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 MAY 2012 • THAT MAGAZINE FROM CiTR 101.9 FM • FREE! ,
SUPPORTING VANCOUVER'S INOEPEIf ENT MUSIC COMMUNITY
«FOR OVER 25 YEARS I
PEACE
BRASSTRONAUT
FOR THE SAKE OF SONG SUNDAYS
MARK OELONG
**pf , EDITOR'S NOTE
I'll start with a disclaimer: I just graduated from school, so I'm about to get all
reflective and introspective and stuff. No doubt many of you are in the same
boat, so perhaps you'll relate.
I think it's natural for people to regularly have "On This Day in History"
moments in their lives. I'm no different, and there are a few that stand out
every year. On June 29s, I recall launching into a month-long cross-Canada
road trip with my mom in 2010, camping our way from Vancouver to the east
coast On April 16s, I reflect on two years ago when I went to Coachella, peed
my pants a bit seeing LCD Soundsystem for the first time, and sweated and
grinned madly for three days with 75,000 of my best friends. I was just invited
to the Facebook group for my 10 year high school reunion, and am hashing
up memories of 6 a.m. rowing practices, my first real boyfriend and student
government-hosted chocolate milk drinking contests, which tended to end
in projectile vomiting. On March 16s, I take a moment to remember that one
time I came out of my mom's womb.
Whenever I'm struck with a "On This Day in History" moment, I'm more
aware of how quickly time passes, prompting me to say to myself, "Self, was
that really [x] years ago? Geeze!" The majority of posts in the aforemenrined
FB group begin with, "I can't believe it's already been..." Although I'm not
typing it, I am thinking the same thing. It's cliche\ but I almost cannot believe
how fast the last 10 years have gone, especially the last two in college. School
weeks as a teenager dragged on, but now it's the opposite. Not just Monday
to Friday, but month after month. It's already May, for crap sakes. Didn't we
just publish April?
Apparently it's not going to slow down, so I am often reminded by many
older family members. Maybe time is flying because I just joined the ranks
of adulthood (on paper, at least). Then I bought some pumps, I got a hair
cut and I got a real job. Graduation hasn't sunk in yet though; I'm still trying
to wrap my head around having all this space in my life that homework and
class and public transit occupied.
Interwoven with these date-induced flashbacks is the music that narrated
it. Driving to Indio, I got my co-pilot hooked on Brasstronaut, one of our
feature artists this month. One song that could always get me out of bed on
those dark mornings before rowing was Matthew Good Band's "Everything
is Automatic" (back off, I was 15). And I clearly remember that "Jump" by Van
Halen was the number one song on the day I was born.
And it's odd to think that five years from now, I'll reflect on May 2012
remembering how Peace, Weed, Nii Sensae and a buttload of electro got me
through another issue of Discorder. Fancy that.
Speaking of this months issue, I'm happy to share articles on Centre A in
recognition of Asian Heritage Month, five great features on five very different musical subjects, and our usual assortment of reviews and news on all
things listen-worthy.
So bring on May! It's time to make some more memories.
Read on and stay rad,
laurel Borrowman
EDITOR
Laurel Borrowman
ART DIRECTOR
Jaz Halloran
COPY EDITORS
Jordan Ardanaz, Steve Louie
AD COORDINATOR
Maegan Thomas
UNDER REVIEW EDITOR
Jordan Ardanaz
RU EDITOR
Steve Louie
WEB EDITOR
CALENDAR LISTINGS
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
Corey Ratch
OFFICIAL TWEETER
Dorothy Neufeld
CiTR STATION MANAGER
Brenda Grunau
PUBLISHER
Student Radio Society of UBC
STUDENT LIASONS
Zarah Cheng, Dorothy Neufeld
COVER
Katayoon Yousefbigloo
WRITERS
Jordan Ardanaz / Robert Catherall / Rowan Coupland
/ Alex de Boer / Fraser Dobbs / Ariel Fournier / Jacey
Gibb / Brenda Grunau / Sam Hawkins / Coleman
Ingram / Tristan Koster / Chirag Mahajan / Brent
Mattson / Joni McKervey / Grace McRae-Okine / James
Olson / Nathan Pike / Shane Scott-Travis / Jeremy
Stothers/ Angela Yen
PHOTOGRAPHERS & ILLUSTRATORS
Amanda Cooper / Melanie Coles / Gerald Deo /
Jonathan Dy / Victoria Johnson / Dana Kearley / Brennan Kelly / Kari Kleinmann / Choo-Kien Kua / Michael
Lee /AshleeLuk/Chirag Mahajan/Aaron Read /Flip
Sandy / Weed / Daniel Thomas Williams / Katayoon
Yousefbigloo / Priscilla Yu
PROOFREADERS
Jordan Ardanaz / Tristan Koster / Chris Yee
©Discorder 2012 by the Student Radio Society ofthe University of British Columbia. All rights reserved. Circulation
8,000. Discorder is published almost monthly by CiTR,
which can be heard atioi.9 FM, online at www.citr.ca, as well
as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland,
except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTRDJ line at (604)
822-2487, CiTR's office at (604) 822-3017, email CiTR at
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SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T1Z1, Canada.
CHECK DISCORDER.CA REGULARLY
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donate. \
FEATURES
08 / Nii Sensae
Maybe the first thing you associate with thrash
punk music isn't necessarily sponsorship from
BP Oil or a beer company. Fair enough, but that
doesn't mean trio Nii Sensae wouldn't be down
for a litde extra cash from either. After all, with
a new album on the horizon and a tour schedule
that won't quit the money's got to come from
somewhere.
11 / Peace
Get ready to take a magical, mysterious journey
into the bowels of oddball America with Vancouver punk rockers Peace. The quartet that parties
with the likes of moshing dogs, blue collar dads,
and vertically challenged individuals at Olympia's
legendary Black Houses have got a thing or two
say about touring. And old wise men. And they
have a new album on the horizon, so that's good.
14 / Weed
nental venture to capture the perfect vibe. What's
a few thousand kilometres on the road between
friends, anyway?
16 j Brasstronaut
If there's one thing we Discordians encourage,
it's support for the music community. How to
support that community is becoming a hot topic
of conversation. By now you've likely caught
wind of Michael Mann's article (and its explosive
backlash), calling Brasstronaut out for its use of
croud-sourced funding. How have the members
ofthe band responded?
18 / For the Sake ofthe Song
What happens when you fill a room with Vancouver's best songwriters and performers? Elliot
Way and Bob Sumner, hosts ofthe River Vintage's
monthly celebration ofthe soul-defining art ofthe
song, could tell you it sure as hell isn't an open
mic. We find out why, and what's sacred about
good song writing.
Mysterious all-ages venues, crushing existential
dillemas and the value ofa good name: we discover some ofthe many prevailing themes in the
life ofWeed, as we track the band's trans-conti-
REGULARS
04 / Venews
07 / Filmstripped
201 Calendar / choo-KienKua
22 / Program Guide
25 / Alt PrOJeCt / MarkDeLonfl
28/ Under Review
32 /Real Live Action
38 / On The Air / Funk My m
$g j Charts CENTRE A
by COLEMAN
INGRAM
illustration by PRISCILLAYU
i
SK
May is Asian Heritage Month, a nation-wide recognition of Asian cultural contributions to Canada
and a celebration of Asian culture as a whole. One
would be hard pressed to find an institution that
celebrates that culture as enthusiastically as Cen-
; tre A (a.k.a. the Vancouver International Center for
Contemporary Asian Art). Coincidentally, May also
marks the centre's 13th anniversary. Discorder paid
a visit to Executive Director Haema Sivanesan to
reflect on the milestone.
Founded in 1999 by multimedia artist and arts
administrator Hank Bull, Centre A's mandate is to
provide a platform for contemporary Asian art in
the form of not only exhibitions, but also public
forums, artists-in-residence, screenings, publications and web projects. Since its beginnings it has
presented work from over 300 artists from Canada
and beyond, produced over 80 original projects
and continues to thrive. With Bull having stepped
down as Executive Director lastyear, his successor Sivanesan said the centre is going through a
transitional period, but that it is an exciting one of
growth and new opportunities. After all, part of celebrating heritage is encouraging growth and prosperity for the future.
™ Ddojs's Heath Pool  -
J)ntTY Sl'KULS     SlIIMMiatlXG STARS
Rickshaw Theatre
ADV / $12 DOOR   •   WWW. Coming from a position at the South Asian
Visual Arts Centre in Toronto, Sivanesan says that
she is looking to develop Centre A's reputation as
"a nationally recognized contemporary art community [who] wants to show leadership." She and the
other staff, including curator Makiko Hara, intend
to do this through the traditional means of showing
new and engaging exhibitions and by utilizing the
rapidly changing way that artists communicate and
exchange ideas via the Internet. Their current exhibit
is Yellow Signal: New Media in China, which uses sound
and video to explore contemporary Chinese life. It
will be followed by the reissue of David Khang's
acclaimed photo and essay catalogue for his exhibition How to Feed a Piano. On May 5th the centre will
host its 13 th Anniversary Fundraising Dinner and
Art Auction, with works by a variety of young, local
and upcoming artists, including Ken Lum, creator
of Monument/or East Vancouver (the 19.5m LED cross
at Clark Drive and 6th Avenue). These are the diverse
mediums that keep Centre A refreshing and inviting
for both artists and the public.
Sivanesan added that, it isn't just diversity
between mediums that keeps Centre A current, but
diversity of Asian culture itself, With artists from a
number of backgrounds re-examining traditional
Asian art, such as a recent collaboration in progress between a non-Asian artist and an Iranian artist reconceptualising 18th century Japanese prints.
Sivanesan sees Centre A and those who work there as
as broadening the paradigm of art history to include
ideas that wouldn't typically fit and being seen
through the lens of contemporary art, they create
something new in the process.
Pointing out that National Volunteer Appreciation Week is also soon upon us, Sivanesan says it
isn't just the artists and staff that make Centre A
what it is, but the help and support ofthe community as well. As a non-profit organization, it takes in
40 to 50 volunteers annually that help with the day-
to-day functions ofthe space as well as additional
people for special events. She discussed one of Centre A's goals is to engage the community more deeply
and generate awareness of Asian art and artists; volunteers are a very crucial part of this goal, calling
them "ambassadors for the centre."
Center A is open Tuesday to Saturday, from
n a.m. to 6 p.m., free of charge to the public. To
donate, become a member or volunteer, visit their
website at www.centrea.org. FOR A MEASLY 15 BU
J   S for, free for statkHinHjfflbers]
mm
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Show it when you shopl 8ASLAN*
Gasland directed by
JOSH FOX (2010)
illustration by
MICHAEL LEE
by ARIEL
FOURNIER
Josh Fox does not want his drinking
water poisoned. Fair enough. Schooled
in the documentary tradition of Michael
Moore and Morgan Spurlock, Fox constantly inserts himself into scenes in
his film. The outcome is awkward, but effectively
demonstrates that this movie is a personal plea.
Slightly self-indulgent, the film brings attention
to the much-needed conversation around natural
gas extraction. Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking,
to recap, is the process used to extract underground natural gas deposits (the film focuses
on shale gas). Companies drill into the ground,
chemicals and water go in, a small earthquake
occurs and gas comes out. The film is especially
relevant here, given that Northeast British Columbia has the biggest source of shale deposits in
Canada and natural gas production is already well
under way in the Peace River region.
The film is a journey into the "heartland of
America" in which the protagonist, our good
buddy Fox, discovers more and more about the
insidious effects of natural gas drilling. After a
gas company offers to lease his land in Milanville,
Pennsylvania for $100,000, Fox goes on a nauseating road trip filled with dead animals, brain
lesions and contaminated water to find the effect
of fracking on residents living near well sites.
The film's central concern is specific to the
regulations put in place in the United States in
2005. An exemption in the Safe Water Drinking
Act means that companies can claim the chemicals they use as trade secrets rather than being
forced to disclose the "secret sauce" that they
pump into the ground. So if a water source is poisoned, it is extremely difficult to trace the exact
source of what is making people sick and even
more difficult to regulate practices. The Fractur
ing Responsibility and
Awareness of Chemicals
(FRAC) Act that
Fox discusses in the
film is a bill to have
fracking included in the
Safe Water Drinking Act,
but it has been blocked in
congress several times.
In B.C., companies have
to disclose their methods;
fracfocus.ca provides a list of
all well sites and the chemicals
used during fracking. Still, companies do not have to list the chemicals until
30 days after drilling has begun, so the approval
process for companies is unaffected by this information. On top of this, there are still many other
issues with fracking, including water use, carbon
emissions and the fact that despite monitoring,
contamination from drilling and above-ground
spills still happens in Canada and the U.S.
Ironically, Fox would actually benefit from
fracking in a way most Canadians would not. He
would actually get paid to lease his land, whereas
in Canada the mineral rights for land beneath the
topsoil mostly belong to the government Here,
you could have a drilling site right next door and
not see a penny. Fox would at least get $100,000 at
the risk of being poisoned. Gasland is a visual journey through the American natural gas industry.
The road movie format is effective, but it might be
time to turn the car around and head north. NU SENSAE      by COLEMAN
INGRAM photos by
KATAYOON
YOUSEFBIGLOO
lettering by
AARON READ
"Ok, so we wanna be sponsored by what so far? Beer,
a gas station; BP, cause I think it would be easy."
Daniel Pitout is sitting on a bench in Tea
Swamp Park: a small corner of trees and playground equipment in Mount Pleasant, and the
namesake of Nii Sensae's most recent EP. He
and his two bandmates facetiously run a tally on
their wish list of band/life financers while we sip
drinks and soak up the sun. Among other things,
new axe-shredder Brody McKnight has suggested
sponsorship from an apartment building, trance-
inducing-bassist/spine-tingling-screamer Andrea
Lukic is hoping for one from Toyota, and Animal-
on-speed drummer Pitout has his fingers crossed
for an endorsement from the town of Whistler
"...so I can go to gay week every year for free!"
It is a scene that seems unusually light and relaxed
considering the intensely dark and sometimes
frightening music the group plays and the pace
of their recent schedule. Since McKnight joined,
they have recorded their second full length record,
toured extensively across the United States and
Canada, both as headliners and openers, and had
hardly sunk their toes into Vancouver soil before
gearing up for another tour in June.
The new album, titled Sun Downing, will be
released on July 24 via Seattle's Suicide Squeeze
Records. The recording took place in February
and the vocals were barely finished before the band
hit the open road, not only for the first time as a
three piece but also as support for Denver's EMA,
playing some ofthe largest venues of their gigging careers.
"Maybe we should have been more mtimidated,"
muses Lukic. Apparently, the most challenging part
of playing larger venues, such as the Lincoln Hall in
Chicago, was dealing with know-it-all soundmen
who McKnight says, "don't take into account that
you're trying to get something across by being
loud. They're just like *you guys are supposed to
sound like this' and they don't really get it But
we're stubborn."
The tour also helped the already long-time
friends establish some archetypes within the band.
"Brody's like the dad, Andrea's the aunt and I'm the
sexy younger sister, with no rules!" laughs Pitout
"Pm like the daughter from Married mith Children.
Brody is like Wilson from Home Improvement He^s
mysterious."
They jokingly refer to the supporting dates as
a "band vacation," that although fun, were almost
uncomfortably easy compared to the d.i.y. shows
they played for their headlining dates and have
been playing since their early days as stalwarts of
the Emergency Room scene.
"We're used to playing in basements, hoping we
get ten dollars per show," says Pitout It comes as
no surprise that a harder, more work-intensive tour
is what the group finds familiar. Aside from Nii
Sensae's schedule, Pitout and McKnight also play
in a project called Eating Out and, just last month,
released their debut cassette on Burger Records.
Lukic and McKnight also play in Heavy Chains
and they all collaborate on a Nii Sensae Fan dub
newsletter, with artwork and games created by the
band and mailed at their own expense to members
all over the world, raising the question: Where do
these guys find the time for all this?
"It's true," admits Pitout "The past year for
me has been crazy. I was touring last year with
Hunx and his Punx for a while; Eating Out hasn't
been super busy. We try to play shows where we can; Nii Sensae's been busy. I think it's better that
way though. I get really depressed if I'm not super
busy."
By the looks of things, they should be staving
off depression for a while to come. Aside from a
few isolated shows over the next month supporting
indie-buzz acts including Japanther, Ty Segall and
Best Coast June will see the group make a solo
venture along the west coast playing with Black
Bananas and King Tuff among others.
"Then after the record comes out we're going to
go on another big tour fox all of August and some
of September," says McKnight with Pitout adding,
"Yeah, so that will be across North America again
and then we have a few festivals we're playing in
the summer: Sled Island in Calgary and then two
bigger festivals in Seattle in the fall. And then we
have a tentative tour in December that will go into
Florida and through the South."
"When?" Lukic cuts in.
"December [laughing]. It's news to her."
Understandably, it appears difficult to keep up
with the hectic agenda, but despite this, it doesn't
sound like any burn-out is imminent "I think you
have to find a balance," says Pitout describing
the magical novelty of early tours having calmed
enough that they can look forward to returning
home and seeing friends and family.
"[On tour] you just sit and think for so long,
like eight hour drives, sitting, thinking about your
life," laughs Lukic, saying that the daily routine
of drive-play-sleep-repeat isn't very conducive to
easy-going sightseeing. "People are like 'you get
to see all these cities.' You get to see the highway!"
Sightseeing aside and having toured a number of
times now, what seems to make it all worthwhile
for them is meeting people, whether it's 10 kids in
rural Canada or a sold out show in one ofthe many
metropolises ofthe States.
Calculating their projected travel for the upcoming year, Pitout figures they will be on the road for
five or six months, and says with a grin, "It's kind
of crazy! We like it though."
McKnight agrees, "Yeah, I like it a lot" slowly
sips a beer in the afternoon sun, and says with
a smile, "I don't want to work." Ironically, he is
playing in one ofthe hardest working and most
dedicated bands in Vancouver. With a much anticipated record on the way and a slew of shows to
come, Nu Sensae is poised for their biggest year
yet Sponsorship, here they come!
Catch Nu Sensae supporting Ty Segall on May 5
at the Waldorf and ivith Best Coast on May 23 at the
Commodore. To sign up for the Fanclub, check out their
Faceboolcpage. PEACE
byJACEY
GIBB
photos by
AMANDA COOPER
illustration by
BRENNAN KELLY Brennan Kelly, "Peace", ink on paper, 9" x 6", 2012
I'm unsure how many bands have their names
bestowed upon them by mysterious strangers
at Vancouver's Funky Winker Bean's, but I can
assume that Peace is one of the few. "It was
bequeathed to us by a wise native man," explains
Dan Geddes (vocals/guitar) over a mess of half-
empty pints at The Whip, just off of Main Street
Geddes and Peace's drummer, Geoff Dembicki,
were talking to a gentleman at the bar and when
they went to leave, the man's friend, who had
remained silent throughout the entire exchange,
told them that their unnamed band now had a
name: Peace.
The band's formation, however, wasn't nearly
as mystical as their name's origin. Geddes and
Dembicki met when they were four, over a friendly
game of Candyland. "I told him that he would
look better with glasses and the friendship blossomed [as a result of Candyland] and aesthetic
criticisms."
While Dembicki was unable to make the interview, Peace's two other members, bassist Connor
Mayer and guitarist Michael Willock, were also
with us on the warm spring night ready to share
the band's inner workings with the world.
What started as a high school group in Edmonton, composed of Geddes, Mayer, and Dembicki,
eventually flourished after all the members made
their separate pilgrimages to Vancouver over a
span of several years.
When asked to explain the reasons behind
the change in landscape, each member had their
own. "Edmonton's sweet but I don't want to live
my whole life in the same city," says Mayer, while
Willock is more driven: "I actually moved here to
try and find a band and, you know, get rich and
famous."
"I think I actually fled," Geddes adds.
Since Peace's formation, the punk-rock group
released an EP back in 2009, Slow Children, and a
full-length album, My Face, last April. Both works
were recorded with Jordan Koop, and the latter
was completed over five days in a music hall in
Ladysmith, B.C. Geddes recalls the experience with
mixed emotions: "It sounds really idealistic when
you talk about it but it's actually just us having
a big teenage sleepover. Itwas sort of disgusting
actually. But it's a lot of fun."
After My Face was unleashed, the band took
to the road with a tour across Canada ending in
Montreal, and then another tour throughout part
of Washington. Peace has developed a reputation
for being a lightning rod for antics, but when
discussing highlights from their tours, it sounds
more like a clip show from a David Lynch film.
"Itwas mostly based around more idiosyncratic
venues, not too many straight up bar shows. And
we like that Or at least I do," says Geddes, in an
attempt to justify their unusual gigs. "As long as
there's people there that care, then I'd rather it be
weird." During their trek to Montreal, theyplayed
in a blue-collar dad's garage for a bunch of punk
kids and even did a show in the basement ofthe
Department of Foreign Affairs in Ottawa. But the
really weird venues were south ofthe border, with
a show in Olympia being the peak in surrealism.
"We don't know how much of this to believe,"
Geddes begins the tale, "but there are these things
called Black Houses in Olympia and they're painted
completely black. According to [the guy who was
putting on the show] there's this satanic dentist
that owns like twenty properties around Olympia
and they're all painted black."
"It's either a grand nihilistic statement or something about affordable housing. He'll buy these
houses and paint them black and then just let
them turn to shit and rent them out to sketchy
kids for no money." Mayer adds. But in order to
rent the houses out there are requirements—one
of which is that the tenants have to put on shows.
At the Black House Peace played at which Geddes
, describes as "a place you wouldn't go to willingly,"
they found a teepee in the front yard and noticed
that a tree had fallen over onto the house. Apparently it had been dead before, but then came back
to life after falling over.
"Itwas like a lucid nightmare," Willock sums up
blundy. In attendance at the show were a midget
dressed as a skeleton, a guy that lived in a tree,
a man who collected human hair, and a golden ^^^H
, retriever who would watch the show and knew
when to start moshing.
When they're not on the road, playing former
mental institutions and satanic manors, Peace
likes to get in at least one show a month around the
Lower Mainland, preferably at one of the underground venues that have mostly been shut down
now. They're currently looking forward to their
next show on May 12 at The Anza Club with Eating
6ut, who drummer Dembicki also plays for.
"We just finished recording a new album actually," Willock recalls, seemingly out ofthe blue.
When asked to describe what the new LP sounds
like, everyone struggles to form a fair representation of what to expect. Mayer is the first to admit
defeat, "It's kind of funny trying to describe an
album in words." But what fans can look forward
to is tighter songwriting, more ofa standout persona throughout the tracks, as well as an overall
"simpler" feel. The current title is The World is Too
Much With Us, a conscious shout-out to English
Romantic poet William Wordsworth.
When the future of Peace is brought up at the
end ofthe interview, an air of uncertainty takes
over. Aside from finding a label to adopt their
new album, playing a few festivals this summer,
and hopefully doing some more touring, the road
ahead is unclear. "We don'treallyknowwhatwe're
doing," Geddes admits, "but we hope it's good.
That's always been the goal."
Peace perform at The Anza Club on
May 12 with Eating Out, The Gay '90s,
and The Fight. r
photo by KARIKLEINMANN
photo by FLIP SANDY
WD
lettering by
WEED
A year ago, interviewing Weed would have meant a one-on-
one with Will Anderson and his tape deck, when the name
was applied to his d.i.y. solo cassettes. Today, he's flanked
by Kevin Doherty (second guitar), Hugo Noriega (bass) and
Bobby Siadat (drums), who have melded Weed into an epic
lo-fi, guitar-sludge quartet Anderson couldn't be happier about the change. I'm catching them at Budgie's
Burritos as they prepare to release their new EP, Gun Control, next month. The excitement of going on tour
to support it is bursting from their collective seams, and the conversation is a reminder that underneath
the grabby moniker is a band with serious ethos.
by FRASER
DOBBS
photo by
MELANIE COLES Discorder: This will be the second record you've
pressed to vinyl as opposed to releasing on tape.
Will Anderson: Yeah,With Drug/Eighty was
the first. We self-released it I came up with this
dumb phrase, "Cruising USA" and I decided that's
a record label. CUS-02 is With Drug/Eighty, Gun
Control will be CUS-03.
You toured for With Drug/Eighty through die west
coast and die mid-west, and you are touring for
this release all the way to the east coast Not many
bands here do that Why are you doing it where
others aren't?
WA: I have to ask why other bands don't tour.
Hugo Noriega: Ifs scary playing outside of your
town. Locally, all bands have connections.
What was your connection to die cities you've
. toured to, like Portland or Seattle?
WA: We didn't have any. Our first show in Seattle
was a disaster. The first show in a new city is never
good. There were three people there, but we met
them and talked to them and they helped us get
our next show there.
Bobby Siadat: We met a girl from Baltimore.
We're going through there but we didn't have
anything scheduled. She knew all these people
and places to play.
WA: A big point for us is traveling. That's what
it's all about
BS: Being on the road is super sweet It's the best
way to travel. I couldn't see a more fun time, being
together and traveling around. More bands need
to get down with that
Kevin Doherty: Ifs an excuse to go places, and
it's an inherendy social environment
HN: We've got rules for interactions, though. like,
don't talk to Will after shows sometimes. Just
leave him alone.
WA; Especially when we play with bands that I
really respect, I just feel unworthy. And I just like
to go into the van and sit by myself for a bit
HN; One time, in Olympia, after a show in an old
youth insane asylum, Will didn't talk to anyone
for three hours.
There's a significantly different sound in your
older tapes than on the two new records you've
released on vinyl. Why is that?
WA: Before those, it was just solo experimentation.
It was about me getting something on tape, I didn't
know what I was doing. Still don't really.
How does it feel playing with a band after those
releases?
WA: Way more satisfying. Ifs what I really wanted
in the first place. All my friends were in bands
and I asked "why don't they ask me to be in any
bands?" and so, fuck it I'll do my own tape. What
I really wanted was to have a band to go on tour
with, and now we have that. There'll be a day
where I want to do more stuff by myself, but not
for a long time.
Despite keeping the same name, do these new
releases feel like they're by the same band?
WA: No. I would have changed the name ifl didn't
thinkitwas the most brilliant name of all time. It's
totally different now.
You've got to be the least-Googleable band in
history. Why "Weed?"
WA: Well, ifs easy to remember. It attracts a lot
of attention,'for sure. The word weed, when you
say it out loud you think of one thing. But it can
mean to weed something out of your life. Ifs also
something that won't die, thafs resilient.
KD: I think we like the sensationalist aspect of it
too. It gets attention.
Weed records are incredibly lo-fi. Why?
KD? Ifs more ofa means thing. The last record
sounded great but we recorded it in Seattle.
WA: We knew this one was going to be a little
harrier. We could have recorded in a studio again,
but there was something important in having us
do almost everything.
HN: It was a completely conscious decision. We
wanted to do it ourselves.
KD: Chris Gilling [a friend of the band] recorded
everything and did a lot ofthe mixing too, along
with me. If my part was anything, itwas to muck
up the.recordings a little. Chris got everything
sounding crispy.
The list of venues you've played at is eclectic:
cramped house shows, even more cramped art
spaces, and the like. Is there a reason for that?
WA: We'll only play shows open to minors. It
forces us to be creative aboutwhere we play. There
are a very limited amount of all-ages venues in
town. I think that music is for everyone: it wasn't
that long ago that I couldn't go to shows unless I
had a fake ID. Like there's a magic age where you
can drink alcohol, so now you can enjoy music?
I'm not trying to say our band is inspiring to kids
or anything, but a lot of kids can be inspired by
bands when they're 15,16 years old. Ifs really
convenient to just play bars—to tour the bars of
America. We won't do that
Weed lack ojf their tour at The Lion's Den, May 3. BRASSTRONAUT
byJONi
MCKERVEY
photos by
VICTORIA JOHNSON
illustration by
BRENNAN KELLY
Late on a Thursday evening, hunkered down in a
basement jam space crammed end-to-end with
sparkly drum kits and vintage synthesizers and
covered floor to ceiling in cheap but lush-looking Persian carpeting, Brasstronaut embody the
calm in the eye of the storm. The big storm is the
impending May 15 release of their second full-
length album, Mean Sun, which heralds a cross-
Canada tour and revving up their promotional
media machine.
But there is also a storm within a storm, a
whirlwind of online debate and acrimony sparked
by a contentious op-ed piece printed in the Georgia
Straight that week. The article attacked bands who
pursue crowdsourced funding for albums and
tours through sites like Kickstarter and Indiegogo,
and author Michael Mann, uses Brasstronaut as
an offensive example of what he refers to as "panhandling online." The band is not shying away
from the discussion.
Earlier in the day before meeting, Tariq Hus-
sain (lap steel, guitar) met with Mann in the CBC
studios for a live discussion on the radio show On
the Coast. Rather than fueling the fires
of recrimination, Hussain left the show
feeling positive. "You touch a nerve
when you talk about arts funding," he
says. "This particular article [in the
Georgia Straight] is a little bit acerbic, but if you
look beyond that there are probably a lot of people
who have the same questions, so ifs good to have
a discussion about it."
The "it" in general is the growing practice Of
bands raising money by asking for direct contributions from their fans, which has become increasingly common since the launch of websites like
Kickstarter. Specifically, the "if that got them
entangled in the debate is the Indiegogo campaign that the band set up early in April. Having
been turned down for a FACTOR recording grant
twice, and without the backing ofa record label to
pay for Mean Sun , Brasstronaut went ahead and
recorded it anyway. The album has been recorded,
mixed and mastered, and is ready to see the light
of day, so the band has set out to raise $15,000 by
May 3 to fund the production and promotion of
Mean Sun, as well as the aforementioned Canadian
tour. Admitting to some initial reservations about
asking the public for money—"we did it kind of
as a last resort," comments Edo Van Breeman
(keyboards, vocals)—the band, however, is feeling
good despite the negative press. "Since we started,
ifs been amazing," reflects John Walsh (double
bass, electric bass, guitar). "We reached almost
half our goal in the first ten days. People really like
it. They can be part ofthe process, and they are
actually helping out a band that they like." Brennan Kelly, "Brasstronaut11, ink on paper, 9" x 6", 2012
"The campaign's been such a positive experience in a lot ofways," agrees Samuel Davidson
(EWI, clarinet). "Ifs an innovative way of fund-
raising. Ifs not total charity. We're offering limited edition, autographed copies of albums. You
know, we're making it special. People are really
encouraging and really happy to help out and it
seems like we're building an identity with our fans
more through it"
Fans and finances aside, writing and recording their sophomore album precipitated some
new experiences for the band internally as well.
The process they underwent making 2010's Mt
Chimaera, their first full-length album, was protracted and fragmented; new band members—
Hussain and Davidson, whom the rest ofthe band
met during their residency at the Banff Centre in
2009—joined partway through the initial recordings, which were later torn apart and reworked
back in Vancouver over several months. Mean Sun,
on the other hand, was birched rather seamlessly.
"It was written within a month, basically," recounts
Van Breeman, "and then we went into the studio
weeks later."
"In a way, it feels like our first record," Walsh
says. Everyone present nods in agreement
"I think this is the first truly collective work the
band has put out" adds Brennan Saul (percussion).
"If 8 our first full-blown collective sound."
That sound is a spacious, soft, whooshing kind
of pop music, a sound that is inviting and intimate,
a little bit tripped out and saturated with melancholy. The tide track on Mean Sun, exemplary if not
a little more down-tempo than most songs on the
album, is the sound ofa break-up in outer space,
of Le Petite Prince wandering his barren asteroid
after his rose has lied to him. The rest ofthe album
takes that sound and applies it to varying degrees,
dialing up the pulse of optimism here, like on
opener "Bounce," and blanketing you with stars
there; cue the heavily filtered horns and distorted
synths on "The Grove." Overall, the greater cohesion ofthe band shines through on this effort and
fosters its rather polished sound.
In the past Brasstronaut has been somewhat
at odds with the labels the press has given it At
least a handful of articles from the last couple of
years quote Van Breeman's protest that "we're not
a jazz band," a term easily reached for perhaps
due to their employment of Davidson's clarinet
and Bryan Davies (not present at the interview)
trumpet When asked how they are resolving the
gap between the music they think they're making
and the way it is communicated by journalists and
critics, the band is almost blase*.
"Ifs resolving itself by us not caring anymore,"
asserts Davidson. "People call it whatever they call
it and we just make whatever music we make."
Noting some groups that spring to mind,
Van Breeman discusses the ever more common
reality of bands having a myriad of contrasting
influences, resulting in genre-blending sounds
that defy categorization. "Like Grimes," he says.
"Whaf s Grimes?" (According to Pitchfork she's "airy
post-Internet cyber-pop." Obviously.)
Unconcerned with the "this band meets this
band meets this band" comparisons on the horizon, Brasstronaut are in rolled-up sleeves work-
mode, preparing for a busy year of touring and figuring out how to get the attention of as many fans
and potential fans as possible. The band recendy
launched a new website with a blog designed to
keep listeners informed of their activities and
whereabouts, and they are making forays into the
usual social media suspects.
"We've been, uh, 'twitting'," admits Van Breeman. " [We realized] that if people really love the
music, how do you reach them?" he says of their
commitment to connecting to and communicating with their audience. "How do you keep reaching them?"
To a man, the band seems preoccupied with
finding a way forward, a way to keep going despite
the hurdles facing independent bands these days,
such as a lack of label support, dwindling public
funds, and all that free mp3 downloading people do.
"We have fun playing. Thank God," says
Davidson.
Besides $15,000, what more could you
ask for? lot, jthu mJ& o$ 3tL
photo by JONATHAN DY
photo by DANIEL THOMAS WILLIAMS
Standing inside River Vintage during the seventh
edition ofthe singer/songwriter event For the Sake
ofthe Song Sundays (FSSS), I whisper to my friend
. until the crowd's stirring settles and heavy silence
stares me down. In the upper right-hand corner of
the room, above the little stage, a picture of wild
horses resembling those on Bob Segerfs "Against
the Wind" is stuck to the wall. With a plastic sheen
and uneven wooden frame, the image hangs like
an enlarged postage stamp. And, as Rich Hope
sits humbly on stage, he sincerely delivers blues
tunes to the audience. Prior to Hope, local talent
Katelyn Molgard addressed the audience; her head
occassionally falling forward, catching on hanging
cords, her voice wonderfully riveted and chipped.
Molgard's sharp blues were then followed by a
sunnier second act as Vancouver musicians, Shawn
Hall and Matthew Rogers ofthe Harpoonist& The
Axe Murderer effectively coordinate harmonica
and guitar notes into dynamic and dance-worthy
roots beats. Both performances are appropriately
punctuated by friendly chatter.
Indeed, the evening was a mixture of vibrancy
and silent respect; a night of cheap beer, dancing,
singing and strumming In a room caught ramblin',
Jack Elliott style. And it continued ramblin' until
a noise complaint forced a folk fan exodus two
songs into Hope's set As the audience scattered, it
seemed like this interruption was significant like
there was suddenly a danger in this safe place. The
dreamy living room awoke, once again a venue.
A week later, I meet Bob Sumner and Elliot
Way, the duo that started FSSS, at Roundel Cafe.
Sumner, a musician from White Rock, contributes
both his last name and musical talents (guitar/
vocals) to country/folk band The Sumner Brothers,
while Way is a local musician, music organizer and
owner of The River Vintage Clothing and Musical
Instruments on Commercial Drive. Aware of their
individual endeavours, I am about to be inspired
by their collaboration.
Born out of The Classic, a similar event held by
Way in Langley, FSSS first began in August 2011.
From the beginning the shows were designed to
be heartbreaking, held on what Way describes as
the dreary "decline ofthe weekend." Named after
the Townes Van Zandt song, FSSS is a reminder
ofthe honest reverence owed to music. And this
reverence is a monthly ritual, as local and visiting
roots inspired singers/songwriters perform for
attentive fans at The River Vintage.
It might be ambitious to describe FSSS as Vancouver's version of the Jester of the Cafe Wha? but
thafs the shape Sumner and Way would like the
event to take. Sumner explains, "There's nowhere
in town that we know of, where people can sing
songs, like just good songs with just an acoustic
guitar and 50 to 80 people sit cross-legged and
listen."
"There is no escaping the power of these songs,"
and Sumner points out that for the performers,
"it'll be the best night on their tour," Way says.
But not just anyone is awarded the opportunity
to play at FSSS. The selection process aligns with
FSSS's need for what Sumner describes as, "a
strong vision," ensuring that only the strongest
folk performers, both local and out-of-town, play.
This selectivity extends even to celebrity appeal.
"We wouldn'tlet Jack Johnson play," says Sumner.
He and Way also immediately reject John Mayer,
although when asked hypothetically if they would
accept $10,000 in exchange for a performance,
they are undecided. If they did let him play though,
Way promises he would change the name ofthe
store for a day.
The heartfelt musicians who do perform at
FSSS, step on stage to inspire and step offstage
to be inspired. Sumner and Way carefully align
musicians with complementary sounds, so that
when the lineup is arranged, excitement builds,
"thinking about each one of them hearing each by ALEX
DE BOER
other. And when this leads to friendship and collaboration, we call that community."
Sumner emphasizes the significance of this by
drawing on his own experience. After performing
as a band for seven years alongside many other
bands, some they liked, some they didn't, Sumner
admits that the band "always felt like an island."
He continues, explaining how Way came along
and "almost overnight it feels like we're part ofa
community that all care about each other and are
all working towards a goal together, which is the
only way a music scene can really be successful."
Way casually receives the praise by suggesting, "I
just want to listen to good music and be around
good people," but Sumner quickly adds, "ifs not
like Elliot has ever made a single penny from any
show he's ever promoted." And this comment
puts us back on track.
Entrance to FSSS is free and beers are served
for a. three dollar donation, which prompts me
to ask if this cheapness articulates to the audience that FSSS is wholeheartedly about the music.
Sumner and Way nod that this is the case. Way
elaborates, "music fans and musicians aren't rich
people so why make it about capital?" The two are
determined to keep the night free, reminding me
that they've always made enough in beer sales and
entrance donations to pay the musicians well. The
space is, however, financially sustained by its day
job as a vintage clothing store, prompting Sumner
to explain the ugly reality that "if we wanted to
charge people five bucks then we would probably
have a third ofthe turn out" It is the grim tru± that'
living in the most expensive city in North America,
where clubs on Granville Street thrive and Don- ,
nelly pubs are always full, "five bucks stops people
from coming to see amazing music."
Nevertheless, FSSS exists, carried on the backs
of two fans who are breaking down the barriers
between audience, performer, and venue, creating a community grounded in good music. And
despite the darkness cast by financial burdens in a
city where music venues struggle to maintain their
integrity, Way reminds me that it all comes down to
the honesty ofa song. "Thafs what if s all about"
And before departing the cafe we open our fortune
cookies. Way's fortune reads, "Your kindness will
lead you to success." A welcome thought, though
his passion is what I would bet on.
5£>
FIVESIXTY
560 Seymour Street
Friday May 4th    CIRQUE w/ Radio Javan Launch
Saturday May 5th    PONI w/ Bearacuda
■ Vancouver's premiere gay night
Wednesday May 9th    BIG EZAY i n Taste Lounge, Killer APP
Collective & Michael Kushnir
free before 11, $5 after
Thursday May 10th    Too High Crew, Tre Nyce,
Lanse Base & Jay Worthy
Friday May 11th    MSH PRESENTS Sub Antix
Saturday May 12th    PONI w/ Jerica Jem
Wednesday May 16th    BIG EZAY i n Taste Lounge w/ Junita Werk,
Pony boy and Michael Kushnir
free before 11, $5 after
Thursday May 17th   Vancouver 80's Rock Reunion
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+ SHAHdjs & Vincent Parker
Saturday May 19th    PONI w/ Peter Rauhofer.
Sunday May 20th    HARD PARTY, XTRA PRESENTS
Wednesday May 23rd    BIG EZAY in TASTE Lounge  •
w/ Kevin Quinian + Surprise Guest
free before 11, $5 after
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Supercassette, Young Liars, Mercy Years,
The Magician & The Gates of Love
Friday May 25th    CIRQUE w/ TIGER AND THE WOODS
+ Luke Mckeehan, Woodhead,
Joel Armstrong & PK
Saturday May 26th    PONI w/ ADAM DREADDY
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doors at 9pm, free before 11, $5 after
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& Beastie
Thursday June 7th     TOPLESS GAY LOVE TEKNO PARTY
Presented by the Georgia Straight
www.fivesixty.ca
wfaceboofccbm^lVESIXTY -  www.twltter.com/FIVESIXTYtjdk -  www.youtube.com/FIVESIXTYtalk
I* Y D L**
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British pop music from all decades.
International   pop   (Japanese,
French, Swedish, British, US, etc.),
'60s soundtracks and lounge.
QUEER FM ARTS XTRA
(TaW6-8pm
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian,
bisexual and transexual communities of Vancouver. Lots of human
interest features, background on
current issues and great music.
queerfmradio@gmail.com
RHYnHKINDM
(World) i-9pm
Alternating Sundays
Featuring a wide range of music
from India, including popular
music from the 1930s to the present; Ghazals and Bhajans, Qaw-
walis, pop and regional language
numbers.
(Dance) Worn
Alternating Sundays
A mix of the latest house music,
tech-house,   prog-house   and
techno.
(Dance/Electronic) 9-10pm
TRANCENDANCE
(Dance) 10pm-12am
Hosted by dj Smiley Mike and dj
Caddys hack, Trancendance has
been broadcasting from Vancouver, BC since 2001. We favour
Psytrance, Hard Trance and Epic
Trance, but also play Acid Trance,
Deep Trance, Hard Dance and even
some Breakbeat. We also love a
good Classic Trance Anthem, especially if it's remixed. Current influences include Sander van Doom,
Gareth Emery, Nick Sentience,
Ovnimoon, Ace Ventura, Save the
Robot, Liquid Soul and Astrix. Older
influences include Union Jack,
Carl Cox, Christopher Lawrence,
Whoop! Records, Tidy Trax, Plati-
pus Records and Nukleuz. Email:
djsmileymike ©trancendance.net.
Website: www.trancendance.net.
SO SALACIOUS
(Electro/Hip Hop) 12am-130am
Skadz and Sprocket Doyle bring you
Electro Swing, Alternative Hip Hop,
Dubstep, Acid Jazz, Trip Hop, Local
and Canadian Content-good and
dirty beats.
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
(Eclectic) %-Uam
Your   favourite    Brownsters,
James and Peter, offer a savoury
blend of the familiar and exotic
in a blend of aural delights.
breakfastwiththebrowns@hotmail.
com
^fsSCEWGDRivE
fS/ra;ilam-12pm
SYN C H RO NIC ITTY
(TaflU12-l:00pm
Join host Marie B and discuss spirituality, health and feeling good.
Tune in and tap into good vibrations
that help you remember why you're
here: to have fun!
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
(Cinematic) 7:30-9pm
Join gak as he explores music from \
the movies, tunes from television ;
and any other cinematic source, j
along with atmospheric pieces, cut- |
ting edge new tracks and strange .
old goodies that could be used in
a soundtrack to be.
PARTS UNKNOWN
(Pop) l-3pm
An indie pop show since 1999, it's
like a marshmallow sandwich: soft
and sweet and best enjoyed when
poked with a stick and held close
to a fire.
NEWS 101
(Eclectic) 4-5pm
Explore the avant-garde world of
music with host Robyn Jacob on
the Rib. From new electronic and'
experimental music to improvised
jazz and new classical! So weird it
will blow your mind!
NEWS 101
(7aW5-6pm
Vancouver's only live, volunteer-
produced, student and community
newscast. Every week, we take
a look back at the week's local,
national and international news,
as seen from a fully independent
media perspective.
SORETHROATS, CLAPPING HANDS
(Rogue Folk, Indie S/S) 6-7:30pm
Lyric Driven Campfire Inspired:
Playing Acoustic Punk, Anti-Folk,
Alt-Country, etc. Tune in for live
acts, ticket giveaways and interviews, but mostly it's just music.
Submit tOi music@sorethroat-
sclappinghands.com. Find us on
Facebookl
THE JAZZ SHOW
(7azz^9pm-12am
Vancouver's longest running prime-
time jazz program. Hosted by Gavin
Walker. Features at 11pm. May 7: i
"In Orbit": Trumpeter/composer
Clark Terry with Thelonious Monk
in a rare appearance as a sideman.
May 14: "Bags Meets Wes" a clas-
sic meeting of Milt Jackson (vibes)
and Wes Montgomery (guitar).
May 21: "Kenton atTheTropicana"
The Stan Kenton Orchestra. May 28: '
Victoria-born bassist Neil Swainson
with Woody Shaw (trumpet) and :
Joe Henderson (tenor saxophone)! :
"49th Parallel".
CANADA POST-ROCK
(Rock) 12-l:00am
Formerly on CKXU, Canada Post- ;
Rock now resides on the west coast
but it's still committed to the best |
in post-rock, drone, ambient,
experimental, noise and basically
anything your host Pbone can put !
the word "post" in front of.
PACIFIC PICKIN'
(Roots) 6-8am
Bluegrass,   old-time   music, ;
and its derivatives with Arthur I
and the lovely Andrea Berman. !
pacificpickin@yahoo.com
QUEER FM ACTS XTR*
(TaW9:30-10:30am
supWrlq?
(Eclectic) 10:30-ll:30am
Fuzzy and sweet, a total treat! Tune I
in to hear the latest and greatest j
tracks from independentand Van-
couver bands.
MORNING AFTER SHOW
(Eclectic) U-Mam-lpm
An eclectic mix of Canadian indie I
with rock, experimental, world, reg-
gae, punk and ska from Canada, \
Latin America and Europe. Hosted
by Oswaldo Perez Cabrera.
IMMERiSfSSEY""
(Folk/Experimental) lpm-2pm
A source text for where sonic experi- j
mentation meets the folk tradition. ]
Attention to d.i.y culture, http:// ;
nohats.tumblr.com/
uvTnliEioiF~
(World) 2-3pm
Sample the various flavours of
Italian folk music from north to |
south, traditional to modern on
this bilingual show. givetheboot® •]
gmail.com < httpuVgiveemtheboot.
wordpress.com
PROF TALK EXTRAENVIRONMENTALIST
(Talk) 3-3-.30pm \  (Talk) 2-3pm
Bringing UBC's professors on airto \ Exploring the mindset of an out-
talk about current/past events at     sider looking in on Earth. Featuring
the local and international level, i interviews with leading thinkers in
Aiming to provide a space for fac- j the area of sustainable economics
ulty and doctoral level students to : and our global ecological crisis,
engage in dialogue and share their     M*iiTi«"rjjiiHilii?T
current research.http://ubcproftalk.     ^L,/C
wordpress.com • proftalk@gmail. i !=^LI™	
com ARTS REPORT
RADIO FREETHWKER  ;  .(5?*?!^ _	
(7aW3:30-4:30pm j  REEL TO REAL
Promoting skepticism, critical ■  (7a//rJ 6-6:30pm
thinking and science, we examine     Alternating Wednesdays
popular extraordinary claims and ' Movie reviews and criticism.
subject them to critical analysis.       D|SC0RDER RADIO
THE CITY (7a//o>6-6:30pm
(Talk)5-6pm ! Alternating Wednesdays
An alternative and critical look j  Discorder Magazine now has its
at our changing urban spaces,     own radio show! Join us to hear
www.thecityfm.wordpress.com.     excerpts of interviews, reviews
Follow the program on Twitter:     and more!
®Ih!?50n?rI!:      SAMSfflMNrtHiHIDDilff"""
FLEX YOUR HEAD (Eclectic) 6:30-8pm
(Hardcore) 6-8pm ■ Alternating Wednesdays
Punkrockand hardcore since 1989.     All-Canadian music with a focus
Bands and guests from around the     on indie-rock/pop. anitabinder®
world. ; hotmail.com
INSIDE Wit j  SHAMELESS
(Dance) 8-9pm j  (Eclectic) 6:30-8pm
riistfsTSriwiirc  ' Alternating Wednesdays
/w n Ln. q i ;" I W'cated to giving local music
rri^«Snn«flanMiii mm       acts a crackat some airplay. When
c^^™™s?*™^™.. j notplayingthePRshtick,J,ucan
CABARADIO ! hear some faves you never knew
C7aWllpm-12:30am | you liked.
For the world of Cabaret. Tune in for     folk OASIS
interviews, skits, musical guests ■  «h). 1fl
and —■«. Radio with sass! , <™s  of  eclectic folk/
roots   music,   with   a   big
emphasis on our local scene. C'mon
SUBURBANI lU1t6IJE 'n' ^ kumbaya-free zone since
(Eclectic) 8-10am l997.foltoa5is@gmail.com	
Live from the Jungle Room, join radio     SEXY II WW CITY
host Jack Velvet for an eclectic mix of     (Talk) 10-1 lpm
music, sound bites, information and     Your weekly dose of education
mam^djejackvelve^net and entertainment in the'realm
POP DRONES °* relationsniPs and sexuality,
ffc*c«W10-ll:30am sexyinvancrry.com/category/sexy-
 .....  ! in-vancity-radio
Various members of the CiTR's     (Hm Kloss) llpm-hm
student executive sit in and host i ?Tf* much the ^ thm« on
this blend of music and banter     '
about campus and community
news, arts and pop culture. Drop
ins welcome!
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
TERRY PROJECT PODCAST
(Talk) 1-2 pm
Alternating Wednesdays
There once was a project named
Terry, That wanted to make people
wary, Of things going on In the world
that are wrong without making it all
seem too scary.
(Talk) l-2pm
Alternating Wednesdays
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
{Talk) i-lOam
RELENTLESSLY AWESOME
llam-12pm
Vancouver's got a fever, and the only
prescription is CiTR's "Relentlessly
Awesome." Each and every week,
Jason attempts to offer adrenaline-
pumping, heart-stopping, hands-
over-the-eyes suspense. He is a fan
of various genres, and a supporter
of local music, DUNCAN'S DONUTS
Eclectic) 12-lpm
Sweet treats from the pop underground. Hosted by Duncan, sponsored by donuts. http://duncans
donuts.wordpress.com
weaITfalldIown
(Punk) l-2pm
Punk rock, indie pop and whatever
else I deem worthy. Hosted by a
closet nerd, www.weallfalldown-
citr.b
INK STUDS
(Talk) 2-3pm
Underground and indie comix. Each
week, we interview a different creator to get their unique perspective
on comix and discuss their upcoming works.
THUNDERBiRDEYE
(Sports) 3.30-Apm
Your weekly roundup of UBC Thunderbird sports action from on campus and off with your host Wilson
Wong.
MANTRA
(Eclectic) 4-5 pm
Playing various Mantra music, this
show is about personal and global
transformation through chanting
and utilizing sound vibration for the
development of higher consciousness. Hosted by Raghunath with
special guests.
BUTTA ON THE BREAD
(Eclectic) 5-6 pm
It's like mixing unicorn blood with
Christopher Walken's tears, and
then pouring it into your ears.
AREYOUAWARE
(Eclectic) Alternating Thursdays
6-7:30pm
Celebrating the message behind
the music: Profiling music and
musicians that take the route of
positive action over apathy.
PEANUTBUTTERI'N'JAMS
(Eclectic) Alternating Thursdays
6-7:30pm
Explore local music and food with i
your hosts, Brenda and Jordie. You'll !
hear interviews and reviews on eats
and tunes from your neighbourhood, ]
and a weekly pairing for your date '
calendar.
STEREOS!^
(Experimental) 7:30-9pm
RADIO HELL
(Live Music) 9-1 lpm
Featuring live band(s) every week ;
performing in the CiTR Lounge. Most ;
are from Vancouver, but sometimes |
bands from across the country and j
around the world.
rhythm and blues to the golden age
of motown, to contemporary dance
remixes of classic soul hits.
AURAL TENTACLES
(Eclectic) 12-6am
It Gould be global, trance, spoken
word, rock, the unusual and the
weird, or it could be something
different. Hosted by DJ Pierre.
auraltentacles@hotmail.com
beginner's show It Ain't Easy Being
Green! With the support of experienced programmers, this show
offers fully-trained CiTR members,
especially students, the opportunity
to get their feet wet on the air.
HUGO
(Eclectic) l-2pm
Alternating Fridays
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
(Punk) 12-lpm
On the air since 2002,
playing old and new punk on the
non commercial side of the spectrum. Hosts:-Aaron Brown, Jeff
"The Foat" Kraft. Website: www.
generationannihilation.com
and www.facebook.com/genera-
tionannihilation"
FRIDAY SUNRISE
(Eclectic) 7:30-9am
An eclectic mix of indie rock, hip-
hop and reggae to bring you up with
the sun.
ALTERNATivE RADio
(7a//r;9-10:00am
Hosted by David Barsamian.
SOUNDS OF THE CITY
(Eclectic) 10-11 am
Promoting upcoming live concerts
and shows in Vancouver, be they
local, national, or international
acts.
RADIO ZERO
(Zte/?o?;2-3:30pm
An international mix of super-
fresh weekend party jams from
New Wave to foreign electro, baile,
Bollywood and whatever else.
www.radiozero.com
FUNK MY LIFE
(Soul/Dance) llpm-12am
Grooving out tunes with a bit of soul
and a lot of funk, from the birth of
WnM
STEREO BLUES
(Blues/Eclectic) llam-12pm
Every Friday host Dorothy Neufeld
sinks into blues, garage and rock
n' roll goodies!
rTAMTEAWBEM^
(Eclectic)12-lpm
CiTR has revived it's long-dormant
&)1>)!IM!M£
mmm
I WOULD LIKE
D an annual subscription
to Discorder magazine.
($20 for Canadians, $25
for OS subscribers)
□ to support Discorder
magazine vM^M-y-i
donation of;
Discorder is Vancouver's longest
running independent music magazine.
Show your support for Vancouver's
independent music community and the
developpp^^feew writers, editors,
jflpgners and artists. Sign-dw have
Discorde/ delivered to your door!*
Fill-out this forrji and mail-in cash or a
^'ilpque to:
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NARDWUAR
(Nardwuar) 3-.30-5pm
Join Nardwuar the Human Serviette for Clam Chowder flavoured
entertainment. Doot doola doot
doo...doot doo! nardwuar®
nardwuar.com
NEWsibi
(TaW5-6pm
See Monday for description.
SnUNDED
(Eclectic) 6-7:30pm
Join your host Matthew for a weekly
mix of exciting sounds, past and
present, from his Australian homeland. And journey with him as he
features fresh tunes and explores
the alternative musical heritage
of Canada.
AFRICAN RHYHMS
WW7:30-9pm
www.africanrhythmsradio.com
THE BASSMENT
(Dance/Electronic) 9-10:30pm
The Bassment is Vancouver's only
bass-driven radio show, playing
Glitch, Dubstep, Drum and Bass,
Ghetto Funk, Crunk, Breaks and UK
Funky, while focusing on Canadian
talent and highlighting Vancouver
DJs, producers and the parties they
throw.
(Industrial) 12-4am
Industrial, electro, noise, experimental and synth-based music.
thevampiresball@gmail.com the-
vampiresballoncitr.com
SATURDAY
THE SATURDAY EDGE
(7?o0fsJ8am-12pm
A personal guide to world and roots
music—with African, Latin and
European music in the first half,
followed by Celtic, blues, songwriters, Cajun and whatever else fits!
3C.com
POWER CHORD
(Metal) l-3pm
Vancouver's longest running metal
show. If you're into music that's
on the heavier/darker side of the
spectrum, then you'll like it. Sonic
assault provided by Geoff, Marcia
and Andy.
CODEBLUE
(Roots) 3-5pm
From backwoods delta low-down
slide to urban harp honks, blues
and blues roots with your hosts
Jim, Andy and Paul, codeblue®
buddy-system.org
TWEWR^iilREZSHOW
(World) 5-6pm
The best of mix of Latin American
music, leoramirez@canada.com
NASHAVbLNA
(World) S-Tpm
News, arts, entertainment and
music for the Russian community,
local and abroad, nashavolna.ca
NORWEGIANWOOD
(World/Eclectic) 1'-8pm
Catch the authentic, fragile,
hardcore, chill, up-beat, progressive, and low key tunes of Norway,
Sweden, Denmark, Finland and
Iceland.
MORE THAN HUMAN
(Electronic/Experimental) 8-9pm
Strange and wonderful electronic
sounds from the past, present and
future with host Gareth Moses.
Music from parallel worlds.
STIU^SANDWTCH
(Dance/Electronic) 9-1 lpm
If you like everything from electro/
techfte/trance/8-bit music/retro
'80s this is the show for you!
www.synapticsandwich.net
RANDOPHONIC
(Eclectic) 11pm- lam
Randophonic is best thought of as
an intraversal jukebox programmed
by a vast alien living intelligence
system which has no concept of
genre, style, nation states or even
space-time relevance. ART PROJECT
MARK
DELONG
Colored Egg
Paint and resin on ceramic
19" x 12"
2011
Untitled
Ceramic, plaster, paint, glaze, and resin
25" x 25" x 25"
2011
Mark DeLong, born 1978 in New Brunswick, is a self taught
artist working in a variety of mediums including drawing,
painting, sculpture and video. His work has been displayed at
Colette, Paris; Bee Studios, Tokyo; Spencer-Brownstone Gallery,
New York; Museum Of Contemporary Canadian Art, Toronto
and LES Gallery, Vancouver. Delong has collaborated with
artists Paul Butler, Jason McLean, Jacob Gleeson, and Geoffrey
Farmer. DeLong currently lives and works in Vancouver. Jf,r
Uki
mm
1
m^3
A |     %^—
1
MARK
DELONG IS?
W
STUDIO Untitled
Acrylic on canvas
40" x 36"-42.5" x 55" (diptych)
2012
Thanksgiving
Oil on canvas
14" x 12"
2012
In the Country Untitled
Acrylic on canvas Ceramic and glaze
54"x42" 19" x 16" x 16"
2012 2012 UNDER REVIEW     MAY 2012
TOUGH LOVERS
(Independent)
In an effort to distinguish themselves
from the overcrowded marketplace
of west coast rock'n'roll, the second
release from Vancouver's Tough Lovers is a rustic blend of ethereal
harmonies and powerful solos.
Though Good Morning was independently produced, you'd never
guess it by the youthful energy
replicated in the five new songs
from these Vancouverites that
both celebrate and deprecate.
Through the confusion of heartache and frustration, Tough Lovers have evolved beyond their
earlier self to produce a suc-
■ cinct EP whose forlorn verses
seamlessly transform into dignified
proclamations of empowerment.
Juxtaposing these common themes,
Jamie Smail leads the energetic quartet through another concise collection
of captivating choruses and rhythm
sections that should make any young
upstarts envious.
For having five songs that run just
under twenty minutes, Good Morning
draws from a remarkable number of
influences. The disco beat of "Surrounded" elaborates on the catchier
synth-driven "Jennifer" from 2011's
Exits, while the harmless daydreaming
of "Before the Sun Sets" catches the
band in their most straightforward
pop moment, proving that Tough
Lovers find inspiration in a variety
of genres and should be treated as
more than just a simple rock'n'roll
outfit
Surprisingly, Smail also brandishes his darker side on the ominous lyrics of "Inside My Head,"
sjnging: "The reaper knows your
name / And he knows your situation
/ Don't you cry / He knows just where
you're living / And what cigarettes
you're smoking," before closing with
"Graveyards," which shows that this
band can turn up the volume (and
fuzz) when they want While the distinctions are nuanced, Good Morning
manages to adapt a variety of genres
to that of their traditional rock origins
to form an endearing album that will
leave you surprisingly satisfied in the
time it takes you to enjoy your morning coffee.
—Robert Catherall
want is blood," paint an image ofa
backwards and disintegrating world.
Sebastian Fleet lends his soft vocals
but avoids a generic indie-folk tone
by delivering interesting phrasing and
SEBASTIAN FLEET +
COUNT OAK
(Kingfisher Bluez)
Toronto artists Sebastian Fleet and
Count Oak team up for a 7" release
on Vancouver label, Kingfisher Bluez.
The two singer/songwriters tout a
similar bleak and mournful- vibe
with their respective solo projects.
Together the sound is no different,
as they create an ambitious melange
of folk and ambient music.
"Drowning" instantly grabs the
listener with its blunt juxtaposition
of folky acoustic guitars against
weirdo sci-fi filters and effects. The
odd mixture feels both surreal and
earthy which caters to the song's
sometimes dystopic lyrics. Lines like,
"Chocolate drops and rainbow can-'
dies are falling from the sky/ All you
memorable lyrics. The haunting outro
with the chanting lyrics, "You've been
infected now," is creepily catchy and,
indeed, infectious.
The B-side, "Fishing" is less
experimental and opens with an
intricate and jazzy acoustic riff that's
close to something in the likes ofjose'
Gonzalez. Again, the lyrics are bleak
and abstract but help create the song's
haunting and calming quality. There
is another dose ofthe experimental
with the use of an echo-y stomp that
sounds like a door slamming.
The psych-folk tendencies on
Sebastian Fleet + Count Oak's first
7" display the band's already unique
and distinctive sound, something
difficult to claim in a day and age of
pastiche and revivals. A full-length
album is slated for release later this
year and it will be interesting to see
if Sebastian Fleet + Count Oak can
retain their much-acclaimed originality. With the official album title, 0 Sun
of Muddled Mind and Distant Space, it
seems-like they will.
—Angela Yen
TWIN RIVER
(Light Organ)
Folk. Indie. Pop. Psych. Those four
words pretty much sum up Twin
River, a band formed in the summer
of 2009. Core members Courtney
Ewan and Andy Bishop have chemistry that they've developed playing in  ;
a few local bands that seem to prefer
nature-themed names, like Red Cedar
and White Ash Falls.
The first two songs on Rough   j
Gold, "Can't Keep This Alive"   ;
and "Feather," have beautifully  j
intertwining melodies, while the  \
closing track, "Family Tree," is
lyrically deep and vivid. These
are fairly mature songwriters, and the sound Twin River
is going for is nostalgic, as if
looking back to the golden age
of psych-folk. Yet somehow it
still sounds totally modern.
The EP's downfall is the
sound levels. Bishop's endlessly
noodling guitar is too far in the foreground. It would be listenable, even
enjoyable, if it wasn't all you heard.
The sound levels, and to a lesser
extent the arrangements, make the
ideas here seem like they're not fully
realized.
Hopefully Ewan and Bishop's next
work will have their lovely lyrics and
melodies presented in the best way
possible. There is serious potential
here.
—Jeremy Stothers
WHITE LUNG
(Deranged)
In a recent interview with Exclaim,
White Lung frontwoman Mish Way
says their new record Sorry is a more
melodic venture for the Vancouver
weird-punk foursome, and that
there are distinct possibilities of fan alienation. Having wowed audiences
across the country and beyond with
their 2010 full length debut, Ifs The
Evil, there has certainly been some
anticipation building for the next
chapter. That said, if there are any
self-professed White Lung fans out
there that can't get behind this latest
output, they may need their hearing
and/or attitudes checked.
Sorry definitely has a few more
melodic parts and the band's creative growth can be heard, but on
the whole it is still a freight train
of an album, blistering through ten
tracks in less than twenty minutes.
The heart-rate scarcely has time to
drop for the duration ofthe record
as one ripper blends into the next,
from the opening charge of "I Take
the Mirror," to the heavy dead stop of
closer, "Dead Beat"
The aforementioned melody
doesn't seem at all out of place within
the chaps around it, and is easily heard
in the almost Bif Naked harmonies on
"Bag," and Kenny McCorkell's shimmering, creepy breakdown on "St
Dad." Aside from these slight ventures outside their normal repertoire,
it is business as usual for White Lung.
Way yells and wails over McCorkell's
frantically strummed chords and the
rock solid rhythm section of Grady
Mackintosh on bass and Anne-Marie
Vassilou on drums.
Perhaps contributing to the overall speed and intensity ofthe record
was the triple-session process by
which it was recorded. But even if
the songs were rushed in studio,
they don't sound rushed; rather, they
sound focused. There is not an ounce
of fat on this record. And if there is
any alienation caused by the melodic
inclusions, Pm sure Sony's producer
and former d.b.s. member Jesse Gander would agree: expectations are for
the old. White Lung is back. Get into
it Vancouver!
—Coleman Ingram
HERMETIC
(Independent)
Vancouver's Eric Axen and Bart Newman keep their racket on post-punk-
pop sealed tightly on Hermetic's
latest release Civilized City. A guitar/
drums duo, Hermetic is less inspired
by the blues-rock of the White Stripes
and Black Keys, and are more influenced by sweet-tooth post-hardcore
groups like Jawbreaker and Mission
to Burma.
Axen and Newman squeeze everything they can out of their instruments to fill in the negative space
around their songs, adding a touch
of harmonica or strings here and
there for flavour.
Axen flashes between fuzzed-out
melodic riffing and distorted strumming best demonstrated on "You
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Can't Go Home Again" and "Sunday Best" All the while, Newman's
busy, yet still toe-tapping, beats
perfectly complement the angular
guitar parts.
Civilized City's all liberal arts lyrics are sweetly sung in an upper register, gliding over jagged melodies on
Axen's baritone guitar on tracks like
"Nixon Song" and "Revenge Comedy." Axen and Newman's voices
blend seamlessly, often sounding like
two Morrisseys sans the caterwauling
and posturing.
The award for best patriotic shout-
out on the album goes to "Preventative Arrest," for the line "I shared my
lunch with the Canada goose today/
So tame that it never thought once
about trying to fly away." That song,
along with the title track and "Curmudgeons Club," may be familiar
to those who are lucky enough to
own Hermetic's split EP with Plus
Perfect. These well-worn tunes
make a triumphant return on this
full-length, featuring tweaked production and tighter, more confident
performances.
This two-man group's powers are
fully on display on "Expatriate Act"
the album's strongest track, which
rides a gently bouncy melody to a
quietly anthemic conclusion, feeling
simultaneously personal and global,
proving big statements can come in
small packages.
—Brent Mattson
RODNEY DECROO
(Barge)
"And when he looks down, a sparrow is nesting as if in the crook of
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»I#<#*IS* BEATROUTE a tree...Its high, sweet trilling goes
out among the sleeping passengers,
drawing each breath into its praise.
My father knows he is as much this
song as anything else in his life." So
begins Rodney DeCroo's dreamlike
journey into the spoken word genre,
surely one ofthe more challenging
styles of music for a wide audience
to appreciate. DeCroo however, a
prolific Vancouver-based musician
and writer, foregoes any doubt and
throws himself into the abyss, notebook in hand.
Allegheny, his sixth album, and
first foray into the realm of spoken
word, recounts a deeply existential
and personal path through DeCroo's
grey and green-toned youth, which
he spent, growing up in rural Pennsylvania along the apparently putrid
cavity ofthe Allegheny River.
Blended with deeply brooding
music produced by Robert Malow-
any, the album is somehow sparse
and bleak, yet rich and warm.
DeCroo's eloquent but stark prose is
lyrical, and serves as the linchpin that
holds the whole escapade together,
flowing in angular but lucid passages and backed by the constant
ominous pounding of synths, guitars and distorted horns.
Allegheny's drama unfolds in
scenes set under overcast skies and
within the murky flow ofthe river
itself, as DeCroo manipulates the
mood with his haunting narrative,
expounding events occurring either
in the past or as imagined outcomes.
The sentiments are frequently dark,
but quickly become touching near
the end ofthe album, at the drop ofa
mayonnaise jar filled with fireflies on
"The Lightning Catcher," simultaneously releasing much ofthe Steadily
building tension.
The even, nasal timbre of
DeCroo's voice complements the
moods ofthe album beautifully, and
the instruments twist around his
gnarled landscapes as he presents
a bleak vision of his past that serves
as "an uneasy reminder ofthe river's
phlegmy, dark green clutch."
Allegheny is a gorgeously lush
and intensely captivating piece of
work.
—Jordan Ardanaz
ISOTOPES
(Independent)
For those that aren't aware, the Isotopes really love baseball. It is a love
that is most likely on par with their
admiration for Ramones-sounding
bubblegum-punk. On their fourth
and latest EP, Blood Diamond, the
Vancouver/Louisville-based group
bring out another few slices of baseball-laden punk-rock just in time
for summer.
EP opener "Rule 21" is a fast-
paced chanter about a disgraced
player subjected to the major league
misconduct rule, while "Operation:
Vamos" is a mid-tempo tune regarding the kidnapping of Washington
Nationals player Wilson Ramos.
They wrap up the under-five-minute long EP with a camp rendition
of "Take Me Out to the Ballgame,"
causing one to wonder how it took
them so damn long to get around
to covering it.
Whether or not you actually
know anything about baseball, all
you need is a set of ears to get your
feet tapping along (just don't let the
band know; you're likely to get called
a "rookie wimp" and doused in chew
spit). And though the songs are all
catchy, Blood Diamond barely leaves
the listener with enough content to
sink their teeth into. Previous EPs
like Cuban Missile and Heatseeker
have twice the material on them and
don't dedicate one-third of the con-
mum mum
tent to a cheesy and obvious cover.
So if Blood Diamond leaves your reservoir of baseball trivia dry, there's
always the older material. And as for
the band, there's always next season
for chapter five which will hopefully
see them play a few extra innings.
Good game Isotopes.
—Coleman Ingram
LIQUOR KINGS
100 PROOF ROCK AND ROLI
(Wax Records)
Here is solid proof that you're never
too old to rock. All it takes is guts,
passion and unwillingness to give
up on the good life. Mix that with
some well-utilized dirty chords and
a beat and you have yourself a heck
ofa rock album. 100 Proof Rock and
Roll sounds like a true labour of love,
and the Liquor Kings aren't ones to
hold back. From start to finish it's
a whisky-soaked romp with no day-
after regrets.
Eddy Dutchman leads this pack
of seasoned toughs with a voice that
comes on like a blues-and-booze-
fueled fireball. He's enabled on
either side by guitars that sound
like revved up hot rod engines and
backup vocals that stand nose
to nose with any young ham-
and-egger from today's generation. Drummer Terry Russell is
an impressive timekeeper and
pulls out some nasty tricks
behind the kit without being
a showboat while bassist Ed
Hurrell keeps it greasy and
smooth.
■J "Give the Devil His Due" and
"A Day Late and a Dollar Short,"
are wild tunes, vaguely reminiscent
of Danzig, that got me stomping
while "Kicking the Shit Outta Love"
brought a smile to my face.
ioo Proof is a rowdy blues-
infused rock and roll record that will
make you want to throw down your
fists and get your skank on. Even if
Liquor Kings were to remain a bar
band for the long haul, they'd be the
baddest damned bar band this side
ofthe border.
—Nathan Pike
BUCKMANCOE
BY THE MOUNTAIN'S FEET
(Buckmon Coe Music)
It is important to note, when introducing Vancouver-based yogi and
folk artist Buckman Coe, that the
term "yogi" should take first position. The singer-songwriter's latest
release, By the Mountain's Feet, is one
ofthe most optimistic albums I've
heard in some time, laden with the
personifying, loving, at-one-
with-the-earth type of language
that one would come across in
any yoga studio. But this isn't
to suggest that Coe is some
sort of contrived act or incapable artist. In fact, his message of unity and simplicity is
delivered quite naturally, and
simple associations with the
likes of Ben Harper won't do
him justice.
Nevertheless, the album
isn't devoid of aggravated undertones. On tracks such as "The
Apocalypse is Not Guaranteed"
and "Paranoia," Coe's frustration
with the mishandling ofthe world
is evident. On "Paranoia" he sings, "Oil spills are the price of their greed/
They are selling arms to watch both
sides bleed." There is a mood of
lamentation in the album's second
half, apparent in tracks such as
"Brother" and "Leaving Samsara."
But his soothing vocals maintained
throughout can only be imagined as
sung with a smile on his face.
Diverse musical arrangements
and intricacies complete the album;
Coe's skills on guitar are on display,
along with an impressive backing
band complete with a range of percussion, keyboards, mandolin, banjo,
violin, cello and even a mandotar.
Coe's album is steeped in nature,
lamenting today's sorrows while
hoping for tomorrow. It's put best
on "Promise," when he sings: "Truly
great humanity/ If we look inside
we will find it." Coe should have a
future in North America's folk scene
if this album is any indication of his
potential. For now, it's a good dose
of optimism for those rainy Vancouver days.
—Andy Resto
CHILDSPLAY
(Independent)
Old farts that don't believe the kids
have what it takes to make good punk
music can officially choke on their
words. The average age of Vancouver's Childsplay couldn't be much
more than legal drinking age, yet
they're rocking harder and making
more accessible punk music than
some punkers who have been at it
for years.
Righteous Rampage, the band's
second release, is a straight-up tra
ditional no frills punk record, and
a huge achievement for a group so
young. Raw, raging and in-touch,
Childsplay guns their motors and
has a whole lifetime ahead to hone
their craft.
Vocalist Jaden Faber's voice is ±e
perfect combination of snot-nosed
brat and viciousness that can only get
more gruff and compelling with age.
The guitar/drum/bass combo is perfectly loud, clean and well executed,
. but has plenty of room to grow. With
none ofRighteous Rampage's breakneck tunes clocking in at much more
two and a half minutes, Childsplay
effectively get the job done. The rapid
pace of "Hey!" grabs your attention,
"It's All Lies" is a perfect grimey
romp, and the band's ferocious cover
of "Iron Man" is anything but filler.
Smart-assed and wise beyond
their years, Childsplay sounds like
a band that is refusing to do what
they're told or how to do it This fresh
blood is exactly what the punk scene
seems to need right now.
—Nathan Pike
THE GEESE
(Independent)
The Geese's debut album is an engaging and diverse effort that sounds like
the collaborative work ofa tightly
functioning unit The shifting roles of
each ofthe band members throughout
the album are evident as every track
bares its own unique character.
Heralding what the Geese have
coined "West Coast Danger Folk,"
the record begins with a stunning
string instrumental, "The Genera
tor." This heartbreaking theatrical i
piece sets a high bar for the listener's  I
expectations, which are consistently j
satisfied by the first half of the record.  ;
One ofthe album's many high- !
lights is "Omnibot" a playful  [
tune in which singer Zoe Fitch  j
plays the role ofa robot sent to '
observe the decay of Earth. The I
song details how Omnibot 563
flees its overbearing superiors
in order to live in the woods .It's
simultaneously humorous and
inventive.
Throughout the album, the
Geese keep their sound varied
and engaging, while still work- ,
ing within many ofthe parameters of.
the folk genre. "Cola Cans" features a
melancholic disco swing beat while
"Lille Gard" sees the band reprising the moving strings of "The
Generator" in the chorus for a dramatic effect These are among many
inspired deviations from folk formula
that combined with a near perfect
production, set the Geese apart from
many of their contemporaries.
So, whatever the heck "West Coast
Danger Folk" is, ifs creative, compelling and unique.
—James Olson
w
Black Hen Music r,   2jj   -  ,
at the Electric Owl
^Presented with: |Q CAPILANO ^SsrJ^SSSZSSZ.
Wgmg u n 1 vustrr   Centre for the Performing Art:
STEPHEN FEARING
"Fearina's music crackles with ideas and collaborative energy.^
masterful guitar work nam acoustic rock rhythm to elegant fingersfyie.
-Acoustic Guitar Magazine
Sunday, May 27
Doors - 6PMI Show - 8PM
Tickets $23 (advance), $25 (door)
Available at 604.9trO.78lO
and capilanou.ca/nscucentre
A different artist each month playing with L_
Steve DaWSOn and the Black Hen House Band.
3 Main St. | Vancouver, BC MYTHS
photo by
ASHLEELUK
J TRUST/MYTHS
■ April 14 • The Electric Owl
■This past Saturday presented both
la gift and a curse to the patrons of
I Main Street's Electric Owl—the early
■show. There seems nothing more
■ daunting to a young Vancouverite
I than arriving at any venue before n
I p.m., so itwas surprising that there
I was a crowd milling about by 9 p.m.
■The double bill of local electronic
I opera pioneers Myths and Toronto's
I depressing yet danceable three-piece
■Trust seemed like a sure bet With
■enough '80s synth riffs and fat bass
I beats, we would be just drunk enough
I to dance by the n p.m. curfew, so
■help us.
"This is supposed to be a sea
landscape set" was one ofthe first
things Myths said to the crowd, and
these strange words were some of
the last intelligible ones heard for the
remainder of their set The duo shimmered in sequins, cooed, screeched,
and looped riffs with aplomb, but
few seemed ready for such a aural
onslaught The only people visibly
into the Myths set were Myths themselves.
The draw ofthe night was Trust
and their delivery ofthe short and
tight set was flawless, with little
crowd interaction to suck up time I
between tracks. Composed of lead I
singer Robert Alfons on vocals, Maya I
Postepski (also of Austra) on drums, I
and a "friend" on synths, their vibe I
is gothic yet danceable, Joy Division I
meets Hot Chip.
"Bulbform" set the stage for eerie I
beats to infect your system before bigger hits like "Candy Walls" got the I
crowd bopping, and "F.T.F."' closed!
the show to a veritable dance party.
Why or how doom and gloom I
electro, this goth-rave music, is on I
the rise is anyone's guess. What is I
known is that these Canadian purveyors ofthe sound are delivering it in I
quantity and quality, and the Electric I
Owl has come into its own, turning I
the dreaded early show into a Saturday night success.
—Grace McRae-Okine
DAMIEN JURADO /
PETER WOLF CRIER
April 18-The Biltmore
Itwas a day of blue sky, budding
leaves and bright sun soon to button down with bleeding hearts at the
Biltmore Cabaret As Townes Van
Zandt's "Waiting Around to Die"
played dirge-like over the speakers, the curtains pulled back from the stylish stage to reveal Peter Wolf
Crier, a go-getting two-piece from
Minneapolis.
Hyping their recent sophomore
Jagjaguar release, Garden of Arms,
Peter Pisano (guitar, vocals) and
Brian Moen (drums) caused quite a
ruckus for two rather unassuming
dudes. With flair and brio abounding, the boys quickly won over the
crowd, their pluck and performance
quite infectious.
As Moen playfully pounded out his
affections on the drums and Pisano,
like his namesake suggests, cried out
his predilection, there was a wistful,
earnest and totally cathartic batch of
tunes. Fans of John Vanderslice and
Pedro the Lion take note; these lads
have a similar indie aesthetic that's
as perceptive as it is wry, rockin' and
fast paced.
There was a quick turnover before
the headliners took the stage, where
it was hard not to notice the excited
rabble sporting a wealth of beards
and plaid. Fitting, as Seattle-based
Damien Jurado and his first-rate
band stormed the stage. His five-
piece assembled, the beard/no-beard
ratio on the stage was four to one.
But whisker worries soon fell by the
wayside as Jurado's intense brand of
urban folk mesmerized the room on
a dime.
Visiting tracks across his
impressive catalogue ofa dozen or
so releases, with a particular focus
on his excellent new Maraqopa LP,
Jurado surrendered his gentle gifts
with balance and dedication. "Everyone a Star" reached pastoral peaks,
summoning a Paul Simon sparkle,
followed by "Working Titles" where
choral arrangements and haunting
harmonies played with religious
severity.
At one point, during a trembling
rendition of "Sheets," Jurado twisted
on the floor, howling with ecclesiastical, revival-like intensity that was
like some land of sorcery. Jurado
gave a great show, one that both his
bearded brethren and fledgling fans
could completely cherish.
—Shane Scott-Travis
PORCELAIN RAFT/
IN MEDIAS RES
April vj ■ The Electric Owl
It was an unfortunately rainy and
miserable night when Brooklyn's
Porcelain Raft rolled into town for a
spot at the Electric Owl. Perhaps that
was the reason the club was slightly
lacking in attendees. Or perhaps it's
that Porcelain Raft's ambient, synth -
driven full-length debut hasn't hit the
masses—yet Mauro Remiddi, the
sole musician and songwriter ofthe
"group," assembled Strange Weekend
over a few months in his basement
and has since been touring with the
likes of M83 and Youth Lagoon to
support it Now embarking on his
first headlining spot, he brought
along Vancouver locals In Medias
Res to brighten ±e dreary eve.
In Medias Res, which usually perform as a quartet was down to a one-
man show, of Andrew Lee (vocals/guitar) . He played a mellow, expectantly
\ stripped-down set starting by wailing
out heavily reverberated vocals over
an equally echoing pedal steel guitar.
Switching over to an electric guitar,
i he played a number of bass pedals
with his feet on top of pulsing beats,
, managing to handle things more than
■ reasonably as a solo act.
Porcelain Raft was up next and
fired right into Strange Weekend opener
"Drifting In And Out". Remiddi took
care of most instruments including
I guitar, effects pedals and keyboards,
I and to the crowd's good fortune
brought along a live drummer, giving the atmospheric dream pop of his
album a formidable punch. The venue
; filled up considerably at this point and
even though it was still nowhere close
j to capacity, the eyes of all attending
; were glued to the stage. The captivat-
I ing duo ran through a large chunk of
Strange Weekend with tracks like the
acoustic, Brit-poppy "Shapeless &
Gone," the moody and melancholic
"Is It Too Deep For You?" and also
dipped into older tracks like "Talk to
Me" from their Gone Blind EP.
They did, however encounter some
technical difficulties, which Remiddi
attributed to "using gear from the
'70s." Thankfully sorted it out to wrap
up the set with the ludicrously catchy
"Unless You Speak From Your Heart"
which took on a slightly faster pace
and heavier thump in the live setting.
The pair exited the stage briefly before
returning for a two song encore and
then said goodnight. It was a solid
performance and I have a distinct feeling that if or when he returns, it will
be to more pairs of eagerly awaiting
ears and not likely in such an intimate
setting.
—Coleman Ingram
THE RIVER AND THE ROAD /
BEHIND SAPPHIRE/
DOGWOOD AND DAHLIA
April 14 • The Media Club
The River and The Road played a
packed show at the Media Club to
celebrate the release of their debut
self-titled album. The Vancouver
transplants, consisting of the bearded
Australian wonder Andrew Phelan on
guitar and north Vancouver Island
banjo-master Keenan Lawlor, have
been busting their asses in Vancouver
bars, up and down Granville Street
in particular, for a brief time, but
they've amassed quite the following
with their twangy folk rock and good
old boy charms.
They've made some good friends
along the way too. Opening were
Dogwood and Dahlia who took a
moment out of their set to reflect
on times playing basement shows
with Phelan and Lawlor to make rent
money. They made a great impression with their melancholy trumpet
and moody songs that evoked all the
emotion of prairie thunderstorms and
whiskey-filled hearts.
Following up were the wonderfully
loud and fun Behind Sapphire, who
strike a kind of shoegaze-screamo
balance in their music with layers
of sounds and extended riffs that
encourage heartfelt wild abandon.
Their excitement and enthusiasm
were contagious and reciprocated
in kind by the enthralled crowd, and
they struck an incredibly poignant
moment with their cover of 19th century Christian hymn "Nearer, My
God, To Thee" towards the end of
their set.
Both of the opening acts set a
high bar for The River and The Road,
who did not disappoint The already
dense crowd pushed in as close as
they could as Phelan and Lawlor took
the stage. Everyone loves a banjo, but
to incorporate it so beautifully into an
acoustic folk and rock sound is really
some±ing to behold.
Phelan and Lawlor forego any
theatrics with their music in favour
of sincere melancholic music about
loss of love on songs like "Elisabeth."
The soul and honesty evident in their
music and their performance makes
you feel instantly better about every
loss and bitter memory thatyou have,
even when they're singing about
cocaine addiction. The tempo and
excitement steadily built
They made a blues song dance
like a swing tune and escalated to a
triumphant pounding rock 'n' roll
finale that had them playing with
the crowd onstage—always with the
folky twang of Lawlor's banjo persisting. It's no wonder that they've
been embraced by Vancouver folk
fans. The River and The Road aren't
going to remain a hidden gem for
long; they're basically to folk what
the Black Keys were to blues, and it
couldn't have happened to two nicer
guys, I was totally unfamiliar with any
ofthe acts going into that night, but
I was a lifelong fan as I left.
—Tristan Kdstjer'  *
ONEOHTRIX POINT NEVER,
CONNECTICUT/POP
IDRONES / PLAYS:FOUR
April 11 • Wi Media Cafe
Trippiness is a strange musical currency; value is so often predicated on
the mind-altering substances consumed by its listeners. Having arrived
stone sober at W2 to see Oneohtrix
Point Never (Brooklyn-based Daniel
Lopatin), this reviewer admits she
was only adequately captivated by
the synaptic soundscapes on offer
Wednesday night. But as someone's
grandma might say: better to be
challenged than bored. Plays:four
was a surprise local opener. Jonathan Scherk Of 8o(sun), Sam Beatch
of Beamss and Ellis Sam of Flash
Palace hovered around an island of
laptops, samplers and effects gad-
getry plunked in the middle ofthe
W2 floor. Skittering psychedelia
floated up over ambient, sometimes
shiver-inducing bass drones. Ix>ops
veered from erratic to expansive, but
remained accessibly stimulating. The
trio's youthful chemistry was impressive, but understated.
DJ Pop Drones, a.k.a. Mark Richardson, filled the segues between sets
with a schizophrenic assortment of
electronica and found vinyl. Video
artist Merlyn Chipman built an analog j
feedback loop at the back ofthe room,
where hand-waves across a toaster-  '
sized television screen would produce  |
kaleidoscopic blooms on four or five
gigantic screens. Singeing fluores-  \
cents writhed at the edges, destabiliz-  |
ing the few recognizable samples in  ;
the music mix.
UK ex-pat Samuel Macklin per- i
formed next as Connecticut — a
similarly drone-centric noise project.
While all the openers were expertly
selected for a Oneohtrix Point Never
gig, this third session felt repetitive
and caricatured, like a live-action animated gif. Anticipating the satisfying
familiarity of Oneohtrix PointNever's
Replica and Returnal, I found it difficult
to tuck in and contemplate Macklin's
artistry.    .;^^
Closer to midnight, the much-
awaited laptop wizard Lopatin took
the mic and matter-of-factly told
someone in the crowd to fuck off.
Maybe it was his mood, or maybe
it was just a safe assumption that
a majority of attendees were noise
heads—either way, Lopatin launched
into the more ragged bits of his early
work, relying on frequent bursts of
noise and feedback.
Looking at my notes, I saw phrases
like "crash-landed chopper" and
"caustic drudgery (in a good way?)."
During the lighter bits I thought ofthe
year Justice was popular (remember
2003?) or when videogames were still
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ricepaper in two dimensions and emitted cutesy
gun sounds. More organic moments
approached an uncalculated Black
Dice jam, while other chunks commanded patience. As some strange
Russian-looking hieroglyphs rotated
on the screens behind him, Lopatin
shook his head while diving further
into acidic territory.
Lopatin's album tracks already
invoke a certain element of anxiety
and alienation, but in a live setting
this is a constant top-of-mind affront
I didn't feel that magnetic sense of
nostalgia until he knowingly dropped
the track "Sleep Dealer" much later
in the set
While there was a certain rawness to seeing Lopatin do his thing
in person, the minimal setup nearly
thieved the mystery of his signature
spacey transmissions. At least for
this reviewer, Oneohtrix Point Never
is better experienced through headphones. I left feeling excited for whatever Playsrfour is up to next.
—Sarah Berman
Browse
3,000
Local &
Independent
Bands in the
CiTR
sponsored
Vancouver
Band
Directory
Find it at:
ANDREW BIRD/
LAURA MARLING
April 10-TheVbflue
Shows at the Vogue always include
extensive preamble; the pre-show
drinks, the line-up, the seat grab,
the hour wait the random opener
and excessive line check, all with an
encore finishing at the clock strike
of eleven when the union hands go
home. However, there is no venue
more enjoyable for seeing a great artist with a great view and great sound
in a plush chair until the fans rush the
stage and obstruct the perfect view.
Laura Marling, songstress from
the UK, opened, filling the single
spotlight with her low contralto voice.
This slight blond in shapeless black
showed remarkable dexterity on the
guitar, channeling folk singers of
old hke Joan Baez and Joni Mitchell. The crowd was silent, listening
to the songs of varying styles and
temperaments and the slight hint
ofa British vowel at the end ofthe
phrase. Her rich, clear storytelling
voice sang song after song in minor
key with audience enthralled.
Brightly lit, the stage featured
a scattering of instruments with
DNA-esque swirl sculptures
hanging from the rafters and a
double-horned gramophone at
the back. Andrew Bird appeared
lonesome, a toqued troubadour
with his violin. Creating layer
upon layer and manipulating
each with shoe taps on pedals, Bird filled the theatre with
sound all on his own.
His backup band acted
as a rhythm section, playing
around the edges and drawing on calypso rhythms. These
jazz influences lent the tone of
steel drums to the plucking of
the violin. Swaying like a pixie
with half-closed eyes, Bird was
captivated by ±e music, his full
concentration on his mastery of
layers. Although his banter was
slight the intimate bluegrass
set mid-show created a needed
change of pace, with bandmates
crowded around an old school
microphone on acoustic guitar
and stand-up bass.
These stripped down soulful
tunes, and a cover ofthe Handsome
Family's "Drunk By Noon," were
the highlights ofthe show. Showcasing songs off recent and past
albums, Bird delighted his fans with
his incredible violin chops and mad
whistling skills.
—Brenda Grunau
DAMO SUZUKI /3-D FEST
April i- The Waldorf
Damo Suzuki entered the Waldorf at
an amble, an unassuming middle-
aged Japanese man clad in sensible
clothes and a backpack. His entry
bore no relation to his performance;
the ex-singer of acclaimed krautrock
band Can whipped through a free-
form set backed by Vancouver band
Von Bingen.
Standing centre stage, Suzuki
gripped the microphone with both
hands and then shunt into it for each
lyric, and phrase, a strange snap and
relax that carried through the whole
set Lights flickered and ebbed from
green to blue to red,
punctuating the performance which had
few breaks between
"songs."
Since Suzuki left
Can in 1973, his performances have all fallen
under the banner of
Damo Suzuki's Network, where "sound
carriers"   improvise
a set with him. Von
Bingen followed in the footsteps of
Broken Social Scene, Acid Mothers
Temple, and Omar Rodriguez Lopez,
among others.
Their backing was at times rhythmic and driving, the beginning ofthe
concert highly structured with only
some electronic manipulation that
pushed the music away from straight
rock. Later it drifted more, allowing
Suzuki's space to break into snippets
of old blues songs and sometimes
allowing the audience space to whoop
and clap. For the most part, though,
much ofthe audience stood stock
still regardless ofthe tempo, per
haps trying to drink in the presence
of one greatest alternative singers of
the 1970s.
Some of the most interesting
moments from the band came when
the guitarists began manipulating
synthesizers and electronics, applying
dissonance and off-rhythmic phrases
that complemented Suzuki's singing style.
However, the backing was usually fairly restrained in its workings,
always leaving space for Suzuki to take
centre stage. Even when the music
could be a weird approximation of nu-
metal, with Suzuki's bark emulating
rap, there was a measure of control
to the proceedings.
Although this probably wouldn't
rank up there with some of his most
glittering collaborations, there was
probably enough intrigue to do the
man justice. And at the very least you
would be hard pressed to predict just
what would be the next bark, holler, or
croon to come out of his mouth.
—Rowan Coupland
NvATRON
SATURDAY JUNE 2ND, 2012-8PM AT
LITTLE MOUNTAIN GALLERY
195EAST26TH AVENUE, VANCOUVER B.C.
LEM0UNTAINGALLERY.COM MAY 3RD-MAY 5TH
CD RELEASE SHOW
W/Guests:
{YOUNG PACIFIC 1
W00LW0RM  J
May 3rd //8pm//7$ //The Cobalt
'^"<$w& £®(^a,s?;
mon
COBALT ANNIVERSARY WEEKEND
PRESENTED IN
PART BY:
JCiTR
BANDS
WANTED
B«VAM«THBCOBALTXA
OTHER UPCOMING EVENTS INCLUDE:
DIE MANNEQUIN
TOUR
SD   {
FOR MORE INFO VISIT US AT:
I ©THECOBALTMAINST
ITHECOBALT - 917 MAIN STREET
WWW.THECOBALT.CA  Am^wsII^vA^^wA,
intra, interview
and photo by
CHIRAG MAHAJAN
illustration by
MICHAEL LEE
If you could talk to Oker Chen long enough, he
would gladly walk you through the entire history
of dance music. Starting with some of his favorites, hke soulful house and funky hip-hop, you
might be surprised to hear about the interesting
and unexpected connections that modern genres
have with soul, funk, swing, motown, doo-wop,
disco and hip-hop. He'd even explain how these
styles originated and adapted from the blues, jazz,
and gospel music. His DJ training classes at CiTR
must be quite a learning experience.
His show, Funk My Life, has been on CiTR's
airwaves since 2010, and has since aired countless
soul and funk originals and boodegs, mash-ups and
re-rubs, dubs and remixes (and only a DJ could tell
you what the difference between each one was). But
despite the possibly infinite differences between
these rhythms and styles, Chen tells me there is
always one quality that connects every track: each
one has a bit of'soul'. Thatword can mean awhole
lot of things, so I had to ask him what he meant
Discorder: What does "soul" mean to you?
Oker Chen: These days, recorded music is mostly
manipulated, highly controlled and non-spontaneous, so it's hard to say that it comes from the heart
Soul is a quality of vocality where you feel the sounds
coming from the heart. The sounds seem like they
are being squeezed and extracted as genuine and
sometimes uncomfortable emotion. What I love
about music is when producers can integrate that
emotion into something danceable, because it feels
authentic and meaningful. You can tell how the
sound flows with who you are. But the biggest way I
can recognize soul is through the track's optimism;
on trying to look at the brighter side of life.
When did your interest in soul and funk begin?
Honestly, I did not have much ofa music background until I came to Vancouver. One ofthe first
parties I went to here was Mod Night Fridays at
Lotus, before it became Retro Vinyl. That was really
fun to go to in those days. I didn't realize how
upbeat soul could be. From there I started checking
out all these older compilations of Aretha Franklin,
Diana Ross & the Supremes, the Commodores, and
all those golden era chart-topping soul classics.
And things just went from there.
What is the format of Funk Mu Life?
The show is all about remixed funk and remixed
soul. I mix together different funk and soul remixes
made by often-times unknown producers, especially bedroom DJs with a web audience. They take
samples from older tracks and usually mix them
within a funky dance beat On the show, I also talk
about music history and how certain tracks relate to
vintage music. People can hardly believe the tracks I
play were originally soul tracks that have now been
adapted to the modern music scene.
What has been your most memorable on-air moment?
I once had a show on drum and bass remixes of soul
tracks. D&B is a genre few people associate with
soul, but it actually comes from the U.K., where
their music history was strongly influenced by the
upbeat style of Northern soul. When Motown and
soul started dying out in the U.S. in favor of disco,
the U.K. was still into that old style. The beat and
style in songs, like "Hit The Road Jack" by Ray
Charles, were precursors to D&B. And when DJs
mix in their D&B bass-lines, melodic synths and
break-beats, both these styles flow together very
naturally. That's how this sub-genre was slowly able
to incorporate those soulful vintage vocals.
If you could play only one track to destroy the
dance-floor, which track would you pick?
I'd pick the Jade remix of "Misirlou" by Dick Dale.
This is a D&B remix of Dale's cover, which was
used as a soundtrack in the movie Pulp Fiction. For
a house crowd, I'd play Wicked Lester's remix "Gay
With an E," which is a funk remix ofMarvin Gaye's
"Ain't No Mountain High Enough."
What is your favorite CiTR radio show, apart from
your own?
Trancendance. The show's mixed really well.
What does the future hold for Funk My Life?
I would love to have an event that showcases the
talents of bedroom DJs who do incredible remixes
of soul tracks but rarely get publicity. And remixing
is still in its infancy; there are a lot of possibilities
for all those untouched tracks out there. My show
is all about taking funk and soul to higher, unexpected places, so I'll always try to make sure that
my tracks have that certain funkiness to them. And
soul, of course. //CiTR 101.9 FM CHARTS
STRICTLY THE DOPEST HITZ OF APRIL
.___#	
 ARTIST	
ALBUM	
LABEL
■''-'■'# %
ARTIST
 ALBUM
LABEL	
1
Grimes*
Visions
Arbutus
26
Bleating Hearts**
Bleating Hearts
Self-Released
2
Black Mountain**
Year Zero
Jagjaguwar
27
Bend Sinister**
On My Mind
File Under: Music
(FU:M)
3
Various**
Busy Doing Nothing!
Mint
28
Watermelon /
My Friend Wallis**
Watermelon /
My Friend Wallis 7" Split
Student Loan
4
Real Boys**
Real Boys
Self-Released
29
Maqlu**
Black. Blood. Haze
Self-Released
5
Chromatics
Kill For Love
Italians Do It Better
30
Trampled By Turtles
Stars and Satellites
Six Shooter
5
Chris-A-Riffic*+
Bible Beats
Self-Released
31
Babysitter/Korean
Gut**
Babysitter/Korean
Gut Split
Self-Released
7
Trust*
TRST
Arts & Crafts
32
Bear In Heaven
1 Love You, Its Cool
Dead Oceans
8
Great Lake
Swimmers*
New Wild Everywhere
Nettwerk
33
Art Kenyon**
Cocoon
Self-Released
9
TOPS*
Tender Opposites
Arbutus
34
Nite Jewel
One Second Of Love
Secretly Canadian
10
Various**
Team Mint 20
Mint
35
Octoberman*
Waiting In The Well
Saved By Vinyl
11
Yukon Blonde**
Tiger Talk
Dine Alone
36
Chi Sun**
Year of the Disco Tiger
Self-Released
12
Chains of Love**
Strange Grey Days
Dine Alone
37
Les Momies Oe
Palerme*
Brulez ce coeur
Constellation
13
The Ketamines*
Spaced Out
Mammoth Cave
38
Howler
America Wake Up
Rough Trade
14
Phedre*
Phedre
Daps
39
VCMG
Ssss
Mute
15
Weed**
Gun Control
Cruising USA
40
B.A. Johnston*
Hi Dudes
Mammoth Cave
16
Hunx
Hairdresser Blues
Hardly Art
41
Tanlines
Mixed Emotions
True Panther
17
Grass Widow
Internal Logic
HLR
42
Zeus*
Busting Visions
Arts & Crafts
18
Cousins*
The Palm At The End
Of The Mind
Saved By Vinyl
43
Cuff The Duke*
In Our Time
Paper Bag
19
Tennis
Young and Old
Fat Possum
44
Leonard Cohen*
Old ideas
Sony
20
The Ramblin1
Ambassadors*
Ramble On
Mint
45
THEESatisfaction
awE naturalE
Sub Pop
21
La Sera
Sees The Light
Hardly Art
46
Vulgar, you*
Fais-moi cuire
fais-moijouir
Self-Released
22
Cold Warps*
Cold Warps/
Endless Bummer
Noyes
47
The Shins
Port Of Morrow
Columbia
23
Mad Bomber
Society*
Butchers, Stompers &
Cheats
Self-Released
48
Eamon McGrath*
Young Canadians
White Whale
24
Wintermitts**
Oceans
Self-Released
49
Wax Idols
No Future
HoZac
25
The Mallard
Yes In Blood
Castleface
50
The Albertans**
The Hunter
Ernest Jenning
CiTR's charts reflect what's been played on the air by CiTR's lovely DJs last month. Records with asterisks (*) are Canadian and those marked (+) are local.
Most of these excellent albums can be found at fine independent music stores across Vancouver. If you can't find them, give CiTR's music coordinator a shout
at (604) 822-8733. Her name is Sarah Cordingley. If you ask nicely she'll tell you how to find them. Check out other great campus/community radio charts at
www.earshot-online.com. VINTAGE SOUND AT ZULU
Ditch your hard drive, ear buds, and wizard playlists and start a real
listening experience at Zulu!
¥e carry an amazing selection of VINTAGE turntables, amps, and
speakers!
*AH brands... Sansui, Dual, Technics, Sony, Pioneer, Marantz, Kenwood,
Wharfdale, Boston Acoustics... warm sound and super cool!
Plus all the records you ever dreamed of!!
These titles Just in... CHECK WWW.ZULURECORDS.COM for a constant
update of new arrivals!
THE ROLLING STONES
OUT OF OUR HEADS
ORIGINAL UK MONO PRESSING.
JEFFERSON AIRPLANE
' gJSS rrs POINTED LITTLE head
ORIGINAL CANADIAN PRESSING.
GREAT SHAPE.
CHET BAKER
ONCE UPON A SUMMERTIME
1980 US PRESSING. GREAT SHAPE.
LENNY BRUCE
IM NOT A NUT, ELECT ME!
US PRESSING. GREAT SHAPE.
JAMES BROWN
I GOT YOU (I FEEL GOOD)
ORIGINAL CANADIAN PRESSING.
RAY CHARLES
THE GENIUS HITS THE ROAD
ORIGINAL CANADIAN PRESSING.
^REAT SHAPE.
VARIOUS-ARTISTS
VANCOUVER COMPLICATION
. 1979 VANCOUVER RELEASE.
COMPILATION OF CLASSIC
VANCOUVER PUNK!
SOUNDTRACK / HANK WILLIAMS
YOUR CHEATIN HEART
OLDER CANADIAN PRESSING.
CONNIE FRANCIS
. COUNTRY WESTERN & GOLDEN HITS
ORIGINAL PRESSING. GREAT SHAPE.
JAMES BROWN
PLAYS NEW BREED
CANADIAN PRESSING. ON SMASH
RECORDS. GOOD SHAPE.
MILLIE JACKSON
FOR MEN ONLY
1980 US PRESSING.
RUSTY WARREN
SIN-SATIONAL
SEALED.
RUSTY WARREN
IN ORBIT
60'S PRESSING, ON JUBILEE.
WALTER CARLOS
SONIC SEASONINGS
70'S US PRESSING. 2LP GATEFOLD
COVER W/POSTER.
STOMPIN'TOM CONNORS
ORIGINAL CANADIAN PRESSING.
1967 CANADIAN PRESSING.
THE LORDS
LIKE A VIRGIN
1985 UK PRESSING.
LEON RUSSELL & MARC BENN0
ASYLUM CHOIR
ORIGINAL 1972 PRESSING.
GATEFOLD COVER.
BOB DYLAN
DESIRE
70'S SPANISH PRESSING.
W INNER SLEEVE & INSERT.
PINK FLOYD
THE WALL
GERMAN PRESSING. W/ INNER
SLEEVES & GATEFOLD COVER.
GREAT SHAPE!
PINK FLOYD
DARK SIDE OF THE MOON
70S SPANISH PRESSING.
W/GATEFOLD COVER POSTERS &
STICKER.
THE KINKS
LOLA VS POWERMAN AND THE
MONEYGOROUND
70S US PRESSING. GATEFOLD
COVER. SLIGHT WARP ON RECORD.
THE REPLACEMENTS
PLEASED TO MEET ME
1987 CANADIAN PRESSING.
BILLY BRAGG
GREETINGS TO THE NEW BRUNETTE
1986 CANADIAN PRESSING.
LEONARD COHEN
SONGS OF
CANADIAN PRESSING. W/ LYRICS
INSERT.
TALKING HEADS
THIS MUST BE THE PLACE
1983 UK 12"
THE BEATLES
HEYJUDE
1970 FIRST PRESSING. 'AGAIN'.
THE BEATLES
REVOLVER
ORIGINAL UK PRESSING. SOME
MARKS. MONO.
THE BEATLES
LET IT BE
US PRESSING ON RED APPLE LABEL.
GATEFOLD COVER.
SOUNDTRACK
SON OF DRACULA
HARRY NILSSON / RINGO STARR!
DIE-GUT FOLD OUT COVER.
BYRON LEE AND THE DRAGONAIRES
WINE MISS TINY
1985 JAMAICAN PRESSING.
JIMMY SMITH
THE CAT
ON VERVE. GATEFOLD COVER.
GREAT SHAPE!
JAMES BROWN
GRITS & SOUL
ORIGINAL US PRESSING.
ON SMASH RECORDS.
JAMES BROWN
BODYHEAT
1977 MEXICAN PRESSING. NICE
SHAPE.
JAMES BROWN
SAY IT LOUD
I'M BLACK AND PROUD
ORIGINAL CANADIAN PRESSING.
SOME MARKS.
PRINCE AND THE REVOLUTION
GIRLS & BOYS
DIE CUT PICTURE DISC! WAY COOL!
THE CULT
SWEET SOUL SISTER
PICTURE DISC 12"
THE BEATLES
GET BACK JOURNALS
11 DISC BOX SET. BOOTLEG BEATLES
COMPILATION ON MULTI COLOURED
WAX!
PETER FRAMPTON
FRAMPTON COMES ALIVE
LIMITED EDITION NUMBERED
PICTURE DISC#44684. WATCH PETE
SPIN!
BEE GEES
ODESSA
ORIGINAL UK PRESSING W RED
VELVET & GOLD EMBOSSED
GATEFOLD COVER. SEXY!
BRAINSTORM
SMILE A WHILE
GERMAN PRESSING. GATEFOLD
COVER.
KAI WINDING
THE INCREDIBLE TROMBONES
US PRESSING. ON IMPULSE.
GATEFOLD COVER. GREAT SHAPE!
PERTH COUNTY CONSPIRACY
KANADA
70'S GERMAN PRESSING.
KISS
FIRST KISS LAST LICKS
LIMITED EDITION COMPILATION.
PROMOTIONAL COPY.
FRANK SINATRA
A SWINGIN'AFFAIR
60*S PRESSING. NICE SHAPE.
1977 UK PRESSING. W/INNER
SLEEVE.
THE CLASH
LONDON CALLING
CANADIAN PRESSING. 2LP
W/ INNER SLEEVES & INSERT.
THE POGUES
IF I SHOULD FALL FROM GRACE
WITH GOD
ORIGINAL UK PRESSING.
W/ INNER SLEEVE. GREAT SHAPE.
ALKOOPER
NAKED SONGS
70'S PRESSING. GATEFOLD COVER.
MARKKNOPFLER
THE INTERVIEW ALBUM
PROMO ONLY INTERVIEW ALBUM.
LEONARD COHEN
SONGS FROM A ROOM
ORIGINAL CANADIAN PRESSING.
1983 PRE CONCRETE BLONDE
RELEASE ON HAPPY HERMIT.
W/INNER SLEEVE.
JOHN COUGAR
LIMITED EDITION / PROMOTION
SPECIAL
2X12" PROMO RELEASE.
ENOCH LIGHT
SPACED OUT
BACH, BEATLES & BACHARACH
FIVE HAND REEL
FIVE HAND REEL
ORIGINAL UK PRESSING
EMERSON LAKE & PALMER
BRAIN SALAD SUGERY
70'S PRESSING W/DIE CUT FOLD
OUT COVER & POSTER.
ERIC BURDON & THE ANIMALS
LOVE IS
ORIGINAL PRESSING. 2LP
W/GATEFOLD COVER. GREAT
SHAPE.
THE BEATLES
A HARD DAYS NIGHT
OLDER UK PRESSING. NICE SHAPE.
VARIOUS ARTISTS
PEBBLES VOLUME 5
1980 PRESSING. GREAT SHAPE.
SILVERHEAD
16 AND SAVAGED
1973 US PRESSING. GREAT SHAPE.
LA ROCK.
THE BEATLES
GOLDEN SLUMBERS
12 DISC BOX SET. BOOTLEG
BEATLES COMPILATION.
twltter.com/zulurecords
t    h   Lr    facebook.com/peopIe/
raceoooK    zuluRecords-Store/680210042
tumblr.   zulurecords.tumblr.com
K£Ca7?33\
Zulu Records
1972-1976 W 4th Ave
Vancouver, BC
tel60A.738.3232
www.zulurecords.com
STORE HOURS
Mon to Wed 10:30-7:00
Thurs and Fri 10:30-9:00
Sat 9:30-6:30
Sun 12:00-6:00

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