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  IllrSTJslcoiiCEfiTS"
~^^     CANADA Issue 229 • May 2002 • That Magazine from CiTR 101.9fM
Features
thunderbird interview hell by evan symons p. 12
wasteland of wax by tobias v. p. 13
vinyl ritchie by boon kondo p. 14
emily pohl-weary by doretta lau p. 15
fall silent by eric flexyourliead p. 16
radiogram by val cormier p. 18
general rudie by ska-t p. 20
paul kelly by val cormier p. 21
Regulars
dear airhead p. 4
fucking bullshit p. 4
Vancouver special p. 4
panarticon p. 6
7" p. 7
strut & fret p. 10
radio free press p. 11
over my shoulder p. 11
under review p. 22
dj profile p. 22
real live action p. 26
charts p. 31
on the dial p. 32
kick around (comic) p. 33
datebook p. 34
Cover
Blue skies, blue skies... Radiogram, as captured on
film by Lori and layed out in fabulous style by JJD
of u-ww.tlu'waxmuseum.bc.ca.
editor:
Barbara Andersen
ad rep:
Steve DiPasquale
art director:
Lori Kiessling
production manager:
Christa Min
real live action editor:
Ann Goncalves
under review editor:
Sara Young
editorial assistant:
Donovan Schaefer
design:
Christa, Lori, JJD, Jesse Simoi
production:
Derek Boone, Vampyra
Draculea, Duncan McHugh,
Jesse Simon, Keith Turkowsk
on the dial:
Bryce Dunn
charts:
Luke Meat
datebook:
Barb
distribution:
Matt Steffich
us distribution:
Tlie Peanut Gallery
publisher:
Linda Scholten
L^r^^SE
© "DiSCORDER" 2002 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All
rights reserved. Circulation 17,500. Subscriptions, payable in advance, to Canadian residents are S15
for one year, to residents of the USA are S15 US; S24 CDN elsewhere. Single copies are S2 (to cover
postage, of course). Please make cheques or money orders payable to DiSCORDER Magazine.
DEADLINES: Copy deadline for the June issue is May 15th. Ad space is available until May 22th
and can be booked by calling Steve at 604.822.3017 ext. 3. Our rates are available upon request.
DiSCORDER is not responsible for loss, damage, or any other injury to unsolicited manuscripts,
unsolicited artwork (including but not limited to drawings, photographs and transparencies), or any
other unsolicited material. Material can be submitted on disc or in type. As always, English is preferred. Send email to DiSCORDER at discorder@club.ams.ubc.ca.
From UBC to Langley and Squamish to Bellingham, CiTR can be heard at 101.9 fM as well as
through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR
DJ line at 822.2487, our office at 822.3017 ext. 0, or our news and sports lines at 822.3017 ext. 2. Fax us at
822.9364, e-mail us at: titnngr@maiJ.ams.ubc.ca, visit our web site at http://www.citr.ca or just pick up a
goddamn pen and write #233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 CANADA.
printed in Canada
66 WATER STREET VANCOUVER CANADA
Events at a glance:
C1RCA PRESENTS the SLAM CITY JAM PARTY @ OVERWEIGHT
»early to avoid disappointment!) http://www.c11
SUNDAY MAY 5
SUNDAY SESSIONS presents: DJ ELEKTRA (Grounds
TUESDAY MAY 7
ARIZONA (Etheric Link/Really C
• Victoria, BC) @ TACTICAL
WEDNESDAY MAY 8
GMAN & RIZK present GRANDE The very I
THURSDAY MAY 9
NORDIC TRAX & NEW MUSIC WEST present SPEAKING WITH SOUNDS:
Feat GAVIN FROOME (live pa), MORGAN PAGE (live pa), LUKE MCKEEHAN (dj set),
SATURDAY MAY 11
Nettwerk presents "CHILL OUT 2002/The Ultimate Chillout" CD. Early at 9:00pm Roc
come lounge and listen the new release featuring the likes of Massive Attack, BT, Radiohead and more.
Followed by INSIDE Hosted by Cotton (House of Venus) with resident DJs Dickey Doo and Todd O
- "  Tstairs with Clarence and his Soul/Jazz Crew. Franc Logik warms up the main room 9-10.
 ^m/Cover $10.00
SUNDAY MAY 12
SUNDAY SESSIONS presents: MARCUS VISIONARY (P
One of Canada's most beloved junglists, Marcus is here to rock the pari,	
spanning from the smoothest vocal R&B stylings, to the most hard-edged breakbeats in the biz.
THURSDAY MAY 16
MARK FARINA: THE 'CONNECT CD RELEASE TOUR
J 'Connect'. Another Vancity session with
d disappointment! Doors 9pm/$22.00
TUESDAY MAY 21
CORNERSHOP-LIVE
Early Doors 8pm/*l B.00 Advance tickets available at Zulu, Scratch, Highlife, Noize! and Ditch (Vic
THURSDAY MAY 23
SOUND PROOF: presented by 1200LBS and DJ LAYZ in
ng Knowledge Mag free CD I
of D&B, Hiphop, and
9 at Bassix, FWUH, Futuristic Flavour
SUNDAY MAY 26
2GUERILLA, DADABASE, BOOMTOWN & REPHLEX RECORDS present the
BRAINDANCE COINCIDENCE TOUR Featuring DMX KREW (live pa), CYLOB (dj set),
BOGDAN RACZYNSKI (live pa), OVUCA (live pa) UK based R<
3 Aphex Twin, is sending a i
Early Doors 7pm/$14 Advance tickets at Zulu, Scratch, Boomt
SUN. JUNE 2: DJ SUV TUE JUNE 4: TIMO MAAS THU JUNE 13: KRAFTY KUTZ
TUE TACTICAL progressive grooves WED GRANDE r&bhiphop
THR WEEKLY ROTATION s
FRI OVERWEIGHT hiphop,
ENTS FRI BIG SHMOOZE (
*ks SAT INSIDE HOUSE
SUN SUNDAY SESSIONS drumnbass
Club: [604] 683.6695
i styling by: URBAN
3E^g£H©SB icaraimca
#233-6138 SUB Blvd. Vancouver BC V6T 1Z1
A CORRECTION
I am writing this letter to clear
was printed in Pnnarticoii in
your April 2002 issue. It would
be unfortunate for anyone fo
believe that I "curated" Signal
and Noise by myself entirely. In
keeping with Video In protocol,
all decisions for the New Works
programmes (this includes the
audio and video programmes)
were made by a committee of
three, of which I was only one
person. The other unfortunate
part of anyone harbouring
under the illusion that I did it
all is that it ignores the fact that
there were also programmes
curated by artists in the community. This is clearly stated in
the program guide itself.
Further, it is important for
people to understand the background and history of how the
majority media arts festivals are
organised. Typically there is one
individual or core group of coordinators who invite curators
to present programmes, and
organise the committees for the
juried programmes. This is to
say that the media art festival
form combines democratic
processes with that of individual decision making processes.
The only other matter I
would like to point out is one of
nomenclature, but is significant
nonetheless.  The works that
Pan,
inlet
>xpen
I only bring this up as part of
the intention of Signal and Noise
is to bring attention to, and raise
the profile of, single channel
video specifically, as opposed to
other forms of media. Not to
suggest that Video In—and by
way of Video In, Signal and
Noise—-is not down for all
and activist media
s, including film,
for too complex
here, I am not going
to the hierarchical
of film vs. video.
However, if anyone reading this
is interested, give us a call at
604.872.8337, and we'd be
happy to chat with you about
this matter further.
If anyone who missed the
festival wants more information,      please      check      out
dilei
get
www.videoinstudios.com   for
programme details.
Best regards,
Jen Weih
Exhibitions and Programming
Coord mater, Video In
fucking bull/shit
iiiiiuiiiMiaraMmmHMaasa
bullshit by Christa Min
Tom Verlaine won't stop
calling me. He calls three
times a day. Some days he
calls three times in a row, other
days, once every eight hours.
Lately, I've been letting the
phone ring, which only leaves
me with three messages a day
from Tom Verlaine, who happens to have a very nice voice.
Sometimes I call him Miller.
He doesn't like that. And he
won't like that I'm writing about
our torrid affair. But it's over. He
knows it, and still he won't stop
calling me.
It started over a year ago
when I saw him buying sport
socks at the Vancouver Flea
Market. Well, he saw me. I
didn't recognize him until I
looked up after he asked me if I
was as hot as his bare feet on
Bleecker Street in the summertime. What a stupid question, I
thought. OF COURSE I AM. But
it was Tom Verlaine, one of the
only people in the world who's a
better guitar player than me. So
that afternoon, Tom and I went
and flew a kite. It was fun.
I fell on my ass at first. He
took my feet and pushed them
off the ground with a broom.
That   had   never   happened
before. His teeth were as yellow
as gold. His chest was like a
sheet of glass, smooth but brittle.
And his arms were long and
beautiful. He liked to wrap them
around me and press so hard it
was as if his arms were a twist
tie, and I was the soft, fresh, loaf
of ass (bread, ass, whatever), that
women to make him think that I
was lying.
So two months ago I told
Tom Verlaine to leave me alone. I
suppose Tom never really did
anything wrong, I just didn't feel
like seeing him anymore. He
was upset, and he accused me of
being jealous of his guitar solos.
HE ASKED ME IF I WAS AS HOT AS HIS
BARE FEET ON BLEECKER STREET
IN THE SUMMERTIME.
Ire wanted to keep safe inside a
plastic bag. But he would tie his
arms so tight that I couldn't
breathe.
I saw him much less often
than he would've liked. I never
visited him in New York. He
came to me as much as I would
let him, and he always called
three times a day. Which was
way too often. He sent all sorts
of garbage in the mail, too—aib-
ber plants, brown sugar, stuffed
animal parts—you know, the
usual. I told him that I didn't
want any stupid garbage and
that he didn't have to call me at
all, but I guess in his 52 years
he's been with enough stupid
The truth is, once he called me
"Sweetie" and I hated it.
In reality, he didn't deserve
me (really, who does?), and he
was WAY too young for me. I
thought he understood.
I figure that the only way to
make him stop calling is to write
about it, leak our little secret to
Mojo, Wire, and Discorder so the
publicity of his rejection will
make him stop crying.
I'm sorry I had to do this,
Miller.
Tom Verlaine, I will always
love you. I will still listen to your
records every day. I will never
forget you and your big old
cock. •
local reviews by Janis McKenzie
Recording a CD can take a
long, long time. I know
this better than a lot of
people, since my old band has
been working on one (off and
on) for more than five years, and
still shows no sign of finishing.
But could this be the explanation
for all the CDs that have come to
me lately with copyright dates of
1999 and earlier? Call me cynical, but I suspect that a lot of
musicians are doing a spring
cleaning, unearthing old forgotten gems from the bottoms of
their closets, then sending them
to us here at Discorder. Good as
these older recordings may be,
for space reasons I've decided to
stick to reviewing the fresher
pressings. (Bands, send your
me here at Discorder, and maybe
I'll reconsider.)
SK ROBOT
SK Robot
(Independent)
The band's name and tlie cover
art hardly say "pop," but pop is
certainly what this 5-song EP
delivers, in the tradition of
Matthew Sweet, Alex Chilton,
and even some of those josie and
the Pussycats-era Saturday morning cartoons. Five current and
former members of Space Kid,
the Saddlesores, Bossa-nova,
Speedbuggy, and Cinderpop
play well-constructed, boy-harmony packed songs that may
have moments as mellow as Big
Star on downers but tend on the
whole to be downright ener
getic. There are twists mixed in
with the catchy sweetness: a bit
of bad-boy '70s guitar at the
beginning of "Sweet Gun," and
a childlike Small Faces-
flavoured intro to a song that
turns out to be called "Hooded
Church of Satan," to name just
two.
<s_k_robot@hotmail.com>
A may 2002
SLOW NERVE ACTION
...The Soap of Beautiful
Women
(Independent)
Wow, these are some horny
funksters. From the somewhat
abstract naked intertwined
people on the cover to song
titles like "Take It All Off,"
"Bunz," "Bisexual," and
"Astroglide," it's all about sex.
And the groove-driven songs
themselves seem carefully calculated to lure chicks into
removing their garments (see
that first song title). Alas, lyrics
like "Astroglide, goes deep
inside... Open up the back
door," don't feel as fresh and
funny as when Elastica sang
similar things about Vaseline a
few years ago. But if you do
feel like seducing someone, or
having music to disrobe to, this
could be the CD for you.
www.sIownerveaction.com
THE TENNESSEE TWIN
Free to Do What?
(Mint)
Remember what commercial
country music used to sound
like before the ascent of
Shania, Garth, and the Dixie
Chicks? It always seemed to
me to rely heavily on the use of
pedal steel guitar, and lately, to
my great surprise, it looks like
that instrument has found a
new home with the alt-country
crowd. Is it ironic? Is it respectful? These are the questions
you may ask yourself about
Free to Do What?, which makes
use of the pedal steel guitar as
well as the once-loathed accor-
dian, fiddle, mandolin, and
even a Dolly Parton song.
Lucinda (a.k.a. Cindy) Wolfe's
voice has a nasal twang that
could be post-modernist
tongue-in-cheek or sincerely
hillbilly-esque—she's really
from the American South, after
all, and quite capable of either.
What's easier to figure out: the
title track that sharply criticizes
the (North) American way, and
"Ruben, Oh Ruben," a song
that asks only that you get up
and dance like an idiot for a
minute and a half.
www.mintrecs.com • rr's     So    5vi£T     HtR.e,       i-r^S
TOv<yo. t      live     I./W     rirt^^^
^S      p^ceF^L
/
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TrtE"   ouTJKi^^y
vaRv     ^ifoIf*AL.     ft ^ d    ^# 'TET.
mon f LI
May is Asian Heritage Month here at CiTR
101.9FM and to celebrate we'll be contributing a
special day of programming Thursday May 16th
from 4PM to midnight, featuring music, spoken
word, interviews, social commentary and much
more, as we explore the influence of Asian culture
in our community as well as around the world.
Grand Re-opening!
2" 16/24 track
No Bullshit, Just Good Recording
Satisfaction Guaranteed!
>   (206)525-0628
hbgrant pbcords
email- studio@vagrantrecords.com
Ut:
itclviree
Pick up these dreadf
dreadlocks a t: |
5E^m®SB ponorticoM
the sound of spectacle by tobias
Here I Am In Montreal
All the rumours are true—hardwood floors, bagels, and cheap
rent—Cote de Neiges screaming by—Franglais and sexy
sex—snow in May—neverend-
ing club nights—cigarettes—of
course I am writing this column
before I have left, but as you
read it I am there.
FUCK the Referendum
Alright, this is it: time to put up
the fists and fight. The Liberal
Referendum on First Nations is
a bigoted attempt to silence the
minority with the weight of the
majority. I don't think I am
going too far in saying that it's
equivalent to asking the
Germans what to do with the
Jews in 1935. Get it? Alright.
Let's proceed. Here are some
great ways to register your disgust not only with the
Referendum, but with the system itself. For those who think
voting "No" is the answer—it
isn't. The Referendum questions are ambiguous enough
that either answer can be legally
interpreted in favour of racist
policies under Liberal control;
furthermore, a No vote is not
binding; and because of already
existing Constitutional protections of First Nations status,
neither does a Yes vote hold any
legal weight. The result? An historic waste of nine million
bucks that nevertheless plays
homogenizes a diverse people.
Every First Nations treaty is different and unique. Solutions to
First Nations treaty rights lie
not in the public poll of uninformed, majority non-native
people.   2.   The   Referendum
creative—speak your mind on
the Referendum, attach a letter,
get a black marker and pull out
the anti-Liberal slogans: just
make sure to fuck it up so it is
obviously "spoiled"). Then put
it in all the necessary envelopes
(do that all normally) and drop
it in the mail. Voila. Your ballot
will be counted as a spoiled ballot. 2. Spoil your ballot, and
send it to an Indigenous organization collecting the ballots, i.e.,
the Indigenous Media Arts
Group at the Video In reception
area (1965 Main Street,
604.872.8337). You can also take
A NO VOTE IS NOT BINDING; AND BECAUSE OF ALREADY
EXISTING CONSTITUTIONAL PROTECTIONS OF FIRST
NATIONS STATUS, NEITHER DOES A YES VOTE HOLD ANY
LEGAL WEIGHT.
into the Liberals' hands, giving
them the weapons to do
irreparable damage before the
Constitution comes to bear on
the situation. Details: 1. The
public is provided with no
information on the subject
whatsoever. History of colonial
occupation? None. Residential
schools abuse? Nada. Existing
treaties and pacts? Zilch. Many
of the questions depend upon
the results of others; most are
completely ambiguous as to
whether the question is a general question or one specific to
certain, individual First Nations
claims.      The      Referendum
crushes the heterogeneity of
humanity with the same jackboot: it smears non-natives with
the same brush as Natives
through its offensive generalities. It is not too much to say
that generalities that attempt to
conceal and whitewash histories and at the same time promote the hatred of difference
are the premise of nothing less
than fascism.
The Ballot... and its Eminent
Destruction
There are two main ways to
spoil your ballot. 1. Write whatever you want on it (make it
your ballot to the Native
Friendship Centre at East
Hastings and Commercial.
Why? The Union of BC Indian
Chiefs will collect and count the
spoiled ballots as protest votes
and then burn them in a public
ceremony. If I hadn't already
sent out my ballot with "Liberal
Racist Fascists" on it, I would
have done exactly this. Sending
your ballot to a willing First
Nations representative not only
registers your protest vote, but
also shows your support for the
indigenous rights of First
Nations to self-government on
their own terms, unhindered by
the tyranny of the majority.
You've got until May 15th, so
get a move on!
The Liminal Zoo
What is "in-between" space?
What becomes in-between?
Colin Miner, James Nizam, and
Chris Ruffatto—in that "in-
between" stage of neither-stu-
dent-nor-professional-artist—explored this non-space in their
"Liminal" show which ran April
15-25th at SUB Gallery, UBC. As
Aaron Peck notes in his "Of
Other Spaces, or Liminal" document for the exhibition, "the network of galleries signifies how [a
young artist] is placed in relation
to that stage of their career." As I
walked into the Gallery, James
was trying to sort out the lighting of his "Lucid (Series III)"
painting, a dark green/black
plasticized Rothko-esque dream-
scape. Praxis: James was
attempting to turn the admittedly crappy gallery into an engaging space, dealing with the shitty
in-house lighting... The art:
Miner's "David and Goliath"
was a collection of colour, cardboard and cut-out sheep surrounding a backlit photo of a
bushy-eyed and toga-clad Greek
with a sling-shot. Was he attacking or defending the sheep or
me? Ambiguous in either
defending or attacking
Christianity, I felt like a misunderstood god. Ruffato's large,
backlit photo of a room-set, "The
Grommet"—complete with a
strange "grommet" human doll,
"grommet" easel sketches, a fake
miniature-world outside the
"window"—reminded me of his
consumer-topia film exhibited at
"Overperson" (indeed, the same
black and red notebooks were
scattered on the floor of this
room-space). And yet I was perversely captured by Nizam's
"Lucid (Series I)," a series of
peep-show eye-holes—of those
strange lenses you use for looking at 3D topographical maps—
that allowed the viewer to see
mysterious photos of a clinical,
white room with a model in a
white biological suit. For Nizam,
it was a dreamscape; for me, it
was almost an erotic nightmare.
As I moved from peep-hole to
peep-hole, the model disappeared from the white table to
appear in a slide-mirror projection on the opposite wall; and in
the last two projections, two separate conflicting images attempt
to place the viewer in two spaces
at once, both looking at the
room from the viewer's point-
of-view and looking back-out at
the camera from the model's
point-of-view, an impossible
position, an in-between space,
what, as Peck notes, Foucault
would call a "heterotopia," or
Turner a "liminal" space. For
me, at least, Nizam's particular
work was attempting to discover fetishistic relations—the peep-
show, the viewer, and the
clinical—"with(in/out)" the
khora. •
Until First Nations are Free!
no fun
check out HiMfllAP! Mondays @ MesaLuna
MAY 06   // punk
Nunstalker •
Based On A True Story •
Uwaytoday •
ME-
MAY 13   // rock
Chore •
The Liars •
Assertion •
Black Rice •
MAY 20 // hip hop
• JC
• Def Poets Society
• Baron Samedi
• I roc & K-Cuf w/ DJ DJ
MAY 27 // ska
• The Furios
•The Hoodwinks
• Guests TBA
STAY TUNED IN JUNE FOR
• Grade & Flashlight Brown (03)  • The Frenetics (10)
Mesa Luna: 1926 W. Broadway. See www.whap.ca for more info.
6 may 2002 ■ H<
It's May, when a young
man's mind turns to the
finale of his favourite TV
show (Buffi/ The Vampire Slayer,
anyone?), and, of course, music.
I give you the latest offerings
heard through the ears of a man
who's not afraid to make that
declaration and put his two
cents in for a bunch of records
that s
make hiri
befon
the ol' turntable
ing the offending
piece of vinyl (much like our
aforementioned heroine does to
her foes) into the trash heap.
Take HO-HUM and
JASON MORPHEW, for example. Note to the former: usually,
when they say the music speaks -
volumes,'there's some truth to
that when it describes your band
name. And to the latter, what
iuldp
■ share yo
talent which such a crappy
band? (riayadel Records, PO
Box 250721', Little Rock, AR
72225-0721 USA)
If Buffy had an alternate
theme song, I'm sure KEVIN
BLECHDOM would be the
songwriter behind it. Thank
goodness it doesn't, cuz her stuff
is more suited to those Itchy and
Scratchy episodes  that never
by Bryce Dunn
engage in minimalist blips and
bleeps, somewhat reminiscent of
early Kraftwerk, on songs
like "Final Analysis" and
"Daydreams" and put an interesting spin on The Troggs'
"Strange Movies." (No contact
provided; intentional maybe,
accidental probably.)
Shifting into high gear, we
turn to THE RADIO REELERS
no doubt inspired them (Devil
Dogs, The Humpers, et al.). Two
great originals are to be had in
"Radio Feelin'" and "No
Respect" (and a throwaway version of Wanda Jackson's "Let's
Have A Party") at least get the
shindig shakin' properly. Only
500 of these babies were pressed,
so better snatch 'em up, quick!
Action, 1816 East
3rd Avenue Vancouver, BC V5N
" party favours
are the name of the game for
THE CYNICS and THE BRIEFS
3 it past the cutting n
Two tracks of wigged-out
be found on a 7"
that sees Ms. Blechdom helped
out by Adult Rodeo on "Jelly
Donuts" and Fred Frith on "I
Done Usin' U's and Bees." Not
for children under the age of six
(unless they've had enough of
The Teletubbies to last the rest of
their natural born lives). (Four
States Fair Record Co., no
address given.)
Still weird, but nonetheless
entertaining is THE T-CELLS.
On this 10" effort (yes, occasionally we make exceptions for the
7"s larger friends), our T-Cells
ting speedy purchases from
yours truly. Garage maniacs can
rejoice with "Turn Me Loose," as
any stiff will ultimately give in
to the charms of this fuzz-filled,
harmonica-blastin' rave-up,
backed with an equally amped
nod to The Electric Prunes'
"Never Had It Better." Punk
purists will pogo accordingly to
the so-catchy-it's-stupid "Love
and Ulcers" and laugh as the
boys poke fun at their country
and its citizens with "We
Americans." Essential additions
rd c
t Hip Recx
'O Box
7 USA
DirtNap Records, PO Box
9, Seattle, WA 98111 USA,
.■ely.
La
are ME A
t laugh (they g
.ne song). Inste
Nat
and
"Massacre High," all set to a
backbeat of Stiff Little Fingers-
style punk. Their name translates as "My Responsibility" and
for any conscientious individual
to check this stuff out. (Empty
Records, PO Box 12034, Seattle,
WA 98102 USA)
And i
, back t
blonde
butt... •
kickin'
npire
MEDITERRANEAN H0MEC00KIN'* DRINKS • LIVE MUSIC
Wednesday, May 1
Thursday, May 2
Friday,   May   3
Saturday, May 4
Sunday, May 5
Wednesday, May 8
Thursday, May 9
Friday, May 10
Saturday, May 11
Sunday, May 12
Wednesday,   May   15
Thursday, May 16
Friday, May 17
Saturday, May 18
Sunday, May 19
Wednesday, May 22
Thursday, May 23
Friday, May 24
Saturday, May 25
Sunday, May 26
Tuesday, May 28
Wednesday, May29
Thursday, May 30
Friday, May31
Angle Inglis
Steve Dawson and Elliot Polsky
The   Rockin'   Daddys
Bottleneck
Kendra  Shand
Amy Honey / Carolyn Mark
NEW MUSIC WEST... TBA
NEW MUSIC WEST... TBA
NEW MUSIC WEST... TBA
Musiki Parea / Grup Baris
Steve  Dawson  and  Elliot  Polsky
Rich  Hope
Victor Polyik and Scott Smith
Amy  and  Harry's Birthday Bash
RANCHFEST!... David P. Smith / Boomchix
RANCHFEST!... Rich Hope / Jon Wood / Heather Griffin
RANCHFEST!... Hopetown / Swingin' Doors
RANCHFEST!... Silt / Violet / Conrad
RANCHFEST!... Greasy Kings / Rocket Fins
RANCHFEST!... Grahma Brown and the Prairie Dogs
From Toronto... Picastro w/ guests
Organix
Elisa Rose
Janet Panic
For booking info contact Amy Honey: amyhunnie@hotmail.coni
THE  MAIN  4210   MAIN   ST. o  26TH V5Y  2A6   604.709.8555
*w*fv       0&Wm; .■■■■ ■w^
ggm
~
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aggression yet utilising a level of melodious dynamics
that few aggressive acts can manage." chris Gramiich, Exclaim!
Kl niAl fl kl Tfl 11D   THU MAY 09 VANCOUVER, BC @ The Cobalt
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Arrhythmia
THE HERBALISER
Something Wicked This Way Comes
Live June 23
at the Commodore Ballroom
MICKEY HART
Over The Edge And Back
The Best Of
BILLY BRAGG
England, Half-English
MICHELLE SHOCKED
Deep Natural
[Dub Natural]
CAITLIN CARY
While You Weren't Looking
JEFF TWEEDY
Chelsea Walls
FRED EAGLESMITH
Falling Stars And Broken Hearts
Live May 10
at Richard's On Richards
JOSH ROUSE THE PINE VALLEY PETER MURPHY
Under Cold Blue Stars COSMONAUTS Dust
The Executioner's Last Songs
Vol.1
MARY MARGARET
O'HARA
Apartment Hunting
Original Motion Picture
Soundtrack
VARIOUS ARTISTS
This Is Where I Belong:
The Songs Of Ray Davies
& The Kinks
THE CONSTANTINES
The Constantines
Live May 10
at Piccadilly Pub
VARIOUS ARTISTS
Rewind!
mObiOf
VARIOUS ARTISTS
Motion 2: A Six Degrees
Dance Collection
ALL TITLES SPECIALLY PRICED AT
OUTSIDE
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performance/art by Penelope Mulligan
DAVID YONGE
Horrifying the Inner Child
a playroom
Friday, April 5
1 didn't know it was going to be
a birthday party, even when
someone at the door handed us
each a cardboard hat with balloons on it. We climbed a long,
steep staircase and floated down
a hallway lined with white
paper. Turning the comer, I saw
what a vast and curious place
we were in. It was impossible to
tell where the rooms began and
ended as 2 x 4s marched off into
the distance. It was as if giant
maggots had gotten into the
building and picked the skeleton
clean. It was cold, so we kept our
coats on and headed for a single
lamp glowing all weak and yellow in a far corner.
The headless dummy of a
small child sat in a highchair
above a sloppy, green birthday
cake. A little bicycle, a stack of
presents and a huge cardboard
box sat on the floor while a
strange-looking toy monkey
leered from a sideboard. Some
artists would call this an installation, bung it in a gallery and
have done with it, but not David
Yonge. It seems that whatever he
creates, constructs or finds
becomes set and props for a
methodical rampage of actions
under various aliases. And this
one wasn't going to be pretty.
We amused ourselves walking through walls and chatting
until Puff the Magic Dragon start -
Against a loop of tinkling,
poignant music broken by chattering voices, Peek-a-Boo blundered through the rituals of
lighting birtnday candles and
opening gifts, but it was all
going horribly wrong. He
stomped on the cake, trashed the
presents  and   began   beating
David Yonge. Horrifying the Inner Child
ed playing. It was funny to see a
big knife suddenly poke through
the carton. Something was sawing its way out of there and it
was Peek-a-Boo the Clown. By
song's end, the scariest party
guest of all was out of the box.
everything in sight with a broom
handle, including the little boy.
The lamp got knocked out and
we were plunged into blackness
while he repaired it by the light
of his Zippo. Then he tried to set
himself on fire. Things got real
ly weird when he pulled what
looked like a big, rubbery thermos from the front of his pants
and started beating off. He came
all over the kid, then used the
knife to slice the thing off. Blood
gushed down his trouser leg.
Climbing onto the ridiculously
small bike, he paddled down the
hall toward the stairwell. We followed, already guessing how it
would end. Party hats on heads
and sick looks on faces, we
watched as clown and bike
crashed and tumbled down the
cruel stairs and out the door. A
few of us clattered down after
him but he was already gone.
This was definitely the darkest thing I've seen Yonge do. The
relentless cruelty and destruction seemed pretty much directed at the artist himself (the
hapless birthday boy dummy
was wearing a little red T-shirt
with "DAVID" on it) but the
clown's black make-up was so
thick and angular that it was like
a mask which drove a wedge
between perpetrator and victim.
The whole thing managed to
stay just below the sights of anyone trying to psychoanalyse the
proceedings and felt refreshingly free of the rivers of "issues"
that run through so much performance art. Maybe that's why
it could make us feel so genuinely sad.
I pondered how it must
have looked to someone walking or driving past late at night
as a frantic clown in a pink lame
suit burst into the street and
dashed off with a tiny bicycle
under his arm—especially in
such an upscale neighbourhood.
The wonder and the joke was
that this space even existed. The
event had been a kind of heist.
Peek-a-Boo's people were locking up, so we dispersed.
Feeling a little rattled, I went
off in search of hot chocolate and
found a cafe that was still open.
Eventually, a few others drifted
in carrying their party hats and
we grinned softly, knowing that
we'd  been  having the same
THE PLUGHOLE
Further proof that the manky
end of Granville Street is getting
washed and groomed, or a sign
that some dancers have an
inventive way of breaking out
of conventional performance
spaces? For now, I choose to
believe the latter and highly recommend a visit to the Royal
Hotel Pub when MovEnt presents Dances for a Small Stage
on May 7 and 8.
Movement Enterprises is a
performance society co-founded
by Day Helesic and Julie-anne
Saroyan, whose priority is to
round up dancers with something to show and get it out
there. They launclied themselves
last Fall at the Roundhouse with
a mini-festival of New Dance
called Start Here, but for their
current project, have chosen a
venue whose ambience will be
an important part of the show.
They've also attracted an
impossibly stellar line-up.
Imagine The Holy Body Tattoo
performing three excerpts from
Circa; former Ballet BC supernova Crystal Pite as her folksing-
ing alter ego Crissy Rockbottom;
Cori Caulfield (of Party Girl
fame) in her new piece Bought
and Sold and Dean Macarenko
performing a monkey solo created for him by Cornelius Fischer-
credo. There's also a chance to
trawl for the next big thing as
Christopher Duban, Melanie
Phillips and Montreal expat
Shauna Elton round out the bill.
Helesic promises that while
they'll stick some candles on the
tables, they'll maintain the
Royal's rawness. It will be interesting to see what the dancers
do while hanging around a different kind of bar(re). Start time
is 8pm. Info from 604.731.6856.
At the grunt gallery on May
9, you can watch a mischievious,
thoroughly engaging performance artist and exercise your I-
hate-America muscles at the
same time. Naufus Ramirez-
Figueroa has used the overthrow
of Guatemala's elected government in 1954 as an inspiration for
his latest work, Banana Republic,
an abstract tour through
Guatemalan history and the
Broadway musical. Naufus will
be using two Colombian dancers
as his back-up chorus! Show at
8pm. Info from the grunt at
604.875.9516. •
VIDEO IN STUDIOS
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audio and new media
production and post-
production including:
we also have a 2000 sq. ft.
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production purposes,
screenings and audio and
music events, for more
information contact Tricia
Middleton at 604.872.8337
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10 may 2002 zines. etc. by Bleek
THEY WON. WE LOST.
If I were even more cynical than
I am right now, I might believe
that nearly all the magazines,
newspapers and other news
sources were making a planned
and concerted effort to pull our
attentions away from difficult
current events.
It's something we've heard
so often in our indie culture that
it becomes cliched and loses
impact. Words like "corporati-
zation," "globalization," "disinformation," "manufactured
consent," and so on. All these
issues multiply until those
words become trademarks of
the left, getting little more than
chuckles from the "establishment."
I have heard "serious journalists" (cough) speak condescendingly about critics of the
mainstream press, claiming that
in no way are news organizations pressured by advertising
dollars or an outright embrace of
their comfortable lifestyles. I've
heard programmers on National
Public Radio suggest that left-
wing concerns are fine for college kids and adolescents, but
for serious "adults" what they
give   us   is   real   "balance."
Interesting how often I hear the
word "balance" to describe a
pro-business agenda. Being an
American, I feel this threat probably more than most Canadians,
although Canada is hot on the
heels of the US's trend toward
"selective reporting." All over
the radio, conservatives are
bitching about the "liberal
media."
In defence of Joe Sixpack,
we should remember what kind
of information nearly everybody
is receiving after a busy day of
competing for a piece of the pie.
For media nerds like me, the
facts are bleak, and dissent is
hard to find. It is out there,
though, and once you develop a
routine, you can hear and read a
very different version of the
"official" story.
I recommend active effort in
searching for alternative news
sources. Reading foreign press is
still a good way to find out what
is going unheard and unseen
here in North America! Read The
Guardian, a British newspaper
where the American investigative reporter Greg Pa last had to
go to do actual investigative
reporting for once, uncovering,
in a frighteningly detailed man
ner, how the Republicans stole
the US election. I wish I could
tell you that that was big news. I
can't.
An interesting new book
called Into the Buzzsaw (Leading
journalists Expose the Myth of a
Free Press) edited by Kristina
Borjesson, chronicles how the
careers and lives of certain
investigative reporters were
devastated by exposing corruption and conspiracy in government, business, and media.
Investigation into the crash of
TWA Flight 800; the CIA's
involvement in the War on
Drugs; the US military's efforts
to cover up Operation Tailwind,
the massacre of hundreds of
civilians during the Korean War,
and the conspiracy to court-martial a returning POW from
Vietnam; the writing on the wall
foreshadowing the terrorist
attacks of September 11, 2001;
and much, much more.
Revealing stuff, if not really
depressing. I just heard Rush
Limbaugh (1 often listen to the
other side of the aisle) claim that
middle-grounder/newsreader
Sam Donaldson was some sort
of liberal! Right-wingers who
lean to the moderate side are
considered left-wing radicals to
these fuckers! What might be
even more pathetic is the likes of
commercial radio stations that
claim they are "rebels" or "outrageous!" Stations like "The
Buzz" in Seattle are popping up
all over the place with "shock
talk." And what do we get?
Jokes at the expense of "bitches,"
'"tards," "homos," "eco-freaks,"
etc. That's the great alternative,
to the right, my friends. That's
the best they can give us.
When was the last time
some major news organization
pointed out the fact that Bush
and Cheney have millions in
investment monies tied up in
Saudi Arabia, a place where they
kiss ass even though most of the
9-11 terrorists were from, funded by and, in-part, trained as terrorists there? Or how convenient
it was to send troops into
Pipeline-istan? The examples of
under-reported stories go on for
miles, even in BC where we
allow Premier Campbell to tell
us that things are IMPROVING!
Who exactly is benefiting from
this economic genocide, Gord?
I've got more bad news,
kids. Those on the side of big
money, corporate greed, media
censorship, and pacifying
Hollywood glitz have won.
WE'VE LOST! Big Business
owns the government and big
media. Government owns the
military and police. That's it. The
war is over! Thanks for coming
out! They've got our countries
and are about to have the rest of
the world. I live between two
very different cultures, the affluent and the downtrodden. I've
got very rich Canadian family
members and those in the states
who are just flyin' Old Glory
and supportin' the president. I
can tell you plainly and without
exaggerating that they don't
really care about the needy that
have made "poor life choices." If
they're suffering, they should
have done something with their
life long ago. They need to take
"personal responsibility" for
their lives. "Now let's thank the
Lord for what we are about to
receive." I'm often emotionally
distraught after family gatherings. And I'm not worried about
them buggin' over this column
since it would be a cold day in
hell when they'd pick up an
independent and outside-the-
mainstream mag like Discorder.
We need to figure out how
we, the non-participants, are
going to exist under this. How
will we be able to communicate
to each other and live communally? I don't know, but be
assured, the forums we still have
are being eroded this very
minute. Funding for real public
access programs has decreased
and will continue to die because
we lack the flashy escapism on
other stations. The internet is
monitored by big government in
order to "protect" us. But if you
are still convinced that there is
hope, you'd better get involved
and act now. I don't know where
or how but I'm hoping you can
tell me. I'm not holding my
breath, though.
I really wish I had the hope
that good people like Howard
Zinn, Noam Chomsky, Ralph
Nader, etc. have. They seem to
expect a public groundswell to
eventually rise up and take back
our culture. It is refreshing that,
with almost no media coverage,
Michael Moore's book Stupid
White Men (and other lame excuses
for the state of the nation) is the #1
bestseller in the US and Canada
as I write this. Still, I lack confidence that people will actually
see the light and do something
constructive. I expect people to
continue giving, in essence,
more and more money to the
very rich and keep expecting it
to trickle down, which it never
does.
With this current "war on
dissent," it will be interesting to
see which caring reporters will
resort to writing for the smaller
press, or whoever will take
them. Some of the best minds
are found in the smallest papers
and magazines and rarely
appear in "legitimate" papers or
as guests on those major political and current events talk
shows. How long before hard
reporting turns to zines to get
the truth out? Will zines even be
legal in 10 years? Many are barely legal now and have been sued
for copyright infringement or
congratulating big business in
winning the war for media control! They won. We lost.
Hey, I'm just kidding.
Everything is fine in the world,
really. •
over mv AMOMi€re:i^-i
book reviews by Doretta
My month of mistaken
identities began with a
clerk at Zulu Records
who spotted me talking to
Discorder's editor during an in-
store performance featuring the
Intima, and later asked her if I
was Christa Min. My guess is
that the clerk doesn't read
Christa's column, the too-good-
to-be-true Fucking Bullshit,
because, if he did, he would
have never thought "that must
be Christa Min." These are the
facts (call it "everything I've
learned from reading Fucking
Bullshit"): Christa Min is a goddess, a guitar player whose
skills can't be matched. In addition to her tremendous talent,
her beauty is unparalleled. From
what I understand, she's got
long legs, lips as soft as her ass,
and an amazing rack. I haven't
had the pleasure of meeting her,
but I feel I know her pretty well
because I read her column every
month, except for Jancember,
when I had to make one column
last for two long, winter
months. You could never mistake me for Christa Min because
I am short, and the only amazing rack I can lay claim to is the
one in my wardrobe, which
holds, among other things, six
black skirts and  twenty-two
kept thinking, who uses the pet
name "Honey"? That romantic
overture seems so 1950s, as in
lates. Instead, it was an
ode to advertising, two grey
speckled pages extolling the
virtues of the Vancouver
Symphony Orchestra in the
guise of a love letter. Here's an
excerpt from "Honey": "I was
just thinking about how wonderful our time together has
been and how lucky we are to
have each other. Those times we
spent in Florence and on the Via
Medici were so special, I will
WHEN IT COMES DOWN TO IT WHEN MONEY'S BEING
EXCHANGED. WE'RE REDUCED TO CERTAIN
DEMOGRAPHICS: AGE, GENDER. CLASS. CULTURAL
AFFILIATION. THOUGH WE SHAPE OUR OWN
IDENTITIES TO A CERTAIN EXTENT. THE REST OF THE
WORLD ALSO HAS A SAY IN WHO WE ARE. OR AT LEAST
APPEAR TO BE.
blouses. (Yes, I know I have a
clothing problem. It's marginally worse than my shoe problem.)
So when an envelope
marked "Honey" appeared in
my mailbox, I was intrigued. I
figured it was meant for our
neighbour, a woman in her seventies, but wanted to check with
my roommates to make sure
they weren't expecting anything
in the post. I waited all day for
ites to return and
"Honey, I'm bringing my boss
and two important clients home
for dinner tonight. I hope you
don't mind. You're so great in
the kitchen." I couldn't wait to
discover the contents of the letter. My curiosity overwhelmed
me, and I tore the envelope
open, though I meant to steam it
so I could reseal it if need be.
Alas, it wasn't a love letter
to the old woman across the
way. Nor was it a missive from a
boy trying to love up one of my
never forget them." The letter
ends with "We'll get dressed up
and have some more trulv classic evenings." No joke, I'm giving it to you verbatim. The
second page is a price guide to
concert packages. I gave this
whole incident some thought
because it was a case of mistaken identities on two fronts.
There was my misguided fantasy regarding the contents of the
letter. I thought that the letter
writer delivered the envelope to
my mailbox by mistake. In reality, it was the folks at the VSO
inaccurately pinpointing my
roommates and I for people
with lots of disposable cash, just
because we live in a yuppie
neighbourhood, and trying to
appeal to us with what they
probably thought was a
"quirky" advertising tactic. The
letter, with its assumption of
who 1 must be, is a lot like The
Table of Cynicism at Zulu, a coffee table which features Belle
and Sebastian, Nick Drake,
Boards of Canada and other
It's music the staff thinks that its
neighbourhood clientele—with
their S70 haircuts and dinners
for two—would enjoy. When it
comes down to it, when
money's being exchanged and
there's marketing in the mix,
we're reduced to certain demographics: age, gender, class, cultural affiliation. Though we
shape our own identities to a
certain extent, the rest of the
world also has a say in who we
are, or at least appear to be.
All this talk about identity
brings me to the subject of this
column: May is Asian Heritage
Month. I thought I'd get around
to reading a collection of folk
tales that's been on my shelf for
months.
MICHAEL DAVID KWAN
Tlie Chinese Storyteller's Book:
Supernatural Tales
(Tuttle Publishing)
The late Michael David Kwan
takes traditional folk stories and
applies his literary skill in his
collection of supernatural tales.
Kwan, most famous for his
award-winning memoir Things
Tliat Must Not Be Forgotten, tells
the tales, which have been
passed down through the generations (more than one story
refers to the Imperial
Examinations, which are a
throwback to days of bureaucratic appointment in China by
test taking) with confident narration and his own style. The
tales deal with the positioning
of humans in relation to the
spirit world, and work to dissect
various evils (such as greed) in
Kwan's supernatural tales
are a refreshing departure from
the Chinese propaganda tales I
heard when I was younger. Best
of all, the stories work to take
a pa i
a bo
by looking at a supernatural
world that is "other." If we
could have that outsider perspective on our present day
world, we might be able to better understand ourselves. •
Listen up for CiTR's Asian Heritage Month
Celebration on Thursday May 16th.
nursings lungbutter
DiSCORDER: Who are you? (Name, instrument of 4/4 destruction,
hairstyle, choice of facial hair.)
Lennie Haggerty: Drums.
Nick Kuepfer: Guitar/Vocals.
Colin Fisher: Guitar/sax.
Tim Nicholls: Bass.
We're crazy! Hair growing everywhere! Manwhores, apparently.
Tell us some of the highlights of your tour so far.
When our van broke down for the first time we thought we'd have
to abandon the van and the tour because the mechanic at Slim's
Auto in Marathon, ON tried to convince us that we needed $600 to
$800 to fix it. A second opinion suggested we get a $4 bottle of gas
line anti-freeze which fixed it.
Nick from Lungbutter books shows in Stratford, Ontario. Name
and described some of your favourite bands who you've booked.
Da Bloody Gashes, The First Day, Slight Return, Two Minute
Miracles, Gaffer, Mach Tiver, A few of the improv shows with Colin
Fisher [of Lungbutter] and a few other guys from Toronto, Evan
Symons, Projecktors, Paperbacks, Joel and The A Minus, Cities To
Drown In... pretty much every band that's booked I really like
because there's no point in booking something you don't.
What percentage of your set is improvised and how could an audience tell?
It varies from show to show. The improv is just as tight as some of
the composed material.
Are all members of math rock bands good at algebra?
We suck at math (and direction) and to set things straight, we're 401
core! 2+2 is 4; 2+2 is 4; 2+2 is 4; 2+2 is 4.
What do people do for work in Stratford when Shakespeare season is over?
We starve but drink more and have children.
Are bands from southern Ontario spoiled compared to the rest of
Canada given the shorter distances between shows? Where would
Lungbutter commonly play outside of Stratford? Who might you
play with?
We play around Ontario a fair bit as well as neighbouring province
Quebec. Montreal has a good scene. The shorter distances between
cities don't matter because few cities have good scenes and places to
play. We play with punk/hardcore bands, rock bands, improv bands
and many others. We've driven too much this tour, that's for sure.
How many practices does it take for Lungbutter to get a song
down?
Three or four usually, depending, of course, if everyone is present.
They tend to work themselves out pretty quick.
Close friends of yours passed away shortly before you left on tour.
At a show in mid-September of 2001, one of them gave away an
"Osama Bin Laden Is My Hero" t-shirt. Please take this opportunity to eulogize your friends and explain how it has affected your
tour.
When something like that happens within a group of friends, it really hits home. It definitely brought out a lot of feelings from everyone. Not just us—everyone. We brought those feelings with us. We
brought them with us. This tour is for them, and it's given us direction. We miss them and I think I speak for everyone who knew them
when I say "Stay strong, stay together, and try and remember!" We
miss you Barry and Lubby.
Ask yourself a question and either stretch the truth about the
answer or lie outright.
What music has influenced Lungbutter and how has your music
changed? Drive Like Jehu, Polvo, Sonic Youth, Fugazi, AC/DC,
Rush, John Zorn, Captain Beefheart, Joe Morris, Massacre, Erectus
Monotone, Flaming Lips, Mr. Bungle, Archie Shepp, Naked City, etc.
The music has grown from its hardcore roots to incorporate even
more complexity and more improvised ideas. •
Discography...
Bizivip CD - Red Elephant Records - 1998
Donk EP - Red Elephant Records - 2001
Dr. Rush's Tranquilizer - 2002
www.geocities.com/sunsetstrip/vine/4872
www.mp3.com/lungbuttered
By   Evan   Symons
Thunderbird
n
w
H
I    I
DiSCORDER: Who are you?
Michaela Galloway: Vocals, flute, keyboard, percussion.
John Lucas: Guitar, baritone guitar, bass.
Gregg Steffensen: Drums, random noises.
Cam McLellan: Bass, guitar.
Kyle Fogden: Guitar, keyboard, bass (currently in Copenhagen).
Meredith Woolley: Keyboards, backing vox (Kyle's temp replacement).
Hinterland played its first show at Ms T's Cabaret. Is it the best
venue in Vancouver for up-and-coming bands? How does it rate
compared to the ANZA Club and the Sugar Refinery?
Michaela: You left the best venue for up and coming bands off your
list. The Purple Onion is by far the best. We have played there more
than anywhere else. Jay from Seaside Studios puts on Thursday live
band nights. Sean is a super great soundman. Never underestimate the
importance of a good soundman who really knows the house system.
Gregg: I believe Ms. T's is the ideal venue because of the simple fact
that it's easy to fill and it costs nothing to put on a show there, as
opposed to Video In, who need a $300 fee up front. I also think it's on
par with the ANZA and the Sugar Refinery.
Cam: The ANZA has a certain something—knowing your dad drank
hinterland
beer there in the '70s after rugby games.
Meredith: I think that Ms. T's is a good venue for gigs, but I like the
feel of the ANZA Club because it has this cozy cabin type setting.
Should the Sugar Refinery be banned from the Georgia Straight?
John: Only if the Georgia Straight is banned from the Sugar Refinery.
Kyle: No, but Hinterland should.
Gregg: Of course not! I think this town is a little too self-serving at a
time when we (local bands, venues and media etc.) need to help each
other to save this pitiful live scene. Where's the love?
Describe the first show you ever played and add a little folklore
for good measure.
Michaela: I played my first show at the Press Club in April of 1997.
I was in a band called Space Cadet. We played with the Dirtmitts
and the Beans. Jenny (who used to book the Press Club) told us that
the Club had never been fuller than that night!
John: Flutter debuted to an audience of about 25 at some rec centre
in Coquitlam. Our bass player took off to Hawaii and we were
forced to do an acoustic show. Never again!
Gregg: My first show was at a theatre in Salmon Arm with a bunch
of guys from my high school. We did a song in 7/4 time to impress
my drum teacher. I was into glam rock... next question.
Cam: Starfish Room on an indie-rock bill with Blaise Pascal and
Meet Daisy. It was their last show, I believe, and it was a good one.
True Love Forever didn't last much longer either—probably my first
and last show as a drummer.
Kyle: House party with my first band (I was 17). I did backing vocals
and after singing my first lines I got embarrassed, hid in the kitchen
and played bass from there. Then I broke a string before playing
"Gauge Away" and compensated by playing the wrong third note in
every phrase. Then I went on my first rock 'n' roll bender...
Meredith: Well, that would have been a month ago. It was my first
time ever in a band and on stage playing an instrument and singing.
Sure, I had pre-show jitters and blocked out some of my singing
parts but once I was on stage and I heard the songs it came back to
What other bands have the members of Hinterland performed
with? How have they influenced Hinterland? Are you older and
wiser now or just older and "losing your edge" to quote a 20-some-
thing indie rocker who is now 30-something?
Michaela: I used to be in Space Cadet, and in the Electrosonics. I am
a much better musician now than I ever have been before. Joining
the Electrosonics was very educational. Suddenly I was playing the
Starfish Room (a big jump from the Press Club) and recording on
something other than a 4-track. The other members of the
Electrosonics were older than me, had been on tour and in the studio
before. I feel like I really cut my teeth in that band. In the
Electrosonics Eric White really had primary creative control. In
Hinterland I am creatively present in the music in a way I never
have been before, and that I never was ready to be before.
John: I learned to play live and write songs in Flutter, which also
featured a very rusty Gregg on drums.
Kyle: Loud Twin Bell is all I'll name... the other two in that band
taught me to fuck around and try to keep things interesting. Another
band I was in in Toronto taught me that combining new wave, the
Smiths, and glam rock just isn't where it's at.
Gregg: This is embarrassing because all my old bands were metal. I
guess the most popular was Sasha's Aura. We played at the Lunatic
Fringe a lot. I think I still pull out some of that influence on'
Hinterland.
What part of the world would you most like to tour in?
Michaela: I'm not really into the idea of being on the road for weeks
at a time in any part of the world. Sleeping on floors and dealing
with crabby ex-metalhead sound people isn't my thing. I could go
on a short tour anywhere in the world as long as I got to stay in a
hotel and got to play at a decent club with a good sound system.
Oh, and I would need to take my cats because Meredith usually
looks after them and she would probably come with us.
Gregg: Eastern Europe.
Cam: Northern England or Lebanon 'cause the food's good.
Where is your personal Hinterland?
Michaela: I take it we are being metaphorical here. I have places I
imagine in my mind, things I imagine being in those places.
Sometimes I imagine that I am a lovely little fish in a babbling brook
navigating the current. Sometimes I imagine that I am sleeping in a
large ice cave with a towering ceiling. Sometimes I imagine that I
am standing in a vast tall grass field.
Gregg: Photographer Hiroshi Sugimoto's Sea of Japan.
Cam: Miles from here.
Meredith: Sooke, BC, where my grandma lives. It fulfills both definitions: a) a region that is remote from cities and b) the land that lies
next to coastline or river.
Describe your style without comparing yourself to any other
bands.
Michaela: No.
John: Atmospheric rock. Better than a stick in the eye?
Gregg: I hate this question. Ethereal applications volume 6.7.
Kyle: To quote John Lucas quoting Kyle Fogden: "Close your eyes
and it's 1991," but I guess not so much anymore. •
Demo tracks available at www.mp3.com/hinterland
www3.telus.net/hinterland Wasteland    of    Wax    by    tobias
Where did Vancouver get the reputation as a "cultural wasteland"? We're the home of Douglas Coupland, William Gibson,
Hank Bull, and Jeff Wall; we're known the world over for our
killer weed; we've got whales, nonsensical politics, forests, loggers, hicks, and yuppies. Face it—we're hip and happening. So
how come no one knows? Or cares? I'm going to reduce the cultural analysis and give you one simple reason: music. Any city
worth an eighth of green has an exploding music scene. In
Vancouver, however, the rockers complain about the loss of "live"
venues and the DJs complain about the lack of crowds.
I can't speak for the rock crowd (I'll leave it to Nardwuar or
Bryce to stir that bucket of worms), but as for the rest—what a
bunch of whiners. This article is about some people starting something, and not the whiners, and although it's been claimed that
"Digeridoo Mania!" rules the city, the real Vizier of Vancouver is
House Music.
It's not all house music, thank God, as Vancouver is slowly
coming to realize that there is a world of music outside of the evolutionary path of disco. However, even such experimental labels
as Spencer's itiswhatitis (named after Derrick May's infamous
Detroit techno track) incoporates a deep sense of melancholy, a
tension played out between the city and the forest that can be
heard in the work of Victoria's Mathew Johnson. Is that melancholy—which can take the form of subtle joy—native solely to
house? Hardly; and with that realization, Vancouver and its sister
colony Victoria have taken the big step into the world of genre-
blurring contemporary electronic music. But we're not quite there
yet, and I'm going to be blunt in this article about it: the house
tradition in this city, while strong and alive in a healthy fashion, is
also hegemonic in its sonic power. Hopefully, with the introduction of six new record labels, the house backbone of the city will
come to grow arms, legs, and eventually, a soul.
DJ NANCY KYD
[1] Deepen. "Deepen" is the name of DJ Vernon and Tyler Stadius'
Saturday tech-house night at the Lotus, as well as the namesake of
Vernon's label, which just pressed its second release, the Ogopogo EP
by Jay Tripwire. Tripwire's sound is easily classified as "UK tech-
house," despite his Vancouver origins, and it is only lately, with this
recent release featuring the vocal work of house DJ Leanne, that he
has begun to inject feeling and emotion into his work. .
The first release on Deepen—the Nightvision EP—is a compilation 12", and it is Elan Beneroch who stands out with his "One Time
Staggered," following in the footsteps of accomplished Nordic Trax
house artist Gavin Froome. Although Tripwire and Primordial Nature
have "techno" tracks on the EP, they fail to grab any real attention.
[2] Northern Lights. If there is one thing I can say about Jay Tripwire,
it is that he is prolific. He released close to a dozen records this past
year as well as launching his own label, Northern Lights, which
seems squarely aimed at the tech-house niche, although with a few
surprises: monthly upcoming releases feature Evil Eddie Richards
(UK), Sensei (Denver), and the famed Mark Ambrose (UK), with
remixes from Tripwire and Baltimore's Patrick Turner. Always confident, Jay says that starting up a label was "pretty easy," as he managed to acquire a prestigious "P+D" (Production and Distribution)
deal with the UK distributor Greyhound. The arrangement means
that he takes a cut of the sales instead of risking investment capital in
pressing his own records. Tripwire's long term plans, however, are to
run Northern Lights himself and start an independent sub-label
focused on harder techno, which I personally find fascinating, given
that harder techno has all but am out of steam internationally.
[3] Active Pass. Deep house is the sound with DJ Kris Palesch's label
"Active Pass," which is a good name for the dubby and spaced-out
pot-house found on the beautiful debut Urban Fever EP featuring
Stephane Novak, a.k.a. Pilgrims of the Mind. Expertly detailed in its
production of sound and groove, with deep basslines anchoring
dubby synthesizer riffs and a jazzy piano presiding over a strong
kick, this is a stellar record from a mature producer that sets the bar
for a Vancouver house sound. As the manager of Boomtown Records
in Vancouver, Palesch has the industry know-how and business
sense to make the label successful; yet the label's music reflects the
quieter aspects of the coast's islands.
[4] Twisted Roots. Can you say dub? Twisted Roots label head DJ
Nancy Kyd has recruited a handful of primarily West-coast house
producers to remix vintage King Tubby dub and reggae material
from the 1970s for her Yabby You, 1972 series. Each of the 12"s features a dubbed-out house remix on the A-side and the original Tubby
track on the flip. The project sounds fascinating, but so far, nothing
has hit the shelves. And when it comes down to it, it's a bit disappointing that more local producers aren't involved in the project and
my academic side says to me: "Why are all these white people remixing Tubby, and how the hell did a Vancouver DJ get hands on this
rare material?" It is my hope that the project will show the same dedication that Tubby gave to his work. Tlie series will be made available on CD, with producers such as the UK's Nigel Hayes and SF's
Jeno digging deep into the classic material.
[5] Totem/Villlage. From what I can tell, DJ Little T's respected house
label Leaf Recordings has launched two new sub-labels, Totem and
DJ SPENCER
Village. Managed by Graham Boothby, the sub-labels are promising
solid house tracks under the umbrella of the successful Leaf imprint
which has helped to pioneer house music in Vancouver. Information
has been sparse and elusive, but keep your ear to the ground for
releases over the next few months.
[6] itiswhatitis. Run by respected Victoria DJ Spencer, I've left
itiswhatitis for last because, at least for me, it is the label that has
strived the hardest to push past boundary restrictions, and most significantly, break the house mold. Unlike most of the Vancouver-
based labels, itiswhatitis hasn't followed in the musical footsteps of
Nordic Trax. It is perhaps not so surprising that the most innovative
music is not happening in Vancouver, but in collaborations between
primarily Victoria-based artists and Eastern Canadians (as well as a
few New Yorkers, as we shall see).
Influenced by the sounds of Germany and Detroit, with a
healthy dose of minimalism, dub, and jazz, and working closely with
the action in Toronto and Montreal, itiswhatitis is producing fundamentally genre-blurring music between minimal techno, house, and
electro, a sound that attempts to sonically interpret the tensions
between city and nature that make the Pacific Northwest such a
unique place. Spencer says that it "doesn't matter what genre it is,
for good music comes from a deep, deep place"—which is not to say
that the label is unfocused; Spencer, a DJ of 12 years and an avid soccer player, is passionate about releasing talented Island and
Vancouver artists as well as expanding the label's scope to include
international collaborations. "I'm just surrounded by musicians, so
what better to do but support them and put it out, you know'?"
itiswhatitis' current release, The She Is He EP by Matthew
Johnson, is an edgy, minimal techno mindfuck that will see a limited-
edition clear vinyl run, with remixes from German-Chilean Perlon
heavyweight Ricardo Villalobos, and a relatively large run of 1,500
12"s. Johnson's work inaugurated the label, and his Rob Hood-esque
blend of repetitive off-key synth loops and tight percussion was
what first caught my ears and drew me to hunt down every IIWII
Upcoming releases will feature the likes of Victoria's
Cobblestone Jazz and minimal house producer Ben Nevile (who is
playing Mutek this year in Montreal: take note!), while past releases
have featured the work of ex-Vancouverite Steb Sly. Meanwhile the
East Meets West series will continue to pair up local Westerners with
Canada's Eastern artists, including Toronto's Mike Shannon and
Bodensee. On an international level, the DrumKomputer series will
continue to feature the minimal electro collaborative work between
New York's Dietrich Schoenemann and Taylor Deupree (of experimental label 12k). For those that caught any of my last DJ sets in
Vancouver, I've been playing these tracks non-stop; Deupree's attention to detail found in his microsound work finds its niche in the driving determination of Schoenemann (of Hidden Agenda).
It would be cliche to say something along the lines of "Vancouver's
'wasteland' certainly has its advantages: there are acres of room to
grow," for Vancouver is neither wasteland nor acreage. It is environment and habitat competing with a reclusive modernism, and
streaming through its peripheries are the sounds of this tension,
sounds that are beginning to reshape a Pacific NorthWest sonic consciousness. •
wmgzmm Film critic Pauline Kael once described Pulp Fiction as a movie that
gets you drunk off movies. To her the movie exuded an exuberant
love of cinema. A kaleidiscope of characters, plots, tunes, and a gold
watch stuck up Christopher Walken's ass, it was a funky ass rainbow of influences turned into the world of Tarantino. Although he
ain't "nearly as violent" as QT, Van City's Funk Grand Master, Vinyl
Ritchie (along with his partner-in-crime, Brian Carson) has produced his own sort of Pulp Fiction with the album Wicked (soon to be
released under the name Lester). Sure, Samuel L. was sporting a jeri-
curl wig and doing his rendition of a modern Shaft, but it wasn't a
straight retro blaxplotation flick. So, sure, Vinyl's taking things back
to the funk essentials; but its not like he justed rapped over a James
Brown staple either.
In this town, there's hip hop music, there's house music, then
there's the music of Vinyl Ritchie (aka Spun-K, aka Wicked Lester,
aka Scott Arkwell). While "breaks" is a term that often may be used
to label his sound, to me it's also a ground half way between the
beats and vibes of hip hop and house, but without the cliches of
either. All the way back to '91, from his Zoo Boogalo night at the
Starfish Room circa '94, Cherry Bombs at Sonar during the lattert
half of the '90s (both with DJ Czech) to the Big Sexy Funk night at
Shine today, Vinyl's been spinning records trying to find that ground
combining different sounds that all revolve around one word: funk.
Though his career has already lasted an eternity by DJ standards, you couldn't exactly say that the audience for his sound is
an established one (compared to the establishments that are hip hop
and house). Perhaps this could be because his sound isn't really a
definable one. But while Vinyl does acknowledge that "there always
will be little pockets of genres and sub-genres," some more established than others, he has at least seen the overall community of DJs,
MCs, etc. in Vancouver "holding it down and keeping it together a
lot more" than in the early days.
Just looking at the success of local hip hop acts like the Rascalz
and Swollen Members—as well as the successful opening of
Vancouver's first DJ school by DJ Leanne— it becomes apparent that
the scene has matured in significant ways. Which brings me back to
that ground between the hip hop of a Swollen Members and the
house music of a DJ Leanne. Tracing the roots of hip hop and house
music, one comes back to the dance-oriented music of the 70s that
had "groove" and "funk" all over it. These pieces of groove and
funk that were extended by early DJs came to be known as "breaks."
These breaks are the foundation of Vinyl Ritchie's music: "breaks to
me are the origin and the root of all evil."
Anyone who's experienced one of Vinyl Ritchie's DJ sets might
have expected that, when the time came for Vinyl to produce his
own beats and breaks, a more uptempo and intense type of "breaks"
music would have appeared. However, Wicked is a more mellow
affair. Vinyl's Wicked album is more patient, refined, and organic
than that of his DJ sets at the clubs: "Rocking the clubs is my job,
[but] sometimes, when the party's over and you're at home, you
don't want that kind of vibe. At the end of the day, when a song is
complete, I like to close my eyes and visualize a band playing it. You
know, what is the drummer doing? What is the bass player doing in
this part of the song?"
Like a Tarantino movie, the Wicked album has its share of a wide
variety of songs and vibes (like Pulp Fiction's various characters and
plots) but all seem to share to same overall vibe and humour. Take a
brief survey of some descriptions of the Wicked songs: Moka Only
rap-singing on an old school funk break; Lady Precise and Ishkan of
the City Planners rapping over a swing beat; Lady Precise singing
and rapping over a '60s game show kinda vibe; Vinyl and Brian
singing themselves (like two drunk-ass "gringos") on a downtempo
latin lowriding jam; a couple of Middle Eastern/Latin/Byzantine
U may 2002
instrumentais;
singer Lily Frost
singing in French
and ragga MC
Shylox doing his
thing on a song
which also happens to be an
easy-listening type
tune...
This is where
the various collaborating vocalists and
MCs fit into the puzzle. The vocalists and
songs vary in crazy
ways, but all seem to fit
togther like the weird
characters  did  in  Pulp
Fiction. Artists like Moka
Only and Lady Precise fit
the   project   like   a   glove
because  they  share  Vinyl':
diverse musical addictions, but
all revolve around one thing at the
end: funky music. And while tho<
two particular vocalists come from a
hip hop-type background, their performances on the album go way beyond that
of hip hop's often restrictive nature and
tality—and are still way more down and dirty
than the frequently pretentious house crowd
Moka, for one, stands apart in that he doesn't really
look like a hip hop head, or an R&B singer, or a hoi
model wannabe, either. And his vocals can't strictly be classified as rapping or singing. Lady Precise can go from straight MC-ing
to belting it out Aretha Franklin-style. The collaborations just happened naturally because in the end, "game recognizes game."
While Vinyl and Brian made a conscious attempt to make their
sound "as organic as possible considering we're making it with
computers," I wondered whether it was all sampled stuff or is there
some live stuff in there too? "Well, you got to tell me, man, that's
the big mystery of this album." Well, I do know that I don't recognize any of the beats or basslines in there, but I also know that he is
still waiting on some samples to be cleared. But then again, I also
know that his partner and producer Brian Carson happens to "play
just about every instrument there is" so... I dunno.
Through his decade-plus stretch of DJing and the delays he's
experienced waiting for Wicked's samples to be cleared, Vinyl's definitely had time to reflect on the nature of sampling. "I guess you
could say that, ironically, since the laws are so tight, it's almost a
good thing because it challenges the people more. I can understand
it if, you know, in the '70s, you were a drummer and you dedicated
your life to being an artist and being a drummer and a lot of time
and energy and blood and tears were put into recording some drum
breaks and 20 years later, some fucking kid with a sampler is going
to jack your beat and make a million dollars—yeah, you deserve to
get paid." But, on the other hand, "look at the RZA... you can't tell
me he steals melodies: he makes up his own with the stuff that he's
borrowing."
So, while the borrowing issue is always close to hand (especially whenever turntables are concerned), there are people that borrow
and take those borrowed ideas along for a ride of their own. But still
Vinyl
acknowledges that this project
wouldn't have been possible without the creation of the turntables
because he, himself, has "learned about music from listening to
records and playing records and manipulating records, and even
my partner Brian, (who's a multi-instumentalist), is starting to get
into the turntable aspect of it."
That's not to say that Vinyl sees turntablists being the dominant
music provider at the clubs forever either, but lie does see himself
ready for the era when live music is the norm again. And while he
"can remember a time back when bands were hiring me to play with
them" back in the early '90s, working on this project has prepared
him for the next wave even more.
Leaving aside he songs on the Wicked album, Vinyl Ritchie, to
me, is the only guy in town that'll mix N.W.A. with Steve Winwood
at the clubs, or finish off an interview by playing me his own break
remix of Kenny Roger's "Tlie Gambler." •
Vinyl Ritchie (a.k.a. Wicked Lester, Spun-K, or Scott Arkwell) is the resident D] al Sonar on Friday's and Shine on Saturday's. His Wicked album
will be released under the name Lester worldwide this September on
Nettwerk Records. By Doretta Lau
/ can't figure out how Toronto writer and editor Emily Pohl-Weary
manages to do everything she does. Non-fiction publisher Between
tlie Lines has just released her book Better to Have Loved: The
Life of Judith Merril, which she co-wrote with tlie late, great science-fiction writer Merril, who is her grandmother. The grandmother/granddaughter team came together when Pohl-Weary was
20, and Merril stipulated in her will that Emily would complete
the story of her life.
Pohl-Weary is also co-editor of Broken Pencil, a magazine
devoted to zines, alongside Hal Niedzviecki. Before she became co-
editor, she worked as reviews editor and managing editor. Over
the past three years she has organized of the Canzine Festival of
Independent Art, she lias just finished a novel (Sugar's Empty),
and she edits her own zine, Kiss Machine. What impresses me
most is that even with her prolific output, she still has time to follow Buffy the Vampire Slayer and complete this email interview.
DiSCORDER: What's your favourite childhood memory?
Emily Pohl-Weary: Reading. Going to the library and checking out sacks hill of books. Mostly, though, I'm glad childhood is over. I like being grown up and independent much
better.
Did you grow up in Toronto?
Yes. I grew up in the west end of the city, a working class
neighbourhood called Parkdale that's only now slowly
becoming gentrified. Actually, back in the '30s and '40s,
when Lake Ontario was not horribly polluted, it was a real
hotspot. Then they put in a highway that divided the city
from the beach. It's also separated from downtown by the
Queen Street Mental Health Centre, and is home to a diverse
community, including out-patients from the hospital, the
working poor, new immigrants to Canada, and a large
Eastern-European population.
How did the community you grew up in influence your
work?
I grew up in an extremely urban environment, fixating on
the way a lot of really different people interacted with each
other in such close quarters. A lot of people who lived in my
neighbourhood were down and out. I knew the local shopkeepers and recognized the hookers on the corner. After seeing how cops treat poor people, it became apparent to me at
a very early age that our society is not set up to protect the
little guy. My mother says that as a child, I was very concerned with the concept of fairness, and I think to this day
these experiences influence my work. I proselytize the DIY
ethic because I don't think it's fair that only people who have
money to publish glossy mags or produce television shows
should be able to have their say and portray their political
views.
When did you first read your grandmother's fiction?
I read it as a child, but it didn't make the same impression on
me that it did as an adult. I reread all her novels, and many
short stories and articles, when I first started working on the
book. Her incisive analysis of our society's failings and understanding of the relationships between people who love each
other completely stunned me. So did the fact that dynamics
she had observed in her ancestors seemed to be repeating in
my generation.
Did your decision to become a writer have anything to do
with Judith's influence on your life?
Certainly. Judy raised my mother to be a reader and a thinker.
In return, my mother facilitated my desire to consume fiction
and to exercise my imagination. For instance, we only got a TV
set when my grandfather decided to buy one for us. Also, my
grandmother and I were always discussing books we had read or
were interested in. I asked her about everyone from Philip K Dick to
Ursula K Le Guin. She kept clippings from the Toronto Star and other
magazines for me to read and when I visited she would ask me about
things I was reading or learning about at school—the politics of
health care, graffiti, hip hop music, pop-music magazines and the
things her own friends knew nothing about. She really truly wanted
to know what I thought. As a child, if you feel like your opinion is
important enough to be considered, and even argued with, then you
believe you must have something interesting to say. She also read
everything I wrote while she was alive and gave me very critical
encouragement.
How did your understanding of Judith change when you completed Better to Have Loved?
I think that now my understanding of Judy is more complete and
comprehensive. Before, I saw her mostly as my grandmother.
Afterward, I came to respect her for her impact on the literary world,
and as a catalyst who sparked and encouraged many interesting people's careers. More than anything, I think her death has changed the
way I see her; instead of the everyday fights and difficulties you have
to deal with in all relationships, there is a kind of fuzziness to things
that allows me to romanticize our friendship a bit.
How did your understanding of yourself change?
I believe my identity as a writer was formed in the process of completing the book, as well as the courage to identify as such, despite
the fact that I have not necessarily chosen an approach to writing
that is considered prestigious by the mainstream. Judy was an idealist and I am also clearly an idealist. I will only write things that I feel
like writing. I don't pander to the status quo or the market's desires.
I also realized that I love feeling the solitary pull of writing and I
believe Judy's stories and encouragement often fuelled that pull.
Aside from all that, the task of putting together a book's worth of
text is extremely educational. It helped me conceptualize my novel in
do-able chunks, so that I didn't feel overwhelmed by the hugeness of
it. I don't think I would have tackled writing a novel if I hadn't done
the book about Judy first.
What is your writing process like?
In order to work on larger writing projects, such as Better to Have
Loved or Sugar's Empty, or even Broken Pencil or Kiss Machine during
production time, I have to completely clear my plate for weeks at a
time. I do my best writing early in the day and have got to feel that
no other pressures will force me to stop writing before the inspiration
has been translated to the computer. Sometimes that means writing
for days on end, and barely coming up for air and food. Other times,
that means forcing myself to sit in front of the computer until I've
written 1,000 words. Generally, the 1,000 words per day rule helps
me feel like I've been productive, but still allows me to stop torturing
myself when I'm not in the mood for writing.
Do you listen to music when you write? If so, what do you listen
to?
Sure do. Lately, I've been downloading old songs by Hole, Madonna,
and Prince. I also have music by the Weakerthans, Billy Bragg, Lou
Reed, Belle and Sebastian, Blink-182, Echo and the Bunnymen, The
Smiths, and Luscious Jackson cued up in Winamp right now. The
last CDs I bought were the soundtrack to the Molly Ringwald '80s
classic, Pretty in Pink, which I found in a bargain bin and The Teaches
of Peaches.
Who or what do you find influential?
Frida Kahlo (I wrote a poem about her four years ago, called "It's All
Frida K's Fault"). Emily Carr (I was named after her). Francesca Lia
Block. Buffy. Willow. Alice Walker. Marge Piercy. Octavia Butler.
Haruki Murakami. My mother. My grandmother. My 15-year old sister. Nancy Drew. Michael Turner. Tamara Faith Berger. Yoko Ono.
Passionate zinesters. Isabel Allende. Anti-capitalist protestors. Ann
Hansen (author of Direct Action). Plus, I'm soooo completely a child of
the '80s that any of the cool rock stars from then—and some of the
movie stars, like Molly Ringwald and John Cusack—really turn my
crank.
Please tell me about your zine, Kiss Machine.
Kiss Machine (www.kissmachine.org), which I co-edit with visual
artist and poet Paola Poletto, is my little baby, and its growth continues to amaze me. It's a photocopied foray into independent art, literary culture, and political views, and an effort to highlight the
surrealism inherent in day-to-day life. Each issue features two seemingly discordant themes, such as bugs and small business, or hospitals and aliens. Visual art relating to these themes weaves through
poetry, short stories, interviews, articles, and interviews, without any
clear indication where fiction ends and non-fiction begins. The issue
we're currently working on has the themes of cars and religion in
honour of the Pope-Mobile, which is schedule to stop off in Toronto
this summer. Up next, we're planning a special shoot 'em up girls-
and-guns issue.
Paola and I have been publishing zines and artists' books together for years. We did our first collaborative zine in 1996, called "This
City of Faces," for which I wrote five overlapping short stories, and
Paola contributed a photo-essay After several other pleasurable collaborations, we decided to take our publishing efforts one step further
and launched Kiss Machine when we came to the conclusion that there
aren't many arts and culture magazines in Canada that reflect the
kind of inspirational and incredible work being created by the emerging artists and writers who most inspire and entertain us. Kiss
Machine is our attempt to create a magazine that we actually want to
contribute to ourselves, and living proof that a community can produce better and more vibrant art than a corporation.
What are you reading right now?
I've been loving the books in Joan D Vinge's Snow Queen series. I
recently reviewed Ordinary White Guy, by Brock Clarke and Saugus to
the Sea, by zinesters Bill Brown and BradYung, for Toronto's alternative weekly, NOW magazine. The former was so-so, but the latter
rocked. In the past few months, I've read manuscript versions of novels by Toronto writers and friends Jim Munroe and Hal Niedzviecki
that I really enjoyed.
Do you have any zines to recommend?
The best zines I've read in the past month were both about cats: My
Cat's more Punk than Yours by Toronto's 5:17 and Is This a Cat? by
Lexington, Kentucky's Christopher Rowe. Donit know why I liked
them so much, cuz I'm not big on pets. But they're both seriously fabulous and completely different. The former is a biography of a cat
named Maxwell. The latter is a collection of highly literary science
fiction stories by a group of up-and-coming American writers.
What are you currently working on?
Just last week I finished a draft of a novel, called Sugar's Empty. It's
about an average slacker girl named Sugar. She shelves CDs at Record
Teen for minimum wage when she isn't avoiding her boss' advances
or numbly watching her co-worker steal the merchandise. After work,
she finds solace in chips and Parker Posey movies in her empty apartment; empty, that is, except for her recently deceased boyfriend. Postmortem break-ups suck. Even changing the locks won't keep a ghost
lover out. To be able to stand up to her boss, get out of her rut, and
into the life she wants, Sugar needs a little help from a hardcore video
activist, a blue-haired single mom-to-be and the supernatural.
I'm also gearing up to start working on an online interactive
detective novel with my chum, Sally McKay. McKay is one of the editors of Toronto art magazine Lola, and an awesome visual artist.
Inspired by a childhood binge on Nancy Drew mysteries and Choose-
Your-Own-Adventure books, we decided to write a mystery story
that involves what we consider true crime. So far, the plot's shaking
out to be something like: a homeless man is found dead, is it murder? With her trusty sidekicks Robot Dog and Old Crone, Girl
Detective gets to the bottom of it and uncovers all kinds of nasty corruption in the powers that be.
What's the last thing that blew your mind?
Um, two things? 1. Angel actually tried to kill Wesley at the end of the
last episode. 2. I actually got married two weeks ago!?! •
Emily reads at the Vancouver Public Library on Georgia, May 7th at 7:30pm.
]5im&mM& by Eric Flexyourhead
Ever since Fall Si lent's new
Revelation full-length, Drunken
Violence, showed up in my mailbox I've been spinning the hell
out of it—a rampaging hardcore
assault that defly jumps genres
and breaks down barriers.
Suitably stoked, an interview was
in order—I spoke with vocalist
Levi Watson via email in April.
DiSCORDER: Obligatory email interview band stats—the who,
when, where, what, why, and how of Fall Silent.
Levi Watson - Vocals
Damon Watson - Drums
Danny Galecki - Guitars
Justin Spalin - Bass
Donny Johnson - Guitar
Can you give me a little band history?
We started playing in late 1994 and had our first show in March of
1995. We have released an album a year, save 1998, since 1995. We
have toured at least six weeks a year every year since 1996, save
1998. In the year 2000 we toured Japan for two weeks and Europe
for seven weeks. Needless to say, 1998 was a really slow year for
Fall Silent. We spent that year getting new band members and writing Superstructure after our guitar player and bass player accidentally overdosed on heroin. After the first guitar and bass player
OD'ed on heroin, our second bass player died in a speed-related
incident. Not speed the drug, but because he was drag racing his
dragster and his car blew up. I feel sorry for anyone who joins our
band 'cause most of them end up dying.
We have been a totally DIY band until last year when Revelation
Records signed us up.
You guys are from Reno, Nevada... apart from 7 Seconds, Reno's
not had a lot of band's make their mark on the hardcore map. Do
you think this has worked for or against Fall Silent? Are you guys
at all steeped in the local hardcore history?
The only other band that has done anything out of Reno is
December. They just got signed and are currently touring the globe
with their new album that just came out on Earache Records. They
play a very intense style of metal with screams and playing that will
fuck your mind up if you listen too much. Not fast, but technical for
sure. So yeah, since 7 Seconds left our fair city we have not had a lot
going on as far as punk/hardcore/metal is concerned.
I don't think that it has hindered us in any way. We never had
the goal in the band of getting big or popular. We always just wanted to play music and be a local band that got the party started. So if
that is what you want in a band then your location can never hinder
your goal. Being creative and artistic has always been more important than being popular for us and that is probably why it took so
long for us to get noticed outside of town, because we never tried to.
Has growing up in a city where gambling and prostitution are
legal had any effect on the way you guys have turned out? If these
factors have affected you personally have they also had an impact
on how or why you do Fall Silent?
Gambling and prostitution have made Reno what it is. Me and
Damon moved here with our parents because my dad needed a job
and there was a lot of work in gaming here in the early '80s. If all of
a sudden there were no casinos then the economy would quickly
crumble and we could not sustain ourselves. So I guess that is a big
factor on how we turned out as a band. None of us gamble or frequent the brothels so that has never had an effect on us. I don't think
that gambling and prostitution have affected us in any way besides
that it is our hometown and anyone's hometown affects them.
By the way, prostitution is not legal in our county. You have to
drive about 15 minutes from the city limits to get sex. It isn't like
there are brothels on every corner or a Red Light district or anything
like that.
You've got a new disc, Drunken Violence, coming very soon on
Revelation. The label certainly has a reputation that precedes
itself. Has signing with Revelation had any positive or negative
impacts on Fall Silent? We know that Revelation isn't a "big" label
compared with a major, but were there any cries of "sellout" when
you signed with Rev?
Working with Revelation has been great. We have never worked
with a label that isn't more than just one kid in his apartment doing
mailouts, so it is a huge change for the band. There are actually people that work full time on trying to get people to hear our record
and advertising and stuff. It is really cool that I don't have to do it
anymore and that it is getting done really well. I mean, we have
been a band since 1994 and people are just now hearing us, and it is
because of Revelation. The label is most definitely legendary and I
am proud to be a part of it.
There are a few people that say we are "sellouts" because we
gave up on the DIY ethic. Mostly those are local kids that dislike us
personally so that doesn't count. It is sort of different and strange to
have an A&R guy and a publicity person working on your record,
when I should really be the one doing that. But my life is one that
can't allow room for me doing that so it works out fine. Plus, they
know how to do it way better than me, so....
One of the best things about Drunken Violence is that it seems to
be influenced by a lot of different hardcore sub-genres. The influences appear to run from mid-'80s crossover hardcore, to traditional straightedge hardcore, to early '90s straightedge hardcore a
la Unbroken or Undertow, to straight-up metal, to "power violence"... are Fall Silent influenced by all of those styles of music?
I think we are because then our music would not sound the way it
does. Influence comes at us all the time from different areas and
sometimes without us even knowing it. We have listened to all the
styles of hardcore that you listed above in our lives, and our subconscious mind has taken all of that in so that when it comes back
out in our creative endeavors it is all right there. What makes us
interesting is that we are all so different in our tastes that when you
put us all together it makes something unique, somewhat.
I was raised on '60s and '70s rock, then Van Halen, then NWA
and Too Short, with Sick of it All, The Misfits, Black Flag, then DRI,
then Metallica, then Gorilla Biscuits, then Pantera, Demolition
Hammer, Crowbar, and Bloodlet. It is all there and it shows in our
music for sure.
It would almost seem as if the punk/hardcore scene mirrors society as a whole—a society that seems ever eager to embrace conservative politics and ideals. Do you think there is an
overwhelming acceptance of conservative ideas in the punk/hardcore scene?
Yes and no. I can see a lot of people clinging to a lot of ideas that go
against the norm, like vegetarianism, womyn's rights, and animal
rights. But on the other hand, in response to activism there are peo
ple who swell up with pride when they talk about how they love
meat and could give a fuck less about the world around them. It is
just a reaction and an attempt to be different in their scene when
actually they are just emulating the outside world.
And inadvertently we see an acceptance of norms in our scene
as well. Men make up most of the band members in hardcore/punk.
Womyn hang in back while guys go crazy on each other's sweaty
bodies. There are dress codes and speaking codes. I can see these
things happening, but it is much better in the punk scene then it is in
the real world for sure—and there is no place I would rather be than
surrounded by like-minded people.
Lyrically, Drunken Violence covers a lot of ground, from skateboarding to scene politics to commercialization invading every
aspect of our lives. How do you determine what you want to write
about? Are there any topics you choose to avoid?
I determine what I write about by a) seeing if there is enough substance to write a whole song about this one topic, b) can I write intelligently about this? c) will anyone really care? d) do I care enough?
There are a few aspects that come along as well, but that is pretty
much it. Sometimes songs come easily and sometimes I just can't
get it so I won't do it. I only work with the topics that flow from me
at certain times in my life.
I have learned over the years that I need to try and avoid writing about certain groups within our scene specifically. I avoid
putting my animal rights views in our songs. I avoid writing too
many songs about love of opposite sex. And I try to keep it as positive as I can, but sometimes life is not so positive and some of our
songs relate that aspect. No one can be positive all the time, so how
can I honestly write songs that are positive all the time?
You'll be leaving soon for a pretty extensive tour of western North
America, playing a lot of smaller centres. Are you looking forward
to the tour? Are there any plans following this spring tour... the
rest of North America, Europe, or elsewhere?
Yes, we are leaving on a very extensive Canadian and west coast US
tour in about two weeks. It is something that I have been booking
and planning since February or January and I am really happy with
the way it is going. I am always excited to leave on tour, but this
time I have a baby boy named Jude and it is with a heavy heart that
I leave him for two months this summer—but this is the life I live
and I need to deal with it.
Anything else to add?
Just that we will be playing in Surrey, BC on Cinco de Mayo. It
should be at a place called Snackers and it would be nice to have a
really good turnout. It will be our first ever show in Canada and my
first time on Canadian soil. •
littp://w-iVW.f,illsilent.com/
Fall Silent will be headlining the Flexyourhead 13th Anniversary Show at
Snackers in Surrey (formerly the Java joint) on May 5 with Means to an
End, Three Inches of Blood, and End This Week With Knives. Check out
flexyoiirliead.vancouverliardcore.com for more information or listen to Flex
16 may 2002 Discorder is accepting
applications for the
postion of EDITOR
We are seeking a hard-working,
personable, and committed individual for
the important and challenging job of
Discorder editor.
The ideal candidate should have:
• an excellent command ot the English language
• very strong writing and editing skills
• experience with and/or knowledge of the mandate and
workings ot campus and community radio, especially CiTR
• wide-ranging knowledge of independent and
underground music from many genres and time periods
• a lot of free time; between 5-30 hours a week,
depending on production contingencies
• an open and approachable manner
• individuals with previous or current involvement with
CiTR are encouraged to apply
This is a volunteer position.
A $350 honorarium is provided per issue
(11 issues per year).
We require a time commitment of one year at the very least.
Please contact Barbara at 604.822.3017 ext. 3 for more
details, or fax resume and cover letter to 604.822.9364.
voiumizer
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•   »
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Free to Do What? First Base CDEP The Bright Side
Tribute to Nashville   Hanson Brothers   New Town Animals
various artists My Game CD/LP Is Your Radio Active? CD/LP
,
5*
17BR§£3ffi3B radiogram
Radiogram first came to the attention of
local audiences and music press in 2000
with their much-vaunted debut Unbetween.
Their sound lies somewhere between ambient-folk and country-noir; think Red House
Painters, Lambchop, Giant Sand with a
moody Vancouver chill. I sat down with Ken
Beattie in a Commercial Drive boite to chat
about their new CD (All the Way Home),
music, and such like.
by Val  Cormier
DiSCORDER: How does All the Way Home differ from your first
CD?
Ken Beattie: I think the first CD took everyone by surprise.
Everyone was, like, "Who is this band?" The first album had a real
nice mixture of a lot of different influences that worked. With the
second album we've developed a "sound," so maybe it's not as surprising to people. In terms of the music, the second album is a little
darker, the songs are a little longer, the arrangements are a little more
complex. I think as far as anything else goes, it's folk music. If I
described it in a word, that's what it would be. But I think we're trying to move away from the alt-country thing and more towards transcending our genre. We're trying to push the envelope a little bit.
So you're not afraid to use the "f" word, then?
Oh, folk? No, I think folk music is probably the most widely-defined
music there is. Really, in its simplest form it's music about folks, by
folks, for folks. I often think that any song with a standard
verse/chorus approach that tells a story is a folk song. I'd say that
every song on our new album is a folk song.
Do you think folk music has got a bad rep?
Well, I don't know if it's got a bad rep, but yes, it probably has got a
rep from the folk festivals and stuff. I've heard people say, you know,
"Oh, the folk festival crowd," then they roll their eyes at the same
time. I'm not really sure what that means, but maybe it means people with long hair and Birkenstocks. But I used to have long hair and
Birkenstocks.
The only cover song on your new CD is "Love Vigilantes" by New
Order. How'd you come to choose that one?
It's a personal fave, something I used to play around the campfire.
That song brought a tear to my eye the first time I heard it. I think it's
a pertinent, timeless song, and I always thought that song could use
a good folk-rock approach. It was born as a Radiogram song one
gorgeous day in August on our way to Victoria on BC Ferries.
Jonathan had just bought a banjo, and he picked up on the melody in
that song right away—people clapped, it was fun. We put it in the set
that night and it's been there ever since.
Lefs hear about your personal music background.
My earliest memories involve being surrounded by music. My
mother used to turn on the radio when I was in the crib and I would
just sit and listen to music when I was a baby. I grew up listening to
'70s AM radio and loved it. I took my little transistor radio with me
everywhere. We'd go to grandma's for dinner and all the cousins
would be playing, but I remember being in the back room listening
to the radio because I wanted to hear the Top 10 Countdown. I was
fascinated by charts, countdowns.
You grew up in Winnipeg—did you play in any bands there?
Not at all—I was never in a band in Winnipeg. My friends and I did
tons of camping when I lived there. Everyone in Winnipeg had a
cabin or cottage, and there was always an acoustic guitar kicking
around. I was known as "the music guy." I always had the mix tapes,
knew all the bands, was the trivia guy, had all the albums. So at these
cabin parties someone would pass the guitar around and we'd all
play our little two and three-chord songs. I think I played more than
most people, but I never really considered myself a "musician." I
never really made up songs. I guess I did make up melodies and
stuff.
When I moved to Vancouver I ended up in this party band called
Foam in the late '80s. Somehow I became the singer, I guess because
I didn't play an instrument very well. I came to the realization one
day that I'd actually been writing songs all my life, so I just explored
that. To this day, that's how I write a song: I have a melody in my
head and the words come to me. I write them down, and if I look
back at my notepad a couple weeks later and the melody instantly
comes to mind, I figure it's worth working. Then I pick up the guitar
and try to teach myself the song.
What would have been on a typical Ken Beattie mix tape in, say,
the late '70s?
Gosh, I'd have to think about what grade I would've been in... Well,
about 1979 I would've included stuff from Elvis Costello's first
record, the Clash. I was still listening to Zep—Zeppelin II and Houses
of the Holy. Pink Floyd for sure, I'm still a huge Pink Floyd fan.
Maybe Moody Blues. I liked to mix up genres—a great song is a
great song.
18 may 2002 photography   by  ann   &   lori
It's a little harder for me to listen to music now than it was when I
was younger, but I still listen to the radio. The only good radio here
is Co-op (CFRO), CiTR, and CBC. Because if you turn on commercial
FM radio, you just hear all those songs that I just mentioned on my
mix tapes. I want to get past '79, you know?
Thinking of early '80s bands, I was big into U2, REM, Echo and
the Bunnymen, Split Enz, Squeeze—remember them? But I want to
say for the record that I never liked Flock of Seagulls.
Where'd you go next musically after Foam?
Foam lasted a couple of years—we made a tape, did some shows.
Then there was a band called Sourpuss. I took a break from music
for awlule—our guitar player was "sick," and I met my wife. At that
point I'd realized I wasn't a good songwriter yet, so I took some
time and tried to work on some songs, and started this band the
Emptys, which did all right. We put out two CDs, got good reviews
across the country, did a couple of tours. I thought that my songwriting was getting a little better, a little more subtle, and I wanted
to escape the confines of a four-piece folk-rock band. I wanted to
add some different instrumentation. I'd been rediscovering my
country roots—in the early '70s, I liked Glen Campbell, Kris
Kristofferson. I got into Uncle Tupelo like everybody else and started this pseudo-alt-country band called Radiogram.
Then came the first album...
I wasn't in any hurry to make the first album [Unbetween]. It was
originally going to be a solo album for me, with players to fill out the
parts. From the time of the first demo to release was three years. At
one point my co-producer Shawn was away in Thailand for five
months. I was itching to have the album out, so I made CD copies of
what I thought were the best five songs. We got invited to NXNW,
we started playing around town. I think the band was really good
live from the get go. I handed out CDs at shows, I sent CDs to everyone on my press list and got really good response.
How about the buzz in England?
That didn't happen until Unbetween was about eight months old.
This distributor in the UK loved it, and sent out copies to press, who
picked up on it, started writing about it. We ended up on a bunch of
websites with downloadable songs, people were buying CDs off the
internet and sending email. It was great, it just took off. I thought
that might be a good thing to explore, so it was a conscious decision
to tour the UK with this new album. We're going over in May as a
trio, and hopefully go back in the fall as a full band. I'm looking forward to it, even though I don't like plane rides, and I've never been
off this continent. Seems strange to be 35 and going for my first trip
to the UK, but whatever-
Speaking of the UK, I've noticed a few writers from there have
referred to Vancouver as being the "new Chicago" when writing
about Radiogram.
Yeah, I think they're tallcing about all the great music coming out of
Vancouver. I think I've been helping that along somewhat. Every
time I get a good review in the UK I make friends with the writer
and send them all kinds of Vancouver stuff: Flophouse Jr.,
Bottleneck, Auburn, Linda McRae, Bob Kemmis, JT King.
Sounds like you're doing your bit to promote our local scene?
Absolutely! And why not—I think there's strength in numbers. If
Vancouver becomes known for a certain type of music, that can only
benefit everyone—the clubs, radio stations, magazines. Everyone
gets a high from that. I think too many people just try and get into
their own corners: "Oh, she got that spot and I wanted that spot,
I'm not going to go to that show now." But I think that's changing.
Maybe because we're getting older, maybe we're getting better at
promoting ourselves. Maybe we're getting better at writing songs, I
don't know.
You just got back from a cross-Canada tour. How'd that go?
Yeah, we did 14 dates in 18 days. We had a great time, got fantastic
press. Toronto and Winnipeg were packed, Guelph was a great
show.
It wasn't exactly the best time of year travel-wise, I imagine. Any
horror stories?
There were a couple of really brutal drives. We ran into seven snowstorms. As soon as left Vancouver, March 28 we ran into a snowstorm on the Coquihalla, and then two more on the Yellowhead,
above Kamloops. We ran into a brutal whiteout going through Regina.
We played Calgary on the Saturday before Easter, and we were
booked to play St. Catherine's, Ontario the following Tuesday. I
looked at a map, sussed it out, and figured we could do this if we
took an eight-hour break somewhere. We were going to take the
break in Winnipeg, at my parents' house. But the snowstorm slowed
us down, so we drove from Calgary to St. Catherine's straight
through, with four hours sleep in Sault Ste. Marie. After the storm in
Saskatchewan, we ran into another one outside Thunder Bay, another one in Sault Ste. Marie, and another one south of Parry Sound. We
rolled in half an hour before sound check. But you know what? The
band was awesome, we all pulled our weight and we did our jobs.
Short term goals for Radiogram and the new CD: what have you
got in mind?
I'd like to make the album happen in the UK, that'd be nice. I'd like
to license the album to a UK label, so we could go over there on a
fairly regular basis. I'm not really concentrating on the States right
now. If things go well there, that's fine. We do really well in Western
Canada, but I'd like to get something going on in Ontario and
Eastern Canada. If we can win some fans and sell some CDs in those
areas, I'll be happy. I think it'd be nice to sell 10,000 copies of this
CD. •
See www.radiogram.orgfor more info. Radiogram's next local appearance
will be Nezv Music West (May 9 at The Penthouse).
19E|F^Ll^Ilffi GENERAL   RUDIE   BY   SKA-T
20 may 2002
DiSCORDER: Before you introduce the band tell us a little bit
about the history of the band and in particular... about the
General?
Phil: The General's a great guy...   once you get to know him. We
see him every now and then, when he briefs us on his new plans.
Rumor has it lie is presently somewhere on the West Coast preparing
for our arrival. /
Since the original formation in February 1997, General Rudie
has played with the biggest names in ska music today. The formative
years of the band are highlighted by opening for the legendary
Skatalites, the originators of ska music. In our home town of
Montreal, we have played at venues such as The Cabaret, Le
Swimming, Club Soda, Metropolis, The Spectrum, and The Medley
on several occasions. In 2000, the band firmly established itself in
the Toronto area and developed a fan base by playing the annual
ARA (Anti-Racist Action) yearly benefit as well as the Toronto
International Jazz festival. That year also saw the band play at the
Ottawa Tulip Festival and other Ontario towns in order to promote
their first EP, The Green Light Sessions, Vol. 1. It was during that summer that Stomp Records first became interested in signing General
Rudie for a recording contract. 2001 proved to be General Rudie's
most fruitful year. After a week long tour of the Maritimes with the
Planet Smashers in June, the group devoted the rest of the summer
to the production of their first LP entitled Cooling the Mark. 2002 got
off to an excellent start when they headlined the ARA show.
Doubling the evening as their Toronto record launch, General Rudie
played to an intense sold out crowd at the Reverb. With a cross
Canada tour planned for May and June and an American tour in the
works for July, 2002 promises to be the most exciting and rewarding
year in General Rudie's history.
Who are the current members of the band?
Phil "Dandimite" Dixon: Vocals, sax.
Nicky "6-Pack" Popovic: Trombone.
Stefan Popowycz: Bass and back-up vocals.
Marc "King Head" Thompson: Keyboards.
Rob Radford: Drums (the new guy).
You've been together how long? And why did it take this long to
visit your brothers and sisters in the West!? Do you know that
Skaface never once played Vancouver!!
Phil: We played our first show in March '97 opening up for
Flashlight's CD launch.
We weren't all that serious in the beginning and with constant
member changes we were never able to organize a national tour. We
almost toured Canada in summer 2000 after the release of our EP
The Green Light Sessions, Vol. 1, but the band exploded and we spent
the summer rebuilding. That's when we started really working hard
as a band. We solidified the lineup and worked on new material for
the Cooling the Mark CD. And now finally its time to visit everybody
in the west and show them how strong the Montreal ska scene is!
With any luck, we'll get to see our old friends in the Kiltlifters while
we're there.
I had no idea Skaface never played Vancouver!
You played the Skaface Reunion gig last year. How was that? What
other memorable shows have you played? And who would you
most like to open for?
Phil: The Skaface show was cool, I believe it was a matinee at Lee's
Palace—which always have those strange "the show is at what
time?"feeling to them. It was the first time I had actually seen
Skaface live, I felt like we were in the early '90s all over again!
We've had the chance to play some really great bands so far:
NYSJE, Slackers, Allstonians, EST, Skarface (France) Nicotine
(Japan), Peacocks, Mustard Plug, Articles, King Django, King
Apparatus, etc... Maybe the most memorable show was playing
with the Skatalites and our first major road trip to NJ with Inspecter
7. Also nice was Saturday's show at the Metropolis with Reel Big
Fish. Hepcat would be fun, we never got a chance to play with them.
You recorded your latest album with Mitch (King Kong) Girio.
What was it like to work with him?
Marc: It was a real treat. He really channeled in on what we were
trying to do and had great advice with insightful musical ideas. We hung out a lot too, he
stayed at my house for two weeks. We saw
Planet of the Apes together and shared banana
cake on more than one occasion. In the studio,
he dances like a monkey. What a guy-
Tell me about the 2 Tongue compilations.
Phil: This is an ongoing project headed by
Stephane Ramon Vitesse to encourage the
French ska scene in Quebec. It has grown
quite popular (just today they played the
whole CD on the radio) attracting anglophone
bands like the Planet Smashers and a bunch
of European bands as well. We've always
been kind of in both scenes in Montreal so it
was natural for us to put a track on each of
his three compilations.
What do you guys listen to in the tour van?
What's your favorite band that no one's
heard of?
Marc: It's pretty varied. Lately we've been
trying to steer away from ska in the van, but
the Skafflaws, Slackers, or Skatalites always
end up in the CD player somehow. Stef
brings the ska, Phil brings his jazz CDs,
Nicky brings his chill-axing lounge music. I
am most happy listening to Weezer.
Recently, I brought my fave noise band
from Japan, The Boredoms. I don't think they
exist anymore, probably because of people
like my bandmates, who immediately made
me take it off. The arguments about what to
listen to can get pretty heated, but we manage not to get offended by each other's musical tastes.
What's the story with Jammah Tammah?
Phil: In '98 we decided it was time to try
recording one song to see if we were ready for
something more. Well a few days before the
recording we run into this guy "Hans" at a
local ska show. Turns out he's from Holland,
plays the Tenor Sax and is in a ska band. He
kind of joined the band and recorded with us.
He's a really great guy, a self proclaimed
"drifter" whose next stop was Morocco. He's
back in Holland now and his band Jammah
Tammah are releasing a new CD soon. They do
a great cover of "From Russia with Love."
It looks like General Rudie is set to tour
throughout the spring/summer. What are your
plans for the next couple years?
Phil: Yeah, this summer filled up pretty quick.
We'll be on the road for about three months in
North America. We would like to hit Europe and
Japan next, and record another CD of course!
When you see a commercial for a new teen comedy and hear a silly little ska rune in the background, what goes through your head?
Phil: Hey, why isn't that our song playing?
It looks like the new ska trend becoming popular
is emo-ska-punk. What would make General
Rudie change his tune?
Phil: I'm still having trouble figuring out what emo
is! The right price. •
<generalrudie@skapages.com>
General Rudie play the W.I.S.E. Hall on Saturday, Junt
with the Kingpins and Chris Murray. PAUL   KELLY
by  Va I  Cormier
Paul Kelly is one of Australia's greatest living singcr-songivriters, yet has
been criminally overlooked outside his home country. He's often called
Australia's answer to Bruce Springsteen in terms of the obvious folk influences and innate ability to invoke a strong sense of place. One Australian I
know told mc that whenever he goes on the road, he takes at least one Paul
Kelly CD to conjure up pictures of his hometown of Melbourne.
I chatted with a soft-spoken, gracious and polite Paul before his recent
sold-out show at Richard's on Richards. He appeared markedly gaunt mid
older than his 46 years. One might -wonder if lyrics from his current CD: "I
toasted time... now time has wasted me" tire indeed autobiographical.
DiSCORDER: You grew up in Adelaide, and moved to
Melbourne... in the late '70s was it?
Paul Kelly: I moved to Melbourne when I was 21, which was 1976,
and that's when I first started playing in bands.
What was the music scene like in Melbourne at that time?
There was a lot going on—Boys Next Door, which became the
Birthday Party, Teenage Radio Stars. Lots of pub bands. Melbourne's
always been a good music town, a bit of a livelier scene than Sydney.
What's your take on the current scene there now?
Lately a few venues have closed down. One particularly good one,
the Continental, has left a hole. It was fairly small, only about 300
people, but had a good nightclub feel and booked Jots of acts from
overseas—jazz, blues, singer-songwriter. A real "listening room"—is
that what they call them over here? There's another little pub called
The Punters, in Fitzroy, that was really an important venue for indie
and alternative bands, that also closed. I don't get out a lot when I
have time off, but I see a few things.
Anyone lately you've seen who's impressed you?
King Curly from Australia, the Avalanches... I always go blank when
someone asks me a question like this. Snout. There's heaps of good
Australian bands.
You've been producing other artists' albums lately, I understand?
Yeah, quite a lot of collaborative things over the last few years,
including soundtracks. I've been involved with three film soundtracks. Lantana was all instrumental. Another film called One Night
the Moon, which I did with two other composers, was like a mini-
opera, with the story told through music and song. I acted in that
one as well.
Did you enjoy that?
Yes and no. [Laughs] Being an actor on a film is like being a piece of
machinery. There's always people doing these esoteric, but tightly-
coordinated jobs, just to get half a minute or less of a performance on
film. Your camera operator, clapper loader, best boy, gaffer, props
person, director—all working very intently with the actor to get the
performance to work. It's a dance. In a sense, it's what you're doing
when you're playing music: you're listening to other people and
meshing in with each other. But it's more relaxed with music—if we
fuck up a song or something, it's like, "Oh, that was a laugh," and
you go on to the next song. But there's a greater intensity with working in a theatre on stage or on a film set. If you get it wrong, you
start again!
Was film scoring a different exercise in writing for you?
I haven't really done anything like scoring in a traditional way.
Directors have come to me and asked me to do what they thought I
could do. What I liked about it was not having to write words. I
always have more musical ideas than I've got words for.
When you write, then, you do the music first?
Generally, yes, the ideas are all musical, rhythm first. The words get
attached gradually.
What other artists have you worked with lately?
I've done records with Renee Geyer, and Vika and Linda. Both those
records were two or three years ago. More recently, I've done production work with Archie Roach, an aboriginal singer, and also did
a duet with Kasey Chambers.
Kasey's been getting a fair bit of press here in North America—is
there anyone else from Australia that you think deserves more
attention here?
I think the Avalanches have been doing well in England, I'm not sure
about over here. It's hard to know what's going over. I'm in a little
bit of a fog about that since I don't follow trade papers much.
What did you enjoy about working with Kasey Chambers?
She's a great songwriter—she lias a very arresting, very cutting
voice. We took her on tour with us about two and a half years ago
when I was touring with a bluegrass band from Melbourne, Uncle
Bill. Slie used to be in a band called the Dead Ringers with her broker, father, doing country music. She came out and opened for us and
I'd get her up during our set to do "Grievous Angel" by Gram
Parsons. Then I wrote a song we could do as a duet, called "Heart
Break, Heart Mend." We had a day off during that tour in Perth, and
I thought we should record the song. I asked her if she had a song
that she wanted to do as well. She had a song called "I Still Pray."
She released "I Still Pray" as a bonus disc, it got a lot of airplay in
Australia. She cut it again with lier band and asked me to record it
with her, so that version's on her latest release. Her family are all
good people, we've had a few good singalongs.
I don't think many of us associate Australia with bluegrass. How
did you come to first hear that kind of music?
The music I heard when I was first learning guitar was early Bob
Dylan, Hank Williams, Woody Guthrie. Then I started digging deeper and listening to Bill Monroe, Stanley Brothers. I always loved that
kind of music. I went to see that film Oh Brother, Where Art Thou?
and I just loved that film because I used to sing half those songs. 1
even used the chorus of "Oh Death" in a song I recorded with
Professor Ratbaggy, which is more of a groove-based record. I
checked with my publishing company and said, "Is this okay to
use?" and they said "Yeah, it's from the 17th century." I thought it
was an incredibly obscure song, but then a year later out comes Oh
Brother and another movie, Songcatcher, with that song.
It's interesting that you've got these different side projects. Tell
me more about Professor Ratbaggy.
It's more groove-based, a bit dubby, songs written more around the
bass lines and the drums. Built around riffs, not many chord
changes—just get a groove and put stuff on the top.
I see you did a track with Mick Harvey [of the Bad Seeds] on your
latest CD. Have you known him a long time?
Actually, I recorded two tracks with him but just used one, "Would
You Be My Friend." He plays everything on it. We've both got
recording setups in our garden sheds. He's got a bit of a bigger
space, but we've both got eight-track recording. I don't really know
him well, but I've admired his music a long time. He's the captain of
tlie Bad Seeds, in a way, really. I love the way he plays guitar, just the
way he plays around a song—he doesn't get in the way. He's poetic
and plain at the same time.
From what I've read, you've been quite involved with aboriginal
issues in Australia and have worked with many aboriginal artists.
What are some of the current hot issues in that regard in your
country?
Over the last few years, one of the main issues has been the "stolen
generation." Government policy in the 1930s to 1960s was to move
aboriginal children from their parents into white homes. There's a
film that's just come out about that called Rabbit Proof Fence by a
director whose name escapes me right now [Phillip Noyce]. One of
the big issues between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians
is that there's never been a treaty. There's never been a real facing up
to what's happened in our history, especially by our current government, which is quite conservative. It's festering away, really.
Recently I worked with a singer-songwriter named Kutcha
Edwards, a Victorian aboriginal. I've worked a lot witli Yotlii Yindi,
Christine Anu, Kev Carmody Kev's an angrier, wordier songwriter,
but also a very powerful one when he hits it.
I hear that at least one of your children is following you in the
music business.
My eldest son, who's 21, is a DJ. I'm always interested in new music,
anyway, but he has turned me on to lots ot different music. He works
mostly in the Melbourne area and especially loves Detroit house. •
www.paulkellv.com.au
21 u^^smm recorded media
ANTIBALAS
Talkatif
(Ninja Tune)
DAMON AND NAOMI ON
TOUR WITH KURIHARA
Song to the Siren: Live in San
Sebastian
(Sub Pop)
According to the liner notes
adorning the new album by the
Afro-beat orchestra Antibalas,
"For true change to happen, the
hearts of each and every human
being must evolve." Antibalas
explain, "Talkatifis dedicated to
people all over the earth who
create   positive   change   by
changing themselves."
There's so much wrong
with this individualistic New
Age hogwash that one hardly
knows where to begin tearing it
apart. But that's beside the
point—which is that the
Antibalas album is crap; a
cleaned-up, slimmed-down,
bleached and normalized take
on the classic Fela Kuti sound.
Discorder readers are recommended to forget about its existence immediately and seek out
the real thing instead. You do
not  need   this  self-righteous
hippy claptrap.
Not that I have anything
against hippy claptrap per se,
you understand. Indeed, the
exploration of arcane Jewish
tradition, feyer-than-thou folk-
rock melody and aimless psyche-rock improvisation that is
Damon and Naomi with Ghost
always gets a rewind on my
sound system. Those poor souls
who have not yet fallen under
the spell of this under-rated collaboration between the drum-
and-bass engine room of
defunct indie rock touchstone
Galaxie 500 and Japanese joss-
stick wavers Ghost should do
so immediately.
For those of us who are
already smitten with that particular volume, Song to the Siren
provides some excellent, never-
before-published appendices.
An audio-CD-plus-DVD double
set documenting a trio tour
undertaken by Damon, Naomi
and Ghost guitarist Michio
Kurihara, it presents a selection
of originals and cover versions
in an appealingly stripped
down form (as witnessed at last
year's Bumbershoot) alongside
a "video tour diary" directed by
Naomi. Sure, this certainly isn't
an essential release, but it certainly is an enjoyable one,
which is way more than you
can say for the new album by
Luna, the band led by ex-
Galaxie 500 main-man Dean
Wareham. Why, it's the revenge
of the rhythm section!
Sam Macklin
DO MAKE SAY THINK
& Yet & Yet
(Constellation)
Disclaimer: Do Make Say
Think contains no members of
Godspeed You Black Emperor.
The reason I mention this is that
there seems to be a trend among
Constellation bands that share
members with Godspeed to
sound remarkably similar to
said band. Not that this is a bad
thing. I only mention this fact
because an assumption that Do
Make Say Think is merely
another Godspeed clone might
prevent someone from buying
their new album, which would
be a tragedy.
The band's third full length
release, &Yet &Yet, seems to
have melded the best parts of
their earlier efforts (which are
both good in their own rights),
combining a minimalist aesthetic with warm arrangements of
bass, guitars, keyboards, and
multiple drums, as well as subtly blended (rather than gimmicky) horns and electronics.
The album uses a mixture
of restrained harmonies, tasteful repetition, and almost jazz-
influenced song structures and
creates a mood akin to
Tortoise's earliest albums.
Veering away from the post-
rock quiet, loud, quiet, loud and
the wanky annoyingness of
prog-rock and acid jazz, &Yet
&Yet finds a somewhat original
and highly enjoyable middle
ground.
Ian Mosby
GET HUSTLE
"Who Do You Love" b/w
"Mad Power" 7"
(Gravity)
The Get Hustle have the exact
same instrumental setup as the
LA cult punk band The
Screamers—and this Portland-
based group could become just
as legendary.
Their new single on Gravity
starts off with their very
demonic take on Bo Diddley's
"Who Do You Love." Mac and
Marc's pianos are abrasive and
scary in the way that The
Orioles' rock 'n' roll was scary
to white, Christian Americans
in the early '50s. Valentine's
totally possessed vocals in this
song will scare your daughter
into becoming a nun and never
listening to music again. Ron's
drums fall perfectly into place
but are always totally on the
edge in a far-out and off-kilter
way.
The B-side of this record,
"Mad Power," blows away the
A-side. This song finds the Get
Hustle building a totally weird
bridge somewhere between
dirty R&B, jazz, and hardcore.
The last time I saw the Get
Hustle I saw blood on the keys
of Mac's piano. Dig that punk
shit!!
Brace Paine
THE GOSSIP
Arkansas Heat
(Kill Rock Stars)
I spent a bleary couple of days
blowing out my hearing with
the Gossip's new EP. By the end
of it all, I was both totally converted and totally exhausted. I
loved the music, but I also felt a
sort of existential strain trying
to reconcile the record with,
well, my own personal and
musical history. Let me make
myself a little clearer. This EP
contains six songs, the first five
of which are bright, extremely
memorable R&B punk songs.
They're also all just under two
minutes long. The last track is a
ten-minute-plus opus framed in
washes of droning guitar feed
back entitled "(Take Back) The
Revolution." It features girl-
gang chant choruses and makes
me feel a deep sadness—the
sadness of a person who ate too
much of that food back in the
early and mid-'90s and has subsequently become allergic to
what used to be her primary
form of sustenance. "The revolution." Sheesh.
H. Apropos
HOLZKOPF
Only a Bad Harvest
Will Save Us
(Dainty Deathy)
As one who is uninitiated in the
post-modern jargon of the minimal/experimental electronic
music crowd, I have no
cliches available to describe
Saskatchewan's Holzkopf
(a.k.a. Jake Hardy). Even if I
knew some, they wouldn't adequately serve this review.
Because I want to convince you
that you should buy Only a Bad
Harvest Will Save Us and that it
is really good, I must go further.
First, I need to explain to
you how painfully flat the
Canadian prairies are. Believe
me, I've driven through them a
few times and I can tell you that
there is far too much sky all
around you. There is nothing
more confining than all of those
gigantic fields and rivers, dotted by the occasional small
town or grain elevator.
However, as a long-time resi-
CiTR  DJ PROFILE
Dave and Mike
Local Kids Make Good
Alternate Mondays, llam-lpm
Record played most often on your show:
The Accident's self-titled EP.
Record you would save in a fire:
The Smugglers, Selling the Sizzle.
Record that should burn in hell:
Nicklefault; shit Langley bands.
Worst band we like:
Gob. At least, we pretend to like them.
First record you bought:
Salvador Dream, UR.
Last record you bought:
Three Inches of Blood, Battlecry Under a Winter Sun.
Best interview:
Katie Lapi of Operation Makeout. Friendliest rock
star ever.
Worst interview:
Magical Glass Tears. Most pretentious indie pricks
ever.
Musician you'd most like to marry:
Christa Min. Her beauty is unparalleled.
Favourite show on CiTR:
Chris-a-Rific's Parts Unknown.
Strangest phone call:
All of our groupies. No we won't go out with you.
22 may 2002
TAKE ME TO SAINT JOHN!
This June 10-1 6, 2002, CiTR 101.9fm is headed to Saint
John, NB for the National Campus Radio Conference and
we would like to take you with us! If you're in a band and
would like your music to be heard by other stations across
the country, why not send us your stuff by May 31st?
(Min. five songs, no more than two copies.)
C/O CITR RADIO 101.9FM
UBC
#233-6138 SUB BLVD.
VANCOUVER, BC V6T 1Z1 dent of these flatlands,
Holzkopf has managed to fabricate a musical structure that
makes up for this lack of vertical geography.
Holzkopf's music draws
heavily from this isolated landscape and builds a digital
replacement: the ambient
drone of weak AM radio
signals along the prairie horizon is reconstructed and
filtered, punctuated by high
calibre glitches and distortions,
then subdued by mountains
of atonal feedback and noise,
only to be smoothed out again
by organic and lush arrangements of staccato beats and
droning oscillators. The result
is a carefully crafted 10-song
CD that presents a perfect
description of (as well as
violent reaction to) the open
and diffuse prairie landscape.
Musical comparisons are
difficult, as Holzkopf manoeuvres between the more rhythmic moments of someone like
Kid 606 and the difficult randomness of BC's Vote Robot.
Regardless, there is much to be
gained by staring at the horizon
and listening to Only a Bad
Harvest Will Save Us, so I direct
you to the Holzkopf MP3s on
the Dainty Deathy web site
(www.daintydeathy.com).
Ian Mosby
ABFAHRT HINWIL
Links Berge Rechts Seen
(Toytronic)
Toys for adults. No, I'm not
talking about those Bandai
Anime models your wispy-
bearded, same-sweater-wearing, portly neighbour collects,
or the ones of the XXX variety
either. The toys I'm talking
about are the ones made by a
small collective of Londoners
who put the "indie" in indie-
electro. Abfahrt is one half
Austrian Martin Haidinger
(best known for his Gimmik
releases) and one half Chris
Cunningham who, along with
labelmates, runs Toytronic.
Perhaps best known for last
year's Neurokinetic compilation
(featuring Funckarma and
Novel 23 among others),
Toytronic has been quietly
releasing vinyl and CD trea-
Abfahrt Hinwil (translated
as Exit Hinwil, a small village in
Austria) is the most solid full-
length on the label to date. This
CD compilation of previous
Abfahrt 7"s and 12"s, plus two
new trades, maps the uncharted
territory between early Warp
releases and Haidinger's sound,
which is the popcorn song
meets the comforting beauty of
an infant's nursery room
mobile. Navigating a different
course than dance and D&B/
Garage artists, this duo leaves a
lasting impression of fine craftsmanship through their studied
weaving of melodies, rather
than an adrenaline dance fix.
Think u-ziq in his ambient/
warm bleep fashion rather than
his drill 'n' bass mode, and
you're developing a taste for
Abfahrt. This is a non-vocal
soundtrack, music to a laser
light show that won't ever happen. Being an adult and playing
with toys is no longer regressive
but progressive. Go forth and
be an adult toy collector—just
change the sweater first.
Rbot
CAROLYN MARK AND HER
ROOMMATES
A Tribute to Nashville
(Mint)
Be warned that this is a fluffy
review, full of praise. If you
want   disgust,   wait   for   my
review of the Starsailor album
next month. (But who knows, I
haven't listened to it yet and I
might like it. Stay tuned for
that.)
Back to the review: I once
saw Carolyn Mark open for
Neko Case and, at the end of
the night, I thought Mark stole
the show. She's so charming,
plus Neko was feeling sick.
Also, the song "Edmonton" on
the album Party Girl is one of
the funniest songs I've ever
heard. Funny ha-ha, not funny
strange. So when I found out
that Carolyn Mark and Her
Roommates were doing a tribute to Robert Altman's cinematic masterpiece Nashville, I was
excited. I plucked the CD from
the review bin and listened to it
many a time. One of my own
roommates kept on commenting how "hot" it is. I was all set
to write my review, but first I
had to watch the film because
I'm a good reviewer girl. I do
my homework and all that.
Nashville (the film) is the
shit. Once I got through the first
40 minutes, I was super
impressed by the scope of
Altman's vision. It's a film
about a specific period in
American history, set to a
Nashville soundscape. I was
struck by how the same thematic threads continue to run
through American politics
today. Seeing the film made me
appreciate the album all the
more. Yes, Nashville the tribute
is also the shit. There are
appearances by a number of
Mark's alt country friends:
Case, Carl Newman (okay, so
he's not alt country), Dallas
Good, Robert Dayton (okay, so
he's not alt country either, but
he does his song Canned
Hamm-style, which is enough
for me), and a long list of musicians who'll put the twang into
your talk. I'm hoping that
someday I'll be able to catch a
live presentation of the Nashville
tribute, complete with attitude
and assassination. A girl can
wish.
Doretta Lau
OZY
(Force Inc.)
Beats! My life is hill of them—
Fireball Productions
and here's a dish of kicks to
maintain the hectic pace of my
techno-Dasein, while at the
same time remaining warm and
emotional with my digital
Other.
Beginning with dub washes, Ozy moves into clicky
micro-house and tops out with
long techno-jams that sound
like a slightly harder version of
Swayzak's dancefloor pounders
on Himawari. Even intellectuals
drink and get ripped and shred
the dancefloor. And this album
is a driving reminder that two
out of every three chin-stroking
PIB (People In Black) are dedicated post-ravers who still own
their Phat Pants. Take the angst
of techno, the soul of house, and
the intellectual brevity of the
post-generation and you've got
the right mix of dubby-yet-
slamming techno on this Force
Inc. album.
Although Ozy displays his
vigour on the dancefloor
tracks—making for good driving music, much like
Monolake, speeding down
Whistler Highway 99 at 150
with the snow blowing SUVs
off the road like bowling pins—
it is his subtlety in the careful
arrangement of ambient synth
pads and dub chords on ambient meanderings such as
"Drama Club" that give the
album as a whole, as an entire
CONTINUED ON
PAGE 24...
Unle ash   you r
Dionysian   frenzy
AT THE
BUNDING
LIGHT!!
CINEMA
(^
®
EYE OF NEWT PLAY LIVE TO
CABINET OF DR. CALIGARI
Classic horror to a live soundtrack.
<D
MANWOMAN
& THE PAPERBAG CATHOLIX
Harry Kemball's 70s classic exploring
tattoos, taboos, and sex.
^rTU
THE TARGET SHOOTS FIRST
Wilcha's searing first person account ot
the music biz and Columbia House.
P
©B
with tales of Pink Floyd!
® CBC RADIO 3's
120SEC0NDS.COM
DIGITAL FILM FEST
Two nights of parties,
live music and screenings.
W VINYL
Alan Zweig's brilliant and already-classic
record collecting documentary.
BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND
JESUS CHRIST
VAMPIRE HUNTER
EL SANTOS and JC team up
to tag team kill vampires!
03) HIOETHE CHILDREN!
W NARCOLEPTIC
VIDEOGRAPHER PART 2
TEAM NARC 0 and their blissfully bizarre
.......... W"
^fj
;/
^anKimTO
23 listen from beginning to end,
the "storytelling" properties
that make electronic music
shine and gives it that exquisite
ability to pull off a harmonic
weaving of sound that evokes
both memory and passion in a
composition which, despite
being startlingly familiar, is
futurist and experimental to the
core. It is of little surprise to me
that this album evokes the
foggy, blue-grey visions that I
hallucinate whenever I hear
Boards of Canada; for Ozy—
a.k.a. Ornolfur Thorlacius—is
an Icelandic cold-freak, making
his music the sonic equivalent
of a mocha milkshake for the
rained-out and cold Northern
climes.
THE QUEERS
Pleasant Screams
(Lookout!)
This band is totally gay.
Seriously. All the guys in the
band have totally gay names,
like Joe Queer, Dangerous
Dave, and Matt Drastic. The
lyrics sound like they were
written by a bunch of faggots
too. The song "Homo" is about
this guy who "likes da banana
split." I don't know what that
means, but I think it is probably
a reference to some act where
one guy puts his dick in some
hole belonging to another guy.
The music on this album is like
the soundtrack to one of those
bathroom orgies where a bunch
of guys get together late at
night and jack each other off.
There is a lot of guitar wank on
this album.
If you still don't believe that
these dudes are gay, they totally
thank Green Day and the
Mighty Mighty Bosstones in
their liner notes. Anyway, it's
totally cool if guys want to be
gay or whatever. I just don't get
it. I mean, if there are three guys
in the band, do they take turns
with each other, or do they all
just go for it at the same time?
Yeah, and isn't 'corn-holing'
(I'm totally not going to explain
what that means) really bad for
you or something? You would
have to be really careful about
listening to this album in
Stanley Park, or while driving
down Davie, 'cause people
might think you're a homo, too.
Sara "up the bum" Young
SONNY SHARROCK
Monkey-pockie-boo
(Get Back Re-issue)
In 1969, free jazz was reaching
its peak. Men and women were
throwing it all away to destroy
their lungs and hands and other
people's ears with saxophones,
drums and guitars. Sonny
Sharrock's Monkey-pockie-boo,
recorded in Paris in 1969, is one
of the most dangerous of the
BYG releases and some of the
most chaotic free jazz ever
recorded.
Sharrock's guitar playing
comes off like a totally demented Derek Bailey versus Arto
Lindsay. Sonny always said he
wanted his guitar to mimic the
screech of Albert Ayler's sax,
and he goes way beyond that.
Linda Sharrock, Sonny's wife
(true avant-garde romantics),
tackles the vocals and totally
goes nuts! Ben Guerin plays
bass and Jacques Thollot plays
drums. THIS IS FIRE MUSIC!!!
EMBRACE IT NOW!!! Put this
record on and watch everyone
leave the room, except you and
your really cool girlfriend.
Brace Paine
SILKWORM
Italian Platnium
(Touch and Go)
My friend Naspam admitted to
me that his guilty pleasure band
is They Might Be Giants. They
are horrible. I thought about it
for awhile, then I told him that
the worst band I like is
Silkworm. He said "That's really bad. They are the worst.
Except they don't count because
they're on Touch and Go."
Every member of Silkworm
is slightly tone deaf. I'm sure
that if Mr. Andy Cohen's guitar
was a quarter tone out of tune
he would be able to notice, but
when he's singing, he must
have no idea. Or else he just
can't sing in tune. Perhaps the
best singer in the band is
Eulvatina  Rats,  Mr.  Michael
Dahlquist the drummer, who
sounds like a drunk Mark
Eitzel.
No song on Italian Platnium
is over four minutes long. And
half the time is usually spent by
a Cohen guitar solo. Some of
the solos are nicely broken, but
most are typical of what would
come out of a gold Les Paul special (which is GREAT and guilty
at the same time). The ska song,
"The Brain," is good, except for
the annoying vocal panning.
The last song, "A Cockfight of
Feelings" is about taking it up
the ass. "Softly now, softly now,
try it you won't die." The love
song "Young" was surely written by the multi-talented Mr.
Tim Midgett, and is sung by
ALTERNATIVE COUNTRY
singer Ms. Kelly Hogan. If
Silkworm could sing as well as
her, I wouldn't be the only one
in this city who liked them.
I'm not exactly sure why I
like Silkworm so much, but I
sure do like them bitches.
Christa Min
TRANS AM
TA
(Thrill Jockey)
Here at Discorder, opinion is
stacked against Trans Am and
their new album, TA. Steve says
that not only are they not good,
they shouldn't even be called
Trans Am anymore; this is
because they no longer represent   the   sound   of   quote-
unquote '70s music meets
quote-unquote '80s music.
Steve can only appreciate TA
through a shield of disbelief,
reclining in meaningless, sub-
pleasurable lassitude. Barb and
Christa agree: "Trans Am
sucks," they say, "and you,
Donovan, suck for liking them."
Even Julian Who, the apex of
the self-deprecatory Indie mentality, with his flannel shirts,
brown pants, and house in
Strathcona, hates Trans Am,
quietly despising them with a
muted, self-deprecating fury.
I condemn them all: withered souls, degraded by excess
immersion in hipster culture,
confused and bewildered in
their own ironic prisms. Only I
am capable of transcending this
trap and realizing the purity of
expression that is Trans Am, the
uncanny synthesis of masculine
and feminine experiential
modes, the darkly alluring combination of the post-Transformers
paradigm's intellectual juvenility with the sexuality of bitter,
spit-in-your-face indifference.
Damn the contempt of the
jaded; rise up and join Trans
Am in the sky.
Donovan
At your local record store
or online at
www. scratchrecords. com
24 may 2002 real live action
live music reviews
THE SADIES
CLEM SNIDE
Saturday, March 30
The Picadilly Pub
Everything had gone terribly
wrong. I stood outside the Pic
and read a sign, where
Beachwood Sparks' name had
been crossed out. Clem Snide
was slotted in their place. Never
heard of him and I wasn't sure
if I wanted to. When you're told
to expect something and that
something is taken away, you're
entitled to act the part of an
abandoned baby. So I was
propped up against the bar
moping, grasping my drink
with miserable intent and all
thoughts in my head were of
betrayal. I didn't know the
place or the people, but the
crowd filed in laughing. There
were rockers and cowboys that
shared jokes and bought each
other drinks. The Pic has the
strange effect of erasing personal borders, on account of how
tight a space it is, and when
people bump into you, you
both just smile. The reception
for the openers was hesitant
and I must admit I wasn't up
and hollering "Lordy." As far as
songwriters go, they weren't
half-bad, but not good enough
to replace the California
inspired beauty of Beachwood
Sparks.
People twisted, turned and
packed in towards the stage.
Everyone shone from the heat.
Drinks spilled on my shoes, cigarettes scorched my button-up
shirt, and bodies shuffled. The
Sadies walked out, bathed in
red light, and those boys looked
like they were on a mission of
God's will or murder or maybe
both. The Good brothers were
dressed in similar white rhine-
stone suits, not unlike the suits
made by Nudie's Rodeo Tailors
for dear departed Gram
Parsons. Everything about
them standing there, even
before they played, seemed to
evoke a serious anticipation.
Now maybe it was the drugs or
the drink or the heat in that sardine can, but when that guitar
and fiddle broke in, my problems were eased and I was
freed. The show can only be
described as a whole, something complete where songs
were broken up with minute
long instrumentais and the only
pauses were for family or
friends to get up on the stage.
Neko Case joined the boys for
"This Little Light of Mine," and
Ma and Pa Good came up for
some wonderful numbers.
Dallas Good's deep resonant
voice carries with it more character, depth and tribulation
than any performer twice his
age. When he sang, the speaker
shook and begged for leniency;
and too bad you couldn't see
the fury in his eyes underneath
all that hair. Brother Travis
Good has one of the greatest
rock and roll snarls I've ever
seen, and he plays with such
unfettered madness you think
he might start swinging that
guitar at your head. During
their set this prancing asshole
kept jumping back and forth
over the stage and from the
look in Travis Good's eye, this
wasn't sitting well with the
booze. Well, this asshole, as I
call him, jumped one more time
and knocked over the mike
stand. Well, Travis made like he
was gonna bring hell down on
him, but on account of the folks
being there I think he reconsidered. So what does Asshole do?
He jumps again, and with that
Travis raises up his gorgeous
guitar and boots the prick right
in the ass, sending him sprawling to the hardwood. The
Sadies are without a doubt one
of the best bands I've seen, and
from Dick Dale to The Flying
Burrito Bros. to Ennio
Morricone, they run through
styles and give them a new life,
and a new worth as well. The
Sadies aren't country music;
The Sadies are the fucking
Sadies.
Derek Sterling Boone
MARTIN TIELLI
Saturday, March 30
Richard's on Richards
First, a little history. Martin is
my rock god. I've adored him
since I first saw him on the
Ralph Benmergi Show with the
rest of Nick Buzz. Being one of
the front men of The
Rheostatics just made me love
him more. He's a brilliant
painter, writer and musician
with a voice that can make you
cry or send chills down your
spine. He is my Elvis, he'll be 80
CONTINUED ON THE
NEXT PAGE...
FROG EYES WOWS THE SUGAR REFINERY. THURSDAY APRIL 25.
AS CAPTURED BY JAY DOUILLARD.
Ed Harcourt
Here Be Monsters
$15.99cd
Featuring
Apple of My Eye & She Fell Into My Arms
d Street 604.669.2289 £7VIRGINMEGA.C0M
7 before ten/$9 i
dress to impress
(604) 878-GOGO   www.rumbletone.com
25em<mm%z and I'll be 60 and I'll throw my
underwear at him. Now, having
said all that, I don't like his new
album, We didn't even suspect
that he was the poppy salesman.
Martin can be a crazy genius,
but this album screams Gordon
Lightfoot. It's bland, unobtrusive, and heartfelt for sure, but
without the manic weirdness
I've become accustomed to.
Regardless, I went to his
show at Richard's because I support him in all his endeavors.
Martin came on and did a brief
acoustic set with two of his new
songs and one Rheos' song. It
was actually quite beautiful and
completely did away with my
preconceived notion of how
lame the show was going to be. I
was certainly settling into the
mellow mood he was trying to
cultivate... and then the band
came on. Made up of local Can-
rock celebrities like Ford Pier
and the drummer for Veda
Hille's band, they proceeded to
ruin the rest of the show. Even
the bass player seemed more
concerned with making people
know what a rock star he was
than playing. Martin played
some more songs from his new
CD and the newly re-released
Nick Buzz CD, but all of his
wonderful intricacy was lost. At
one point Martin was singing
"Shaved Head," (a Rlieos' song
he sings far too often). It's a
beautiful, intense brooding song
and I had "the-crazy-dancing-
drunk-guy" in front of me. I
guess I should be glad he didn't
feel the need to take his shirt off.
Martin also did "Love Streams"
off of the Nick Buzz CD.
"Good," I thought, "this delicate
melody will have the strength to
break hearts—and it's only
Martin singing with Ford Pier
on piano." Boy was I wrong.
Ford pounded that piano until
any trace of Martin's voice was
drowned out in his coarse
cacophony. No tickling of the
ivories here. There were other
things that bothered me, like
Martin singing about a break-up
and the response being incessant giggling. Why? Because he
said the word "poo." I wasn't
aware that this was an all-ages
show. By this point, I stopped
paying attention to the show. It
was getting louder and louder.
The songs ceased to make an
impact and became a wall of
noise. And though I don't condone Richards' "Boot-'em-off-
stage-as-quick-as-possible-so-th
e-people-with-the-real-money-
can-dance-to-the-shitthey-hear-
on-tlie-radio-all-the-time"policy,
I was relieved that it was finally
over. Maybe I'm getting old.
Maybe Martin loses something
when he doesn't have the other
Rheos around. Maybe he
should've picked a band more
suitable to his subtle nuances.
Whatever the case, I was really
disappointed. If only I could be
like the little old ladies who
loved Elvis and were content to
weep and scream at the sight of
him. If only I could be happy to
stare at my darling malcontent
artist. If only....
Robin Fisher
26 may 2002
FILA BRAZILIA
GRAND CENTRAL SOUND
SYSTEM
Thursday, April 4
Oh, golly: How I looked forward to this show. What a treat
to see these master producers
who never stop amazingly
weaving together a cacophony
of influences with style and
mirth. Hot on the heels of Fila
Brazilia's latest and arguably
best release, Jump Leads, I was
all amped up for a show that
featured a whole band—not
simply two pasty Englishmen
behind decks, which is the
usual for English DJs at Sonar!
This is wliat they got in Seattle
the night after. What Vancouver
got was basically one pasty
Englishman—Dave "Man"
McSherry—and their touring
MC. The rest of the Fila band
(drummer, bassist, and the
other half of Fila proper, Steve
Cobby) were in Vancouver, but
sans their gear, which was stuck
in the States. One could say
Man's set was alright for a guy
who's better known for his production and music making and
his mixes of everything house
and R&B were nice. But was
Kylie Minogue's megahit really
needed in the mix? Going to a
show where less than one half
the act performs makes one
give less than one half of a shit
in the end. Respect is due to the
Sonar crew for booking Fila, but
I'm going to pretend they never
came and reserve judgment
until they're in full presence.
Sticking this show out to its end
was well worth the wait on the
weekday, however. The DJs of
Grand Central Sound System
(K7 Records) kicked some life
back into the crowd thanks to
the energetic vocals of
Brooklyn's Nikosol. I don't
know who this sassy lady is,
but her party vocals kept the
crowd engaged, inserting some
much needed hip hop creativity and fun into a so-so evening.
Rbot
PRINCESS SUPERSTAR
STINK MITT
Thursday, April 4
Wettbar
The Wettbar's bouncers set the
mood the minute I walked in.
Open the door, pay the cover,
then a boys-only, totally comprehensive pat-down from the
security detail. Which sends the
message: packing anything in
your pant leg? Leave it outside.
This is ladies' night.
The bouncer didn't find
what he was looking for, so in
we went. Almost right away we
were treated to an unannounced opener, local rap duo
Stink Mitt. Dressed up like '80s
backwash in Cyndi Lauper
sunglasses and teased hair,
these ladies delivered a two-
song mini set that might even
have made Princess Superstar
herself blush. The first one I
was barely listening to until I
caught the chorus chant, something that rhymed "hit" with
"clit." The second song,
"Jailbait,"   was   an   ode   to
teenage boys. I have to hand it
to them, Stink Mitt was the perfect primer for the act to follow,
they got the small crowd up out
of their seats—enough chairs
for everyone that night—and
gave us a playful (I hope) reversal of the typical sexual politics
rap songs get caught up in.
But there was something
wrong. It was 11:30, and the
club was barely a quarter full.
Surely Princess Superstar
deserved better? My friends
and I speculated that not many
people showed up to this show
because: a) not much advance
notice, not a lot of hype; b) the
new album, Princess Superstar
Is, though excellent, has only
been out a couple of months; c)
Wettbar waters down their
drinks; d) it was only 10 bucks,
but bank accounts were empty
after De La Soul's Commodore
shows earlier that week.
And we also thought up e)
people don't take the Princess
seriously as a rapper. Maybe
it's that tired old white rapper
stigma—or the even more tired
woman rapper stigma—but
anyone who's heard the new
album should know better: this
white girl has skills. Maybe it's
her background in indie rock.
Or maybe they don't take her
seriously because she doesn't
take them seriously, at least as
seriously as they take themselves. Her scene is to reverse
and play with some of rap's
favourite topics, like misogyny,
gangsta poses, and battle MCs.
When she's rapping, Princess
Superstar is taking the piss
with "keeping it real" scenesters. Her reply is "Hell yeah
I'm faking it, but I'm faking it
better than you are, and the big
difference is that I know I'm
faking."
But our tirade got cut off.
There she was, leather bodysuit, Las Vegas showgirl-headgear and all. She gave it to us
fast, funny, and sexy, working
the stage 4ike Britney's evil
alter ego. Backed by a DJ and
live bass player, and trading
rhymes with her stage partner,
who I'm guessing was Curtis
Curtis (poor substitute for
Kool Keith, but what can you
do?), slie got the hundred or so
people at the club that night
dancing to some quality party
hip hop. Role-playing was a
big part of the show—she
changed hats four or five
times, switched from sex kitten
to goddess, female John to bad
babysitter, rhyming her way in
and out of each persona. Silly,
early Madonna dance routines. Crotch grabbing and
chest thumping. The show was
good. But when slie broke out
the ultra-erotic "Wet! Wet!
Wet!" and Curtis Curtis, who
obviously came in through a
different door than me, pulled
a little squirt gun out of his
pants to sprinkle the #crowd
and draw us into the Princess'
raunchy fantasy, most of it fell
onto the empty spaces on the
dance floor.
Evan Mauro
HARD RUBBER
ORCHESTRA
Wednesday, April 10
Vancouver East Cultural
Centre
Well, I always hate writing
unbalanced, sycophantic reviews.
But some acts, like Vancouver's
own Hard Rubber Orchestra,
just leave me with no choice.
When I showed up at the
Cultch, I really had no clue
what to expect. I had heard bits
and pieces about HRO around
the UBC School of Music and
knew I was in for something to
was a suite by Vancouver composer Brad Turner, which also
had an exotic feel to it, sometimes seeming Middle Eastern,
sometimes tribal, sometimes
Latin, and at other times pure
jazz. Throughout both sets,
everyone had at least one solo,
when Korsrud would duck out
of the way to avoid obstruction.
Korsrud also made sure at the
end of each number to introduce each of the soloists for that
number to us. All of the members of the orchestra played
phenomenally, but I'd have to
JONNY 0 OF STREETS PLAYS THE ELECTRIC
GUITAR AT THE PIC.
PHOTO BY DIRTY AND THIRTY.
do with big band jazz. The
members of the band immediately set up a good rapport with
the small audience, with both
bandleader and conductor John
Korsrud and baritone sax player Daniel Miles Kane joking and
chatting with the audience pre-
show.
Once the show got underway, HRO played long and
hard, performing a mix of old
material and new material from
their just-released CD, Rub
Harder. Of course it was all new
tome.
In the first set, they performed pieces by Korsrud and
Montreal composer Jean
Derome, including a mesmerizing piece commissioned by the
Kokoro Dance company for a
performance in 1995 at the
Vancouver International Jazz
Festival. This piece was one of
my particular favourites, with
its Caribbean flavour and a beat
driving even harder than the
rain outside.
The second 50-minute set
say my absolute favourite one
was percussionist Jack
Duncan's extended solo during
the second set. This solo, mostly
performed on the Congo
drums, had a trance-inducing
tribal rhythm, and Duncan
seemed totally given over to the
blood-pumping beat. It reverberated in my head long after it,
and the show, was finished.
Another great solo was Saul
Berson's alto sax solo a few
minutes earlier in the same
suite, with its Middle Eastern
flavour, which inspired the
audience to break into applause
mid-number.
The pieces were all expertly crafted by their respective
composers, blending different
textures and timbres, changing
meters and tempos, and all
flowed naturally, almost hypnotically, drawing the listener
into the world of the music. The
show was being taped, so I
hope that it will someday be
released on a future HRO CD.
At the beginning of the sec
ond set, John Korsrud asked us
if we were enjoying this "crazy
quasi-big band experience." Of
course the answer was a definite "yes!"
Korsrud announced that
Hard Rubber Orchestra will be
back^in the fall of 2002 with a
new commissioned, work by
trombonist Hugh Fraser (who
also had an awesome, face-reddening intense solo of his own
in the last song, a Jimi Hendrix
cover), and (I think) also an
appearance at the Jazz Festival
in June, so keep an eye out for
them.
Vampyra Draculca
...AND YOU WILL KNOW US
BY THE TRAIL OF DEAD
BOBBY CONN
Saturday, April 13
Richard's on Richards
This is a payback review: I
owed Discorder, I owed Trail of
Dead, and I owed you, the
reader, most of all. I sincerely
apologize for not writing a
review for this band when I was
supposed to, last Hallow's Eve.
Set the scene: early show
with a long line, and raining, it
was raining. The more shows,
the more faces you know. We
finally make our way in, determined to stand near the front.
What is an opening act? A
performance meant to showcase an up-and-coming talent,
and, in the vernacular of the
music biz: "stir the crowd up."
Bobby Conn is short and he
insults the audience. Bobby
Conn likes to look at the ceiling,
gt the lights, or maybe it's God.
The band was dressed in their
finest lavender ostrich-skin
numbers, which started them
sweating upon the stage.
Obviously club management
had turned up the heat. Bobby
came across like he was tutored
by Jagger and Iggy, and then
maybe beaten up by them.
Anyone willing to combine
platter rock and willing hooks
with   clever,   smarmy   lyrics
form. And that was exactly
what it was: a performance. The
cliches were toxic-molasses
thick and the posturing jumped
the comedic gap right into
absurdity. More than anything,
though, their genuine willingness to perform made them
damn entertaining. By the end
of their set we had already
blown our eardrums. Bobby
even crooned to some fella in
the front row, then took some
girl instead.
I believe in a number of
strange things: mass political
conspiracy, alien life, mutant
talent agents, sock gnomes, and
yes, I even believe in DEMONS.
I've seen demons, seen their
eyes glaze over black and profound. Yes, I 'm certain there are
demons, and they definitely
come from Texas. Lights are out
and that malicious little tunnel
song from Willy Wonka and the
Chocolate Factory plays as the
CONTINUED ON
PAGE 28... nmur
newmusicwest
May 08 -12 Vancouver
Th | May 09
Fr | May 10
Sa | May 11                     Su
| May 12
CFOX SEEDS Event
Shocore
Sideshow, WDC, Hybrid Cartel,
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- All Ages
Matthew Good
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Honeysuckle Serontina
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The Rage
Sasha & Digweed
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Richards on Richards
Jim Rose
Richards on Richards
Fred Eaglesmith
The Corb Lund Band
Tix: $15.00 at NMW02 office or
Zulu, Highlife, and Ticketmaster
BT
Kevin Shiu, Henry Mah,
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The Penthouse
Bif Naked
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The Penthouse
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John Ford
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new releases: mp3's at endearing.com
RADIOGRAM - ALL THE WAY HOME
the acclaimed second album from this alt-country, ambient folk 7 piece chamber pop
ensemble, lush and dreamy canamericana.
THE WAKING EYES - COMBING THE CLOUDS
members of the pets and novillero come together to make an album inspired by 60's
pop and 70's rock.
JULIE DOIRON - HEART AND CRIME
the companion record to Julie's desormais, this is Julie's first english record since the juno
award winning JULIE DOIRON AND'THE WOODEN STARS CD.
PAPER MOON - ONE THOUSAND REASONS TO STAY...
ONE REASON TO LEAVE
members of b'ehl, the bonaduces and the electrosonics unleash a fierce pop record
with touches of rock and new wave.
EDISON WOODS - S/T
from new york, edison woods creates stunning and lush lullabies, sparse and dreamy,
for fans of ida, low and julie doiron.
ENDEARING ARTISTS IN VANCOUVER
RADIOGRAM
Thurs. May 02 - The Pic
with Beans, The Secret Three
Thurs. May 09 - Penthouse
with Bottleneck and Old
Reliable
THE SALTEENS
Thurs. May 09 - The Pic, 1 2:00
with Moneen, Hot Little Rocket
and the Waking Eyes
HOT LITTLE ROCKET
Thurs. May 09 - The Pic, 10:00
with Moneen, The Salteens and
the Waking Eyes
THE WAKING EYES
Thurs. May 09 - The Pic, 9:00
with Moneen, The Salteens and
Hot Little Rocket.
featuring guest performance
by Rod Slaughter of Duotang
and Novillero :
Trail of Dead walked upon the
stage. It was a moment where
humour and horror are the best
of friends walking hand in
bloody hand. This was a thematic introduction to the best of
Texas and to the very night
itself. The boys in black play not
just to entertain, but to transform through intensity. And
allowances are made to guarantee this as Jason Reece and
Conrad Keely play musical
chairs and share the vocal/guitar and drum duties. Reece possesses a distinct, high energy;
any hostility is internalized and
used to manufacture a positive
reaction. Lights up—and for
their entire set the momentum
is furious and transient, and
nothing is still and nothing
stops. Their three full lengths
have created a metamorphic
transition from recording to
stage, and everything is suddenly made of napalm. Even in
the chaos of Reece jumping on
the bar, or colliding with us on
the floor, even in those
moments the music maintains
and waits to devour. Keely just
has to stand there, hypnotically
swaying and singing; his face
contorted into a portrait of evil,
loving every minute of being
there. The crowd was transformed: we were slauglitered in
such a beautiful way, and we
became part of that long trail.
Tlien, in a blinding moment, it
stopped, it stopped with the
fury of an imploding drum kit.
Guitar and bass were thrown
into the kit, and the band
walked away like a gang from
the scene of a mass crime. But
then the dead awoke and asked
for more: "Encore" shouted the
undead—they demanded more.
Engineers were called to the
front and asked to turn disorder
into a puzzle. A successful ten-
minute operation completed
with doormen standing at the
wings of the stage. They were
glaring as the club was opening
up to the dancing queens and
open shirts with chains. But the
boys emerged and just smiled—
those devil-may-care smiles—
thanked us with some songs,
and then deliriously razed the
stage one more time. Then, like
an apparition of the night, they
were gone. Fuck, you just have
to laugh.
Derek Sterling Boone
CANNIBAL CORPSE
ABUSE
KOARK
Friday, April 19
Studebaker's
Metal shows offer certain things
that just aren't to be found at
any other type of concert. The
witty between-song banter
takes on a menacing edge: for
example, vocalist George
"Corpsegrinder" Fisher's threat
to an overenthusiastic fan
who'd thrown a bottle on stage.
"Come up here so I can tear
your fucking heart out and
shove it up your ass. I will kill
you and your whole fucking
family because I do not give a
fuck." Now there's something
you  won't   hear  at   a  Julie
Doiron gig. Cannibal Corpse
played to a large and active
crowd that responded well to
their heavy-and-fast approach
that has remained in place for a
good 13 years. Although
they've become a bit of a joke in
much of the metal scene (they
were in Ace Ventura, y'know),
there is a groove and swing to
the best of their music that
makes it much more engaging
than the formulaic chugs of
most grind/death bands, especially recent ones. Yeah, maybe
the lyrics aren't the most clever,
but the intensity is in place and
the hair-swirling circular banging is still the best you can
expect to see. And it's kinda fun
to yell "MAGGOTS" over and
over again, accompanied by a
roomful of sweaty white
teenagers.
Naben Ruthnum
BERES HAMMOND
HARMONY HOUSE
SINGERS
Friday, April 19
Commodore
Grammy nominee Beres
Hammond was at the
Commodore for one of the
dates on his "Music is Life"
tour. The show got off to a hype
start with several DJs; one of
note was Ginger, who was
busting out some conscious
lyrics for the crowd. There was
definitely a lovers' rock feel to
the crowd, but what can you
expect when you know they
were waiting for the smooth
voice of singer Beres
Hammond? After the DJs we
got to hear some lovely ladies,
simply known as the Harmony
House Singers. These were
Beres' back-up girls, but they
certainly proved their right to
be in the spot light as they
beautifully sang some classic
reggae standards and some
more consciously styled tunes.
I'm thinking they were the
most interesting act of the
night... Not to say that I didn't
enjoy the man Beres
Hammond, 'cause I certainly
did. He sang his soulful lovers'
tunes and managed to pull off
a number of wicked dancehall-
esque tracks along with the hits
we were all expecting and waiting for, like "Can You Play
Some More" and "They Gonna
Talk." My only complaint is
that it all ended too early.
Karen Larsen
LES SAVY FAV
HOT HOT HEAT
WITNESS PROTECTION
PROGRAM
Friday, April 19
Picadilly Pub
Hot Hot Heat are B-A-D. That
spells PENIS. The lead singer,
what's his name, sounds like a
kid going through puberty trying to sing while hiding his
erection. I don't know how the
FUNT he comes up with a
British accent when he's from
Vancouver Island, either.
Les Savy Fav's lead singer,
good old what's-his-face, had a
beard, a belly, and a nice pair of
shoes, He's also balding with a
healthy pair of tits. At least he
has some style, for Christ's
sake.
Christa Min
THE BUILDING PRESS
TRAIL VS. RUSSIA
VERMILION
Saturday, April 20
Picadilly Pub
Vermilion started playing at
10:40. They finished at 11:25.
They    played    TWO   songs.
have been a "total fucking
blowout" (as promised on their
posters). But the April 21 show
at the Piccadilly Pub was
doomed from the beginning.
The first setback was finding
out that Lost Goat from San
Francisco were told to get lost
by our keepers of national security, the men and women who
protect us from the evils of
independent rock: the Canadian
Border Patrol.
president of Fireball Productions, got the call at about
10:30 that the headliners were
turned away at the border.
Lucky for Chase, half the
people in the bar were musicians themselves and perhaps
more sympathetic and learned
in the ways of border crossing.
Patrons were offered a five-dollar refund on their eight- dollar
cover charge or a free drink if
PEDRO THE LION AT RICHARD'S.
PHOTO BY MICHELLE FURBACHER.
Apparently they have an album
coming out that's a two song
double LP recorded by Steve
Albini with cover art by Roger
Dean of Yes fame. I don't like
their songs or the way they
sound, but Vermilion is incredible. Next time they play, you
should go. Even if their music
makes you want to kill yourself,
you will die in amazement.
The Building Press sound
like this: a flock of a thousand
birds flying in a precise formation. Then there are 40 gun
shots and 40 birds drop like
bombs screaming from the sky.
Actually, no. No they don't
sound like that.
The bass is Trail, the guitar
is Russia, the drums are the
officials, and whoever is the
loudest wins.
Christa Min
FIREBALLS OF FREEDOM
LOST GOAT
STREETS
Sunday, April 21
Piccadilly Pub
Fireballs of Freedom should
A few disappointed fans
chose to cut their losses and
pass on the remaining two
bands, including the main
attraction, Portland's Fireballs
of Freedom. But a majority of
them took it in stride and
watched the hockey game while
they waited for FOF to hit the
stage with their blues-infected
delivery of punk rock.
So then we were down to
two bands but the show went
on. In fact, without Jive music
blasting for the first couple of
hours, The Pic had an unexpectedly mellow and laid back vibe
reminiscent of the old
Niagara—when you could go to
a pub with your friends for a
drink and not get hit on by the
kind of cheesy no-neck wankers
that frequent Malone's.
However, the good vibes didn't
last forever. As the night went
on, one couldn't help but notice
that the Fireballs hadn't loaded
in yet.
Setback number two came
in the form of every promoter's
worst nightmare. Steve Chase,
they stayed for STREETS, a
local hardcore skate band.
Again, there were mild
murmurs of disappointment,
but this crowd wasn't going
down without a fight. The scattered remains of The Black
Halos, a Spitfire or two and
some Feltchers (old and new)
were among the 60 or so who
opted to stay for some ass-kicking skate tunes from
Vancouver's punk rock quartet,
who, ironically, are not strangers
to last minute promotions.
According to STREETS'
lead singer, Jonny O, they were
bumped to headliners at their
last show when two other
bands from the States couldn't
penetrate the Fort Knox of
immigration. Is there a pattern
here?
STREETS played a
respectable 40-minute gig
chanting, "Come on everyone.
Let's skate. Let's go," before
CONTINUED ON
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fatigrttofeue' tpr-onl8ie.com / arttixom / fore*$ritet*uf6,<5oro admitting they didn'
have any
can sell out several thousand
iCUBANISMO!
of music (do you get my point
they will because it seemed to
somehow managed to sneak
material left foranei
core.
seats at a high-end American
Thursday, April 25
yet? It was awesome!)
me that they were enjoying
past the doorman and sat on the
Well, the much a
nticipated
venue at $30 American a tick
Commodore
Back to the scene: I just did
themselves immensely up there
stairs (it was in the basement,
blowout mav not Ju
ve been a
et? Because the audience eats it
That was absolutely phenome
n't want the vibe to stop and
on stage as well.
remember?) watching the red-
raging success. Tin
Canucks
up, loving Nick to the last; in
nal... and just when it got to the
mid-way through, when the
jCubanismo! was support
and-white superstars standing
lost 3-1 and The Pi
lost two
the eyes of these little ones,
point where I thought i could
rhythm began to wane, one of
ed by  the Coastal Jazz and
around, looking bored. Kevin
bands, but the nigh
wasn't a
Nick tan do no wrong, ever,
n't  take  anymore,   the  band
the "younger" members of the
Blues Society, while the support
Lee of Bum was in the venue
complete waste ol ti
ne either,
when he is, and scandalously
found more energy and played
group stepped  forward  as a
band was Queztal, which was
and he was selling oil some of
thanks to a bar full
of people
so. The explosion of energy
on. AU the crowd wanted was
ladies man and crowd pleaser
led by a captivating woman
his possessions to buy a plane
shrugged lonnvO.
Sarah Rowlands
NICK CAVE AND THE BAD
SEEDS
KHAN
Monday, April 22
Paramount Theatre
Seattle
him: Nick performs best when
he works on the cusp of the
explosion, on the threshold of
released tension.
Is Donovan just bitter
because he had a bad seat? Is
he presenting an elite expecta-
more and more of jCubanisr
vibe, the high-pitched cresc
through the COl
rhythms, taking
the bell and small cong,
with their finest fast-pa
cussive beats.
tun
dle-<
in. Although Nick Cave
ways be a brilliant per-
r, he's reached a level of
vely because
ge
lesis of the
infamo
.s Buen
the voice of
Vi
sta    Social
Club-
also   c
bulent, Nick
Ci
ban origin.
was Ha
bbergast
rnes. Not to
1 ,im now
com pit
telv sol
Nick's practiced, Elvis-derivi
last   tour,   Nick   played   with
only  one of his  Bad  Seeds
own awareness of his p
isition
more of this scene and the
music itself! i had my doubts
(Warren      Ellis,      also      of
as   an   overstuffed   sta
r.   His
before-hand about what was
Australia's The Dirty Three)
and two backing musicians; the
pretation of all of his songs,
and a heightened awareness on
his part of their quality. On this
deliberate positioning i
self in between the stage
izontal spotlights creatt
Paramount Theatre, a I
f hi ill's hor-
d two
iule.it
reath-
going to happen, but the
Commodore was definitely a
formance. Tlie entire audience
couldn't help but move every
tour, with his entire Bad Seeds
gang (two keyboards, two guitars,  two  drum   kits,  violin:
taking experience for a
cerned.   "The   Mercy
performance elicited all
Seat"
of the
single little part of their individual bodies, as part of the collective—every note was stretched
the effect being a maelstrom of
sonic    and    visual    activity,
effects of a classic mas
lectri-
to exquisite perfection and
turned into a danceable tune.
pinned by the axis of Nick and
his      histrionic      silhouette,
fied       consciousness
generated in the crowd \
grid
as felt
1 was initially wondering if
that many musicians on stage
level   of  low   self-awareness
even   more   strongly   c
"Saint  Huck" in  the s
uring
econd
would be able to reach such a
sizeable     crowd,     but     the
where maniacal gesticulation,
absurd    stadium    rock   light
encore: from my vantagt
up in the sky, 1 could s
audience,   stunned,   b
point
ee the
asted,
acoustics and sound engineering were impeccable and the
Ivrics—an    eclectic    mix    of
the   funerary   bell,   perhaps)
dominate the experience. And
pulsing as one  in col
mythic bliss. Kudos to t
rave   trotting   in   the  s
ie kid
Spanish and English—soon
transgressed any imagined
social and sound barriers. The
Why is this a product of Nick's
status as a "brooding, alt-rock
mezzanine: you felt it fo
us, man.
r all of
mood created was a very personal and  intimate listening
forefather"—as someone who
Donovan
experience of a superb quality
dmc Canada
Sunday July 7th
@ The Round House
2pm - 6pm
Special Guest
JR. FL O IrV (funkyteknicianz)
and suprise M. C.
02 Technics / DMC DJ Championship
Vancouver Elimination
RULES AND REGULATIONS
Competition is open to Canadian OJs only.
The 03 must perform solo - no teams are permitted
The only equipment permitted and supplied in the Championships are:
2 - Technics SL1200/SL1210/M3D turntables
t - Technics SH-OJ1200/SH-DX1200 mixer, no other equipment is allowed
Competitors must supply their own cartridges & stylus
The use of headphones is permitted but must be provided by the cc
rach competitor will be allowed a period of exactly six (6) m
All competitors will be judged on the following criteria:
A. Technical Skills & Tricks (technique, scratching, speed, etc.)
B. Creation of Breakbeats (juggling, beat morphing, etc.)
C. Running Mixes (consistency, accuracy, rhythm)
D. Entertainment Value (stage presence, ability to work the crowd, et
E. Originality (creativity, originality, musical selection, innovation, et
APPLICATION TO COMPETE
Name: D] Name:	
to compete
with a sample audiocassette, Video or CD to:
1200LBS. Productions,
INFO: www.1200lbs.com email: 1200lbs@telus.net
i^jrwBnss [§3 *ecko unltd. srttvp&r
smooth tones. With my limited
grasp of Spanish, 1 was able to
discern "busca me," or "look at
me," which 1 thought was very
cool. Another male lead singer
broke it down into hip hop rap-
Ught :
the dh
of   t
i ba
Sheenn Teiffel
TALKING HEADS
FRANK ZAPPA
WHITE STRIPES
THE FRUMPIES
Date Unknown
Various Venues
Though t
islv
■thattoldofhislon
.tally insane, it followed
orld logic by presenting
■s conn-
ticket for a friend. He had an
Old Time Relijun box set that
included a very swanky art
deco-stvle wristwatch, two
CDs, some mystical Wiccan
herbs, and a book of instructions for channelling demons. I
tried to steal the box set, but
was eventually overcome with
guilt and gave up.
Frank Zappa was playing
the Plaza of Nations and this
was where things started getting really fucked up. Being
dead, Frank was not particularly equipped to headline a
packed show at the Plaza, so his
record label had taken the ini-
thank Vancouver and the audi-
(something to that effect) for the
opportunity to play here, 1 am
sure I was not alone in thinking,
"No. Thank you for coming all
the way up here and sharing a
part of your heritage... and for
finding a way to share this
music, this soul, this energy.
Regardless, this bloody fantastic n
ude
tvv
thee:
e of havir
•. One cloi
e the othei
ned—
stage
-. The
rtgh .
rs—but
c has
;al la i
guage.
I was all aglow, and I don't
think that it was a coincidence
that the moon was nearly full; it
unleashed in some of us frenzied Jiowls and foot-stomping
ecstasy and hand clapping into
oblivion, while others melted
into graceful dance duets as
fluid as poetry gliding across
the bouncy dance floor. I hope
that iCubanismo! will come
back some day to energize us
with their presence, but I think
fought and
whined with the sullen energy
of siblings stuck in the back of a
station wagon.
J was really excited to see
The Frumpies but my friends
kept telling me that thev
sucked. Meanwhile, I would
answer back that they didn't
suck, they ruled, and I would
play them some 7"s the next
day to prove it. But my friends
were right: The Frumpies did
suck, playing a few notes at a
time and then standing around,
looking bored. We hastily left
the venue.
Our next stop was the sold-
out White Stripes concert held
in the basement of Ms. T's. We
ngest part of
the concert, however, was the
audience: it seemed to be composed almost exclusively of
small Indo-Canadian children
and their parents dancing elaborate waltzes:
By the time we made it to
the Talking Heads show (which
was in some kind of outdoor
concert bowl, maybe the Gorge
or something) 1 had been
reduced to a state of utter paranoia, accusing my boyfriend of
infidelities with a wide spectrum of individuals, male and
female. The rest of the group
had disintegrated and the
dream slowly melted away into
more mundane incomprehensibility: flying amphibians, melting blue walls, the rest.
H. Apropos
otherwise interesting Rock
If you've had idiotic, disturbing.
Dreams, send them in to <discorder@club.ams.ubc.ca> with
the subject heading "My brain manufactures strange chemicals." Make sure to include your name.
WHAT WE LISTENED TO THIS MONTH...
FROG EYES • LYNC • GRADE • SILKWORM • ALFIE •
RICHARD HELL • JOSEF K • DEATH IN JUNE • SIGHTINGS
• MISSION OF BURMA • SWANS • MOUNTAIN GOATS •
SLOWDIVE • TRANS AM • V/A ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN
FRONT • GARY WILSON • JON RAE FLETCHER • THE
GOSSIP • THIS HEAT • GUIDED BY VOICES • FANG •
HOT SNAKES • HINTERLAND • V/A MUSIC FOR PUSSYCATS
• METALLICA • NILS PETTER MOLVAER
30 may 2002 chartA
what's being played at CiTR 101.9fm
May Long Vinyl
May Short Vinyl
May Indie Home Jobs
1 Three Inches of Blood
Battlecry Under... Teenage Rampage
1
The Organ
We've Got to Meet
Genius
1 The Accident
Perestrokio
2 Spitfires
Three
Longshot
2
Destroyer
The Music Lovers
Sub Pop
2 Sharp Teeth
Burn  Return
3 Young and Sexy
Stand Up For Your Mother         Mint
3
Matt Pond
This   is   not
Polyvinyl
3 Hextalls
I'm Sick of You
4 Radiogram
All The Way Home
Endearing
4
Evaporators
Honk the Horn
Nardwuar
4 Byronic Heroes
I'm a Drunk
5 Voiumizer
Gaga   for   Gigi
Mint
5
Tijuana Bibles
Mexican   Courage
Trophy
5 Red Scare
Try to Give Up
6 Neil Young
Are You Passionate?
Reprise
6
Mirah
Cold Cold Water
k
6 Amarillo Stars
You've Seen This Before
7 Herbaliser
Something Wicked...
Ninja Tune
7
Songs:Ohia
The   Gray   Tower
SC
7 Human Hi-Lite Reel
Lamb-a-rama
8 Jon Spencer Blues Explosion
Plastic Fang
Matador
8
Rye Coalition
11   Topless
T.gerstyle
8 Winks
Aprin Fell
9 DJ Shadow
You Can't Go Home Again      MCA
9
Class Assassins
No   Justice
Insurgence
9 Bend Sinister
Untitled
10 Catheters
Static Delusions And.
Sub Pop
10
V/A
Volume one
Out of Touch
10 Ether's Void
It's Over
11 Hot Hot Heat
Knock Knock Knock
Sub  Pop
11
Mea Culpa
Corporate
Nation Empty
11 Bestest
Wilfor
12 Cornershop
Handcream for a Generation Wiiija
12
Riff Randalls
How Bout Romance
Lipstick
12 Spin-offs
Novelty    Garb
13 Mark Kleiner Power
Trio Love to Night
Mint
13
The Lollies
Channel Heaven
Evil World
13 Roadbed
JB   Fool
14 White Stripes
White Blood Cells
V2
14
The Spitfires
Juke  Box  High
Glazed
14 Dr. Pong
Snapshot
15 Badly Drawn Boy
About A Boy
Artist
15
The Cleats
Save Yourself
Longshot
15 Stoke
Black  Sorrows
16 Mimosa
Bucolique
Independent
16
The Riffs
Such A Bore
TKO
16 Six Block Radius
Kill   to   Hide
17 Richard Hell
Time
Matador
17
Matthew
Stars
Numero
17 Too Hectic
As  You Were
18 Mooney Suzuki
Electric Sweat
Gammon
18
Bottles & Skulls
1 am one...
TKO
18 Billy the Kid and the Lost Boys
This One's For You
19 Julie Doiron
Heart and Crime
Jagjagwuar
19
The Chrome Yellow Co.
Summerside
Northern Light
19 Mr. Solid
Already      Gone
20 Gas Huffer
The Rest of Us
Estrus
20
Stereo/Ultimate
Split
Popkid
20 Emerald City
Machinery   Needs
21 Sightings
Sightings
Load
22 Hanson Brothers
My Game
Mint
23 Deadcats
Bad Pussy
Flying Saucer
24 [
illy B
25 Cinematic Orchestra
26 Selby Tigers
27 Medeski Martin and Wood
28 Epoxies
29 Various Artists
30 Flying Nuns
31 Gary Wilson
32 Chicago Underground Duo
33 Acid Mothers Temple
34 Pretty Girls Make Graves
35 Reverend Horton Heat
England, Half-English Elektra
All That You Give Ninja   Tune
Return Of... Hopeless
Uninvisible Blue Note
Epoxies Dirtnap
Japan For Sale Vol.2 Sony
Everything's Impossible... Q Division
You Think You Really Know Me Motel
Axis & Alignment Thrill Jockey
In C Squealer
Good Health Lookout!
Lucky 7 Artemis
HOW THE CHARTS WORK
The monthly charts are compiled based on the number of times a CD/LP
("long vinyl"), 7" ("short vinyl"), or demo tape/CD ("indie home jobs") on
CiTR's playlist was played by our DJs during the previous month (ie, "May"
charts reflect airplay over April). Weekly charts can be received via email.
Send mail to "majordomo@unixg.ubcca" with the command: "subscribe citr-
charts." •
FOR THE LOWEST AD RATES ON EARTH
JUST CALL STEVE
604.329.FUNK
DISC0RDER@YAH00.COM OM
th<
your guide to CiTR 101.9fm
SUNDAY
ARE YOU SERIOUS? MUSIC
9:OOAM-12:00PM   All of
time is measured by its art. This
show presents the most recent
new music from around the
world. Ears open.
THE ROCKERS SHOW  12:00-
3:00PM      Reggae   inna   all
styles and fashion.
BLOOD    ON    THE    SADDLE
3:00-5:00PM Real cowshit
caught-in-yer-boots country.
CHIPS   WITH   EVERYTHING
alt. 5:00-6:00PM British pop
music from all decades.
SAINT   TROPEZ   alt.   5:00-
6:00PM    International   pop
(Japanese,   French.   Swedish,
British, US, etc.), '60s soundtracks and lounge. Book your jet
^c
;t holiday n
QUEER   FM      6:00-8:00PM
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian,
bisexual, and transsexual communities of Vancouver. Lots of
human interest features, background on current issues and
RHYTHMSINDIA 8:00-
10:00PM Rhythmslndia tea-
tures a wide range of music
from India, including popular
music from Indian movies from
the 1930s to the present, classical music, semi-classical music
such as Ghazals and Bhajans,
and also Quawwalis, pop and
regional  language  numbers.
THE     SHOW 10:00PM-
12:00AM Strictly Hip Hop-
Strictly Underground—Strictly
Vinyl. With your host Mr.
Rumble on the 1 & 2's.
TRANCENDANCE 12:00-
2:00AM Join us in practicing
the ancient art of rising above
common thought and ideas as
your host, DJ Smiley Mike lays
down the latest trance cuts to
propel us into the domain of the
mystical. <trancendance@hot-
BBC WORLD SERVICE 2:00-
6:00AM
MONDAY
BBC WORLD SERVICE 6:00-
8:00 AM
BREAKFAST        WITH        THE
BROWNS   8:00-11:00AM
Your favourite brown-sters, James
and Peter, offer a savoury blend
of the familiar and exotic in a
blend of aural delights!
LOCAL KIDS MAKE GOOD
alt.   11:00-1:00PM   Local
Mike and Local Dave bring you
local music of all sorts. The program most likely to play your
band!
GIRLFOOD alt. 11:00-1:00PM
PARTS UNKNOWN 1:00-
3:00PM Underground pop for
the minuses with the occasional
interview with your host Chris.
STAND AND BE CUNTED
3:00-4:00PM
DJ Hancunt wants you to put
your fist to the wrist—you know
where!
ABSOLUTE BEGINNERS 4:00-
5:00PM A chance for new
CiTR DJs to flex their musical
muscle. Surprises galore.
WENER'S BARBEQUE 5:00-
6:00PM Join the sports dept.
for their coverage of the T-Birds.
CRASH THE POSE alt. 6:00-
7:30PM Hardcore/punk as
fuck from beyond the grave.
REEL   TO    REEL    alt.    6:00-
6:30PM
Movie reviews and criticism.
MY ASS alt. 6:30-7:30PM
Phelps, Albini, 'n' me.
WIGFLUX RADIO 7:30-
9:00PM
Original rude gals, skanksters,
bad boys, big men and sing-
jays. Join Selector Krystabelle
for raw roots, dub-fi dub and
some heavy dancehall sounds.
THE JAZZ SHOW 9:00PM-
12:00AM Vancouver's longest
running prime time jazz program. Hosted by the ever-suave
Gavin Walker. Features at 11.
May 6: Composer,
orist, pianist and band leader
George Russell and his septet,
The Stratus Seekers.
May 13: In celebration of the birthday of Canadian-born composer/arranger Gil Evans, one of his
most acclaimed albums, Out Of
The Cool.
May 20: Modern jazz pioneer
Bud Powell with Paul Chambers
and Arthur Taylor performing
Bud's final great album for Blue
Note, The Scene Changes.
May 27: Pike's Peak, performed
by an underrated vibraphone
master named Dave Pike. Pianist
Bill Evans makes this album extra
VENGEANCE IS MINE   12:00-
3:00AM Hosted by Trevor. It's
punk rock, baby! Gone from the
charts but not from our hearts-
thank fucking Christ.
PSYCHEDEUC AIRWAVES 3:00-
6:30AM
TUESDAY
PACIFIC PICKIN' 6:30-8:00AM
Bluegrass, old-time music, and its
derivatives with Arthur and "The
Lovely Andrea" Berman.
WORLD HEAT 8:00-9:30AM
An old punk rock heart considers the oneness of all things and
presents music of worlds near
and far. Your host, the great
Daryl-ani, seeks reassurance via
<worldheat@hotmail.com>.(Mo
ves to Thursdays 11PM-1AM
starting May 16).
THIRD TIME'S THE CHARM
9:30-11:30AM Open your
ears and prepare for a shock!
A harmless note may make you
a fan! Hear the menacing
scourge that is Rock and Roll!
Deadlier than the most dangerous criminal! <borninsixty-
nine@hotmail.com>
BLUE MONDAY alt. 11:30AM-
1:00PM Vancouver's only
industrial-electronic-retro-goth
program. Music to schtomp to,
hosted by Coreen.
FILL-IN alt. 11:30AM-1:00PM
BEATUPRONIN 1:00-2:00PM
Where dead samurai can program music.
CPR 2:00-3:30PM
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
REGGAE LINKUP
ARE YOU
SERIOUS?
MUSIC
ROCKERS
SHOW
BLOOD ON THE I
SADDLE
Po I   SAINT   I Po
__J TROPEZ I
QUEER FM
RHYTHMSINDIA
kg
13
TRANCENDANCE
BBC WORLD
SERVICE
BBC WORLD SERVICE
BREAKFAST L~
WITH
THE BROWNS
0
GIRLPOOD
LOCAL I	
KIDS MAKE
GOOD
PARTS      H
UNKNOWN
STAND AND BE CUNTED(CF)
ABSOLUTE BEGINNER!
S
MEAT EATING VEGAN(Ec)
WENER'S BARBEQUE
(Sp)
WIGFLUX RADIO u
THE
JAZZ
SHOW
13
VENGEANCE
IS MINE!
PSYCHEDELIC
AIRWAVES
PACIFIC PICKIN'
WORLD HEATL
THIRD TIMES
THE CHARM
B
BLUE
MONDA
j°r
BEATUPRONIN   0
CPR
10,000 VOICES (Tk)
FLEX YOUR
HEAD
SALARIO MINIMO
0
VENU"
FLYTRAP
JLl_i
SOULl
SONIC
WANDERLUST
AURAL
TENTACLES
2 WORLD SERVICE
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
FOOL'S PARADISE L
THE ANTIDOTE
ANOIZE      |^1
RADIO FREE PRESS L
MOTORDADDY
RACHEL'S      [Tk
SONG
POP GOES THE   Ec
WEASEL        L-"
STRAIGHT OUTTA [M-
JALLUNDHAR
HANS KLOSS'
MISERY HOUR
FIRST FLOOR
SOUND SYSTEM
BBC WORLD SERVICE
END OF THE
WORLD NEWS
a
PLANET        EEJ
LOVETRON
CANADIAN     lfl|
LUNCH
RHYMES &
REASONS
OUT FOR KICKS
ON AIR        IZ.
WITH GREASED HAIR
LIVE FROM...
THUNDERBIRD HELL
HIGHBRED VOICES
PLUTONIAN
NIGHTS
BBC WORLD
SERVICE
CAUGHT IN
THE RED
SKA-T'S       L
SCENIC DRIVE
THESE ARE THE L
BREAKS
LEO RAMIREZ
SHOW
NARDWUAR
PRESENTS
FAREASTSIDE
SOUNDS
AFRICAN
RYTHMS
BREAKING      L!
WAVES IN YOUR
HEAD
BBC WORLD SERVICE
BBC WORLD SERVICE
THE
SATURDAY
EDGE
POWERCHORD
CODE BLUE
RADIO FREE AMERICA
SYNAPTIC
SANDWICH
SOUL
TREE
H
PIPE
DREAMS
REGGAE LINKUP
8
9
10
11
|12AM
1
2
3
4
5
Cf= conscious and funky • Ch= children's • Dc= dance/electronic • Ec= eclectic • Gi= goth/industrial • Hc= hardcore • Hh= hip hop
Hk= Hans Kloss • Ki=Kids • Jz=jazz • Lm= live music • Lo= lounge • Mt= metal • No= noise • Nw= Nardwuar • Po= pop • Pu= punk
Rg= reggae • Rr= rock • Rts= roots • Sk = ska »So= soul • Sp= sports • Tk= talk • Wo= world
32 may 2002 Buh bump... buh bump... this is
the sound your heart makes
when you listen to science talk
and techno... buh bump...
LA BOMBA (First three
Tuesdays of every month)
3:30-4:30PM
ELECTRIC AVENUES 3:30-
4:30PM Last Tuesday of every
month, hosted by The Richmond
Society For Community Living. A
variety music and spoken word
program with a special focus
on people with special needs
and disabilities.
THE MEAT-EATING VEGAN
4:30-5:00PM
10,000     VOICES 5:00-
6:00PM Poetry, spoken word,
performances, etc.
FLEX YOUR HEAD 6:00-
8:00PM Up the punx, down
the emo! Keepin' it real since
1989, yo.
http://flexvourhead.vancouver-
hardcore.com/
SALARIO MINIMO 8:00-
10:00PM
VENUS FLYTRAP'S LOVE DEN
alt. 10:00PM-12:00AM
<loveden@hotmail.com>
SOULSONIC WANDERLUST
alt.10:00PM-12:00AM
Electro-acoustic-trip-dub-ethno-
groove-ambient-soul jazz-fusion
and beyond! From the bedroom to Bombay via Brookyln
and back. The sounds of reality
remixed. Smile. <sswander-
lust@hotmail.com>
AURAL TENTACLES 12:00-
6:00AM It could be punk,
ethno, global, trance, spoken
word, rock, the unusual and the
weird, or it could be something
something different. Hosted by
DJ Pierre.
WEDNESDAY
BBC WORLD SERVICE 6:00-
7:00AM
THE    SUBURBAN    JUNGLE
7:00-9:00AM Bringing you
an entertaining and eclectic
mix of new and old music live
from the Jungle Room with your
irreverent hosts Jack Velvet and
Nick The Greek. R&B,
disco, techno, soundtracks,
Americana, Latin jazz, news,
and gossip. A real gem!
< suburbanjungle@channel88 .com>
FOOL'S PARADISE 9:00-
10:00AM Japanese music
and talk.
THE ANTIDOTE 10:00AM-
11:30PM
ANOIZE 11:30AM-1:00PM
Luke Meat irritates and educates through musical deconstruction. Recommended for the
strong.
THE   SHAKE   1:00-2:00PM
RADIO FREE PRESS 2:00-
3:00PM Zines are dead! Long
live the zine show!
MOTORDADDY 3:00-
5:00PM "Eat, sleep, ride, listen to Motordaddy, repeat."
RACHEL'S SONG 5:00-
6:30PM Socio-political, environmental activist news and
spoken word with some music
too.   www.necessaryvoices.org
POP GOES THE WEASEL
6:30-7:30PM
AND SOMETIMES WHY alt.
7:30-9:00PM
(First   Wednesday   of   every
month.)
REPLICA REJECT alt. 7:30-
9:00PM Indie, new wave,
punk, noise, and other.
FOLK OASIS 9:00-10:30PM
Roots music for folkies and non-
folkies... bluegrass, singer-songwriters, worldbeat, alt country
and more. Not a mirage!
<folkoasis@canada.com>
STRAIGHT OUTTA JALLUND-
HAR 10:30PM-12:00AM
Let DJs Jindwa and Bindwa
immerse you in radioactive
Bhungra! "Chakkh de phutay."
HANS KLOSS' MISERY HOUR
12:00-3:00AM
FIRST FLOOR SOUND SYSTEM
3:00-6:00AM
THURSDAY
BBC WORLD SERVICE 6:00-
8:00AM
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
8:00-10:00AM
PLANET LOVETRON 10:00-
11:30AM Music inspired by
Chocolate Thunder, Robert
Robot drops electro past and
present, hip hop and inter-
galactic funkmanship.
CANADIAN LUNCH 11:30AM-
1:00PM
STEVE AND MIKE 1:00-
2:00PM Crashing the boy's
club in the pit. Hard and fast,
heavy and slow (hardcore).
THE ONOMATOPOEIA SHOW
2:00-3:00PM Comix comix
comix. Oh yeah, and some
music with Robin.
RHYMES AND REASONS
3:00-5:00PM
LEGALLY HIP alt. 5:00-
6:00PM
PEDAL REVOLUTIONARY alt.
5:00-6:00PM Viva la
Velorution! DJ Helmet Hair and
Chainbreaker Jane give you all
the bike news and views
you need and even cruise
around while doing it!
www.sustainability.com/dinos/
OUT FOR KICKS 6:00-
7:30PM No Birkenstocks,
nothing politically correct. We
don't get paid so you're damn
right we have fun with it.
Hosted by Chris B.
ON AIR WITH GREASED
HAIR 7:30-9:00PM The
best in roots rock 'n' roll and
rhythm and blues from 1942-
1962 with your snappily-attired
host Gary Olsen.
<ripitup55@aol.com>
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO      HELL 9:00-
11:00PM   Local muzak from
9.    Live    bandz    from    10-
11 .<http://www.stepanda-
half.com/tbirdhell>
HIGHBRED VOICES
11:00PM-1:00AM (Moves
to Tuesdays 8-9:30AM starting
May 14).
PLUTONIAN NIGHTS 1:00-
6:00AM Loops, layers, and
oddities. Naked phone staff.
Resident haitchc with guest DJs
and performers.
http://plutonia.org
FRIDAYS
BBC WORLD SERVICE 6:00-
8:00AM
CAUGHT IN THE RED 8:00-
10:00AM Trawling the trash
heap of over 50 years worth of
real rock 'n' roll debris.
SKA-T'S   SCENE-IK   DRIVE!
10:00AM-12:00PM
Email requests to <djska_t@hot-
mail.com>.
THESE ARE THE BREAKS
12:00-2:00PM Top notch
crate diggers DJ Avi Shack and
Promo mix the underground hip
hop, old school classics and
original breaks.
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
2:00-3:30PM The best mix of
music, news, sports and com
mentary from aroung the local
American communities.
NARDWUAR    THE    HUMAN
SERVIETTE PRESENTS...
3:30-5:00PM
CiTR NEWS AND ARTS 5:00-
6:00PM  On  hiatus  for the
September.
FAR EAST SIDE SOUNDS alt.
6:00-9:00PM
AFRICAN RHYTHMS alt.
6:00-9:00PM David Love
Jones brings you the best new
and old jazz, soul, Latin,
samba, bossa, and African
music from around the world.
HOMEBASS 9:00PM-12:00AM
Hosted by DJ Noah: techno,
but also   some trance, acid,
.  Gue;
trospec
aways, and rr
BREAKING WAVES IN YOUR
HEAD 12:00-2:00AM
BBC WORLD SERVICE 2:00-
4:00AM
SATURDAY
BBC WORLD SERVICE 4:00-
8:00AM
THE       SATURDAY       EDGE
8:00AM-12:00PM    Studio
tele;
tish
comedy sketches, folk music
calendar, and ticket giveaways.
8-9AM: African/World roots.
9AM-12PM: Celtic music and
performances.
GENERATION ANNIHILATION 12:00-1:00PM
POWERCHORD 1:00-3:00PM
Vancouver's only true metal
show; local demo tapes,
imports, and other rarities.
Gerald Rattlehead, Dwain, and
Metal  Ron do the damage.
CODE BLUE 3:00-5:00PM
From backwoods delta low-
down slide to urban harp
honks, blues, and blues roots
with your hosts Jim, Andy, and
Paul.
ELECTROLUX HOUR 5:00-
6:00PM
RADIO FREE AMERICA 6:00-
8:00PM Due to popular
demand,Dave Emory returns to
. the CiTR airwaves with his legendary   For The Record radio
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH 8:00-
10:00PM
SOUL TREE alt. 10:00-
1:00AM From doo-wop to hip
hop, from the electric to the
eclectic, host Michael Ingram
goes beyond the call of gospel
and takes soul music to the nth
degree.
PIPEDREAMS alt. 10:00-
1:00AM
THE RED EYE alt. 1:00-
4:30AM
EARWAX alt. 1:00-4:30AM
"noiz terror mindfuck hardcore
like punk/beatz drop dem
headz rock inna junglist
mashup/distort da source full
force with needlz on wax/my
chaos runs rampant when I
free da jazz..." Out.
—Guy Smiley
REGGAE LINKUP 4:30-
9:00AM Hardcore dancehall
reggae that will make your mitochondria   quake.   Hosted   by
WWW.CITR.CA
22®iggumm date: boo l<
what's happening in May
SUBMISSIONS TO DATEBOOK ARE FREE.   FOR
THE JUNE ISSUE. THE DEADLINE IS MAY 28. FAX
SHOW, FILM, EVENT AND VENUE LISTINGS
TO 604.822.9364 OR EMAIL
<DISCORDER@CLUB.AMS.UBC.CA>
FRIDAY MAY 3
MONDAY 6
the scene (brit pop night)@purple onion; chargers street gang, t
national playboys@picadilly
TUESDAY 7
WEDNESDAYS
wto@blinding light!!; emerald citytfsugar refinery; georgia straight music
awards@richard's on richards; motorbooty (funk mght)@purple onion;
lonesome pine, sedatedScobalt; dj sage, kuma w/miss behavior, jungle
soldier@dnnk
THURSDAY 9
CITR PRESENTS THE SALTEENS, MONEEN, HOT LITTLE ROCKET,
WAKING EYES, THE ORGANfeTHE PIC; ashleigh flynn, cobv, nicky
mehta, Joanna cairns@the main; a sense o/p/flce®blinding light!!; i'kill my
conscience at times, the radio, plan b@sugar refinery; gavin froome, mor-     ing light!!; av lodg
gan page, luke mckeehan, dana d, otaku@sonar; shocore, sideshow, wdc,     party@sonar; kell;
FRIDAY 10
john bottomley, birgit, wendy ip) restricted bbc@the main; live fro
THURSDAY 16
play live to the cabinet of dr. ni//y<!n'y,blinding light!!; mike zachernuk quar-
FRIDAY17
light!'; kai/en "'sugar refiners'; big bottom, the slick watts, new eden@purple
onion club; no|o"-western trout; the polys, shrimpmeaKu'side door; real
SATURDAY 18
CITR PRESENTS THE ENEMY WITHIN, INSIPID, VICTORIAN PORK,
MR. UNDERHILL, DEATH SENTENCE@GRANDVIEW AUDITORIUM
(ALL-AGES); tyler t-bone stadius, vernonSlotus; amy and harry's birthday
bash@ttie main; niiiiiwoiiuiii ami the paperbag oi//n>//'.r®blindfcig light!!; spar-
nuirge, code name: scorpion, dj sciencegcommodore; masters of the multi-
SUNDAY 19
RANCHFEST featuring david p. smith, boomchix@the main; the target shoots
//rsf@blinding light!!; p:ano@sugar refinery; jerry cantrell, comes with the
■, the
SATURDAY 11
dave mothersole@lotus; derek fairbridge, ask nora, bonnie bailiff, mani
music   hall;   clover   honey,    the   dirtmittS@pi'cadiUy;   super   furry
feminists, the dinks@cobalt
SUNDAY 12
musiki parea, grup bans@the main; icint .kVrkkblinding light!!; rupix
kubeSsugar refinery; varais visionarv@sonar; sasha and digweedkthe
rage; |im rose circus@richard's on richards; patty tarkin@WISE hall
MONDAY 13
little wings, casiotone for the painfully alone, the birthday machineSsugar
refinery; motorhead, morbid angel, brand new sin, today is the day@com-
modore
TUESDAY 14
kn/'kbliiiding light1!; parallelatuesdays@sugar refinery
WEDNESDAY 15
steve dawson, eliot polsky@the main; spotlight on oka@blinding light!!; hi
rise dex and the stellar jays, ngjdd@sugar refinery; darryl's grocery bag,
downweller@cobalt
MONDAY 20
beth orton@richard's on richards
TUESDAY 21
if god be with i/s'e'blinding light!!; parallelatuesdays@sugar refinery; Christine fellows@sugar refinery (early show, 7-9pm); cornershop@sonar; frank
black and the catholics, david lovenngwkichard's on richards
WEDNESDAY 22
RANCHFEST featuring rich hope, jon wood, heather griffin@the main; early
works by ray bruce'/blinding light!!: guitar trio with Stephen lyons, chris
albanese, chad mcquarrie@sugar refinery
THURSDAY 23
RANCHFEST featuring hopetown, swingin' doors@the main; byo8@blind-
ing light!!; av lodge'isugar relinerv; sound proof label launch and cd release
railway club
FRIDAY 24
RANCHFEST featuring silt, violet, conrad@the main; 120seconds.com dig-
veda hufe®vancouver east cultural centre
SATURDAY 25
RANCHFEST featuring greasy kings, the rocket fins@the main; 120sec-
onds.com digital film test gala." blind ing light!!; collapsing lung ksugar refinery; mr. underbill, phrapp, koark@briekyard; big bottom@urbn street wear
clothing store (vv. 4th avenue); april wine@commodore; veda hille@vancou-
ver east cultural centre
SUNDAY 26
RANCHFEST featuring graham brown and the prairie dogs@the main;
i'mi//@blinding light!!; beta carotine@sugar refinery; dmx krew, cylob, bog-
MONDAY 27
go for a bike ride, you need the exercise!
TUESDAY 28
picnstroSthe mam; /cm/,- christ vmiipiir /inufenablinding light!!; parallelat-
uesdays@sugar refiner}-; hritney spearskipacifk coliseum
WEDNESDAY 29
organixOthe  main; jesus  christ   vampire  riunfer@blinding  light!!;  jp
carter@sugar refinery
THURSDAY 30
kai/enSsugar refinery; John creamer@sonar
FRIDAY 31
radar, the red light sting, billy the kid and the lost boys&snackers (former-
Apecial event*
A NIGHT OF INDIGENOUS FILM
the appalling general ignorance about the struggles
and successes of indigenous peoples in Canada is a
big reason why we're being faced with shit like the
referendum—a cruel and possibly illegal government
exercise that insults us all. educate yourself at the
blinding light!! on friday. may 17 when mayworks presents incident at restiqouche. blockade: alqonquins
defend the forest, and village of widows, while you're
at it. check out the rest of the mayworks
programming by picking up a program guide or
checking out www.tao.ca/~mayworks.
CITR & DISCORDER PRESENT...
as part of new music west, we're putting on a night of
indie pop at the piccadilly pub. the salteens. hot little
rocket, moneen, the waking eyes, and the organ play
our little night on thursday may 9.
we're also presenting another showcase in the purple
onion's main room the same night featuring xyn
quadra, dj noah, wood, the air conditioners.
place* to be
bassix records
217 w. hastings
604.689.7734
pic pub
620 west pender
604.669.1556
beatstreet records
3-712robson
604.683.3344
railway club
579 dunsmuir
604.681.1625
black swan records
3209 west broadway
604.734.2828
richard's on richards
1036 richards
604.687.6794
blinding light!! cinema
36 powell
604.878.3366
ridge cinema
3131 arbutus
604.738.6311
cellar
3611 west broadway
604.738.1959
scrape records
17 west broadway
604.877.1676
chan centre
6265 crescent
604.822.9197
scratch records
726 richards
604.687.6355
club 23
23 west cordova
sonar
66 water
604.683.6695
cobalt
917 main
604.685.2825
sugar refinery
1115 granville
604.331.1184
commodore ballroom
868 granville
604.739.4550
teenage ramapage
19 west broadway
604.675.9227
crosstown music
518 west pender
604.683.8774
Vancouver playhouse
hamilton at dunsmuir
604.665.3050
futuristic flavour
1020 granville
604.681.1766
video-in studios
1965 main
604.872.8337
highlife records
1317 commercial
604.251.6964
western front
303 east 8th
604.876.9343
the main cafe
4210 main
604.709.8555
wett bar
1320 richards
604.662.7707
ms. t's cabaret
339 west pender
WISE club
1882 adanac
604.254.5858
orpheum theatre
smithe at seymour
604.665.3050
yale
1300 granville
604.681.9253
pacific cinematheque
131 howe
604.688.8202
zulu records
1972 west 4th
604.738.3232
34 may 2002 Fat Wreck Chords Regrets:
PEEPSH0W
PEEPSHOWANDPEEPSHOWH
NOW AVAILABLE ON ONE DVD
MORE THAN 30 MUSIC VIDEOS!.
45 or 46 sQIh<§S
that weren'tGQOA eNGu$
ft fIat *TG *° Gn oUR QTHeR ReCORds
KET
THE; DICKIES
ERENZAL /IB
§14%
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NOTUSE
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NAME
SCREW 32 I
SICKfQF IT AUU
TEEI^iypOLS
/TdLTk.
*|%%r  %>3>
M   'V   "" -
Fat Wreck Chords JPH3F
P.O. Box 193690 r-,!^r-3
San Francisco, CA 94119   **** ^—.uluf
3 new releases I
LUNA
RomanticaCD
Here's how the story
Narrowly avoiding a life of tweed
jackets with iron-on elbow patches,
m dropped out of Harvard
to do his masters
drone rock with Galaxie 500. Someone told him his deadpan
voice was better suited for dissertations regarding Lou Reed and
John Cale, over that of Shelley and Yeats. The rest is history, and
after 6 records with his 'Loaded' era outfit, LUNA, Wareham s contributions to East Coast coolness are firmly cemented, as his
anthems are the new odes to for a weekend of Coney Island
thrills. ROMAMTICA is his latest 13 song thesis!
AVAILABLE MAY 7
CD 19.98
THE MOUNTAIN GOATS
Protein Source of the Future Now! /
Bitter Melon Farni / Ghana CDs
Calling all gap-tooth vault robbers!! Gold panners pick your
mules and deflect your vacant glare away from the Beautiful
Rat Sunset for a minute as THE MOUNTAIN GOATS return with 3
volumes of pioneer songs for hijack nylon string guitar and voice! I
dare you to decree that you've heard all these goods before -
fabled cassettes, hand-made 7inches, compilation submissions,
one-sided 12inches, and yes...unreleased minerals! The ebay
mines don't even yield such rare jewels! 81 tracks spread over 3
separately available CDs! Eureka.
CDs 16.98 each!
TRANS AM
T.A.CD/LP
For many at the time, the 80s was a period of ugly clothes, lame
haircuts and lightweight electro pop. Nowadays, with a decade
plus between us, the 80s have miraculously become a bounty of
neon-hued signifiers to be used in newfound ways. Well, maybe
cooler ways if not exactly newer ways. Nevertheless, people today
can see the good in what once seemed convincingly and uniformly
bad. And hey, maybe it wasn't all that bad in the first place. Who
can tell? Rejoice in the sweet melodies of irony - we can finally
shed the guilt from our guilty pleasures! Anyway, the point is this:
TRANS AM's latest - and sixth, can you believe it - album is
packed full of cool 80s Zeitgeist. So, dude, put this radical CD on
the shelf next to your Fischerspooner and your Miss Kitten and
the Hacker, et al, and go get a mullet before it's too late!
AVAILABLE MAY 7
CD 19.98    LP 16.98
JAZZONOVrf
S/tCD/3LP
are fostering a new American indie-rock sound.
The principle elements of this 'Battlestar Galactica Rock'
sound are stripped down acoustic guitars, bongwater fuelled
moog synths, and spacey drums. And so, the RADAR
BROTHERS are a rag-tag fleet jettisoned from civilization into
alien territory, with a battery of rambling songs, epic choruses, and lyrical imagery drawn from their peyote missions into
the desert pueblos of mother earth. The perfect sounds for
an episode entitled "Disorientation in the space dunes".
CD 19.98
TOM WATTS
Alice/Blood Money CDs/LPs
Two new TOM WATTS recordings! At once! Is it Christmas?
Have we all died and gone to heaven? Is this some kind of
hoax? NO! That's right, NO! Would we joke about something
as important as this' Would we take advantage of your
expectations in this way? Indeed, would TOM WAITS? This is
the truth, ladies and gentlemen - sweet, solid, genuine truth.
Sometimes the gray routine of life surprises us and reaffirms
our efforts. Sometimes it's worth getting up in the morning.
Sometimes the 'good life" is here on earth. Yes, the dusty
junkyard balladeer of theatrical Americana delivers twice over.
Haunting, idiosyncratic, special, TOM WAITS is second to
none. Take your pick. Or better yet, get both.
Wour swizzle stick rests peacefully in a concoction of grape-
T fruit and gin, as the clubs lights illuminate the endless possibilities held in the contours of an ice-cube. Suddenly, a gentle
rumba caresses the bass cabinets causing an effervescent
reaction as the sounds sparkle before you. Courage is at an all
time high, and like a method actor studying the palms, you
sway with an electronic language that translates loosely into
heaven. So this is what comes after the last days of disco, an
awesome release on par with Kruder and Dorfmeister, Thievery
Corporation, and the other lounge giants! 5 stars!
CD 19.98   3LP 26.98
THE PROMISE RING
Wood/Water CD
The Refused are credited with reconfiguring the Future
Shape of Punk, and so now post-punk gets a its much
needed redefinition, as pioneering emo-rockers PROMISE RING
return with their most concise effort yet! With a new record
that delves into the arty territory of hardcore, while smartly
weaving in strands of varied instrumentation and edgy production, WOOD/WATER approaches arrangements like those on OK
. This will appeal to the established fan, as well as the
i listener into a progressive recording that packs a punch.
CD 16.98
^>oundtruchd ^jroi
MUSIC IN THE
AFTERNOON
SUNDAY MAY 5 @ 4PM
FROG EYES From victoria, the new
school of Beefheart disembodied poetics!
SUNDAY MAY 26 @ 4PM
SINOIA CAVES
CD 16.98    LP 14.98
KID 606
The Action Packed Mentalist
Brings You Fucking Jams CD
We have a suspicion that the so-called "Violent Turd" label
isn't actually based in far away New Zealand. We have
our reasons. We can't go into it. We fear that if we revealed
too much "The Man" would try to take away our right to party.
Let's just say that this is a naughty record - and not just
because it's got a swear in the tile. This is KID 606 getting
back to doing what he does best. Fans of the recent
"Freakbitchlickfly" compilation are advised to take note.
Lilly-livered indie rockers are advised to brace themselves.
You have been warned. But you didn't hear it from us.
AVAILABLE MAY 7
CD 16.98
a &DidcuLt,   llHi
JEFF TWEEDY
Chelsea Walls CD
Wilco's latest release Yankee
Hotel Foxtrot shows JEFF
TWEEDY and company embracing
indie-rock, electro-acoustic ambience
and the Jim O'Rourke production
genius. Well, here's another pleasant turn of events, as
TWEEDY jumps into the improvisation game to make both his
solo and soundtrack recording debut. Offering a mix of pared
down isolation odes as well as sharp edged Dead Man-esque'
Neil Young guitar jams, CHELSEA WALLS is an evocative listen
sure to tingle the nerves of any Witco fan. Enjoy.
CD 16.98
MARY MARGARET
O'HARA
Apartment Hunting
CD
'um:
4
CAPTAIN BEEFHEART AND THE MAGIC
BAND-Dust Sucker CD
ELECTRIC WIZARD-Let Us Prey CD
BRANT BJORK & THE OPERATORS-s/t CD
ALABAMA THUNDERPUSSY-Staring At The
Divine CD
DIANOGAH-Millions of Brazilians LP/CD
SAGE FRANCIS-Personal Journals CD
PAN AMERICAN-The River Made No Sound 2LP/CD
GONZALES-III: Presidential Suite CD
PLAID- P-Brane Cdep/12"
GARY WILSON- You Think You Really Know Me CD
BRATMOBILE-Girls Get Busy CD
CROOKED FINGERS- Reservoir Songs CD
street, Toronto's most under
appreciated troubadour returns to
search out new shelters with this intimate soundtrack recording. Best known for her idiosyncratic
1988 release Miss America, MARY MARGARET O'HARA has laid
low in the international music scene for quite some time. On
here return, reminiscent of Aimee Mann's rediscovery via the
film Magnolia, O'HARA s songwriting for Apartment Hunting
shapes the characters and drama, by providing a near-Lynchian
atmosphere. Welcome back!
CD 16.98
bounds;
ancouver
HOT HOT HEAT
Knock Knock
Knock CDEP
Calling all 24 Hour Party People!!
There's a happening tonight at ar
undisclosed warehouse (YOU know
where it is). Bring two friends you're
sure are the best possible candidates for a night of unknown
pleasures (YOU know what they are). Push your way through the
rest of the night people, past the smartly-dressed, slightly
zonked-out band (YOU know who they are), frantically playing
this gig like it's their last, and into the flickering bathroom at the
back. Work up your nerve and KNOCK KNOCK KNOCK on the stall
door. Yeah, the one marked with the lipstick-scrawled words,
"tomorrow forgets tonight" (YOU know what that means). Cool it
down and indulge!
CDEP 12.98
THE SPITFIRES
Three CD/LP
THE SPITFIRES have been kicking
out the jams for about seven
years now, surviving the hell that is
touring, line-up changes, and... well,
growing up in Abbotsford. Those of
you who've seen 'em live can attest
to the excitement and pure adrenaline rush that is their live
show. Those of you who haven't, can begin by checking out
this, their excellent third album. Is it the final chapter in a trilogy
that spills the sordid story of survival in the business of rock
from the point of view of one of Vancouver's greatest bands?
We're not sure, but we do know this.. .with "3", THE SPITFIRES
have proven once again that they wouldn't even know how to
begin to disappoint you, little lover.
CD 14.98    LP 12.98
THE CINCH
EpCDEP
After honing their craft i
est recesses of Vancouver's rock
clubs for a couple of years now, THE
CINCH have finally given us their
debut release on Stutter Records. A
short, sharp, 5 song (one unlisted
bonus track for all you modem lovers out there) dynamo that
reminds one of early Dream Syndicate and Wire. Glorious, driving rock 'n roll, delivered by nervous, buzzsaw guitars, a
tough-as-nails rhythm section, and fronted by a coupla' edgy
female Richard HeH's. A 2002 summer must-have! See 'em live
at their CO release party at Ms.T's on May 25th.
CDEP 9.98
SINOIA CAVES
The Enchanted Persuader CD
JEREMY SCHMIDT is pretty much the godfather of contemporary space rock in this neck of the woods. From his beginnings in the early 90s as a founding member of Pipedream
(who, back in the day, rubbed shoulders with the likes of
Mogwai, Spectrum and Flying Saucer Attack), through his
involvement in the late lamented Unitard, to his current role as
sonic sous-chef in The Battles, he has tirelessly explored the
parameters of the analog synthesizer. Armed with more vintage
gear than any man without a car should rightfully own,
SCHMIDT has finally completed his magnum opus, the recorded debut of his solo project, SINOIA CAVES. Monumental washes of synth mingling with eerie, unforgettable melodies, somewhat reminiscent of the incidental music from classic space
programs like Or. Who or In Search Of - a symphony of sounds
best experienced with your feet up, eyes closed and head
phones on. Don't be afraid. Take SCHMIDT'S hand and let him
guide you through the cosmos.
PH 19 Qfl SALE PRICES IN EFFECT
UU ,*"ao UNTIL MAY31 2002
Zulu Records
1972-1976 W 4th Ave
Vancouver. BC
telr604.738.3232
www.zulurecords.com
STORE HOURS
Mon to Wed 10:30-7:00
Thurs and Fri 10:30-9:00
Sat 9:30-6:30
Sun 12:00-6:00

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