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That "Brokeback" Magazine From CITR 101.9 FM
Ifflm
Blood Brothers
Pink Mountaintops
The Diableros
Liars
Akimbo* (^o^Isfi^B] lTuVe-sI concerts®
BUY TICKETS AT
hoKca
PURCHASE TICKETS gQBSQQ AT hob.ca OR ticketmaster.ca 604-280-4444
2   March 2006 the GENTLE ART of EDITING
Editor
David Ravensbergen  ,
Ad Manager
Caroline Walker
Production Manager
Caroline Walker
Art Director
Will Brown
RLA Editor
Kimberley Day
Review Coordinator
Jordie Yow    ||||||g
Lay out & Design
Will Brown
Caroline Walker
Production
Will Brown
Julie Colero
Ben Lai
Duncan McHugh
David Ravensbergen
Sarah Spencer
Caroline Walker
Curtis Woloschuk
Graeme Worthy
Julian Wil Helmsen
Photo & Illustration
Guillaume Boucher
Jennifer Chrumka
Alex Coombes
Marielle Ko
Nicole Ondre
Alanna Scott
Program Guide
Bryce Dunn
Charts
Luke Meat
Distribution
Lasse Lutick
VS Distribution
Frankie Rumbletone
Publisher
Student Radio Society
of UBC
here's more than 01
actual human contact into question, talking tc
REGULARS
Editorial
by David Ravensbergen
Strut, Fret and Flicker
by Penelope Mulligan
Riff Raff
by Bryce Dunn
Mixtape: The Buttless Chaps
by Mike LaPointe
Calendar
by Alanna Scott
Under Review
Real Live Action
Under Review
CiTR Charts
Program Guide
"The Goat Is Impossible"
John Cassavetes' Love Streams
by Allan Maclnnis
way to learn how to edit a magazine. Although Google's near-omniscience calls the need
real people in the field is still a good place to start. In most
advice is far more valuable than the search results for "how to edit". But humans have egos and strong optnioi
can interfere with the acquisition-of editorial know-how (no passive aggression towards former editors intended). So,
like any good bookworm, I see the printed word as a refuge from the pressures of personal interaction. While my friends
always accuse me of being an asshole for incessantly correcting their spelling and punctuation, books like Lynn Truss'
Eats, Shoots & Leaves make me feel good to be an uptight grammarian. With these sources combined, I should have been
on my way to editorial stardom.
' But something about these strategies just seemed too conventional, so I opted to hop a jet plane bound for the
Dominican Republic instead. Sure, there's nothing instructional per se about lounging on a white sand beach with a
each hand,' but the value is there somewhere.
eed for
cases,
which
As I was flying off to parts unknown, changes were afoot back on the home front. After much rending of robes
and gnashing of teeth over the hiring of a new Art Director, Will Brown emerged victorious, eager to prove that there
is art and life after Graeme Worthy. Armed with a moustache and a keen eye for aesthetic magnificence, Will promises
to make our magazine consummately readable. To complete the renewal of newness, Caroline Walker decided that her
responsibilities as a Production Manager, scientist-m-training, and general busybody were insufficient, and added the
role of Ad Rep to the list. Ad sales and business rapport have blossomed under her delicate touch, and the future of
Discorder as a thick, content-laden magazine is looking bright.
While I was cultivating my editorial skills in the tropics, my beloved magazine was in disarray, adjusting to a new
set of faces after years of personnel continuity. In the.hands of lesserbeings, this issue could have disintegrated into
a ten page jumble of incoherence. But thanks to the skill and determination of our staff and contributors, everything
has fallen into place, and for that I am grateful. There was a brief scare when teetotaller Caroline succumbed to the
sauce during production, rendering herself nearly useless right when I needed her most, but she persevered and worked
through her alcoholic stupor. ',
So what exactly did I learn about editing from my stay in the Caribbean? That no matter how soul^charging the
sunlight or how catchy the non-stop reggaeton, a good magazine comes from self-sacrifice, diligence, and, well, being
on the right continent.
CSi
HOW To Rock Part n: The Bass
. by Jeffrey Helm
elle
ebllStiClTl From Twee Popper To Toe Tapper
by Duncan McHugh
it's A Blog-Eat-Blogworid
by Michelle Chua
Chinese RocksbyA
McBride And Prejudice
Nettwerk Records' Terry McBride throws
the gauntlet in the RIAA.copyright wars
by Alison Benjamin
David Ravensbergen
Red Cat Records
4307 Main St.
Hair by Nicole Ondre
© DiSCORDER 2006 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All rights
reserved. Circulation 17,500. Subscriptions, payable in advance, to Canadian residents are $15 for
one year, to residents of the USA are $15 US; $24 CDN elsewhere. Single copies are $2 (to cover
postage). Please make cheques or money orders payable to DiSCORDER Magazine. DEADLINES: Copy
deadline for the April issue is March 20th. Ad space is available until March 22nd and can be booked
by calling Caroline at 604.822.3017 ext 3. Our rates are available upon request. DiSCORDER is not
responsible for loss, damage, or any other injury to unsolicited manuscripts, unsolicited artwork
(including but not limited to drawings, photographs, and transparencies), or any other unsolicited
material. Material can be submitted on disc or in type or via email. As always, English is preferred,
but we will accept French. Actually, we won't. Send email to DiSCORDER at discorder@club.ams.
ubcca. From UBC to Langley and Squamish to Bellingham, CiTR can be heard at 101.9 FM as well as
through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ
line at 822.2487, our office at 822.3017, or our news and sports lines at 822.3017 ext. 2. Fax us at
822.9364, e-mail us at: cttrmgr@mail.ams.ubc.ca, visit our web site at www.citr.ca or just pick up a
goddamn pen and write #233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, BC, V6T1Z1, CANADA.
New & Used CD s & Vinyl
ph. 708-9422 * email buddytreMea'
Discorder   3 out-lnterpols Interpol
With a simple test of skill, determination, and as much
strength as is required in your mousing hand you can win:
She Wants Revenge full-length album vinyl
and tix to the March 13 show at Richard's On
Richards
All you have to do is to give the nice vengefilled lady on the She Want Revenge
album cover a head, human or otherwise. Email discorder@club.ams.ubc.ca your
submissions with an appropriately obvious subject "head"er
Dismembered female torsos at Rolling Stone say:
iasa Music Festival Winners play semi-finals   V^^.
Thursday, March 30th
[Richard's on Richards 1100 RieKardsSLi
I / Band @ 9pm **VOTE FOR SKOOKUM*
Tix: $15 @ REDCAT, ZULU & AUDIOPILE 20i6com.™
"d website or call: 604-813-3729 **$22 @ do
m
Mvtra&_
'%*
Questions   of   misogyny
my head irack for the
ADVISORY
sums]
ON BROADWAY.
UMr I UI1LU
THE PULITZER PRIZE.
NOW, IT WILL WIN
YOU OVER.
IAMMY
OWN WIFE
BY DOUG WRIGHT
MARCH 11-APRIL 1,2006
2005/08 SPONSORED BY:
SOT Hyphen
4   March 2006 STRUT, FRET
AND FLICKKf
Penelope Mulligan
6 Miniature Tragedies
Studio 58
Friday, February 10
Repetition is invaluable for training and development, but it can
be deadly in performance. The six playlets by France's Jean-
Paul Wenzel—all contemporary riffs on Greek tragedy were
wonderfully horrifying, but lost power by being performed back to
back.
Wenzel, whose residency at Langara College's Studio 58 was
facilitated by the PuSh International Performing Arts Festival,
previously mounted the collection at a theatre school in France, and
the plays provide an undeniably good opportunity for students to sink
their teeth into nice, dark meat. Overflowing with classically nourish
themes—children murdered to punish philandering spouses, lovers
cooked and fed to unsuspecting husbands, wives killed for oversalting
the food and so on these were nasty little stories indeed, but the
effect over two hours was numbing.
Some of the overkill can be blamed on delivery. I can't recall
ever having been so aurally bludgeoned by live theatre. There was no
time to build tolerance, as the evening began at full volume and more
or less stayed there. Because nearly everything deemed dramatically
significant was shouted, there was no room for the mercurial outbursts
that would have made all the madness convincing.
KerrySandomirsky.oneoftheproduction'stwoprofessionalactors,
set the tone from the off as she excreted a murderous monologue at her
terrified sprogs in "Mado and Her Two Children". With Medea, on whom
the character is based, one should have a deep sense of the woman's
pain and of how she becomes unhinged, but as played by Sandomirsky,
Mado was justloudly, repulsively bonkers. Arestless and demanding wife
was similarly ear-splitting in "A Flower on the Freeway", while the
closing segment, "Maya's Command", was marred by a central
performance so shouty that the actress seemed to be in a different
play. It's possible that Wenzel, who also directed, wanted things this
way, but as with most of the show's problems, one got the feeling
that it was something he simply neglected to fix. Too bad, because the
latter piece was a frightening study in adolescent dysfunction, and
contained a touching supporting turn from Tom McBeath, the other
pro actor. Later on, in "Salt in the Soup", McBeath was a lesson in quiet
intensity. Without raising his voice, he directed a furious, agonized
monologue to his wife's fresh corpse. (It can be done, kids!)
There were some student successes as well: Both John Doucet and
Kyle Jesperson, who shared the role of a troubled small town youth in
"The Butcher", were fully believable without pushing, and Emmelia
Gordon nailed the droll and dangerous tone of the evening's blackest
tale, "Love in a Tin Can". Even in translation, the writing was razor
sharp, and Gordon was right at home with lines like "I didn't bear you
children so I'd rather watch you eat".
All told though, despite some tasty material, the overall feeling
was of having watched an exercise.
The Plughole
If you're reading this before March 5th and have yet to see Searching
for ihe Wrong-Eyed Jesus, then hurry to the Pacific Cinematheque
to catch Andrew Douglas' intoxicating, music-fuelled tour of the
American South—with alt-country sinner-man Jim White as your
shepherd, no less. It shares a double bill with Be Here To Love Me: A
Film About Townes Van Zandt.
The Cinematheque continues to make generous with music
films throughout March and April, and in a highly appropriate tie-
in with CelticFest, brings us If I Should Fall From Grace: The Shane
MacGowan Story. This warm and unadorned study of the ex-Pogues
frontman meshes brilliant footage from various stages of his career with
ample musings from the people in his life, including family, colleagues
and long-time partner, Victoria Clarke. Some of the most interesting
and incisive observations come from former bandmate Philip Chevron,
who states that the Pogues could never have happened in MacGowan's
native Ireland, butonly in thediaspora.Thatthediasporainquestion was
London made it all even more unlikely; the film sheds light on the
musical and political landscape into which the band crashed in the
early 1980s (England was awash in synth-pop while London was
having the poop bombed out of it by the IRA). Nick Cave shows up
looking shockingly healthy and well groomed, but his earnest chat
about the advantages of being off the junk pales beside the brief clip
of him and MacGowan back in the day singing "It's a Wonderful
World".
It's MacGowan himself who gives the film a kind of shambling
tension. Glassy-eyed and slobbering drunk for the most part, he
still comes off with remarkable dignity and lucidity; and it's to
If I Should Fall From Grace: The Shane MacGowan Story
director Sarah Share's credit that she allows lym to set the pace in
these extended segments. We simply stumble after him.
And, oh god, the music 17 songs in all. Watching the band
hammer through "Dirty Old Town" (back when Shane still had front
teeth), or swooning through the fully orchestrated "Rainy Night in
Soho" is reason enough to park yourself in front of this one.
Searching for the Wrong-Eyed Jesus screens from March 1-5 with
Be Here to Love Me: A Film About Townes Van Zandt. If I Should
Fall From Grace: The Shane MacGowan Story plays March 26
@ 9pm and March 18 @ 3:45pm. For more details go to www.
einematheque.be.ea or phone 604-688-8202.
Rm
FF
Bryce Dunn
The Ponys
Hi, this Is your record player speaking: how are you? Been a while
since we got together, huh? iPod is god and downloads are
coming in by the buttloads what's the deal? How soon we forget.
Let me try to tempt you with some seven inches...please? What are
those, you ask? Well, first it starts as a sticky black tar, like when you
see road workers repaving...oh never mind, let's cut to the chase. Take
Lyme Regis for example. Now I know how long you grieved when The
FM Knives cut short their brief but illustrious career, but it's time to
get out of that funk, punk, and listen to some power-pop from this
Sacramento supergroup. When it comes to Buzzcocksian hooks there
are few bands that do it better, especially on the track "Suffer Suffer",
even if it is the Knives in disguise. See, even they haven't quite let it
go, and that's ok with me; as they say, "It All Starts With The Band".
And hugs, not drugs. (Smart Guy Records, #32 3288 21st Street, San
Francisco, CA USA 94110 or www.smartguyrecords.com).
But if its drugs you need, friend, then look no further than The
Gris Gris, and a new four song single that'll put the voodoo on what
you do. Leader Greg Ashley packs his bags for a head-trip that gets
good mileage from the Small Faces and Beach Boys (on "Corporation
Station Agent") to The Seeds ("Pick Up Your Raygun") and his own
psychedelic pit stops ("Bakery" and "Won't Be Long"). Tune in, turn
on and drop out, man. (Birdman Recording Group, Inc. P.O. Box 50777
Los Angeles CA USA or www.birdmanrecords.com).
Once the haze lifts, a little knock to the noggin is in order, don't
you think? Let Nikki Sudden set you straight. Former Swell Maps
co-founder and current troubadour around town, he delivers two
numbers on a new seven inch that cater to his glam side. Sudden
channels T.Rex on "Hanoi Jane", a handclap-heavy big guitar smash,
and "Pretty Little Pretty" an organ-fuelled, rollicky blues in D (just a
guess) Rolling Stones rip-off. Sources tell me that this is not the last we
will be hearing from Mr. Sudden, as he plans to slowly but steadily take
over the world, so watch out for that, kids. (Munster Records, www.
munster-records.com.).
Lastly, The Ponys pony up a decidedly pop-tastic slab of post-
punk with their most recent outing. 'Another Wound" mates a return
engagement, having already starred on the Chicago crew's 2005
magnum opus Celebration Castle. But it's the b-side that will garner
critical aplomb for their slightly skewed version of The Descendents
"Good Good Things", arguably malsing a great song even greater.
(Sweet Nothing Records, www.sweetnothingrecords.co.uk).
So you see chum, you can't be glum knowing there's all this great
music for you to be spinning on my shiny metal surface. So grease up
that tone-arm, drop the needle and hear me snap, crackle and pop my
way back into your heart you'll thank me later I know.
Discorder   5 THE GOAT IS IMPOS*
JOHN CASSAVETES' LOVPl  TREA
s
r^k byAi
by Allan Maclnnis
John Cassavetes has been called "the father of
American independent cinema;" awards for
excellence in independent filmmalcing have been
named for him; his praises have been sung by Fugazi
("Crush my calm you Cassavetes..."), and his status
pondered by Le Tigre—though I disagree with their
inclusion of "misogynist" on their list of "takes" on
the filmmaker ("alcoholic," "genius," and "messiah"
all are far easier to argue). Filmmakers and actors as
diverse as Jim Jarmusch, Gary Oldman, John Sayles,
Seem Penn, and Steve Buscemi have praised him.
Martin Scorsese called him his "mentor," and Who's
that Knocking on my Door, Scorsese's remarkable
first feature, strongly bears the mark of his
influence. Cassavetes has even made his way onto
an American postage stamp, and author Jonathan
Lethem has called him "film's Bob Dylan."
Given all this, it is surprising how few people
have seen any of his eight major films. Love
Streams, which screens March 6, 7, 8, and 12 at the
Vancouver International Film Centre—the Vancity
Theatre for short—is currently only available in
France on DVD. Acknowledged by many to be his
final masterpiece, it has not screened in Vancouver
since a Pacific Cinematheque retrospective of
Cassavetes' work shortly after the actor-director's
death of cirrhosis of the liver in 1989.
is knew he was dying when he began
to direct Love Streams. Adapted from a play by
Canadian Ted Allan, the ailing director was forced to
take over the lead role of the film when Jon Voight,
who had starred in Cassavetes' stage version of Love
Streams, bailed out of the production for personal
reasons (Cassavetes could be notoriously difficult to
work with, bullying, manipulating, and pleading
with his actors to reach as deeply into themselves as
possible, to offer authentic emotion; so sincere are the
performances in his films that they are often taken
to be improvised). Cassavetes plays Robert Harmon,
an alcoholic author of romance novels, hiding from
emotional involvement in a house full of call girls;
Gena Rowlands—Cassavetes' wife in real life and
star of several of his films—plays Sarah Lawson,
recently driven to despair by a painful divorce, and
as intensely emotional as Robert is withdrawn. Her
arrival at Robert's home—Cassavetes' own, used as
a set, as it is in Faces—sets in motion the beginnings
of change for both of them. Love Streams combines
typical Cassavetean moments, where characters are
stripped of their defences and left in emotionally raw
states, with a screwball goofiness and exuberance.
Though its characters are quite confused, the tone
of the film is ultimately hopeful. Cassavetes said of
it, "If I die, this is a sweet last film."
Tom Charity, the author of John Cassavetes:
lifeworks and the former film editor of Time Out
magazine, is excited about the event. "I'm delighted
there's a new print [of Love Streams]. I haven't had a
chance to see it yet, but I think it's a film that, partly
because of who produced it, didn't get its due when
it was released. It's only really since Cassavetes'
death that people have given the film the respect
that it deserves, and for a lot of that period it hasn't
been widely available to see." As a measure of that,
THt CANNON GROUP, INC. PRESENTS GENA ROWWNI
GOII-GMS PRODUCTION OF A JOHN OCTET!
ALSO STARRING DSAHNNE ABBOTT / SEYMOOR CflSSEL /OIR.
SCREENPLAY BY TEO AULAN & JOIN CASSAVETES / PRODUCED.
MB HAM GLOBUS / DIRECTED BY JDRN CASSAVETES © Att
JPJCO4FR0I CANNON REIEAS1.A DIVISION OFTRE"""
note that neither Charity nor Mark Peranson, the
programming coordinator of the Vancity Theatre,
have seen the film on the big screen. The new print
was struck by Sony, who currently owns the rights
to the film, for a Gena Rowlands retrospective at
the Brooklyn Academy of Music last November. To
Peranson's ^knowledge, this is the first time the film
has played since then.
of how obsessive (
devotees can be, scholar Ray Carney, the author/
editor of the definitive Cassavetes on Cassavetes,
has asked me to bring a timer to the screening of
Love Streams and time the film "to the second" to
see how complete the new 35mm print is. He has
stated that the previous VHS release—supervised
by low budget action film producers Golan and
Globus—was incomplete, with material missing
from the dream sequences; as that was the only
version anyone has had any access to for years, this
is difficult to confirm or deny.
Ray Carney's difficulties with the Cassavetes
estate are detailed at length on his website. Personal
conflicts and disagreements about what material
should beincludedledto him being unceremoniously
booted from the Criterion box set, John Cassavetes:
Five Films; his commentaries were discarded and
his work unacknowledged. For years, Carney was
Cassavetes' most vocal advocate and the only writer
in the English languaga&prior to Charity, to have
published a book on him. Though he appears to be
somewhat of a difficj| man, it's a shame that his
work has been so urijglappreciated.
Carney's Jsfflculties aside, Charity and
Peranson agrepmat the Criterion box set is a "good
sign" that the period of Cassavetes' commercial and
critical neglect in North America is ending.
I asked Charity how the experience of writing
John Cassavetes: Lifeworks affected him.
"You know, you write a book about somebody and
you get totally obsessed and it takes over your life—
especially with somebody like Cassavetes, who's a very
inspiring figure. And I think it becomes an unhealthy
kind of fixation. You can't talk or think about anything
else that interferes with doing the book. It took me a
couple of years from start to finish, working on it, and
then you have to cut yourself off from that to get some
semblance of reality back into your life; it's a weird kind
of transition you go through. There was certainly a
period there where 1 didn't want to read anything more
about him; I didn't want to see thefUms anymore, I just
needed to go cold turkey. Now it's been a few years and
I'm back to a more level kind of appreciation...Last year
I went and did some DVD commentaries for the UK
release of the Five Cassavetes Films box set, and I was
able to interview Seymour Cassel and others...I'm in a
position now where me and John are back on speaking
terms, let's put it that way."
Charity's favourite Cassavetes film is A Woman
Under the Influence. "It's the film that really churned
me up emotionally... I first saw it when I was in my
late teens on television. I knew nothing about this
guy or what I was about toexperience. It had a huge
impact on me, and that impact has not diminished.
I've watched the film I-don't-know-how-many
times, very closely, and if I watched it today it would
still have that impact on me, I'm sure." (As a point of
note, as a fellow Cassavetes obsessive, Love Streams
is my favourite Cassavetes film—which makes it
quite special to me that the March 7th screening of
the film, with Charity in attendance, will be on my
birthday).
Born in Britain, Charity and his wife "fell in
love" with Vancouver and relocated here after he
was invited as a juror for the 1999 VIFF. Charity
feels that the Vancity has contributed greatly to the
local cinema scene, noting only that "it's a shame
the media hasn't been more supportive" of the
venue.
Aside from the recent sold-out Walter Murch
screening, attendance at Vancity Theatre events
has been sporadic at best, despite very good word
of mouth, an exciting line-up of films, and the most
comfortable seats of any theatre that this film buff
has sat in. Here's hoping that Love Streams marks a
turning point for the theatre.
6   March 2006 ffiawfe/eif ^Wwfynay
iytiwxjhr a di/ifti//t/*tw/a/rd a cu/Mre m deetuf
«#•
Hawksley \^)rkman releases a new album of remarkable directness,
breathtaking beauty and heartfelt emotions that reveal sentiments
not heard since his debut album 'For Him And The Girls*
Limited Edition GD includes collectible lyric cards
IN CONCERT:: APRIL 8 & 4 xx mNCOUVER EAST
CULTURAL CENTRE
mmi4at^.v/t^uw^^.mm
music • DVD • more If you 1
c we arO
Acientists
^^■•^ Three Pan-Am, discotheque-wrecking
nutjobs who will simultaneously dislocate
your hips and break your heart*
with LOVE and SQUALOR
the debut album,
chock fu'l c   snappy songs and
dubious claims like:
Nobody Move, Nobody Get Hurl,
I The Great Escape & It's a Hit
'Q&6
,sound
Don't Let Student Voices Fade Out.
For 62 years, CiTR 101.9 FM radio has provided the most dynamic
programming on the airwaves.  Broadcasting from the Student Union
Building, CiTR has welcomed and trained thousands of UBC and
community volunteers who have used their experiences to launch
successful careers.  Harry Hertscheg, donor and Chair of the CiTR
Board of Directors, is calling upon alumni and former community
members of the station to support the CiTR Capital Campaign, which
will raise funds for major upgrading of broadcast equipment, facilities,
and a new Podcast service called CiTR On Demand. "Your contribution to one of Canada's truly independent community radio stations
would ensure that CiTR continues to provide an important service to
UBC students and Greater Vancouver communities."
To make a one-time donation, contact UBC Development Coordinator
Angie Smashnuk at 604-822-5345, angie.smashnuk@ubc.ca, or visit
www.supporting.ubc.ca, and keep CiTR on the airwaves.
www.citr.ca/capital
Embrace Local Food.
March 2006 MKKTAPE/
THE BUTTLESS CHAPS by Mike LaPointe
I'm sick as a brick, and the Buttless Chaps are doing their darndest'
to save themselves from the infection. And they've got good i
to be scared: other than the general crumminess of coughing out.
off-yellow stuff and being subject to sudden menopausal hot-flashes,;
the Chaps have a show in two days to celebrate their first release in
three years, Where Night Holds Light, and then they're heading out on!
a month-long tour across the great Canadian springtime landscape.
"We were all sick for our last tour," frontman David Gowans says. -
"Two weeks in a van. It was disgusting."
We're at dinner to discuss a Buttless Chaps mixtape, and over
the next hour, as they eat food that looks horribly unappetizing to my
diseased bowels, I quiz them on their eighteen eclectic choices, and
discover that, at heart, they're all a bunch of softies, enamoured with
the experimentalism and beauty that informs their music.
SIDE: David
a w f*MA*4 -» x V&. v»v *y
I have a real fascination with overblown stage set-ups. Numan's visio
was to put his show before budget, so he consistently lost money o
tour, but he did what he wanted to do, and still does.
Pioneers of the Cold War synth-sound. With all the stuff everyone'!
into now, people should hear this <
^*2I£i^£,^22*jj
_E_rafelC
I SilbSliillf
This song reflects the next generation of the Smiths. Great wordplay,
great imagery. Brings back my fears of P.E. class. Perfect for anyone
who's not a jock.
Everyone was a teenager once. These themes were so heavy when I was
mnszminnm
fourteen yei
ig23i
__E£EaBan_a
Insanely emotional. Insanely dynamic. I listened to it when I missed
somebody, and he sings, ""I miss you!"...so yeah...
Combines mythology, traditional country, extreme distortion, chaos,
noise, something that our band has always enjoyed.
r^TT.t*i^___ttj__ii_
The Story of My Life.
This was my first introduction to prog...and I_
The first musician I could name, and it still makes
when I was ten. Pfcwas my birthday present. I cried.
l the drummer...
VfcmMrarcJ
takes me cry. I met him
ried.
Saw them at the Starfish Room. This is the first of three songs in my life
that made me cry.
^^^"^iTirrriii	
This is very good when high. Pterodactyls and Giant
Creatures.
Perfect for dancing in your living room.
MM___m_tt______wM.'	
Discovered this last year, and it carried me through yet another year of
treeplanting.
Great morning music. Beautiful and relaxing.
A Japanese B-side. Fucking unbelievable. A pertect song. Right around
when they stopped rocking so hard. Or, I'm not sure if they ever really
rocked, but whatever it was...
Balloon     Another eight-minute song. It's just absolutely beautiful.
I still think that they're the best electronic band. The sounds...
was doing that...and the guy's an amazing drummer.
Fou can catch the Chaps on March 25th at the Railway Club,
when then make their triumphant, healthy return to Vancouver.
NARDWUAR THE HUMAN SERVIETTE
AND CiTR 101.9 fM PRESENT...
'boo*
DOOr
Do°-
_^S RELEASE LAUNCH!
#ff2SE
THEEGOSUnS
«*NAROWUAR'$ WEO VAULT!
mm a rnecrm ofsomeofmrowmr's favouriteinterviews mi be played mmm samw
TUESDAY MARCH 7 *S&
NORM THEATRE, SUB BUILDING, UBC
I   TlW     7:29PM - TICKETS ^6 + S/C AT ZULU, SCRATCH, RED CAT, AND QTR     [Nard]
* <<Z**)       INFO: 604-822-1242 - WWW.CTTR.CA - WWW.NARDWUAR.COM iWKfliSj Live Party Music Sun - Tues: Joe's Garage Wed - Fri: Dr. Strangelove
Nightly Sat: Does Your Monkey Bite / DJ Junior front Jack FM
Sun: This ain't your mama's country, Featuring Joe's Garage
932 Granville i 604.331.7999:: www.roxyvan.Gom
"We wrote the book on partying!"
www.granvillevan.com
10   March 2006 %IOW TO ROCK
THE BASS
Photo by Jennifer Chrumka j
The bass is cool. It doesn't get in your face,
it doesn't preach, it doesn't fight for your
attention. The bass just slides up and wraps its
sound around your backbone, and before you even
realize it you're hooked.
The bass player is an integral part of rock,
and three of Vancouver's finest practitioners of
the low gave me some insight into the craft: Barry
Higginson from The Doers, Johnny Uljevic of The
Notes from Underground, and Rebecca Stewart
from Vancougar.
The Players
All three came to the bass from different directions,
but there was never any doubt that bass was their
destiny. Like many others, Barry came to the bass by
way of the guitar. When his band's bass man didn't
show up one day, Barry got his chance.
"There is something about the bass, I didn't
choose it as a default," Barry said between sips from
his beer. "I view my brief period as a guitar player
as a happy accident to point me in the direction of
bass...bass was the destination"
Johnny initially thought that drums were his
thing back in high school. He saved up his cash from
a gas station job to get a kit. But the drums were
never meant to be; something always seemed to
sidetrack him before he made a purchase. "One day
I woke up and said, I'm going to buy a bass," Johnny
recalled. "It just needed to happen."
Becca dug a little deeper when she reflected on
her reasons for choosing bass. At first she wasn't so
sure. But later, in the clatter of a pub, a realization
dawned on her.
"Oh my God," she gasped, "I think I became
a bass player because I'm a middle child with
abandonment issues, and a bass player will never be
abandoned." Then she turned to me with a resolute
gaze, "Someone always wants a bass player."
Good bass players are indeed precious
resources to be coveted and fought over. But it takes
a certain type of person to really do bass. Johnny
said that bass players are "people who don't mind
minding the shop." Then he talked about cleaning
up the shop, and keeping thieves away, and then...
"Like that post in a big tall building. It's
hidden, you can't see the post, all you see is the nice
decorations outside, nice looking girls going in and
out, it's great!" said Johnny, his eyes wide.
"No one ever sees the post, but being the post is
nice. First of all, no one bothers you. You just want
to play, relax and take it easy. You don't want people
to bother you, and it's nice." Becca and Barry echoed
Johnny's perceptions of the bass player mentality...
Pluck versus Pick
a good
"Nothing's wrong with picking, but if you'r
friend of mine and I've watched you do gigs..."
Barry told me of a fellow comrade in arms
(who just happened to be Johnny), that used a pick
maybe a little too much for a show. "I like to rib
Johnny and I like to wag my finger and tell him to
put the pick away," said Barry with a large, slightly
tooth-deficient grin. "Every once in a while a bass
guitar needs to be played like a guitar, so there's
nothing wrong with a pick. But if you really care
about the bass and you really care about the sound,
I think you'll eventually start plucking with your
fingers."
Johnny filled me in later. "He came up to me
after a show, and he's like, 'hey how's it going?'"
Johnny then pulled himself up in his chair, raised an
inquiring eyebrow, and in his best Barry voice said,
"used a pick eh?" and promptly burst out laughing.
"Class though, total class. A bit of (
bit of interest, wanted some answers, hul without.'>
demanding them," said Johnny, still chucJdtig.^Pi
just told him, I love the fingers, but once in a while a
pick can be a lot of fun."
Becca doesn't do the pick thing at all, but it's
not because she doesn't like the sound; in her case it's
more about the feeling. "I think there is something
tactile about it. I've tried playing with a pick and I
always end up dropping it. It's like a barrier. It's like
a condom...there's something about the feeling of
it on my fingers," said Becca, once again pondering
the inner workings of her bass motivations.
"Sometimes I wish I could do the pick thing for
fast Dee Dee Ramone stuff...but it's not comfortable
forme."
Gear
"Whatever looks nice and sounds nice to you, that's
what you should have," said Johnny, Barry and
Becca pretty much agreed. A bass player's gear is
a very individual thing, and largely depends on
what kind of sound is desired. It takes a lot of time
and experimentation to get to what's right for each
player.
Barry's main advice was to "borrow people's
gear as much as you possibly can, and then you'll
start learning what can do what."
Becca got a little more particular. "Tube amp.
An amp with tubes in it is key for a big warm sound.
And I think it's better to have a half stack rather
than a combo amp, because with a combo amp,
when one thing breaks the whole thing is broken."
Beginner Mistakes
Barry once again got philosophical when I asked
him about common mistakes that bass players make
when they're just starting out. "Maybe I'm just an
optimist, but I don't tend to see flaws in their playing
as mistakes so much as maybe they haven't learnt
how to play it better yet," said Barry after a long,
ruminating pause.
"Most of the time they play it like a guitar. But
that's how I started doing it too, so there's nothing
wrong with that."
Barry also cautioned against getting too
focused on gear. He explained that often beginners
"get ahead of themselves by acquiring or desiring
better gear when they have a hard time arpeggiating
a chord or keeping time." No amount of gear, no
matter how cool, is going to help you if you can't
play the instrument.
In Becca's mind, the biggest mistake beginning
players make is "trying to learn everything all by
themselves and not jamming." She told me that
learning how to play bass and make music depends
on playing with other people. You have to get over
sounding like crap at the beginning and just do it.
"It's like sex. If you play by yourself too much,
you won't be able to play well with others."
Playing well with others is fundamentally
what the bass player needs to be able to do in a rock
band. Bass players are the hidden posts that*make
the foundation of rock. So if you think you've got
what it takes, go get yourself a bass that sounds
good, feels good and looks good and do itl
But remember, it's more than a guitar it's a
bass guitar. Barry gave me a good quote from Luke
Rogalsky of Mystery Machine that sums it up: "Duh,
one note at a time."
Member of
Influences
PreShow Ritual
"Try   to   get \
to   the   show •
Vancougar;
Tina Turner; Ko
on   time,   try ■
Mb? "*•* iBB
The No
Melina
not to get too j
Feelings
drunk, try to j
eat something, j
try to smoke a \
Rebecca Stewart
"Not being too ■
1 jAh
^1
full...it's worse •
K, *3
thanbeingsleep j
:J|Vy
The Doers
Mike Watt;
deprived    and i
w
*'__
Charles Mingus
too drunk...and j
havingashotof ;
Jagermeister"    j
Barry Higginson
m___mmmm_____m
EHiS
"I forget about \
KF*s
The Notes
Cliff Williams;
it...the more I j
m&. **m
from
DuffMcKagan
forget about it \
BT     m
Underground;
the better show i
___k—J^
"some other
I have"            \
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stuff"
Johnny Uljevk
THE NO NO SPOTS
T.V. HEART ATTACK
the nm-ioous
SATURDAY, MARCH 4TH
THU RAILWAY WM
Kiss Me Deadly
(Montreal)
Hot Loins
Fall Collection
Tuesday, March 7th
Pat's Pub
early show, doors at 8
ONEIDA
THE CHRISTA MIN
LEVIATHANS
FRIDAY, MARCH 17TH
PATS PUB
403 EAST HASTINGS
T1CKEISATSCRATCH, ZULU, REDCAT AND HIGH LIFE
early show, doors at 8
Gnomonsons recording artist from Texas
Jana Hunter
Johnny Wakeham
Daniel and Emma
Tuesday, March 28th
Pat's Pub 403 East Hastings
fitfsrw
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Fireball Productions IN CONVERSATION WITH
BELLE & SEBASTIAN'S
MICK COOKE by Duncan M. McHugh
\
I've been a fan of the Glasgow-based seven-piece Belle & Sebastian
for several years now, and despite not enjoying their recent albums
as much as their first three albums (the amazing TigermUk, If You're
Feeling Sinister and The Boy with the Arab Strap), I've still followed
them closely. To be perfectly honest, however, when I heard I'd be
interviewing the trumpet player (instead of reclusive lead singer Stuart
Murdoch or wild man drummer Richard Colburn), I felt like I'd been
stuck with Face at an A-Team press junket not that cool. In the end,
Mick Cooke proved to be an affable and worthwhile interviewee.
The following is a transcript of a cross-Atlantic phone
conversation that took place on the morning of February 23rd, the
eve of Belle & Sebastian's North American tour in support of their
new Matador album, the surprisingly danceable The Life Pursuit. You'll
notice that my attempt to create a new nickname for Mick fails quite
miserably.
Discorder: How are you doing?
Mick: I'm good thanks, yeah.
Great. Are you in Scotland right now?
I'm in Glasgow. We're leaving for Canada tomorrow. We're playing
Toronto on Sunday night.
I wanted to start off bu asking about the new album. It seems like quite a
departure for you. What was it like recording with Tonu Hoffer [Producer for
Beck. Stars and Air, amongst others]?
It was good, it was a departure from the fifth album. He was great,
actually, very focused, had us working very hard and he was very good
at messing up the sounds of what we recorded. He spent a lot of time
getting the sound of the drums just right. Basically, whenever we heard
what we'd just played coming back through the speakers, it almost
sounded like a record. He had his shit together.
And it was recorded live mostly?
Yeah, mostly live. There's not too many overdubs on that record. It's
really the sound of the band playing in a room.
What were uour reasons for returning to Matador from Rough Trade for this
album?
Rough Trade, at least in America, were kind of winding their operations
down. So it was time to jump ship. When we signed to Rough Trade,
part of the deal was that we would sign for America as well.
Did theu found the Rough Trade America label when they signed you?
It basically just formed. When we signed with them they were just
starting out. But I don't think it worked out too well for them. So we
went back to Matador. I'm glad they took us back.
Given the new sound you're using on this album, what do you foresee for
tour? Are you changing things up at all?
Well, it's the first time we've toured without strings for awhile, with
the exception of Sarah, who plays violin. Of course we're taking a cello
player as well, but we don't have the number of violins we normally
take on tour. The new album really is [the sound of] the seven of us
playing. We figured it would be a good time for us to cut back a bit.
It seems like you're a bit of a vanguard, in terms of trumpet players with rock
bands, that it's a lot more common now.
Well, I think that I was stealing off the guy from The Tindersticks
really. I sort of based the playing on a Tindersticks record. Also, Love
uses the trumpet really well [See: "Alone Again Or"]. It's a bit more
commonplace now I guess.
Are uou auus looking forward to touring with The New Pornographers?
Well, I don't know terribly much about them to be honest. Our manager
lined that up.
tapping, when you get to our age.
You're originallu from Dundee and uour name is Mck. 1 know that uour
online bio says that your nickname is Micholas Mickkby. but have you
ever considered coming up with a nickname that riffs on Mick "Crocodile"
Dundee? Have you ever been called anything like that?
I haven't actually, no. But he was called Mick Dundee wasn't he, yeah?
I can't believe that "Crocodile" would work.
Do you guys have am. plans for after this tour?
We'll be recording a bit in April, for the next single b-sides, that kind
of thing. Then we'll be touring Europe in May, and Japan and Australia
in June, and then it's into festival season. We're going to play some of
the British and European festivals.
Is that going to be a non-album single that you record in _\pril?
It'll probably be another one off the album. We'll see.
I've heard you're a ska aficionado.
I play with a ska band called The Amphetameanies, a
Glasgow-based ska band.
They're from Vancouver, which is where I'm calling from, and they're playing     Given your hectic schedule, do you aet much time with them?
every one of your shows except Vancouver [Note: subsequent research has
revealed that The New Pornographers will be playing Arts Countu Fair on
April 7th. so they're probably avoiding anu Vancouver shows until after
that.]
That seems a bit perverse.
As a trumpeter, what are some of your favourite songs to play with Belle &
Sebastian?
Well, "Dog On Wheels", is always fun to play. We play that one all
the time. It feels like a great privilege to play that; it's one of Stuart's
best songs. It's actually the first thing I played with Stuart. He wrote
the trumpet part and told me what to play. It's been a happy musical
relationship, I suppose.
Is there a particular song on the new album that uou like playing?
Well, I think "Sukie in the Graveyard" is very much my favourite song.
It's a blast to play live as well.
That whole mid-section of the album was astounding to me, from "White
Collar Boy" to "We Are the Sleepuheads." It was so danceable.
I'm glad, 'cos it's what we were gunning for with this record: make
something that would be good to dance to, or, at least keep the toes
I was trying to fit in some recording last night with them; we're trying
to finish off an album. It's kind of hard with me being away so much.
They're working around my schedule. We're all very busy in that band;
it's kind of a hobby for everyone. We've got a launch party for a new
record in April, so we're feverishly trying to get it finished, which'll
probably involve me doing vocal editing on the road; I've got all the files
with me on a laptop. That'll be toy R & R.
What's the scene like in Glasgow rightnow?
There's a band called The Flying Matchstick Men who I think are really
great. There's also a new band called The 1990s who I think are going
to be a big deal.
Belle & Sebastian play the Commodore Ballroom on Friday,
March ZAP. Unfortunately (for me at least), it is sold out.
12   March 2006 .^;«f'
"Smart and sexy like old Hollywood and rebellious and surefire
like classic punk rock. Dont let
your subliminal self miss out on this brassy kind of rock & roll"
4.5/5       ffi---*
»_TV-
-AUMusic
Guide       j
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Your Local Music & Movie Experts!
Yeah Y/sah Yeahs
IN CONCERT
MARCH 13
Richard's on Richards
;MW#
iaSaU
"She Wants Revenge ...
out-Interpols Interpol;
deploying snippets of
Joy Division, Bauhaus,
the Cure and other dark
New Wave acts..."
- Rolling Stone
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/limy a \ji\ /1Af AIT
iffiMi 1. BIogger.com is largely touted]
as one of the first mainstreaml
dedicated personal publishing took, -
created by Pyra Labs, which was co-
founded by Meg Hourihan and Evan'
Williams. It was acquired by Googlel
in 2003.
2. Try googling "why blogs suck."
3. Kostas Kassaras (MA,
University of York)
wrote an essay entitled
Music in the Age of
Free Distribution as
"an attempt to present
and critically discuss the
phenomenon of music
piracy on the World Wide
Web."
4. Backstage is a tool that Bryght
hopes will be the "ultimate
recording artist and record label
web solution. "It is currently wider
development.
its a BLOG-EAT-BLOG world
by Michelle Chua with special guest Colin Brumelle
In 2004, "blog" topped Merriam-Webster's list as Word of the
Year. Now that it's 2006, what's changed? Why are we still
talking about them? More specifically, why are we talking about
them in a music publication?
Last year, Vancouver hosted the first annual Northern
Voice, a conference dedicated to blogging practices, community,
and culture. A handful of Vancouver bloggers (mainly from a
small web company called Bryght, as well as a select group from
our very own UBC) realized that a need exists for events that, in
», the words of Brian Lamb, Northern Voice organizer, are more
accessible to the "wider blogging community, and not Just the
\techno elite". With this in mind, Northern Voice had its second
birthday on the weekend of February 10, and was once again a
sold^Quf success on many accounts.
Whilethe event had the same laid-back, community feel of
the first Northern Voice, this year's topics shifted away from blog
definition and basic blog education. Overall, I felt that there was
more awareness ^nd willingness amongst attendees to discuss
the implications of-blogging as a cultural movement: its roots
N, in DIY and remix, as w^ll as its future in how we communicate,
kpublish, and determine the shape of mass media.
\ As far as technology goes, blogging tools have helped many
writers make a leap into easy/accessible personal publication.
It's pimple: Just go to blogger.comf IL and your voice can join the
gianfe. Conversation. However, critics of the blogging explosion
argue-that internet users now have to wade through a sea of
tripe and misinformation in their search for good, informed
content] 2 j.
In "Age of Free Distribution^^} the music industry is
facing similar trends and.problems. In response to the new
industry dynamics, musician and Bryght BackstageJ4] web
..devetopear.Conh Brumelle gave a talk at Northern Voic»2006 on
"Music 2.0: Where it came from and where it's going!" Discorder
picked his brain over caffeine at frado Cafe. Wpf'came to the
conclusion that while no one really knows what direction the
technologies (including the internet, p2p, BitTorrent, and mp3
players) will take, it's definitely a pivotalktime for the music
industry. Just as the initial emergence of-^ecording technologies
altered our relationship with music-'.m unpredictable ways,
digital networks promise to transform the existing consumer
paradigm. Whether you're making, music or listening to it, and
regardless of your stance on issues like file sharing, we are on
the brink of a massive shift.
One future projection that Colin and I agree would be
really wonderful (if it eyer.comes to fruition) is the "rise of the
musician middle class/ Imagine being an independent musician
and not having to .Work a different day job. As Colin puts it,
musicians have ari "opportunity to redefine what rock and roll
success is. It corild-fce more of a slope instead of all-or-nothing.
We'd still haye the superstars, the Bonos... but there's nothing
standing in" the' way of a [regular] musician making a decent
living." K seems crazy, but when you consider that distribution
is cheap, production is cheap, and promotion (in the form of
internet, buzz) can be almost free, the possibility begins to seem
quite peal. Maybe.
/So if technology makes distribution, production, and
'  pnimotion of music accessible and cost-effective, does this mean
Shat the internet or free p2p is going to make or break rockstars?
/ Probably not. One of the major themes of Colin's presentation
is the idea that "the machine is neither a god nor a devil.''
Interestingly, this quotation comes from German music critic
Hans Stuckenschmidt in 1926, in reference to the purported
negative consequences of the development of the phonograph.
As the debate over the ethics of file sharing continues, Colin
points out that Hans' statement is applicable every time a new
technology comes along and stubbornly refuses to go away, to
the dismay of industry heavyweights. Eventually, the industry is
forced to adapt, and business models inevitably change. Record
labels find ways to make technology work in their favour, as in
the case of Warner Bros.^d the Secret Machines! 5 L,.or the
infamous Sony Rootiat[6]. Independent musicians, in theory,.,
should be able to benefit from new technology as well[7].
The trick, it seems, is to leverage whatever technology  "
is available to your own benefit, and then build up Sa loyal
following hey, just like in the old days. The only difference
now is that your potential audience is much larger and in°re
accessible, regardless of geographic-location. The internet W a
giant distributed system) won't make or break your band. But
internet users music listeners can, and will. "A rating
of 9 on [Pitchforkmedia.com] has a real dollar value," Col%
notes. Sometimes, though, a lukewarm Pitchfork rating doesn't \
matter. The combined efforts of other online sources, and blogs\\
in particular, excel at generating buzz. With good buzz, you just \
know that your torrent is going to download faster than you can
say "Arctic Monkeys,"
But there are still new problems to consider, such as how
to get noticed amidst the increased competition, and how to
build community from an infinite number of blossoming niche
markets. To get around the problem of being drowned out, Colin
suggests getting people to talk about you or your band. Contact
writers of prominent music blogs to get the buzz machine going.
He also suggests making it easy for people to find or discover
your music. For example, an inaccessible Flash website is much
harder for Google to crawl (and therefore, more difficult to rank
high in search results) than a more straightforward site with
textual content Maintaining your website with up-to-date
gigs is another good way to keep up your online presence. With
simple and intuitive blogging software, this process is relatively
painless.
As far building community, one Northern Voice attendee
pointed out that Long Tail[ 8I'ecbriomics could potentially«ause.-
so much fragmentation that there would no longer be a common
ground on which to build any kind of community. While new
methods of distributing content and disseminating information
are altering the balance of power, it seems unlikely these changes
will utterly eclipse the voice of traditional, mainstream sources.
Then, of course, there's always Myspace.com. I pointed
out to Colin that, as developers, we're doing a pretty bad job of
making the web easy to use in this regard. Other than Myspace,
there's not a lot else out there. He agrees. "It definitely needs to
be easier, even easier than blogging... but that's why sites like
Myspace exist right now. The fact that [Myspace] sucks and
looks horrible is almost irrelevant because it's good at linking
things together [...] in the same way that Last.fin mines social
data [for recommendations]! 9 LBut, we need to do better."
Other than the hopeful rise ofthe musician middle class,
there's also the notion of the record company as a gatekeeper to
reconsider. If it eventually becomes econorriically.yiable to forgo
a major record label altogether, who or what will, direct public
taste[ 10]? That question, like almost everything else-,-Is still aid
in the air. "I don't think anyone has any idea of how it's aHgoing
to play?, out. It's really the whole infinite shelf-space thing, right?..
All these bands that people are going to see that won't be huge,
won't Be at GM Place. I mean, hopefully we'd see public taste...
Arid if the record companies lose in the end? "Ultimately,
music! is about communication and enjoyment, not making
mone£ It's funny how we forget that sometimes."
Colitis -presentation can he found on his website. Mixed
Content (http://xaia.ca) or on http://northernvoice.ca.
Audio, pdf, and supplementary links are available.
m
"taste.
e John
10. For _
Seabrook'sbook_l
of Marketing and the Marketing of
I  Culture.
I 6. Sony shipped several artists' CDs
\ with rootkit-based DRM (Digital
-'■ Sights Management) that secretly
1 installed malware on the user's
j computer. "Rootkits are cloaking
technologies that hide system
; objects from diagnostic and security
i software, and they are usually
| employed by malware attempting
\ to keep their implementation
\ hidden. (sysinternals.com)"
| This particular software "phoned
j home" with information regarding
\ the user's actions; as well, the
I "uninstaller" did not work properly
\ and compromised the infected
i computers'security.
5. A music blog posted a positive
review of the Secret Machines and
readers left comments in support
of the band, generating buzz.
However, it was later found that the
comments had been left by Warner
Bros, employees.
7. Sub Pop is a good example of how
promote artists (for more mfo, look
up "Odeo + subpop").
8. Long Eal refers to
an argument made by
Wired magazine editor
Chris Anderson that "the
future of entertainment
is in the millions of niche
markets at the shallow
end of the Mtstream."
He argues that "products
that are in low demand
or have low sales volume
can collectively make up
a market share that rivals
or exceeds the relatively
few current bestsellers and
blockbusters, if the store
or distribution channel
is large enough" (via
Wikipedia).
9. Lastftn and myspace.com
leverage the power of social
networks and PQAF (friend of
a friend) principles, this aids _i
the discovery of new musk; ani in
building a distributed community.
Discorder   17 Words and Photos
by Alex G$pmbes
Back when The Clash were playing the Commodore
in 1978, communist China was taking the first
steps towards opening up to the world, paving the way
for the rapid economic growth we hear so much about
today. Decades on, that open door has not only resulted
in the lucky few buying Ferraris, but has also allowed
for some less expensive cultural exchange.
Kids who grew up with clothing choices spanning
a total of two colours and styles are now able to spike,
dye and otherwise mangle their hair. As the economy
opens up, more choices in music and fashion become
available. But with a notoriously repressive government
and millennia of tradition weighing down on the
shoulders of Chinese youth, what better way to act out
than to turn to punk rock?
During my Vancouver high school years in the
mid-nineties, body modification was de rigueur; for
these kids, it's a break with a long history of continuity
in a still-very-traditional society. Really, the size and
scope of the decision to "go punk" in China cannot be
understated. First, one faces the pressures of a tightly
regimented society unaccustomed to dealing with
people who don't conform, and all that goes along with
that: aggressive police officers, loudly disapproving
neighbours and truly shamed and embarrassed family
members. This social situation is further exacerbated
by the population control measure of the "one child
policy". Families are only allowed to have one link
towards future generations and prosperity. In a society
in which the elderly are looked after by their children
and families stay ridiculously tight-knit, having a son or
daughter decide they want to follow in Joe Strummer's
footsteps instead of Bill Gates' is not swallowed lightly.
How then is Leo, a young man from Guilin with full
sleeves, hand and neck tattoos, and a general inclination
towards rowdiness, received? "It is problem, but my
friend give me tattoo and I fucldn' like." It all makes my
fourteen-year-old rubber cement mohawk seem that
much less impressive.
Unlike its Western incarnations, punk rock can
not be as overtly political in nature in China. Despite Bill
Clinton's guarantee that China's inclusion in the World
Trade Organisation would lead to some relaxation of
its draconian social controls, speech is still anything
but free in China. Google China censors and restricts
access to "undesirable" content, web sites such as the
BBC remain unavailable, and ghosts from the past such
as the Tiananmen Square Massacre of 1989 remain
unaddressed. People in general remain wary of, and
unwilling to discuss, anything remotely political. The
most one might hear is occasional mutterings about the
ridiculous amount of corruption in this country.
So while being punk may be a major social
statement, a political act unto itself, musicians cannot
yell "smash the state" or any of the other slogans
that—hollow as they may sound at times—have been
ceaselessly belted out in community centres across
Canada. That being said, there is something vastly
bolder about sporting a mohawk in Xicheng district,
minutes away from Tiananmen, than urging the
downfall of capitalism at Seylynn Hall in North Van.
There is no better place in modern China for punk
rock to take root than Beijing. The city's relative affluence
is offset by a snarling mess of traffic, construction,
demolition, and pollution. Shanghai and Shenzen, the
other major cities, are far too concerned with being
cosmopolitan and posh to foster a healthy punk rock
scene. Beijing, conversely, is just rough enough—and
just rich enough. Folks in the countryside and smaller
towns don't have the time to think about extravagances
like body modification. Many of them are simply trying
to find enough to eat.
Punk has been growing in Beijing for around
a decade now. The burgeoning subculture has been
most notoriously chronicled by local scenester Chun
Sue, author of Beijing Doll. A rambling and somewhat
sloppy account of her often scandalous exploits in the
It's a Friday at the end of February, and the
relentless Siberian winds that bind Beijing into a
freezing and desolate place in the winter months have
abated somewhat. The night begins in a dirty and
smoke-filled restaurant. Cheap and greasy food, beer
and heart attack-inducing cigarettes are the usual pre-
show warm-up. As is par for the course, our presence
as foreigners is treated as a delightful spectacle by those
around us. Our shoddy Chinese and their minimal
English result in several rounds of "gambe", a sort of
"cheers" that involves downing plastic cups of warm
beer in a race that ends with a round of table-banging,
smiles, smokes, and "very good"s.
After the exchange of farewell salutations, more
cigarettes, and some lamb skewers, we depart for the
What? bar on Yuan Dynasty bar street, in an area that
might be described as "light industrial inner suburb
punctuated by slick new high-rise development."
Combine a smokestack and a Yaletown tower and you're
getting close.
"It is problem, but my friend give me tattoo and
I fuckin'like."
early scene, the book offers up mohawks, piercings,
drinking and underage sex enough to be banned
in mainland China. Chun's high profile has made her
into something of a poster-child for the scene, and she
is regularly interviewed by the foreign press and local
expatriate English language magazines. She is the cool,
aloof voice of the disaffected punks from all around
sprawling Beijing.
Today there are dozens of bars and clubs scattered
throughout the city that play host to punk shows on
a regular basis. There are a range of venues in the
University district, Haidan, as well as the famous What?
bars scattered around several bar streets. Notable
groups include: Last Chance of Youth, The Believers,
Brain Failure, Second Hand Rose, and Joyside. As the
number of punk bands increase, the quality and variety
of music on offer has widened dramatically. The Beijing
punk show listings now confidently toss around all
of the various sub-genre monikers: emo, post-punk,
grindcore, oi, etc. There are also many entrepreneurial
opportunities in the local scene, with record labels like
New Bees doing an excellent job of sourcing, managing
and marketing local acts. Every week there are a handful
of shows throughout the city, and the scene seems to be
tight knit, though by no means tiny. Perhaps the most
refreshing thing about Beijing punk is its honesty, good-
natured fun-times atmosphere, and the general sense of
reckless abandon. In Beijing, kids just want to wild out
and have fun.
We arrive in the middle of a set by a ska band
called End of the World. The band sports a full horn
section, in addition to a colourful, bilingual, rotund lead
singer. An international group if ever there was one:
Japanese, American, Chinese, and an ABC [American
but Chinese]. The crowd is probably about seventy
percent Chinese, with the rest a mixture of foreign
students, English teachers and "Beijing bums." One
can live off a few dollars a day here in great comfort, so
there's an ample supply of lazy folks from around the
world. The ska is neither revolutionary nor that great,
but it's still fun. A handful of local "oi" lads thrash
about in front of the bar's tiny stage. The next band is all
local, all mohawks, leather and English slogans limited
to "fuck the world" and "fuck 2008" [the Olympics].
They smoke, yell, drink and make a lot of fucking noise.
High on enthusiasm, low on musical proficiency. The
last band, a three piece featuring the decidedly un-punk
name "Easy Going," plays what can best be described
as blues-punk.
While you won't find a band that will change the
way you conceptualise music in Beijing, it is refreshing
to see people excited about music in a way that doesn't
seem to happen too much in Vancouver. Eager, and
with a voracious appetite, Beijing kids are devouring,
adopting and reinterpreting punk wholeheartedly.
[arch 2006 VANCOUVER'S #1 NIGHTCLUB
BEST MUSIC - BEST SOUND - BEST DJ'S
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MaRCH 15-19,2006
iy|Jjy|AD|# PRiSENTEDBY     |Play    CDOSO
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Tickets at Zulu, Beatstreet, Boomtown, DIPT, and The Plaza box office -19+ with ID - Doors at 9PM
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HERNAN CATTANEO °UfM0"""
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IJPCQiitNC EVENTS
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HARD FI & THE RAKES - 04/22 | PINBACK - 04/241 LYRICS BORN - 04/26
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20   March 2006 I    :; /«&
by Alison Benjamin
NETTWERK WM0i
RECORDS' TERRY    :^fim
MCBRIDE THROWS
THE GAUNTLET \v
IN THE RIAA ^f>€
COPYRIGHT WAR?,>}M
Illustration by Guillame Boucher
Napster. BitTorrent. Soulseek. Gnutella. Most every music
connoisseur is at least familiar with, or currently uses, peer-
to-peer (p2p) file sharing as a means of acquiring music. While
sensational media reports fuelled by the pro-copyright fervour of
the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) characterize
online music swapping as piracy "not on the high seas but on the
internet" the legitimate uses of network technology cannot be
so easily dismissed. Thanks to channels officially sanctioned by the
recording industry, such as the iTunes Music Store and the newly
revamped Napster, legal downloading has resulted in burgeoning
music sales. While these pay-to-download services are beginning to
take hold, the basic fact of the widespread availability of "free" music
remains; music "pirates" continue to download. Increasingly, p2p
users find themselves under legal scrutiny from the RIAA for the mp3s
they download or rip to their iPod or CDR without purchase.
Although the conflict is often framed as a clash between the
RIAA's puritanical stance and the anarchic, free-music-for-all ethos
of downloaders, there is a more nuanced cultural shift at stake. As
Lawrence Lessig describes in his book Free Culture, the outcome
of this clash will determine whether creativity will flourish under
increased freedom and connectivity or stagnate in a culture of obscure
copyrights and permissions. As it stands, intellectual property law
increasingly functions as an impediment to technological and cultural
development, rather than a guarantee of artist compensation. Rather
than alter the law to reflect the changing reality of new technology,
the record industry insists upon strict enforcement of outmoded
regulations.
Since current copyright laws can't distinguish between
stealing a packaged CD from a record store and downloading an
mp3, litigation has been a key strategy in the RIAA's fight against
"pirates". To date, about 16,000 people have been sued by the RIAA
in the United States. If you're caught, you could find yourself in a
situation not unlike that of Texan David Greubel, who's in hot water
for owning a computer containing over 600 downloaded songs.
Since facing the RIAA in court could cost him millions, Greubel was
told that he could settle with the RIAA for $9,000 US. Then he found
an unlikely ally: Vancouver's Nettwerk Music Group, which manages
the likes of Sarah McLachlan, The Barenaked Ladies, and Avril
Lavigne (whose track "Sk8er Boi" was one of the 600 songs found
on the offending computer). Thanks to Nettwerk's financial support,
Greubel is refusing to settle the case, and will challenge the RIAA in
court. I connected with Terry McBride, Nettwerk's CEO, to ask why
a record company with such high stakes in the debate would back a
music "pirate".
Discorder: These dans, it's prettu strange to see a record company throw their
weight behind a family charged with piracy. What attracted uou to this case?
Terry McBride: The fact that [the RIAA] were claiming to represent
the best interests of my artists. Ummmm... no, you are not. Actually,
you are hurting my artists. I don't advocate anything illegal. What I
advocate for is changing the law. What's happening now with lawsuits
shouldn't be legal.
What's the RIAA's influence on a Vancouver-based label like Nettwerk?
They influence the music business in the biggest market in the world
[the United States]...as such, they impact our future.
How is the RIAA responding to Nettwerk's support of the Greubels?
They are just re-stating their same policy position over and over again.
What's been the response from other labeb in the industry?
A mixture of "finally someone with power is saying 'enough, stop it!'",
to dismay, to confusion. Our desire is to make the industry open its eyes
and mind to new concepts. They truly have their heads stuck in the
How much will the case cost Nettwerk?
Tens of thousands to hundreds of thousands.
Do uou see Nettwerk supporting the defendants in other similar cases?
Nope. I need to keep this focused and it only takes one to turn a tide.
Are anil other record labels rallying behind uour cause?
Sure hope so, because this is a big risk for us.
If litigation isn't good for artist development, what is? What's the ideal music
industry climate?
Labels need to lose their control of music. Art should never be controlled.
It should flow, like water. The RIAA should exist to lobby US congress
and to work with other industries to make music consumption grow.
We also need to monetize p2p sharing. Monetizing p2p is simple. People
could pay $2 -$ 8 a month to their Internet Service Provider and in return
get total freedom to consume music legally however they wanted. The
music business hasn't had an explosion of new music since the Seattle
grunge scene. Now we are seeing a lot of new artists, like Clap Your
Hands Say Yeah, the Arcade Fire, Sufjan Stevens, Arctic Monkeys, and
so on, sell hundreds of thousands of albums with little to no radio or
video exposure...just the file sharing kids sharing the music!
Sonu recentlu found itself in hot water for selling CDs with "extended
copyright protection" rootkits embedded in their disks. Along with the
technoloau goes the tacit assumption that even CD buyers are (potential)
thieves. In addition to lawsuits, we're seeing technoloau developed to limit
what enters the public domain. What's your position on this trend?
DRM [Digital Rights Management] is wrong. It's about control. Simply
put, the passionate message of music is in the magic of the song. The
more it's consumed, the more it nourishes. Music is ubiquitous; it's a
utility like water. It's not a pair of pants, and as such, we need to stop
treating music like a product that needs to be controlled.
ft
Discorder   21 UN
ni/i
DER REVIEW
They Shoot Horses, Don't They?
22   March 2006
Forging Steel and Laving Stone
(Alternative Tentacles)
With an album cover featuring
a Druid (or the Grim Reaper?)
with his arms shooting flames in
the "Our Father" position while
towering over the Pyramids of
Egypt, one can't help but expect
some righteous doom-like sludge
when one bloodies their hands
on this Seattle band's latest
assault charge. Like many classic
(as well as shitty) metal bands,
Akimbo can be enjoyable even
before the first listen. With the
aforementioned album art and
song titles like "Ground Control to
Major Bummer" and "Spooning
with Disaster", Forging Steel and
Laying Stone is already worth the
price of admission.
But what about the sound,
man? Well "dude," if Rage
Against the Machine and Black
Sabbath ever formed a hardcore
band fronted by Corey Taylor
from Slipknot stuck on "Heavy
Chorus" mode, they would
probably be slammed for ripping
off Akimbo; let's just hope that
never happens. Though there
is absolutely no variation in
vocalist/bassist Jon Weisnewski's
blood-vomiting scream, he can be
forgiven. He's preoccupied with
desperately trying to keep the
band from blowing apart with
his forceful bass playing driving
the all-too-brief songs forward.
The bass really shines at the
end of "Digging a Hole," where
the band cuts out, leaving only
a slow, oppressive bass that is
eventually picked up by everyone
and carried all the way to hell on
a wave of messy leads.
Guitarists Jared Burke
Eglington and recent addition
Patrick Cunningham shine
throughout the album with a
funky looseness reminiscent of
Neil Young & Crazy Horse on
amphetamines. For proof, check
out the mind boggling, blink-
and-you'11-miss-it riff midway
through the slash and burn
violence of "Tina, Bring Me the
Axe." Drummer Nat Damm may
be the real money of the band,
with his non-stop barrage of hip-
shaking beats sliding into freak-
out fills and back again without
missing a beat.
Forging Steel and Laying
Stone is an economical neck
workout at 39 headbangin'
minutes. With enough variety
and sonic change-ups, it leaves
you satisfied and never feeling
bloated. Not to mention the
occasional passage that sounds
like a hardcore version of the
soundtrack to Nintendo's Double
Dragon II. And isn't that all that
the kids are asking for? So, in the
words of the immortal Akimbo,
"sharpen the swords, polish the
r, it's feeding time."
Brent Mattson
Destroyer's Rubies
(Merge)
I know we've already given Mr.
Bejar a whole page of praise,
but his new album cannot be
overlooked, used as mere fodder
for one journalist's intellectual
fawnings. Destroyer's Rubies
must be reviewed, and in a totally
unbiased way.
As if that's possible.
Vancouver, you love Destroyer.
I'll just help you admit it, if you
weren't ready to commit yet. It's
love, and here's why: Rubies is a
shiny, sharp thing of beauty. Bejar
has assembled himself a band
capable of orchestrating the oft-
understated but still powerfully
meandering background sounds
required to frame his poetic
genius. The lyrics on this album
sprout forth from where all your
favourite idea seeds from works
previous were planted.
I hope every Canadian
buys this record. It's that good.
And just in case you're a little
overwhelmed by initial listens,
a word of encouragement—the
first three times I saw Destroyer
live I got migraines. I kept going
back though, and soon enough,
I got used to the sound. Now I
can't live without!
Julie Colero
You Can't Break the Strings in
Our Olympic Hearts
(Baudelaire) '
There's nothing like a blast of
shimmering 12-string guitar,
bouncy organ lines, gritty
fuzzbass, trebly guitar leads and
yelping/longing talk-singing all
set to a groovy 4/4 beat to remind
you that you've got a pulse. After
all, major-key melodies are so the
new defibrillators. Who cares if
you've heard it before? The Byrds
who, right? If any of this reminds
you of a lonely day in your dorm
room (minus the defibrillator),
The Diableros may be your
new fourth-favourite band. On
their debut, this band from the
painfully un-hip city of Toronto
plays jangling indie rock without
the self-conscious quirkiness
of groups like Modest Mouse
and Wolf Parade, or the mock
grandeur of Arcade Fire. Not
that I intend to disparage those
groups; I just want to stress that
The Diableros specialize in good,
old-fashioned pop songwriting
that you can take home to mom.
Gary Leggett's fuzzbass
intro to "Tropical Pets" will warm
even the hippest hipster's icy
heart, and the interplay between
the bass, guitars and organs
(one regular and one a vintage
Farfisa) throughout the album is
always interesting. The separate
instruments mesh to create
glorious melodies within the
dense compositions, disguising
how impressively tight and
attuned to each others' playing
the band members are. The icing
on the cake is Phoebe Lee, who
might just be the best drummer
at maintaining a constant 4/4
beat with bubblegum fills since
Ringo Starr.
At the end of the 39
minutes, the album is a pleasant
escape from a bad day. Not quite
mind blowing enough to make
you quit your job and follow the
Maharishi, but perfect for putting
on your headphones and melting
into your comfy chair for say, 39
minutes. This album is good from
the first spin and will only get
better as all the musical layers
are revealed.
Brent Mattson
Drum's Not Dead
(Mute Records)
"It seems like all our friends are
gone," sobs Angus Andrew on
the fourth track of the Liars' third
album, Drum's Not Dead. "You
drove them out," he answers
himself. Maybe he's talking about
the reaction to the band's second
record, the harrowing They Were
Wrong, So We Drowned, a chaos-
injected concept album about
German witch gatherings on
Brocken Mountain. Everyone was
expecting more of the same from
the JSJYC dance-punk revivalists
following their hyped debut, They
Threw Us All in a Trench and Stuck
a Monument on Top, and most
people didn't buy the baffling
reinvention. Several major
publications deemed the follow-
up entirely unlistenable.
So they enter their third
album with a clean slate and,
perhaps, no friends left. But that's
alright for Liars. They've always
taken a certain childish glee in
confounding the expectations
of their audience, leaving the
opinions of both their fans and
their critics utterly polarised.
Here's something to unite
them: Drum's Not Dead is a
record of fascinating complexity,
unravelling at each captivating
step a world of equal parts force
and fragility. Centering around
two main characters who embody
these parts, the assertive Drum,
and the self-doubting Mt. Heart
Attack, the record is a highly-
rhythmic drone of lush guitars
and Andrew's spooky falsetto.
The band, once flag-bearers
of the revitalised New York
scene at the turn of the century,
relocated to Berlin (like another
innovator did in the 19 70s who I
can't seem to remember the name
of). The continental shift inspired
the Liars to push themselves in
both obscure and traditional
directions. While a song like "Let's
Not Wrestle Mt. Heart Attack",
with its cliff-diving hollers and
eerie, ritualistic percussion
shows them delving further into
unpredictability, lead single "It
Fit When I Was a JOd" is one of
the most cohesive songs Andrew
has ever penned, as terrifying as
its sounds can be.
Each track flows seamlessly
into the other and, though
the opening trilogy is the
most exciting sequence on the
record, the elements at work on
Drum's Not Dead never fail to
surprise and amaze. Whether
it be the shivering, Animal
Collective-influenced "Drum
Gets a Glimpse", or the metallic
crescendo of "Drum and the
Uncomfortable Can", there's a
trick of genius up every sleeve.
But the Liars attain their
greatest height at the very last
minute, with the stripped down,
shimmering "The Other Side
of Mt. Heart Attack", a song
that brings back memories of
hearing the Yeah Yeah Yeahs'
"Modern Romance" for the first
time. Reverb-gilded guitars sing a
simple melody that compliments
Andrew's honest poetry: "If
you want me to stay/I will stay
by your side." It's the first time
you can hear the Liars speaking
directiy, with their message
crystal clear, not shrouded in
their genre-bending mischief.
At the end of a record this
diverse, it comes as a shock to
hear such a succinct statement.
But then again, this entire album
comes as a shock. From across
the Atlantic, the unexpected has
occurred: these exiled, friendless
pioneers have just established
themselves as one of the most
important bands recording
today.
Mike LaPointe
Axis of Evol
(Scratch/Jagjaguwar)
Steve McBean has been in so
many bands (some of which
you know if you're lucky, one
of which you'll know if you're
conscious), and his songwriting
abilities seem to be near-peak at
present. The Black Mountain
frontman must just fucking
DREAM music, as he's coming up
with great new records while the
rest of us are tying our shoelaces.
Pink Mountaintops started as a
solo project and fleshed itself out
into jam-band proportions when
asked to perform the rollicking
blues-rock sex boogies contained
in the first, self-titled album.
McBean pulled back from
the   pack   again  last
to four-track some new songs,
concerning himself more with
the spiritual than earthly loving
this time around. It appears
that some of Black Mountain
band-mate and country-twinged
Blood Meridian frontman Matt
Camirand's "Jesus and the Devil"-
ing has rubbed off on McBean,
as there's a whole lotta Lord on
this album. It fits, especially with
the political admonishments of
a frustrated pacifist (there's a lot
of Bush-hatin' going on here—
pretty different from the first
record, eh?), and the minimal but
fuzzed-out druggy bits.
If you were into the dirty
feel of the first Mountaintops'
record, you'll be pleased to hear
that this one is sonically quite
similar. The focus of the songs
may have shifted, but the sound
remains true to form. You could
listen to this in a dark and dank
basement or on a park bench on
the sunniest of days, and still find
something that makes you feel
just right. Mr. Mountaintops has
the gift of knowing exactly how
to stroke you...
Julie Colero
Boo Hoo Hoo Boo
(Kill Rock Stars)
I can't help but think that I'd be
having way more fun right now if,
instead of parked in front of the
computer on a Friday night, I was
out at a They Shoot Horses gig.
I'm synced in real time, I think,
with the band's last Vancouver
show before a six-week tour, and
am pretty sure I picked the wrong
spot to be. And so...
I'm going to close my eyes
for a moment and put myself
on that stage, in amongst the
thousand gleaming horns that
toot so gloriously throughout
every song this collective crafts.
What's all that clapping? Where's
all the sweat coming from? An
eternally ecstatic sound lures
me into placid reveries, soon
disturbed by the realization that
the songs are all actually quite
dark—way to harsh the glow!
Thankfully, one of Chris's peppy
keyboard lines pops up and saves
me from utter despair.
But there's no "I" in "They
Shoot Horses, Don't They?", now
is there? Let us move instead
towards a place where everyone
is afforded the chance to hear
what the hype is about, here
beautifully captured on disc
in a way that lets the listener,
get much closer to singer Josh
Neelands' lyrics than is possible
in the live-show din. The band's
debut starts and ends strong, and
keeps marching in sort-of-tune
the whole way through.^
Julie Colero N -      	
outlet m
new laptop electronica
every other Sunday
presented by
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march 5th
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march 19th
PELLUCID
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at the alibi room 157 alexander at main
submissions needed email eat@allbl.ca
$5 cover
I have a love-hate relationship
with Mesa Luna. Its regular
all-ages shows are a treasure
to the music-starved masses of
■ Vancouver minors. "But there is
a growing trend of disrespect
amongst the patrons of these
concerts: from long waits
outside in the bitter cold, to
ridiculous coat-check prices, to
Big Brother booming through
the soundsystem to "please get
off the stage" (even after the
performers invite people to climb
on up), patience with the venue
is wearing thin. Still, not thin
enough to prevent tickets selling
out for Seattle's shriek-scene
superstars, the Blood Brothers.
First on the bill was
Winning, new kids on the block
featuring former Red Light Stinger Andy Dixon and that intense
dude from the Primes. They were
all jagged stabs of guitar, spastic
rhythms, and yelped vocals—as
expected, reminiscent of the
Sting or Ex Models. Moments
of genius left as quickly as they
came in what seemed more like
musical collages than actual
songs. Sorry boys, but you're no
Fantomas; work your potential,
and maybe I'll give you another
chance.
The  head-scratching  was
replaced with ass-shaking when
You Say Party! We Say Die! got
down to business. Shouts and
handclaps filled the room as the
band delivered shot after shot
of spunky dance-punk. The
snap-crackle-pop combination
of beats, chords, and vocals
demonstrated to one and all just
how much fun Vancouverites
can have. The bassist's repeated
stage dives were the cherry on
top. I say party!
2004's Crimes saw the
Brothers expanding their sonic
arsenal with exotic instruments
and adventurous song structures,
and their set showcased that
album to the eager masses. The
band was assertive enough with
their material to hit every musical
sweet spot possible: the dynamic
shifts in "Peacock Skeleton with
Crooked Feathers" were smooth
as butter; the chaotic bridge of
"Love Rhymes with Hideous Car
Wreck" swerved like a school
bus out of control; and the slow-
burning buildup that is "Crimes"
captured the disaffection of
an entire generation. Johnny
Whitney and Jordan Billie put
on a real acrobatics display with
their barely-controlled screams
and frenetic vocal delivery. The
night ended with "Cecilia and
Phmjfa Marielle Ko
the Silhouette Saloon," a song
whose closing lament, "where
is love now," was still ringing in
everyone's ears the next morning
at school.
Simon Foreman
Sonata Arctica
Antiquus
February 6
Richards on Richards
Vancouver's Antiquus has a lot   j
of   potential.  They  have  solid
musicianship and riffs. The have
that   great   heavy   prog-death
sound matched with Jesse White's
powerful and melancholic voice.
What they lacked tonight seemed
to be lyrical variation. It seems
much of what they were going
on about was one story about a
captain and the sea. Now, I'm all
in favour of concept songs and
even concept albums, but there
needs to be variation on themes
within that concept or it gets very
boring, very quickly. Such was the   J
case with their set this night, and   j
the White's excessively earnest  I
recitations of poetry in between
songs (again on the same topic)   j
and his poses looking up to the   j
heavens came across as more
lamentable   than   lamentation.
Nonetheless,    they're    still    a  j
young band and they have great
potential if they write themselves
outside of their box.
Sonata Arctica was, of
course, the main attraction of the
night, and they did not disappoint
those of us who had waited
years to see their neo-prog metal
performed live. Heavily influenced
by fellow Finns Stratovarius and
Nightwish, as well as the likes of
Steve Vai and Frank Zappa, you
could even say they wear their
obsessions on their sleeves (at j
least guitarist Jani Liimatainen
did). Their show consisted of the
expected monster chops, exquisite
melodies, fantastic energy and
almost ESP-like synergy within
the band, as well as great stage
presence and crowd rapport.
Singer Tony Kakko's voice was ,
in fine shape (I don't believe for
a second his bio claim to have
never had any training), and he
even got the crowd warmed up
in a little sing-along towards the
end of the night. I just wonder
what the Finnish phrases he lead
us through meant.
Never ones to wallow in
misery, Sonata Arctica were
gregarious and funny in between
songs, and even closed the show
with a chant of "Now we need
some vodka" to the tune of some
old Russian folk tune that I sort
of dimly recognized. If they're
not already getting paid for the
Discorder   23 plug of Finlandia Vodka, they
probably should fix that, as I
think that little chant would
make a rather effective jingle.
If you missed them, well, they
promise to return somewhat
soon, so you'll get your chance.
Drake
Sevendust
Nonpoint
February 19
Commodore Ballroom
I arrived just in time to hear the
last couple of songs by Nonpoint,
and I was very impressed. They
have great energy and stage
presence, and seem to have a
fresh take on their subject matter;
even when it's the usual metal
message conveyed in tracks like
"Fuck That". Some people may
not like it, but, well, like the song
says...
While the majority of the
crowd vacated the floor to obtain
more beer, I rushed up to the
front row barrier to stake out my
territory for Sevendust's set. In
a way, I'm glad that Sevendust
is still a small enough band
that I can easily do that, but I
doubt this will last long. The
band has been steadily building
momentum throughout its
career and seems poised to break
into the big leagues soon. As
soon as Sevendust hit the stage,
the band showed why these good
Southern boys are ready for more
recognition.
Their trademark aggressive-
but-catchy hooks translated
better live than even I expected,
and the crowd was moshing,
surfing and chanting along right
from the first lines. The members
of Sevendust all have a natural
ability to engage their audience
without resorting to the usual
lame crowd rapport methods.
Their set was one big vibrant-
march through old and new
standards, with well-polished
chops and performance antics
along the lines of Steve Vai
leading up to the big favourite for
an encore, "Enemy". You know a
concert is great when it's over an
hour and a half long and you still
can't believe it's already over. But
hey, best to leave us hungry for
DANCING WITH MYSELF
ABOUT ARCHITECTURE
by Curtis Woloschuk—
holding Vancouver's hair
back while it pukes and
still wanting to make-out
Let's make this clear from the
outset: I'm neither a numbers
nor science guy. Thus, I leave it to
someone else to explain how it's
possible that, as the winter days
have gradually grown longer, the
nights have responded in kind.
Indeed, evenings of late
have proven short of sleep and
steeped in lurid aural temptation.
A man can only stave off his base
musical urges for so long. And so,
after a month spent exhausting
every justification for staying in,
the February 8th Dead Meadow
show at The Red Room officially
ushered in my show-going season
(which traditionally stretches
into the third week of December).
The evening commenced with
Matt Camirand leading his
Blood Meridian troops through
selections from their recently-
released Soldiers of Christ EP. With
a sound comprised of rural gothic
guitars, wounded organs and
cryptic imagery, Blood Meridian
churned out rootsy soul revues
that were both immediately
accessible and ominously off-
putting.
Next up was Local Boy
Made Top Ten List: Steve
McBean. Operating under the
Pink Mountaintops moniker,
McBean's performance focused
primarily on his entrancing
vocals and dirge-like guitar
work. A smattering of Black
Mountain Army personnel were
positioned at the periphery and
lent backup voices and sparse
accompaniment. The subdued
affair was afar cry from the dawn-
of-a-new-era Mountaintops rave-
up that tore the Anza Club a new
hole eighteen months earlier.
However, the evening's restraint
is replicated on the forthcoming
Axis of Evol (read Julie Colero's
analysis in Under Review). With
rare exception-
"New    Drug     Queens"
24   March 2006
potential bong water bongo jam
"Cold Criminals" the new disc
seems destined to separate the
Pink ranges from the Black in
McBean's canon.
Axis of Evol s release on
March 7th will complete a flurry
of launch activity for local bands.
While that disc will assuredly
join Destroyer's Rubies as one of
the scene's crown jewels, there
are a few other local luminaries
in possession of new product to
hawk. They Shoot Horses, Don't
They? finally found a home for
their fulllength debut Boo Hoo Hoo
Boo (on shelves since February
21a) with Kill Rock Stars. Oddly
enough, I spoke to Josh from the
Horses last March about what
was then to be their ready-to-
drop album. "We tried to keep the
live energy in the recordings," he
said. "At the same time, we're not
sticking to what we do live." Such
active deviations are evidenced
on a track such as "Emptyhead",
which sees the Horses collapsing
their    frenzied    wall-of-sound
and aided by producer Colin
Stewart bringing more
focus to their song's discordant
components. "What we'd do was
have every single sound be as
interesting as possible," said the
guitarist/singer of the recording
process. "If it's made simpler,
then the sound is that much more
present and effective in what it's
trying to convey."
Mint Records' The Buttless
Chaps and Young and Sexy
also have long-delayed albums
out. Both bands seemingly fell
victim to Mint's in-house will-
not-compete-with-The-New-
Pornographers policy. Now
that Twin Cinema has reached
its saturation point, Where
Night Finds Light and Panic
When You Find It have been
afforded the light of day. Both
records see the venerable bands
foregoing innovation in favour
of refinement of their trademark
sounds.
Speaking of the
Pornographers (because no
one has for at least thirty
seconds): any official word on
why they're ducking out of the
Belle & Sebastian show at the
Commodore Ballroom while
joining the Scots in every other
city? Although it may be horribly
unfashionable to admit, the
B&S album, The Life Pursuit, has
really caught my fancy. Granted,
it would be greatiy improved
if Stuart Murdoch flushed his
happy meds for every second
song. The mid-album pairing of
"We are the Sleepyheads" and
"Song for Sunshine" is a little too
much sugar, not nearly enough
pill. Elsewhere, "The Blues are
Still Blue" and "Sukie in the
Graveyard" are both ludicrously
hip-shaking. Honestly, the disc
is enough to make me regret not
ponying up $40+ for their March
24th show.
Instead, I'll likely end
up wherever The Christa Min
are playing that night. The
velvet garagers seem rather
omnipresent of late, and their
immediate future promises high
profile support slots for Oneida
and Destroyer. On February 18th,
they and Pride Tiger entertained
the DOs & DON'Ts devotees at an
invite-only Vice/Kokanee
held at Silkhaus. Again, I'm not
a numbers guy. You do the math:
add those co-hosts and multiply
by free beer. If images of hurtling
aluminium cans and rampant
public urination dance through
your head, you're close to the
mark.
And to think I used to stay in.
scott pilgrim wa*vts
vlscorderl
He 4©esp*t care if yooYe a KMC student or
an sfu dropout* a lawyer or a sanitation
engineer, an heiress to a diamond~mmint|
fortune or ®* welfare. The T%corder
welcomes swI^wMSsions from all tvfes*
even W you write $&e another publication *n
Vancouver or elsewhere, that*s cool too. The
"Piscorder doesnHl; hold grvclges* •
i| v-ou would like to submit story ideas or
review shows or cps, email the editor. «e*s
furry ®md friendly!
Art and fhotograf hy
submissions are
welcome too! If you
have something you'd
like to see in frint, or
MP vou just want to
join the art s€|uad and
lend a hand when it's
needed, go ahead and
let ^s know! CITR CHARTS!
CiTR's charts and reflects what has been spun on the
platters can be found at finer (read: independent) musi
His name is Luke. If you ask nicely he'll tell you how to
r for the previous month. Rekkids with stars mean they come from this great land o' ours. Most of these
tores across Vancouver. If you can't find 'em there give the Muzak Coordinator a shout at 604-822-8 733.
it 'em. To find out other great campus/community radio charts check out www.earshot-online.com.
#
ARTIST
Title
Label
1
Destroyer*
Destroyer's Rubies
Merge
2
They Shoot Horses, Don't
They?*
Boo Hoo Hoo Boo
Kill Rock Stars
3
Ivan Grvatska*
Seasons of Love {Party All Year)
RroAn
4
The Spinoffs*
Street Rock Stars
Black Market
th$
Young And Sexy*
Panic WhenYouFind It
Mint
6
Ghost House*
Departures
Independent
|f
Blood Meridian*
Soldiers of Christ EP
Outside
8
The Black Halos*
Alive Without Control
Liquor And Poker
9
Cat Power
The Greatest
Matador
10
The Soledad Brothers
The Hardest Walk
Alive
11
The Gossip
Standing In The Way Of Control
Kill Rock Stars
12
Hinterland*
The Picture Plane
Submerged
13
lesbians on Ecstasy*
Reraises
AlienS
14
The Barmitzvah Brothers*
The Century Of Invention
Permafrost
15
Tortoise and Bonnie Prince
Bitty
The Brave and the Bold
Overcoat
16
The Buttless Chaps*
Where Mght Holds light
Mint
17
Ariel Pink's Haunted Graffite
House Arrest
PawTracks
18
Rich Hope And His Evil Doers*
Rich Hope And His Evil Doers
Maximum
19
BellOrchestre*
Recording A Tape The Colour Of The light
RoughTrade
20
CSrclesquare*
Right Sounds
Output
21
Elevation
Neotext
Mangrove
22
The Arctic Monkeys
Whatever People Say I Am, That's What I'm Not     Domino
23
EickMaranis*
The Agoraphobic Cowboy
Unichappell Music
24
Secret Mommy*
VeryRec
Ache
25
The Advantage
Elf titled
SRC
#
ARTIST
Title
Label
26
The International Falls*
The Plateau
Independent
27
Telepathy
Farewell Forest
The Social
Registry
28
The Buff Medways
Medway Wheelers
Damaged Goods
29
dd/mm/yyyy*
The Blue Screen of Death
Culture Industry/
WeAreBusyBodies
30
Acid Mothers Temple & The
Cosmic Interno
Iao Chant From the Cosmic Interno
Ace-Fu
31
Stereolab
Fab Four Suture
Too Pure
32
Twink
the Broken Record
Seeland
33
Nick Cave/Warren Ellis
O.S.T. "The Proposition"
Must
34
Robert Pollard
From A Compound Eye
Merge
35
Oars
It Fit When I Was A Kid
Mute
36
Various
Run The Road 2
Vice
37
Mylo
Destroy Rock And Roll
RCA
38
The Checkers
Running With Scissors
Teenacide
39
The Furios*
Tread Lightly
Independent
40
Ahleuchatistas
What You Will
Cuneiform
41
Jackie-O-Motherfucker
Flags Of The Sacred harp
ATP
42
Angels Of light & Akron/
Family
Akron/Family & The Angels Of light
Young God
43
Wolfmother
Dimentions
Modular
44
The Tranzmitors*
The Tranzmitors EP
Independent
45
Japanther
Master Of Pigeons
Menlo Park
46
Test Icicles
For Screening Purposes Only
Domino
47
Dandi Wind*
Concrete Igloo
Todtenschlaf
48
Arab Strap
the Iiast Romance
Transdreamer
49
Various
How To Destroy The Univers Part 5
Mobilization
50
We Are Scientists
With Love And Squalor
Virgin
SPM MUSIC BIZ AND CITR 101.9 PRESENT
AUDIO PRODUCTION ARTIST DEVELOPMENT/ CONTACT 604 322 0102 WWW.SPMMUSIC.BIZ
FRIDAY MARCH 24TH
FRIDAY MARCH 31ST
CTrrgnm
IMJdil       dhH i 7'V_R-|
^^l__M_i____hd   W" iijiiifiEfeiEDniE^0*ffai[ •■->«« ■ii-Mf
>Z£.'_
■MS_
¥MMWiWMMM\WMB-
W(SMMES MWV_.Miftti.iit-- I iM.i in i II ''■m*_r'J
FRIDAY MARCH 10TH
THURSDAY MARCH 23RD
WHYTEHOTT
WiWflfM
THE BIG BAD
AZIMYTH
CASTIE GREYSKU1L
RE-ENTRY
MARRIED TO MUSIC
303 COL
! WWWLIVEMllSICVairai^R.C()M   *&W CHOP SHOP
________m
I pQiryt-1
ANARCHY TAnOO   CITR _2__&&3B present   I    CITR 101.9 FM
SATURDAY mar 4th
The FURIOS
The SMEARS
& LIONS IN THE STREET,..,..*,,.-...,
@ The LAMPLIGHTER, 210 Abbott Street
SATURDAY mar 11th
LOTUS CHILD
MADISON'S PANIC
DANIMANGAN
HEY OCEAN!
PROGRAM GUIDE
SATURDAY mar 18th
RYAN MCMAHON
cd release party
BIG TALL GARDEN
DESERT RADIO
DUSTIN BENTALL
SATURDAY mar 18th
WINDOWS 78
OCTOBERMAN
PARLOUR STEPS
LOCATOR SSBSS5
FRIDAY mar 24th _
JEFF JOHNSON
with ASTORIA
tour kick off party
NEINS CIRCA
THBI      The MEDIA CLUB
Gr I HII _L    695 CAMBIE, 9PM
SATURDAY mar 25th
BRITISH INVASION
TRIRUTE NIGHT
The ORCHID HIGHWAY
STAR COLLECTOR
The FEMINISTS
& MANY MOB tl In      ~
FRIDAY mar 31st m
HINTERLAND
STORYBOARD
(from edmonton)
orchards a vines
&   GUESTS® The BACKSTAGE LOUNGE
SATURDAY apr 1st *.
RIG JOHN RATES
WAGES OF SIN
(from seattle)
& GUESTS®ti
FRIDAY apr 7th ^
BILLY a THE LOST BOYS
cd release party
m MONGOOSE
The ROCKY FORTONE
& TREACHEROUS MACHETE
LOTUS CHTLO
RYAN McMAHON
jeff Johnson
hinterland
m
boini"'      ^^m CiTR   Get full show details at:
TiSE™ 2i.;IIM ifnupmcluctions.com
AFRICAN RHYTHMS (World)
David "Love" Jones brings you the
best new and old jazz, soul, Latin,
samba, bbssa and African music
from around the world.
<www.africanrhythmsradio.
com>
AFROBEAT (World)
In two hours, I take the listener for
a spin—musically—around the
world; my passion is African music
and music from the Diaspora.
Afrobeat is where you can catch up
on the latest in the "World Music"
scene and reminisce on the classic
collections. Don't miss it.
<nryafrobeat@yahoo.com>
ALT. RADIO (Talk)
Hosted by David B.
AND   SOMETIMES   WHY   (Pop/
Eclectic)
First Wednesday of every month
ANOIZE (Noise)
Luke Meat irritates and educates
through musical deconstruction.
Recommended for the strong.
AURAL TENTACLES (Eclectic)
It could be punk, ethno, global,
trance, spoken word, rock, the
unusual and the weird, or it could
be something different. Hosted by
DJ Pierre.
BEATS FROM THE BASEMENT
(Hip Hop)
BLOODONTHESADDLE (Roots)
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-boots
country.
BLUE MONDAY (Gom/Industrial)
Vancouver's    only    industrial-
electronic-retro-goth    program.
Music to schtomp to, hosted by
Coreen.
BREAKFAST WTTH THE BROWNS
(Eclectic)
Your favourite Brown-sters, James
and Peter, offer a savoury blend of
the familiar and exotic in a blend
of aural delights!
CAUGHT IN THE RED (Rock)
THE CANADIAN WAY (Eclectic)
Independent   Canadian   music
from     almost     every     genre
imaginable covering the east coast
to the left coast and all points in
between.  Yes,   even  Montreal!
<thecanadianway@popstar.
com>
CHIPS WITH EVERYTHING (Pop)
British pop music from all decades.
CODE BLUE (Roots)
From backwoods delta low-down
slide to urban harp honks, blues,
and blues roots with your hosts
Jim, Andy and Paul.
DEMOCRACY NOW (Talk)
Independent   news   hosted, by
award-winning journalists Amy
Goodman and Juan Gonzalez.
EN AVANT LA MUSIQUE (French)
«En   Avant   la   musiquel»   se
concentre sur le metissage des
genres musicaux au sein d'une
francophonie ouverte a tons les
courants. This program focuses
on cross-cultural music and its
influence on mostly Francophone
musicians.
END  OF  THE  WORLD  NEWS
(Eclectic)
EXQUISITE CORPSE (Experimental)
Experimental,   radio-art,   sound
collage,   field   recordings,   etc.
Recommended for the insane.
FLEXYOURHEAD (Hardcore)
Up the punx, down the emo!
Keepin' it real since 1989, yo,
flexyourhead.
<www.vancouverhardcore.com>
FOLK OASIS (Roots)
Two hours of eclectic roots music.
Don't   own   any   Birkenstocks?
Allergic to patchouli? C'mon in! A
kumbaya-free zpne since 1997.
<folkoasis@canada.com>
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
(Punk)
A fine mix of streetpunk and old
school hardcore backed by band
interviews, guest speakers, and
social commentary.
www.streetpunkradio.com
<crashnbumradio@yahoo.ca>
HANS   KLOSS'   MISERY   HOUR
(Hans Kloss)
This is pretty much the best thing
on radio.
HIGHBRED VOICES (World)
I UKE THE SCRIBBLES (Eclectic)
IN THE SHADOWS (Hip Hop)
THE JAZZ SHOW (Jazz)   '
Vancouver's    longest    running
primetime jazz program. Hosted
by the ever-suave, Gavin Walker.
Features at 11:00, as listed.
March 6: "Smokin' at the Half
Note" is one of guitar master Wes
Montgomery's very best and one
that has been studied and copied
by generations of guitar players.
Delebrating   what   would  have
been Wes' 81st birthday tonight.
Marchl3: "Motion" is a definitive
recording by  alto  saxophonist
Lee Konitz withjust bass (the
underrated Sonny Dallas) adn
drums (the Great Elvin Jones).
Konitz (who is still alive and well)
was one of the very first altoists
to develop his own concept after
Charlie Parker. Here's Konitz at
his best!
March 20: Oscar Pettiford was one
of the first great modern bassists
and for a short time led a fine big
jazz orchestra. Tonight we feature
that star-studded band and it's
innovative arrangements.
March 27: Tenor saxophist Ben
Webster (whose birthday is today)
possessed one of the most easily
identifiable sounds in jazz. Here
is Ben alongside another concert
with some inspired blowing.
Saxophone masters at play!
JUICE BOX (Talk)
Developing your relational
and individual sexual health,
expressing diversity, celebrating
queerness,    and    encouraging
pleasure at all stages. Sexuality
educators     Julia     and     Alix
will   quench   your   search   for
responsible, progressive sexuality
over your life span!
<www.juiceboxradio.com>
LAUGH TRACKS (Talk)
THE    LEO    RAMIREZ    SHOW
(World)
The best mix of music, news,
sports,   and  commentary  from
around the local and international
Latin American communities.
LET'S GET BAKED W/ MAT +
DAVE (Eclectic)
Vegan   baking   w/"rock   stars"
like Sharp Like Knives, Whitey
Houston, The Novaks and more.
UONS AND TIGERS! AND BEARS...
(Eclectic)
A mix of indie pop, indie rock, and
pseudo underground hip hop,
with your host, Jordie Sparkle.
LIVE     FROM    THUJTOERBIRD
RADIO HELL (Live Music)
Live From Thunderbird Radio Hell
showcases local talent...  LIVE!
Honestly, don't even ask about the
technical side of this. As listed.
March 2:10pm Channels 3x4
March   9:   10pm   International
Falls
March 16:9pm The Fiends; 10pm
The Dropouts
March 23:10pm lover lover lover
March 30: 10pm Married To
Music
MOTORDADDY (Rock)    4|jf
Cycle-riffic rawk and roll!
MORNING AFTER SHOW (Eclectic)
MY SCIENCE PROJECT (Talk)
Zoom a little zoom on the My
Science Project rocket ship, piloted
by your host, Julia, as we navigate
eccentric, under-exposed, always
relevant and plainly cool scientific
research, technology, and poetry
(submissions welcome).
<myscienceprojectradio@yahoo.
ca>
NATIVE SOLIDARITY NEWS (Talk)
A national radio service and part
of an international network of
information and action in support
of indigenous peoples' survival
and dignity. We are all volunteers
committed to promoting Native
self-determination, culturally,
economically, spiritually and
otherwise. The show is self-
sufficient, without government or
corporate funding.
NARDWUAR THE HUMAN
SERVIETTE PRESENTS...
(Nardwuar)
NECESSARY VOICES (Talk)
Socio-political,     environmental
activist news and spoken word
with some music, too.
<www.necessaryvoices.oi_>
<necessaryvoices@telus.net>
NEWS 101 (Talk)
A  volunteer-produced,   student
and      community      newscast
featuring    news,    sports    and
26   March 2006 Listen to CiTR on-line at www.citr.ca or on the air at 101.9FM
arts. Reports by people like you.
"Become the Media."
NUTHOUSE   RADIO   THEATRE
(Drama)
All-original     Canadian     radio
drama   and   performance   art
written and performed live-to-
air by our very own team of
playwrights and voice-actors. We
also welcome you to get involved,
whether you are a professional or
inexperienced...
OPEN SECRETS (Talk)
OUR WAVE (World)
News, arts, entertainment and
music for the Russian community,
local and abroad.
PACIFIC PICKIN' (Roots)
Bluegrass, old-time music, and its
derivatives with Arthur and "The
Lovely Andrea" Berman.
PARTS WJKNOWN (Pop)
Underground pop for the minuses
with  the  occasional interview
with your host, Chris.
PEDAL REVOLUTIONARY (Talk)
PLANET    LOVETRON    (Dance/
Electronic)
Music   inspired   by   Chocolate
Thunder;   Robert  Robot   drops
electro past and present, hip hop
and intergalactic funkmanship.
<robertrobot@gmail.com>
PLUTONIAN   NIGHTS   (Dance/
Electronic)
Cutting-edge, progressive organ
music   with   resident   Haitchc
and various guest performers/
DJs.   Bye-bye  civilisation,   keep
smiling blue, where's me bloody
anesthetic then?
<http://plutonia.org>
POWERCHORD (Metal)
Vancouver's   only   true   metal
show; local demo tapes, imports,
and    other    rarities.     Gerald
Rattlehead,  Dwain,  and Metal
Ron do the damage.
QUEER FM (Talk)
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian,
bisexual, and transsexual
communities of Vancouver.
Lots of human interest features,
background on current issues,
and great music.
RADIO ZERO (Eclectic)
REEL TO REAL (Talk)
Movie reviews and criticism.
RHYMES AJMD REASONS   (Hip
Hop)
RHYTHMSmDIA (World)
Rhythmslndia features a wide
range   of   music   from   India,
including popular music from
Indian movies from the 1930s
to the present, classical   music,
semi-classical   music   such   as
Ghazals and Bhajans, and also
Qawwalis,   pop,   and   regional
language numbers.
THE ROCKERS SHOW (Reggae)
Reggae inna all styles and fashion.
RUMBLETONE RADIO (Rock)
Primitive,     fuzzed-out     garage
mayhem!
SAJNTTROPEZ (Pop)
International    pop    (Japanese,
French, Swedish, British, US, etc.),
60s   soundtracks   and   lounge.
Book your jet set holiday now!
SALARIO MLMMO (World)
THE SATURDAY EDGE (Roots)
Studio guests, new releases,
British comedy sketches, folk
music    calendar,    and    ticket
9AM-12PM: Celtic music  and
performances.
SHADOW   JUGGLERS    (Dance/
Electronic)
An exciting chow of Drum n'
Bass with DJs Jimungle & Bias on
the ones and twos, plus guests.
Listen for give-aways everyweek.
Keep feelin da beatz.
SKA-T'S SCENE-IK DRIVE! (Ska)
Email requests to:
<djska_t@hotmail.com>
SON OF NTTE DREEMS (Eclectic)
SWEET AND HOT
Sweet dance music and hot jazz
from the 1920s, 30s, and 40s.
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH   (Dance/
Electronic/Eclectic)
THESE ARE THE BREAKS   (Hip
Hop)
Top notch crate digger DJ Avi
Shack mixes the underground
hip hop, old school classics, and
original breaks.
THIRD TIME'S THE CHARM (Rock)
Open  your  ears   and  prepare
for a shock! A harmless note
may make you a fan! Hear the
menacing scourge that is Rock
and Roll! Deadlier than the most
dangerous criminal!
<boiT_3sixlyriine@hotmaiLcom>
TRANCENDANCE (Dance)
Join us in practicing the ancient
art   of   rising   above   common
thought and ideas as your host DJ
Smiley Mike lays down the latest
trance cuts to propel us into the
domain of the mystic-al.
<trancendance@hotmail.com>
UNCOMMON PRACTICE (Classical)
Alltheclassicalmusicyoudon'thear
on mainstream radio! A variety of
innovaative and interesting works
from the 20th and 21st centries,
with   an   occasional   neglected
masterpiece from earlier eras.
THE  VAMPIRE'S  BALL   (Goth/
Industrial/'Metal)
Dark, sinister music to soothe
and/or move the Dragon's soul.
Hosted by Drake.
<thevampiresball@yahoo.ca>
VENGEANCE IS MINE (Punk)
All the best the world of punk
rock has to offer, in the wee hours
of the morn. Hosted by Trevor.
WE ALL FALL DOWN (Eclectic)
Punk   rock,   indie   pop,   and
whatever else I deem worthy.
Hosted by a closet nerd.
WENER'S BARBEQUE (Sports)
Join the sports dept. for their
coverage of the T-Birds.
WIGFLUX RADIO (Reggae)
Listen to Selecta Krystabelle for
your reggae education.
WI.N.G.S (Talk)
Womens    International   News
Gathering Service
WRAPPED IN SILVER SOUND
(Eclectic)
JulieCo., just playin' what I know
best (or is it the only thing I
know?) - indie rock!
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday       Wednesday      Thursday
Friday
Saturday
m
7
8
9
BBC
PACIFIC PICKIN'
BBC
BBC
BBC
7
8
BBC
(RT)
BBC
TANA RADIO (WO)
BREAKFAST WITH
HIGHBRED VOICES (WO)
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
(EC)
THE
SATURDAY
EDGE(RT)
THE BROWNS
(EC)
(EC)
THIRD TIMES
THE CHARM (RR)
10
11
11
AFROBEAT (WO)
WRAPPED IN SILVER SOUND
(EC)
SWEET'N'HOT (EC)
SKA-T'S
SCENIC DRIVE (SK)
LIONS AND TIGERS AND BEARS (EC)
12™
MORNING AFTER SHOW (EC)
ANOIZE (NO)
12™
ALT. RADIO (PO)
FILLJN
THESE ARE THE
GENERATION ANNIHILATION (PU)
v ;,*2L>?
FILL-IN
SHOW(RG)
PARTS
FILL-IN
WE ALL FALL DOWN (EC)
BREAKS (HH)
POWERCHORD
(MT)
2
p
UNKNOWN (PO)
DEMOCRACY NOW (TK)
INKSTUDS (TK)
RADIO ZERO (EC)
REEL TO REAL(TK)
3
BLOOD
ON THE
SADDLE (RT)
FILL-IN
LETS GET BAKED (EC)
CAREER FAST TRACK (TK)
MOTORDADDY
(RR)
RHYMES &
REASONS (HH)
CODE BLUE
(RT)
MUSIQUE (FR)
RADIO
(RR)
NARDWUAR
PRESENTS (NW)
NATIVE SOLIDARITY NEWS (TK)
WENER'S BBQ (SP)
5
CHPSWITH                 SAINTTROPEZ
EffitflHHGlPO)                  (TO)
CiTR NEWS {TK)
NECESSARY VOICES (TK)
MY SCIENCE PROJECT
TO
PEDAL
REVOLUTION (TK)
NEWS 101 (TK)
LEO RAMIREZ SHOW (WO)
t'^'l
W.I.N.G.S.(TK)
6
QUEER FM
(TK)
SON OF NITE
DREEMS (EC)
UNCOMMON
PRACTICE (CL)
FLEX YOUR
HEAD(HC)
NUTHOUSE
RADIO THEATRE (DR)
THE SONIC
SOCIETY (DR)
THE CANADIAN WAY
/Ff\
OUR WAVE (WO)
'^''if&
AND SOMETIMES
WHY (PO/EC)
BLUE MONDAY
7
$$rM£*i._
P|
SHADOW JUGGLERS
(DC)
8
9
10
WIGFLUX II
ORPSE(EX)
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
(WO)
8
9
10
RHYTHA
ISINDIA
SALARIO MINIMO
JUICEBOX (TK)
OPENJKRETS
EXQUISITE (
0)
THE JAH
(WO)
LIVEF
(OM...
DHELL(LM)
PLANET LOVETRON (DC)
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
(DC/EC)
SHOW
FILL-IN
CAUGHT IN THE
FOLK OASIS (RT)
THUNDERBIR
TRANCE
(D
YDANCE
C)
l"J
HANS KLOSS'
MISERY HOUR
(HK)
LAUGH TRACKS (TK)
IN THE SHADOWS (HH)
BEATS FROM THE BASEMENT
(HH)
VENGEANCE IS MINE!
(PU)
1 UKE THE SCRIBBLES
4
5
ww6
RAL
\CLES
C)
BBC
(EC)
BBC
2
3
4
5
BI
c
BBC
AU
TENT
1
BI
c
THE VAMPIRE'S
BALL (GI/MT)
CL=classical • DC=<
LM=live music
Jance/electronic •DR=drame
• LO=lounge • MT=metal • r>
• EOeclectic • EX=experir
0=noise • NW=Nardwuar •
nental • FR=French languac
PO=pop • PIMpunk • RG=r
e • GI=goth/industrial • HC=
eggae • RR=rock • RT=roots
hardcore • HH=hiphop • HK
• SK=ska • SP=sports • TK
=Hans Kloss • JZ=jazz
=talk • WOworld
Discorder
27 YOUR BACK PORCH
Destroyer's Rubies
CD
Dan'lej^-dMMp
is, in fact, a band, not just him.
This proclamation — of seif-identi-
ftcatioh by means of group atfilia-
5 know'slt /^ralt'we^I'knwrio^thdf D^roj^danfee^ilj
has been a group of people js east1'/ in{fffearij^fis»fl room -
nil' oJ Mini-controlled machines vVhat fem_js.£rld continues, of course, tefjaar himself el l,ombra'l$6V.'.afld this fact'
- is<S4_r htm.alc-Be-'. challenge But it is, lmmrdlly, ashaTfejitje
that    itil ^tat^ti^e, sustaining tlie Sj^-cailerJs!^jBQessafy    \±
wound' embodied. Mortal after alfcsnd bleeding, what does
Bejar do mreip'i. • • ? he is eli^i& defensive but always cre-
at<tf_.aticU in. his ow^i way. thoroughly Honest. This wound Is "si
* ln"fa& t1t89>factd^'rfte Wtgw at rygrrj_thfi first and fjSf .3- \
tactic, the" motive heat, the ijp chaos * the shinny red ruby x .\
itself of which tie speaksf i^p^^^^paf "Oestroyer's"
pasl work >ruth-telling ts hers amongst the densely refwarftial
and metaphorical text the lurking wee the cutting jibs _8_ .
_^he theatre oFojd man" roc*MojI'whatfe the truth berugt^
' fold"? Pcrtaps orrty that beet qrrthe back porch is always
flooa and njfttv    >- „. ,    r«-
Neko Case
Fox Confessor
Bnn^The Flood
rfNP
Citf™ct the facts on this case:
Neko's fourtft.falWeggth Oftv
Vancouver's own Mint Records further solidifies te-statii^l^
one of the premiere voices in the &-at__tr¥jig$$Qmffl&
Ipecorrjed in sum^^KOttA^^^tofetiere joined by'
' The Bands Garth Hudsor»ijj|ik^% dynamic dt^of Joey
Burns and 4oiraCi^fB|™;fil_Dt&a^'^tepan Howe
ft §§§|i§| ofot»jl^lon(^rne Sadies pals tefi and Travis «
^^^^^^^^^^ songs expand "g^Bnusicuniw J
■>'%i ${$<falve$ deep $rte\3WQber of sonic f§j||f|§§ to fash
l^f^^^oes^pLmafismagicaltyforei^^f^fetJIl"
; stt^gp^HaBfa Confessor is Cas«'s:8^&f|sive    j
1 jtggl Rftere^d with a-cg&rjf (§|_i_ and sp1m^5*w&6 work asl
||S^fete^^feA||eflectior!s. The result m^^Brtcy
listen amt't&rfe'magt^&^tred by the siren — Anpble     j
-''.March m    ,       '     "*
They Shoot Horses,
Don't They
Boo Hoo Hoo Boo
Swing and Sip hie New Sounds
The Pink
..■thai, after a-jistep to the new TSH, DT? ajbum, inspiration will
stake and you will attain saj0cto5ets_(ano storage tm>ts to
boot!) wtb a previously unkw/n fwot in an attempt to find
your high-school wind instrument F^pybodj warts to be m
this bandi The ehaolic artd'ch&nsmatic TSH, DT? Jive show
aesthetic flas bein captured beautifully on this, tM group s .
first ftilt length album If -oW!> and bombast are your cup of,
tea then this is wlutyou should be srpjilno at this spasor1
Put on yper gumboots and march on down tc-helfi ensure '
that meseio'tmer band geefe earn the prajse and fwbate
thev so rightly deserve! Buctong, Kicwotj and throwing you
■^Orfkthis is^one wilrj rate
C016.98
Mr. Beast 2CD Ltd
Q_W__J________^in9e many
things subPy, wfll the overall
pJcbjte be dras*icafiy differeTt? For
this we turn to our amp blowing
rock pals Mogwai "The qtriet loud/q'tiet-Joud formula that
wa>(»jf t<9<3emaik became pretty cliche..vtTead noise .nuw^j
Wm, of Megwai adds, 'and also a lot c*ofher people started
p|g rt, so we consciously tried to stopjpbt that we: invent
pK if^oftFtiia point where people tfiought thai was alt ftfe
jfli iP*P* ^k® Set^9 ttred of it ourselves... Scotland's   '
^wSgiin)'fi§veJutlived every passing sexy trend including * j
fmj^) pte^^^xii^^eJtas the wlpfe tedspeed phenomenon Instead Megwai have fashioned an impressive catalog of relpales that each reshaoe a very simple, toek aesthet-
k — anb gne (hat with eac* revisited sculpting explores, an
giej bt~ of ftierr bold cofcjurs Mr. Beast much tike all,
'iljbejieai releases fwthers'the troth — sonjs beauty hiaoen-fe*
^]dense^arkness of brooding guitar cgtertsaul Tell rt ld(p ttjs
'—*Mr. least is a beautiful unpacfcmg of sound ■— stare w
the eye of Magmai's storm arid at ttfe center ottt you wlH.f|nd
_ peacf AvaiiaWe March "$0>
Axis Of Evol CD
When the light starts to fade
on the horizon and the air
begins to chill, there's a shiver
that courses up and down your
spine. That shiver, my friends, is Steve McBean. Unwilling
^r^^^^and focus another album elf the vibe that
Upts the^lpvefs io.ing McBean has tapped into something
equally powerfttf?tele less .latently sexy. Axis of Evol *
Kpi'to-track daltia^es and meditations on world
affairs and the battles that rage between the forcesof good
and evil, subjects broashed here with an earnestness and
honesty consists$|j|Pi this Black Mountain frontman's
modus opeipgl pre is your chance to be a part of some-
ttting bjiiiiantljTd you u nest take this revolution lying
down. Sfj^Mfeoi and avSfMWe Sfe^ffW *
Arctic Monkeys
WhateverPeople
Say I Arn, That's
What I am Not
R^^^^phe days when you,d do a quick flip through
.^^^^Sbefore popping off to a sweaty and wefi-
i§p:||§|lip. but the Arctic Monkeys are here to turn us
^^^^Mhe British Sound and bring the world's atten-
|K|TOpb where it belongs—the dance-floor of some
seedy.littfe Londoner bar. What's drowning in hype must
ajjidkty..tearn to swim, and the four young lads responsible
||||||!g§ forty-plus minutes of instant classics have earned
lllllllpes some diamond floaties. Pick up this album,
11|11§S a few weli-tir^dance moves, and hit the clubs
■Hp'esh new take on indie cool.
Lave Is All
Nine Times That Sali_ Song
CD |
Can we all speculate on the status off ock music?
Can we hedge bets and define some contoursifbr ■* ■
fBcurrent scene? Perhaps we canjaalyze the       »
tr^ds and project a possible picture of how things
Jm look this time next year? No we can't. Insteajtwe
vfiltell you about a band that has attracted a lot of
praise recently and seem to have a lot of the elements that have made for past proven winners.
Sweden's post-punkers Love is Ali are a classic art
jjjiool band. They write songs that have an edge,
lllage an audience and ultimately push an agenda
- Ilin ttieir case t0 make Passionate rock music- Give
wk a listen — it will rock you. Or if you prefer check
J|r Arctic Monkeys (elsewhere in this ad) as they
"lie the group saddled with expectations. Let,s be
cheeky — didn't someone once say love Is All you
need?
J019.98
tWEEPUPnEMEWSOUND:
The Butttess Oi^-WtereHi_htholdsL_MCD
tlie west coast best orchestral folk rockers now
Sue Ma.
Narthvuar The Human Serviette-Doot Doola Doot
Doo Doot Doo! 2 DVD The only reality TV show
Hie Flaring tips- 20 Years of Weird CD Exclusive
and Butted - a coiec-on of weird Oklahoma,
the Christa Min - The Devil & Tex Watson T
Jtebut single on Ron Down Sun from Vancouver
swamp rockers. One epic song over two sides!
C014.98
PrideTiger
Vtood, Dhak, Froese, Payette CD
A. alphabetic run-down of righteousness Atomic Rooster,
Btee Oyster Curt Captain Beyond fHamondhead Frijuf
Ph* firoumKtogs ttawkwfmf iggy 4 the Stooges, James
Geag, King Crimson Lynyrd Skynyrd, Magma Nazareth, ,0
Ba'Msa rW& IrSER Qnicksilv« Messenger Ssrrice, - '^'
Rainbow. Sfr lard_a_linBK^^tJw>,ttriah Heep. VanSIa
fudge. Wishbone Ash, Yes and_l1eps.tajfty plastenerrt. I
^feow,yef ttes^re^' trusfWW%naiver'sj«west^
CD 12.98
pM Ltd Ed/10) 16.98
itereol^l
f^ Four Suture CD
If you h 1 ■> e jer visited France you witiknow thaj the wsne 4
cheaper tl'd'i fhe water Therefore yotMjrinlt the grapes.    >-
when you get thirsty and you walk wlied get tifisy Itvfw walk
^'firenough out^p^^wn of Bordeaux you may be itiGky
•: enough to findfl hoy teceromg stud>o called Instant fftvliere _
sot i_ >' i i 'iiosi ftnt.rwii*in t m '"r on tlie ptanet is cun(*h_yi
I being cre^Ee^_^idthe console brc- Stereolab — the band
responslipfo#^^)aceage Bachelor PaoSound and the
reicr^stiption c&ai^i^pioneers such as Men!, Can and
Amon Duel. SerPi mis disr?toefore they rock the
Commodore in March and you will be getting into the grooviest of poly-rhythms, the most switched oagf synths, some
samba guitars and Stereolab's signatu-i' ck <> coo voQafe, ._
Previously released as a series of T singles fast September
which instantly se#j_ut. Fab Four Suture collects these
nuggets along wjtiijix new tracks! Recommended Available
W16.98
CWJ» 16.98
The Paper Cranes
The Veins Ep CD
iTHperendipitous turn of
ivlgte we went looking for a
partykby the Framberg house.
M_HBftwere we should
have:fjrjjed^rigrtt,.wecame ^.,,
acjo&4 a small bWir%?irt me n1icklfe'fiftTeyr&_ct^flete;' _*"*
|§ nri'otder tharp)iwe/rr)i_Flve-wearirif a cave man suit was
tjlirrung he record cofMitW snd ren<?unang the fjjvofQ/'
tidn The flames loj^edI _ood and werw was aH done we
■^^WCT r$mFW documentary. "No, go away*. We
w^B.backwJ^^tfc whole way to mj^irty and a band
jvas^yinf pbt-we didn t see^rWjsWd|@'tl^i
^roufitf Thpywere from Victoria iwhere evp"rv^iir^i8*ss»S)
^dbd) and had a srnl of magical sound that can cmvbe*^
described here as that of a captured spider in a jar of liberated honey. Now, this is where the story gets weird - the
^fSSnlftthe party, recorded a great EP and have become
the darlings of the underground trade route. Simply put,
the Paper Cranes are poised to make that cave man kid
want to buy records again, and that in itself may be the:  »
first step towards personal revolution or better yet personal
revolt.-Recommended.     &_+t_¥%-
CD 9.98
Revolution rock from DC_ only admirable players.
JJ.S.T.- The Proposition CD Nick Cave and Warren
HpM
R.FIerschmaim-TlieHumbncking Coil CD/LP
Chicago Underground Duo- In Praise of Shadows
|CI|jFreeja_! and mod composition reflect
European, Asian and African influences.
Mudhoney- Under A BillkmStarsCOAP Grunge
pioneers get back into the muff.
^ig|y||o||JM^Iioil hong bubble - tins is
The Sparks-Hello Young Lovers CD Their influence
iStsal^-thet charms great.
Barrin-% life In Rorjms CD Dark, pate and bleak,
this is the night's finest record.
jMdn^^pnWaJi-lnASpaMOutuSrrundfmP
Back to tie groove channel.
Various- DJ Kicks The Exclusives CD/IP A sample
of the beats found under this acclaimed label.
Arab Strap- Last Romance CD Bleak morning after ,
observations from this dandy Scottish duo.
Coldcut-Sound Mirrors CD Ninja Tune* leaner
gets his own beats out
Eels-Live At Town Hall CD Strange scenes from
inside the goldmine of your melodic mind.
PRICES IN EFFECT UNT1 MARCH 31,2006
ZULU'S ART NEWS:
Robert Niven "Bewilderness"
Opens March 4th to April 2nd
featuring Tailing In Love With Great Women'
^  //   i    %
Zulu Records
1972-1976 W 4th Ave
Vancouver, BC
tel 604.738.3232
www.zulurecords.com
STORE HOURS

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