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Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) Jul 1, 1986

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 JULY 1986 • FREE!
That Magazine from CITR fml02 cablelOO Sun.
June 29
Mon. Tues.
Wed. 30,1,2
Thurs. Fri., 3,4
Sat. 5
Sun. 6
Mm
Mon. lues. Wed.
7,8,9
Thurs. Fri. Sat.
10,11,12
Sun. 13
Mon. 14
lues. Wed. 15,16
Thurs. 17
Fri. Sat. 18,19
Sun. Mon. 20,21
tues. Wed. 22, 23
Thurs. 24
Fri. Sat. 25,26
Sun. 27
Mon. 28
CJIV Benefit with THE SUBTERRANEANS
THE BOTTOM LINE & THE ZAMBONI DRIVERS
THE STINGIN'HORNETS
JAZZMANIAN DEVILS
Cat Productions present THE WOODENTOPS
NO FUN-"Love & Music" an exploration of rock's drug
culture
THE ROCKIN'EDSELS w/guests
POISONED w/guests
TBA
B & B (Bob Bell-Barry Taylor) w/guests
from Montreal-CONDITION with Cleveland's
MY DAD IS DEAD
TBA
HOLLY ARNTZEN w/guests
TBA
from Halifax THE KILLER KLAMZ w/guests
from Toronto CHANGE OF HEART w/guests
THE YODELLS with UNDERTAKE DADDIES
TBA
From Portland THEATRE OF SHEEP w/guests
Gourmet Express - Nightly Dinner Specials 7-9 PM
Open Sundays
7 to 9 PRE-MOVIE SPECIALS • NO COVER 7 to 9 UNLESS POSTED
932 GRANVILLE ST • OPEN 7 pm TIL 2 am • 684-VENU DfcORDER
That Magazine from CITR fml02 cablelOO
July 1986 • Vol. 4/No. 6
EDITOR
Chris Dafoe
CONTRIBUTORS
Pat Carroll, Terry Walker, Steve Edge,
CD, Jacques Major, AI Thurgood, David Firman,
Ralph Synning, Kevin Smith, Reza Sara,
Laurie Mercer, Mike Harding
PHOTOS
Jim Main
CARTOONS
Rod Filbrandt, Chris Pearson, Susan
Catherine, Ian Verchere, William Thompson
COVER
Illustration — Rod Filbrandt
Colour — Dave Wilson
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Karen Shea
DESIGN
Harreson Atley
LAYOUT
Pat Carroll, Dorothy Cameron, Don Bull,
Robin Razzell, Mike Mines, Ken Jackson,
Dave Wilson, Alan Scales, Randy Iwata
CD, Karen Shea
TYPESETTING
Dena Corby, Sheila Haldane
PUBLISHER
Harreson Atley
ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE
Robin Razzell
DISTRIBUTION MANAGERS
Bill Mullan, Steve Robertson
BUSINESS MANAGER
Randy Iwata
DISCORDER, c/o CITR Radio 6138 SUB Blvd..
Vancouver, B.C., V6T 2A5. Phone (604) 228-3017.
DISCORDER Magazine is published monthly by
the Student Radio Soeiety of the University of British
Columbia (C1TR-UBC Radio).
CITR fml01.9cablel00.1 broadcasts a 49-watt signal in stereo throughout Vaneouver from Gage Towers
on the UBC campus. CITR is also available via FM
cable in Vancouver, West Vancouver, North Vancouver, Burnaby, Richmond, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam,
Port Moody, Maple Ridge and Mission.
DISCORDER circulates 15,000 tree copies. For
advertising and circulation inquiries call 228-3017 and
ask tor station manager Nancy Smith.
Twelve-month subscriptions available: $10 in Canada, $10 U.S. in the U.S.A., $15 overseas. Send cheque
or money order payable to CITR Publications.
Unsolicited manuscripts, photographs, cartoons
and graphics are welcome but they can be returned
only it' accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped
envelope. DISCORDER does not assume responsibility tor unsolicited material.
The offices of CITR and DISCORDER are located
in room 233 of the UBC's Student Union Building. For
general business inquiries or to book the CITR Mobile
Sound System call 228-3017 and ask for station
manaeer Nancv Smith. The Music Request line is
228-CITR,
IN THIS ISSUE
NIRVANA IS JUST AROUND THE CORNER
Terry Walker goes on a dream date with the
Prima Donnas of Polyester: The Crimpolines.
THE CHAMELEONS
Reza Sara opens a fetter bomb from these Manchester
reptiles.
HUNTER S. THOMPSON
Bad craziness with the Dean of Gonzo journalism.
By CD and Jacques Major.
IN EVERY ISSUE
AIRHEAD
Love Letters in the Sand.
BEHIND THE DIAL
AMARC 2 (bet you can't figure out what that means)
and coming events.
ON THE DIAL
Programming for the deprogrammed.
SPIN LIST
The essential 20 (give or take a few).
VINYL VERDICT
Jonathan Richman, Robert Wyatt, Husker Du,
Butthole Surfers...
DEMO DERBY
Local tapes harshly judged.
THE ROVING EAR
Chief Petty Fry Cook Broadway reports for duty
in the Bay Area. Tony Bennett will never be the same.
JULY
6
10
12
18
19
22
23
28
30
1986       3 "What in t
AMARC Z
July 25-29
he world
to do"
'A                Holding an
i\             international
'J           conference of
>7   community broadly casters during Expo
'  may not be the best
thing to do, but then
again, neither is Expo.
We need 350 billets
and plenty of
volunteers.
So if you've been
wondering "What in
the world to do this
summer?"
Give us a call.
mjune iy, r.uu p.m.
■ Vancouver Indian Centre Rm 107
1 7607 E. Hastings (at Commercial)
1  Amarc office   1
1  253-0427
rh8a|>
sssssssssssssssssssssss
Oh Shit! What Have We
Done Now?
Dear Sir:
The Burnaby Community
Standards Committee, at their
meeting held on 1986 May 01 we
were introduced to your magazine, which was submitted by
one of the Committee members.
Arising out of a discussion
which ensued regarding the
magazine, the following motion
was adopted.
THAT staff contact the Student
Radio Society of UBC and request   details   regarding   the
method of distribution and areas
covered in the circulation of the
magazine DISCORDER. Therefore, would you kindly provide
this information as requested.
Yours truly,
Mrs. M. Pasqua
Secretary
Community Standards Comittee
Oh boy. We figured we were in
real trouble here. Visions of piles
of Discorders going up in flames
on Boundary Road, surrounded
by fundamentalist Burquitlam
church groups carrying placards
denouncing our dear little mag as
smut. Banned. Denounced from
the pulpit. Maybe even an issue
in the next Burnaby election.
We were thrilled.
A brief phone call to M. Pasqua, however, revealed that the
concern stemmed from the use
of profanity in one of the ads in
our April issue. The members of
the Burnaby Community Standards merely wanted assurances
that our vile rag would not be
thrust at their tots by trench-
coated men standing on street
corners.
Rest easy, folks. Discorder's
only Burnaby drop-off point is at
BCIT Your children are safe.
c/o CITR Radio
6138 S.U.B. Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T 2A5
I Saw God at the Xerox
Theatre
Airhead,
I have just experienced something very enlightening to my
soul, mind and body...it's called
...Einsturzende Neubauten...I
not only watched them play their
instruments (?) but participated
and entered into their own private
world of sound...music. What
they manufacture is the very art
of noise...the art of a culture rarely seen... heard.
Their performance was very
powerful, and overwhelming...
and upon leaving one felt a
sense of being electrocuted with
the artistic creation of...Einsturzende Neubauten.
Treza D.
I'm sure it was good for them too.
Would you like a cigarette?
Airhead Plays Post Office
Dear Airhead,
If I may relay my deepest feelings towards Disturbed Young
Man  (Airhead,  June) through
you.
Dear Disturbed,
YOU DUMB SON OF A
BITCH...
Those of us young punks
who are governed by our parents
can't move into UBC to get CITR
on our radios. We should all
move into CITR range (10 feet
from the station?). We can't all fit.
The high power idea is a good
one, but until it goes through, my
radio gets CITR with an antenna
and on mono—oh well.
But YOU are a first-class
jerk. Think there are no punks in
North or West Van? Think again.
We (or most of us) can't get CITR
and want it to go high power—
SO TAKE YOUR HOLY SHIT
IDEAS AND GO TO HELL...
Love and Flowers
Scharrque
4      DISCORDER Foreign Mail
Dear Airhead,
Perhaps your mag has got further afield than Basingstoke,
Hamshire, England, but maybe
not quite so regularly. After studying several of your issues, I'll
give you an Englishman's point
of view, if you're interested.
In my opinion, one of the
most important functions of any
new-wave mag is to inform, on
events, arts, etc., and especially
music. To this end, I find your
Vinyl Verdict rather a letdown.
Your writers don't seem to actually analyse the music recorded on
the LPs; instead, they always
seem to concentrate on a potted
history of the band in question
(i.e. the B.A.D. review in your
March issue.) Not one clear-cut
reference to music.
I'm not suggesting you carry
out a marketing exercise to try
and sell the records, but at least
give the prospective punters
some idea on what they might be
buying.
On the whole I find Discorder
a refreshing publication, although, obviously, due to the
physical distance, I do find some
of the articles a little difficult to
relate to (CITR Radio, etc.)
Reading the "Roving Ear of
Emma Peel" in London was
quite interesting, I never thought
of Camden Town as the cultural
centre of London, but opinions
differ. It is true, the Ballroom is
at the forefront of the alternative
scene, but I feel her portrayal of
leather-clad punks leading the
way to be a little simplistic. True,
that is one aspect of the London
music scene, if you care to take
that approach, but there are so
many more diverse things going
on at the moment. There has
been an incredible surge in the
appearance of one-off nightclubs
such as Raw in Tottenham Court
Road or there is the better-
known Fridge in Brixton, the
Apollo (as mentioned) and even
the Camden Palace on its better
nights. But jazz is surging in
popularity; every major club
worth noting has at least two jazz
sessions each week from The
Way to the 100 Club. They've
been taken over by slick-cut trendies bored with the monotonous
tones of the synths. When one
says punk is dying out there will
always be someone to leap in its
defence, so let us say that the image has somewhat mellowed.
The only 'punks' you see now
are those neferious creatures
that inhabit the Kings Road, begging money to fund their habits
or posing for photographs with
anxious, thrill-seeking tourists.
The true punks of 76 are ten
years older now and have redirected their experiences and talents into other fields.
Everyone foreign thinks London is still the centre for the punk
industry, but all that's left now is
a bunch of attention seekers carrying on something that they
were never a part of anyway. The
Jesus & Mary Chain have got
spikey hair but there's no way
you could call them punks.
I'm sure you've had insider's
opinions to London before so I
apologize if I've gone on a bit,
but I feel it's a point I should get
over.
Now back to the much more
important topic of Discorder. To
conclude, MORE music, arts,
Armchair Eye (brill!), gig reviews,
and please, for your lone reader
in Basingstoke, Hampshire, a few
more names I might have heard
of!! Who the hell are the U-Men?
I suppose, as I've said, it's up to
you to inform.
Keep dishing it out,
ADM
JSS&
Thanks to your support the live music
program at the Arts Club has been saved!
Find your salvation every Friday & Saturday
night at the Arts Club Lounge, featuring
the best original independent bands from
across North America and a measly $2 cover
charge — Vancouver's best entertainment
value.
June
27/28 San Francisco's SHRODINGERS CAT
(psychedelia!) with Houston's legendary
nerd band 3-DAY STUBBLE
July
4/5 TBA
11/12 FRANK FRINK FIVE
18/19 TBA
25/26 THE HIP TYPE & STUBBORN BLOOD
I LIVE MUSIC IN THE LOUNGE I
I   FRIDAYSFROM 10:30-SATURDAYSFROM11:30P.M.
ARTS CLUB THEATRE   1181 SEYMOUR  683-0151 IWIANA
IS JUST AROUND THE COR
^^ CENE I: SUMMER 1985. TWO YOUNG WOMEN, ONE WITH A GUITAR, THE OTHER
^^k an accordion, are street-busking on Granville Island. People are drawn to them and
mj at one point the police ask the women to leave because they've drawn such a large
^0 crowd that traffic was being disrupted.
Scene II: New Year's Eve '85. The Railway Club. The same two, now calling themselves The
Crimpolines and with a new-found three-piece band behind them, open for the Jazzmanian
Devils. The audience is charmed by their entertaining blend of satire, wit, visual buffoonery,
and professional musicianship.
Cut to: Whitehorse, Yukon. February 1986. After laying waste to Nelson and Kaslo, B.C., The
Crimpolines, Rita and Ginny, are the toast of the annual Frostbite Festival, which features among
other musical guests, Amos Garrett, Rick Scott, and Skinny Puppy Several mad trappers' hearts
are broken when they leave. On their way back to Vancouver, they decide to devastate Nelson
again, completely annihilating any non-believers who may have been left in the area. Then it's
on to Calgary, where a screaming horde of 10,000 well-wishers are on hand at the airport. "What
Flames," shouts one of them above the din. "We're here to see The Crimpolines!"
Fade to: May 2, 1986. Vancouver, B.C. The Crimpolines are on hand for the opening of Expo
86. It's rumoured that their inclusion at the last minute was at the Royal insistence of none
other than Prince Charles and Princess Diana. When queried on this point, all officials involved
were keeping very tight-lipped. Expo chairman Jimmy Pattison says, "Ah, gee. I dunno. Maybe."
6      DISCORDER
YOU MAY HAVE SEEN THE CRIMPO-
lines by now, and may be familiar with
the "ultra tacky Value Village-on-a-
bad-day" outfits and props, the slick harmonizing and song stylings, and their wise-cracking rapport with the audience. But just who
are these two? Rita Book (Sandy Scofield),
vocals, guitar; and Ginny Tonic (Karen Anderson), accordion, vocals, are accomplished
musicians as well as being comediennes, artists, seamstresses, and good cooks. Their
band is named after a 1960's man-made clothing material, "like nylon only thicker, spongier;
garishly coloured, smelly, very synthetic, and
very flammable," boasts Rita.
Guitarist and vocalist extraordinaire Rita
grew up in Windsor, Ontario, and as a teenager she was surrounded by the Motown
scene, dressing up and miming to Diana Ross
in her livingroom mirror. It was during this
period that she discovered she had 'a voice'
and decided to learn guitar and piano. She
moved to Vancouver in 1975 and continued
songwriting as a compliment to her visual artwork. After performing at local coffeehouses,
Rita took three years at the V.C.C. music programme, studying jazz and R&B. From
1980-83 she was a key member of the local
C&W group Red Tucker and the Rhythm
Ramblers. She opened for other artists, did
studio sessions, and performed in various
venues doing her own material, and with a
backup band. It was at V.C.C. that she first met
Ginny Tonic.
Accordion-toting Ginny is from Surrey, B.C.,
"and I'm darn proud of it!" she snorts. Known
as the barefoot bassplayer in her high school
band, she went on to be the keyboardist in
such local outfits as Suntone, Sandy and the
Originals, Form 5, Decca Dolla, and Bamff.
Whipping out her trusty accordion, which she
learned to play at age 11, Ginny also performed with the Rosy Cheeks Goodtime Band, an
acoustic, traditional music ensemble.
Originally intending to start a lounge act,
which led to busking, which led to The Crimpolines, Rita and Ginny have now teamed up
with guitarist Steven Nikleva, bassist Martin
Walton and drummer Steve Lazin, all three
members of 1984 Shindig winers Red Herring.
With the new lineup, the band performs material ranging from 1926's "St. Louis Blues" to
"Strangers In The Night," "Arrividerci Roma"
to "Your Cheatin' Heart," and from a 60's med-
ly of "Secret Agent Man/Hawaii Five-0" to the
"Whoop De Doo Polka," sung in Czechoslovakia^ All this is, of course, highlighted by
their own original songs, and punctuated with
deft humour. Up to this point there has been
no problem with conficts of interest between
the two bancs, and while Ginny and Rita still
perform the odd show as a duo, it is with the
full lineup that they want to record and present themselves to record companies. "WE'VE
1"
COLLECTOR'S R.P.M. IS VIRTUALLY
DOUBLING ITS FLOORSPACE
featuring
collectables / memorabilia / rarities
posters / music videos / picture discs
clothes / MORE...
C01UCT0KS
TOW.
...now taking up the whole
northeast corner at
Seymour & Pender...
456-458 SEYMOUR
685-8841
**e
L.G-1*- Y>e'
$0*
Our 2nd Location
2528 Main
876-8321 Some interest has already been shown by
MuchMusic, who were airing a short blurb of
the girls, taken from their February 14th appearance with Bolero Lava and Rhythm Mission at U.B.C.
So the Crimps appear destined to rule the
world, but ace they maybe just a bit too campy
for their own good? "Well, that's a subjective
opinion," offers Rita, who feels the band has
sufficient serious original material and are
musically competent enough on the off-the-
wall tunes that "too campy" doesn't really
apply. We can't, it appears, judge this Book
by her covers. "Besides, fuck 'em if they can't
take a joke," she laughs. "Let's get the marsh-
mallows out," smirks Ginny.
On a more serious note, The Crimpolines
are aware of the audiences' tendency to compare them to k.d. lang. I was actually guilty
of this first impression myself, but after catching their show a few times, the uniqueness
of their performance became apparent. But
what do they think of the parallels drawn?
Rita explains: "It's quite a compliment, and
yet I would hope that people could hear my
voice for it's own qualities; or that the group's
overall sound is a unique one in terms of what
each player is bringing to it, especially Gin-
ny's accordion work. But I have to admit it's
inevitable there's going to be that association.
We're approaching our performance from the
same principles. I think that's where the comparisons come in; she does off-the-wall stuff,
she does grassroots stuff, there's costuming
involved..."
"She's a woman," chimes in Ginny. Rita
agrees.
"Right. She's a woman, fronting a band;
she's uninhibited on stage, and what she does
is in the realm of performance art. But I think
what we're doing is different. It may take a second look to see that."
So after shrugging off the first two charges,
the girls respond to the "What about Expo?"
question. "Listen," says Rita, "the time to have
refuted Expo was long ago, probably before
the public even knew about it, and I realize
that the other side of the argument is, well if
you're participating in it, it's like condoning it.
However, politics aside, it's much better for the
little guy to be able to have a cut on it...artists,
regardless of that their medium is, than for
them (Expo) to be importing entertainment or
visual artists or anybody; that would be the
ultimate insult, if the local people were completely cut out of it. From an artistic point of
view, there's tremendous advantages from doing it. The reality is, you do have to make a
living and if you have a craft and you want to
pursue that..."
"And it's going to help us survive the summer for sure," adds Ginny, "because the
amount of gigs we can get at the point we're
at now, and the venues we can play at, would
not make us a living; and if we can't live on
what we're doing, and put all 6ur energy into
it, it can't advance. And hopefully we'll get
good suntans."
The promise of Expo dollars has lured the
girls for the most part away from their former
day jobs. Ginny used to sustain herself working at the Ridge, slinging cappuccinos at L'
espresso, and still does flyer deliveries the
odd time. Rita, who is also the band's manager, made futons for two years, and now
slings donuts at Nuffy's.
So what lies ahead for the Crimpoids?
(Crimpolinies?... Crimpoloons?...) "We're going to have more original material," says Ginny. "But we'll always have the good tasty
covers that we really dig in our repertoire," she
reassures us. "I'm sure we'll do more as time
goes along, because there's a lot of tunes that
we could...ah...you know...'Crimpolinize'." Her
grin has an ever-so-subtle hint of evil. Her eyes
twinkle. Already there are some who believe
Ginny's accordion is nuclear-powered.
I suppose this article.wouldn't be complete
without talking aobut the outfits Ginny and
Rita sport onstage; so to satisfy all the women
who have been demanding to know, I inquired
as to how the two go about acquiring their
'haute cotture.' "We actually do make most of
what we wear," assures Ginny. Talented little
devils.
So when can the general public look forward to being able to purchase a piece of
Crimpolines' vinyl (and we're not talking about
their handbags here)? "The fall!" the two sing
in unison; probably in the form of an EP,
depending on how things go for them this
summer, and how much money they can
scrape together. Following the EP release,
look for a major tour. As for upcoming dates,
"we're really swamped," confides Rita. They
were off to Calgary and Edmonton last month
and plan a multitude of performances at Expo,
both as a band and as a duo, throughout the
summer—check local entertainment guides
for exact times and locations—and a return
to gigging locally at clubs again around the
beginning of September. "COMING SOON
TO A BOWLADROME OR LAUNDRYMAT
NEAR YOU!"
FORMERLY
THE
MATERIALIST
224-5711
6,000,000 Miles/Gallon
No Insurance Needed
That's right! We build our bicycles so well that many
of our customers have been riding for years without
a single traffic jam. For Recreation, Touring, Racing,
Triathlon and Mountain Biking, come to Bikes on
Broadway — the leaders in quality, service and
selection.
VANCOUVER'S COMPLETE BICYCLE CENTRE
620 E. Broadway
at Fraser
874-8611 • 874-4288
8      DISCORDER One final note: on the subject of ice-cream,
Ginny tells us that her favorite is maple walnut,
because "it reminds me of this stuff I used
to lick off the leaves of trees after it rained
when I was about six." She goes on to assure
us it wasn't "bird poo," thereby answering
Rita's remark before she has a chance to
make it. And Rita? "Ever since I was a little
girl, I've always been partial to Sour Cream
and Onion flavoured ice-cream. It's very good
with beer."
These are The Crimpolines. All they want
is Nirvana. (And a date.)
The Crimpolines wish to thank the nice
people who gave them panty-hose at their April
23rd gig at the Railway Club. And if anybody
out there has any white vinyl wet-look go-go
boots, "please, please! Give them to us!" Rita
is size 9 and Ginny is 12.
—Terry Walker
jteflfl*
Keep your lips together.
•Don't wear real heavy earrings.
Be yourself. Trying to act like someone
else will never make you popular.
• Don't try to live on just Kraft Dinner and
tube steaks.
Don't drop out. Make sure you get that
High School diploma.
•The way to be popular and get a boyfriend is to be yourself.
If you're handy with a needle and thread,
you can sew for versatility.
•Be confident. Several times a day, say to
yourself, "There's nothing f can't do."
Take up bowling.
•Take some correspondence courses: hairdressing, typing, playing guitar, interior
decorating, flower arranging.
Don't be afraid of leg stubble.
•One thing to look for in a roommate: Can
they play Bingo?
• It's hard being a trendsetter. Don't be
disappointed if you are one.
Try not to intimidate people with your bad
taste.
If you're thinking about going into show
business, looks aren't that important,
although height and weight are. People
don't pay to see those little bulges.
Don't be offended by things like
callouses, sweat, mud, dust, or occasional swearing. (Sometimes when she
gets mad, Rita cusses too.)
•The way to kill cockroaches is to be
yourself.
To improve your conversation techniques,
try reading Safeway flyers.
To improve your posture, sleep with a
book on your head.
•Spot removal: If you spill some wine on
your lap (while your legs are together,
and you're being yourself), just sprinkle
some salt on it, and the stain will come
out.
BOYS' COMPANY
OAKRIDGE CENTRE
• 2 6 6-0388
JULY   1986        9 £S5SS-!
TETTER *B°M
Bv Beza
Sara
ENVELOPES ARE SUPPOSED TO
be white. Or blue. And I guess pastels
are okay. But black? A black envelope is not a good sign. Letter-
bombers with a sense of humour use black
envelopes, I suspect the Mafia does too. And
I guess there might be a style-conscious anarchist or two out there who use black envelopes
for their missives to other style-conscious
anarchists. But why would someone send me
a black envelope?
Imagine my surprise, then, when the small
black envelope contained not a few ounces
of high explosive or an invitation to a demo,
but a letter from Mark Burgess.
Mark is the singer, wordsmith and bass
player of The Chameleons, a four-piece from
Manchester, England. I'd sent him a letter
several months earlier, in lieu of a phone call
which the powers that be said would be too
expensive ("Do you know how much a call to
England costs? Have you seen our budget?
Blah, blah blah..."), and with the passing of
time, had more or less forgotten about it. After
apologizing for the delay, Mark went on to explain the genesis of the band.
"Reg Smithies (electric and acoustic guitar),
Dave Fielding (electric guitar and strings) and
myself have known each other since we were
very small. We went to the same school, and
all went to see our first concert about the same
time, 1972. The thing we had in common was
the same as it is now—a love of music..."
They went their separate ways for a while,
and each was in one different group during
this period ("we've been assured that it will
remain a secret providing we all keep up the
payments...") of learning to play music. Years
after, they met up at a local college where The
Fall were playing a gig, and there they decided to form a band. With the addition of John
Lever on drums ("due to the high cost of kits
'round here drummers are becoming something of an endangered species..."), The
10      DISCORDER
Chameleons came into being, and the band
made its live debut backing up The Belle Stars
at a college in London.
The Chameleons created a very distinctive
sound of their own without having to rely on
effects more complicated than guitar delays
and the like ("distinctive...is an aim in itself...").
They were quickly signed to CBS/Epic Records in London. Their first single "In Shreds"
was recorded with Steve (U2, Big Country...)
Lillywhite in late 1981. As one might expect,
the song was completely dominated by a
crashing drum pattern, overlaid with a scorching guitar riff. Unfortunately, the patent Lillywhite sound did not mean world radio domination and fat royalty cheques...
"Steve Lillywhite didn't like the record
because it had too much compression on the
high-hat or something stupid like that. The version which eventually got released was a
fifteen-minute rough mix because we all felt
that it had more excitement than any of Steve's
mega-mixes. CBS/Epic would only handle it
with a pair of surgical tweezers held at arm's
length. They put it out because we made such
a big fuss about it. They edged it out with their
toe and then buried it; some time later they
deleted it altogether and us with it."
OBVIOUSLY IT WAS NOT a pleasant
experience for The Chameleons. But
they kept at it and eventually they
were signed to the indie label Statik Records
in 1982. The first release on the new label was
a track on the compilation album Your Secret
is Safe With Us, and in 1983 The Chameleons
debut full-length record The Script of the
Bridge was released. The debut album's
opening track was the driving "Don't Fall,"
featuring an odd combination of soaring
music and lyrics that explored the dark side
of human thoughts. Twelve songs later the
record is brought to a fitting close with the
dream-like "View From a Hill." Sandwiched
in between are rough-edged rock songs infused with life and vitality. But Script was not
recorded without some difficulty.
"...The studio kept falling to bits around us,
but we had a lot of fun making it. The only
reason we were able to get results in the place
was because, having recorded all our demos
there with (producer) Colin Richardson, we
knew the place inside out. We wanted to go
to a better studio but Statik pleaded poverty
so we just got on with it. I'm happy to say that
the studio was bought by Pete Hook of New
Order, re-equipped and is once more active.
The studio's now been named Suite Sixteen."
The album wasn't a huge commercial success (although it was released in Canada with
four fewer tracks) and it was two years before
The Chameleons released any new material.
In 1985 the very rare "In Shreds" single was
re-issued on Statik with a different sleeve and
a bonus track from the Lillywhite session. It
was re-issued due to "...lots of letters, people
mithering for copies at gigs and dodgey people selling them for 20-30 Pounds..." And this
time it was something of a hit. The middle of
1985 saw the release of The Chameleons
second album What Does Anything Mean?
Basically. Finally the band got the attention
they deserved and Basically was treated to
critical acclaim and chart success.
The new album retained Colin Richardson
on production but was recorded at a better
studio—Highland in Inverness, Scotland.
Basically showed an overall refinement of the
band's sound, while losing none of the drive
so evident on The Chameleons' previous
work. Songs like "Home is Where The Heart
Is" and "P.S. Goodbye" contained richly layered electric and acoustic guitars and string
arrangements. In addition, the first 10,000
copies of Basically included a gate-fold sleeve
with video portraits and a poem by Mark called So This is the Jet Age. Oddly enough,
though, Script remains Mark's favourite
album.
"Basically has a lot of good points but having to make an LP just to get away from a label
is not an ideal atmosphere for making great
records, which is all we've ever wanted to do." On the insert to Basically there is an acknowledgement to BBC's John Peel, the man
responsible for breaking an incredibie number of bands. In 1982 Peel broadcast some
demos by The Chameleons, and re-recorded
versions of the demos eventually turned up
on the second album. "Had it not been for
John Peel I doubt that we would be making
records today." Which brings us up to the present activities of The Chameleons...
"We signed with Geffen Records (distributers of Lloyd Cole and also Siouxsie in Canada) just before Christmas and we've been
writing and recording new songs with a producer called David Allen. In the past he's
worked with The Sisters of Mercy and, more
actively, The Cure. So far we've finished four
tracks."
So it seems big things are in store for The
Chameleons. They hope to tour this side of
the Atlantic soon, which would surely help
make them something more of a household
name here in Canada.
And as for what message, if any, The Chameleons may have for the world...Burgess has
no absolute answer.
"My lyrics are simply thougnts sei to music
and only God knows where they come from.
Some are emotional, some are observational,
and some are prophetic. As a person and a
lyricist I'm influenced by the same things
almost everyone else is, i.e., the people that
they find themselves surrounded by and the
environment that they find themselves in. Personally, I've never placed much importance
on the meaning of lyrics, I mean, the lyric to
"Drive-in Saturday" is quite brilliant, but I've
no idea what it's supposed to mean. I mean,
what does anything mean? Basically.
"Perhaps all art is trying to say is, 1 exist.'
Or perhaps it is a basic desire within us all
to express the inexpressable. On that thought,
I think I'll go to bed. Goodnight."
AT  Bffio
WELFARE STATE INTERNATIONAL
of Great Britain
in
'False Creek a visual symphony'
or
The night the racoons ate dogmeat'
a rip roaring, mythical
pantomine and pageant
Presented at
FOLKLIFE
ON EXPO SITE
JULY 9 - 13 and 15 - 20
9:30 pm - 1:30 am
Reserve your free tickets in
advance by calling 668-2976,
10:00 am - 6:00 pm
Tickets may be picked up before
9:00 pm on the day of performance
only at the Welfare State ticket
booth in Folklife.
Sponsored in part by Super Valu in co-operation with the British Council
THE FIRA CONCERTS
FESTIVAL OF INDEPENDENT RECORDING ARTISTS
Slow
Poisoned
Red Herring
Rick Scott Band
Bolero Lava
Rhythm Mission
FEATURING
Bob's Your Uncle
Brilliant Orange
Hunting Party
Paul Dolden
Skinny Puppy
Grapes of Wrath
with more still to be announced
Presented at
XEROX INTERNATIONAL THEATRE
August 4 - 10
Two concerts nightly
9:00 pm & 10:30 pm
JULY   1986 HST   ON.
HOPE
/
GONZO  BUT  NOT
FOR A CHANGE IN CAMPUS
APATHY AND CONSERVATISM
// Any hope for you people, is that what is, real
fast? No time to analyze this. "Is there any
hope for me?" Well, no, not in the near future,
I don't think so. This will be known as a generation of those who mumbled and shook their
heads and said, "Yeah gods." No, you'll get
your chance. I take that back. In two years
there's going to be such a mangled, rotten,
cheap, ugly, unprincipled and really embaras-
sing presidential election that you may finally
have to make your choice in a democracy: is
it better to vote or let the rats run off with it?
There's nobody who maintains anything in
politics in the country except that we're in
serious trouble and that the stock market still
goes up and we know that Reagan will get out,
he'll go back to the mountain. But Ed Meese
will be there and Bill Casey will be there. It's
a profit-taking, though,Jt's like sacking the
ship as it goes downA^
HST   ON.
THE
1
U.S. PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION
'V/1988 is going to matter. There are watersheds; some elections matter, some don't.
We've gone through having this actor, a very
good politician, let's not forget that, but the
next one that comes along will be a definitive
choice if only because you're going to have
to explain it to people. There was an election
in 1960 that a generation of people defined
themselves^ on as whether they voted for
Kennedy of Nixon. It was like Kurt Waldheim
—where were you in 1943?
KST   ON
MURRAY
AS HST IN
WHERE THE BUFFALO ROAM
* ...It was silly. He did not a bad job on the
portrayal, I guess, but I found the whole thing
silly. But, it's amazing: we were friends before
and we're still friends. And that's odd, because
it's strange to be friends with someone who
does something like that to you. He's a good
actor. He's one of the best. But it was a warped
thing that he did. r*
SAY WHATEVER YOU WANT ABOUT
the man, Dr. Hunter S. Thompson is
an original. He appeared on the
scene in the mid 1960s writing first
for Scanlans Monthly and then for the budding, then-radical Rolling Stone, for whom he
did the bulk of his work. Flaunting the conventions of journalism, he became part of his
stories: getting whipped like a cur while writing
his breakthrough book on the Hell's Angels,
chronicling his own massive pharmaceutical
intake while in search of the American dream
in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, talking football in the back of a limo with fellow fan and
arch-nemesis Richard Nixon in Fear and
Loathing on the Campaign Trail 72.
Thompson was not a traditional reporter: invisible, objective, an observer. He kicked his
way into his stories, influenced them, turning
even the most mundane assignments into a
vicious, twisted road trip into the American
psyche. Nobody really remembers why Thompson went to Las Vegas; what stands out are
the book's opening lines: "It was just out of
Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the
drugs began to take hold..."
Like most originals Thompson spawned a
pack of imitators. Every fledgling student journalist had a crack at gonzo journalism, and
who could blame them? Here was a man
showing that you could cover a story while
wired to the eyeballs on crystal mescaline and
do it better than the guy in the frumpy tweed
jacket scratching furiously in his notebook.
What most of the imitators forgot was that
underneath the chemical stew Thompson was
a good journalist. He did his homework before
, he did acid. He worked hard, he dug, and he
made sense, albeit in his own weird way.
By the mid 1970s, however, Thompson faded from view. He was still in the public eye
thanks to Gary Trudeau's recreation of him as
Duke in the Doonsbury comic strip and Bill
Murray's portrayal of him in the film Where the
Buffalo Roam, but the real Dr. Thompson was
reportedly locked away in his home in the tiny
community of Woody Creek, Colorado, just outside of Aspen. There was the odd, lacklustre
piece for Rolling Stone, an occasional appearance on the college lecture tour (at a reported
$5,000 a crack), and, of course, the rumours
about his lifestyle continued. Stories about
Thompson read like pharmaceutical handbooks. He was said to have shot at visitors to
his Woody Creek spread. In spite of all the talk,
the temptation when talking about the good
Doctor was to use the past tense.
Until this year. This year Thompson returned
to print with a syndicated column in the San
Francisco Chronical, there were rumours of a
forthcoming book chronicling his job as the
night manager of O'Farrels Theatre, an X-rated
porn theatre in San Francisco. The Dean of
gonzo journalism was back.
&L ^*
*3^
*&_
tm
EVEN AFTER 25 YEARS IN
HUNTER S. THOMPSON Sfltj
"ROUBLE MEETING DEADLI m rt en
THE BUSINE .SS,
|tJL SOMETIMES HAS
NES. HE WAS LATE A
So when it was announced that Thompson
would be speaking at the University of Western
Washington on May 31, a group of intrepid
Discorder staffers piled into a VW van and
drove down to Bellingham to catch the action.
Rolling into the University of Western Washington it's hard to believe that ifs a university
and not some country club asylum for the
brain-dead children of America's idle rich. No
towering brick residences here, Jack. This
place has condos. Green rolling hills pockmarked by cul-de-sacs. The pastel and polo
shirt dress code is strictly enforced. You get
the feeling everyone here is blond and tanned
and voted for Reagan in the last election cause
he seems like such a nice man and, well,
"Mondale just doesn't act like a leader. I mean,
like, he's such a wimp."
Granted, this entirely subjective opinion
could be completely off base. UWW could be
a bastion of campus radicalism. But I doubt
it. First of all, there is no bar on campus. This
may not seem like a big deal to some of you,
but when you've spent an hour waiting for a
noted substance abuser to drag his ragged ass
into the lecture hall, a beer seems like an absolutely vital item. Second of all, when my
travelling companion enquired after the absence of drinking facilities on campus, he ventured to ask whether UWW was a "Christian
campus." He was told that "some of it is." Not
the most encouraging answer in this age of
evangelical America.
HST   ON   DRUGS,
V  ...Where did you say you had those mushrooms?
...It would seem real smart to say that cocaine will enjoy more massive use and that
this crack thing is today's herpes drug. But
what we're going to see—and I say this because I know people in the business, in
Haight-Ashbury, people who are really concerned about it—heroin is where the drug
trade is going right now. I deplore that. If
you're talking to the bettors in the marketplace,
it would have been coke five years ago, but
crack is just bullshit. Smack is the one. I don't
know why but smack is the most popular, hip-
pest drug across the board in all the places
where people gauge these things. It goes
hand in hand with the political attitude in a
way. Smack goes along with the apathy, and
the "Let me out of this politics" thing. It may
be an argument for being a real junkie and
never going anywhere near politics. William
Burroughs did it for a long time. Here's a man,
one of the most honorable men in American
literature, who's been consistent, and a junkie,
and one of the most intelligent anti-politicians
...no one else has made sense like that. But
crack is the drug of publicity right now, PCP
was like that for a while, but smack is the one.
And I don't like that. ...Where have all the pure
drugs gone? Used to be able to go to the drug a
store and buy five cartons of amyls for $12.95.
HST   ON. .
RICHARD NIXON
HST   BY   CD
&   Jacques
Thompson finally arrived an hour and a half
late, nattily attired in a fishing cap, sunglasses
and wrinkled shirt and pants. After a brief
apology for his lateness, and a compiaint
about the general hostility of the world on that
particular day, Thompson opened the floor to
questions. The next hour ranged from the incomprehensible to the inane. The good Doctor was asked about American politics, drugs,
pro basketball, drugs, Richard Nixon, drugs.
He mumbled in reply, sometimes articulately
sometimes rambling, making strange digressions, connections, accusations, as if trying to
explain to himself why these fresh young
things, the hope of America, were asking him
who they should vote for or how to combat their
own apathy. It was a weird evening.
We managed to salvage these comments
from it.
y/...Boy, I've seen Richard Nixon in times
when there was no rule, and no law, and no
possiblity and he could do anything, like cross
off a street in downtown Manchester, New
Hampshire. The idea that Richard Nixon in
1968 would ever run for anything ever again...
Here was a man who in 1963 shook his fist
at the press and said "You bastards, you
swine, you've done it for the last time to me.
You won't have Richard Nixon to kick around
anymore." That was the only race Richard Nixon ever lost in public life. And he quit. You
don't have to believe in ghosts. If you believe
in the power in politics, and you know a real
pro when you see one...eh...it's like the coach
of the Milwaukee Bucks said after Boston
thrashed 'em—"those young men should
understand what a privilege it is to play with
Larry Bird," and, in a darker sense, I understand it was a privilege to play politics with
Richard Nixon. And we're not finished yet. As
long as that bastard's alive he is on the wall.
He has long claws. Because nobody else
cares, and he does care. You see a man who
cares? George Bush is nothing. He doesn't
care about anything at all. He's just a lizard
who got too fat in the sun. Reagan's an actor,
and they're evil people, you've got Meese in
there, but nobody else cares like Richard Nixon cares. You laugh now, but you'll see—the
mother will be with us.
I'd make him a winter book 18-1 favorite,
despite all the lawsA-
JULY   1986      13 OPENS JUNE 28 thru JULY 3 (at least)
LADIES & GENTLEMEN
WRSTRUN!
RuJ>
Stains %£
■fEt
"STAINS"
DIRECT FROM
VANCOUVER FILM
^      FESTIVAL.
^  DIANE LANE,
)RAY WINSTON,
PETER DONAY,
FEATURING
THE TUBES,
FEE WAYBILL &
MEMBERS OF
THE CLASH & SEX PISTOLS
FROM 'ROCKY HORROR'
Phil Daniels • Hazel O'Connor PR0DUCER L0U ADLER
Jon Finch & Jonathon Pryce
BREAKING
GLASS
DIANE LANE
as a 15 year old
orphan
turned punk-rocker
Great
tun'.
ROCK MUSICAL DOUBLE FEATURE
"FABULOUS STAINS0 AT 3:30, 6:45 and 10:00
BREAKING GLASS" AT 5:05 and 8:20 pm
FOLLOWING 'FABULOUS STAINS'
SCHEDULED OPENING JULY 4TH
SPECIAL LIMITED ENGAGEMENT
Return Engagement of the original full-length version
MAli3DLMMcDCWHl
CALIGULA
NO ONE UNDER 18 YRS.; PHOTO ID REQUIRED
(.-1!"'tJX*      ALL SEATS/all DAY $5.50
^^    " ^ TUESDAYS- $2.50
WARNING: Cruel & brutal violence throughout.
Explicit sex scenes, depiction of childbirth. —B.C. Director
DAILY AT 3:20, 6:15, 9:10 (& Midnite Mon. thru Thurs)
COMING LATE IN JULY
FOR ANIMATION FANS
AN EXPRESSION
IN ANIMATION
A RALPH BAKSHI FILM
"HEY GOOD L00KIN"
the outrageous 50s
ANIMATED        from JOHN KORTY & LUCASFILM LTD.
HlifHil'KH "TWICE UPON A TIME"
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EVERY FRIDAY-SATURDAY & SUNDAY
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INFORMATION (24 HOURS) CALL 681-1732
HST   ON.
//
THE   HELLS   ANGELS   T0DT
/l haven't talked to them lately...Sonny (Berger, Angel's leader and the focus on Thompson's book Hell's Angels) has retired from that
league now. Those boys have gotten real serious. Sonny was of the golden age of bikers.
He was part of it when it was fun. These guys
are very serious criminals now. They don't
mind admitting it and they're better at it. There
aren't too many retired Hell's Angels; it doesn't
go with the territory. Well, that used to be true.
The dramatic sort of James Dean or Brando
thing is pretty well gone now. They don't even
wear their colours any more; it's big business.
To see a Hell's Angel with his colours on on
the street on a bike in the Bay Area is really
rare now. I miss it, it's one of those pure statements. We're in the '80s now—not too many
people want to fly their coloursAv
// Oh Lord. That's a curse that I've learned to
live with. As a child people had notions of what
they wanted to be when they grew up. Some
wanted to be a fireman, cops, soldiers, sheep-
herders, god knows what. But nobody wanted
to be a comic-strip character. Li'I Abner was
not much admired. If you ask Trudeau it was
a goofy happenstance...! don't know. I just
learned to live with it, like having herpes III
or something. For a while you call a doctor
and say "Ye gods, what can I do about this
thing," after a while you just don't mention it
anymore. I don't have many people I can share
that ugly thing with. I just take it as one more
curse. \v- X,AyX,XyX^VrXy^^^,'Ky^yKyX^,'WWVyvy^
JOUR
HST ON...
HIS JOB AS A NIGHT MANAGER OF
O'FARREL'S PORN THEATRE IN
SAN FRANCISCO
It's amazing how fast you get completely
blind to working with naked people...uh...
women. There are no men. I didn't make the
policy but I approve of it. In a hardcore sex
club, given the choice, I'd keep the men out.
It gets mean in New York. I would defend the
O'Farrel as the Carnegie Hall of public sex in
America. I had the choice of quitting and denouncing the boys, the Mitchell Brothers, or
taking my job back, which I'm going to do.
There are some ships worth going down with
and I'll do that with the Mitchell Brothers. I
wouldn't do that with anybody who was into
the kiddie-porn business or all that stuff (U.S.
Attorney-General Ed) Meese is laying on us,
that sex leads to violence. If sex leads to violence I wouldn't be sitting here tonight, I don't
think. This was the same Ed Meese who was
implicated in the Vicki Morgan tapes with,
what's his name, Bloomingdale. It insults me
that Meese would say that the country's gone
mad with sex, leading to violence. I'm not going to defend grabbing little children off the
street and putting them in porno films, but
that's crazy from what I've seen in this business. It's a bunch of goofballs, the sort of people who would be owning minor league baseball and not making them pay. But it's a nasty
sort of track to get on, where the Attorney-
General equates sex, violence, and the screwing of children. It's insulting. That's why I'm
still in the business: it's more of a civil rights'
issue than anything to do with sex.
ON   NICARAGUA AND MEXICO
Nicaragua is the last civilized choice we're
going to get. Right underneath us we've got
the biggest social volcano in the world: Mexico. Mexico has, what, 42 million people and
18 million of them are unemployed and most
of them hate our guts or could be made to by
the first person like Daniel Ortega who comes
along. There is no more dangerous social
situation in the world and all we do is call them
twisted dope fiends. Which is why Nicaragua
shoud be watched; because if we can't deal
with Nicaragua we sure as hell can't deal with
Mexico. We'll get invovled, but it won't be a
principled involvement. It'll be a dumb and
bungly involvement. There's no threat from
those people down there but we'll get involved because there's no way to cope with it.
N A L IS M Well, right now, the trouble with journalism
now is that it's not fun. If this sounds frivolous,
think whatever you want. But you don't get into
journalism for money; most likely you'll just'
pay your rent; very few people, even the best
editors and writers do more. And when I say
fun I'm talking about looking at Richard Nixon in November of 1972 and saying "that
swine, that bastard, how could any evil man
like that become president."  I  remember
watching television and thinking that's the
crookedest son of a bitch I've ever seen in my
life. What does this mean for me? And I remember thinking, ah ha, he is so crooked we
can get him. And we did get him. He was right.
He claimed the liberals and the maniacs and
the people with personal grudges came after
him and got him. He was right. It had to be
done. And that's fun.
RRIIV1^\L_ DANCE
IS/1 U S I G FOR
ALTERNATIVE
URBAN    TYRES
HiNRG, NEW, OLD WAVE,
AVANT-GARDE, PUNK,FUNK
DANCE 40, ROCKABILLY ETC
BUT NO PALM TREES.
FRI b\ SAT. 7 P.M.
tZMN.
p/wce club
13465 KING GEORGE
SURREY   584-1044
RESTRICTED
UNDER 19
.5
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.X,
I WILD ICE CREAMS
I SANDWICHES
I COLD LIQUIDS
I ESPRESSO BAR
I OPEN TILL 3 A.M.
With the Ultimate
in hot cappuccinos,
wild d-zerts
and much, much more,
For lunch we offer
darn good soups
and sandwiches
CW
c^
A"
Suite 108
950 WEST BROADWAY
V% block east of Oak Street
732-1664
JULY   1986      15 r
In the Spirit of Independence,
Presents
******* S| faA   ajli
W E A / R K P R I S 1-   RECORDING   ARTISTS
plus
The North American Debut of England's Own
The woodentops
ana
ROOTS ROUND-UP
FRIDAY, JULY 4th
Commodore Ballroom
ARE PLEASED
TO PRESENT THE
VANCOUVER
DEBUT OF
fm
Tickets $10.00 at VTC/CBO and all usual
ticket outlets. Subject to service charge.
• ANITA CHELLAMAH, VOC
• ANDY MCCOY, GUITAR
• TERRY CHIMES, DRUMS
• NASTY SUICIDE, GUITAR
• DAVE TREGUNNA, BASS
MONDAY J
LUY A FAIR
Tickets now on sale at VTC/CBO,
MORE TASTY TREATS
Encore Performance!
The Woodentops
witn     guests
FAMILY PLOT
AND
OVERSOW- 7
Tickets now on sale!
take the skinheads bowling with
Camper Van Beethoven
and special friends
The Catheads
2 ROLLICKING NIGHTS!!
Monday-Tuesday   /Vavov
July 14 & 15
6 Powell Street \ ililPOTO
JARRING
fALS • EX-TOTO COELO
• EX-HANOI ROCKS
• EX-THE CLASH
• EX-HANOI ROCKS
• EX-LORDS OF THE NEW CHURCH
ULY 7, 1986
1275 SEYMOUR ST. DOORS 9 P.M.
Odyssey Imports, and all usual outlets.
IT'S party time!
w
^8P ^
°*UuJ
SUNDAY, JULY 20
NEW YORK THEATRE
639 Commercial Drive
FROM  CAT PRODUCTIONS
mm
INDEPENDENT
RECORDING
ARTISTS
4th FLOOR BEHIND
THE
DIAL
AMARC 2
LE DEUXIEME Assemblee Mondiale des
Artisans des Radios de Type Communautaire
(also knows as AMARC 2) will take place in
Vancouver from July 25-29 at Britannia Centre, 1661 Napier St.
Yeah. So?
Well, AMARC 2 is the largest gathering of
community and campus broadcasters in the
world. Participants will be coming from Canada, the United States, Africa, Central and
South America, and the Philippines. They'll
be discussing topics like the role of radio in
revolution, peace programming, audio mail-
art, women's programming, and the role of
community radio around the world. There will
be guest speakers, shops, socials, and, if
AMARC 1 was any indication, some interesting discussion on the role of radio in the world
today.
Yeah. So?
Well, if you'd snap yourself out of your insular world for just a fraction of a second you
might realize that this thing might be of some
interest to you. If you listen to the radio, this
is an ideal opportunity to see what radio can
be. Even if you don't want to attend the con
ference you can participate by volunteering or
offering your humble dwelling as a billet for
one of the participants. Hell, you might even
meet someone interesting.
And even if you're only slightly curious you
can find out more about radio by attending the
public forum July 27 at Britannia High School.
Admission is free and the forum will feature
speakers on Latin American radio, Native
radio, and women's radio in Scandinavia.
Organizers are also hoping for participants
from Nicaragua and the African National
Congress.
Okay. Calm down. Sounds interesting. At
least more interesting than the Challenge B.C.
pavilion. Whafs the poop on the AMARC thing
then?
You can find out more by phoning AMARC
at 253-0427 or by attending the volunteer
meeting, July 22 at Britannia Centre.
CITR Presents
JULY 4 54-40 celebrate the release of their
first record with Warner Brothers Records with
a show at the Commodore. A special invitation to this American Independence Day show
has been sent to former U.S. President James
Polk, who coined the phrase 54° 40' or
Fight." Also appearing will be the Woodentops
and Roots Roundup. Bring your iguanas.
July 19 The Cramps will attempt, once
again, to answer that age-old question,
"What's Inside A Girl?" in a show at the
Thunderbird Arena. Join Lux, Ivy and Nick for
an evening of unforgivable bad taste, feedback, and gold lame. Rounding out the bill will
be Slow.
July 20 GBH headline an evening of very
loud music and random, meaningless violence (we hope not) at the New York Theatre.
Also contributing to the carnage will be New
York's Cro Mags and, from Los Angeles, St.
Vitus.
Attendance, as always, is compulsory.
PARTY TIME
by Chris Pearson
W     TURN YOUR    Wi
\ OLD RECORDS
INTO CASH!
NANCY
PREW
clue in the last lane
Beverley Cooper & Ann-Marie MacDonald
directed by Ray Surette
an exciting 3-part comedy mystery
featuring everybody's favorite teen
detective!
OPENS JULY 10
Firehall Theatre
280 E. Cordova Street
3-Part passes 20% off!!
Reservations (passes & tickets)
689-0926
18      DISCORDER ON
THE
DIAL
CITR fml02 cablelOO
WEEKDAY HIGHLIGHTS
WEEKDAY REGULARS
7:30 am    Sign-On
8:00 am    WAKE-UP REPORT
News, sports and weather.
10:00 am BREAKFAST REPORT
News, sports and weather followed
by GENERIC REVIEW and INSIGHT.
12:00 pm HIGH PROFILE.
1:00 pm    LUNCH REPORT
News, sports and weather.
3:00 pm    AFTERNOON SPORTSBREAK
5:00 pm    DINNER MAGAZINE
News, sports and weather followed
by GENERIC REVIEWS, INSIGHT and
a DAILY FEATURE.
4:00 am    Sign-Off
MONDAYS
SOUNDTRAK
10:30-11:30 am
Theatre-style radio incorporating the voice,
music, and other permutable sounds. Produced by ESI.
THE BLUES SHOW
8:00-9:00 pm
Can blue men sing the whites? Join host
Eric Von Schlippen to find out.
THE JAZZ SHOW
9:00 pm-12:30 am
Vancouver's longest-running prime time Jazz
program, featuring all the classic players, the
occasional interview, and local music news.
Hosted by the ever-suave Gavin Walker.
Album Features: 11:00 pm.
07 July  Booker Ervin—The Freedom Book.
The late Booker Ervin (d.1969) was
one of the most individual and
powerful tenor saxophonists in Jazz.
This is one of his best recordings.
14 July  Duke Ellington at Fargo (1940). The
Ellington Band reached the highest
peak of musicality in 1940. Hear
how this great band sounded at a
concert dance at Fargo, North
Dakota in 1940.
21 July  Mingus at Antilles (1960). A "live"
recording by one of Charles
Mingus' best bands from his first
European tour. Hear Mingus, Erick
Dolphy, Booker Ervin, etc.
28 July Out Of The Blue. One of the best
new pure Jazz groups. All young
men under 25. If you are wondering
about the future and the direction of
Jazz, here is a real answer.
TUESDAYS
THE FOLK SHOW
8:00-9:30 pm
Host Steve Edge continues to upset people
by persevering in his solo crusade for roots-
oriented music on CITR! July sees the start
of Canada's folk festival season and we will
have reports from 2 of the nation's largest &
most prestigious events, the Winnipeg & Vancouver festivals. Other scheduled features
are—
01 July Canada's birthday, so we have
Canada's finest folk band Spirit of
the West with a selection of their
material, including excerpts from
their new LP Tripping Up the Stairs.
08 July A live performance by Christine
Collister & Clive Gregson, 2 members of Richard Thompson's band,
recorded in England Spring '86.
15 July Vancouver Folk Festival preview starring Albion Band, Crossman/
Renbourn etc., but not Spirit of the
West. WHY?
22 July JSD Band, one of the finest & least
well-known bands of the U.K.'s folk-
rock explosion of the 70s.
29 July Triona Ni Dhomnaill. One of
Ireland's finest singers. We trace her
career from the seminal Bothy Band,
Touchstone and her latest recorded
project Relativity, with Silly Wizard's
Cunningham brothers.
BUNKUM OBSCURA
9:30-11:00 pm
A drop on the end of a needle reflects the
world around it as well as a virgin's tear.
LOVE PEACE AND VIOLENCE
11:00 pm-1:00 am
An earnest effort to resolve 7,000 years of
passion, sedation and empty threats (read
civilization), featuring live sex, tape loops,
simulated drug taking and lots of normal
music. "Some things are so stupid that they
must be done." E. Raoul
PLAYLOUD
Late night 1:00-4:00 am
Psychic disease, disastrous medical conditions and the experience of nervous systems
in borderline situations. Aural surgery performed by Larry Thiessen.
IF You WEp-E TOJUVZY To l£/WE YovR CHAItf.OR.
To DRAG YoUR$ElF ACROSS THE RooM IQ TURN
A PIAL     "
DEMOTE CONTROL HA5 MDE IT" eA5Y T» AVo|pasTASTERJL VIEWING JHE
Average North AMERICAN HAS To f#e few PrpBuzW A* \t is whew
Compare? with othei? societies.ndgopyhm evq? sheujep akpdm,
CM\0, NOR HAVE AR40UKEP VEHICLES AND TAMcS EVE* RpiLET> THgouciH |
THE STREETS Of VANCOUVER... 01 July The Culling
08 July Nekrophile Records...with readings
from The Church of 2CRII.
(Originally scheduled in May.)
75, 22, 29 July — TBA
WEDNESDAYS
VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
10:30-11:30 am
JUST LIKE WOMEN
5:15-6 pm
Tune in for 45 minutes of invigorating and
stimulating interviews, news and music. For
anyone interested in women's issues or learning more about them.
THE AFRICAN SHOW
8:00-9:30 pm
Catch the latest in African news and Music
with Umerah Patrick Oukulu and Todd
Langmuir. News at 8:30. Special feature
weekly at 9:00. Onward-Harambe.
THE KNIGHT AFTER
Midnight to 4:00 am
Music to clobber Yuppies by—featuring radio
shows traded with alternative stations in
Europe and the U.S. This show will really
mess up your BMW!
THURSDAYS
PARTY WITH ME, PUNKER!
3:00-5:00 pm
Same place, same time, different hosts. Join
rock action and Crusty Love for cool tunes
and special guests and features. Tune into
Crusty for the last Thursday of July for the
best ot Vancouver punk rock, including local
antiquities.
COMPILATION COMPILATION
6:30-7:30 pm
The name says it all. Explore the rich and
varied sound of the world of compilation
tapes and albums.
03 July Jacques Major—personal collection
10 July Firm Faves—Fruit of the Original
Sin
17 July Personal collection
24 July Firm Faves—Cabaret Futura
37 July Compilation Combination—Cohosts
Jacques and Kawika battle it out.
TOP OF THE BOPS
8:00-9:00 pm
Screaming guitars, throbbing basses, pounding drums, pumping pianos and howling
saxes: Top of the Bops has them all, and you
can have them too!
MEL BREWER PRESENTS
77:00 pm-Midnight
If you haven't tuned in yet then you missed
The Arts Club Memorial Blues Band playing
live in the studio, and a lot of other way keen
stuff. So stay up late one night a week to
hear Patrick, Jay and Jerry interview local
bands and highlight local music. This month,
with some luck, Los Durangos, the Hip Type
and others. Tune in for details. Remember,
no spitting or foul language, Pat's mother is
listening.
FRIDAYS
FRIDAY MORNING MAGAZINE
10:30-11:30 am
STIRRINGS: Your host Kirby Hill has just felt
the scent of Spring. Out of the hibernation of
the winter semester, this Wolf reawakens in
search of fresh summer territories. This
month the Wolf senses:
04 July  An independence day special: a
21/2-hour profile of the Peace
Festival, Special Guests TBA.
77 July Jazz, Jazz, Jazz, Jazz, Jazz.
18 July   Summer Funfest with summerwear
fashion designer, Shaughan
Williams.
25 July   Previewing AMARCII
POWER CHORD
3:30-5:00 pm
Vancouver's only true metal show, featuring
the underground alternative to mainstream
metal: local demo tapes, imports and other
rarities, plus album give-aways.
SOUL GALORE
8:00-9:30 pm
All the tearjerkers, all the hipshakers. From
R&B to funk and especially soul. Join Fiona
MacKay and Anne Devine and wear your
soul shoes.
04 July Music from the Modern Records
label, featuring Etta James, B.B.
King, The Cadets and more.
77 July  Soul Galore's favorite dance steps.
78 July James Brown Pt. II
25 July Surfing Black America. Sounds of
At Mido Framers our exacting craftsmanship
and knowledge have enabled us to establish the
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WVe take the extra time, make the extra effort that
distinguishes truly impeccable work from the
merely acceptable. Specializing in aluminum,
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AS
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20      DISCORDER
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SUNTANNING
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HAIR STYLING
20% Discount
on any hair care services
with Robert
5784 University Blvd.        Ph. 224-1922
(in UBC Village) 224-9116
Valid with presentation of this ad Expires July 31, 1986 the sands from California, South
Carolina and Florida.
THE BIG SHOW
9:30 pm-midnight
Why pay money to get into a nightclub on a
Friday night? If Big InternationAI can't get
you dancing, no-one can.
THE VISITING PENGUIN SHOW
Late night 1:00-4:00 am
Now, finally, a reason to stay up past the BIG
SHOW on Friday nights. Yes, Andreas Kitz-
mann and Steve Gibson dish out requests,
new music, interviews and selfless egotism.
WEEKEND REGULARS
8:00 am    Sign-On
Noon        BRUNCH REPORT
News, sports and weather.
6:00 pm   SAT./SUN. MAGAZINE
News, sports and weather, plus
GENERIC REVIEW, analysis of current affairs and special features.
4:00 am    Sign-Off
WEEKEND HIGHLIGHTS
SATURDAYS
EARLY MUSIC SHOW
7:30-10:00 am
Have breakfast to music from the Medieval,
Renaissance and Baroque periods, played on
strange and exotic instruments. With host
Tyler Cutforth.
NEOFILE
Noon-4:00 pm
A rundown of the newest, most exciting and
insipid releases raked in during the week at
CITR. Join music directors and charismalep-
tic hosts Don Chow and Kevin Smith for an
eclectic musical pig-out, with occasional interviews, live mixes, and peripheral relevance.
PROPAGANDA!
6:30-9:00 pm
An eclectic mix of interviews, reviews, music,
humour, High Profiles, and other features
with Mike Johal.
PYJAMA PARTY
9:00 pm-1:00 am
Your hosts Mike Mines and Robin Razzell
present everything from ambient music for
snoozing to upbeat tunes for popcorn and
pillow fights.
TUNES R' US
Late night 1:00-4:00 am
Music, Music, Music, Handyman Bob, Music,
Music, My Favorite Album, Music, Music,
Experimental To Classical, Teddy Kelowna
presents, and yes more music.
SUNDAYS
MUSIC OF OUR TIME
5:00 am-Noon
With the threat of an American cultural takeover looming ever nearer, Music of Our Time
is devoting the entire month of July (at least)
to works by Canadian composers in conjunction with the International year of Canadian
Music. Listen for Pentland, Somers, Willun,
Champagne, Kenius, Coulthard, Schafer,
Hetu, Archer, Weinzweig...
ROCKERS SHOW
Noon-3:00 pm
The best in Roots, Rock, Reggae, DJ and
Dub. With your hosts George Family Man
Barrett, Collin Hepburn and Bruce James.
MICHAEL WILLMORE'S ROCK TALK
3:00-6:00 pm
Authentic Rock 'N' Roll from the 1950s and
1960s featuring many collectors' items and
rock rarities you'd never hear anywhere else.
SUNDAY NIGHT LIVE
8:00-9:00 pm
Your fave artists and others presented in their
truest form—live. So just turn up the volume
to an unbearable level, smoke lots of cigarettes, close your eyes and imagine you're
there. No listings this month, just surprises.
FAST FORWARD
9:00 pm-1.00 am
Mark Mushet searches the world over for
experimental, minimalist, avant-garde, electronic, and other non-mainstream sounds.
LIFE AFTER BED
1 am-4 am
The return of the nightmare from the people
you're parents warned you about. Ugly radio
has returned. Warn your avocados.
ULY   1986      21 Tm1o2- Cable
TOP AIRPLAY ALBUMS
Husker Du
Candy Apple Grey
WB
Butthole Surfers
Rembrandt Pussyhorse
Alt. Tent.
Robotics
My Computer's Acting Strange
ARIWA
Let's Active
Big Plans for Everybody
IRS
Peter Gabriel
So
Geffen/WEA
We've Got a Fuzzbox...
...And Were Gonna Use It EP
Vindaloo
Jonathan Richman
It's Time For
RT/WEA
Ramones
Animal Boy
WEA
Mojo Nixon & Skid Roper
Frenzy
Restless
Screaming Blue Messiahs
Gun-Shy
WEA (UK)
Various Artists
Vhutemas Archetypi
Side Effects
The Empty Quarter
Delirium
Illuminated
Sonic Youth
Evol
SST
G.B.H.
Midnight Madness and Beyond
Combat Core
Cocteau Twins
Victorialand
Polygram
Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan
Best Of, Volume One
Wo mad
Lost Durangos
Evil Town EP
Armadillo
Lou Reed
Mistrial
RCA
Get Smart
Swimming With Sharks
Restless
That Petrol Emotion
Manic Pop Thrill
Demon
Various Artists
Rough Trade Compilation
RT/WEA
Various Artists
Raw Cuts Volume Two
Criminal Damage
Kalahari Surfers
Living in The Heart of the Beast
Recommended
Frank Tovey
Snakes & Ladders
MUTEA/VEA
TOP AIRPLAY SINGLES
The Woodentops
The Love Club
Hunting Party
Black Britain
Alex Chilton
Big Guns
He Said
A Merry Cow
Gerry Hannah
Alien Sex Fiend
22      DISCORDER
Good Thing
Shadows on the Wall
Lost in a World
Ain't No Rockin' in a
Police State
No Sex
Running Out of Time
Pump
Honey Don't
Songs From the Underground
I Walk the Line
Rough Trade
* Demo**
**Demo**
Stiff
New Rose
**Demo**
Mute
**Demo**
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VERDICT
Butthole Surfers
Rembrandt Pussyhorse
Touch and Go
OKAY, LIKE I DRIVE TAXI LATE AT NIGHT,
not much of a job, but I make good money
and see the best things in life, if you get my drift.
Being with this company so long, I got a super
stereo system and good music to go along with
it. But, to the crux of the matter.
So, one night I'm cruisin' and, like, I don't
usually pick up really straight-looking fares, but
things were slow and I picked up this guy outside Expo and about that time the Buttholes were
doing the 'American Woman" thing. This guy
says what is that anyway...sounds familar and I
say, O it's the Buttholes doing the old Guess Who
thing and this guy gets really upset and starts
screaming about cultural chauvinism and psychotic trash and I ask, very politely, You got a problem, pal? and he's so pissed off he can hardly
tell me he's like the Canadian cultural representative in the recent trade negotiation with the Big
Brother to the South, and he's hot, mad, that
some band named the Butthole Surfers would
take a Canadian Classic and destroy it. So, like
he's off his fuckin' tree about theft of cultural integrity, etc., so I stop the cab and tell him, very
politely, If you don't like the Butthole Surfers, it's
time you found another ride. Being at Main and
Hastings, he calms down real quick and says It's
not that I don't like them, I've never even heard
of them, but they're American and doing bad
things to Canadian culture...and I though for a
moment and realized Yes, it is my mission tonight
to educate this poor geeb.
So, I take him for a long ride, with the meter
off, of course, and I play him the whole Rjem-
brandt Pussyhorse LP and smoke a few hits of
really maximum hash and explain to him the finer
points of the Buttholes. After about IV2 sides and
some very deep hits, he begins to see my point.
The Buttholes are not only the best batid in
America right now, they may be the best band
in the whole entire universe (space-time continuum included), at least at this particular moment.
So what if they're from Texas and include a dog
in the band lineup, so what if they're drug addicts and hate Henry Rollins and Madonna, so
what if they're doing almost like classical stuff
on this new record? Like, the Butthole Surfers
are, move over Iggy, GOD.
And just then, the 'American Woman" thing
comes on again and he gets started on again
about the destruction of cultural artifacts, and I
realize that the cause is lost. You can't lead an
asshole to the toilet. So, I open the door, grab
him by his mauve silk collar, and tell him, very
politely, Listen shithead, Gibby Spillane just wrote
me the other day and he says on the next record
the Buttholes are going to cover "SNOWBIRD"
and the "HOCKEY NIGHT IN CANADA" theme
Maybe it was the hash or the wrinkles in his
jacket, but as I drove away I saw him in the rear-
view mirror, perched on all fours, slobbering,
drooling, hysterical, clawing at the moon.
O well, can't win them all. Hey, the Buttholes
are not for everyone.
—Travis B.
Muslimgauze
Flajelata
Limited (U.K.)
WITH THREE ALBUMS RELEASED IN
less than a year, it would be easy to forgive
Bryn Jones if signs of exhaustion in one form or
another were evident. Add to this the fact that
Muslimgauze is essentially drum sounds and the
lack of any really new sounds might have one
be prepared for disaster. Instead, Jones seems
to have used the release of three albums to explore the inner works of his medium and cut
down on the aspects which might be extraneous.
Buddhists on Fire (#1) showed us the splashy,
often danceable side. While television tapes,
Gregorian Chant and radio splices have their
value in establishing a mood or conveying a
message, overuse in the industry has possibly
dulled their impact.
Blinded Horses (#2) showed exploration into
the spacey, decidedly Oriental side of things. For
me, the record was like a series of long slow
breaths—probably enough to keep people like
me who enjoy not having to think (much less do
anything) happy—but not recommended for toe-
tapping. Flajelata (#3) leans more to the Blinded
Horses side. The mid-Eastern influence is even
more pronounced—due in part to the dedication
to the oppressed people of Afghanistan. There
is an added fullness to the sound here.
Jones has discovered ways of filling his silences without always using drums. The tape
sounds feel more like an integral part of the
piece. Tonality has become more a feature and
there are even moments where it's possible to
hear melodies of a sort. All the percussive
sounds that have come to be associated with
Muslimguaze are there: piano, tinkles, tympani,
bongos, machines, etc. So are the strings
sounds. In short—nothing new. What makes it
all click is the restraint in the use of all the
assorted gadgetry and the persuasive ability to
work within one's means.
How nice, too, to find someone making political
statements without screaming them from one
end of the LP to the other. (The Scargill effect).
It's hard to imagine how it could be improved.
—Larry Thiessen
Dissidenten/Lem Chaheb
Sahara Elektrik
THIS IS A GREAT RECORD BY TWO INSPIR-
ing bands who have collaborated to create
a successful synthesis of music from two very
different cultures. Lem Chaheb are an immensely
popular Morrocan group, now living in Europe,
who never saw much financial reward in their
native country due to rampant pirating of their
records and also fell into disfavour with the
government for their outspoken attitude.
West Germany's Dissidenten are a group who
have long been involved in non-Western music,
having toured and collaborated with musicians
from India and Zimbabwe. They came to love
Arabic music while living in the immigrant ghetto area of West Berlin.
Lem Chaheb are in the forefront of the music,
carrying the melodies, playing the indigenous
Morrocan/Arabic guitars (the Gimbri and Oud),
percussion and doing all the singing. Dissidenten
keep a solid rhythm backing with kit drums and
electric bass and add electric guitar, keyboards
and flute to the melody lines. The music is inspired by Morrocan tribal music and combines
both the authenticity and uniqueness of the
original "ethnic" music and the power and drive
of Western rock. The songs are all wonderfully
melodic and "sing-along-able" (you have to make
up your own "words" though). They switch easily
between very uplifting major key type melodies
and sombre minor key parts and back again,
each song having as many as three or four
themes.
Most of all, this is extremely infectious dance
music, as that is what it is intended to be (the
live performances are often accompanied by a
belly dance group). The base of this music is folk
dancing, so the steady pulse of the bass and
drums propels and fuses with it in a perfectly
organic way to create something entirely original.
Says Friedo of Dissidenten, "We realized when
we made this record with Lem Chaheb that if we
merely tried to copy their music Europeans would
JULY   1986     23 <£i~~~-~^
DESSERT
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& COFFEE SPECIAL $2.25
Evenings from 6:00 p.m.
i   — cappuccino or cafe latte
(           with cheesecake
\3§^
OpGn
Mon.-Thurs.       8 am-10:30 pm
Friday            8 am-Midnight
Saturday          11 am-Midnight
Sunday           noon-7 pm
820 HOWE STREET   683-5122
not be inspired to familiarize themselves with it.
This is dance music which translates into the
language of the European."
Check it out and see if you don't agree. Crank
this record up loud and see it it doesn't make
you move.
—Mike Harding
Del Lords
Johnny Comes Marching Home
THE DEL LORDS' SUPERB DEBUT LP,
Frontier Days, was a personal favourite, so
now we have the follow-up. They still have that
driving, unashamed, rocking beat and their
predilection for going where other bands fear
to tread by singing about such topics as old
soldiers and U.S. hostages (they did a song
about mercenaries on the first LP).
The focal point of side one is "Soldiers
Home," about the veterans' Christmas wish
for no more war, supported by Pat Benatar's
voice, no less. Side two highlights are the insistent, pounding beat of "Ever Lovin" followed
by the other "issue" song "Against My Will,"
about the plight of hostages in some foreign
land.
The band rocks as hard as anyone and
Scott Kemper's lyrics are sufficiently thought-
provoking to maintain interest. Unfortunately,
the whole thing ends with the disappointingly unimaginative "No Waitress No More," although its false endings should instill panic
into D.J.s everywhere.
Great freeway-driving, too.
Asi»~ ~Steve Fdge
&m
Just make sure your design includes
the words CITR FM 102 CABLE 100
^
VANCOUVER, B.C.
^ UBC RADIO prfte
Send your design to:
CITR RADIO Attn: Kevin Smith
6138 SUB Blvd.
Vancouver V6T 2A5    /£y
?^        Deadline July 25
Work fast..time's running out.
Robert Wyatt
Old Rottenhat
Rough Trade/ WE A
THIS RECORD IS ONE OF A NUMBER OF
Rough Trade releases in this country, all
of them quite admirable and none of them at
all likely to sell any great number of copies.
Which is a shame, really, considering they include the likes of Chris & Cosey, Linton Kwesi
Johnson, Pere Ubu, and Float Up CR Being
ignored by the general public, however, is certainly nothing new to any of these artists, nor
to Robert Wyatt particularly. If there is anyone
to blame for these sad injustices, then it is the
artists themselves; and this is precisely why
you should check out Old Rottenhat. You see,
there is absolutely no way that the general
public is ready to hear what these artists are
trying to say, either literally or musically. More
popular figures get around this by diluting
24      DISCORDER their message, making it smoother, slicker,
and easier to swallow. Wyatt, happily, avoids
this "warm water effect," and gives us the real
thing.
This is not to say that this is an unlistenable
or inaccessible album. It is not dissonant,
funky, non-metric, nor modern. There is a
minimum of sounds and instruments—voice,
drums, organ, a bit of bass, and that's it. The
record is passive, unobtrusive, and utterly
unfashionable, just like the cover art. At the
same time, though, it is full of anger and melancholy and political angst. Old Rottenhat
seems more for those of us who already like
Wyatt, but the uninitiated may like it as well.
If you've never listened to a Robert Wyatt LP
(and there are quite a number of them), the
collection Nothing Can Stop Us is an excellent
place to start. Give it a chance; the man grows
on you.
—Don Chow
Husker Du
Candy Apple Grey
Warner Bros.
1 THINK I FINALLY UNDERSTAND THE TITLE
of this record. The colour association one
usually makes with candy apple is red, and from
there to the low-slung, powerful sports car of
one's daydreams is only a slight shift of the imagination. With Candy Apple Grey, on the other
hand, one is faced with an image of a powerful
album leaving ambiguity and uncertainty in its
exhaust.
The songs, alternating, as usual, between
those written by guitarist Bob Mould, and those
written by drummer Grant Hart, tend to build on
the image created by the title. Opening with
Mould's "Crystal," the album immediately envelops the listener in a net of white noise as Mould
screams about Life, The Universe, and Everything, until he concludes, "You realize the finest
things in life/ Are the ones that can never be
hurt." This track is followed by Hart's engaging
"I Don't Want to Know if You are Lonely." In it
we find Hart passionately concerned with the affairs of his heart, rather than the world around
it. This is a pattern which is repeated throughout
the album. Mould, uncertain of the world, and
his place in it, and Hart equally unsure of the
future, but seemingly, more sure of what's going by in his life than Mould.
Musically, the album continues the trend of the
prolific Husker's recent albums, towards a cleaner mix of the instruments, clearer vocals (a trend
aided by the lyric sheet in the record). As a bit
of a surprise, keyboards are being used more
often, and more prominently. Particularly on
Hart's great pop tune "Sorry Somehow" and his
ballad "No Promises Have I Made." Mould,
meanwhile, has used an acoustic guitar on "Too
Far Down" and "Hardly Getting Over It," making the band sound something like one of those
"guitar" bands that REM is always being blamed for inspiring.
By the album's close, with Mould's "All This
I've Done For You," I found myself concluding
that these guys, not forgetting bass player Greg
Norton, write better songs about not knowing
what the hell is going on in the world than anyone
else. This is a great record.
—PC
Peter Gabriel
So
Geffen/WEA
CO.
O A seemingly enigmatic title for Gabriel's
latest work, with a cover baring his face, throwing away the masks/illusions that graced his
previous solo efforts.
So.
The word itself is indicative of cause, as, "I
have created this, so...you will respond." And so
you will, and so will I.
So.
This record has "winner" written across it, a
record so filled with captivating songs that you
will hear and hear and hear them all year; hear
them on college radio! hear them on FM rock
radio! hear them on AM rock radio! hear them
on FM MOR radio! hear them on AM MOR radio!
hear them on MTV/MuchMusid...Sledgehammer
indeed...
So.
This record will invariably chart higher and
longer than any Gabriel solo album before, a
record that will rack up sales numbers as high
I as fellow Genesis-alumni (and all-round hack)
Phil Collins, a record that will be familiar to
housewives and truckdrivers and students and
clubbers and EVERYBODY ELSE this summer...
So.
With a record that is almost impossible for
anyone, I say anyone, to dislike (even those longtime Gabriel/Genesis aficionados disturbed by
the possible lack of...depth...on this release),
Gabriel will take his place in the rock firmament
as one of the greatest vocalists in a business
notable only for singers, and the marvelous
range of voice textures will become a rock fixture.
So.
So is produced by Quebec's Daniel Lanois,
and the usual brilliant production of a Gabriel
album is enhanced with a wide range of musicians—some, like Kate Bush, Stewart Copeland,
Jimm Kerr, and Tony Levin relatively well-known;
others, like Simon Clark, Manu Katche, Youssou
N'Dor, and Djalma Correa familiar to those versed in his previous works or influences—the overall effect of which is to give each song a unique
"feel" within the album: the beautifully evocative
"Don't Give Up," featuring Kate Bush; the rockin'
funky "Big Time" with Copeland; the R&B-influ-
enced "Sledgehammer," with Manu Katche, and
so on.
So.
Despite the lessening of that biting social conscious, and the shift away from the dominant
African tribal rhythms of previous works, Gabriel
has crafted an album that builds upon his earlier
material and anticipates a summer market at the
same time, a record destined to be a big hit.
So.
Don't worry about getting to like it. You are going to hear it an awful lot, and you will like it.
Unless, of course, you are one of those dinosaurs
still walking around with "Frankenchrist" on your
walkman.
So.
—Laurie Mercer Mofungo
Messenger Dogs of the Gods
Lost Records (US)
MOFUNGO IS A NEW YORK, NEW YORK
band that has been playing together since
about 1980. They released several EPs before
recording a full-length cassette called Out of Line.
This effort enjoyed some success in the New
York alternative market and was subsequently
pressed into vinyl in 1983. That album was a
refreshing arrival at CITR in the summer of '84,
featuring an abrasive saxophone (a la James
Chance), discordant guitars and pointedly political lyrics.
When Messenger Dogs arrived at the station
I tore open the wrapper with great anticipation.
The LP features 13 songs, all short. For the most
part, the sound is much safer than on the original
album and the mix lacks the jarring tension that
marked Mofungo's earlier work.
The saxophone has retreated into the background, only occasionally slipping forward to
make hair stand on end. Where the band used
to react to the punk and new wave that dominates
the New York club scene, they now attempt to
join in.
There are still some exciting moments. Middle
Eastern influences are apparent on "SNCC" and
"Strike from Within" is convincingly angry.
The B side is the most listenable, if somewhat
repetitive. The first four songs owe much to the
folk tradition. "Johnny Didn't Come Marching
Home" sounds like a Johnny Horton hit and
Mofungo does a respectable cover of H. McLin-
tock's "Big Rock Candy Mountain."
However, it is not until the last three cuts on
the album that things get interesting. Though the
saxophone remains somewhat indifferent, a
demanding edge asserts itself in the rest of the
sound structure. Bass and drums provide a simplistic and heavy rhythm line with two guitars
creating fractured dischord, leaving voice and
sax to carry the melody. Good stuff, and it comes
to a peak in the final cut, "The Typist's Pleas,"
which suffers only from a muddied vocal mix.
—Kawika
Jonathan Richman
and the Modern Lovers
It's Time For...
Rough Trade Records
NEED AN ANTIDOTE FOR SYNTHETIC
pop? Tired of O-so-politically correct songs
that shoulder the problems of the whole world
(OOOooo!)? Or maybe you've heard the angst
of hardcore nail-biting nihilists once too often to
be genuinely convinced...? I mean, there's a lot
more to life than what gets on the 11 o'clock
news...really. Like what? Like cool neon signs,
thick chocolate malts, camping out at the beach,
shopping at the corner store, having fun, oh
yeah, and real macoy love, too.
If you find that no one is singing about the
realities in your life, and you don't fit in, then I
suggest it's time for Jonathan Richman and the
Modern Lovers. They sing about these things,
things that matter, things that are important.
Jojo doesn't clutter up his songs with stupid
syncopations that confuse toe-tapping, or synthesizer noodles, or absolutely correct rhymes.
This might be hard to understand, but wait a
minute—he's just big on the back-beat and
straight forward in his words: / don't care if it cost
more money to shop there, 'cause this was love.
I don't care if ya hav'ta walk longer, I'll walk further, I'll pay more, I don't really want what that new
mall got, I want what they got in that corner store.
And what did I feel when I walked by slow: sorrow, sorrow all around. Why I should feel that way,
I know: I smell the ghost smell from the ground,
that old wooden smell of the corner store." Now
that's not too hard to understand is it?
Some people laugh when I say I like Jonathan
Richman, think I'm a jerk or something, just
because he uses girl backup singers and harmonies. So what? I like when Jonathan sings
about love and permanence in relationships—
you know, he's not just talking about a lover
either, he's talking about friends, communities,
your favourite jeans and stuff, and trees and bugs
too. Hey, people can feel good for a long time
about who they're with and where they are, that's
all.
Jonathan's not too a big on mechanical things,
consumerism, or progress in general (nope, you
won't see him at Expo...aw). There's a neat blend
of insight, poetry, sincerity, and not-taking-one-
self-too-serious-ness on this record—oh yeah,
that's a big part of love too, isn't it, not taking
yourself too seriously... It's a pretty good record.
—Ralph Synning
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"I don't wont to ever have a
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all the time, and I don't even
lite to carry a purse."
*fl rather be in a ward for the
criminally insane than be here
right now.'*'
JUNE 27 - JULY 10
2 SHOWS NIGHTLY
7:00 & 9:30
"FASCINATING,
UNFORGETTABLY VIVID!'
—Janet Maslin, N.Y. Times
"AMAZING...the spectacle,
as in time-lapse photography,
of human beings taking shape
before our eyes!'
—Molly Haskell, Vogue
"Absolutely enthralling...
% BETTER THAN THERAPY
AND MUCH CHEAPER!'
—L.A. Weekly
"HILARIOUS, tragic,
revealing, always fascinating,
and at times tremendously
moving!' —Newsday
"A RARE PHENOMENON IN
FILM HISTORY...the most
spectacularly surprising
satisfaction of the 23rd N.Y.
Film Festival!'
—Andrew Sarris, Village Voice
From noted director
MICHAEL APTED
(COAL MINER'S DAUGHTER)
28 UP
GENERAL
A FIRST RUN FEATURES RELEASE
COMING MOVIES TO WATCH FOR
KOYAANISQATSI & BRAZIL — July 11 - 17
THE MAKIOKA SISTERS — July 18 - 24
KAOS — July 25 - 31
"I never told you this s\5, bat I
Knew somebody who had a friend
that slept with Elvis, and it was
no big deal at all/'
Just 3 short blocks
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SkyTrain Station
Phone for available times
and rates
526-3455
MCI 2"
16 TRACK
The latest in
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JULY   1986      27 Der Mittlegang
"Rituals"
Rituals are usually not mysterious occult
ceremonies. They are more like having to go
over to granny's house for dinner, wearing
matching shorts and blue velvet blazer, while
fat relatives pinch your cheek. Rituals are
tedious and boring. This song feels that way.
The music is tedious and the singer sounds
like he did his bit in another room. Was he trying to get away from Aunt Fannie, perhaps?
Excited First Daughter
"Perelandra"
This folksy instrumental reminds me of the
soundtrack to one of those boring NFB shorts
that come on after Hockey Night in Canada.
Should be retitled "Oyster Shucking in Cape
Breton."
I HAVE THIS RATHER CYNICAL ATTITUDE
towards the local music scene. You see,
it's always been my contention that no
matter how often bands put out singles that:
equate the Socred Government to the Reich
Chancellory, say life sucks, sound like vegetables being thawed out in a microwave, or just
plain claim to be alternative, they're all bogus.
Why? Because I think deep down every local
band secretly wishes to get connected to a
certain local talent agent, who is nicknamed
after Bullwinkle's species, and open for Mr.
Mister or ZZ Top on an 85-day North American
tour starting off in Amarillo, Texas. Of course
I'm probably wrong, but that's not going to
stop me from performing the autopsy on this
month's entrants in the Demo Derby.
Big Guns
"In the Know"
Oh yeah! Dig this song! The pick of the litter. Garage rock with Iggyish vocals, it's the
kind of tune to have blaring in your '65 Chev
Dinosaur, while you stalk convertible Rabbit-
driving preppies on their way to an invitation
only party.
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Nepenthe
"Entwine"
Sounds like an android mating dance. Synthesizer music for those who are sexually
aroused by floppy discs.
Go Four 3
"This Flight Tonight"
A close second to Big Guns for pick of the
litter, this song makes me smile every time I
hear it. (Probably because I flashback to my
delinquent Nazareth days.) Great guitar work
and only occasional lapses in the vocals. But
nothing that chain smoking and scotch can't
cure. Big question: will they do "School's
Out?"
Deviant and the Clones
"Slaughtering Fran's Cat"
Fran's cat was lucky. A bone grinder sounds
better. When the singer annoyingly chants
"Here kitty, kitty," one hopes he's flattened by
a real Cat, D-8 size.
The Water Walk
"Far Fields"
If you play this song at home, your parents
will praise you for finally listening to some
decent music. Reminds me of a singer in a
Sandman Inn lounge accompanied by a rhythm ace. "Thanks very much! Here's some
Dire Straits."
Radio Europe
"No Hurry"
I like the bassline to this. It's reminiscent
of King Crimson. The vocals aren't too bad
either. Unfortunately this song is lacking in any
real hooks and is thus forgettable. On an
album, "No Hurry" would be the filler between
the hits.
Love Club
"Shadows on the Wall"
An adequate semi-rockin' nuclear rally tune.
I like the vocalist. She reminds me of an early Grace Slick, before Grace had everybody's
kid, discovered late night munching, and
started impersonating the Michelin Man. This
band should go over quite well when they play
the Hornby Island Community Hall.
—Jerome Broadway
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from p. 30
seems to be reflecting the ongoing changes
of the sixties' generation. The generation that
once wore tie-dye and did acid now wears ties
and does lunch. On the Haight this means
that the numerous seamy taverns and used
clothing, book, and record stores are being
slowly elbowed out by pasta bars, frozen
yogurt stands, designer cookie shops and
yuppie bistros. Fortunately, the Haight still has
a thriving herd of long-haired sixties' burnouts
proving that they are not an endangered
species as once thought. (Best burnout conversation overheard: "...Oh yeah, man! I
wouldn't miss Wavy Gravy's birthday for
anything!")
THE HAIGHT ALSO HAS PLENTY OF
skate punks and a number of decent
bars serving as outposts against the
overachiever onslaught. Among the worthwhile bars is Nightbreak, a Repo Man-like
tavern which on Sundays featured dollar draft
specials, hardcore punk videos, three thrash
bands and a Sushi bar. A great place to hang
out in statement clothing and look bored. Also
worthwhile along the Haight is the I Beam. A
dress-in-black-dirge-disco Tuesday to Saturday, it featured special bands on Monday night
for five bucks, which enabled me to see a
double bill of Tupelo Chain Sex and Snake-
finger. I also caught another double bill of the
Bolshoi—a power pop band from England
whose singer tried hard to look indifferent but
nonetheless managed to put on a pretty good
set—and SF's version of Skinny Puppy, Until
December. This Gene Loves Jezebel-looking
trio—wearing mom's old hand-me-downs and
paste jewellery—were a big hit with the audience, but I thought they were about as exciting
as ukulele lessons. If Until December were
dull though, they were no where near as bad
as what I'll call the Worldbeat scam.
Worldbeat is supposed to be a new multiracial music form that borrows from reggae,
funk, and others. It's supposed to be really hot
and it received a big write-up in a national
music magazine. But when I caught renown
worldbeaters Zulu Spear in the Full Moon
Saloon on the Haight, I was less than impressed. The band dressed like extras from the
Gilligan's Island episode where Gilligan meets
the headhunters, and the music sounded pretentious. To top it off the bar was overpriced
and boring. (You know when a bar is bad
when you hear people talking about tax shelters and software) The Worldbeat verdict:
plastic African music for yuppies. Beware! But
don't worry. The yuppies aren't taking over.
You won't find any of them in clubs like Wolfgangs, DV8 or the Mabuhay Gardens, clubs
which presented such unyuppie acts as the
Long Ryders, Tuxedomoon, and Frightwig.
The Bay Area has a lot of good action despite the infestation of Young Republicans, and
it may be just the thing for those individuals
over-Exposed to Exploit '86. For me, my original assignment never completed, I relunctant-
ly return home to my regular job.
"Would you like fries with that, Mr. Pat-
tison?"
—Jerome Broadway
l,fe  K
IHT TO Me>« B>4 (r««cn !***>.)
mzAA
7„m
ttim
SO
,   WIS  S£<<**<*
'^3«*.
^'JHf
fDfco IV
MO MiflOfcS
JULY   1986     29 The Roving Ear
Chief Petty Fry Cook Jerome Broadway
Finds Himself... Stranded in  Frisco.
I ALWAYS SEEM TO MISS THE BOAT
when it comes to doing insightful and
interesting articles for Discorder. I don't
know why, but I do know that in the past year
I've missed the chance to cover the skinhead
scene in Manila, report on a pirate radio station in Beirut, and interview the members of
an Afghani marching thrash band. So when
I was offered the opportunity to cover a reunion of former Air America pilots (Air America being that wonderful [now defunct] carrier
which used to be the only way to fly for the
globe-trotting CIA man wishing to visit the
friendly skies of Southeast Asia) in Tucson,
Arizona, I jumped. Besides, anything's an excuse to get away from my present job—Chief
Petty Fry-Cook on the McBarge.
Unfortunately, due to a lack of Discorder
funding, I only made it as far as San Francisco. So there I was stranded in Frisco, the
city that brought you a bridge, a song, Rice-
a-Roni, and Deadheads. Fortunately, I was
able to look up an old buddy of mine from my
black market days in Macao—actually we met
washing dishes in the Broadway Bino's—who
was living in San Mateo, a safe white suburb
twenty minute's drive from SF, and I was set
to check out the Bay Area scene. However, being outside Frisco one quicky realizes the
need for a car. There's a lot of ground to be
covered in the Bay Area, what with clubs all
over Frisco, not to mention Berkeley and
Oakland across the bav and Palo Alto to the
south, so a car is a necessity. Besides, with
out one you'll never get to drive the streets of
Frisco like Steve McQueen did in Bullit.
Of course driving aimlessly around Frisco
and bottoming out can get to be a drag, so
you need to find the action spots. The best
written sources for club info are BAM (Bay
Area Music) and Calendar magazines. These
magazines are both free, can be found all over
town, and provide pretty thorough club and
concert listings. My issue of BAM even had
a cover story on Camper Van Beethoven. Another good source for club listings is the Sunday issue of the SF Examiner, which had an
entertainment section that even listed hardcore clubs. Try finding that in your Province
Weekender. For those who can't read there is
always radio. Since Bay Area commercial
radio is as bad as anywhere, maybe even
worse with such a high play rate of SF's finest:
Journey, the Starship, The Dead, and Michael
J. Fox's older brother Hubert Lewis, one'd want
to choose from one of the area's four college
stations. Best bets are UC of Berkeley's KALX
and Foothills Junior College's KFJC, which
broadcasts from Palo Alto. These stations are
a lot similar to the beloved R, except, they
have two superior features. These being way
more female announcers and constant concert ticket giveaways.
Nonetheless, with all these sources of information I somehow managed to miss a triple
bill at the Filmore of Husker Du, Camper Van
Beethoven, and Faith No More. However,! did
catch SF thrash favorites RKA (Rich Kids on
Acid) and Verbal Abuse at the Rock on Broadway. The Rock is a former movie theatre turned into a thrash club in which the DKs used
to frequently play. The club had a great atmosphere helped by a neighbourhood made up
of sleazy strip joints, all of which seemed to
have the kind of shlocky neon signs that one
only sees in T.J. Hooker re-runs. But the Rock
was beset by two problems common to all-
ages gigs in Frisco and Oakland. These are
curfew shows and no-ins-and-outs shows.
Since there's a curfew in both cities, a sure
sign of a crumbling society, a lot of the all-ages
gigs start at 6 p.m. and end at ten. Gotta get
those rotten kids off the streets, you know!
Also some clubs have a policy of not allowing you to go in and out, forcing you to stay
inside once you've entered. This means you
usually end up playing the hide-the-mickey
game.
Out in Berkeley though, there's none of this
police state garbage at all-ages gigs. So you
could see a good band, like LA's The Descendants, in a good bar, like Ruthie's Inn, without
any hassles. The Descendants, incidently, do
a pretty good punked-up version of the Beach
Boys' "Wendy."
Another area that is hassle free and a must
to visit is the Haight. Haight-Ashbury, man.
The sixties' mecca where future Saab and
BMW owners made their trek to find peace
love and outer body experiences. The Haight
cont. p. 29
mw
MfK ,
30      DISCORDER 75S»«»«
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