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MAKEOUT VIDEOTAPE
CAITLIN GALLUPE / HIDDEN TOWERS / HALF CHINESE / NEVER ON A SUNDAY PT.3 / KIDNAP
KIDS! / THE OLYMPICS / THE FUNDRAISER / CHIN INJETI / SALAZAR / A TRIP TO CITY HALL with special guests
The Ofpheum • February t8, 2010
I Breakout Canadian bands deliver
i atmospheric, romantic pop.
K NAftW«» ^_
■" 'tSl&h«ttii»l^^!^ 25«2010
A Speaktagmit and standtife tali with
the Somali-Canadian rapper and south
Jpliharan poet-guitarists.
Gomez
with special guest
tuiceOoucet
':TiJbrpft«um ■ March vS&BBi':^.
?Aw^ts perform songs from their latest
release A New Tide.
j TheQrpfteum-March20;2010
Potent young artists, vintage
rhythm and blues.
VanCOUVer201O.com/CUltUraloIympiad
taw  1-800-TICK6TS l tickets.com I    for, free lor station membersl I
212 Productions Ltd
454 W Cordova St.
604-685-2426
Antisocial
Skateboard Shop
2337 Main St.
604-708-5678
Audiopile
2016 Commercial Dr.
604-253-7453
Band Merch Canada
www.bandmercn.ca
Banyen Books
3608 W 4th Ave.
604-732-7912
Baru Cafe
2535 Alma St.
604-222-9171
Beatstreet Records
439 W Hastings St.
604-683-3344
The Bike Kitchen
8138 Student Union
Blvd.
604-822-BIKE
Biim
197 E 17th Ave.
604-872-8180
Bonerattie Music Ltd
2012 Commercial Dr.
604-251-BONE
Devil May Wear
198 E 21st Ave.
604-216-2515
Dream Apparel i
Articles for People
311 W Cordova St.
604-683-7326
The Eatery
3431 W Broadway
604-738-5298
The Fall Tattooing
644 Seymour St.
604-676-3066
Flaming Angels
Boutique
644 Seymour St.
604-689-3224
Fresh is Best Salsa
&Co
2972 W Broadway
778-737-2442
Grindhouse Video
2911 W 4th Ave.
604-734-746& -•
Gumdrops
2029 W 4th Ave.
604-733-1037
Hart and Sole
Clothing Inc
843 Granville St.
604-630-9151
Highlife Records
1317 Commrecial Dr.
604-251-6964
Hitz Boutique
316 W Cordova St.
604-662-3334
The Kiss Store
2512 Watson St.
604-675-9972
Lucky's Comics
3972 Main St.
604-875-9858
Pacific
Cinematheque
1131 HowelC'.-.:
604-688-8202
People's Co-op
Bookstore
1391 Commercial Dr.
604-253-6422
Prussin Music
3607 W Broadway
604-736-3036
Red Cat Records
4307 Main St.
604-708-9422
The Regional
Assembly of Text
3934 Main St.
604-877-2247
Royce Clothing
and Shoes
2817 W Broadway
604-731-4474
R/X Comics
2418 Main St
604-454-5099
Rufus' Guitar Shop
2621 Alma St.
604-222-1717
Scratch Records
726 Richards St.
604-687-6355
Slickity Jim's
Chat and Chew
2513 Main St
604-873-6760
Spank Clothing
1027 Commercial Dr.
604-255-1131
&
856 Granville St.
604-677-3202
&
2082 W 4th Ave.
778-371-1305
Spank Shoes
1181 Commercial Dr.
604-568-1229
&
2066 W 4th Ave.
604-677-3583
Thriller
3467 Main St.
604-736-5651
True Value Vintage
710 RobsonSt
604-685-5403
Twigg & Hottie
3671 Main St.
604-879-8595
Vinyl Records
319 W Hastings M.
604-488-1234
The Wallflower
Modern Diner
2420 Main St
604-568-7554
Woo Vintage
Clothing
321 Cambie St.
604-687-8200
A Friends of QTR Card scores
you sweet deals at N/knoouver's
finest small merchants and
supports QTR 101.9 FM. |
Show it when you shop!	
www.citr.ca SUITOR
JordieYotu
ART DIRECTOR
Lindsey Hampton
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Debby Reis
COPY EDITORS
Liz Brant, Corey Rateh, Debby Reis,
Mini? Salkin.Al Smith
AD MANAGER
David Stansfield
UNDER REVIEW £DIT0R
Mine'Salkin
RU EDITOR
Al Smith
WEB EDITOR
RetllyWood
CALENDAR LISTINGS
Melanie Coles
PROMOTIONS DIRECTOR
Learma Orr
PROGRAM GUIDE
Bryce Dunn
DISTRIBUTION
Jamie Anstey
CiTR STATION MANAGER
Brenda Grunau
PUBLISHER
Student Radio Society of UBC
COVER
linage by Robert Fougere
EDITOR'S NOTE
Dear Discorder:
Well, by the time you read this the Olympics j$j$l&
upon u^j4pi3 our city will be ssiliteied with tourists here
for the bwkst two-week party in the world. Mayfee you are
even one of tho^i^urists, in 1«|pch case, "Hello totttpt,
we are conflicted about you being here."
The Olympics are a mixe|||iessing at bfig!| ^a^ mey'N
always be a coniiiiious one. For Vancouver's$j|ipsic fans
they cert^jiiiJy have somebjenefits. There are pjpijy of acts
that will be com^pto town and you will get the rare chaifesfe
to see them play for free. (Check out our pi^pffpn page
12). I, for one, tire of hefpig about the Olympics though,
so that is the last I will write of them Suitor's Notes get
written last minute during production).
This mon$||pu can also $$fjto know this year's Shindig
winners—part of their prize is coverag||lptour pages. The
technical metal masters, pidden Towers, took it this year
and Scott Lyon catches up with them on pa||tek4. Half
Chinese Iplge 16) and Kj^ftap Kids! (page 25) took second
and third places respectively, which is interesting because
the bands Share a mend^Et^s Rented Enzio Verster.
You will notice a hjtagS by the name of Makeout Vidfflft^e
on the cover of this isstp§phe photo-iSp&ttage was taken
by Robert Fougere, who we think did a^Ky job of getting
all three band members into the shot.
Perhaps the most important announcement that
we're making this issue can be found on page 19. To keep
Discorder in print and continue informing yon of what's
going on in Vancouver'i%idependent music scene, we're
1&il$Sga fundraiser. We^jisked a number ofotffivourite
bands and DJs to play a concert for us on March 5 at the
Biltmore and to our surprise (and endless giiptude) a
$$|a$f them agreed to play! We will also be having a silent
auction with items doo|§|d from some of ou^fivourite
local artists andr|sj|}|£iip$$. This fundraiser is crucial to
our continued existence in the next fiscal year, so come out,
;&fftg all your friends and enjcj^K^E's not only important
to us; it's aif&going to be $gjffeeat party.
Cheers,
Jordie
CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE!
DISCORDER.CA IS HOME TO LOADS OF CONTENT WE CAN'T FIT INTO THE PRINT ISSUE OF THE MAGAZINE, LIKE
EXTRA FEATURES, REAL LIVE ACTION AND UNDER REVIEW.
CHECK DISCORDER.CA REGULARLY FOR NEW ARTICLES, PHOTOS AND ALL THINGS MUSIC RELATED!
CORRECTIONS
Last month we printed a piece on the Writers' Festival Talk Satellites of Love featuring John K. Samson and Christine Fellows without a byline. The piece was written by Stephanie Orford.
FEBRUARY
WRITERS
Sarah Berman, Nathaniel Bryce, Katherine Boothroyd, Slavko Bucifal, Sarah Charrouf, Dan Fumano, Andy
Hudson, April Knibutat, Justin Langille, Tamara Lee, Scott Lyon, Doug Mackenzie, Adam Mannegren,
Miranda Martini, Sancho McCann, Sean Nelson, Quinn Omori, Leanna Orr, Mark PaulHus, Gavin Reid,
Debby Reis, David Stansfield, Gordon Wetzstein
PHOTOGRAPHERS & ILLUSTRATORS
Merida^Hl^^Francesca Bennett, Aisha Davidson, Caitlin Gallupe, KM$j&0&krey, Kate Henderson,
Lindsaysdiet.com, Steve Louie, Cyrus McEachern, Quinn Omori, Ehren Salazar, Shaun Stander
PROOFREADERS
Simon Foreman, Gaby Lim
©DiSCORDER20io by the Student Radio Society
of the University of British Columbia. All rights
reserved. Circulation 8,500. Discorder is published
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'"* f* HV111*1 if* C*
fa |* ji ||    I M §* \
f m H   UH <t f? *   JfI i «
•» \l
08 /MAKEOUT VIDEOTAPE
This Vancouver transplant is something you should be listening to.
12 / THE OLYMPICS
The Olympics isn't just bringing tourists to town to ruin your commute/they*re
also bringing cool tourists to town to play music. Check out, our guide to things
worth seeing that are part of the event ',
14/ HIDDEN tjWERS:
Scott Lyon sat down with Hidden Towers to talk about their,^fedig win. A
rare win considering they're a metal band.
16/HALF CHINESE
Masks and conspiracies to destroy their rivals are what make this band tick.
Also they seem to enjoy playing music.
17/ NEVER ON A SUNDAY PT. 3
Your continuing guide for things to do at night: This time with a look at Rock
% Roll Pizza Barry and the Astoria Soul Revue.
Caitlia Gallupe is a lovely artist whose work you may recognize from Immaculate Machine's album covers, a band she plays-bass in. She also has a love of
wheatpasting. Cheek out her d.i.y. guide.
36 / CHIN INJET1
Vancouver-based Chin mjetihas been producing hip-hop tracfe^ that aojiualhj
make the Top 40. Rij|htmourbackyardrwhoIcnew? a        ***:•>'       *f*
29/UNDER REVIEW
Anami Vice / Beach House / Fout3$&£ jMtidiern Lakes
jffflft^tag / Petroleum By-Prwduct/ the Slew / We Are
the CitP / Bob Wiseman / Woodha||i|g* <%
32 /REAL LIVE ACTION
Califone / CiTRFundrive Finale / Fine Mist/ the
Intelligence/ Japandroids / Magik Markers / Peace /
Pointed Sticks / Woodhands
06 /TEXTUAUY ACTIVE
Vancouver Special by Charles Demers
Glenn Gould by Mark Kingwell
10/FILM STRIPPED
The Salazar Collective: Music video masters
18/VENEWS
Ttac Regulatory Review for Live Performance Venues
(it's more exciting than it sounds)
20/CALENDAR
Art by Francesca Bennett
22/PROGRAM GUIDE
25/INSTRUMENTAL LOVE
Kidnap Kids!
38/CHARTS
BRMVflff ft EHREN SALAZAR // TEXTfJALLY ACTIVE
VANCOUVER SPECIALBY CHARLES DEMERS
ARSENAL PULP PRESS, 2009
REVIEW BY DEBBY REIS
I have a parallel existence to Charles Demers. We went to the same Burnaby
high school without ever meeting. We were both involved as editors at The
Peak, SFU's student newspaper, albeit at different times, and we seem to run
into each other at publishing events, comedy shows or just randomly on the
street far more often than seems possible. I think the first time we actually met
was at a youth labour conference. It is perhaps due to this parallel existence
that his book of essays about Vancouver resonates so strongly with me, but
then again, it's more likely because I grew up in Vancouver at the same time
as Demers.
Vancouver Special is a well-researched collection that begins with neighbourhoods, moves towards peoples and then to movements and'issues that
are prevalent, including "Vanarchism," "Racism" and "Homes." The simply
titled essays are accompanied by bold yet stark black-and-white images by
Emmanuel Buenviaje.
There's a nostalgia that runs through Vancouver Special that's pointed to in
the introduction of the book. As Demers explains, "This is a book... written
on the eve of the 2010 Winter Olympics by a Vancouverite who grew up with
and after Expo '86." And now the Vancouver between Expo and the Olympics
is at risk. Exploring its past is the l^st way to prepare for the future.
But what makes Vancouver Special a gem is that in his exploration of the place
he grew up, Demers exposes himself and his history. This disclosure informs
the cultural and political slant of the book, but more importandy, the reader
gets a sense of who Demers is without the overexposure often found in full-
out memoirs. His use of (often) self-deprecating humour and examples from
his own life illustrate his topics rather than detract from them and they add
colour to what could have been drab academic essays. Take the essay "Pot."
Demers tells the story of successfully buying marijuana seeds when he was
15, when he was "so doughy as to be circular, with a silken blond mushroom
cut like the shortstop on a lesbian softball team." This self-description serves
two purposes. Not only is the reader invited to laugh at a vision of Demers
as a chubby cherub buying drugs, but that that vision of innocence could so
easily obtain them—because virtually everyone in Vancouver has a marijuana
connection (literally and figuratively).
I often found myself laughing aloud while reading the book, especially at
Demers' observations of what any Vancouverite knows to be true Vancouver-
isms. In describing the Naam, for instan^tie points out that "on Friday and
Saturday nights, after the shows and the clubs let out, the patchouliati are
joined by the chachi nightclub crowd, and the smell of incense mingles with
that of Joop! and Right Guard."
Demers' comedic wit is obvious throughout the book, even when dealing
with difficult topics. In "First Nations" Demers tells his reader about Chief Dan
George and E. Pauline Johnson, cultural figures revered by Native and non-
Native alike, along side that of Frank Paul and the disappearances of women
from the Downtown Eastside, emblems of the racism towards aboriginals in
Vancouver, to show the dichotomic relationship the city has with its original
inhabitants. But Demers jovially admits to feeling insecure about being a white
guy writing about these issues, saying, "What if I spelt something wrong,
marking me as a racist?"
Demers also draws from other local comedians, placing their hilarious
annotations of the city throughout the book, such as Erica Sigurdson's note
that she doesn't have kids because she doesn't have "the uniform for moms
in this city—head-to-toe Lululemon."
A topic that runs throughout the course of the book is Vancouver's political
climate, both today's and throughout its history, ©Specially in regard to labour.
What else could we expect from a man who repeatedly describes himself as a
young Trotskyite? It's easy to forget how politics shape culture but Demers'
extensive research reveals much of the city's political influences, whether it's
the controversy over highways in the 1970s, the Woodward's squat in 2002,
or the 1912 protests by the Industrial Workers of the World that followed the
city's ban on their public speeches.
Vancouverites and non-Vancouverites alike will learn something from the
smart and witty essays in Vancouver Special. Locals will appreciate seeing their
lifestyles reflected back, and both them and foreigners will get a glimpse into
what makes Vancouverites tick. As well, they will be introduced to an up-and-
coming Vancouver personality—I'll probably run into him on the bus home. GLENN GOULD BY MARK KINGWELL
PEN6UIN BOOKS EXTRAORDINARY CANADIANS SERIES, 2009
REVIEW BY ANDY HUDSON
Biographers of Glenn Gould face a tough subject, something like a Mozart
child prodigy crossbred with mind-wrangling communications thinker
Marshall McLuhan.
Also, since dying in 1982, Gould has provoked a hubbub of competing
biographies, from Francois Girard's 32 Short Films About Glenn Gould to a PhD
dissertation on his facial tics.
MarkKingwell, a young Toronto philosopher with recent books on art, war,
public space and idlers, sees the problem of the Gould bio like this: because
Glenn Gould retreated, Oz-like, from the public eye and only communicated
through broadcasts and recordings, no one got a single, solid impression.
"Lacking one Gould," he writes, "the public generates multiple ones,
Gould-ghosts, all of them vaporous and partial."
In case you've somehow dodged the Goulds—the film, books, poems, plays
and CBC tributes—here's a quick recap.
Glenn Gould, piano whiz-kid, names his goldfish Bach and Haydn, goes
pro at 15 and wears a winter coat and scarf in mid-June New York to record his
1956 Goldberg Variations. With a radical sound (early classical, reworked in light
of modernist composers like Schonenberg) and news of Gould's eccentricities
(his humming, his pill popping, his preperformance arm soaks), the album
outsells Louis Armstrong that year and wins him concert gigs in cities from
Moscow to Tel Aviv.
Anyway, that's the Mozart angle. Gould himself said his real career, the
second half, "spawned out of a radio station."
In 1964, age 31, Gould suddenly quits giving live shows and retreats to a
cottage on Lake Simcoe and an apartment a few blocks from CBC Toronto.
On a 1968 LP called Glenn Gould: Concert Dropout, he says he resented "the one-
timeness, the non-take-twoness" of live performance. For the next 19 years,
Gould focuses on recording and, at the CBC, broadcasting a stream of TV
specials, interviews, composer profiles and a set of curious radio docs known
as the Solitude Trilootj.
Okay, so what was Mark Kingwell's take on this story?
Before it came out, Kingwell told an interviewer, "It's supposed to be a brief
biography for a new series that Penguin Books is doing, but I have a secret
plan to make it a meditation of the philosophy of music cleverly disguised
as a biography."
No doubt, Kingwell's plan was super clever. He calls it a "bio-philosophical
recording session"—21 short chapters about the ideas of Glenn Gould, each
with a single-word title like Memory, Time, Play, Puritan and North.
At times, Kingwell nails it. He distills the philosophical nature of recording technology from a California bumper sticker that reads, "Drum Machines
Have No Soul," and the only good answer, "Neither Do Drum Kits." A chapter
called Illness takes up the frequent hints that maybe Gould had Asperger's,
and builds a compelling case for why this syndrome so fascinates our current
popular culture.
But, too often, as he tries to avoid a linear repeat of the Gould life story,
Kingwell rushes it, sometimes writing out Gould's career highs in a leaden,
bullet-point style.
Kingwell is a text-based creature, at his best when parsing a Greek root
word, or alluding to a passage in Thomas Mann. His operating principle is
supposed to be a Gould-Like series of variations on a theme, but the book reads
more like a philosophical dialogue.
If you've already read a full Gould bio, such as Kevin Bazzana's Wondrous
Strange, or are more keen on philosophy than Gould stuff, you likely won't mind
that this book is less of a take on Gould than a take-off on his ideas. Gould is,
after all, a neat venue to try and understand statements like "Music is a hidden
architectural activity of a mind that does not know it is counting."
For the last word on Glenn Gould, I give it up to Mamie Stern, a pop philosopher with a finger-tapping guitar that sounds the way Gould, in another
life, might have shred. Stern sums up the Gould ethic pretty well in her song
"Patterns of a Diamond Ceiling," where she gives a shout-out to the amazing
Solitude Trilogy and sings: "I am not looking to find a pot of gold / The picture
in my head is my reward / Go." It seems fitting then that when young DeMarco came to Vancouver seeking
the glorious West Coast summer, one of the first things he did upon arrival
was to record a song called "Heat Wave!" That song became the title track of
Makeout Videotape's first release, and soon all 500 copies of the self-released
EP were sold out. "When I first moved here, I lived in Killarney, way out in
south East Van," DeMarcoexplains. "And I had a garage and I lived in a weird
Vietnamese neighbourhood. I had lived here for three months or something,
I didn't have any music friends, worked at a shitty Starbucks on East 49th. I
was like 'Well, I'm not doing anything else. I might as well record a CD.'"
Sheepishly, but with utter sincerity, DeMarco adds, "I'm glad people seem to
like it." That's Mac DeMarco: self-effacing yet confident, funny yet candid.
And he really is a hell of a songwriter.
0 Despite DeMarco's insistence that he doesn't think Makeout Videotape
sounds ttkgsgarage pop, "HeatW^e!" is a great collection of pop songs that
literally sounds like it was record^ in a garage (because, of course, it was).
i;J$||!g&ut Videotape's songs are charming, catchy, jangly gems with melodies
and hooks as strong as any in your parents' '60s pop songs, just drenched in
distortion and fuzz. When you hear the "oooh oooh oooh"s on the title track,
it's hard not to fall in love at first listen. If it's possible to havp|crush on a
band, it seems like Makeout Videotape is that band for a lot of people. This
is true in Vancouver and, increasingly, elsewhere as well, largely..because of
their youthful enthusiasm and sheer likeability. Of course, it also helps that
DeMarco has demonstrated such a strong songwriting sensibility, as well
as an'incredible knack for getting a rich, warm sound out of filing more
than afljaszed-out electric guit?tafid a two-piece drum "set" (just a floor torn
and a snare, which interchanging drummers Alex Calder and Jenn Clement
play while standing).
Over a few beefs at the Japanic>wn loft where DeMarco now lives with a
^^pends, he and bandmate Clement discussed the relatively brief history
and excitiftjI^b^lHfMakeout Videotape. Later that same evening, they were
heading out together to see Clement's cousins, Tegan and Sara Quin, play
the secon^ftwo consecutive sold-out nights at the Orpheum. However^ this
was a special occasion Clement explained, giggling: "It's my aunt's birthday, •
and there's going to be birthday cake backstage." During the show, Tegan &
Sara sang "Happy Birthday" to their mother as DeMarco and Clement sat by
her Side. "It was a wild ride," DeMarco commented afterwards.
Clerherk^sw up in Calgary along with her older cousins the sisters Quin.
$jffc<fetfc a year ago, she formed a punk band called Puberty with a couple of
|itts^nd it was w||a| Puberty toured to Vancouver that Clement met DeMarco.
She's now living in Vancouver, attending Vancouver Film School and sharing
the drumming duties in Makeout Videotape with Alex Calder, a friend of
DeMarco's from back in Edmonton.
Explaining how things progressed from Edmonton to a Killarney garage to
the next step, DeMarco makes getting hooked up with a record label sound so
simple it's kind of funny. "I met Edo [Van
Sfffinen, manager of Unfamiliar Records]
on the street, and I was like 'Hey, man, you
should come to my show tomorrow.'" Van
Breemen was impressed enough that, after
the show, he approached DeMarco to ask
him to play a party at his parents' house
the next night.
"So, okay," DeMarco recounts. "We
showed up [at the house party the next
night] and there was this two-piece
instrumental ambient noise band playing.
It felt really weird, really mellow. Just a
guitar and a cello, everyone was sitting
down and there were candles. But then
we played, and everj^jdy took their shirts
off, and we had a great time. The next day
I woke up at Edo's parents' place after this
party and I was really hungover. I just said
to him, 'I wanna go on tour,' and he was,
like, 'Well, okay. Go with Japandroids.'"
The resultin^anada-US tour supporting
Japandroids^also on Unfamiliar Records)
proved to be an inimitable experience for
the young duo, DeMarco and Calder.
^mjj&m EKing] and Dave [Prowse] are greatl^fsi" exclaims DeMarco. "They just
love drinking. And we love drinking! $e we knew we'd be best friends."
DeMarco was noticeably eager to tell stories from the fall tour. Peppered
with. lots of giggles and the occasional belch, DeMarco enthusiastically rattled
off one great anecd^fiJS after another. There was the transsexual's birthday party
in Winnipeg; shotgunning||§ers onstage with the Japandroids boys, drawing
the wrath of the venue owner; playing the Mercury Lounge in Manhattan on
the same stage that has hosted such N5§|||pons as Tony Bennett, Lou Reed
and the Strokes. There was the night wf$§lthe officiatMakeout Videotape
I^K^iehicle (Mrs. DeMarco's Dodge Neflfl broke down in Sault Ste. Marie.
They didn't know^^tt^p|,the only thing that saved them from spending
the night sleeping in the freezing outdoors was meeting a friendly music
-fan at the mechanic and bonding over th^ love of a certain '90s Vancouver
£OjH?unk group (pigment interjected: "Gob brings people together!"). "I
hope the next tour is that crazy!" DeMats&^^ughed.
The next tour is in fact coming up soon. Feb. 19th, DeMarco and Calder hit
the road again, cutting a similar route through Canada and the US, travelling
with Van Breemen's own excellent band Brasstronaut for part of the trip, and
then with RatTail, a young Toronto band^^lnew addition to the Unfamiliar
family. Before thegtieave town, though^fhese sweethearts will celebrate
Valentine's Day at the Biltmore for a special edition of my!gay!husband!'s
Glory Days on Feb. 13, sharing a great double bill with Sun Wizard. Makeout
Videotape's first Unfamiliar release, a new 7" (according to DeMarco titled
either "Weird Meets" or "Weird Meats"—he's not sure which yet) will
"hopefully" be atratffitfe at the show. From there, the plan is to release a full-
length 12" from Unfamiliar in the summer.
A heatw^6cis a fleeting, temporary phenomenon. Most crushes flicker and
fade away. DeMarco, Clement and Calder won't be kids forever, and it seems
very possibjflhat Makeout Videotape won't be Vancouver's own littit|^^|
much longer either. But one can hope that for as long as Makeout Videotape is
playing shows and making records, they'll always keep the sense of adventure,
fun and enthusiasm that they have right at this moment. FILMSTRIPPED//SALAZAR
BY DAVID STANSFIELD
ILLUSTRATION BY KARLENE HARVEY
For generations raised on the big, shiny videos of MTV and MuchMusic—
think Puff Daddy dancing in a tunnel or a topless Slash shredding in the
rain—the music videos produced by local motion picture collective Salazar
are a welcome departure from the norm. The collective, which consists of
Nathan Drillot, Jeff Petry, Jesse Savath, Liam Mitchell and Bienvenido Cruz,
create films that are completely unlike the glossy infomercials slouching down
Much's Top 30 Countdown.
As Nathan Drillot explained, "We're not interested in creating the usual
music video, something that' s basically an advertisement that looks expensive."
Instead, the collective uses striking locations and a strong sense of narrative
to craft videos that more closely resemble short films than music videos. "In
essence," Jeff Petry remarked. "We're using bands to score our films."
The collective is also unique in how they work together. With each project,
each member takes on a different role, complementing each other rather than
competing. "Film is usually a dictatorship," observed Petry,"whereas we use
more of a Communist approach."
U Iff U$£ MUM OF
APPROACH))
Prior to forming, all the members had been working in the film industry in
various capacities. After regularly running into each other on sets, they eventually decided to stop competing and start working together. The formed as a
collective in 2008, taking their name from a mutual friend: Ehren Salazar of
Little Mountain Studios. "At the time, Ehren was a P.A. on one of our sets and
we thought'd be funny to name the company after a P.A.," described Savath.
"That way clients would think the boss was getting us sandwiches."
Since forming, the group has created films for acts like Brasstronaut, Wood-
hands, Circlesquare, Fan Death, Aaron Read and Dandi Wind. Thanks to the
unique quality of their films and with no small help from the miracles of the
interweb, the collective's been featured in such disparate places as Pitchfork,
Nylon, Fader, Stereogum, Hipsterrunoff.com and the BBC as well as a music
festival in the Netherlands and an upcoming film festival in Russia.
The video that garnered them the most attention and that continues to come
up in all of their press was their first. Local act Fan Death approached them to
make their debut video with essentially no budget. The guys took what little
10 budget there was and decided, fuck it, let's fly to Mexico. Once
there, they used the remaining $100 and a willingness to hike into
the jungle for hours with 90 pounds worth of equipment for a single
shot to produce a video that got noticed internationally.
This emphasis on unusual locations and intense physicality
runs through all of their films. "0|fcen we just find the right location and see what happens," described Petry. For their latest music
video, for the Brasstronaut track "Old World Lies," they loaded into three boats—a fishing
boat, a zodiac with a hole in it and a picture boat loaded down with chains and antiques—
and took off into the open ocean. For three days, they battled huge swells, several cases of
seasickness and the lead actor's fear of open water to create another remarkable video.
Currently, the group is branching into different types of films, including a particularly
bitching skate video, Wizard Smoke, and promotional films for local clothing label Lifetime
Collective. However, they're not done with the form that first brought them together and
got them noticed. "There are great bands in Vancouver and we're lucky enough to know
and work with some of them," stated Drillott. "It's just grown from there."
^IWrlfMti^ WORDS .^
LiAM MITCHELL "WHEN YOU'RE SHOOTING AN HE SLOW-
Ma ARTSY-FARTSY MUSIC TOM YOU GOTTA PICK THE
\ 2.^ BR^STRONAUT - OLD WORLD LIES
'JEFF Ww^^S^^^^^^M M DEBILITATING
SEA SICKNESS Mm ME OVERCOMING ■ A DEEP WATER
PHOBIA LATER..."
["nATHM
You can find their films at salazarfilm.com
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?? OLYMPICS: BLAH BLAH
The Olympics are coming to town and at this point, unless you plan on flying
standby to escape, you're probably committed to riding 'em out Since we're
all in the same boat we thought we ought to make the best of it and check out
some of the better bands that VANOC is bringing to town. You can go see these
BY JORDIE YOW AND GORDON WETZSTEIN
ILLUSTRATIONS BY EHREN SALAZAR
events and still have plenty of time to complain about tourists, your commute,
the forces of globalization and why bringing 5,000 athletes to town for a two-
week party is a colossal waste of resources. We sorted them by price.
FES13
WtLCO, CALIFONE @ DAVID LAM PARK
There are a lot of bands being brought into town for the Olympics and LiveCity Vancouver is getting a lot
of them to play for free. There are so many people coming to town that it may be hard to actually get down
and see these bands (the city of Vancouver estimates 2.3 million people will come to attend the Olympics),
but if you don't mind braving the downtown crowds, they'll be well worth the trek. These shows are all free
and early. Check www.livecityvancouver.ca for set times. There's a lot more than what we list here, but we
thought we'd go through and pick the best ones out and save you the time trying to figure out how the Olympic
website was set up.
MOTHER MOTHER @ DAVID LAM PARK
ELLIOTT BROOD @ LIVECITY DOWNTOWN (GEORGIA & CAMB1E)
FES IS
MALAJUBE® DAVID LAM PARK
BUCK 85 # LIVECITY DOWNTOWN (GEORGIA & CAMBIE)
DEADMAU5, IES BREASTFEEDERS # DAVID LAM PARK
FEB 20
SAM ROBERTS BAND, COEUR DE PIRATE, THE ARKELLS
@ DAVID LAM PARK
VEDA HILLE TRIO @ PERFORMANCE WORKS (this Cultural Olympiad
event isn't- actually part of LiveCity Vancouver, but it's still free and
m®
■iNTERSLEEP, THE CONSTANTINES ® DAVID LAM PARK
Name us a time that all these bands would be playing a set in town if the Olympics weren't happening. If s in Surrey, but if you are a fan of poppy Canadian rock music, these are two good reasons to
make a trek out there and make a day of it. Much like the LiveCity Vancouver shows, these are early
shows that start around dinner time, which will give you plenty of time to get home to bed or go out
and drink afterwards, and they are free.
SAM ROBERTS, THE ARKELLS, DAN MANGAN, WE ARE THE CITY
@THE CELEBRATION STAGE, SURREY
FEB 2?
WINTERSLEEP, TOKYO POLICE CLUB, YOQ SAY PARTY! WE SAY OlEf,
HEY ROSETTA @ THE C&EBRAT10N STAGE, SURREY
1 H$ KID KOALA WITH LEDERHOSEN LUCIL (FEB. 12 @ GREAT NORTHERN WAY)
Vancouver-born Eric Sans, a.k.a. Kid Koala, has always been one of the most innovative turntablists you could hope
to see. The eccentric Ninja Tunes artist is a scratch DJ who performs using turntables to provide everything for a
song. His dedication to the turntable as an instrument has led him to create a wonderful (and sizable) back catalogue
of songs from which he'll be able to select. If this performance is anything like his past ones in Vancouver, he'll do
it not only with panache, but also an effortless charm that wins audiences over every time.
Speaking of charm, his opening act, Lederhosen Lucil, is an onslaught of it. Though her recorded efforts may
leave you scratching your head at her dark take on polka music, she'll win you over with a faux accent and energetic
lovable persona when you see her live.
LA RIOTS, THE GOLDEN FILTER, HUMANS, JUNIOR BOYS (DJ SET) (FEB. 16 @ GREAT NORTHERN WAY)
Get your dancing shoes out! CODE and New Forms Festival present a night
of electronic entertainment at its best. Featuring three live electro-pop acts
that are rising stars in the scene, LA Riots, the Golden Filter and Vancouver's
Humans, this show will surely get you moving. The night also features Junior
Boys playing a DJ set, as well as stunning visuals by Electrabelle.
The New Forms Media Society has established itself as one of the major
local organizers for cutting-edge performances of new media arts, electronic
music and other aspects of digital culture. The non-profit organization's
annual New Forms and Midforms Festivals have been featuring some of
the best dubstep, techno, electro and breakbeat DJs/producers that this city
has seen. So come out to the Great Northern Way Campus on Feb. 6 at 9:30
p.m. and don't forget to get your ticket in advance. (For all details visit code.
newformsfestival.com).
BELL ORCHESTRE, BRASSTRONAUT, CERTAIN BREEDS (FEB. 18 @ GREAT NORTHERN WAY)
Fans of post-rock will delight to see Bell Orchestre on stage. The band, which
features members of Arcade Fire, Snailhouse and the Luyas, will be on hand
during the Olympics to play some jammy orchestral awesomeness. Make sure
you get in early enough to catch some local favourites: Brasstronaut, who will
likely be playing some of the material from their just announced album due
out March 1, and the goth-pop stylings of Certain Breeds.
MARTYN, 2562, DEADBEAT, MICHAEL RED & TANYA TAGAQ, DAEGA SOUND (FEB. 19 @ GREAT NORTHERN WAY)
If bass-heavy music gets you excited, this night will throw you into ecstasy.
Three major players are going to perform at the Great Northern Way Campus.
Martyn has just recorded the latest of the highly acclaimed Fabric mixes. With
his, 2562's and Deadbeat's creative mix of dubstep and techno, this night will
certainly feature some of the most innovative electronic music out there at
the moment.
The event also features an experimental live performance by Michael Red
and Tanya Tagaq. Red is a core member of the local Lighta! Sound crew, who
has been throwing some of the most spectacular dubstep parties on the West
Coast. Tagaq, on the other hand is an award-winning Inuit throat singer from
Nunavut and has collaborated with Bjork, the Kronos String Quartet and others.
Daega Sound, another member of the Lighta! crew, as well as Charly & Gallus,
will also perform earlier that night
CHROMEO, TEAM CANADA BJS, L0VE & ELECTRIK (FEB. 20 0 GREAT NORTHERN WAY)
Chromeo certainly is Canada's hottest electrofunk duo. The title song of their
last studio album, "Fancy Footwork," won the prestigious CBC Radio 3 Bucky
Award, Best Sweatin' to the Indies Workout Song 2007. Since releasing DJ-Kicks
last year, Montreal-based Dave 1 and P-Thugg have been working on a highly
anticipated new studio album. They refer to themselves as the only successful
Arab/Jewish collaboration since the beginning of time. We will see how that
works out at this show.
Locals Love & Electrik will be opening the show and their '80s inspired
electro pop will surely get the crowd moving. The duo has been playing
around town a lot lately and have even done a photo shoot for the clothing
brand Fenchurch.
Team Canada DJs, who will also entertain the Olympic Crowd at Whistler's
Celebration Plaza most afternoons from Feb. 14 to Feb. 26, will also be DJing that
night. DROne and DJ Grandtheft, known as Canada's top club remixers, mash
a variety of samples with clubby beats using their four-turntable party set.
HAL WILLNER'S NEIl Y0UN8 PROJECT (FEB. 18 & 19 @ QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE)
a^e:r^i$omeiotherevett^
& Tinariwen for example, but if you are a big enough fan to spend money on those events you don't need us to
tell you about them.
We've tried to keep all our recommendations for things to see in the cheap or free department, but this pricey
event is one we had to mention. This tribute to one of Canada's greatest songwriters brings together a large
group of talented musicians including Iron & Wine's Sam Beam, Lou Reed, Vashti Bunyan, Ron Sexsmith, Joan
as Policewoman and a sizable portion of Broken Social Scene. In this rare performance put together by Hal
Willner—who seems to have made a career out of curating tribute events and albums—an impressive collection
of artists will come together to pay tribute to one of Canada's most important Musicians. If s a little pricey, with
tickets ranging from $60 to $75, but this isn't exactly something you can see every day.
IS BY SCOTT LYON
BANNER BY AISHA DAVIDSON
PHOTO BY KATE HENDERSON
COLLAGE BY LINDSEY HAMPTON
//POST-APOCALYPTIC LULLABIES TO PARALYZE
WHEN HIDDEN TOWERS TOOK FIRST PLACE AT CiTR'S SHINDIG
2009 COMPETITION. IT MARKED THE FIRST TIME SINCE 3 INCHES
OF BLOOD'S 2001 VICTORY THAT A BAND PLAYING HEAVIER MUSIC
HAD WON THE COMPETITION.
A look at winners from years past reveals myriad
styles, from hip-hop collectives to folk-pop, but it's
undeniable that metal has rarely been well represented in the competition. CiTR music director Luke
Meat commented, "Every year the type of hard rock
or heavy metal we seem to get at Shindig seems to
be your stereotypical Korn or Nickleback knock-
offs. Hidden Towers were a pleasant and welcome
surprise." Discorder recently had the chance to
sit down with Hidden Towers founder/guitarist
Chris Cantrell and discuss the band's victory, their
influences and the future for Hidden Towers' music—which interestingly may or may not include
humanity as we know it
Amazingly, Hidden Towers almost pulled out
14 of Shindig before it began. Originally a four-piece,
their singer dropped out shortly before the start of
the competition due to family and work commitments. In fact, Cantrell mentions that the band
initially thought of Shindig as an "opportunity to
audition for a singer." Yet as the competition continued and the band advanced, it became apparent
to the band—and the audience—that the lack of
vocals actually worked in their favour. When asked
about the Shindig experience, Cantrell stated, "all
of the other bands were very warm and welcoming
to us" adding that, "while most of them probably
don't normally listen to heavy metal, the fact that
we are an instrumental band allows us to transcend
genres a little easier."
And transcend genres they most certainly do.
Hidden Towers have a hypnotic quality to their
music that demands repeated listens. For simplicity's sake, one can label Hidden Towers as heavy
metal but fans of math rock, post-rock and even
contemporary jazz could claim the band as their
own. This is no happy accident; rather, it comes
from Cantrell's o%i strong musical background
(having taken music composition at school in
Edmonton) and the wide array of music the band
counts as influences (The Mahavishnu Orchestra,
King Crimson, Do Make Say Think and traditional
Turkish music are just a few that Cantrell mentions).
"We're trying to create what is almost classical or
jazz music with metal instrumentation," Cantrell
revealed. Furthermore, the band carries an enviable
work ethic—practicing four times a week, three
hours each time—that allows them to execute their
intricate compositions with stunning precision.
The aforementioned hypnotic quality of Hidden
Towers' music led our conversation into a discussion about another one of Cantrell's influences—
movie soundtracks. "I'm quite interested in creating
music for films, it's something I hope to do in the
future." When it is suggested that Hidden Towers'
music would make a great soundtrack for post-
apocalyptic, post-modern films, Cantrell admits
that this is, essentially, the idea. For their "Sounds
Like" entry on their MySpace page, the band writes,
"A nursery rhyme for the rapture" [sic]. Having lived
in Vancouver for years now but raised amongst a
Prairie-landscape backdrop, Cantrell said, "Growing up in the Prairies—among these beautiful yet almost empty landscapes—influenced the tone of my
music a lot." Refreshingly, even the band's name has
some significance beyond the usual something-we-
used-to-call-my-best-friend's-fat-younger-brother
fare. "For me, the name 'Hidden Towers' evokes
this image of a planet devoid of human life but
with traces of our existence" Cantrell said. "It's
the idea of nature reclaiming the Earth. Pd like to
think of our music as something that might be the
soundtrack to that... a peaceful, healthy planetwith
hope—not for us, but for itself."
With their winnings from Shindig—which includes 20 hours recording time from Hive Creative
Labs—Hidden Towers are hoping to record a five-
song EP in March of this year. One song will feature
vocals ("a three-part harmony, Queen-style thing"
Cantrell said) which will be a continuing trend on
future compositions and releases. Cantrell stated
that though Hidden Towers will likely remain a
three-piece permanently, they plan to release one
"showpiece" vocal track on each of their releases.
The next chance to see Hidden Towers live will be
Feb. 19 at the Purple Crab (3916 Main). Feel free to
either sit there and absorb the depth of their music,
or jump around and pump your fist with a group of
your friends. Regardless of which camp you fall in,
make sure you're united in applause at the end of it
all. Hidden Towers deserve your applause, respect
and, most of all, your undivided attention.
&ot better ewrtfdag maasaseJHsn CfiTCUoi.9 jm
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Charlie's Wake-up Service BY SANCHO NICCANN
BANNER BY AISHA DAVIDSON
PHOTO BY KATE HENDERSON
COLLAGE BY LINDSEY HAMPTON
Half Chinese, a Vancouver-based indie/avant-garde rock band, placed second in Shindig 2009, CiTR's annual battle of the bands. Harrison Pratt,
Enzio Verster and Danny Dakak make up Half Cttiese. Pratt and Verster are
an offshoot of the now-defunct Light Bulb Effects. Theyjftet Dakak when he
moved in with Pratt in 2008. "We had lots of jam sessions and just fell in love
with this man," Pratt said.
"There was a musical foundation made between the three of us throufpi ju$t
lots of outdoor jam sessions during those days," recalled Dakak. "Then they
invited me tKplay drums with them."
Half Chinese mix up their instrumentation. They'll trade off at bass and
drums, and sometimes add in a clarinet or a mandolin.
"Yeah, like, we all have a different style-of playing drums, for example. Like
Danny's pretty solid. Actually, Danny's incredible actually. I like Danny's drumming style." To which Dakak quickly countered, Tm not incredible. Solid's
fine."
"Kay, fine," continued Pratt, "He's very solid. Then, when I play it's different
'cause, you know, you hold the sticks differently, you hit different parts with it,
and it sounds different"
They described their songwriting as a collaborative process. Someone comes
up with an idea, and they each write their own parts for the song. They feel that
despite their spontaneity, they're all on the same wavelength. Their songs get
written and rewritten, and evolve when performed them. "I love improvisation.
I always push forward whenever we play. I value practice a lot, but improvisation just as much," Dakak said.
Half Chinese aren't shy to share their influences.
"We really like Deerhoof... I think they're one of the
best bands going. I'm a big fan of Yo La Tengo,
Built to Spill, Pixies. Pixies were the first indie
band we were into," said Verster. A
"I wish I was as good as these drummers ... the guy for Don Caballero
[Damon Che], the drumming in Do
Make Say Think—I wish I could do
jazz drumming. I try to imitate it, but
can't. I just try to think rhythmically
like that," Dakak admitted.
When asked about their experience in Shindig, Verster was quick
to note the high level of talent in
the competition: "We were really
surprised that we got second place,
'cause there are so many bands that
are so talented." It could have easily
ended up differendy because Verster
is also a member of the third place
band, Kidnap Kids!, and he had to
choose between them for the competition.
Pratt described the ideas they had
to get around the problem: "One of
them was to kidnap the Kidnap Kids!
id destroy them. Option two was
to have Enzio dress up, to wear his mask, and have* a secret identity on just for
the competition and be Enzio for the Kidnap Kids! Third one was to just not
[play with] Kidnap Kids!, fourth one was to not play with Half Chinese. So we
had four choices and Enzio took the non-exciting one and just played with us
without wearing a mask."
Playing with a mask wouldn't have been a new concept for the group. Their
May 2009 show at Goonies was performed almost entirely in masks. "We made
them like when we were... what, 16 or so?" Verster guessed.
"We made them initially for the lantern festival and became really attached to
them. During that period of time—they really captured the essence of that time
... Sometimes we don't wear masks at all. Sometimes we bring them out for one
song, depending on which one it is. We play our earlier stuff with the masks to
bring back the same kind of feeling," Pratt explained. Dakak doesn't do the mask
thing, though, because as he noted, "that was well before my time."
Although they plan to complete an album in 2010—after all, they won recording time with their Shindig prize—they're really just having fun doing what they're
doing now. The album will likely be a mix of existing work and new material.
Pratt described their earlier sound as much lighter, but they'll try to capture both
sounds on the record, which will be titled We Are Pretending To Be. And they'll
continue to play live. Harrison said house parties are his favourite venue: "The
thing is, you're so close. When you have to fill up a whole room, it takes away
from the high energy, so it's more concentrated when you're up close, and the
sweat, it just smells good."
The members are also very supportive of the Safe Amplification Site Society (www.safeamp.org), a non-profit
society trying to start a permanent, safe, all-ages venue.
The group has performed at many monthly fund-
raising events for the society to help out tThree
- < people... Half Chinese. The math doesn't quite
work. I had to ask about the name. Harrison
dug through his pile of vinyl and pulled out
a record by the group Half Japanese.
"The band Halfjapanese, they're not
actually halfjapanese though, thaf s
the thing," Harrison explained, "They
started in '75 and me and Enzio were
really into them early on. There's three
reasons why we have the name Half
Chinese. Well, if s 'cause me and
Enzio started it off and we're both
half Chinese. Number two: Half Chinese... H is at the beginning of the
first word and E is the end letter, so
if you highlight those, if s Harrison
and Enzio. Oh yeah, and we liked
Halfjapanese."
Check out their MySpace site
(www.myspace.com/halfchinese-
band), or get in touch with them in
person to get a three-song CD. NEVER ON A SUNDAY // PART 3
IILBST8ATI0N BY MfRIDA ANDERSON
wm& mni ipom i?mm
(THIRD WEDNESDAY OF THE MONTH)
VENUE: THE BILTMORE
MUSIC: GARAGE AND PUNK
.;.§itf§$$7 FOR LOwigHios, $8 ^^pHfi^'rl
. DRINK SPECIALS: $3.75 PBR, $4.75|N FEATURE JHttfT
It seems obvious now, but the idea is actually totally ingenious. Jillian Mann
has been a promoter for the Biltmore for two years now and entertained the *
idea of having her own night there. When given the go, she had to come u^
,..,  with something that would get people out on a Wednesday night. What betf*
ter than the best music and free food? "We thought of naming it Hot Lunch
- and having free hot dogs/' saidMann, but then the idea of free pizza dawned
on them. fcWe found out there's a bar in Montreal that already does a Rock&
- Roil Pizza Party, so I contacted the promoter for it and asked if we could hows
; one here*"-Mann fcoW nwi% && Interview outside the venue while we watched
people pour in. "He was really excited about the idea ,„ Now there's on<e?w&
: Ctigary, $00.? '
,  ' With your $? cover ($8 for touring bands), you gggitwo tickets which you
ca&eKchange ibr i*vo slices o$DaIlas Pizza. According to Jillian, Dallas ££§$$.
-   has "been amazing!* November was the first 10011th of the Pizza Party, and tite*-'
■' Biltmore ran out before half the people there got their eats. They had to call'
;'   for emergency pizza and Dallas had no problem delivering.
, furthermore, with every cover charge, $1 gets donated to PR0HAB Helaset
Society. Started by Renee N. Le Page and Dustin Jf. Bromley, PRDHAB fa the
•.,; Confederation Ibr the Protection of Heads and Brains, and according to their
website, PB0BAB is "dedicated $p^d^£lgp^gg awareness about the use of
helmets in our community." Music, pizza and a good cause! Could you think
of a better way to spend the fhi rd Wednesday ofthe month? .
It gets better. DJ Kyle Scully with guest DJ, either Johii Arnett or Ashley
Marie, play the best garage, punk arid grunge from the past three decades.
Every song is on point and there's more: 1 ive bands! Deceniber's event featured
Manic Attracts, Student Teacher and the Tra nzmitors. Wh£t a line up like that,
what more is there to say? Tf you like Black Plag, Black lips and Blade Easter
£ed. andipuao], you'll love tiais party.
—Sarsk Cftofr»t|f
1
man, (mm®
(THIRD SATURDAY OF THE MONTH)
VENUE: THE ASTORIA (SURPRISE!)
. MUSIC: SOUL MUSIC,
PREFERRING SOUTHERN GOSPEL AND RARE GEMS
Wk SLIMROY AND JOHNNY WAS
COVER: $6
B|J!«S; $3.75 BOTTLES, $4.25 SHOTS
Have you joined the club yet? True, "Astoria" and "Soul" is a surprising combo,
- ;^to%-you may face a door line (and bar line and bathroom line). Okay, it may
require scalirtg people fo get your dance floor #po&\ &
These arene reasons to miss the ktest hot spot night, rou will be bumping *
shoulders with everyone, grandma and the kitchen sink included. You won't
be laced With pretentious vibes from the usiialciow^lftste^d,^^^ perfect
melange of weekenders, scooter kids, mod kids, son! nerds, punks and just
your average unclassified Joes. Somehow this spastic mix doesn't even create
f*' '^-f^j^cted sock-hop nightmare. The mus^l^ol^ hjcrediblyaccessible and
funky as feeS* making the dance floor irresistible.
Aside Iron? owning &x&^rj& what Is the secret to Soul CW**s itfeefiss?;
Maybe it/s because they never tried c© be successful, Da a nutshell, k modestly
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—■Tatnaf^li^''?^ // VENEWS
BYJORDIEYOW
ILLUSTRATION BY LINDSEY HAMPTON
ffHp
his is going to be really huge if it goes through; it will change the city,"
whispered Dave Duprey, owner of the Rickshaw, Grace Gallery and
the Narrow, before he went up to speak in favour of a report that the city of
Vancouver's cultural services had compiled for Jan. 21's city council meeting.
The report, with the innocuous title "Regulatory Review for Live Performance
Venues," is based on two meetings that cultural services had with stakeholders
in Vancouver's live performance community (full disclosure, including myself)
to discuss problems and possible solutions for the bureaucratic nightmare that
can be running a venue in Vancouver.
The report brings up nine key issues that
cause problems to running live performance
venues, which encompasses not just music,
and makes 33 recommendations for changes.
Here are some of the most important recommendations: to work towards developing flex use for spaces that are not
typically venues, but may occasionally act as venues; changing the way bylaws
are approached to create a focus on basic life safety instead of the overkill approach currently used to prevent all possible lawsuits that could be thrown at the
city; retraining staff to work towards assisting people who want to run venues
instead of acting as gatekeepers who prevent new venues from opening; and to
simplify the current bylaws and make them easier to understand.
In an interview before the meeting, Vision Vancouver councillor Heather
Deal made clear the goal of this report. "What we want is more performance
venues," she said.
"What you see here is a change in attitude," Deal went on to say, explaining that city hall no longer wants to view cultural activities as an afterthought
that cause administrative hassle, but rather to view things like concerts and
performances as something that city hall would like to encourage more of.
The report was accepted by council with staff, council and all speakers in
favour. City staff will not have much time to work on the changes until after
the Olympics have finished rolling through town, but immediately after that
they will begin working on making the short term goals a reality. Deal expects
bylaw changes, which will have a serious effect on how things are run in town,
to be presented to council in the first quarter of 2011.
The report acknowledges that current policy has had the effect of driving venue operators to simply run their spaces illegally and wants to change
that.
"One thing I like about the report is that it says we're driving things underground," Deal admitted.
This problem was pointed out most strongly by Ryan McCormick of the
Safe Amplification Site Society.
i£ HOW DO WE ENCOURAGf;
mEMMTY IN VANCOUVER?
we Med w legalize ~h n
"How do we encourage creativity in Vancouver? We need to legalize it," McCormick said before council. "I want to make it clear the underground spaces
[referred to in the report] are actually illegal spaces."
There is still a lot of work that needs to be done, and there is, of course, the
problem of the province, who hold a lot of the strings for liquor regulation and
have not yet been approached on this potentially thorny political issue.
"We need to engage the province in discussion," said Will Johnston, the
director of licenses and inspections and chief building official at city hall, when
he brought up the issue of overlapping
jurisdictions in regard to liquor.
Johnston gave some indication of the
direction the city would take when lobbying the province though.
"Liquor primary and food primary,
there's nothing [permanent] in the middle," he said, referring to the fact that
there are only two types of liquor licenses an operator can acquire to sell booze.
The liquor primary license is suitable for a bar or club and allows operators
to make the majority of their money on alcohol sales, however these licenses
are very difficult to get approved. The food primary license is suitable for a
restaurant and allows for liquor sales, but the majority of the space's profits
must come from food sales. The majority of venues operate with one of these
types of licenses, but places with food primaries, like Hoko's for instance,
can run afoul of regulators when they have events like concerts, which tend to
have more liquor sales. An operator can apply for a Special Occasion License
(SOL) which allows them to sell liquor at a one-time event. There isn't currently
anything in between these types of licenses and that is likely what the city will
push the province to create.
There is hope that these new recommendations will also bring down the
cost of creating a new venue in town. "It is impossible to create an affordable
music venue in Vancouver," said Dave Duprey, when he spoke before council.
To create a new venue in Vancouver from scratch is well beyond the ability of
a small business.
Though the regulations that will actually change things are still a long way
off, there's a lot of hope that this first step will lead to a complete change in
Vancouver's music and cultural landscape.
"If Vancouver wants to be a world-class city then it really needs to embrace
the [arts] community," said Alison Thieriault, from Bible Belts, on the verge of
tears as she spoke to council about how necessary these changes were. These
changes won't go through in time for the millions of Olympic guests to see,
but if they do maybe, when they return Vancouver will be somewhere we can
be proud to live.
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aitise // CiTR 101.9 FM PROGRAM GUIDE
DISCORDER SUGGESTS LISTENING TO CiTR ONLINE AT WWW.CiTR.CA, EVERYDAY.
SUNDAY
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7
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1
I
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HNNHI
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2
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CiTR Ghost Mix
Tana Radio (World)
Shookshookta {Talk}
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Blood On
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CMps    | Saint Tro-
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Stranded
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Pacific Piddn' (Roots)
Sounds of Africa
"fW&fld)'
Third Time's The
Charm (Rock)
Parts Unknown (Pop)
Morning After Show
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tel to Real (Talk)
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Awesome.
CBcb
This Side of Monday
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Crimes And Treasons
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Saaa-    Canadian
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Ate Ifou Aware
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Exguisite Corpse
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Sexy In Van City
Live From Thunderbird|
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CabaRadio (Talk)
Sore Throats, Clapping
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CiTR Ghost Mix
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CiTRGhostMix
Hans Kloss Misery
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The Vampire's Bi
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CiTR Ghost Mix
CiTR Ghost Mix
9
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11
1
22 SUNDAY
TANA RADIO
(World) 9-ioam
SHOOKSHOOKTA
(Talk) io-nam
A program targeted to
Ethiopian people that
encourages education and
personal development.
KOLNODEDI
(World) nam-npm
Beautiful arresting beats
and voices emanating from
all continents, corners and
voids. Always rhythmic,
always captivating. Always
crossing borders.
THE ROCKERS SHOW
(Reojae) i2-3pm
Alternating Sundays
Reggae inna all styles and
fashion.
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
(Roots) 3-5pm
Alternating Sundays
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-
boots country.
SHAMELESS
(Eclectic) 3-5pm
Alternating Sundays
Dedicated to giving local
music acts a crack at some
airplay. When not playing
the PR shriek, you can hear
some faves you never knew
you liked.
CHIPS WITH EVERYTHING
(Pop) 5-6pm
Alternating Sundays
British pop music from all
decades. International pop
(Japanese, French, Swedish, British, US, etc.), '6os
soundtracks and lounge.
SAINT TROPEZ
(Pop) 5-6pm
Alternating Sundays
Welcome to St. Tropez!
Playing underrated music
from several decades!
st.tropez101.9@gmail.com
QUEER FM
(Talk) 6-8pm
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transexual
communities of Vancouver.
Lots of human interest
features, background on
current issues and great
music.
queerfmradio@gmail.com
RHYTHMSINDIA
(World) 8-9pm
Alternating Sundays
Featuring a wide range of
music from India, including
popular music from the
1930s to the present; Ghaz-
als and Bhajans, Qawwalis,
pop and regional language
numbers.
ALL AWESOME IN YOUR EARS
(Eclectic) 8-gpm
Alternating Sundays
MONDOTRASHO
(Eclectic) g-iopm
The one and the only Mon-
do Trasho with Maxwell
Maxwell—don't miss it!
TRANCENDANCE
(Dance) iopm-i2am
Join us in practicing the
ancient art of rising above
common ideas as your host
DJ Smiley Mike lays down the
latest trance cuts.
trancendance@
hotmail.com
MONDAY
PROF TALK
(Talk) 7:30-8am
Prof Talk is a radio talk
show that brings UBC
professors in to talk about
current/past events at the
local and international
level. http://ubcproftalk.
wordpress.com
proftalk@gmail.com
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
(Eclectic) 8-nam
Your favourite Brownsters,
James and Peter, offer a
savoury blend of the familiar and exotic in a blend of
aural delights.
breakfastwiththebrowns@
hotmail.com
STRANDED
(Eclectic) nam-i2pm
Join your host Matthew for
a weekly mix of exciting
sounds, past and present,
from his Australian homeland. And journey with him
as he features fresh tunes
and explores the alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
ALTERNATIVE RADIO
(Talk) 12-ipm
Hosted by David Barsamian.
PARTS UNKNOWN
(Pop) i-3pm
An indie pop show since
1999, it's like a marshmal-
low sandwich: soft and
sweet and best enjoyed
when poked with a stick
and held close to a fire.
THE RIB
(Eclectic) 4-5pm
Explore the avant-garde
world of music with host
Robyn Jacob on the Rib.
From new electronic and
experimental music to
improvised jazz and new
classical! So weird it will
blow your mind!
NEWS 101
(Talk) 5-6pm
Vancouver's only live,
volunteer-produced,
student and community
newscast. Every week, we
take a look back at the
week's local, national and
international news, as seen
from a fully independent
media perspective.
THIS SIDE OF MONDAY
(Eclectic) 6:30-7:3opm
Fun and independent music
supported by a conversational monologue of
information, opinion and
anecdotes focusing on the
here, the now and the next
week.
becktrex@gmail.com
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
(Eclectic) 7:30-9pm
THE JAZZ SHOW
(Jazz) 9pm-i2am
Vancouver's longest
running prime-time jazz
program. Hosted by the
ever suave, Gavin Walker.
Features at npm.
Feb.i: This is Black History Month and our tribute
will feature drummer/
composer Max Roach and
his ensemble with singer
Abby Lincoln plus Coleman
Hawkins, Michael Olatunji,
Booker Little and others
playing Roach and Oscar
Brown Jr's Freedom Now
Suite. A powerful and still
controversial recording
dedicated to the freedom of
people of colour.
Feb.8: Bassist/composer
and firebrand Charles
Mingus and one of his
most famous works:
Tijuana Moods. This time the
"alternate version." These
are alternate takes of the
five movements. A refreshing new look of a Mingus
classic.
Feb. 15: Alto saxophone
master Jackie McLean with
trumpeter Donald Byrd, pianist Mai Waldron and others
in McLean's debut recording called New Traditions.
Feb.22: A great orchestral
performance of a suite in six
movements by composer
Lalo (Boris) Schifrin dedicated to North America and
called The Neu> Continent—
with John Birks "Dizzy"
Gillespie on trumpet as the
principal soloist.
SORE THROATS, CLAPPING
HANDS
(Eclectic) i2am-iam
Sore Throats Clapping
Hands relies on simple
melodies and poignant lyricism to drive our passions.
We embrace music that
takes little production and,
for that reason, is extremely
accessible to play, share,
create and enjoy—music
that can be produced with
little more than clapping
hands and sore throats.
TUESDAY
PACIFIC PICKIN'
(Roots) 6-8am
Bluegrass, old-time music,
and its derivatives with Arthur and the lovely Andrea
Berman.
pacificpickin@yahoo.com
SOUNDS OF AFRICA
(World) 8-9:3oam
Showcasing music, current
affairs & news from across
the African continent and
the diaspora, you will learn
all about beat and rhythm
and it will certainly kick-
start your day.
THIRD TIME'S THE CHARM
(Rock) 9:30-n:3oam
Open your ears and prepare
for a shock! A harmless
note may make you a fan!
Deadlier than the most
dangerous criminals!
borninsixtynine@
hotmail.com
MORNING AFTER SHOW
(Eclectic) n:3oam-ipm
An eclectic mix of Canadian
indie with rock, experimental, world, reggae,
punk and ska from Canada,
Latin America and Europe.
The Morning After Show
has local bands playing
live on The Morning After
Sessions.
LAUGH TRACKS
(Talk) i-2pm
Laugh Tracks is a show
about comedy. Kliph
Nesteroff, from the 'zine
Generation Exploitation,
hosts.
generationexploit@yahoo.
com, musicalboot@
yahoo, ca
WINGS
(Talk) 2-2:3opm
REEL TO REAL
(Talk) 2:30-3pm
Movie reviews and
criticism.
NATIVE SOLIDARITY NEWS
(Talk) 3-4pm
A national radio service
and part of an international
network of information and
action in support of indigenous peoples' survival and
dignity.
RADIO FREETHINKER
(Talk) 4-4:3opm
Promoting skepticism, critical thinking and science, we
examine popular extraordinary claims and subject
them to critical analysis.
The real world is a beautiful
and fascinating place and
we want people to see it
through the lens of reality
as opposed to superstition.
WENER'S BARBEQUE
(Sports) 4:30-6pm
Daryl Wener talks about the
world of sports. Everything
from the Canucks to the
World Rock Paper Scissors
Championship.
ethanwener@hotmail.com
FLEX YOUR HEAD
(Hardcore) 6-8pm
Punk rock and hardcore
since 1989. Bands and
guests from around the
world.
LIFE ON JUMPSTREET
(Dance) 8-gpm CRIMES & TREASONS
(Hip-hop) 9-iipm
crimesandtreasons@
gmail.com
CABARADIO
(Talk) npm-i2:3oam
For the world of Cabaret.
Tune in for interviews,
skits, musical guests and
more. It's Radio with sass!
WEDNESDAY
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
(Eclectic) 8-ioam
Live from the Jungle Room,
join radio host Jack Velvet
for an eclectic mix of music,
sound bites, information
and inanity. Not to be
missed!
dj@jackvelvet.net
POP DRONES
(Eclec&c) io-n:3oam
ANOIZE
(Noise) n:3oam-ipm
An hour and a half of avant-
rock, noize, plunderphonic,
psychedelic and outsider
aspects of audio. An experience for those who want to
be educated and EARitated.
lukemeat@hotmail.com
THE GREEN MAJORITY
0P$f) i-2pm
Canada's only environmental news hour, syndicated by
CIUT 89.5 FM Toronto or
wunu.greenmajority.ca.
DEMOCRACY NOW
(Talk) 2-3pm
RUMBLETONE RADIO
A GO GO
(Rock) 3-5pm
Primitive, fuzzed-out
garage mayhem!
ARTS REPORT
(Talk) 5-6pm
AUDIOTEXT
(Talk) 6-6:3opm
The juiciest Canadian writing: poetry readings, author
interviews, short stories,
spoken word, etc.
SAMSQUANTCH'S
HIDEAWAY
(Eclectic) 6:30-8pm
Alternating Wednesdays
All-Canadian music with a
focus on indie-rock/pop.
anitabinder@hotmail.com   !
THE CANADIAN WAY
(Eclectic) 6:3o-8pm
Alternatina Wednesdays
FOLK OASIS
(Roots) 8-iopm
Two hours of eclectic folk/
roots music, with a big emphasis on our local scene.
C'mon in! A kumbaya-free
zone since i§$?.
folkoasis@gmail. com
SEXY IN VAN CITY
(Talk) 10-11PM
Your weekly dose of education and entertainment in
the realm of relationships
and sexuality.
sexyinvancity.com/category/
sexy-in-vancity-radio
HANS KLOSS' MISERY HOUR
(Hans Kloss) npm-iam
Pretty much the best thing
on radio.
THURSDAY
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
(Talk) 8-ioam
SWEET AND HOT
(Jazz) ioam-i2pm
Sweet dance music and hot
jazz from the 1920s, '30s
and '40s.
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
(Eclectic) 12-ipm
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by
Duncan, sponsored by
donuts.
duncansdonuts.
wordpress.com
WE ALL FALL DOWN
(Eclectic) i-2pm
Punk rock, indie pop and
whatever else I deem worthy. Hosted by a closet nerd,
www.weallfalldowncitr.
blogspotca
INK STUDS
(Talk) 2-3 pm
Underground and indie
comix. Each week, we inter-
1$£W a different creator to
get their unique perspective
on comix and discuss their
upcoming works.
JAPANESE MUSICQUEST
(World) 3-3:30pm
Syndicated from CJLY
Kootenay Co-op Radio in
Nelson, B.C.
FRENCH CONNECTION
(World) 3:30-5pm
French language and music.
ARE YOU AWARE
(Eclectic) 6-7:3opm
Celebrating the message
behind the music: Profiling
music and musicians that
take the route of positive
action over apathy.
EXQUISITE CORPSE
(Experimental) 7:30-9pm
Experimental, radio-art,
sound collage, field recordings, etc. Recommended for
the insane.
artcorpse@yahoo. com
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
(Live Music) 9-npm
Featuring live band(s) every
week performing in the
CiTR Lounge. Most are
from Vancouver, but sometimes bands from across
the country and around the
world.
HYPNOTIC GROOVE
(Techno) npm-i2am
AURAL TENTACLES
(Eclectic) i2-6am
It could be global, trance,
spoken word, rock, the
unusual and the weird, or it
could be somethjig different. Hosted by $f: Pierre.
auraltentacles@hotmail.com
FRIDAY
FRIDAY SUNRISE
(Eclectic) 7:30-9am
An eclectic mix of indie
rock, hip hop and reggae to
bring you up with the sun.
SYNCHRONICS
(Talk) 9-ioam
Join host Marie B and
discuss spirituality, health
and feeliiggood. Tune in
and tap into good vibrations
that help you remember
why you're here: to have
fun! This is not your average
spirituality show.
SKA-T'S SCENIC DRIVE
(Ska) ioam-i2pm
Canada's longest running
Ska radio program.
djska_t@hotmail.com
BARNBURNER
(Eclectic) i-2pm
The greasier side of Rock
n' Roll, Rhythm n' Blues,
and Country... Crack a beer,
order some BBQ, and get
your boogie on.
RADIO ZERO
(Dance) 2-3:30pm
An international mix of
super-fresh weekend party
jams from New Wave to
foreign electro, baile, Bollywood and whatever else.
www.radiozero.com
NARDWUAR
(Nardwuar) 3:30-5pm
Join Nardwuar the Human
Serviette for Clam Chowder flavoured entertainment. Doot doola doot
doo...dootdoof
nardwuar@nardwuar.com
NEWS 101
(Talk) 5-6pm
See Monday description.
HOT MESS
(Eclectic) 6-7:3opm
On temporary hiatus. Will
be replaced with UBC
Sports.
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
(Eclectic) 7:30-9pm
On temporary hiatus. Will
be replaced with UBC
Sports.
RAINBOW GROOVE
(Dance) 9-io:30pm
On temporary hiatus. Will
be replaced with UBC
Sports.
SHAKE A TAIL FEATHER
(Soul/R&B) id:30-i2am
The finest in classic soul
and rhythm & blues
from the late '50s to the
early '70s, including lesser
known artists, regional hits
and lost soul gems.
THE VAMPIRE'S BALL
(Industrial) i2-4am
Dark, sinister music to
soothe and/or move the
Dragon's soul. Industrial,
goth and a touch of metal
too. Blog: thevampiresball.
blogspot.com.
thevampiresball@gmail.com
SATURDAY
THE SATURDAY EDGE
(Roots) 8am-i2pm
A personal guide to world
and roots music—with
African, Latin and European
music in the first half, followed by Celtic, blues,
songwriters, Cajun and
whatever else fits!
steveedge3@mac.c0m
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
(Punk) 12-ipm
A fine mix of streetpunk
and old-school hardcore
backed by band interviews,
guest speakers and social
commentary.
crashnburnradio@yahoo.ca
POWER CHORD
(Metal) i-3pm
Vancouver's longest running metal show. If you're
into music that's on the
heavier/darker side of the
spectrum, then you'll like
it; Sonic assault provided by
Geoff the Metal Pimp.
CODE BLUE
(Roots) 3-5pm
From backwoods delta
low-down slide to urban
harp honks, blues and blues
roots with your hosts Jim,
Andy and Paul.
codeblue@
buddy-system.org
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
(World) 5-6pm
The best of mix of Latin
American music,
leoramirez@canada.com
NASHAVOLNA
(World) 6-7pm
News, arts, entertainment
and music for the Russian
community, local and
abroad.
nashavolna.ca
SHADOW JUGGLERS
(Dance/Electronic) 7-9pm
Broaden your musical
knowledge with DJs MP, So-
cool, Soo and their guests.
Working across music
genres including electronic
and club-based music.
shadow.jugglers@
hotmail.com
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
(Dance/Electronic/Eclectic)
9-npm
If you like everything from
electro/techno/trance/8-bit
music/retro '80s this is the
show for you!
www.synapticsandwich. net
BEATS FROM THE BASEMENT
(Hip-hop) npm-iam
Mr. Joi, being a cinemaphile
as well as a DJ, will surprise
you with the likes of:
French New Wave, Golden
Age, Noir, Action, Adventure, Comedy, Coming of
age Drama, Epic/Myth,
Fantasy, Gangster, Horror,
Romantic Comedy, Science
Fiction, Social Drama,
Thriller, The Art Film, The
Black Comedy, The Musical
and the Porno. INSTRUMENTAL LOVE // KIDNAP KIDS!
BY SARAH CHARROUF
PHOTO BY SHAUNSTANDER
imiimiJ)
I was invited into the Kidnap Kids! jam space,
which is really just the garage behind Celina
Kurz's parents' house in North Vancouver. I was
expecting to go in there and look at all the instruments and talk about their amps and keyboard,
but it became apparent right away that they're not
concerned so much with their instruments as they
are with joking around and telling stories.
Unlike some bands who pride themselves on
their equipment, the Kidnap Kids! are more stoked
on having fun and making music they like rather
than the instruments they use to do it. Bass player
Enzio Verster, who owns most of the equipment
they use live, turned up late. In his absence, the
band discussed how Verster knows more about the
instruments than the rest of them. When asked
about the drums, amps and steel guitar in the
garage, Kurz said, "Everything in here is my dad's.
We just come in here and use it. When we have
actual shows we use Enzio's stuff." As they joked
about being lazy and using whatever instruments
required the least amount of work to acquire,
drummer Fred Hawley joked, "We show up late,
unpracticed. We expect to go first and be able to
use everyone's equipment," to which Kurz added,
"Jerks! Jerknap Kids!"
Hawley's drums came from a metal drummer
who sold her mismatch set to him cheap. As far
as what kind of drums he was playing, Hawley's
reaction was: "Oh man, I should have found out
what kind they are ... They're black." Except for
his new high-hats, the drums are falling apart and
the symbols are breaking. Hawley's drums, Kurz
said, make them "look tough." At shows, though,
Hawley will usually play Verster's Pearl Exports.
Hawley could claim to have acquired his
musical talent from his dad, who tried to teach
him piano as a kid. "My dad tried to teach me
how to play piano when I was little, but failed,"
he said. I countered, "I'm sure you got something
out of it, though," to which he replied, "I did:
chocolate chips."
"If I got a chocolate chip for everything I
learned," Kurz joked, "I don't know if I would
learn anything ... I would learn ways to steal
chocolate chips."
Alie Lynch, guitar player for the band, plays a
used, tan-coloured Harmony Hollow Body. It's an
old guitar that used to belong to her dad. Aside
from joking about not knowing how to adjust
the settings and wanting a baby blue Flying-V,
Lynch seemed impressed with her hand-me-down.
"Everyone loves it," she said-
Fans approach her to comment on how nice
the guitar and the whammy bar is. Apparently
"the whammy bar is worth even more than the
guitar."
Kurz told me that "we have our own stuff,
but [Verster's] is better." Without Verster, die
Kidnap Kids could manage, but it seems like he's
a key component of the band in a few important
ways. Aside from providing equipmentand moral
support, he seems to know the most about the
technical side of music and consequently adjusts
the settings on Lynch's guitar and amp. He plays
a white Epiphone EB-o bass guitar, which he also
uses for his three-piece project Half Chinese.
If you've seen Kidnap Kids!, you'll notice
right away the mesh of fun, playful sounds
and instruments. These are all harmonized by
front woman Kurz. She plays a whole array of
instruments including her glockenspiel, shaker
and melodian. Her glock is an old wooden Yamaha
that she found in a closet at home. Her dad had
rescued it from being thrown out by an elementary
school that was getting rid of them. Kurz also plays
keyboard, but she's not very attached to it When
they jam, she plays her dad's, when they play shows,
if she doesn't borrow one from another band, she
plays Verster's Yamaha PS-20. Thankfully, the
Kidnap Kids! came across their nearly abandoned
instruments when they did. The four of them have
so much energy and talent that they seem like they
could make music out of anything.
sfc*s#    ' _Lli
EJfafltfWdEJE
ANAMI VICE
MY MADE ME DO IT
ISdJ-Rcleosed)
Vancouver's Anami Vice plays the
dual role of tapper/producer on this
self-released album (available for free
download at www.anamivice.com),
and over the course of its eight songs,
he carves out an exciting persona as
both MC and beatmaker.
Although it sounds like Anami
is serious about his music, he's not
taking himself too seriously (as one
might surmise from the Don Johnson-
evoking moniker)—Anami Vice mixes
in plenty of humour, alternately swaggering and self-deprecating, with his
fluid, natural delivery. This sense of
fun and humour, combined with the
storytelling, the conversational flow
and the melodic, catchy-as-herpes [ed.
Eu>.] beats makes this album somewhat reminiscent of classic Pharcyde
(in a good way).
The beats are exceptionally strong
and varied on the album, especially
for a d.i.y. affair like this. The tracks
are mostly built from samples and
keyboards, and some live instrumen-
tation really fleshes out the sound, like
the guitar solo on opener "This Ain't
Funny" or the saxophone on "Take
Your Shirt Off." When performing
in concert, Anami is backed by live
instruments and percussion as well
as a DJ, and these musical flourishes
add a lot to the album.
From a city thaf s not really known
for hip-hop, this is a promising start
in what could be a long career as a
rapper, a producer or hopefully both.
// UNDER REVIEW
And at the end of the day, it's a free,
legal album download, so how can
you afford not to check it out?
—Dan Fumano
BEACH HOUSE
TEEN BREAM
(Sub Pep)
Step back drizzly Bear, Baltimore's
dreamy alternative pop duo Beach
M&meM $>aek< wiiih a new^^nduaure
to garner as much acclaim as their
2^c^woW6BcTOn^%OTTaid-back,
reverb-soaked tunes are starry-eyed
and pensive, and are best listened to
accompanied by the visual delights of
a lava lamp or a Lite Brite.
Victoria Legrand and keyboardist Alex Scally were featured twice by
Pitchfork's top albums in 2006 and
2008 for their minimalist, yet vivid
musical scenery. While Legrand may
have been recently featured on the
Tunliflht: New Moon film soundtrack,
suggesting an undoubted sell-out,
rest assured, there's plenty of soul
left in melodic reverie and romantic
synthesizer soundscapes.
The first track opens the album
up nicely with "Take Care," a dreamy
electronic harpsichord, gendy guiding
singer Legrand through her loving
lyrics "I'll take care of you / If you ask
me to." Another particularly standout
track is "Zebra," also the aesthetic
inspiration for the album artwork, is a
great song about an amazing creature,
the child of an oasis.
Teen Dream is a wonderful escape
from the city and the stresses of modern life. It's intellectual, optimistic,
perfect for any Raincouver occasion.
—Mine'Salkin
FOURUT
THERE IS LOVE Ut YOU
(Domf no Records)
The ilhis trious Kieran Hebden returns
with a new full-length sure to please
many. After a five year break, Hebden,
perhaps better known as Four Tet,
delivers his newest release, There Is
Loue in You, and the wild-haired Hebden delivers.
This is a well-groomed album. It's
a solid blend of organic, synthetic and
sampled. Synthesized sound joins
with harps, guitars and chopped up
vocal samples for a dip in a sonic
sea somewhat calmer than some of
Four Tet's previous work. As usual,
Hebden's songs forego the usual pat-
terms of songwriting, with a more
transcendental and evolving musical
flow. Instead of complex song structure, the sound itself is true art Where
the arrangements are restrained, the
interleaving sonic textures are complex and rich.
Ultrasound heartbeats open the
track "Sing," which is reminiscent of
Hebden's recent work together with
fellow Brit and soundscape architect
Burial. Short snippets of digital sound
debris provide a shimmering percussive layer.
"This Unfolds," is a gorgeous
ethereal slow-jam which opens with a
Boards of Canada-channelling sound
before switching into a higher gear
with a steady 4/4 beat, and then merging the two with a rich cacophony of
melodies and polyrhythmic twinkly
bits. It could sound overdone but it's
more synergy than suture.
"Plastic People" is one of the true
gems of the album. Percussion and
evolving textures form a soundscape
that is as deep as it is wide. As much of
Four Tet's work, it's repetitive but not
in a negative sense, rather imbuing a
trance-inducing, and tribally sacral,
essence.
In the end Hebden's return is very
welcome. The single is a good teaser,
but this album deserves its own complete listen-through on a really good
pair of headphones.
—Adam Mannearen
GIRL & THE MACHINE
HELLO EAKTH
(Aporia)   ,
If you pelf t»,4tifr asleep for & few
njliites while tiitgning to Gitl &
the Machine's Hello Earth, you might
regain consciousness and wonder
if someone swapped out the CD or
perhaps you'd think the multi-disc
shuffle feature was turned on.
vSsk %# The first full-length album from
the band offers a diversity of sounds,
atmospheres and moods that change
and morph rapidly into each other.
Asian inspired instrumentation
compliments what can be best described as a throwback to the trip-hop
days of the Sneaker Pimps. Add a dash
of uplifting electro-synth, a sprinkle
of ambient dust, the odd acoustic guitar and an array of languages from the
Girl (Jackie Liew) and the result is a
blended concoction unlike any other.
You would think that so much musical variance would make the the album feel more like a compilation, yet
somehow the energy works and Hello
Earth avoids feeling like a last minute
thrift store Halloween costume.
Standout tracks include "Dhar-
ma," which features a powerful but
catchy vocal hook, penetrating drum
arrangements and an unusual sense of
cohesion. The later part of the album
migrates into beautiful music for meditation in "Mermaid" and "Buddha is
Sleeping." This back-to-back ambient combination provides a necessary
reflective mood to reconnect with the
music after "Honeyjump" demonstrates Girl & the Machine's ability
to create attention deficit down tempo
electronica. The finishing touch is a
simple but solid track titled "Bohdi
Tree." Initially, this piece might get
overshadowed by the band's previous
endeavors—but it is well worth the
investment of repeated spins.
Individual tracks from this album
will find themselves on individual
playlists for individual reasons. The
tide of the band, on the other hand,
is a bit problematic as a machine
is somewhat designed to repeat a
process; the only thing remotely
repetitive on this album is the act of
non-repetitiveness.
—Slavko Bucifal
MODERN LAKES
BETTER TIMES
(Independent)
3fNew,Order collaborated with King
Khan and put out an album worth
listening to, it would sound something like Better Times, Modern Lakes'
. ne#eight-track EP. The^bum was
recorded and produced last year, but
has successfully merged several different eras together.
The droned-out static and poppy
drum beat from the tide track draws
listeners in with its dark and unmistakably '80s electro-goth vibe. This
song sounds much like something
Depeche Mode could have written,
down to the lyrics "I'm waiting for
someone to come and save me" and
"she loves Jesus more than me."
This is followed by a song that's
distinctly more garage-rock and is
paired with the telephone mic-style
vocals of Brian Holt.
Keyboardist Heather Konkin sings
using '50s jazz vocalist stylings on the
fouth track, "Time Bomb," about a
failed relationship. This song is followed by another step back into the
late '80s, as was the first track. Here
Holt sings about what would be a better world with lyrics like "I've fought
the world / I've fought the time." The
chorus turns into a psychadelic guitar
solo, which again gets brought back
into retro synth-pop. This song is the
apex of the album and is followed by
two docile, harmonious tracks, which
then culminate into the dancey last
track, "Lights Out."
From goth to garage, and from
lounge to surf rock, Modern Lakes
has done well to merge uncompatible
genres into a seamless whole. This
album stands out among oh-so-many
indie rock albums being created these
days. Chances are after listening to
Better Times, you'll be singing along
in your head and hoping for more to
come.
—Sarah Charrouf
MONTAG
DES CASSETTES ET UN WALKMAN IAUNE
(Peppermill Records)
Montag is the name of Antoine
Bedard's electronic music project
Operating out of Vancouver, he's
released two albums since 2002, and
remixed the work of artists like M83
and You Say Party! We Say Die!
With his latest offering, he's
chosen to cover a few of his favourite
songs. Blending a totally vibrant collection of instruments—whatever's
called for, really—into a windblown,
spacious-sounding set of pop songs,
he inhabits the space of their origin
while reimagining the means of their
construction.
The selects are obscure and largely
unknown, which is arguably part of
the EP's raison d'etre; to proclaim these
songs' greatness to the unaware. As
they are, it's an eclectic lineup. There's
P.M. Dawn's psychedelic hip-hop hit
"Set Adrift on Memory Bliss" from
1991, as well as a selection each from
the Breeders, Unrest and Low.
There's also "Small Town Boy" by
the Bronksi Beat Gone are the sharply
focused, clean keyboards and Jimmy
Somerville's clear, angelic voice, replaced by this dusty, reverb-soaked
groover that seamlessly weaves in bits
of "Never Gonna Cry Again" by die
Eurythmics. The latter's lyrics add
a light of hope to the aloneness and
rejection expressed by the former,
and the two songs meld together in
a surprisingly cohesive way.
Made up of nifty sampler beats,
electric organs, synthesizers, drum
machines and Be'dard's own vocals,
the sound of the EP is organic in a
warm way; the sounds have at the
same time a grit and smoothness
that is pleasing to the ear, perhaps
meant to sound like tape cassettes.
The instruments work together as
a hazy tapestry to convey a kind of
melancholy—maybe that's nostalgia
for all the time Antoine has spent with
that yellow Walkman running. There's
care in every note; you can really tell
how much he loves these songs, how
much they resonate with him.
~~Dqvi$ Mackenzie
PimWLEIWIBY-f>ftOI«M;i
SUPERFICIAL ARTIFISttl
(Mono Mono)
Petroleum By-Product belts out an
awesome opening track on their latest offering, SuperJirialArrificial. "Mad
about Plaid* Is rad. Rgd? Yes, rad. Welcome back to the '80s—Petroleum
By-Product are keeping the day-glow
alive and well. Getting flashbacks?
No, of course not, you're too young.
But this reviewer remembers the '80s
and just how scary that decade was.
Luckily, this album brings most of
the good, weird stuff and leaves out
the bad: the songs are short, fast and
just a little alarming. It'll make you
want to dance with your Wayfarers
on in the dark.
Petroleum By-Product sound a
little like the B-52S mixed with some
Devo and a heavy dose of die Talking Heads. Drummer Robin Borawski
does his best David Byrne impression
on "Mentally Chill" and "Ignorant,"
and "(Ain't got) Money" is another
synth-happy tune. In fact, the whole
album pretty synthesizer heavy.
While their music could easily
be written off as gimmicky, it's not.
The eight tracks clock in less than
25 minutes so the album really feels
like a teaser.
The cover is gorgeous pop-art,
making the 12" vinyl something to
proudly display beside your record
collection. The lyrics didn't make
much sense for the most part, which
was irrelevant anyhow since their
tunes were so danceable.
Pop-tart-art-synth-music done
good. '80s style of course. Confused? That's just the way Petroleum
By-Product like it.
—Katherine Boothroyd 'ti'a'foif
THESIIW
100%
(Puget Sound Recordings)
Originally, the Slew came together
when MWteeaH^Kld Koawana
Seattle producer/guitarist Dynomite
D were approached to score the
soundtrack to a documentary that
never ended up seeing the light of
day. With the music already in place
and at the urging of friends Chris Ross
and Myles Heskett, former rhythm
section from Australia's Wolfmother,
an album was recorded and eventually
a touring act hit the road in order to
showcase these rough hardened
nuggets of twisted rock 'n' roll
goodness. 100% is the name of this
debut and it's certainly a strange kind
of monster. This big lumbering beast
plods around offering catchy surprises
at every pass and a fresh perspective on
the reaches turntable-based music can
go. Consisting entirely of samples
*#t# borrowed heavily from the golden
age of hard rock and crisscrossing
with funk, hip-hop and southern fried
blues, this collection of tracks sounds
like a possessed bluesman gone metal and exorcised through means of
electronic manipulation. Sounding
like Black Sabbath with a hip-hop tic
or Public Enemy getting wasted in
a seedy Australian bar with AC/DC,
the album is loud, proud and full of
chunky riffs throughout. Though
while great on record, there's little
doubt that this music is best meant for
the live setting to languish in its full
effect. Tracks like "Problem Child"
or "Robbing Banks (Doin' Time)"
are fun to listen to but most likely
carry their true weight when backed
by some live drums and guitar. Aside
from that, this music rules heavy!
—Nathaniel Bryce
WE AftE THEORY
MU MIET WORLD
(Self Released)
The last year or two have been busy for
determined Kelowna trio We Are The
'^sltyy y^t;-s^iete^ A betw^ill^our-
ing (sharing the stage with bands like
Bend Sinister and Said the Whale) and
attending boot camps, they have managed to record a creatively funded full-
length album. In A Quiet World is a well-
produced first offering from the Peak
Performance finalists; it showcases u
tracks of ambitious, piano-laden indie
rock written by three men who are
surprisingly competent despite their
youth. Cayne Mckenzie's boyish voice
and fluid piano serve as the centrepiece, while David Menzel's jangling
guitar and Andy Huculiak's gentle,
dynamic beats fill out the songs and
push them forward. However, nothing is as it seems here, the songs rise
and fall and deviate from conventional formula. They are filled with
surprising, disjointed breakdowns
that are at times awkward, but at least
display the musicians' creativity and
openness towards experimentation.
Similarly, the innocently whimsical,
minimalist lyrics often date the band,
but come from an imaginative place.
Quiet World proves to be the creative
work of an inspired and determined
band that possesses defiance, drive
and conviction. The album will surely
have young indie rock girls swooning
and weeping, while us crotchety, old
hack music critics watch the band's
progress with a curious eye and an
open ear.
—MarkPaulHus
BOB WISEMAN
MB WISEMAN SINSS WRENUH TVffU:
IN HER DREAM
$te&s Recording CM) ■
It's been a decade since Boo Wiseman
Si ngs Wrench Turtle: fit Her Brem was
SlSt released and the enigmatic for*
met Blue Rodeo keyboardist began to
wmkfehiswayirh^^et^eetiveheart
of the underground music scene.
Wiseman's persona in those days was
a prankster, willing to mess with fans,
music execs, and the artist formerly
known as Prince all in one go. But
what makes In Her Dream so interesting isn't the gimmicky weirdness that
made its creator a household name
(ha, ha); it's how easily the songs on
the album upstage the gimmicks.
The 20th anniversary release of In
Her Dream—complete with "Rock and
Tree," the song Warner Brothers had
removed from the album on its original release—is a nice reminder of just
how good the album was and still is.
From the saucy "ooh" that opens the
first track, Wiseman strikes a winning
balance between cheek and virtuosic
control, allowing him to easily traverse
the line between light-hearted ridicule
and serious political critique.
Even with all his silliness and his
light-and-loose warble, Wiseman
feels no need to remove the sting from
his occasionally dour subject matter.
He takes political events heavy enough
to make Warner Brothers burn the
first 2,000 copies of the album, and
turns them into powerful, whimsical,
realist vignettes.
Some of the subject matter is
still relevant and some is not, but
Wiseman's wisdom and gumption
in the face of the corporate music
wasteland of 1989 have aged well.
That the songs themselves are still
charming, soothing and totally
weird—well, that goes without
jaying., ^ sX,,^^ ^, ^^ - **. .,
—Miranda Marfan .
WOODHANOS
REM0RSECAPA0E
(Paper Bag Records)
MuchUkeitsdtJesuggests^ Umorsecaipade
is a portmanteau: a frantic blend of
equal parts euphoria and despair,
excitement and heartbreak. Hailing
from Toronto, the drum and synth duo
have injected an unexpected amount
of emotional honesty (and intensity)
into their sophomore release.
In a nod to older formats, the album is divided by sides. Side A begins
with a relentless brand of electro you
might expect from an album with a
laser-mounted robot-spider on its
cover. Both "Pockets" and "Sluts" are
upbeat and danceable, punctuated
with reverberated snare and front-
man Dan Werb's trademark shriek.
"Coolchazine" and "Talk" explore
darker territory, with a few dub inflections. On the recently-released single
"CP24" Werb expresses an urge to
launch Roman candles at an ex-lover's
home with an unsettling amount of
confidence.
Side B, however, is an entirely different beast. On the whole, tracks are
downtempo and less distorted, with
the sweet harmonies on "Dissembler"
standing out from the pack. The lyrics are moody and self-conscious,
with frank emphasis on the anxieties
caused by partying too hard. "When
the Party Is Over" and "I Should
Have Gone With My Friends" both
capture the discomfort of a weekend
complicated by regret and substance
abuse.
—Sarah Berman CITR FUNDRIYE FINALE!
November 27/WISE Hall
The 2009 CiTRFundrive ended with a bang. Local punk sensations White Lung
warmed up a packed house, definitely getting more of a reaction then they did
during their previous night's performance at the Honey Lounge. Whereas at
Honey the audience could barely be bothered to applaud, at this all-ages show
White Lung got the kids moving. As usual, singer Mish Way's energetic delivery
and Anne-Marie Vassiliou's thunderous drumming brought a dramatic impact
to the group's gloomy post-punk sound.
Following the angst and anger in White Lung's set were the comedy styl-
ings of sketch troupe Pump Trolley. I don't purport to be a comedy reviewer,
so to summarize, the group performed some clever skits about a rock-and-roll
school principal, a Klondike prospector with a complicated relationship with
bears and a business meeting gone non-sequiturial. The group can be seen
each Thursday at the Cottage Bistro on Main.
Finally, following the angry White Lung and the comedic Pump Trolley were
the flat-out-fun local pop-punk legends the Evaporators. Nardwuar was all
about the stage, and among the crowd, during the band's hectic set. Launching
off with "Float Plane," the group immediately got everyone in the room (save
those in the back) dancing. Later, Nardwuar took his keyboard crowd surfing
on a journey around the room whilst still playing it. At the end of the band's
set, during "I Don't Need My Friends To Tell Me Who My Friends Are," the
Human Serviette got the entire room to crouch and leap on command, jumping
into a raucous dance party.
Closing out the night, Talent Time's Paul Anthony introduced chanteur
Rick Valiant with the Sounds of Sinatra. Valiant performed enthusiastic renditions of "My Kind of Town (Chicago [Vancouver] is)" and "My Way." The
songs proved a sentimental end to the evening and a good deal of warmth to
appreciate before braving the night's cold, wet rain.
—Sean Nelson
WOODHANDS/VINCENT PARKER
November 28 / Biltmore Cabaret
Man, the staff at the Biltmore sure doesn't mess around when it comes to their
curfew. Though heading home at a decent hour after a gig can be favourable,
being herded out the door like cattle feels a little weird. But I suppose that's
a small price to pay for catching a show by a band that pretty much destroys.
The dudes in Woodhands never fail to bring it, and on this night the packed
Biltmore was treated to a dose of incredible dance-pop goodness. Playing a
lot of material from Heart Attack and a few tracks off the soon to be released
Remorsecapade, Dan Werb and Paul Banwatt played with such love and dedication
to their craft and fans that even when the snare drum broke, they soldiered on
while a friend went out to pick up a new drum head. This band has so much
fun energy and their tunes are shit-tight! If ever the chance arises, don't miss
out on seeing them live.
Opening was experimental electronic DJ Vincent Parker, an explosive young
fellow with tons of talent in his fingertips. Using a laptop and some mixing
equipment that made the music go all wonky, and backed by some fantastically cued visuals of old movie reels, video game characters and the cast of
You Can't Do That On Television getting green slimed, [ed. I thought it was jrom the YTVgameshow Uh Oh!, but it was definitely people being slimed.] Parker pulled off
a^itehy, beat-heavy set with his humble bank of electronics, resulting in a
^l&gg^astic dance that had him reeling and rollicking all over the stage. It
;T|p3jpN$$ious that he enjoys what he does and by the halfway point he had a few
Spe^tup and enjoflBg themselves as crazily as he was. Aside from the early
curfew after the headliners, nothing was about to dam$«|fii this spazz party,
and a fantastic party it was!
—Nathaniel Bryce
JAPANDROIDS
December 2 / Biltmore Cabaret
A full house crammed into the Biltmore Wednesday night to hear garage rockers Japandroids pl&y^gunes off their acclaimed debut full-length, Post-N#$i»$g£
It was something of a homecoming for David Prowse and Brian. King, and to
say that the boys' road has had its bumps would be an understatement. The
* J^)ds felt the slow burn of exposure while also having had to halt their first
, .major tour after just one show when King needed emergency surgery to treat
a perforated ulcer. On this night though, the raw energy that is at the crux of
the duo's sound sounded as healthy as ever.
Japandroids started off with "The Boys Are Leaving Town" and "Rockers
East Vancouver"; the lyrics, while minimalist, are also poignant and poetic, and
merely a part of the band's expressiveness when complemented by the body of
their sound. Too often, performers are content to be statuesque, with all the
intensity and belief of a postal worker on his daily route. Japandroids could not
be further from this trend, and this earns them love and respect from their fans.
The music has its roots in punk, garage and alt-rock, but the work Japandroids
put into the moment generates their forceful character—a character that allows
a guitarist and a drummer who sing to sound like so much more.
Post-Nothing is in worldwide release and the boys are set to embark on
European dates before playing South By Southwest in March. With King's
medical scare behind them and having the rare fortune of being positively
reviewed south of the border, Japandroids have been given a second chance
at a beginning. For David Prowse and Brian King, each new day is a chance to
live onstage^jrioing what they love with full commitment, complete gratitude
and no regret.
fe&ilffwtidroids Fun Fact: David Prowse shares his name with the 6'y" British strongman
who is knownfor bang both the tallest man ever to lift the 78ypound Dinnie Stones and
playing Darth Vadtr in Star Wars.]
—Gavin Reid
CALIFONE
December 4 / Rickshaw Theatre
I have to admit, I was a little skeptical leading up to Califone rolling into town
on their latest visit I'm a big fan of their records, but this night, before doing
the regular concert thing, the avant-folk quartet took the stage to play a live
score for All My Friends Are Funeral Singers (also the title of their latest album),
a film written and directed by lead singer Tim Rutili. While Rutili's talent as
a songwriter has been well documented, this was, as far as I know, his first
foray into feature-length movie territory.
I don't really consider myself much of a film critic (or a music one, for that
matter), butl'd rate the film as good, butnot great on its own. There were a few
missteps, but the dialogue was sharp, the acting was fairly strong, and the story,
of a psychic who lives in a house full of spirits (the titular "funeral singers"), is
a compelling one. If you picked it up on DVD, you probably wouldn't consider
it a waste of an evening. Califone's accompanying live performance elevated
the whole experience to something truly special, though. The precision with
which they performed the soundtrack was impressive, and the way a live band
sounded compared to even the best-sounding canned score was amazing.
After the film, C^l^f^ok a short break before returning to perform a
more traditional set, pulling from across their catalogue, and taking advantage
of the astonishingly crisp sound in the rather cavernous Rickshaw Theatre.
Ending things off with "actual songs" including gems like "The Orchids"
was nice, but the film/score was the true highlight of the evening.
—Quinn Omori
THE INTELLIGENCE / TWIN CRYSTALS / WHITE LUNG
December 8 / Fortune Sound Club
Okay, so if you weren't at Fortune Sound Club for this show, you should
probably just... well, you're kind of a dink. And judging by the embarrassing
showing, most of you are dinks.
First up was White Lung. In case you haven't heard, they have a new
guitar player. It's not all chicks anymore, which I know was a fixation for
some. The new guitar player is a dude, but this isn't turning into cock rock.
He seems to be fitting in nicely with the rest of the ladies, and his skills are
pretty good too. The band ripped through their set, playing to a small but
captivated audience. They never hit a wrong note as far as I'm concerned—I
just wish more of you were there to appreciate it.
Next up were Twin Crystals. This was only the second time I'd seen them,
J^ij^y does a sound system make a difference. After the first song, Jesse
Taylor asked the crowd "Is it loud enough for you?" I'm not sure if he was trying
to be funny or not. I felt like I got my ass handed to me by them. I could feel
them in my gut and not in a bad way. Sadly, their set was marred by equipment
problems, which was a shame, but, you know, shit happens.
The other shame was the already thin crowd that thinned out after their set.
This didn't seem to bother the cheerful folks of the Intelligence. They seemed
chipper, thanked us for coming and asked the light guy for a crazy light show.
These guys hammered out a quick, upbeat set that got me off my ass and even
got that ass moving slightly. I saw other asses wiggling a bit too.
Did I mention you missed a really great show??
[ed. A lot of us dinks were at the Shindig Jinals... jerk.]
—April Knibutat
MAGIK MARKERS / SIC ALPS / SHEARING PINX
December 18 / Rickshaw Theatre
The garage revivalism of Magik Markers and the riff-heavy chops of Sic Alps
had nothing on the opening set by Vancouver's Shearing Pinx at this all-ages
show. The Pinx laid out a serving of unapologetic, deconstructed punk that
seemed almost formless and searching, but was rife with indications of brilliance. Led by drummer Jeremy Van Wyck's breaking rhythms and occasional
poetry, the trio played a continuous set of throbbing, dissonant song and
improv that was catalyzed by guitarist/vocalist Nic Hughes' manic guitar
phrasing. Amidst the frenzy, the vocals by Hughes and singer/guitarist Erin
Ward became lost in the band's vicious instrumental momentum, but the set
was an inspired performance compared to the acts to follow.
Others in attendance may have found the comparatively tame "noise pop"
(says lastfrn) of Sic Alps to be a nice change from the rock abstraction of the
Pinx, but I felt lulled to sleep. The trio tried to flaunt some feedback as they
lurched about the stage, and made attempts to lean into it, but their lack of
chemistry ultimately stunted the energy of the crowd.
Magik Markers didn't do much to better the situation. Their drawn, Velvet
Underground-flavoured grind kept most everyone in attendance captivated
till the end, but vocalist/guitarist Elisa Ambrogio's vocals sounded strained
and they detracted from the few moments that her bandmates pulled off.
The Pinx set a pace for this night that the Sic Alps and Magik Markers couldn't match, but the Rickshaw's Ittunerislty also
detracted from the vibe of this show, formerly a
cinema, the concert theatre's high ceilings and vast
space seemed to distance the bands from the crowd,
magnifying the stylistic divide betweer^ft^^^feK
promoter Twee Death put together for this everit-A'
smaller venue might have lent the Alps anet the Markers some much needed intimacy.
—Justin Lartgille
POINTED STICKS / TVEES / STRANGE MAGIC
December 19 / Rio Theatre
The dreary Vancouver night didn't make it easy for me .
to peel myself off the conchy but rock and roll duty
called, so I bundled myself up and headed out into.
the rain. The lobby at the Rio Theatre was abuzz with
punks young and old swilling cans ofG14 Milwaukee,
which were being offered at the concession along
with regular movie-theatre fare. Unfortunately, what,
sounded like an interesting set by the Strange Magic
was over before I finished jammingearpK^s into my
head (lesson learned: shows at movie theatres start
punctually!) All was not lost though: I did make it tn
time for a jumping set by local '^^^^^^^^m$"
soul-riddled garage rock perked the cjrowd right up,
sending many attendees stiaigh? to the merch booth
to pick up a CD.
When the Pointed Sticks hit the stage, much ofthe
fanshaw        ^^^^.
dark eyes r*f*
CD/iTunes out Feb. 9*    !    ►»   «■
I ,P ou f soon
album release party:
February 4'*"
The RaHway Club
Carolyn Mark  1
and
NQArbuckle
Let's Just Stay Here   m
CD/iTunctanow ki^F  .'^
Ifca.        I
'     --»JI
^      I
LP out Feb. 23,d!
THE PACK A.D.
CAROLYN MARK
IMMACULATE
MACHINE
crowd left their $jeats\an4'crammed Into the small area in front of the stage. Even though they looked <
like a jam band formed by the staff of a local high school, the Socks came out with a some 'blast. The
sound was supreme and it was no exaggeration when the band remarked that they were "as tight as
Steely Dan." Although the setting was nostalgic, with footlights and a red curtain, the Sticks also Jfai'"
a flashy multimedia presentation projecting behind them, mashing live video wtfJi'Viitotnt graphics.
and old footage. The set featured many well-delivered songs off the new album, but both band and
crowd had die most fun with the old tunes. It was the encore that really stood out, though: the band
added saxophone licks and the Dishrags on backing vocals for a few more blazing" nines that made
everyone glad they left the house! „,.'
FINE MIST
January 9 j Biltmore Cabaret
If you're a fan of live music, you really have uptake your hatbfFto Jason <<my!gay!hn$1>and!f'' Sulyma,
p^ovet a year after launching Glory Days on a sjftc^jSatUnlayatthe Biltmorej the weekly^ popularity
jhas^sen to the point where he could probably forgo the cost of paying a band to play (nearly) every
week and still easily fill the place. In fact, while most similarly-formatted nights reh/ on the band to
draw some of their crowd, Glory Days' popularity, in a nd of itself, gives bands an opportunity to play
in front of a guaranteed packed house made up of people that wouldn't otherwise be attending their
shows. While this is a great chance to perform in front of some new faces, the general indifference of
most of the audience means that Glory Days' bands art sometimes treated like an interruption of the
• evening's DJ portions, rather than the night's fxml point.
With that In mind, hats go off to Fine Mist for converting their fair share of new fans darmg>their
mid-party set The electro-pop duo worked through a set of shimmering dance tunes frorajtfee|^4fK
unreleased full-length, Public Domain, building slowly but surely before getting the bulk of the crov^|.'
< dance floor moving by the time they launched into the sublime "Stop or Start" As good as the dn|$$f
Megan McDonald and Jay Arner was, it's also worth noting the assistance they received ftot&sonreofthe
fine Mist faithfuls in attendance. If you can measure a band by the fervour of its most dff?ow& %0k0»,
Urs, Fine Mist's ready to blow up like Kiss, Thekhardcore fans broughtan army's worth of enthusiasm
with ttjem; J£$ always easier to enjoy something when everyone around you is, and between Hie mass
SMg*a-1ongSjj group hugs and sheer joy being expressed up front, it was damn near impossibk.£lot to
get caught up In the band's set  <
—Quinn Omori PEACE /TIGHT SOLID /KATIE GOGO
January 1$ / Honey Lounge
At the end of the year, or In this case, of the decade, Katie Gogo and Suzie
Q brought an end to the Beehive monthly with a one-year anniversary show
brimming with energy and eclecticism. Katie Gogo started the night off with
a charmingly spare set showcasing the singer-songwriter's sultry voice and
idiosyncratic lyrics. For much of her set, 0oGo accompanied herself on ukulele, but she was joined by several guests, including Prophecy Sun for some
haunting theremin (an early electronic instrument} accompaniment, and Suzie
Q for a rousing rendition of "Hit the Road Jack." Songs about spelunking and
buying American Apparel tights alongside some en jranjcis lyrics made for a
delightful start to the evening. ...
Things then took a cum for the post-punk as Tight Solid hit the stage. The
hand looks to be Vancouver's answer to A Place to Bury Strangers, with their
gloomy tone md overall loudness. Comparisons to Joy Division and New Order seem easy to make, and given the cover of the latter band, apt The band's
presence and composure helped them live up to their name and showcased a
sound that carries on the legacy of the Organ,.
finally, Peace brought the night to a close with a setm&fobe'mksed. Singer
D.M.M. Geddes started things off by stripping down tohk underpants and
delivering stilted lines like the love-ehfld of Bob Dylan and Mark B. Smith.
The band's aesthetic isn't that far off from an act like the Intelligence; ready
to party indie rock with enough of a sense of the bizarre to make it stand out
Those in attendance got a good idea of the why the Bd&gonton ex-pats had
been generating buzz in their hometown, and wil likely be doing so here as
well. Given the talent that was showcased, it's sad to see S*e Beehive go, but
at least it went out with a bang.
—SeanNelson     * -   ,- ,      .'..*,•."•* // HE'S m
KINDA LIKE
A BIG DEAL
BY LEANNA ORR
ILLUSTRATION BY LINDSEY HAMPTON
Chin Injeti is not shy. From terrorism
to sex to post-colonial literature,
the Vancouver-based producer/musician
initiates candid conversation on topics that
I, as an interviewer, would never dare to
introduce. When asked for his reflections
on the decade past—the 'oos—Injeti
responded, "It was the transition decade,
g-n changed everything. Sex is not special
anymore." Perhaps spending long hours
in the studio with hip-hop artists like 50
Cent, Dr. Dre and Clipse (plus the rappers'
lascivious fans) has coloured Injeti's
view of contemporary sexual practice.
The disillusionment is understandable,
considering the number of times Injeti
must have listened to Kanye boast, "Got
head from a girl in Special Ed. / You know^
the pretty ones in that dumb class," while^
producing the new Clipse track, "Kinda j
Like a Big Deal." Whether in regards to
romance, beats or artists, Injeti is always
searching for something special.
The India-born, Toronto-raised
producer/musician found that something special in a group he assembled for a
studio writing project in 20o|. Injeti handpicked a musically and geographically
disparate trio of musicians to collaborate at his Vancouver studio. "I assembled
everyone together because they're my friends," explained Injeti. The gathering
proved talent and creativity to be qualities Injeti values in friends: the foursome
later became a group, the New Royales. The genre-subverting band (alternative
rock meets hip-hop, if I must) consists of the Los Angeles-based producer DJ
Khalil and two Torontonians, striking vocalist Liz Rodrigues and vocalist/
guitarist Erik Alcock.
"When I asked everyone to come here," said Injeti. "I just wanted to make
art." If high-profile rappers are to be believed, Injeti is achieving his goal.
While the New Royales have yet to release an album, Dr. Dre, Busta Rhymes
and Slaughterhouse, among others, are vocal fans. "Dr. Dre loves our music.
He was playing our stuff in every room at his studio," Injeti marvelled. "It was
crazy." The group's potential is palpable in the few offerings found on MySpace.
Injeti's production is both rich and clean: a radio-friendly production style
evocative of Kanye West's. The breadth and diversity contained in the small
a
»
sampling of available tracks reveals that
the New Royales are still in the process
of finding their musical identity. Clearly,
the group has abundant, if diverse,
talent. Should the New Royales settle on
a signature sound and create a cohesive
debut album, widespread commercial
success is a distinct possibility.
The Top 40 potential of the New
Royales is rather ironic. Injeti appears
somewhat chagrined by his rapid success
as a mainstream hip-hop producer. He
recently chalked up his first #1 debut on
iTunes with "Could've Been You," a 50 Cent
single coproduced by DJ Khalil. The track
features a slow-jamming R. Kelly, the man
who may have single-handedly taken the
special out of sex. [ed. Leanna clearly does
I "m^"s I      fT| not wsitus durina our R. Kelly loue-ins a.k.a.
*^l II     production weekend.] "Could've Been You,"
I      jewM* i I jjas p0pUiar appeal, obviously, but is no
I VVi' / gteat feat of musical achievement. Unlike
LmiBwuwrniiiJ    !■«■»   z^f^^Zso Cent, or most of the other mainstream
hip-hop artists Injeti produces, he is
capable of creating eminent and exceptional work. Quite simply, Injeti's
talent outshines his talents'.
The complex relationship between producer and product emerged as the
single matter Injeti shied away from discussing directly. Mainstream hip-hop
has been good to Injeti. "This has been the most lucrative music year of my
life," he said. Nevertheless, he criticizes the current state and direction of
the profitable genre, stating, "It's been catering to club life, where women
are at the top. It's all about sex, and women—I'm sorry—play themselves
out. People used to write stories." Exactly where Injeti stands as producer of
much of this kind of hip-hop is unclear. He does, however, explicate a divide
between his personal tastes and commercial creations: "What I listen to and
what I make for other people are two different things." For Injeti, the New
Royales provide an opportunity to exercise and develop as an artist, and the
possibility of redirecting a misguided genre. Injeti did, after all, assemble the
group because he "just wanted to make art." Ironically, his art may well appear
below his latest 50 Cent creation on the Top 40 charts. The difference is, of
course, that it might also be something special.
36 WP,
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1 i      VI
37 //CiTR 101.9 FM CHARTS
STRICTLY THE DOPEST HITZ OF JANUARY
#
fffoRTlS* ,,-,.',
ALBUM
LABEL
 #	
ARTIST
ALBUM          	
LABEL	
1
Vic Chesnutt
At The Cut
Constellation
26
Aidan Baker
&Noveller*
Colorful Disturbances
Divorce
2
JayReatard
Watch Me Fall
Matador
27
Cold Cave
Love Comes Close
Matador
3
Paperboys*
Callithump
Stompy Discs
28
Trans Am
What Day Is It Tonight
(Live 1993-2008)
Thrill Jockey
4
Sun Wizard*
Maybe They Were
Right
Independent
29
Exene Cervenka
Somewhere Gone
Bloodshot
5
Various*
Sweet Treats: Live...
from CJSW 90.9 FM
Independent
30
Kurt Vile
Childish Prodigy
Matador
6
Los Furios*
sit
Independent
31
East Vamps*
Drunk By 6
Independent
7
Dylan Thomas*
Trees Of Mystery
Sakamano
32
Devils Hotrod*
Dirty Rocks For
Broken Hearts
Stumble
8
Hot Little Rocket*
s/t
file under:music
33
The Laundronauts*
The Laundronauts
Come Clean
Spincycle
9
JayArner*
Bird of Prey
Independent
34
Girls
Album
True Panther
10
Shearing Pinx*
Weaponry
Divorce
35
Fucked Up*
Couple Tracks
Matador
11
TheWillowz
Everyone
Downtown
36
Various
Daptone Gold
Daptone
12
The Secretaries*
s/t
Independent
37
Various*
Beatroute: 5 Year
Compilation
Independent
13
Peace*
Slow Children
Reluctant
38
Beach House
Teen Dream
Sub Pop
14
Patrick Wolf
The Bachelor
Nylon
39
Nous Percons Les
Oreilles*
Shaman
Actuelle
15
If Then Do*
M70
Independent
40
Church of the Very
Bright Lights*
s/t
Independent
16
Hie King Khan &
BBQ Show*
Zebra
K
41
The Dojo Workhorse*
Weapons Grade
Romantic
Load
17
RoleMach*
Orffesques & Fuges
GBCL
42
Crush Buildings*
Surrender Sleep
Independent
18
Lightning Bolt
Earthly Delights
Load
43
Make Love*
s/t
Independent
19
Patrick Wolf
The Bachelor
Nylon
44
Gil Scott-Heron
I'm New Here
XL Recordings
20
Tom Waits
Glitter & Doom
Live
Anti-
45
Thighs*
New Words for
Awful Things
Independent
21
Om
God Is Good
Drag.City
46
Pleasure Bridge*
s/t
Independent
22
Animal Collective
Fall Be Kind
Domino
47
Woodpigeon*
Die Stadt Muzi-
kanten
Boompa
23
Sonic Avenues*
s/t
Going Gaga
48
Asobi Seksu
Rewolf
Polyvinyl
24
Pants Yell!
Received
Pronunciation
Slumberland
49
Vivian Girls
Everything Goes Wrong
In The Red
25
Charlotte Gainsbourg
IRM
Because
50
Do Make Say Think*
Other Truths
Constellation
38
CiTR's charts reflect what's been played on the air by CiTR's lovely DJs last month. Records with asterisks (*) are Canadian. Most of these
excellent albums can be found at fine independent music stores across Vancouver. If you can't find them, give CiTR's music coordinator a shout
at (604) 822-8733- His name is Luke Meat. If you ask nicely he'll tell you how to find them. Check out other great campus/community radio
charts at www.earshot-online.com. REWARD YOURSELF AT ZULU WITH FEBRUARY'S ESSENTIAL NEW RELEASES!
SPOON
Transference Cno
Transference is the first fuii-length offering of new Span material since 2007 's
stellar Zulu fa^e 6a Ga 8a Ga 6a Produced i
fay the band* Iransference is made up of 1f
new gems that honor the Spoon tradition
while pushing the envelope of the band's
soi8$jsver further — imagine an edgy blend of Stone's shuffle. Hang
of f*m arty-ness, and hip Clash Sandinisla dub. With a Vancouver
''date Alongside fellow rockers Deerhunter at the Orpheum Theatre, we
are ready (read champing at the bit) to renew our love for one of
America's finest rock bands (not called WSlca), Uransfereace is a must
have for anyone into experimental rock, catchy songs, screwed up
arrangements and even conceptual photography — hey If
Eggleston does the front cover.
CD 16.98AP 20-98
BEACH HOUSE
Teen Dream
1HWMJ/LP+DVD
Freshly inked to Sob Pop, Baltimore based
duo Beach House offer a sublime reverb
drenched sound that engulfs the listener in a
kaleidoscopic mix of organ drones, Moo
Tucker drumming, and simple yet highly
evocative Stratocaster guitar licks. Soaring above this neo-psychedeiic
pastiche is the enchanting voice of Victoria Legrand — imagine her
completing the isosceies triangle between Steve Hicks and Hico. This,
their third full-fength is easily their most ambitious collection of songs
to date, as highlights such as Norway and the opener Zebra instantly
push their signature sound into the realm of classic artists. Indeed,
Beach House are like the Galaxie §00 of today, as their influence will be
felt for years and their songs will become the blueprint for moody freak-
outs forevermore, FYi: This release comes with a bonus DVD of videos
for every song: fucking gorgeous.
CD+DVD 16.98 /LP+DVD 20.98
Zulu Art Hews!
Ben Jacque
Megitli Gozer Fores
Wrapy 1-28,2010
OWEN
PA11ETT
Heartland CD/LP
^ www *n!*p
Heartland, the third album by Owen Pallet!,
is a panoramic and orchestral work; a song |
cycie of Contemporary Fiction, and his finest
work to date. Heartland s narrative concerns a
young, ultra-violent farmer named lewis and is
J leyn the imaginary landscape of Spectrum. Pailett describes the concepts
behind the record: "The album is about the beginning, middle and end of a
relationship. But its sung from the point of view of the object of my affection." Recorded over nine months, Pailett enlisted the services of the Czech
Philharmonic in Prague and traveled to Re:ykf$vik to use VaitNUf'%
Siggurdson s Greenhouse studio, home to such sonically widescreen masterpieces as BjonV Medulla and Bonnie "Prince" Billy s The Letting Go.
Collaborating on Heartland are drummer Jeremy Gara (of Arcade Fire) and
mixer Busty Santos, who previously worked on Panda Bear's Person Pitch.
Heartland is a unique modern musical statement. A record comprising
twelve concise songs informed by the traditions of pop, which are based on
one long narrative concept, and played by an orchestra, The result is an
extraordinary piece of work ringing to the sound of its distinct sense of ambi-
I fiofl tarmth and emotion.
CD 16.98/LP 18.98
INCOMING NEW RELEASES:
Fucked Up - Couple Tracks 2CD72LP
Various-Casual Victim Pile: Austin 2010 CD
OH Scott-Heron-I'm New Here CD/LP
Partita Du Prince - Black Noize CO/2LP
Woodhands - Remorsecapade CB7LP
Priestess-Prior To The Fire 2LP/CD
V/A-Nigeria Special Volume 2 3LP/CD
V/A - Nigeria Afrobeat Special: The New Explosive Sound
in 1970^ Nigeria 3LPyCD
The Hot Rats-Turn Ons CD/LP     :w::\
Woodpkjeon - Die Statft Muzikarrten CD
Laura Vfeirs - Julyflame CD
Basia Bulat - Heart of My Own CD
FUP THE PAGE!
PRICES IN EFFECT UNTIL FEBRUARY 28,2010
Zulu Records
1972-1976 W 4th Ave
Vancouver. BC
tel 604738.3232
www.zulurecords.com
STORE HOURS
MontoWetl   10:30-7:00
ThursandFri 10:30-9:00
9:30-6:30
Sun 12:00-6:00 WORKING FOR THE VAMPIRE WEEKEND
REWARD YOURSELF AT ZULU WITH FEBRUARY'S ESSENTIAL NEW RELEASES!
VAMPIRE WEEKEND
Contra CQ/LP
The latest missive of NY's Afro-pop, Polo Sport-wearing Columbia grads is destined to be a one of 2010's
Big Ones. And for good reason. Ena Koenig and crew
specialize in Gracetand-esque Afro guitar lines, catchy
New Order inspired chorus, frm While their aifeuJM J'
Centra, fvfitW Jtoe StrunMw-loved Nicaraguan
Marxist rebels, Koenig and company are not interested in politics. In place of politics
Contra offers ten tracks of incredibly catchy pop rock, as evidenced by lead single
Cousins. Destined to be one of this year.s priority releases — how is the time to sink
your teeth into Vampire Weekend!
CD 14.98AP 18.98
G4GJ
MaintenantCQ/tP
Take pause for a moment to stop listening to your
recordings from Beirut, Owen Pailett and Sufjan
Stevens, and do yourself the favour of checking out some
of our own hometown genius. We speak of course otlii |
||A|^jf Nick Krgovich(No Kids/Pano) and Colin   |
Stewart (The Hive, Black Mtn, Destroyer). Working with *
the premise that the recording studio is a place for experimentalism, collaborations, and
to renew one's vows with the love of pop music, Krgovich and Stewart spent four years
crafting these bouncy numbers a la the classic Back to Mono inspired sound with the
IflPpf£ revolving door of session ca$ Including artists such as Owen Pailett of Final
Fantasy, Mirah, Zac Pennington of Parenthetical Girls. Katie Eastburn of Young
People, Base MtflftmMl Karl Blau. Needless to say, this record is rich — sonicaliy
?a^a$&ni wise -— arid iSce Beirut et ai above, Gig! shifts indie rock closer to a celebra-
/ti#rM9ff craft (both sohgwrfting and recording) as well as sonic virtuosity. Maintenant,
the time is now.
CD 16.98/lP 22.98
ANNUL COUECTIVE
CO
The back story comes out This is Animal Collectives
||j| Out-of-print 2001 release on one of the most
influential bedroom labels in America — Catsup Plate,
Recorded way back then completely live on their front
;i®rj|-|j$ Maryland, tnjB^ve song release is the welcome
%0f&k storied A.C. sonic future. AM ft*^ng as a
campfire, complete with field recordings of the nature about them, these tracks outline
the sort of mystical beauty associated with the band, as well as their love for experimentation, looping, and vocal interplay. The reissue works as a blueprint to interpret their
subsequent releases as wen as sounds just as important today ast^did dearly a decade
ago. BravD^    f j i. jj\
CD16.98
THE VINYL DEN!
Hey Folks! It you haven't heard
already Zulu Records has expanded its vinyl store to twice its original
size and as a result our buyers and
staffers have been busy putting in long
hours to fill up the bins with the best
selection of new, used and collectable
LPs, 12* and 7"! Seriously, this is easi
ly the best selection of wax we have
ever had out for public consumption
— and based on the rate of turntables
being hooked up again, we can officially say — the.^ft crazy is starting ail
over again! Come by, hang out, listen
to music, talk about tf?e jruisic, and
most of all — have fun.
SCOUT NIBLETT
The Calcination Of Scout
NMettCO
Scout Nibiett's most tightly coiled long-player yet, a
heavy handful of songs that are reaching for the ripe
and the light. An intense devotional, a determined spirit
journey and a collection of great slow-dance songs.
People come to Emma Louise "Scout' Niblett for the joy
of a scalding hot bath of sound amidst stark, bluesy emoting — and she won't Set em
down this A,.But something has shifted. Having made herself a record or h^ir i
worth of celebration ballads and moody freakouts, she seems to be hearing that call
from within to feel for other things. Throughout The Calcination we see Scout in deep
focus. She's in an empty space and her voice soaps against the waits, behind weird
shadows we can't make out. The songs string together, apjjst as one, her guitar
growls and bites, and the black velvet Of space hovers.^ij&t when the tension in the
room and the filament of guitar can't glow any brighter, suddenly a band erupts,
accompaniment to her vision—and then back down to Scout and guitar.
CD 16.98
FANSHAW
Dark Eyes CD/LP
You may recall Vancouver's Olivia Fetherstonhaugh
from The Choir Practice. However, after one listen
to her Mint Records debut, Dark Eyes, you will remember her as the radiant chanteuse, fanshaw. Her ability to
create intricate songs with minimalistic Ipswumentation
sets this record apart as an understated gem filled with
mellow harmonies and bass heavy instrumental. Recorded by Colin Stuart (Destroyer,
Black Mountain) and Howard Bedekopo (the New Pomegraphers), and featuring
appearances from former Choir Practice members Larissa Loyva (also of Pane and
Keltarlsse), Shane Inner (Love and Mathematics) and Zulu's own Johnny Payne
(Victoria Victoria)! That said, fanshaw is destined to be anything but the dark horse.
CD 14.98/LP 14.98
YEASAYEB
Odd Blood CD/IP
We are pleased to sell the long-awaited second
pfc album from New York's Yeasayer. The album is
titled Odd Blood and will he for sale on February 8th on
CD/LP thanks to the Secretly Canadian label. First
brewed in the frosty hills of Woodstock, NY at me
Marotta lair, then transferred to the steely sweeps of
NYC, Odd Blood took many layers to finalize, but as with all things Yeasayer, the out-
' come is spectacular—filled with theft1 interpretation of pop pleasures and experimentation, the band has once again carved its own path through that ice cold glacier that is
modern pop/rock. Yes, you can dance to this record.
CD 16.98/20.98 LP
FUP THE PAGE!
PRICES IN EFFECT UNTIL FEBRUARY 28,2010
Zulu Records
1972-1976 W 4th Ave
Vancouver, BC
tel 604.738.3232
v\rVvw.zulurecords.com
STORE HOURS
MontoWed   10:30-7:00
Thurs and Fri 10:30-9:00

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