AVAILABLE FREE AT OVER 100 LOCATIONS
DOWNTOWN: A&A Records &Tapes, Arts Club on Seymour, Black Market, Bronx, Cafe Zen, Camouflage, Collector's R.P.M. Records, Concert Box Offices, Discus Music World (Pacific
Centre), Duthie Books,The Edge, F451 Books,The Gandydancer, Kelly's Electronic World, LuvA'Fair, MacLeod's Books, Montgomery Cafe, Odyssey Imports, Railway Club Revolutions
Studio Cinema, VancouverTicket Centre, The Web Clothing, Whittaker's On Seymour. GASTOWN: Afterimage Photo Service, Basin Street, BeBop!, Black Cat Accessories The Block
Cabbages & Kmx Clothing, Cue Hair Studio, Deluxe Junk Clothing, FirehallTheatre, Golden EraClothing, John Barley's Cabaret, Metropolis, Minus Zero Leather Works, M.S.R. Records
Phunk'n Hair, Pow-Wow Clothing, Re-Runs Recycled Apparel, The Savoy Nightclub, Sissy Boy Clothing, Systems, Track Records, Video Inn, The Waterfront Corrall, Zeet Records &Tapes,
ZZ... West. EAST SIDE: Bikes on Broadway, Camosun Aquaria, Changes Consignment Clothing, Cut Price Records, Highlife Records & Music, Kelly's Electronic World (Oakridge) Minerva's
Neptoon Collectors' Records, New YorkTheatre, Not Just Another Music Shop, Octupus Books East, People'sCo-op Bookstore, Store No. 1, Vancouver East Cinema Vancouver East Cultural
Centre, Vancouver Folk Music Festival, Western Front Lodge. KITSILANO: Black Swan Records, Broadway Records &Tapes, Bullfrog Studios, The Comicshop, Deluxe Junk Clothing, The
Eatery, Hollywood Theatre, Jericho Market, Lifestream Natural Foods, Long& McQuade, Mushroom Studios, Neptoon Collectors' Records, Octupus Books, Ridge Theatre, Rufus' Guitar
Shop, Scorpio Records, Videomatica, X-Settera Select Used Clothes, Yesterdays Collectables, Zulu Records. WEST END: Bayshore Bicycles, Binky's Oyster Bar, Breeze Record Rentals.
Camfan Restaurant, Denman Grocery, Doll and Penny's, Downtown Disc Distributors, English Bay Book Co., Little Sister's Book & Art Emporium, Manhattan Books & Magazines Melissa's
Records &Tapes, Pizzarico's, Rooster's Quarters. NORTH SHORE: A&A Records &Tapes (Park Royal), Kelly's Electronic World (Park Royal), Rave Records (Lonsdale) Sam the Record Man
(Capilano). POINT GREY: A Piece of Cake, Cafe Madeleine, DunbarTheatre, Duthie Books,The Materialist, University Pharmacy, Varsity Theatre, Video Stop,The Video Store, West Point
Cycles. RICHMOND: A&A Records &Tapes (Lansdowne), Cubbyhole Books, Kelly's Electronic World (Lansdowne) Paul's Music Sales & Rentals, Sam the Record Man NEW
L^gSIMimEjkC^aulhouse Studios. Kelly's Electronic World. _^_^__	 DISCORDER     a guide to CITR tm 102 cable 100
Dear Airhead,
The May issue of DISCORDER
is blatantly sexist. It is easy to
understand why so few women
choose to associate themselves
with DISCORDER. Obviously anything written by a woman doesn't
have a chance of being published
unless it is totally male-oriented.
You people need to make a lot of
changes before you can expect
many women to choose to work
with you. The fear of feminization
permeates nearly every DISCORDER article, record review, and
cartoon. The message that comes
through is that you don't want
women in your boys' club; especially not women with opinions that
don't conform to male standards.
You have a long way to go.
D. Routsis
I find myself, almost invariably,
at a loss to understand why we
receive so many letters that accuse DISCORDER (and CITR) of
sexism? The shrill tenor of these
condemning accusations leads
my poor male ego-choked brain
to conclude that there is something about DISCORDER that
continues to offend the sensibil-
RH6A£
c/o CITR Radio
6138 S.U.B. Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T2A5
ities of some of our female readers. I have a supremely intuitive
mind, you see. Unfortunately, it
hasn't helped me in my efforts to
muddle through the exaggerated
rhetoric to isolate the specifics
of these oft-repeated charges. I
have failed, not because I am
thicker than the average cock-
swinging dunderhead, but because there are no specifics.
In case you'd forgotten, it is
customary to substantiate accusations with facts. So for the
last time, put up or shut up. Your
credibility is at stake.
Dear Airhead,
Hi. I can't listen to CITR yet. I live
in Kerrisdale. I'm getting p.o.'d. I
miss it. I don't know what any of the
big hits in alternative radio are right
now. I'm geting very restless.
Please get your act together. Either
go back to mono, or get more
power. Whatever—but I'm getting
sick—I've been listening to LG73!
Help me please.
Mildew
Dear Airhead,
Re: World's Toughest Milkman-
Dave Boswell (May, 1985)
Please tell me where I can find
WWfiTb GET
a mmvr
a copy of the book. If not possible
now, where will I be able to purchase it after it is reprinted?
Thanks!
Mark Reed
MacLeod's Books on West Pender and Seymour.
Dear Airhead
I thought CITR had gotten as
bad as it could get. But no. . . now
you bless us with a Heavy Metal
show. How much worse can it get?
Only the CITR music programmers
know for sure. CITR has incredible
potential. Stop pissing it down the
drain.
Hanna K.
You're absolutely right. We'\
decided to bottle it instead.
custom
clothing "y^^^affynM,^ era
12-6 Thus, thru Sat. or by appointment OffyilHtfS B
STORE   NO,   1        (ww.li
875-1897
3520 Main St. (at 19th) A bad haircut can make
anyone look dumb.
Look sharp at the pointei
/.'/ '
DISCORDER     a guide to CITR tm 102 cable 100
High Power On Alow Budget
The wheels are in motion; CITR
has applied to the CRTC for a
high power licence to increase
our broadcasted signal strength
from a lowly 49 watts to a whopping
4900. We have found that our present signal is too weak to be picked up in most areas of Vancouver.
With the anticipated power increase, our signal would be received by listeners all over Greater
Vancouver—even in deepest, darkest Burnaby! However, going high
power requires a great deal of
money and public support, so we
thought—hey, why don't we put on
a two-week high power/low budget
benefit concert series at the
Savoy? For a low-low cover charge
of $2.00, we could supplement our
own, shall we say, inadequate
funding for a new high power transmitter! We could increase public
awareness and support for this
noble cause via direct assault on
a captive Savoy audience! Finally,
we would continue our pledge to
expose Vancouverites to the incredible wealth of starving musical
talent available in our very own city!
Anyways, 'nuff said—the rest is
history. Here's what happened...
Monday, May 6 - Week I
Go Four 3
No Fun
Out Of Proportion
Opening night of the concert
series. All three CITR representatives present bursting with pride—
silent, yet confident, as Out Of Proportion leapt onto stage. A former
Shindig semi-finalist, Out Of Proportion have tightened up their
usual rough-edged sound and become much more melodic, if not a
little slower. Lead singer Mina continues to improve.
No Fun were lots of fun, playing
a great set. Appearing as a duo, No
Fun initially sound sparse—something is missing—but their bright
sense of humour, "greatest hits"
repertoire and create-a-song-as-
you-go-along flash card routine
easily made up for the lacking full
sound. Especially memorable was
the altered version of "Be Like Us,"
which differed greatly from the one
played recently at the Town Pump.
Keep things clean uptown, David...
Go Four 3 gave another consistent performance, much to the
delight of the assembled crowd. An
encore of Sweeney Todd's "Roxy
Roller" had everyone on their feet
screaming for more. Go Four 3
tends to sound a lot better in small
clubs than on large stages, so next
time they're in your local pub,
check them out. . .
Tuesday, May 7
A Cast Of Thousands
Ominsquid
Perfect Circle
Tuesday night opened with the
new band in town—Omnisquid.
"New" is the key word here—the
band had only practiced together
for three days before this, their first-
ever live appearance. They were
great! Sounding (and looking) a
little like Ian Dury playing B-52
covers (New Order covering Oingo-
Boingo?—Thanks M.S.), Omnisquid hopped and pogoed their
way through an entertainingly sloppy 45-minute set which included a
rough "play along with Bach"
piece greatly appreciated by the
small but enthusiastic audience.
Definitely a band to watch for, if
Wednesday, May 8
Shanghai Dog
Bill of Rights
NG3
Hardcore night! Unfortunately,
Death Sentence was unable to
play, as previously advertised. I
was hoping that their first return to
the Savoy since the now-legendary
Shindig Riots of '85 would be characterized by the Revenge of the
M.C.s. . .too bad—would have
made a great screenplay.
I squeezed my way through the
inevitable line-up just before former
Shindig finalists NG3 took to the
Istage. NG3 were at their best, opting to group their set into four-song
bunches in an effort to avoid the
let's-drink-a-beer-and-tune-up-
between-every-song syndrome that
Thursday, May 9
Dilettantes
My Three Sons
Dead Cats
Last night of week one! The
Dead Cats opened, and Cramps
fans, here is a band to check out!
A four-piece, the Dead Cats possess a great sense of humour, playing minimalist, slightly off-key
music with a rockabilly twang.
My Three Sons were up next,
and proved that they still have the
ability to get people up on the
dance floor. Fronted by the amazing Little Stevie Richards (the Face
of the '80s) and supported by the
leggy Prince Georgettes, My Three
Sons hammered out that garage-
rock sound unattainable without
days of practice and serious drug
8 nights at the Savoy featuring 24 bands and a pair of poets. Featured here is
No Fun, who played Monday, May 6 with Out of Proportion and Go four 3.
they ever find practice space and
living accommodations (the lead
singer currently lives in a tent on
Goat Mountain).
A Cast Of Thousands were up
next—a surprise move, as I had
anticipated them playing last. . .oh
well. The band delivered a very
tight set of synth-pop to a complacent audience. Perhaps "tight" is
the best way to describe this band
—they have a "tight" sound and a
"tight" visual performance—very
safe. I kept wishing that they would
"loosen" up a bit and try to be a
bit more fun, but to no avail. . .
Perfect Circle rounded out the
night (sorry), but unfortunately a
large portion of the audience had
already left. A good young band
with a rich, "nice" sound somewhere between REM and Grapes
of Wrath.
so many bands succumb to. Take
note—as a result, NG3 delivered
one of the fastest and tightest sets
I have ever seen them play.
Bill of Rights were up next, and
were possibly inspired by both
NG3's performance and the rabid
. . .uh, enthusiastic crowd, as they
played a great set as well. And then
came Shanghai Dog... I don't
think I have ever seen Shanghai
Dog give a bad show. They were
fantastic, returning with "Clanging
Bell" for an encore. Perhaps the
only incident which marred an
otherwise superb night was the
mysterious disappearance of an
antique vanity from the women's
washroom. A part of Savoy history,
this piece of furniture is large,
heavy, and extremely visible. Surely, someone saw it carried out. . .
problems.
Dilettantes rounded out the
night, refusing to let people off the
dance floor. With saxman extraordinaire Paul McKenzie, the Dilettantes have also obtained that fun
'n sloppy garage band sound previously mastered only by My Three
Sons. A thoroughly enjoyable
night, as testified to by those who
kept dancing and shouting for
more all night long.
Monday, May 3 - Week II
Chris Houston
Herald Nix
The Rockin' Fools
Rockabilly night! First up was
The Rockin' Fools, an excellent
three-piece featuring stand-up
bass, and rubberman drummer
Andy Graffiti. As anticipated, the
Rockin' Fools pumped out an ener- DISCORDER     a guide to CITR fm 102 cable 100
getic dance set to a continually
growing audience. Watch for their
album—soon to be released.
Herald Nix played an abbreviated set which included rockabilly,
C&W, and gospel tunes.
People coming specifically to
see Herald Nix and The Rockin'
Fools were no doubt terrified by the
warped, Elvis-oriented philosophical ravings of Chris Houston. The
man whose greatest claim to fame
is writing "Surfin' On Heroin" was
backed up by Toronto's Rock
Angels and played a brilliant eclectic set, which served to either
entertain or offend all present.
Most of the audience had unfortunately gone home long before his
final soul salvation sermon, read at
random from the sacred Book of
Elvis. Chris Houston is also from
Toronto, but will be playing in Vancouver for the next month. If you're
brave, go see him—it's worth it.
Tuesday, May 14
An Evening of Eclectic, Esoteric
Music
An evening of eclectic, esoteric
music? Oh no! What does this
mean? Those brave souls who
ventured in discovered an unusual
evening c/o CITR's own industrial
madman, Mark Mushet. First up
was Alex Varty, who played guitar
with various effects and toys. The
sparse crowd present responded
well, especially when the amp was
turned way up. demons Rettich
then played "Getting In" from the
"Fine Tendons" tape series before
reciting "Furious Boys" while being pushed around the Savoy. Bob
'Fish' Herring read his eternal masterpiece "Kerouac Was A Mama's
Boy" and Paul Dolden played
several tapes of electro-accoustic
music previously unheard in Vancouver clubs. For those with eardrums still functioning, Joyce Hamilton read poetry, leaving the ever-
present Chris Houston to finish the
night. Definitely an interesting night
—not the usual club fare.
Wednesday, May 15
Poisoned
Brilliant Orange
The Zamboni Drivers
This night was probably the best-
attended of the entire concert
series. After being incorrectly introduced as Brilliant Orange by a
drug-addled M.C, the Zamboni
Drivers made a successful live
stage debut. Utilizing the Zulu
Connection (Don and Dale), the
Zambonis pumped out a mixture
of originals and covers to a pleased audience.
Brilliant Orange played next (only their second live performance)
and certainly lived up to. the #1
position they currently hold on
CITR's playlist. Go see this band—
they're great.
And then came the old Pros. . .
Poisoned was definitely the band
people were waiting for. Screams
were heard at the mention of Art
Bergmann's name... You are
among friends, guys. Riding high
on the recent release of their new
EP, the band played two sets with
a freshness and vitality I have not
experienced at a Poisoned concert
in recent memory. The audience
apparently agreed, as the dance
floor was packed all night long.
Great show.
Thursday, May 16
NoMeansNo
Slow
AKOB
Whew! Last night! Expecting to
be busy with the shitty job of ejecting underage Slow fans, I dragged
myself down to the Savoy one last
time. AKOB (Another Kind Of
Blues) opened with a muddy but
energetic set featuring material just
released on demo tape and charted on CITR's playlist. The audience was unmoved, perhaps anticipating the arrival of Slow.
Slow came out on fire, appearing on the stage, on chairs, on
tables, on people. . .in fact, leaping on anything accessible. The
band lived up to the wealth of
positive publicity they have received of late, knocking out favourites
"Black is Black" and "I Broke the
Circle." If you haven't yet seen
Slow, do. . . but for your own safety,
sit just out of reach of their guitar
cords.
NoMeansNo finished the night
with a fantastic performance—my
ears are still ringing! I am continually amazed by the sheer depth of
sound NoMeansNo manages to
project with only one voice, bass
and drums in use for most of the
set. A truly unique experience. I
personally plan on seeing this
band as often as I can. . .you dig,
man? Except for one ugly incident
involving everyone's favourite neo-
Nazi gang, NoMeansNo completed an extremely successful night,
week, and series.
Well, it's all over now, but our
struggle to obtain a high power
licence continues. If you see a
petition and haven't yet signed it,
please do or better yet write:
Fernand Belisle
Secretary General
CRTC
100 Metcalfe Street
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0N2
Re: Application #851106500
and express your support.
CITR would like to thank all the
bands who participated, donating
their time and effort, Janet For-
sythe and the Savoy, those who
worked on presenting the concert
series, those who supported us
with their attendance and signatures, and all the skinheads who
ignored us and stayed home.
—J. Scott
"^•""SSB
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I Tuesday,^5
j§ Wednesday, <£%&,
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HH      CLUB SODA - 1055 HOMER ST.       &
|S§ 681-8202 | DISCORDER     a guide to CITR fm 102 cable 100
From Beat to Buddhist, from Kerouac to the Clash, Allen Ginsberg
has made his presence felt in popular culture over the last 30 years.
At 58 Ginsberg remains active, and as controversial as ever. His
Collected Poems 1947-1980 has just been published by Harper and Row,
and he has been nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature.
Ginsberg visited Vancouver recently to give a reading and to teach
a poetics workshop on Cortez Island. CITR's Paris Simons (Of
Neither Here Nor There), Mike Johal (from Propaganda), and Jeremy
Hainesworth spoke to Ginsberg during his visit.
D:  You've been doing a lot of readings and lectures and teaching.
Do you still have time to work?
AG: Oh yes.
D:  You're not interrupted by the rest of living.
AG:  No, I don't worry about it. I've written enough anyways, but I
keep writing more. I've written a lot, since I had this big book of
GINSBERG
collected poems out—that covered only from 1947 to 1980. So I
always write something. I don't know if it's any good or not. If it's
still interesting, you can type it up.
D: Do you have a work pattern?
AG: No, no, no, I never know what's going to happen. When I wake
up, and have the energy, and think of something interesting to
write down, I'll write it down. But it needs the
energy: I can't be sleepy, or it can't be too
much trouble. Though, I often wake up in the
middle of the night to write down a dream,
make that effort to get out of my somnambu-
lence. Seem to write those easier. Hardest
thing is to describe what goes on in front of
you, or make a description out the window.
Just waking up to where you are and finding
details.
D:  You commented that you think you've written enough. Why?
AG:  By enough I mean I think I've written about as much as
anybody would want to read. I guess ideally you should write more
than a sane person would want to read over the period of a couple
years. And I think I've already gotten past that limit. I mean, I'm
writing just to add to the plot, the story, or whenever I think of
something to write, whenever I get inspired.
Fm a little more slothful, pot-bellied,
less energetic than when I was young..
Not less passionate... Still jack off,
so I must feel something.
D: Do you feel your attitudes have changed in terms of what your
general attack is?
AG:  I don't think so, not that much. I'm a little more slothful, potbellied, less energetic than when I was young, but I'm also more
free of. . .less abstract. And not less passionate, because I stilt feel
passion. Still jack off, so I must feel something. So I stilt feel
energy, sexual energy, and pleasure energy. Occasionally, I get that
into writing.
D:  What about your social view or the social concerns of your
writing?
AG: Slightly changed, not too much. Several things are obvious:
that authoritarianism is a drag, although it may be, in Plato's
"Republic" and other Utopian systems, even practical if you were to
have a real philosopher king, trained from age two, like the Tibetans
train their Lamas. That might be a workable system.
D: Still, there would be no artists.
AG: Then the Lama is the artist. They're trained in calligraphy, and
painting, and dance, and speech, and poetry, and in the
spontaneous utterance of poetry. That's pretty good, if you have that
training from childhood on. Spontaneous mind, and no mind, and
there might be an interesting mandala principle.
The second thing is that the mandala principle of the cult of
personality does not work well without training. As with Stalin, or
Mao, or Castro who were not the most highly trained, it's open to
lots of problems. On the other hand, you find here, in the non-
Marxist world of the conservatives, who don't like Communism DISCORDER     a guide to CITR fm 102 cable 100
because it has bureaucracy, and authoritarianism, and who think it's
the nexus of evil, themselves aggregate power to themselves in the
same cult of personality: like Reagan, Thatcher and Bennett here.
It's a cult of personality in the sense of contradicting their own
original premise of dismantling Big Government and getting
government out of our lives; instead they're dismantling small
government and aggregating: Thatcher trying to abolish the Greater
London Council and take all the powers to the centre, and,
apparently, the same thing going on in this province.
Really a politicization of the government in the sense of
centralization, and authoritarianization, and generally accomplished
bv the means of insults.
And there's the beginning of censorship again starting, with the
Moral Majority assuming that they're speaking for the voice of God,
and taking on the chutzpah of Jehovah, and setting themselves as
the mouthpiece of the divine, according to the particular mania.
They want to tell you what you can read, and what you can teach,
and what you can read about sex.
If the government is not artistic, it is not a success
D: It's obvious that you don't agree with the idea of censorship. Do
you feel any compuctions in terms of the arguments that pornography will lead to sexual offences. Do you think any of that concern
is valid?
AG: It's valid, it might lead to sexual offences, but in that case
you'd have to start censoring television, because the average kid
sees the average of 12,000 murders on television before the age of
13. So where are you going to stop? Maybe you should censor
Reagan's speeches. I think those cause brain damage, or
somebodies' speeches. Commercial television, tobacco, alcohol are
all causing damage.
So I don't know where you can draw the line on speech.
Apparently it's best to have no censorship, because once you admit
some, everyone's got an absolute reason. The Mohammedan's have
an absolute reason, the Christians have an absolute reason, fj all
the religions, except maybe Buddhism, have an absolute-reason.
Stalin had an absolute reason, Mao had an absolute reason. So
everyone's got an absolute reason, and they quibble about their
absolute reasons and they get mad at each other, sometimes they
kill each other, or they want each other to shut up. So how do you
live and let live?
The better view would be to notice the aesthetics of porn. Most of
the city megalopolitan erotic material is manufactured and
distributed by means of insults, and contempt, and image-industry.
So it might be useful to break up their monopoly, and contempt,
and image-making, and by intolerance, just like Stalinist intolerance
in a way. So where do you finish with all the authoritarian theism?
How to get out of that, I think, is through clarity, a recognition of the
pattern, a personal clarity that may override the mechanical imprint
of a fuzzed image, the confusing image of authoritarian Tightness
with no contradictions. 'Cause you don't see the contradictions
pointed out to the press. You see the contradictions of the Left
pointed out, but you don't see the contradictions of the Right
pointed out so boldly, as if the Left's contradictions are worse and
more bloody.
D: Now where would you say art and poetry are going to fit into this
society?
AG: If the government is not artistic it is not a success. The government is of words; who said that? William Carlos Williams. Ultimately
whose word fasts longest, whose word prevails. That is where the
poet, representing the solitary individual, speaking for himself, and
only for himself, subjectively, can speak for the entire nation, all of
whom are similarly subject: including the presidents and premiers,
who are also subjects. So it's all subjective in that way.
D:  What about other things that are affecting the artist within a
society, like censorship, either from government or groups of people?
AG: We did really get rid of censorsnip between the years of 1958
and 1962 in the United States. In the mid-50s and early 60s there
was quite a bit of censorship. I'm talking about New York, a
megalopolitan centre of the production of arts. There were a
series of trials."Howl" was tried in San Francisco, and won on the
basis of social critique in ine poem. And tnere were a series of
trials where Grove Press defended the publication of Lady
com. ►
111 —*-^^?rzr
JUNE 13th
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Previews June 18 & 19 • 8 PM NIGHTLY
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*****
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Chatterly's Lover, by D.H. Lawrence, Henry Miller's Topic of Cancer
and Capricorn. The Diaries of Frank Harris. . . Naked Lunch finally at
the end, so Burroughs was the last major American classic to go on
trial.
There is a group of feminists who are up against porn, but I think
that they're seeing the red flag and not the toreador.
D: It is still a tough issue.
AG: I like child porn myself; no accounting for taste. Not young
child porn—13, 14, 15. They used to have great child porn from
North Africa: photographs by Pierre Lotie, Andre Gide and all the
writers of the Yellow Decades, 1890 to 1910, in North Africa, Algeria.
Great photographs, everybody having a good time. That was part of
my education, my sophisticated upbringing when I was twenty.
They ought to show those in schools. 'Cause kids get to see porn
all the time; they might as well get to see some great artistic stuff,
where it's some sort of Edward Carpenter, Walt Whitman, Andre
Gide human liberation rather than commerce.
... the consciousness is a sort of gnostic,
humourous awareness that the laws are
provincial; sacred,
but like all things sacred, human.
D: / believe it was Abby Hoffman who said that colleges have
become a hotbed of social rest. How do you feel about that?
AG: He probably said that about a year or two ago. In the spring of
1985, there was an outbreak of social activism—sixties' style—
except much more gentle, and more generous, and more balanced
and better organized, avoiding a lot of the aggression of the sixties,
and the paranoia.
D: So it's an approach that's not so much an affront to society.
AG: Well, it was never intended to be an affront to society. It was
intended to be an education to society.
There were large-scale sit-ins at Columbia University that went on
for several weeks, and may still be going on. And that was a protest
over Columbia's investment in South Africa. There was the same
sort of thing going on in Berkeley. There was a big tear-gassing at
Berkeley; the typical California police reaction to what I'm sure was
a relatively stable student protest group. At Brown University there
were a number of arrests, and I was arrested with 477 students at
Colorado University in Boulder, somewhere around April 18th. That
was a protest, as at Brown, over C.I.A. recruiters going onto the
campusses and trying to seduce young kids into the secret cult of
the C.I.A., and so we tried to make citizens' arrests of the recruiters.
In my case, my arrest was on the grounds of dope-peddling and
murder within the C.I.A. The murder was the murder of Orlando
Letellier (a Chilean diplomat killed in Washington in the early 1970s),
and there was a judge's decision that the C.I.A. was involved with
that. And the dope-peddling was an old story, as far back as the
forties, of C.I.A. involvement with opium traffickers in the Mediterranean and Indo-China.
D: You did a song with the Clash on their last album. What do you
think of the punk movement? I read somewhere that you saw it as a
descendant of the Beat movement.
AG: But in that context I was saying that the Beat movement was
the descendant of the Bohemian movement. You know, bohemian
literati, bohemian amusements, bohemian making love with your
eyes open, bohemian sniffing glue, smoking grass, hash. It goes
back to Baudelaire, Rimbaud, and Van Gogh and Gaugin living
together, and Rimbaud and Verlaine goofing around, and the
Dadaists and the Futurists, and Pound and Williams, and the
Modernists; successive waves of literary exploration that leads into
Kerouac and Burroughs.
D: So a flow of consciousness across time.
AG: And the consciousness is a sort of gnostic, humourous
awareness that the laws are provincial; sacred, but like all things
sacred, human, so therefore to be taken like you'd take a friend
rather than like you'd take a god. And that laws are generalizations,
and that individual cases are particular, and that you have to react
to every event directly, rather than through the intermediary of
generalization and abstraction, that ethics have to come from the
heart rather than a bunch of boy scout rules, and that the heart and
sacred world are primary. And the attitude of sacred world is the DISCORDER     a guide to CITR fm 102 cable 100
continuum of consciousness: the sacramental sense of washing the
dishes, putting on your shoes, dressing up, meeting your friends,
rather than the careless, indifferent, desensitized.
That would lead up to the extravagant punk stylistics as being
kind of sacramental dress; disturbing to the social status quo
aesthetic but, on the other hand, assertion of another futuristic
aesthetic. Sort of a negative protest against conformity, but also a
postitive assertion of an aesthetic gloriousness, or grandeur, or
imaginativeness. An extravagant imagination, andthat's a positive
thing. And mixed with aggression and rejection, and anger. But the
positive aspect is the assertion of individual imagination in dress,
and speech, and music. Something beyond the military-industrial
hyper-economy.
D: So how do you look back on the dabbling you did with the
Clash?
AG: Simply a rapport between generations. Mick Jones is a very
good musician. And Joe Strummer is an intelligent poet. He asked
me to work the lyrics of several songs—'Death is a Star," "Car
Jam," and they asked me to get on the microphone and make up
my own verses on "Ghetto Defendant'—just to make it more particular, along the lines of William Carlos Williams and Blake's notion
of "no ideas but in things'—minute particulars.
D: Of the pop bands at the moment, are there any, in particular, that
you feel have anything really important to say?
AG: I don't know many bands of the last couple years, just the
Clash. I've heard Black Flag—that was amusing, energetic—bands
like X, the Dead Kennedys. Met Sting a couple of years ago, at
Burroughs' birthday—might do something with him sooner or later.
D:  With that albeit brief connection with popular music, you may
have gained a new audience. What do you feel is your audience
today? Is it the audience of the 1960s grown older, or is it a new
audience?
AG: Oh, it's about 30 million young Chinese kids.
D: He said facetiously.
AG: I don't talk facetiously. Gary Snider and I are the best-known
Western poets in China. Most of the young intelligentsia is learning
English and in their official anthologies they have fifty pages of On
The Road. "Howl" has been translated and they interpret that as a
reference to their own trials and tribulations during the Cultural
Revolution.
After time has washed away all the debris,
just the artwork remains... The artwork will
outlast all the social blather that went around it.
D: It would seem you regard them in more seriousness than you do
your Western audience.
AG: No, I was just trying to point out that the question was limited
by reference points that aren't as interesting as the actual situation.
I don't actually calculate my audience, because I'm mostly trying
to figure out what I'm thinking when I write. The trick is not exactly
to ignore the audience, but to get to a deeper level than being
worried about what somebody else will hear. I'm worried about what
I hear. That's where the interesting poetry comes from. Yeats had a
phrase—'Prose is made from quarrels with others; poetry from
quarrels with ourselves."
D: Do you think your rising visibility right now is going to foster an
interest in works, not necessarily of the Beat movement, but works of
that genre?
AG: There's always been an interest in that. Every time I go out in
some cycle of activity, I'm asked the same question. Ten years ago
it was the same question. It's probably surfacing more on an official
level now, because now all of Kerouac is in print, all of Burroughs is
getting together in print, all of my work is in print in a uniform
edition.
So the materials are there for people to read. And also the
immediate onslaught of negative, Frankenstein imagery, scattered by
lesser writers—writers who weren't as good as Burroughs or
Kerouac but who wrote about them, or made movies about them—
has dissipated. So all that's left standing are the structures of work
that they made—the poems, the prose, even the essays. After time
has washed away all the debris, just the artwork remains, and that
was the speciality—the artwork. The artwork will outlast all the
social blather that went around it.
READ
THE BOOK
\ CfFMV f-llfflXS \
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Our favourite satire on Horror Flicks. Starring Tim Curry as the Mad-Doctor from the
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Walking the Dog
Dave Watson gets the scoop on Skinny Puppy
T there is something odd about the name
Skinny Puppy. Just the words themselves are
odd, mixing an adjective and a noun like that.
The two words seem to have a complementary
rhythm as you say them. Maybe the oddness
comes from the phonetics of the words. I'm not
sure what it is, but I do know that everyone I said
the name to reacted by repeating it several times,
often with a tone of disbelief. An uncommon
name like Skinny Puppy deserves a far from
ordinary band, and the two seem to have found
each other here in Vancouver.
Skinny Puppy began around two years ago as
a collaboration between a pair of Kevins. One
was NIVEK OGRE (Kevin Ogilvie), who had just
undergone a rough period in life and took up the
synthesizer as therapy and a release of aggression. The other Kevin, cEVIN KEY, joined Ogre
in a series of late night parties/practices known
as Braps, along with an old friend from Austria,
Bill Leeb. This other Kevin was, and is, a member of another local synth group whose record
label legally holds all rights to the use of his
name. I can't name the band either but if you
read the Roman numeral seven backwards you'll
have a good idea of their identity.
The influences which helped form Skinny Puppy's sound were the British 'Wild Planet' bands
like Portion Control, Legendary Pink Dots and
Chris Carter. NIVEK and cEVIN wrote several
songs, which Nettwerk Productions released as
a six-song EP, produced by KEY and David Ogilvie. NIVEK and cEVIN performed everything on
the album except a bass guitar track on "Glass
Houses", contributed by Dale Pleven.
The themes of Skinny Puppy's lyrics deal with
despair, hatred, depression and Durkheimian
Anomie.
Withered rope/You hang what's empty
Can't remain/To put it simply
In time cry the hollow words/
to sing with false disguise
Smothered hope/fly from sorrow
For a new divine tomorrow
I just don't want to know anymore.
—from "Smothered Hope"
As you can see, pretty gloomy stuff. The lyrics
are sung over a background of heavy industrial-
urban music, harsh waves of sound electronically
altered to produce an otherworldy effect. Tape
loops of screaming and dialogue appear and
reverberate out again. Death imagery abounds,
indicating a relationship to L.A.'s death rock
scene, although Skinny Puppy are thankfully not
as hardcore.
Now, I don't like most syntn oands. Many are
wimpy, bland and repetitive. Let's not forget cold
and emotionless as well. Skinny Puppy managed to escape most of these faults, although I find
repetitive bits scattered throughout their mater
ial. A cold, electronic sound is seemingly unavoidable in synth bands, but it aids Skinny
Puppy by adding to their mutant alien ambience.
Other factors saving the band from Dave's Pit of
Electronic Mediocrity are: a.) Key's drumming
(excuse me, rhythm programming) and b.) a certain amount of layering and studio complexity
which creates depth (in fact, you have to listen
dozens of times just to decipher the singing,
which, like most of their equipment, is channelled
through digital delays). My initial impression of
Skinny Puppy was that they didn't sound like
anything I'm used to calling music. A few listens
enabled me to appreciate them more, particularly
for the effect and rhythm of the lyrics within the
songs. I still hold a few reservations about this
type of music, probably because once you get
into it you could never be happy listening to
Chuck Berry again, which is not an appealing
thought. Skinny Puppy are very much a part of
a disaffected subculture springing up in major
North American cities.
By combining tapes and live performances
Skinny Puppy are able to duplicate their material
onstage. Approximately $15,000 in equipment is
set up in the midst of a set decorated in skulls,
iron fencing and a welded rack of unusual percussive instruments. Skulls are hurled as slides
of dismembered dolls and meat are projected on
a scrim (do I detect a Beatles influence?). One
show culminated in the frenzied destruction of
a dummy with a cleaver. A certain amount of
negative reaction was received, causing Ogre to
feel his display of fantasy violence was misinterpreted by people who prefer the desensitizing
violence of television over its reality. The visual
image of their shows betrays the influence of
weekend horror movie binges, as well as David
Lynch's Eraserhead and A Clockwork Orange.
The band received a good initial response
locally to their EP (now in its fourth pressing).
A cassette release of the album with four bonus
tracks (three featuring Bill Leeb on bass synth)
is now out and both the EP and tape are slated
for release by Play It Again Sam, a Belgium
record company with large promotional influence
in continental Europe and Japan. Red Rhino,
part of the Cartel label is handling the, release
in Britain. This signing opens up a lot of possibilities for the band, since Europe contains the
largest market for decadent urban music, probably because they've been decaying for longer
than us over here in the New World.
Another album, which will probably be 12
tracks long, has been recorded and will be
released at the end of summer. A new, more
natural sounding drum machine is used and further progression is expected as the relationships
within the band tighten.
Skinny Puppy promise another local show
before a tentatively planned West Coast tour. If
the European market is receptive an overseas
tour will follow. The smart money says they'll do
well.
—Dave Watson NETTWERK    PRODUCTIONS
ANNOUNCE
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JUNE 6/85
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ALSO AVAILABLE ON NETTWERK PRODUCTIONS:
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T-SHIRTS:
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PROGRAM
I   WEEKDAY PROGRAMMING
Program titles in boldface have descriptions below schedule.
7:30 am
Sign-on                                                                                       5:00 pm
Powerchord (Tuesday)
Isomatrix (Monday)                                                                   6:00 pm
Dinner Magazine
8:00 am
Wake-Up Report—news, sports and weather.
6:00-6:10       Dinner Report—news, sports and weather
10:00 am
Morning Magazine (Tuesday to Friday).
6.70               Generic Review
10:00-10:10   Breakfast Report—news, sports and
6;73                *lnsite
weather.
6:22-6:35      Daily feature: comedy, poetry, UBC issues
70.70            Generic Review
and lots more
70.25             *lnsight editorial feature                                      8:00 pm
High Profile—Music feature.
10:40-11:20    'Public Affairs                                                    9:00 pm
Jazz Show (Monday)
1:00 pm
Lunch Report—news, sports and weather.
* Where The Action Is (Wednesday)
2:30 pm
Skipping Out                                                                             77.00 pm
Random Cacophony (Tuesday)
4:30 pm
Afternoon Sportsbreak
Mel Brewer Presents (Thursday)
4:35 pm
Party With Me Punker (Wednesday)                                     4:00 am
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The Monday Morning Magazine Show
Monday, 7:30 - 10:30 am
Prime-time Monday Culture starting your day and week off. Focusing on
the issues as they come and go AND sometimes live poetry readings of
original work. Rush Hour RadioCine at its best, every Monday Morning.
Producer: Esi Zarmis; Production Assistant: Patrice Leslie
The Jazz Show
Monday, 9:00 pm - 12:30 am
Vancouver's longest-running prime time jazz program, featuring all the
classic players, the occasional interview, and local music news. Hosted
by the ever-suave Gavin Walker. This month's 11' o'clock features:
June 03 Ray Charles at the 1958 Newport Jazz Festival. Ray Charles and
his band plus the Raylettes at their very best.
June 10 The Kennedy Dream. "A Musicial Tribute to John Fitzgerals
Kennedy" composed and conducted by Oliver Nelson. Oliver
Nelson and his Orchestra featuring Phil Woods.
June 17 A North American Debut. A recently discovered recording by
Miles Davis. Miles Davis (1957) leading Europeans Barney Wilen
(tenor saxophone), Rene Urtreger (piano), Pierre Michelot (bass),
Kenny Clarke (drums). Miles In Amsterdam. (Recording not
available in North America.)
June 24 Charlie Parker at Carnegie Hall...Dec. 25, 1949. An historic
recording (very rare) featuring Bird and his working band: Red
Rodney (trumpet), AI Haig (piano), Tommy Potter (bass), Roy
Haynes (drums) plus*other selections from the Concert with
Miles Davis, Bud Powell, Lennie Tristono, Sara Vaughan, etc.
Tuesday Morning Magazine & Dinner Magazine
Tuesday, 10:00 - 11:00 am & 6:00 ■ 6:40 pm
News, Sports, Editorials, Reviews, and Special Features highlight these
two new magazine shows.
*Public Affairs
Tues. - Fri., 10:40 ■ 11:10 am
Two 15-minute features each day, presented by groups such as Students
for a Democratic University, Students for Peace and Mutual Disarmament, Amnesty International, and by CITR independent producers.
Skipping Out
Tuesday & Thursday, 2:30 pm
Lectures that you were too lazy to sit through yourself, from UBC and
around Vancouver, presented in their entirety.
Powerchord
Tuesday, 5:00 ■ 6:00 pm
Vancouver's only true metal show, featuring the underground alternative'
to mainstream metal-local demo tapes, imports and other rarities, with
weekly album give-aways.
Random Cacophony
Tuesday, 11:00 pm ■ 1:00 am
The second radio show in the history of civilization dedicated to solving
all of the world's problems.
Play Loud
Wednesdays 1 am-4 am/Late night Tuesday
. . .dedicated to the creation of most of the world's problems. The final
word in musical pleasure through pain. Music especially designed for
headphone listening or (alternatively) for killing your houseplants.
Aural surgery performed by Larry Thiessen.
Wednesday Morning Magazine
Alternate Weeks, Wednesday, 10:00 - 10:30 am
A hard-hitting, special show that includes News, Sports and Features by
"Franco" Janusz.
Party With Me Punker
Wednesday, 4:35 - 5:30 pm
A solid hour of 100% punk tunes, live cuts and info from the earliest
punk to the latest hardcore. With host Mike Dennis.
•just Like Women
Wednesday, 6:20 - 7:30 pm
A new magazine show covering a wide range of topics on Women's
issues. Hosted by Anne Pollock.
The Knight After
Late Night Wednesday
Music to clobber yuppies by-featuring radio shows traded with
European and American alternative stations-and on the first late night
Saturday of every month "Music from the Tar Pits" in collaboration with
Random Cacophony and Tunes 'R' Us-The dinosaurs come back to
haunt us—Beware! This show will miss up your hair...
Thursday and Friday Magazines
Thursday and Friday, 6:00 - 6:40 pm
Dinner Magazine shows featuring News, Sports, Insights, Generic Review,
and topped off with interviews and editorials.
Top of the Bops
Thursday, 8:00 ■ 9:00 pm
Top of the Bops approaches rock'n'roll from the broader perspective of
its roots in country, country swing, rockabilly as well as rhythm'n'blues,
jump blues and doo wop.lt revolves around the lives and music of the
"stars" and, more importantly, some of the lesser known figures of that
time, occasionally focussing on one particular artist, label, region or
theme.
Mel Brewer Presents
Thursday, 11:00 pm - midnight
CITR's resident nice guy, Jason Grant, delivers the scoop on the local
music scene with the newest demo tapes and record releases, interviews and general chitchat on the state of Vancouver music. DISCORDER      a guide
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WEEKEND PROGRAMMING
Saturday
7:30 am - noon "
The Altered Alternative Show
CITR proudly (hesitantly) presents a record-breaking 41/2 hours featuring
interviews with local celebrities, man-in-the-street opinions and lots and
lots of requests. Rated general.
Noon - 12:08 pm
The Brunch Report - news, sports & weather.
12:08 - 4:00
The Playlist Show
Join CITR's music directors for a taste of the newest and hottest
releases from around the city, the country, the continent and the world.
CITR's top 40 demo tapes, singles, EPs and LPs are counted down, plus
new releases that have just arrived.
4:00 - 6:00 pm
The African Show
A program featuring African music and culture with hosts Todd
Langmuir, Patrick Onukwulu and Dido. Tune in for the latest news from
Africa, plus special features at 5:00 pm.
6:00 - 6:30 pm
Saturday Magazine
News, sports & weather, plus Generic Review, analysis of current affairs
and special features.
6:30 - 9:30
Propaganda!
An eclectic mix of interviews, reviews, music, humour, spoken word,
Today in History, High Profile, and other features.
9:30 pm - 1:00 am
Pajama Party
Your hosts Mike Mines and Robin Razzell present the not-so-often-heard
aspects of the CITR musical spectrum: ambient music for snoozing,
upbeat tunes for making popcorn or pillow fights. At 11:00 pm: CITR's
#1 Playlist Album.
1:00 - 4:00 am
Tunes H' Us
Lots of Music, a little chit chat and loads of Fun. Handyman Bob,
Groove Jumping, and Music from the Tarpits.
Sunday
8:00 - noon
Music of Our Time
20th Century music in the classical tradition, in all styles, media and
nationalities. Hosts Lynn Price and Bill Hobden will be profiling the
following composers during June:
June 02 Michael Baker, award-winning Vancouver Composer and
teacher.
June 09 Philip Glass-opaque or transparent, tune in and decide
for yourself.
June 16 Jean Sibelius, Finnish nationalist composer.
June 23 Paul Hindemith, one of the Fathers of new directions in
20th century music.
June 30 Toru Takemitsu, the leading Japanese figure in avant-garde
experimentation.
Noon - 12:08 pm
The Brunch Report - news, sports & weather.
12:08 - 3:00 pm
The Rockers Show #
Listen to the Rockers Show for the best in Reggae...Music with your host
George Family Man Barrett, Jerry the Special Selector, The Major
Operator and Collin The Prentice.
June 02 Twinkle Brothers
June 15 Misty in Roots
June 16 B...The Original Heptones
June 30 The Mad Professor Reggae, Dub
3:00 - 4:30 pm
Soul Galore
Focusing on Black-American popular music of the 20th century, this
program takes you from the birth of the blues through doo-wop, soul
and funk, from Massachusetts to California and everywhere in between.
6:00 - 6:30 pm
Sunday Magazine
See "Saturday Magazine" description for details.
6:30 - 8:00 pm
Neither Here Nor There
Relevance? What Relevance? Music, interviews, comedy, and readings of
prose and poetry. Hosted by: Chris Dafoe and Paris Simons.
8:00 - 9:00 pm
Sunday Night Live
Jacques presents your favourite vinyl heroes captured on tape in their
truest element-the live performance. Sunday Night Live will bring you
this month: ,
June 02 Psychedelic Furs
June 09 Weather Report-Live in Tokyo
June 16 Skeleton Crew-Live at the Soft Rock
June 23 Peter Gabriel-Rare Live Tracks
9:00 pm - 1:00 am
Fast Forward
Yet another alternative to CITR's general "alternative" sound, Mark
Mushet gives you the latest and most exciting in the world of experimental, independent, minimalist, electronic, avant-garde sound by non-
mainstream musicians.
1:00 - 4:00 am
Farly Music Show
Ken Jackson presents music from the Renaissance and Baroque periods,
presented at an appropriately early hour. June's features:
June 03 The music of Tallis, vivaldi, Buxtehude, and some Couperin
organ music.
June 10 CPE Bach, Jean-Marie Leclair, J.S. Bach, and
'The Triumphs of Oriana"
June 17 Josquin Des Pres, Teleman, and a Forte Piano Sonata
by Haydn
June 24 Schutz, Couperin, and the Purcell Opera "Dido and
Aeneas." Caribbean Productions Presents:
C
a
b    b
a    n
SUPERFEST
6$
f ^ g
\<-
c^;>
Direct From The Islands
•  MIGHTY ARROW
*  SAM &THECARIBBEAN
EXPRESS
*   PHASE III STEEL BAND
-4( special guest CJUI EL I        I YA heavy rockers
SATURDAY, JUNE 22, 1985
8:00 RM.
COMMODORE BALLROOM
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JIMMY RILEY
with Int
WAILI
JUNE 13 • 7:30 PM
Commodore Ballroom
Tickets: VTC/CBO, Highlife
Records, Zulu Records,
Indo-Caribbean Spice Mart. DISCORDER     a guide to CITR tm 102 cable 100
Vinyl Verdict
Working Week
Working Nights
Working Week has emerged from the British
music scene as one of the bands involved in a
kind of jazz/soul/pop revival that includes Sade,
Matt Bianco and others. Matt Bianco has garnered some minor airplay on this side of the
Atlantic; and Sade has begun what could be an
extremely lucrative breakthrough in the U.S. The
North American fate of Working Week remains
to be seen, but the band certainly possesses
potential for commercial success.
There are few musical styles I dislike more
than jazz-pop; the slicker it is, the more nauseating the effect it has upon me. Given this bias,
it's not surprising I think the most successful
Working Week tunes are those that limit their
jazz pretensions, and lean more toward "soul."
The highlight of Working Nights is the Marvin
Gaye-James Nyx tune "Inner City Blues," due
to the quality of the song and the avoidance of
jazz stylings. Working Week do a commendable
version, but part of the praise for this song is
because of its superiority to the aural wallpaper
that passes for music on much of the album.
Working Week really consists of two basic
entities, vocalist Julie Roberts and musicians-
songwriters Larry Stabbins and Simon Booth.
Roberts owns an enjoyable voice which is vastly
underutilized on the LP. The basic problem for
Working Week is that control of the group seems
to rest with the musicians. As such, Robert's
vocals often take a back seat to the musical
tedium of Stabbins and Booth. In every song,
except for "Inner City Blues," Stabbins and
Booth try their darnedest to turn the band into
a cocktail lounge act. As with much of the product of their style, the music of Working Week
tends to become suitable only for background
sound for a cappuccino bar; easy to sip to, and
ignore.
Most of the songs on Working Nights are
unnecessarily extended. At 6.23 minutes,
"Thought I'd Never See You Again" is about 31/2
minutes too long; it turns into a lengthy Chuck
Mangione-style instrumental—boring. The two
minutes of Latin rhythms on "Autumn Boy" are
just plain ridiculous and nearly ruin the song.
"No Case No Pay" fills out the album as a totally
pointless 8-minute instrumental. Do these guys
truly enjoy playing this stuff?
Roberts' voice has a certain ethereal quality,
and seems to be in the process of development.
Her vocals should be the core of the band since
the musicians have little of interest to offer. Working Nights falls short on "soul" and originality,
and is heavy on slickness. Roberts wrote none
of the songs on Working Nights, which is not
necessarily bad, but I would suggest that she
try writing some herself. Julie Roberts needs to
take greater control within the band, and give
Working Week's music a focus and some grit.
Failing this, she could always find herself a new
band.
—Kevin Smith
The Nomads
Outburst
Homestead (U.S.)
Well, these guys are from Sweden and, boy,
do they rock out! Are you kidding? Guys from
the land of Abba, the Hep-stars and the Spot-
nicks going the graverobbing route? Why not; it
works. There are several reasons for this.
First reason: singer Nick Vahlberg has a good
grasp of idiomatic English, which makes his own
lyrics realistic, and means that the multitude of
covers he sings don't sound sound ridiculous
because of rotten pronunciation (remember
Kraftwerk's first forays into English?) or like over-
precise renditions of semi-literate songs.
Second reason: The Nomads (Vahlberg, rhythm guitar, vocals; Hans Ostlund, lead guitar; Ed
Johnsson, drums; Tony Carlsson, bass; Frank
Minarik, farfisa) realize that there are only six
chords and eleven riffs in rock and roll, and you
only have to use two of them in any one song.
Drummer Johnsson also realizes that the cymbals on a drum kit are completely unnecessary:
the best back-beat is beating the skins for very
life. Needless to say, Outburst has The Sound;
something gut-grabbing and anus-clenching. For
a change, the recording is in a studio, and not
in the John of a flophouse, so you can actually
appreciate the conspicuous, diligent lack of
musicianship.
Third reason: The Nomads' original material
is strong and varied, ranging from the two-chord
thrasher "Rat Fink A Boo Boo" to the pensive-
ness of "Where the Wolf Bane Blooms." It's
obvious that these guys have been heavily influenced by the Chocolate Watchband, the Cramps,
and assorted other grunge-merchants.
This record is not perfect, and I have a couple
of qualifications. First qualification: some of the
eight cover versions (out of 12 songs) are stale
or pointless (nearly identical to the original). I
mean, so many people have done "I'm Not Like
Everybody Else" it's not even ironic anymore.
Also, their version of "Milkcow Blues" (to be
pedantic) is actually the Chocolate Watchband's
"I Don't Need Your Lovin' Anymore" (which was
a ripoff, but a different song). Against this, some
of the covers, like "Don't Tread on Me," are quite
good.
Second qualification: it's obvious that lead
guitarist Hans Ostlund used to play in a heavy
metal band of some sort; his fills are too fancy.
He should keep in mind that he's playing over
two or three chords (mostly C, F, and G) and
restrict himself accordingly: any remaining
energy he has can be expended by scraping the
strings with his guitar pick.
Judgement: good, if you have enough taste to
appreciate garage rock. If not, you probably won't
like Outburst. But maybe I could interest you in
the latest Agnetha single. . . .
—Rob Simms
Severed Heads
City Slab Horror
Ink Records
Many people both in and out of the music
industry regard the second album by any recording artist as THE most difficult thing to do. There
are good reasons for supporting this view—not
the least of which has to do with the old adage
about "what do you do for an encore." I don't
think it's so much a question of whether or not
there is still a wealth of originality to be tapped
as it is a question of how you satisfy an almost
insatiable public. Speaking for myself, I sometimes feel like a greedy vinyl monster gobbling
up and spitting out new records as fast as they
go on the turntables—all the while muttering "no,
no, no, YES, no, no, no. . ." The more music I
get exposed to, the more I need to hear to find
anything original. It's a vicious circle. The potential for burn-out is very high; and sometimes
whole weeks will go by when nothing jars me out
of my musical ennui (sexually repressed
boredom).
This brings us to City Slab Horror—the second DISCORDER     a guide to CITR fm 102 cable 100
album to be released on Ink Records by Australia's Severed Heads. The group is essentially Tom
Ellard, who produces most of the sounds via
tapes, synths, and what have you. NME (London)
gave the first album, Since the Accident, a mildly good review but left the impression that more
could have been expected. I still wonder how.
"Since the Accident" had a great deal of impact
on me and still does a year later for anyone who
has not yet heard it. Certain cuts made it as
rarities or curiousities onto commercial airwaves;
but generally Ellard's approach was one of "anti-
music" as opposed to your run-of-the-mill electro-
dance bands. If that's what made NME have
reservations about the first album (they tend to
label everything they don't understand as "pretentious"), City Slab Horror will get a better reception. It doesn't have the same punch, but somehow I didn't expect it. Considering the many
musical avenues he could have taken, I remain
eternally grateful to Mr. Ellard for not bringing out
yet another 100% dance-oriented machine-
music album, of which there is aldready a bor-
ingly high proliferation. "Good-bye Tonsils" (side
B, cut 4) was released as a single, and other cuts
could easily do as well. The whole album is more
rhythmically organized and in that sense it's
more accessible; but there are still enough unusual sounds and gadgetry to keep all but the
most snobbish happy. So too, the negative aspect which also appealed so much is still there,
as are the slightly inebriated and lurching quality
to the rhythms themselves—it's just all been
more refined. It's not an outrageous album—just
a damn good one; and ultimately it would be unfair to expect more—especially in the face of so
much less.
—Larry Thiessen
Go Four 3
EP
Zulu Records
Go Four 3 strike me as the overlooked, quiet
middle child of the Zulu lable. The band lacks
the humour of the Enigmas, the chaotic energy
of Slow and the live punch of both. By comparison to their label mates, Go Four 3 seem like
earnest, well-intentioned folk who just want to
make a pop record.
Pop, unfortunately, is not in vogue these days.
The admission of powerlessness, the resigned
frustration of pop pale in comparison to the defiance and bravado of rock and hardcore, the
supposed sophistication of more "progressive"
"New Music," and the hip-bending physicality of
black and white dance music. Pop, in the classic
sense of the word, cannot even hold sway in the
arena of popular music. It seems like everyone
on AM radio these days has a $60 haircut, $200
shoes, and a wardrobe that cost at least as much
as their synthesizer.
The tragedy at the bottom of all this is that
bands like Go Four 3 (and the Fastbacks, and
the Dbs, and, in the past, the Buzzcocks, the
Pointed Sticks, and the early Modernettes),
bands that would make AM a joy to listen to, are
shunted off into the underground to languish in
cult popularity.
Go Four 3's music is classic rough-edged pop.
Melodic (so you can hum along), beat-steady (so
you can dance) and dealing with all the shopworn subjects of pop: lost love, abandonment,
frustration at a world you are powerless to change
(so that you can feel for the singer). If this sounds
formulaic, it's because pop is by its nature, by
its simple structure, formulaic; inventiveness is
not the point, emotion is.
On this count Go Four 3 succeeded admirably
Roxanne Heichert's voice overcomes its limited
range with an emotional nakedness that is affecting without sounding affected. Steve Quinn and
Gord Badanic pile up the hooks fast enough
to keep the songs moving along. Lyrically the
band mines those motherlodes of pop: lost innocence ("Look Away"), lost love ("Death of Love,"
"In My Dreams") and powerlessness ("Just
Another Day," "Waiting for a Train"). It's an approach that's been taken a million times before,
and it runs the risk of lapsing into cliche, but Go
Four 3 do it with an honest heartfelt style that
overcomes the pitfalls of formula pop.
This EP isn't going to change the way you look
at pop music. It won't change the way you look
COLLECTORS  RPM.
where the new.... meet the ol
NEW ARRIVALS —
STELLO greenshirt (coloured vinyl) HUSKER DUnewdayri
hat you do STRAWBERRY SWITCHBLADE picture d
picture disc SISTERS OF MERCY the reptile house
SONED six-song ep EURYTHMICS would i lie to you
H WOBBLE love mystery BRYAN FERRY slave to love
THE TRIFFIDS treeless plain NEW ORDER xmas flexidisc
SIMPLE MINDS picture disc GENESIS tour prog#is
456 SEYMOUR ST. & 2528MA&T.     ]'■
1 FORGET local metal-punks DEATH SENTENCE and englSl|esome GBH
at the NY THEATRE on JUNE"7b BE THERE! at politics, sex, death, or the way you eat your
breakfast. It is, however, a record with heart, and
a solid debut from a promising band.
-CD
Killing Joke
Night Time
EG (UK)
Oh no. Another Killing Joke record. You'd think
that they'd given up by now. Nice new haircuts
on the cover. Jaz is blurry though, so at least we
don't have to look at his face. . .
Urn. Okay, I'll admit my expectations weren't
very high when this record came out. The first
thing that popped in my head when I saw it was,
here's another tedious and tiring treadmillian
effort. But when I heard it, I was so surprised,
I threw up. No, no, seriously though—Night Time
is unexpectedly melodic and uncacophonic.
Jaz's vocal lines are quite nice. The bass throbs
wonderfully, and is often upbeat and funky stuff.
"Tabazan," which opens the second side, has
a great beginning and amusing lyrics. The side
ends with the exciting enough "Eighties," which
is rich with rousing rhythmic chanting. In between these lies "Multitudes," the words of which
are honestly written. The same, I think, cannot
be said of "Europe."
A black sun is rising as the
Gods of Europe sleep/
Come back into your strength awaken/
Catastrophies atrocities
shall summon you my love. . .
When Killing Joke were in town a few years
ago, they said in an interview that they thought
the earth was going to swallow up mankind as
soon as we were bad enough. Claiming to be
unable to be understood by rational thought, they
told of this and various other vacuousnesses.
The un-understandable band—with correspondingly understandable music. Recently, however,
the band has admitted that much of what had
been said in the past was crap. They never real-
• ly believed it. This, I think was reflected musically
in their last few albums. These seemed too
dense (but were in fact too shallow) to warrant
approach. This is not true of Night Time, which
is clean and definitely worth a listen.
So, having not broken any records for record
sales, I think the band is trying for a more accessible sound and that this has been musically
beneficial. By dropping most of their facade, Killing Joke has found some expressiveness. And,
although I don't believe Night Times is due out
domestically, they may even sell a few records.
—Don Chow DISCORDER     a guide to CITR fm 102 cable 100
Every month CITR receives dozens of releases from major labels. Some
of these we play, some of
these we don't. And what
happens to those discs that
don't make it to the CITR
airwaves? Well, some are
filed into the library of the
CITR mobile sound system.
(And since selling promo
copies of records is illegal,
the rest go into brown cardboard boxes, waiting for the
day we figure out just what
the hell we are going to do
with them. This month's singles come from that brown
cardboard box.
Welcome  to
Frisbee File.
the  CITR
SHEENA EASTON - Swear
Sheena's transformation from
virgin to vamp is one of the most
amusing episodes in image-manipulation in recent years. Not as funny as Toni Tenille's attempt to
transform herself into a sex symbol (actually that was more pathetic
than funny) but close. The tiny
perfect Scot glared out from the
cover of this single, her cheekbones reinforced by a Va" of rouge.
Inside, she threatens grevious
bodily harm unless her beau guarantees his fidelity on a stack of
"Morning Train" singles.
Ten long years from now she'll
look back and laugh at this. You
don't have to wait that long.
THE BOOM TOWN RATS - Rain
The Rat's Bob Geldof was, of
course, the man behind Band Aid,
the first of innumerable aid for
Africa singles. You'd think that he
would have the sense to coast on
the good graces of that project. But
no, he had to put out this single.
If there is a touch of irony in the
title, there certainly isn't in the
song, which is a dull pedestrian effort. Another step on the long road
to oblivion.
DURAN DURAN - A View to a Kill
Bond producer Cubby Brocolli
has always had an eye to the pop
charts when commissioning the
themes to 007 flicks. I suppose you
have to compensate for Roger
Moore in any way you can. Broccoli may well have struck gold
again in Duran Ditto. Simon Le Bon
& Co. have the wonderful ability to
sing about anything, and still
sound as if they're singing about
nothing. This one will be a hit, but
nobody will know why.
LUBA - Secrets and Sin
1. God bless picture sleeves.
This one reveals Luba as a woman
who dolls herself in trendy designer clothes, and tops off the look
with what appears to be a pair of
Keds.
2. Shoes aside, Luba has a
deep walloping voice, best suited
to anthems. Unfortunately, this
song doesn't fill the bill. Luba
bellows admirably, but the song is
too grey to move anything other
than hot air.
3. God bless picture sleeves
again. The shot of Luba on the
cover of this single shows her in
mid-sneeze. I wonder why it didn't
turn up on the record?
NIGHTRANGER - Sentimental
Street
These guys do a credible Foreigner imitation. Why would anyone
want to do that? You may well ask.
Not nearly as funny-stupid as
their last opus "Sister Christian."
-CD
NON FICTION
ART
CLOTHES   •    NEAT STUFF
136 POWELL ST.
684-9834 DISCORDER     a guide to CITR fm 102 cable 100
(HMD
**I don't thinK my pantyhose
are up to these' endless
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CITR TOP 20 ALBUMS
CITR TOP 20 SINGLES
ARTIST
TITLE
LABLE
ARTIST
TITLE
LABEL
1 POISONED
Poisoned EP
EAST RAY
1 CHRIS HOUSTON
Surfin'
-DEMO**
2 GUADALCANAL DIARY Walking in the Shadow...
DB(US)
2 THE DAMNED
Grimly Fiendish
MCA (UK)
3 JEFFREY LEE PIERCE Wildweed
STATIK(UK)
3 EINSTURZENDE
4 SEVERED HEADS
City Slab Horror
INK (UK)
NEUBATEN
Yu-Gung
SOB (UK)
5 GO FOUR 3
Go Four 3 EP
ZULU
4 BRILLIANT ORANGE
Happy Man
-DEMO**
6 ENIGMAS
Strangely Wild
ZULU
5 THE SMITHS
Shakespeare's Sister
ROT (UK)
7 DUKES OF
6 SALEM 66
Across the Sea
HOMESTEAD (US)
STRATOSPHEAR
25 O'Clock
VIRGIN
7LESCALAMITES
Pas La Peine
NEW ROSE (FR)
8 FRONT 242
No Comment
AN.SIDE(BLG)
8 FIVE YEAR PLAN
At the Beach
-DEMO**
9 SONIC YOUTH
Bad Moon Rising
HOMESTED(US)
9 0MNISQUID
Journey in the East
-DEMO**
10 GAME THEORY
Real Night Time
ENIGMA (US)
10 LLOYD COLE & THE
11 YELLO
Stella
WEA
COMMOTIONS
Glory
POLYDOR (BRD)
12 LIME SPIDERS
Slave Girl
HYBRID (UK)
11NG3
Better Off Dead
**DEMO**
13 THE SOUND
Heads & Hearts
STATIK(UK)
12 JESUS & MARY CHAIN
Never Understand
CREATION (UK)
14 DAMON EDGE
Alliance
NEW ROSE (FR)
13 RHYTHM MISSION
Life's Level
**DEMO**
15 WORKING WEEK
Working Nights
VIRGIN
14 EVERYTHING BUT
16 HUSKER DU
New'Day Rising
FRINGE
THE GIRL
When All's Well
WEA (UK)
17 TUPELO CHAIN SEX
Spot the Difference
SELMA(US)
151 BRAINEATER
Wrong World
-DEMO**
18 THE ASSOCIATES
Perhaps
WEA
16THETRIFFIDS
Bright Lights Big City
CARTEL
19 SISTERS OF MERCY
First & Last & Always
MERCIFUL (UK)
17CHARTWELLINC.
The Old Man They Found.
. **DEMO**
20 KILLING JOKE
Night Time
UG(UK)
18 FOETUS ART
TERRORISM
Calamity Crush
SOB (UK)
19THEFLUNKEES
Let's Dance On
-DEMO**
20STANRIDGWAY
The Big Heat
ILLEGAL (UK)
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