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Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) Jun 1, 1998

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 JUNe/98     THST MUCKRaKiNO MaGaZiNe FROM CiTR 101.9 FM     FRee!
JPRiNG VaN New MllGiC Fe9T
GaQTR DeL QOL
GaRY NuMaN
DiaNOGaH
caLeXiCo
RYaN "MOTORaMa" SCHMiDT du Maurier
4Mew Groove Series
Move your feet to the hottest funk,
blues, jazz and latin sounds.
Richards on Richards
1036 Richards Street
Philosopher Kings
plus Millennium Project
FRIDAY JUNE 19 8PM
Roomful of Blues
SUNDAY JUNE 21  9PM
An Evening with Andy Summers
plus Strange Weather
MONDAY JUNE 22 9PM
Los Pleneros de la 21
plus Rumba Calzada
WEDNESDAY JUNE 24 9PM
Pleneros de la 21
Greazy Meal
plus JukeJoint
THURSDAY JUNE 25 9PM
Billy Branch
& Sons of Blues
FRIDAY JUNE 26 8PM
Lhasa
SUNDAY JUNE 28 9PM
Tickets and Information
BCTEL Jazz Hotline 872-5200
Ticketmaster 280-4444
www.jazzfest.bc.sympatico.ca
Program guides at all Starbucks,
HMV stores & ticket outlets
BCTV
The Vancouver Sun
HI • ...-.* *
UNIVERSAL |
Features
Gstr Del Sol
DlANOGAH
Spring! Vancouver New Music Festival
Gary Numan
Calexico
7
9
10
11
12
Columns
Where is not what you Wear    6
June, 1985
editrix: miko hoffman
art director: ken paul
ad rep: kevin pendergraft
production manager:
tristan winch
graphic design/layout:
kenny, magnetic malcom
bubble, randal mindell
production: barbara
anaersen, michelle eliot, ann
goncalves, erin hodge, alia
hussey, malcolm, christa min,
randal m, siobhan mc, tami
rushlaw, stefan udell, shane
vander meer
photography &
illustrations: ryan schmidt,
jason da silva, ted dave, ann
goncalves
contributors: barbara a,
brady c, chris c, julie c,
Cornelius, glenn d'c, bryce d,
greg e, sarah e, anna f,
trevor f, noah g, alia h,
anthony k, greg  n, jim v,
shane v, tobias v, coreen w
programme guide:
namiko kunimoto
charts: julie colero
datebook: tristan
distribution: matt steffich
us distribution: tristie
publisher: linda scholten
Real Live Action
Printed Matters
Basslines
Demo Derby
Videophilter
Seven Inch
Under Review
On the Dial
Charts
May Datebook
Comics
Botched Ampallang
14
15
15
16
16
17
18
20
22
23
Cover
This months cover by Ryan Schmidt.
Get yer motor runnin1 it's gonna
be a cooker!
© "DiSCORDER" 1 998 by the Student Radio Society of the
l. All rights reserved. Cir.
e $15 US; $24
:r postage, of
s payable to
ity of British Colui
tion 17, 500.
Subscriptions, payable in advance, to Canadic
$15 for one year, to residents of the USA c
CDN elsewhere. Single copies are $2 (to <
course). Please make checks or money oi
DiSCORDER Magazine.
DEADLINES: Copy deadline for the July issue is June 10th. Ad
space is available until June 17th and can be booked by calling
Kevin at (604) 822-3017 ext. 3. Our rates are available upon
request. DiSCORDER is not responsible for loss, damage, or any
other injury to unsolicited manuscripts, unsolicited artwork (including but not limited to drawings, photographs and transparencies), or any other unsolicited material. Material can be submitted on disc (Mac, preferably) or in type. As always, English is
preferred.
From UBC to Langley and Squamish to Bellingham, CiTR can be
heard at 101.9 fM as well as through all major cable systems in
the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock. Call ihe CiTR DJ
line at 822-2487, our office at 822-3017 ext. 0, or our news and
sports lines at 822-3017 ext. 2. Fax us at 822-9364, e-mail us at:
citrradio@mail.ams.ubc.ca, visit our web site at http://
www.ams.ubc.ca/media/citr or just pick up a goddamn pen and
write #233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, BC, CANADA V6T 1Z1.
Printed In Ginada **V
CONeE^fp
j SATURDAY JUNE WtW
esthero
EARLY SHOW
TICKETS
ALSO AVAILABLE AT
ZULU RECORDS
WEDNESDAY JUNE 17THj
SONAR
k's CHOICE
SATURDAY JUNE 27TH
^STARFISH ROOM
Duotang
with very special guests
The Weakerthans   &-pSumtree
TUESDAY JUNE 30TH
ALL
I SUNDAY JUNE 28TH^
TICKETS ALSO AT ZULU
STARFISH ROOM
WITH MOPISH"
SPECIAL ^^
GUESTS   \
^STARFISH ROOM!
CURVE
'f>
i FRIDAY JULY 17THj
PNE EXHIBITION BOWL
ON SALE JUNE 4
Badar Ali Khan
cousin of the legendary Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan
MASSEY THEATRE
MEW4
^THUNDERBIRD STADIUM   THUNDERBIRD STADIUM]
.^■■.-..■^■-»._. ^,,,,,^„,^, ,,U,	
3   H^eSasSB IMMI&MWM& hiraiiMK
Ti£PWe:9cT
WE WERE WRORG!
WE ADJIIJT JT!
Yes, we admit it. We are an exhausted bunch and we certainly aren't paid to be here. No matter how much we try
to do our work the best we can, we can sometimes screw
up. We can read and proof and correct and proof and correct,
but that doesn't mean we catch it all. Sorry we got it wrong. Here's
the right of it all:
In last month's live review of the Propellerheads show (Friday,
March 27 at Sonar), we incorrectly stated that Sonar had organized and promoted the show when, in fact, it was a Timbre Productions show. We also said that Propellerheads had announced
they would return for another set but did not when, in fact, they
played an encore and ended the night early, as it had been
advertised in advance. Third, our writer claimed the house dj
was spinning top 40 music when, in fact, he was not. Essentially,
we gave Sonar "two thumbs down" for reasons which had no
validity.
Not nearly of the same magnitude, we'd nonetheless like to further shed our guilt. An apology is due to those Dukes of
Stratosphear, who we (not Janis, but us overzealous proofers) so
ignorantly misspelt in last month's Vancouver Special column.
HAVE A HOPELESS SUMMER
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PRICES: CD-S10 LP/CS-S7 CDEP-S8 SAMPLER CD-S4 7" $4 MCD-S6
4   June 1998 "-'■
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dj equipment, cd's & vinyl
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<#►
IN STORES SUMMER '98
bmgcanada.com
a§xc_s___b sas^sg  M_M__3^}^os_fa
Our annual directory, chock full of contact numbers and
addresses of bands and the businesses that support
them, will be in the September issue. The deadline for
entries is July 15,1998.
YessireeJ It's time again for the Local Music Directory 1998 callout!
We want musicians, zines, labels, videographers, recording studios, webmasters, record stores, music venues, graphic designers
and all other manner of musical proffessions. Do you have too much
business? Could a free listing hurt?
YOU ARE A (Check one):
_ BAND/MUSICIAN _PR0M0TER
_REC0RD LABEL/DISTRIBUTOR LIVE MUSIC VENUE
_MANAGER/AGENT_STUDIO ZINE OTHER
(elaborate below)
NAME:	
DESCRIPTION (15 words or less):
CONTACT(S):
ADDRESS
PHONE:
EMAIL: _
URL: _
.FAX:
FILL THIS OUT AND MAIL/FAX IT TO US
BEFORE July 15, 1998
233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 fax:(604)822-9364
»MW_g,.l ■:^y .^i*^.**
Ipvrgatoky
where is not
what you wear
I I hav
the
I lofc
f\* D^UK ALTERNATIVE        o   ■&
r% ELECTRONIC DANCE        «■ |6
||   A^pESDIESSCODE 1J
THOUGH TIRED AND CALM.
THOSE SAME OLD GAY BARS
WILL LEARN A NEW PSALM.
GIVE US VOUR STRAIGHTS I    '
IN CLUB. FETISH. OR DRAG. tCttthO-(30Cbl.
AND GIVE US YOUR TWISTED I DJ pailDeCDOniUO)
WITH THEIR CLOTHES IN A BAG.       cflD» CDflC€SIC€nC
GIVE US YOUR DYKES
WITH THEIR BIKES ALL ALIGNED
AND PLEASE GIVE US DRAG QUEEN
WITH GOWNS THAT WILL SHINE.
'HE CHURCH OF THE TWIS
H6AV6N
GREAT DANC6 VIB65
IfTghurchjI ;
J^V       1 OF' THE   TWISTED II   p I
jS "SUNDAYS       NO COVER $ I
|»N DOORS AT 9:00       ^      M I -^
I fe NK*| SI I
i/i
BrrCHIN B66R BUST %
BRING YOUR LOONIES        Ol
HOW TO TiOOW A WHO PAJTY-        '* _?, I
^^Sss^i^-*"-71
e
BY KITTY POULIN
ive been thinking about
dark side: the business
culture. So what's new
about that, you might be wondering. Well, I figure it's
about time I started making a
little money. Let me give you
some context: I'm fucking
poor and, worse, deeply in
debt. My moral resistance is
fading (but it always was a
little tarnished). The way I see
it, why not work to help fabricate culture, while getting
paid for it? My cynicism has
crested and, for this very reason, I feel that I'm ready to
work for evil.
But is it evil, this culture
industry? The sophistication of
late capitalism has turned
everything into labour-time
already. Let's just put it all
above board. Join in. Live out
those pesky contradictions
that dog the dreams of
trenchant Marxists. Fuck 'em
all. I mean, I already work
for the MAN. We all do. Like
yours, my life defines a particular economic shadow.
Everyone knows that huge,
transnational corporations
influence political-economic
structures (and not to mention
our emotional commitments -
our private investments of
meaning). After all, the THEY
or THEM get bigger every
time I help circulate money.
The system is biased and integrated for THEIR benefit. For
my own sanity, 1 can't be bothered to care about the automaton-like support of Nike
products. So what? It's a
game, a sham, oh what fun.
THEY know about influence
and power. Money makes the
world go round. Everything
else is packaging.
All we know is ideology
— stories about the way
things were, are, and ought
to be. And ideology does
build in institutions and social
practices. People generally
recognize the arbitrary nature
of such influence. But this recognition is often half used. For
many people, conceptual
freedom is enough. Enjoy
yourself. Take advantage of
our fanciful western privileges. The how and the why
are your own problem; that's
the swell part. If I can now
choose how to read culture -
well then, I've got autonomy.
And if such autonomy is not
actually freedom, it's still the Culture is necessarily as-
closest thing so far. Right on. sumed as given. The exact
The ambiguity that arises here      nature of whatever formation,
heiOp h i i t i c a t i o n
of late c a p 1 - a I i » m
h a s " u r n e d e * e r y —
t h i n _ I n • o 1 a b o u r ■—
tl m e already L e t *
juatp utitallaboVe
board     Join     in        L  J v   e
out      those
e  a   k   y
c  o   n   • r   a    dl  c<l o   b   i   ' h   i '
do.    the     dreamt     of
t r   e   a    c   h    a
Marx
ist*        F    u    c   k e    m       a1!
is fair game. The former will
also be my first principle:
ambiguity is the cruciai element. But ambiguity is not a
special quality that needs to
be specifically targeted and
developed. Certainly ambiguity can be taken advantage
f
however, is left out of the explanation. This is my secona
principle: the possibility for interaction and self-development must always be included
in product design and promotion — or theory building. In
other words, let confusion
Co    n    '   u   *  1   o    n
p     o   «  i  t I   v    e        a   »   p
here T    h   I
m     a r   k   e  t I
e   c t
1 ■        a
I      ■«•■■.
Culture      la      n    e   c e s *******
•   arlly      a  . »   _    m     ed      _  »
_  * v   *   n  .
of and increased, but it is also
a quality that automatically
forms in relation to any posited meaning. The rest falls
into place.
Ambiguity coincides with
culture in general; they are
joined moments in the
hegemonic inner workings of
cultural knowledge. Confusion is a positive aspect here.
This is a marketing ideal.
happen. Opening options
leaves more potential for interaction. The multivalent
Object has multiple platforms
for possible realization. This
is a template for expanding
the lateral as well as horizontal potential of market definition, and the inherent nature
of the commodity-form is capitalized upon: it is "freed"
within the ephemera of cul
ture. All this can be used in
the development of a long-
term marketing strategy as
much as one that takes advantage of the current formation and proclivity of the
market. If history is congealed in the Object, then
subsequent generations will
"always-already" be the target Subject. Pastiche is a
holy mantra, three cheers for
postmodernism.
With this in mind, I've decided to become a business
guru, a high-paid consultant.
I'm going to get into marketing, design and advertising.
I'm developing my own program and techniques, applying what I've learned in
school: cultural studies, psychoanalytic theory, post-structuralism, etc. They have a
practical use, after all. At the
very least, I now have a little
cultural savvy to exploit. It's
about time my education began to pay off.
I plan on being highly specialized, focusing on the most
desperate market segments.
Cultural elites will be my target. Hipsters, artists, the style-
obsessed. Those who are
most committed to their lifestyles are the most easily manipulated. They are ripe for
it. I will neither pander to them
nor underestimate them. But I
will take advantage of them;
cultural elites will be my medium and the commodity-form
my tool. My secret is: step
back, be invisible, let people
take advantage of one another. They'll not need to be
encouraged to generate whatever "cutting edge" — they'll
do it anyway. Hooray. They do
what they do and I'll be ready
to use it. And if something else
new develops, then I'll take advantage of that, too. The previous "cutting edge" will always slowly circulate to the
least hip, or whatever. Look
at lounge culture, for example, or drum and bass. These
patterns already exist. All this
is obvious. Tyler Brule is my
new role model, until he falls
out of glamour, that is, and
he will. After all, business is
never personal — my third
principle.
Please send all job offers
to me via Discorder; the address can be found on the
masthead. I'm willing to work
for lots of cash. My valuable
cultural insight can be yours
for a price. Attention Nike,
Coke or Pepsi, Sony, Universal, Time-Warner, or whoever: if you've got the money,
then my powerful program
could be yours — right now.
Step right up.*
6   June 1998 PINE 3.95q  MESSAGE TEXT      Folder: INBOX  Message 90 of 200 22% ANS
.te: Wed, 8 Apr 1998 10:57:18 -0500 (CDT)
To: II
Subjec
Re: hello
>*ls it true that "Camofleur" is the last Gastr Del :
it's the last one featuring both jim and me.  whethe:
one - no plans have been made one way or the other.
>*Did you feel that the.'band had reached its lait indefinitely not! ' i'm not sure that i ever would.
>*What
* pla:
just returned from a two-week so:
am in the midst of working on a solo lp that should 1
fall. i'm building up a group feel bit by bit in th<
john mcentire and tony conrad are along for the ride
•The s
=*w.album is a major depart from the old Gastr sound. What were some
ccr.a-ep't***'.'. behind;; "£'amof feu'jr? \   It sounds kinda like a farewell album.
see, i just can't say that it str
we just wanted to focus the mater
had been doing very long live ver
seif-cerjsorship that had, for ins
. I   fhnky/
>*Why did you turn to such a "rootsy" sound after the space-age
>(futuristic?) constructs oiv-"Upgrade and Afterlife?"
i as a farewell record.  in general,
mit the lengths of the songs (we
and relieve some of the
not allowed us to be particularly .
of acoustic ihstriLT.ents
E my real passions.
■*Yo_-*> earlier stuff,fs.eens-.w■■■■weirk* ,a* lot with texture. Does "Camofle*
•still**., -aefl withftextufe' as; heavily," but :in jia different genre?
. think the idea is that on _camoufleur_, texture - nove
.he most exalted element.
>*The vocal influence seems to have
>seems more*melodic and percussive.;
not fearing repetition, not being s(
>*Are you still based mainly in Chi<
abba-so-lutely.
rlif
>[If :
elf r
i think i'm more settled-slash-satisfied with my living condition than
anytime before..  for a long time, whenever i was on tour i'd always find ;
different spot - hamburg, los angeles, paris - where i could imagine •
myself packing up and moving tc.  but now it's more a matter of;ehicago
being the place of friends, work - a really satifsying home (base).  part
: i get to leave it whenever i want.
of it, however,
>*Have you ever
fo:
LOther
album, push comes to lov<
>*Will you be touring fo:
probably in the u.s. at
thanks very much!
best,
■ t from los angeles who also sings in the red
al for and co-produced his upcoming solo
of the
europe aga:
g a
? Help      m|
0 OTHER CMDS V V ^ art I
Spc NextPage  U Undelet
GREAT FOOD,
GREAT PLACE.
GOME CHECK US OUT!
STOP BY FOR
DINNER, DESSERT, OR
SOMETHING TO DRINK.
AS THE SUMMER NIGHTS
GET LONGER SO
DO OUR HOURS...
NOW OPEN
7 AM TO IO PM
MONDAY TO FRIDAY
9 AM TO 8 PM
SATURDAY/SUNDAY
GREAT BREAKFASTS SERVED
UNTIL 2 PM ON WEEKENDS
THE       _?E N D
RESTAURA
&    LICENSED    P
CATCH LIVE SPORTS ACTION
ON OUR a BIO SCREENS!
ALWAYS GREAT FOOD!
JUiJj   J vJ^ -*   ^ v
FIFA WORLD
CUR SOCCER
& NHL PLAYOFFS
GOOD OLD STANDBY-ALWAYS FUN, ALWAYS DEPENDABLE-THE PIT!
THE STUDENT UNION BUILDING • 6138 SUB BLVD.
7 ®m&°mm DiFmnc®
@n DiPI<az<a
Ani DiFranco
Saturday, July 11
8 PM at The Plaza of Nations
with special guests, Rebirth Brass Band
Tickets at Ticketmaster (604) 280-4444
HPIIHB"1
s tn Say
Thirteen angst ridden anthems that gleefully defy the parameters of modern-
day pop punk ...a great record that will set the standard by which the rest of
Canada's punk bands will be judged
- Exclaim Magazine
ian't Turn Back
work ethic has won them a legion ol fans and the quality ol Can't Turn
should win them more ...The band at its frantic best.
- Winnipeg Free Press
Chnkfi on toup..
June 04
June 05
June 06
June 07
June 10
June 11
June 12
June 13
June 14
June 15
June 17
Edmonton, AB
Medicine Hat, AB
Lethbridge, AB
Elkford, BC
Nelson, BC
White Rock, BC
Langly, BC
Vancouver, BC
Victoria, BC
Nanaimo, BC
Kamloops, BC
Likwid Lounge
All ages
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Funky Planet
All-ages
TBA
All ages
Queen's Pub
All ages
June 18
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June 28
June 29
June 30
July 01
July 02
Red Deer, AB
Edmonton, AB
Calgary, AB
Kelowna, BC
Jasper, AB
Estevan, SK
Regina, SK
Yorkton, SK
Brandon, MB
Winnipeg, MB
TBA
All ages
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Pete's
All ages
Utopia Cafe
All ages
TBA
Royal Albert
CDs $12 PPD
PO Box 352, 905 Corydon Avem
Winnipeg.Manitoba R3M 3V3
(204)452-5627
smallmanrecords
ROLL SPECTACULAR*- di<moq<\]^
| Could  you   please   identify  your-
I selves, your names, ages and instruments?
Jay: Jay Ryan, I play fhe sharp bass and I'm
25.
I Jason: Jason Harvey, 26, bass.
1 Kip: My name is Kip McCabe. I'm 26 and I
I play drums.
I Why does Dianogah have two bass
\ players?
\ Jay: Because neither Jason nor I know how
I to play guitar. Kip is actually the best guitar
player in the band, but he's a bit busy
l playing the drums and only one person
i we know can play the drums and guitar
i at the same time and  that is  Ryan
, Rhapsis [sic] of Euphone.
k Tell us a little bit about the history of Dianogah.
Jay: It was originally a sex thing ...
Kip:   Basically, Jay and Jason
were going to the same college
ind playing together for a year
r so, and then they moved to
Chicago   and   needed   a
drummer to start a band.
My girlfriend used to go
out with Jason's room-
and   that's
how I hooked up
i them.
Being   a
dou-
J>
O \
bass band, it's sort of hard to pin-point any
influences but what -would you say?
Jason: Well, we bought the first Tortoise album and
we all liked it, and basically there's too many people
in that band already, so we could be called a rip-off
band of Tortoise, I guess. And then they changed
their sound and we couldn't afford a sampler, so I
guess we're what they would have been, [laughs]
Kip: I would say our biggest influence is Vince
Guaraldi.
Jay: And definitely Bitch Magnet.
Your songs often remind me of really good
theme songs from 1980's TV sitcoms. Do
you rip off TV theme songs or does it just
turn out that way?
Jay: [laughs] I think it was Chris Manfrin from Seam
who once told us our music was 'the soundtrack to
chubby mammals wrestling.' I'd say probably that
most of our songs are derived from variations on
TheA-Team theme song.
Do you think that being from Chicago
affects your band? Is it an attention grabber for people who haven't heard you,
and is that a good or bad thing?
Kip: I don't think so, necessarily. I mean, we all like
the city of Chicago, but there are a lot of diverse
and, at this time, popular bands there. In some sense
that might be beneficial to other people who might
look towards Chicago as some sort of haven for
music, but I don't think that, in large, it really influences the type of music that we play.
Jay: I don't think there's actually a scene in
Chicago, there's just a lot going on. There's not really any type of cohesive sound, like no one can listen
to a band and say, 'Oh, that's a Chicago band.'
Some people might disagree with that!
Jay: Yeah, some people might ... well, OK, I
take that ail back. In retrospect, most of
*vhat I just said is totally wrong.
Basically, just reverse everything
I've stated about
Chicago.
What was it like recording with Steve
Albini?
Jason: Uhh ... he's very ... professional.
Jay: He's mean-spirited, abusive.
Kip: Let's perpetuate the myth!
Jay: OK! He's the biggest jackass. He followed us
around and hit us with bricks.
Kip: He told Jason he'd wear his ass for a hat!
Actually, recording with Steve was the best experience. He was the best person we could have had to
record our record.
Jay: [interrupts] Bob Weston is also very good, just
so his feelings don't get hurt. Both of them are
extremely good at what they do and are very good
at putting the band at ease.
Kip: Playing the same song for the 28th time, they
don't make you feel like a dumb shit — except Bob
always makes me feel like a dumb shit.
What do you have coming out soon, so
people can put it on their wish lists?
Jay: OK, let's see ... we have a brand new 7"
on Highball Records which is a split with the
Logletters. Mark Greenburg from The Coctails is
in that band. It's actually our first 'Team Dianogah'
record, which is stuff we've been working on for a
while. We have John Upchurch, who is another
Coctail, playing baritone clarinet. We'll also be
on a compilation coming out and our first EP is
being re-released.
Am I correct in assuming that 'Dianogah'
is an enemy monster in a Godzilla movie?
Jay: I think you're thinking of Gamarah. Actually I
think Dianogah was the giant cactus on wheels.
Kip: Dianogah is a very obscure pop culture reference. You'd have to do your own research or be
true geeks like we are to know exactly what the
Dianogah is.
Jay: Or listen to some Steve Miller lyrics like we
always do after practice. In one of his songs, there's
a line that goes something like, 'waiting for the
dianogah.' Obviously, we misunderstood it. We
realized later he was talking about beer.*
►by Chris Corday
9  Ef^asiss Jprina! ike 2nJ
Vancouver
J7n/er national
J yew J nusic
by Greg Newsome
10 june 1998
Contemporary art music is
such a straw dog. You can
kick the hell out of this
poor little mutt with a few sweeping generalizations and a couple
of worn-out stereotypes and, in the
end, feel pretty good about it.
Schoenberg's "mathemafic" harmony, Webern's sparse pointillis-
tic textures, Cage's aleatoric
works, Ligeti's static structures —
there's plenty of ammo available
for those committed fo musical
canine abuse. This, by the way,
isn't a lament exclusive to the
avant-garde composers of the
twentieth century; even
Beethoven's Ninth Symphony was
described by Viennese music critics  as  a  nonsensical  pastiche
slapped together by a deaf old
man.   History   has,   of  course,
proven that Beethoven and numerous   other   composers   weren't
maligned musical fools but were,
in fact, fantastically creative artists
composing truly new and original
music. This same spirit of musical
innovation exists right here in
Vancouver and there's no better
place  to check  it out than  at
Spring!    the    2nd    Vancouver
International New Music Festival.
Springl opens on May 29th
_.id runs through June 6th, featuring 48 new works and 1 9 world
premieres by local, Canadian,
and international composers over
the course of 10 concerts. The festival  program  is very diverse;
there are concerts of orchestral
and chamber music, a concert
devoted solely fo electroacoustic
works, and an evening of solo
piano    with    Eve    Egoyan,    a
Canadian pianist of exceptional
talent.  In  addition to Egoyan,
' Vancouver New Music has recruited a number of other outstanding
interpreters    of    contemporary
repertoire, including the virtuoso
Vancouver    quintet    Standing
Wave, Britain's fantastic Maggini
String  Quartet,  the Vancouver
Symphony Orchestra, the CBC
Vancouver      Orchestra,      the
Vancouver Chamber Choir, the
formidable Vancouver New Music
Ensemble, and the two piano/two
percussion    quartet,    Rhythmic
Attorneys at Large. Also involved
is the Canadian cellist Shauna
Rolston, whose golden playing
will be heard in Heather Schmidt's
new work for cello and orchestra,
and      bass      clarinetist      Lori
Freedman, whose truly stellar abilities will be put to the test in Iannis
Xennakis' ephemeral Echange.
For what it's worth, I've heard
most of these ensembles and their
constituent players before, and I
can promise you the festival will
be rife with great performances.
The other half of the new music
equation involves composers and
Springl promises great music from
every composition  community.
Vancouver composers are repre
sented en force — there will be a
new string quartet from Owen
Underhill; chamber music of
diverse instrumentation from John
Burke, Nikolai Korndorf,
Jacqueline Leggatt, John Oliver,
Doug Smith, and John Korsrud;
and electroacoustic music by Scott
Morgan and Doug Cross, Janet
Berman, Ron Samworth, and Rita
Ueda. The evening of live elec-
troacoustics, put on in conjunction
with Vancouver Pro Musica,
involves instruments and tape, signal processing, and interactive
systems, and should be a very
cool exploration of what many
feel is the long-term direction of
contemporary art music. UBC
graduate students Jocelyn
Morlock and Bradshaw Pack both
have pieces in the festival; Pack's
new work for percussion will be
performed by fhe aforementioned
Rhythmic Attorneys af Large on a
program that includes Luciano
Berio's classic Linea and music by
Christos Hatzis, Tobin Stokes, and
Omar Daniel. Vancouver's Janet
Danielson will present a new work
for orchestra and, on opening
night, UBC composition professor
Keith Hamel premieres Overdrive,
commissioned for the festival by
the VSO, on a program with VSO
composer-in-residence Rodney
Sharman's The Archaic Smile and
Russian composer Sofia
Gubaidulina's Offertorii/m. Also
on this program of orchestral
music is the dramatic The World's
Ransoming by James MacMillan,
the guest composer at this year's
festival.
MacMillan, a Scottish composer, describes his compositional
philosophy as one that "looks
beyond the introversion of the
New Music 'ghetto' and seeks a
wider communication while in no
way promoting a compromising
populism." He cites Celtic music,
Birtwhistle, Stravinsky, Messiaen,
and some minimalist composers
as stylistic influences but cautions
that describing his music via these
kind of associations is somewhat
inaccurate. The prolific 38 year-
old composer possesses a refreshing compositional eclecticism that
embraces the seemingly incongruous elements of British modernism, popular music,
neo-romanticism, and minimalism;
in his musical theatre piece
Visitatio Sepulchri, you'll find
music that ranges in character
from tooth-rottingly sweet string
passages to modernistic angular
and fragmented textures to shamelessly tonal harmonizations of
cantabile melodies. With this compositional aesthetic, MacMillan
has achieved an enviable popularity without pandering to the
concert-going public or sacrificing
the intellectual aspect of his music.
Direct emotional impact, rhythmic
vitality, healthy experimentalism,
and cool textures characterize
MacMillan's art. Af Springl there
will be performances of the
orchestral works frysf and Seven
Last Words from the Cross along
with the previously mentioned The
World's Ransoming, as well as his
string quartet why is this night different?
Other festival events include a
special afternoon public forum
with MacMillan, as well as the
week-long Festival Symposium,
which is also open to the public
and dedicated to the discussion of
Throughout the Vogue shows,
there will be site-specific acoustic
installations by Grant Gregson,
Ben Rogalsky, and Carlos Vela-
Martinez. The June 5th concert
presents the music of the three
finalists in the 1 998 Vancouver
New Music Competition for
Emerging Composers; one of the
finalists is UBC doctoral candidate
Gordon Fitzell, competing with a
super-creative chamber work for
amplified cello and prepared timpani. Definitely worth hearing.
So check it out! Every concert
will be its own unique musical
experience where you're likely to
hear strangely beautiful melodies,
complex textures, moforistic
rhythms, very cool timbres, or
none of the above. The only thing
I know for sure is that there will be
scads of great performances of
inspired modern art music composed and played by a lot of
Vancouverites.*> frry
by %h«we 7<^ider -Vleer «*1d Ccreen WoL-W^k*
DiSCORDER: Being one of the pioneers of
electronic synth-pop, how do you feel
about where the genre has gone, where
it has ended up some 20 years later, and
how your new album Exile fits into that?
Gary Numan: I'm not really that aware at this
point where electronic music has gone as a genre.
It seems to me to be, by and large, incorporated
info every kind of music. You'll see synthesizers
or some kind of electronic technology being used
across the board, so, be it sampling or hard disk
editing or even hard disk recording, right across
to synthesizers, it's just been absorbed into mainstream music which, as far as I'm concerned, is
the best thing that could have happened. There's
a few people that were trying to stay purely electronic, but I think that they're living in the past,
really. I think it impresses limitations on you for no
reason whatsoever — unless you think it's cool to
not have guitars or whatever.
Throughout the '90s, there was that
whole grunge movement where music
got taken away from the electronic
scene, but with bands such as the
Prodigy, do you think that there will be a
renaissance for the synthesizer and drum
machine as they gain more mass
appeal?
It's possible. I don't know what Prodigy use technically — I mean, I went to see them a while ago
and they used guitars and had stuff going on onstage and that was all very cool. I've not used a
drum machine since 1983. Personally, I use
either samples or real drums. I use real drums on
stage and I've got a couple of keyboard players
and I've got a guitar player and I play guitar
and keyboards on stage. So it really is a case of
trying to incorporate the electronic thing. I think
you can have electronic-based music without it
being purely electronic. I think that the guitar is
a very useful addition to add substance, weight,
and variety in all kinds of atmospheres, to a
song that perhaps you wrote on a synthesizer or
We v/ere going to do the interview yesterday, but you were going to go see The
Spice Girls.
That was a secret! Yeah, I did. I went to see them
last night in Wembley Arena and I'm never
going to come away thinking, 'Oh, what a great
talent,' but I'm going to say that that show was
geared toward a particular audience, which was
mainly between seven and 12 year-old children,
and they loved it. And that band that they are
kind of taken the relatively bland Spice Girls feel
and turned it into something better live. I really
got off on the band, actually; they were doing
In the middle of the album there is a picture of you wearing these amazing boots
— where did you get them?
Are they the ones wifh the springs in the heels?
Yeah!
I got them in New York. You can buy them here
now. They're great, idn't [sic] they?! But a bit too
heavy for real life.
How tall are you, for the record?
I'm five foot eight and a quarter.
So at the Starfish Room, where you'll be
playing in Vancouver, it's a pretty small
place. Are the other stops on the North
American tour smaller and, if so, is there
a reason that you opted for smaller over
larger?
Well, that's about the smallest. I think the biggest
that we'll be doing is about 1200. I think it's a
genuine and honest representation of where I'm
at, really. I've been around a long, long time but
my career, in many ways, started in reverse — I
started pretty big and got progressively smaller.
Nof in terms of size, but in career success. 1 think
what I'm doing is starting again. I'm right at the
bottom — my career has been in the toilet for a
few years, even in this country where I tend to
do better.
Your old record label, Beggars Banquet,
has put out an album of remixes with a
lot of the newer electronic people remixing some of your old stuff. Have you
heard this?
Well, there was one called Random One, which is
about 26 bands doing cover versions.
There's also  Random  Two.  Have you
heard that one?
Yeah, Random Two is actually techno remixes. I've
heard that one.
Do you like any of them, or do you think
they've just butchered your songs?
They were both intended as tribute albums, so it
would be very unkind of me to be too critical.
On the first one, there were at least a dozen
songs of the 26 that I genuinely like a lot. Some
of fhem I thought were better than my originals
and I really did learn a fair bit. In fact, the first
song that we do on the tour is a very old song
that a band called Pop Will Eat Itself did a cover
of on the Random album. I now do a cover version of their cover version, if that makes any
sense, because it wos really, really excellent.
There [were] a few that i wasn't too keen on.
I think they sort of lost the point of what the original song was meant to be about, atmosphere
wise and product wise. But I think fhe nature of it
was that people were going to try really strange
and unusual things and I think that's why it
worked. The Random Two album is not really my
cup of tea to any extent. I think if you're meant to
be remixing a song, then you're meant to be
remixing what was there, and adding a few
things here and there to give it flavour. You're
not meant to be completely writing a different
song and giving if fhe same title which is what
an awful lot of these so-called remixes are. They
take three or four samples from one lyric or one
tine, spin that info someone else's song completely or their own, which is normally going
about 130 bpm so you can dance to it, and then
they say it's o remix.
The new album definitely has an atmosphere and most of the songs are about
religion and your disapproval of it. What
is that about?
The Exile album in particular is about, well, it's
not what I believe. I don't now and I never have
had any religious belief or faith whatsoever, t'm
almost the opposite. I lean slightly against it. So
what Exile is, as far as I'm concerned, is a horror
story set to music, ft would be much more appropriate as a movie soundtrack, but there wasn't a
movie made and that's a shame.
Maybe that will be your next project.
Yeah! You never know. I'd be into that, actually.
Exile, the new album, looks at the idea that, what
if God and the devil were actually the same thing?
What if there was no devil, but God has a dark
side? God has an ego and he can be paranoid
and he can be viscous and frightened every bit
as often as he cd$ be kind and good and forgiving. The album before Exile was called Sacrifice
and in that one, t looked at god a little bif os well,
but it had much more to do with what I really
believed and how I really saw it. If caused a bit of
an upset amongst some people and I was dealing with the feedback from that when I started to
write Exile. You know, there's a lot of religious
people amongst the fanbase who were writing,
saying I shouldn't have done it and I was being
very offensive and so on. It wasn't intended like
that at alt, but I believe certain things, and sometimes you write about them. But anyway, when if
comes to Exile, I was trying to find a middle
ground point of view that would allow for the existence of God and answer some of the questions I
would have about how the world itself could be so
viscous, nof just to humans but animals who eat
other animals. Everything dies horribly, even fhe
weather can kill you. So I wos looking for something that would answer both things and God having a dark side seemed to answer that, but as far
as I'm concerned, it's just fiction.
I found your new album pretty true to
the sound you've trademarked for yourself, especially your vocals. Was this
deliberate?
It's more a lack of interest, tf I like something, I'll
be as guilty as the next man of borrowing ideas
from it whenever I can. t'm a big Trent Reznor fan.
And I like a lot of the Depeche Mode stuff.
That's funny because I saw the same
thing. I thought £xi'/e sounded a lot like
Depeche Mode's later work as well. Just
some of that sweeping orchestral thing
going on.
Very grandiose, very large sounding, but also
very melodic af the same time. Under everything,
there's massive grooves and rhythm going on. I
love that sort of thing, so I'm quite prepared to
look around to see what other people are doing if
I think it's useful and learn from it.»
11   E^eSSEiES by Anna Fi
Mexico is an offshoot of the Giant Sand talent pool: specifically, they
^>- are the ubiquitous rhythm section of Joey Burns and John Convertino
going it alone.  Their debut Spoke was as sparse and arid as
Arizona desert, with sprinklings of cantina accordion. Their new
release is set in the same landscape, with a few black velvet mari-
achi paintings added to the musical decor. I caught up with Joey
and John on tour backing up Victoria Williams. Our interview
involved some passing around ofthe phone while they set up in the
Great American Music Hall in San Francisco.  While Joey talks,
imagine John noodling around on the vibes in the background. Fill
in the languid southwestern drawls and get a taste ofCalexico.
DiSCORDER: So let's start with the beginnings of Calexico. The two of you have
worked on a number of side projects as
well as being part of Giant Sand, so why
Calexico? How did that all come together?
Joey: Well, Calexico came about by the fact that
John and I had some free time and we wanted to
try doing some recording at home in Tucson, and
record pretty lo-fi on an eight-track. And playing
together for so long with Giant Sand — we've been
playing together since 1990 — we have all
become pretty comfortable playing with each other.
But whereas Giant Sand is mostly us following
Howe [Gelb], we thought we might try doing some
stuff of our own.
Yeah, like writing your own tunes.
Joey: Yeah, exactly; stuff that I had done in the
past but hadn't really paid too much time doing
since we were busy with Giant Sand, and then we
had started this other band, Friends of Dean
Martinez.
What about other side projects? You guys
worked with Lisa Germano ...
Joey: Lisa Germano, Richard Buckner, Barbara
Manning, Bill Janovitz, Michael Hurley, Rainer ...
this guy named Rainer Ptacek, who was also a big
influence on us from Tucson.
So is Calexico more of a side project or is
it evolving into its own focus?
Joey: It's evolving into its own. Everything is a
side project. We do so many different things. We
just like to do different things. I think that's the key.
So whether it's backing up Victoria Williams, or
playing with Giant Sand, or doing OP8 — which
is another project we do with Howe Gelb — we
just like playing different things, different styles,
different instruments. John plays the vibraphone,
marimbas, drums, accordion, piano, little bit of
guitar and bass. I play guitars, cello, bass, sing
some. So for us, it's a chance to develop each one
12   June 1998
of these areas of our style and playing.
I have a question about the accordion,
actually —
Joey: Sure.
I'm an accordion player as well and I find
the accordion is an oppressed instrument.
I was wondering what your thoughts
were on being an accordion player.
Joey: We're both accordion players, so you should
ask us both the same question. I don't know if
oppressed is the right word, but it just hasn't been
popular in popular music. I think it's more popular in
traditional music, or maybe ... you know, it has a
certain sense. Hearing an accordion, depending on
how it's played, you know, it can remind you of a
Parisian setting or it can remind you of Mexican
music. But there's some really great players nowadays — notably, Astor Piazolla from Argentina. He's
just phenomenal. The accordion mainly comes from
both of our families. For me, it's my grandfather. He
passed his accordion on to me before he passed
away So I started playing it ever since then.
I'm also curious about the name, Calexico.
On the one hand, it really reflects your
musical influences, but I did a little
research and found out that Calexico is an
'increasingly lawless' border crossing ...
Joey: [laughs] That's right! In search of a name,
we were driving across the desert to San Diego
from Tucson, Arizona before going on one of these
Giant Sand tours in Europe. I was making a tape of
my home recordings that were just solo and I used
that as the name of the project and I called the tape
Superstition Highway. Once we had done the
home recording and we had this album coming out
in Germany on vinyl only, we decided to use the
name Spoke. But then in New Jersey and New York
we found out that in fact the name was already
taken. So we thought about another name and we
decided upon Calexico.
I hear you have a new release coming out
pretty soon ... Is it still just the three of
you?
Joey: It's mainly the two of us. So it's got more of
the instruments with the addition of some pedal
steel and some mariachi trumpets and some strings.
So Tasha's not in it quite as much?
Joey: Not as much. Tasha, who's John's wife,
played drums on a couple of songs we recorded at
home, but for most of the record John played
drums. Just like on the Friends of Dean Martinez,
John played drums on most all the tracks, [but it]
just wasn't credited to his name. We were going to
try to use some of her samples for this album, but
when we asked [Touch and Go] about using samples they said, well, it's just going to cost a lot of
money to get clearance, so we said, awwright, forget it, we won't do that now, we'll just try to sample
ourselves. But I think in the future it would be nice to
try to use Tasha's dj sensibilities. She's got an
incredible record collection. Some of the songs that
came about on this new record were influenced by
her records and her taste in music, kinda the latin
jazz influence. There's a song called 'Chach,'
another one called 'Stray,' that's kinda influenced
by some stuff that she's been playing and spinning
down in Tucson at the Club Havana night.
I guess you're going to be getting more
and more of that border crossing kind of
feeling —
Joey: I guess the album could be seen as a heavily border-influenced record.
You live in Tucson as well, [which isn't]
that far from the border. Did you grow up
in Tucson?
Joey: No, I grew up in California. We chose to
move there, me, maybe four years ago, John,
about five. For us, moving there was really appealing since we live in part of the barrio. It's the old
part of town, so basically you're in old Mexico.
There's an appeal there, something that kind of
draws you to this area, it seems like you're in
another country. Being there, we're influenced by a
lot of stuff — the music, the people, the culture, the
food, the way of life, the laidbackness. We're not
trying to just emulate that — for us, it's a snapshot of where we're at right now. I definitely
would like to try doing some different things musically: working with other people, maybe some
friends in Chicago. I like the idea of blending
atmospheric mixes with different instrumentations
in different fields.
Most of the projects you've worked on,
like playing now with Victoria Williams,
and specifically Calexico and Giant Sand
seem to be really influenced by the fact
that you and the group of musicians you
tend to work with all live in a similar area
that's dry and arid and not so urban or
people-oriented.
Joey: There must be something there that's kind of
connecting us. There must be something about each
other that we can relate to; maybe the spaciousness,
maybe the way we work. I don't know what it is. I there, something that kind of draws you to this
! V?U.re„in anothei count'y* Being there, we're
.«•_!* 7Su m.USic' tne pe°P,e'the cu»"e,
f hie the laidbackness. We're not trying to just
us, it s a snapshot of where we're at right now.
Ill
don't want to question it, I just want to get into it.
If you could play with bands or musicians
living or dead, what would be your
dream lineup?
Joey: I think it'd be great to hop in for a night with
Duke Ellington and, after the first set, go through
time to hang out with Monk and Mingus, Miles
Davis. And then I think it'd be fun to cruise over
across town to the Beastie Boys and all their
friends. Take a flight to Chicago and hang out there
for a day, then from Chicago I'd like to go straight
down to Lima, Peru, and have all my South
American friends join me there. I love the Afro-
Peruvian thing that's going on there. And then for
the end of the night, when the whole trip is done,
I'd like to hang out in the wee hours of the morning
with Billie Holiday.
I asked Joey already, and I'm going to
ask you, John, too: I've found the accordion to be an oppressed instrument in that
it's the butt of musical jokes, and I'm wondering what you think of accordions.
What kind of relationship do you have to
the accordion and why are you interested
in it?
John Convertino: Hmm. So you think people
make jokes about them?
You know that Far Side cartoon: 'Welcome
to Heaven, here's your harp. Welcome to
Hell, here's your accordion?'
John: Oh, 'cause like the polka thing.
Whenever I bring out my accordion at a
jam, I don't even have to play anything,
the gimmick has already happened
John: [laughs] Yeah, because it's a traditional
instrument. My father was a great accordionist.
He was kind of a master at it. It got phased out in
the '50s when the electric organ got really popular and he switched over to piano, became a
pianist after that. I remember when I was about
10 years old, I was at my grandfather's — they
were immigrants from Italy — and my grandfather had kept my dad's accordion for a long time.
He pulled it out, and my dad played, and that
was the first time I'd ever seen him play, and the
nificer
So I
I guess in his day
nth like 30 accor-
■unded like a mas-
sound was magr
questions about the accordi-
they had an accordion choi
dions doing Bach. He said i
sive pipe organ.  He never gave us lessons,
though. A few years back my wife bought an
accordion and I just picked it up, and this little
melody just came out. It came out real easy and
real pretty. That was that song, 'Per Sempre' on
the Friends of Dean Martinez record. That was
one of the first songs I ever wrote, period. And
that came out on the accordion, so I felt a real
affinity to the instrument.
Do you play a piano accordion or a push
button?
John: Piano accordion. A medium size 1 20 bass.
I see pictures of my dad, and he had one of those
really big ones with 1 2 voicings, and you could
change some of the voicings with your chin. Man,
what I'd do to have that accordion back.
That leads me to ask about playing instruments versus electronic mixing, or recording in the studio versus recording
acoustically at home. Is your music going
to stay in this spare acoustic sound?
John: I think it's going to get mixed up more.
Especially if we have the time and the money to do
that [chuckles]. But I mean, essentially it always
comes right down to the acoustic. When you sit
down with your instrument and play. That's the basis
of what Joey and I really want to do. Everything on
top is whatever goes. You can experiment with
loops and stuff, and building on top of them too,
but I think the main focus will be playing instruments.
You've been considered part of the
emerging cowboy-lounge, countrified, traditional revival underground. Why do you
think this music is happening now? Why
do you think it's becoming popular again?
John: I wonder if it's not the music so much as the
nature of the business that's causing that to happen. The whole rock realm is clogged and all the
bands are sounding the same, so people are getting together in their living rooms and putting
songs together. And I think that's like the underground. And the underground starts happening
and people think, 'Oh, I like this. It sounds different
than what's on the radio.' I knew when Friends of
Dean Martinez started that people were just happy
to hear a band play live that wasn't playing loud.
I certainly hope it doesn't turn into a trend
and die out, 'cause that would be sad.
John: [laughs]
But of course, I'm talking to a member of
Giant Sand, so you've proven that you've
got some staying power ...
John: Yeah, I mean, Giant Sand has its roots in
country blues and acoustic jazz, that's where Howe
comes from. But he loves to rock, too.
What's happening with Giant Sand these
days?
John: We just recorded a record, and we've been
signed to V2 Records. So that should be coming
out this year some time. Howe's still working on it.
He's going through the process of tearing it down
and building it all back up.
If you were to put together your dream
lineup of bands to play with, living or
dead, who would it be?
John: Oh, man ... that's so hard. The list would
get so long. I would love to play with Duke
Ellington; someone who's so vast in his musical ear
yet still so disconnected from it. He was able to
abstract so well. Whenever I think of people I'd
want to play with I always think of piano players
like Thelonious Monk. The piano is so all-encompassing, it's like a miniature orchestra. If you could
go back in time and tour on trains, you know what
I mean? And play acoustically like they did. Before
I came to talk to you I was kind of pissed because
I was up there by my drums and it's like, God,
there's just so many microphones. You know, there's
one on my hi-hat, one on my snare, one on the bottom of my snare, on both tom-toms and overhead
and on the vibraphones and cords everywhere.
Why does it have to be this way? Why can't we
just play? Have one or two mics for vocals. But it
has turned into such a science.
That's what I like about Spoke, it's so out-
on-the-back-porch feeling.
John: Two mics. One over the drums or the vibes,
and Joey had one on his guitar, and that was it.
We basically played to the room and hoped those
mics would pick it up.«
13   S^§2S_S___. Real Live
Action
LIVE MUSIC REVIEWS
HIGH LLAMAS
THE APPLES IN STEREO
Saturday, March 28
Starfish Room
I expected quite a bit more than I
got from this show. The Apples
In Stereo, who come off so
squeaky-clean and harmonic on
vinyl, just didn't do it for me live.
The best thing about their set was
watching audience member Robert
Dayton grooving down in his leisure suit. The Apples seemed
strangely suited to playing for a
retro crowd and were good
enough for the kids to dance to.
Once headliners the High
Llamas took the stage, all dancing ceased. Most all forms of movement ceased, for that matter. I hate
to say it, but this band is definitely
not one to see live. They don't DO
anything! Maybe it's just me, wanting action, action, and more action, but the High Llamas nearly
put me to sleep. Their harmonies
and playing were perfect ... perfect recreations ofthe songs on the
CD, that is. If you want to compare these guys to Stereolab
(similar sound, don't you think?),
don't bother — at least Laetitia
danced for us. In the end, not even
all that neat-sounding vibraphone
(or whatever that pretty xylophone-
thing is called) could convince me
that I was having a good time, and
I went home a largely unsatisfied
Julie Colero
BUFFALO DAUGHTER
THE BEANS
Saturday, April 4
Starfish Room
Before the show, I had heard
neither The Beans nor Buffalo
Daughter. Nearly everyone I
talked to had never heard Buffalo Daughter either, but The
Beans seem to be rapidly developing a reputation as the next
big little Vancouver thing, and I
was very eager to see what they
were about. It was Buffalo Daughter's "Japaneseness" and "Grand
Royalness," though, that I, and
most everyone else, was there for.
As for The Beans: drums, guitars, samples, and a sorrowful
trumpet drone, which provided
a pensive atmosphere in nearly
every tune. This ambient stuff is
truly soundtrack music. Their
sound seemed to be performed
in response to some outside
drama, but unfortunately, there
wasn't enough inside the music
itself to interest me. Halfway
through the performance, The
Beans were accompanied on
stage by a dancer in a sort of tutu.
I thought this could actually be
quite suitable, if only she provided
inspiration for the music, and not
merely visual accompaniment.
Despite all that, this band does
make some good sounds.
14 June 1998
I guess I was expecting Buffalo Daughter to be something
along the lines of Cibo Matto.
My God, even when they
stepped on stage looking so
darned cute dressed in their hip
New Rock T-shirts, they fit the
mould perfectly. I was pleasantly
surprised. These tunes were just
as fun and just as thick with synth
and samples, but without the novelty of so many other Japanese
bands you and I like so much
(Shonen Knife, Pizzicato 5,
The Pugs). That cuteness gets
tiresome quick, but this was loud,
serious fun. They played some
loud guitars, funky synth, kickbutt
beats, and two long ambient tunes
which could be seen as shameless successors to prog-rock. This
was New Rock, and I'm going to
listen to their new album hoping
for more of the same.
Cornelius
JONATHAN RICHMAN
Sunday, April 5
Starfish Room
Jonathan Richman is not for
everybody, so musical snobs beware. But for those with a sappy
of humour or in need of
affirr
-1 that ther
some sincerity in this cold world,
he is the performer for you. No
one can sing love songs through
the nose to objects in a thrift store
like Jonathan Richman. The only
complaints I heard from those
around me were about the drunk
"monkeys" and the kissy couples
in the crowd and, for 1 6 bucks a
ticket, all complaints are valid.
However, all those monkeys and
neckers were singing along so it
was all good for me.
A longtime groupie of sorts
informed us that "Jonathan" hates
performing in bars as he can't
have kids around — he has two
of his own, you knc
snkeys" v
vith less
uld have been an
njoyable experience,
but as a longtime fan of Jonathan
Richman with or without The
Modern Lovers, I couldn't wipe
the dumb smile off my face. He
pulled out the hits like "Pablo Picasso" and "Dancing at the Lesbian Bar," and he did indeed do
some dancing. At least I think it
was dancing. Whatever he was
doing, it was all good.
It's refreshing to see a happy,
confident, and good performer. It
1 long winter and Jonathan
Richm
1 Vai
spring is here. Sigh. Guh.
sydney
LAGWAGON
BRACKET
SUPERCHIEF
Wednesday, April 8
Maritime Labour Centre
Wreck Chords heart-throbs
Lagwagon and, frankly, I'm
tired of the same-old, same-old.
Every show has been the same.
Same set of tunes, all from their
albums — you'll never hear the
good stuff from compilations.
This was probably the best I've
ever seen Lagwagon. I think there
are only two original members left
— Joey the singer and Chris the
enormously tall guitarist. New
drummer, new other guitar, and
new bassist, unless that other guy
cut all his hair off.
For a change, they played
"Wind In Your Sail" — their best
song ever, as well as "Raise a
Family," from that Fat comp,
which tops anything from the
new record. They sure didn't
leave out the stand-bys, like
"Brown Eyed Girl," "Angry
Days," and "Kids Don't Like To
Share," but they actually ended
with "Stokin' the Neighbors,"
which everybody always yells
for but they always refuse to
play. Joey's voice lasted until
TRANSAM
THE CHAMPS
Saturday, April 11
The Great American Music
Hall, San Francisco, CA
First off, the Great American is an
incredible music venue. God
knows when it was built, but to
my eye it looked like a turn of the
century Old West "opera"
house—very lavish, very ornate,
almost Baroque. And it had great
sound. Not bad ... Anyway, all
the groovers in town were there
to catch what one could safely
label a "hot ticket:" Trans Am -
- who have not only put out two
of the finer albums of the last few
years, but are also a mean touring unit — plus hometown heroes
The Champs and their metal
mayhem. As impressive as The
Champs were, they come across
as too much of a novelty act for
my taste. They're essentially a
three-piece (2 guitars and drums)
that's fascinated by the "prog-iest"
elements of metal, especially early
thrash metal. I mean, we're talking some serious arpeggios. And
(like Trans Am) it's all instrumental
so that there's nothing that comes
between you, the listener, and the
licks. Their deadpan song titles
were a real draw too — "tennis
ball song" comes to mind. It was
fun to see good ole Tim Green
again after all these years, but,
let's face it, The Champs aren't
nearly as vital as the N.O.U.
rhythm:
take soi
tracks c
ictronic textures and
Surveillance seems to
s of the louder, crunchier
an Surrender to the Night,
their distortion, strip them
down, and go from there at
breakneck speed, using these
tracks as its heart and soul.
Like I said, Trans Am are an
impressive band — tight, powerful, graceful — and when they
have the room to cut loose, and
they did, look out!
AJ.
FREAKWATER
RICHARD BUCKNER
Tuesday, April 14
Starfish Room
With Freakwater's new one,
Springtime, being such a fine
outing (quite possibly their finest) and, with opportunities to
see Freakwater being so rare, I
was extremely primed for their
visit to Vancouver. Man, did they
ever turn in a performance! They
started off with a hilarious false
start — a three-part a capella
harmony that was just off— but
after clearing up that problem,
the band caught their stride im-
back.
■ Lip,"
r looked
"Twisted
Binding
Twine" (all off Springtime), "My
Old Drunk Friend," and their version of the Carter Family staple "Little Black Train" were all
standouts.
JR centrestage at the starfish room
photo by aim goncalves
This
akesfi*
>s I'v*
about the fifth song or so. That
guy is very hard on his voice.
Superchief opened. They were
all right, kind of Pennywiseish.
Nothing groundbreaking. Bracket
were second. I don't know what
it is about them I don't like, but
it's something, all right. They
did play both songs that I like
and were pretty brief. They're
I always forget just how
popular Fat bands are, and am
surprised at the turnout at the
shows. I suppose by now, I
shouldn't be.
Trevor Fielding
Trans Am came on and were
relentlessly impressive. Although
they threw in plenty of the
stripped, Kraftwerk-esque,
electro-funk numbers that have
become a trademark of theirs —
two of these tracks even feature
vocals (distorted, robotic vocals)
— the tracks that they really
seemed to relish the most and the
tracks that really floored me were
the big, meaty, guitar/bass/
drums workouts that are at the
heart of Surveillance. Whereas
Surrender to the Night, to me,
was defined primarily by its
electro numbers and by its play
Freakwater is an immensely
talented band. Catherine Irwin
and Janet Beverage Bean's vocals
and harmonies are powerful and
moving, and their vocals just seem
to get richer and richer; David
Gay is a rock-solid bassist and the
addition of multi-instrumentalist
(banjo, mandolin, fiddle, etc.)
Max Johnston has given the band
even greater range. But this is a
band with personality — Mr. Gay
nearly stole the show with his
hound-dog looks and his olympic-
calibre smoking (we're talking a
minimum of two packs during their
set alone!); in fact, he just may be
the "Lucky Luke" of the music
world. But it was Catherine and
Janet's storytelling that really won
the crowd over. My personal fave
was Catherine's story about making cracks in Buffalo, New York ,
about "buffalo chicken wings" because, being from Kentucky, she'd
certainly had to live through
enough Kentucky Fried Chicken/
Colonel Sanders jokes, and finding that those cracks didn't go over
too well. All in all, a helluva performance.
Mr. Richard Buckner had
a real nice baritone voice and
some real nice guitar-playing to
accompany it, but he failed to really leave an impression on me -
- that is, until he pulled out a cover
of Pavement's "Here." Maybe
it was the lack of reference points
that kept me distanced from his
other songs, maybe it had to do
with the fact that I was gab-gab-
gabbing the whole way through
his set.
joe bloggs
THE MR. T EXPERIENCE
TEEN IDOLS
THE DISGUSTEENS
Friday, April 17
The Columbia
If was a hot and sweaty night at
the Columbia, and the air was
right for punk rock. Late of Victoria's ex-Defektor Kelly Kijek
fronted   the   openers,   The
Disgusteens. Still a little rough
around the edges, but expect big
things from this bunch of good-
time Charlies. Straight outta
Nashville came The Teen Idols,
riding a greased-back, leather-
clad, hard-rockin' wave of sheer
entertainment. One great song
followed another as we absorbed
45 minutes of solid quality. Finishing up with "99 Luftballoons,"
The Teen Idols established themselves as one of the premiere live
acts to grace our fair city.
And then came The Mr. T Experience. Over the years, they
have been one of my favourite
bands, an opinion reinforced with
every album and live performance. While MTX's most recent
release was less than outstanding,
this live show was anything but.
Best show of the tour, quoth the
bassist, and the best I've personally ever seen 'em. When veteran
smoothie Dr. Frank wasn't makin'
eyes at my girlfriend, he, Joel, and
Jym were ripping though an hour
of MTX's best and impressing the
hell out of everyone there. What
Trevor Fielding Printed
Matters
You've got a way with words that no-one else can emulate/
I don't think anyone's that crazy to try.
(Graeme Dowries of The Verlaines, "Damn Shame"
from Some Disenchanted Evening on Homestead)
KATE ATKINSON
Behind the Scenes at the
Museum
(Picador USA)
TONY GRAY
The Lost Years: The Emergency in Ireland, 1939-45
(Little, Brown)
Due to a number of reasons
— animosity against Eng
land, a desire to be seen
as a fully independent nation, or
a belief there was little they
could contribute to the Allied
effort — Ireland kept out of direct involvement in the Second
World War. In no way did this
mean the Irish did not sympathize with one side or the other
or that they did not suffer. In The
Lost Years: The Emergency in
Ireland, 1939-45, Tony Gray;
examines the effects Irish neu
trality had on the isL
from his personal standpoint as
a reporter for the Irish Times. He
reveals the conflicts the Irish Republican Army had with the Irish
government, the difficult relations with Britain (a country who
possession), as well as the enmities between the Southern
and Northern Irish. Given its
brevity, this book acts as an interesting and involving primer
to the history of the period. Unfortunately, Gray's overt bias
sometimes overshadows context, especially his constant vilification — not always unreasonable — of De Valera. Also, the
text is occasionally choppy, resulting from the journalistic style
and the author's belief of
municating to an informed public. For its purposes, however,
it performs well but not quite admirably.
The next selection deals with
conflict both foreign and dc
tic. Kate Atkinson's Behind
the Scenes at the Museum relates the family history of Ruby
Lennox, starting with her conception. It would scarcely do,
however, to discuss the life of
one child without introducing
her predecessors, beginning
with her great-grandmother
Alice. From a small, countryside
Yorkshire cottage to the city of
York, during periods of peace
and times of war, the family has
suffered from losses, deception,
and mischief. Strangely, the
most prevalent of these is self-
deception, either in imagining
the circumstances better than
they are or that the apparent options are the only ones available. This fascination with the
fruits of the tree of ignorance
has condemned Ruby's family
— especially the female members — to lives of not so silent
desperation. With rare exception, children are seen as demonic encumbrances, sent to
murder the modest sanities of
mothers and to destroy dreams,
hopes, and happiness. Despite
all this misery, hi
vades. Atkin
of such peculiar, altogether hu-
i comedy through her ch(
acters and situations. It is to hei
credit that she deli
s as observations, whethei
.ched
author or as Ruby. Gi
depth of her chc
perb quality of her descripti
and the clarity of her focus
-     rpz
*-• - y    rr£
ti>*
*'"'"l""h
language, it is not surprising
Atkinson won the Whitbread
Book of the Year (1995), as well
as being a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. Yet as
the Boston Globe's Amanda
Heller noted, "[that] such an ambitious and brilliantly realized
novel is also the author's first is
absolutely astonishing." If you
were to read anything this year,
you ought to start with this.*
wants to
f d i s -   N
perse
distribute this darned
paper to the suburbs.
if you've got
transportation and a
desire to drop the
paper off all'round
the 'burbs, we'll give
you free ad
space
phone us:
822-301 7ext0
fax us: 822-9364
or
e-mail us:
citrradio@mail.ams
.ubcca
Basslines
a
It was Sunday, May 1 Oth and
just an hour after opening, Sonar was filled with people from
all walks of life, all there to see
and hear the head "Metalhead."
The club was awash with Adidas
stripes, Fila kicks, blue jeans and
leather. There hasn't been such a
diverse crowd at a club gig since
The Orb played at Graceland a
few years ago. I'm a big fan of
jungle music and play a fair bit
of it on my radio show, so I was
really looking forward fo an
evening of great music, turntable
trickery, and an overall good
time. Unfortunately, this was not
the case.
There's a reason why a dj is
more than just a jukebox and it
was the hip-hop djs of the '80s
who demonstrated their importance as entertainers. People
weren't just interested in what
they were playing, they wanted
to watch how they played the
records and how they could manipulate them. Where's the entertainment in watching a dj light a
cigarette, take another sip of
beer, or take five minutes to look
for another record with their back
to the crowd? In other big cities,
a dj like that would be booed off
the turntables. Because of the
facelessness of today's dance
music, it is up to the dj to put on
a show in place of the artist that
created the music they are playing.
Why am I getting all worked
up about this, you ask? It's because I hate to see people being
ripped off. Why were people
paying $15 at the door to see
Goldie when a local dj with the
same records could have put on
a similar show? I'm sure that not
everyone who was in attendance
left disappointed. In fact, there
were probably those that thought
it was amazing and had a great
time. But then again, there was
at least one audience member
who thought that Andy Bollocks
was Goldie!
Finally, at around 1 lpm, the
gold-toothed creator of Timeless,
one of the most innovative and
influential albums in jungle music, took to the stage. A subdued
cheer emanated from the mixed
crowd and the dance floor accommodated a few more enthusiastic fans. The 150+ bpm continued throughout the night and
Vancouver was treated to an
evening of drum 'n' bass unpar
alleled by any other. The tracks
were hot and because of his European sources, Goldie's fingers
would probably be the only
to touch them in Vancouver. We
just don't get access to the same
records, and some of the songs
he played have yet to be released. As a world famous dj/
artist, it is in the best interest of
independent record labels and
aspiring artists to give Goldie
copies of songs to "test" for them.
For the most part, new songs
were all that the audi
There were moments here and
there during.his extended dj set
where he exhibited his skills, but
it wasn't until towards the end of
the night that the place started to
Goldie was on tour to promote his second full-length release, Saturnzreturn (FFRR). With
so much hype surrounding Timeless, would it be possible to equal
or better such a work? You can
judge for yourselves, but I suggest you borrow it if you can.
With the exception of "Dragonfly," Saturnzreturn is a four-piece
vinyl package that doesn'
come close to the magnitude of
Timeless.*
15 $m&°Emm Demo
Derby
Read your morning paper
carefully: a recent article
published in the Vancouver Sun intended to clear the
record about the indigenous
uprising in Chiapas, currently
being suppressed by Mexican
authorities. The author claims
that the Zapatistas are not authentic indigenous peasants but
"a gang of opportunistic middle
class revolutionaries" with ties to
European terrorists. The article
states that the December m
ere of 45 people was not a paramilitary act but due to a "tradi
tional vendetta between fami
lies." The article's deliberate in
accuracies sparked a small demonstration outside of the new
Vancouver Sun offices.
Ontario Premier Mike
Harris is up to his old tricks
again. He waited until the school
year was finished to announce
the deregulation of all graduate
program fees in Ontario. Undergraduate programs, like engineering where high salaries
are expected upon graduation,
are also being deregulated (by
this premise, my arts degree
should be absolutely free). Tui
tion fees without caps can only
lead to further difficulties for
poorer, and even middle class,
students. Higher fees in Ontario
creases in other provinces, or
inter-provincial barriers which
will make it difficult for Canadians to study in other regions of
the country
UBC campus was adorned
with Coca-Cola propaganda to
prepare for the visit of the Coke
CEO. Coke flags, banners and
umbrellas were displayed on
road leading to.tfre university.
Student activists planned to
throw a pie in the CEO's face,
but mysteriously, he was nowhere to be found the day of his
planned visit. Coca-Cola has a
literal monopoly at UBC. The
administration and student union
receive money so that Coke and
Coke products (Barq's root beer,
Minute Maid juices) have exclusive vending rights on campus.
In Zimbabwe, a student organizing a boycott against the
privatization of his university
was shot by the police. The third
year science student was heading a boycott of classes in opposition to plans to convert the
University of Zimbabwe
food and accommodation serv-
The student was shot by a policeman in a moving truck and
he had to have an operation to
remove the bullet from his shoulder.
The G8 meeting in Birmingham, England, and 50th anni- .
versary of GATT celebrations in
Geneva in mid-May sparked protests around the world. The Eu-   ;;
ropean group People's Glo-   |
bal Action Against Free
Trade (PGA) write on their
website: "These Neoliberal poli
cies are creating social tensions
similar to the ones witnessed during the first stages of industrialization ... While the number of
more people around the world
find themselves in a system that
offers them no place in production and no access to consumption." World-wide protests included a march of 40,000
landless and homeless Brazilians
and 23 regional conferences
against the World Trade Organization in India. Police in
Geneva tried to repress the protests by arresting and deporting
dozens of people, including several journalists and all foreigners in a bicycle caravan from
ists gathered on Camano Island
in Washington State for Art
and   Revolution    People
Recla
the
I.U4AHCNT PUSS
Streets parties were held in 35
cities around the world. These
street parties aim to take the
streets back from consumerism
and use them for public gathering spaces. Toronto's first Reclaim the Streets saw approximately 500 people take over
several blocks of Bloor Street.
Again, the police were on site,
and arrested several people who
refused to leave the street.
During the same weekend
(May 15-17), activists and art-
To «* -^Ef !$*•'
;i|§l§y*|0
worked on street theatre,
dances, music and giant puppets
for a parade in Seattle on Monday. The theme of the parade
overconsumption. The parade
turned many heads with its giant puppets, elaborate costumes,
drumming and stilt walkers. The
march began by Pike Place Market, stopped for some street theatre outside of Niketown and
turned into a street party as others joined to reclaim a formerly
pedestrian-only block.
The Conference de
Montreal on Globalized
Economies brought together
banking and corporate executives to discuss globalization.
Anti-MAI activists called SalAMI
(Sale is the French word for dirty,
AMI is the French acronym for
Multilateral Agreement on
Investment) organized a demonstration and a parallel confer-
Revolution was on the lips of
many Vancouverites last month.
SFU's Special Collections had an
excellent exhibit called II est
interdit d'interdire on the student revolt 30 years ago in Paris.
The display included original
posters and handbills from the
revolt, which began after the
government tried to make universities more useful to industry and
economy. Students called for a
revolution against boredom and
authority in favour of creativity
and pleasure. The revolt swelled
into a strike which shut down factories, railways, airlines, communications, hotels and banks before the movement collapsed.
The Western Front hosted
Rethinking Revolution, an
annual festival of theory and performance art. A panel discussion
entitled Culture at the Counter: The Revolution
Commodified brought together academics, artists, and
activists to discuss the appropriation of revolutionary images by
rock bands and advertisers. Artist/terrorist group B.E.A.R. took
over the bear pit in Stanley Park
for eight hours. Their bizarre performance/occupation included
pirate radio transmission and distribution ofthe B.E.A.R. manifesto.
Part of the manifesto reads, "The
revolution has been appropriated:
bought, sold, mass produced, distributed and trademarked. It puts
snap in your cereal, cherry in your
Coke and wings on your pads.
We want more than wage-slave
service industry jobs, we call for
occupations!" Send strategies,
manifestos and memoirs to
Demo Derby (see email address
in column head).*"
Video Philter
BY TANIA BOLSKAYA
You're at a kick-ass game
of beach volleyball where
you dive for every spike
and the sand crunches under your
sport-sandal clad feet as you
wipe your honeyed brow in anticipation of the next gnarly serve
... You're driving out of the city
in your Jeep, top down, babe at
your side, ready to pound the
brewskies with your buds and
howl at the moon ... You're ready
to flash some of the skin you've
spent the whole winter tanning
and toning, so you leap into the
Cabriolet and cruise on down to
Kits, sure that every glance wil!
be approvingly leered your way
... If any of these scenarios describes your fantasy/typical summer day, this column holds nothing for your reading pleasure. It
would be best if you kept moving along. Nothing to see here.
If you're like me, you think of
summer as that unacceptably
sunny few months between Academy Awards night and the Vancouver International Film Festival.
Going outside is something you
risk only to a) go to work, b) rent
a movie or c) forage for nuts and
berries at the grocery store. Cool
and refreshing as movie theatres
are in the sweltering heat of a
16 June 1998
25°C Vancouver day, the year's
warmest season usually brings its
most idiotic features. (I've never
queried the fact that the most undiluted cinematic pap comes out
of Hollywood — I don't trust a
town where it never rains and the
average temperature is 30°C!).
Fifth Avenue Cinemas tries to
keep the independent/foreign/
quality ball rolling all year round,
but often the happy medium between artsy, rainy-day independents and $200 million ear-drum
tearing studio projects can only
be found at the video store.
Summer is the time of year
when the more buoyant of the
festival circuit films that didn't get
picked up for wide release finally
make it to video. Having run their
merry way around the world,
they are feeling primed to make
back at least some of their investor's dough. Last year's Vancouver International Film Festival offerings included not a few movies in this category.
Newly on the shelves is one
of the 1997 festival's most crowd-
pleasing efforts, Fever Pitch. The
story that many a Vancouver
hockey fan could easily relate to
centres on a 30-ish, laid-back
teacher whose defining person
ality trait is his love for the game
of soccer in general and, specifically, his devotion to the Arsenal
team. As this is a time in history
when Arsenal was not exactly a
football powerhouse, he has
learned to live with suffering. Into
his life walks (primly erect) a female co-worker with whom he
begins an "opposites-attract" relationship, despite her ignorance
of and dislike for his life's passion. Following the true events of
the 1988/89 English football
season and intercut with flashbacks that give insight into the
origins of a true fan, the film's
romantic story mirrors Arsenal's
rocky road to the championship.
A successful romantic/sports
comedy is hard to pull off; a delicate balance between the lovey-
dovey and jock elements must be
tempered with a good sense of
humour about both. Though Fever Pitch does occasionally fall
intc ihe dumb-plot trap of pitting
the uptight female who's looking
to "nest" against the slobbish,
easy-going sports nut who doesn't
want to be "tied down," its willingness to poke fun at itself with
an honest, self-depreciating wit
gives it a likeability that most
Hollywood pictures in this vein
don't have. It helps that, in place
of the de r/gour-in-the-USA Kevin
Costner, we get the charming and
affable Colin Firth.
Unfortunately, charming and
affable are adjectives that I cannot use to describe the "Most
Popular Canadian Film" at last
year's festival: The Hanging Car-
den. At the annual Tania
Bolskaya Awards, this movie won
"Most Canadian Film," a prize
awarded to the most whimsically
earnest, yet yawningly self-absorbed domestic festival effort. In
the oh-so-Canadian plot, a
young, thin, gay man returns to
the scene of his pubescent obesity to attend the wedding of his
sister, who happens to be marrying the object of his past affection. His mother was/is cold and
uncommunicative and his father
was/is a drunk bully who likes
to garden. Flashbacks mix with
surrealism as he learns to deal
with his past. Unlike most of its
ilk, The Hanging Garden is not
set in the prairies, but in the just-
as-ruralCanadian Maritimes. The
big surprise ending has two problems — it ties everything together
much too nicely and it's not that
surprising. Except for the two
actors who play his sisters —
then, Sarah Polley [The Sweet
Hereafter) and now, Kerry Fox
(Shallow Grave) — the performances are as flat as the directing
and writing. If you care to challenge me on any of this, The
Hanging Garden is out on video
June 2"d.
If a fight is what you're looking for, it's finally possible to rent
Waco: The Rules of the Engagement, a stunningly scathing documentary whose word of mouth
wafted through the festival like
tear gas last year. Investigating
the US government's responsibility for the disaster at the Branch
Davidian Compound near Waco,
Texas in 1993, Waco paints an
admittedly biased, yet impossible
to ignore picture of federal fuck-
ups and cover-ups. Though not
exonerating the choices of the
"cult," which according to the
film's evidence was shot at,
trapped, gassed, and ultimately
murdered, Waco seeks to give
the Davidians a voice to balance
the "official" words of the FBI and
ATF. The combination of video
tape from inside the compound,
expert testimony, heat-sensitive
photography and on-the-record
government back-tracking lead
the viewer to ask the question
fundamental to this film: do people whose beliefs clash with our
own, and those of our justice system, deserve to die? Though
heavy in terms of its subject matter and sometimes heavy-handed
in terms of its message, Waco is
never dull. In a summer of films
like Godzilla, Deep Impact, and
Armageddon, a little reality in the
fire-and-brimstone department
never hurt anyone.
If you like your reality a little
less on the "you bastards!" side,
a healthy and unpretentious dose
of life-affirmation can be found
in the latest Errol Morris documentary classic, Fast, Cheap and Out
of Control. Made up of four guys
— a topiary gardener, a mole-
rat specialist, a robotics scientist,
and a lion-tamer — talking about
their jobs, with a little experimental mood photography thrown in,
Morris again proves that it is possible to use film to tell stories in
new and exciting ways. The infectiousness of the men's love
for their respective crafts and the
inspired editing of the ever-innovative Errol make Fast, Cheap
and Out of Control one of those
movies that, like a good dinner,
sits with you for awhile. Nourishment for the psyche, this film has
the ability to make everyone feel
like a humanist — a by-product
of the PhD-in-Philosophy-holding
Morris' love for his own crafts:
thinking and filmmaking.
A lover of thinking and
filmmaking myself, though not
necessarily in that order, I have
a lot to do this summer while I'm
sequestered away in my
lightproof viewing room. At the
top of my list is that letter I have
to write to the VIFF Board of Directors. The topic: those insipid,
grotesquely unfunny commercials
that play before each film.
Though they purport to be advertising the various contests at the
festival, I will threaten to expose
their real intent — to drive film-
lovers (i.e. pass-holders, the
bread and butter of the festival)
so insane with loathing for a humankind that could produce such
annoying drivel that they turn
their murderous rage on their fellow (i.e. one-performance-ticket-
holding) patrons, thereby gaining
notoriety and free publicity for the
VIFF. Until fall ...» 7
inch
BY THE INVISIBLE CLAIRE
No message this month!
The oracle has writer's
block.
Attendees of the recent
Nardwuar the Human Serviette
extravaganza / Gotta Rash will
recognize the MURDER CITY
DEVILS as the high-steppin'
greaser boys who spat on the
stage, set their organ on fire, and
induced maniacal dancing in rebellious teenagers. The recorded
Devils are neither as charismatic
nor as musically exciting as the
real thing, but this is natural and
to be expected. Rock and roll is,
in most of its forms, intended to
be a live experience, up-front and
centre with all the undistinguished
trappings of heat exhaustion,
ecstatic dance moves or lack
thereof, and demonic possession.
"Dancing Shoes" is plenty
sweaty, plenty swanky, and recorded in excellent stereo sound.
"Tokyo Gold," despite an interesting thesis statement (they still
know how to rock and roll in Tokyo), is a typical B-side, a poor
shadow of its superior twin. I still
find MCD's worship of Johnny
Thunders and Iggy Pop somewhat trying, but have convinced
myself that it is a homoerotic thing
and, thus, excusable. (Die Young,
Stay Pretty, 1932 1st Avenue,
Suite 1103, Seattle, WA, 98101)
No information is provided
on or in the packaging concerning the matter, so allow me to use
my powers of deduction to explain how the SICK BEES
achieve such androgyny with
their vocal lines. Thesis one: the
Sick Bees are hermaphrodites!
Unlikely, but possible. Thesis two:
the Sick Bees possess a de-gen-
der-fying pedal which distorts the
gender identity of band members! Once again, unlikely, but
technology is always bringing
forth useful devices such as the
one I have just described (the
possibilities! This contraption, if
it exists, could revolutionize music and, from there, the world!
Call me mad, will they!) Thesis
three: the Sick Bees have two
vocalists, one of either sex. They
sing together in such a seamless
manner that the illusion of sepa-
rateness is destroyed, and male
joins female in perfect buzzing
harmony. Since there is no way
for me to prove any of my three
theses at this time, I will quit this
useless dissection of the vocals
and move on to the instrumentation. "Push" is slow, starlight ballroom rock which sweeps through
the cosmic arena in an atonal but
alluring manner. "Come To Pray"
features brass drones (saxophone? trumpet?), treble overload, and a message of Christian
devotion. "Corn" is buried in
mighty kickdrum, percussive collisions, and strange samples;
4:29 of indescribably demented
fun. You wanna hear for yourself.
(Up, PO Box 21328, Seattle,
WA, 98111-3328)
I get a lot of free frisbees from
Denver garage rawk label 360
Twist, most of which I elect not to
ety, and personal whim. This
month, however, I will briefly skip
over three reasonably new releases and drop the gospel
thereof. Let's begin. THE SECULARS EP, Social Skills, comprises
five songs of fast, snotty, very
poorly recorded punkabilly. This
appears to be a live or semi-live
document. Righteous old-school
(a la 1955) bass lines improve
the whole mess. THE INSECT
feature my favourite promotional
advertising thafs
built to last
5017 (ext.3) for iir?g^
& RECEfVl A CiTR RROMO PACK!
NAME' iy r, 7    \     "        Vs\ /
AjDDRESS        /'<:'      J\    >      "T*
dJTY >- PROV POSTAL
1 YEAR: $15 CDN   $USl5 US   $24 ELSEWHERE
DiSCORDER, 233-6138 SUB BLVD, VANCOUVER, BC   V6T 1Z1
device on the cover of their 7": a
naked chick draped in an American flag and saved from indecency by red-white-and-blue pasties. They do a Northwest
Company cover, "Hard to Cry,"
with the requisite glitter and
much faster and less distinctive,
although "Styler" is a decent instrumental piece with harmonica.
And GEORGIA'S VENDETTAS, with their cat-calling, hog-
squealing, bikini-toting guitarist,
make good, solid rockabilly.
(360 Twist!, PO Box 9367
Denver, CO 80209 USA)
Olympia old-timers KARP
are back, spreading heavy metal
mayhem over two long, tortuous
sides of snow white vinyl. What
monstrous guitar! What harsh
screaming! Extra points for the
chorus of the damned intoning
funereally at the end of "Rowdy."
One feels as if one is being chaperoned across Stygian waters towards the lightless flames of the
underworld. (Up, PO Box 21 32,
Seattle, WA, 98111)
RUN CHICO RUN, a trio of
Island boys, try their hands at
social commentary on the A Secretary Speaks EP. Allow me to
quote from "DJ Fevah:"
"The kids are out on the floor/
they feel they could have paid
more than 30 bones to come in/
and watch the demigod spin/
And then there's after the show/
the girls are ready to go/ and
everyone in the know/ is trying
to slip 'em free blow."
For some reason, I find that
extremely funny. "It's All Good"
is just as amusing, for different
but related reasons. "Voluntary
Solitary" features another tidbit
of hilarity: "Stad boys sit in a
ring/drinking static in cans/circle jerkin in time/stroking hard
for the man." As for the music,
it's silly guitar pop. (Stereotype,
4-1 302 Gladstone Ave., Victoria,
BC, V8R 1S1)
Behind their amateurish
MacPaint-style cover art, KUM-
QUAT are, well, amateurish.
"Fallen Child Porn Star" is so
loose that it falls apart at every
opportunity. "Sneer" is tighter
and better, full of tempo shifts
and vocal distortion. These youths
are feeling kinda sonic, but
they've got quite a way to go
before they achieve the masterful sloppiness of their (presumed)
idols. (Sex Not Suicide, 1509
Julia St., Berkeley, CA, 94703)
The date on the back is
1995, but this TAFT HOTEL single, recently deposited in my
mailbox by persons unknown, is
so good that its age matters not
one whit. The design is gorgeous
and the record label, Co-dependent, is cooperatively run.
The best part of the whole package, however, is the music. "Free
The Witches" begins slowly and
continues at a relaxed pace until the last 30 seconds, whereupon what originally seemed a
sweet Sunday afternoon ride reveals itself to be a stomp through
hardcore city. Strong rhythms
and heavy bass jolt the innards,
even when they're being played
quietly. "Purple" has a more classically emo structure and, like,
this record is so amazingly good
that you, like, totally have to hear
it. ("Excellent ending, Miss
Claire. How do you keep your
prose flowing so smoothly?"
"Practice, Father MacMillan,
practice") (Co-dependent, PO
Box 1625, San Luis Obispo, CA,
93406)
PHOENIX THUNDER-
STONE s cover of Prince's
"Free" has a groinally fixated bar-
band sound which brings to mind
Skid Row in ballad mode.
Nothing wrong with that, nothing
at all. "Pinprick," on the flip,
features the vocal stylings of
guitar mistress Wendy Van
Dusen, who, with her pseudo-
Alabamian drawl, makes me
think of what Jarboe might
sound like after sucking helium
and joining a pop rock combo.
This single is a groovy picture-disc
with cartoon woodchucks and
skunks on it. (Heyday, 2325 3rd
Street #339, San Francisco, CA,
94107)*
DUOTANG CONTEST
Win one of five pairs of tickets to DUOTANG with special guests
THE WEAKERTHANS and plumtree. The show date is on Saturday,
June 27 at the Starfish Room. Send us your most original duotang from
school (no clipboards or 3 ring binders!) by June 19 to:
Duotang Contest
c/o Discorder
233-6138 SUB Blvd
Vancouver, BC  V6T 1Z1
All prizes must be picked up in person at Discorder.
Don't forget to include contact name
and phone number!
CHOICE OF HUM OR JESUS LIZARD
Win one of two pairs of tickets to either
Hum at the Starfish on Thursday, June 18
or Jesus Lizard on Monday, June 29 at the Starfish
All you have to do is drop by the CiTR Business office
beginning Tuesday, June 2
and tell us the latest releases from these fine bands
First come, first served.
CiTR is located at 233-6138 SUB Blvd
Business hours are from 11 am to 6 pm, Monday to Friday
17 Et^gsansa Under
Review
ALBUMS • ZINES
JOHN AQUAVIVA
rmm Saturday to Sunday Mix
(Florida)
Mr. Aquaviva! Be my housemaster! You, oh great one —
founder of Plus 8 and Definitive
Records in Toronto, with many
great house releases once again
— show us what you do behind
the decks! The smoothest,
whipped blend of tasty house and
techno. Saturday Mix: Groove.
Up. Bump and grind then whip
to frenzy with hard beats. Sunday Mix: Down. Tired. But ready
for more and a slap in the ass
from Mr. Aquaviva. Aquaviva
again shows us why he has a
monthly residency at the Florida
Club in Spain, where he plays
five hour sets. We wish he would
come to Vancouver more often.
Buy this. Includes tracks by DJ
Slip, Plus 8's The Kooky Scientist and The Jedi Knights
Worth every penny and I pity the
sucker who missed Mr. Aquaviva
at Celebrities last month.
Tobias van Veen
BRAID
Frame and Canvas
(Polyvinyl)
Ahh, "emo:" the little sub-genre
reserved for bands who span the
boundary between pop punk and
"emotional" indie-rock (a la
Superchunk) Braid, an emo
band much like Sunny Day
Real Estate and The Promise
Ring, sing little ditties about stupid topics using lots of vague adjectives and metaphors, which
leads me to believe that they probably write their random lyrics while
reading a dictionary. Their guitar
riffs are definitely catchy and there
.are so many hooks in the 12 songs
that they often become cheesy and
predictable because of the pick-
quietly- and-then-hit-the-distortion-
pedals pattern of every single track.
This is not to say that I think Braid
suck, because I don't. For me,
they're always fun to listen to, but
you have to be in the right frame
of mind to like this album.
On one hand, I can hear
something overdone and bad like
Third Eye Blind when I lend
an ear to this Braid CD. On the
other hand, I can hear something
unique and enjoyable in these
songs, with their endless hooks
and weird time signatures. It's a lot
better than your average poppunk
record, that's for darn tootin' sure.
Christopher J.C. Corday
Sanctuary
Sundays 9-12
no cover, drink specials
DARK MUSIC FOR A DARK AGE
Dj's micronian and pandemonium
-• starting Sunday June 14th
1250 Richards St. Vancouver, BC
Tel. 604.688.2648
18 june 1998
CHIXDIGGIT
Born on the First of July
(Honest Don's)
Calgary's favourite sons burst
back onto the scene with a 1 2-
song punk rock explosion that'll
make you forget all the Celine
Dions, Bryan Adams and
Great Big Seas combined.
While not quite as consistent as
their 1996 debut, Bom's highs
easily outweigh its lows. KJ and
the kids rock harder than ever with
smashes like "Chupacabras" and
"Ohio" and crooners fit to melt your
heartstrings, like "Julianne" or
"Sikome Beach." Again, with
handsome packaging care of Tom
Bagley and far fewer cries of "Let's
rock!" — evidently they read the
suggestion box — this is a fine
sophomore effort which will presumably garner much southern favour. Yes, Fat Mike ...Anything you
say, Master ...
Trevor Fielding
THE CRYSTAL METHOD
Vegas
(Outpost/Universal)
While listening to this release
from The Crystal Method, I
couldn't help comparing it to The
Prodigy and The Chemical
Brothers. For some, this is a
favorable comparison, for others,
not so favourable. Vegas is an
album that I can put on when I'm
driving and pass many an exciting hour. The breakbeats in most
of the tracks are well done. This
is a dancer's album. All the tracks
take a more rock-oriented format,
as they are all individual songs;
lots of build-up, lots of bass. I like
this album. It's the one that piqued
my interest in electronica and if
it does that to other people, all
the better.
Shane Vander Meer
FREAKY CHAKRA
Blacklight Fantasy
(Astralwerks)
"Bass and Bleeps, '98 style," said
Neil Landstruum. This would also
apply to Freaky Chakra's new
album, Blacklight Fantasy, which
explores the ranges of sample-
happy house and mature,
minimalist trance to intricately structured electro-ish breaks reminiscent
of early Warpera releases. Too
many samples for my tastes, but
the album is a definite progression
and a smooth, gargling-in-space
listen from Daum Bentiey. It's
also a step away from the melting cheese of West Coast breaks
and progressive trance that everyone else (and the mainstream
"electronica" scene) has fallen
into these days. This album has
far more of a Detroit-electro feel to
it, mixed with a touch of West
Coast, and reminds me of
Vapourspace's recent offerings.
Enjoy the snack.
Tobias van Veen
HAGFISH
Hagfish
(Honest Don's)
The conclusion I drew from repeated listenings to Hagfish's
last album was this: they play
very good poppy punk almost
identical to All. This isn't too surprising, since the tag team of
Stevenson and Egerton were
knob-twiddlers for bands.
Hagfish, however, have the
dumbest lyrics I've ever heard.
The worst! Worse than Fluf. It's
hard to like Hagfish, for this very
reason. As far as the new album
goes — well, the music's the
same, and the lyrics ... better. It's
not the best thing I've ever heard,
but songs like "Anniversary
Song," "Closer," "Band," and
They Might Be Giants' "Twisting" are enough to make this a
vast improvement on the last.
Trevor Fielding
RICHIE HAWTIN
Concept 96
(Minus)
Canada's composer of minimal
techno, Richie Hawtin, aka
Plastikman, has released a CD
of collector's 12"s which came
out from 1996 to 1997. These
1 2"s reflected a minimal concept
in techno. The Plastikman-Detroit
style is taken to the extreme, with
tones repeated and panned for
an entire track with only subtle
change; abstract and haunting
rhythms and beats. Hearing the
entire series from start to finish is
quite a revealing treat. There is
a pattern in the silence and Mr.
Hawtin dictates it very, very well.
Makes me long for a party with
40 bassbins and Hawtin on four
decks with a joystick-controlled
quad sound system. Instant orgasm, I tell ya'.
Tobias
IRIDIUM
The Racquet EP
(Lowdown)
Another local recording expressing the ethereal. It's nice and interesting, but nothing really
wakes me up and makes me want
to either spin this out in a deep-
house or morning techno setting
or listen to it endlessly at home.
Iridium is forming its own sound,
though, and the tracks have a developed, west coast-ish/Phil
Western-ish sound to them. Favourites? "Tempest" will probably
be played on the wheels of steel
with the nicely worked, dreamy
and just-woke-up-from-a-coma
vocal sample, as well as "Green
Towels" (whazzup with the
name?!?) with the saxophone
doot-a-loot-loot. Personally, I still
like "Psychos Living in Berlin,"
because of its underground, Paris-
at-night-on-heroin feel. Come to
think of it, the EP is a fine piece
of work, but nothing bites. Good
local artist.
JUGHEAD'S REVENGE
Jusf Joined
(Nitro)
This review is based on my copy
of Just Joined without a sleeve,
cover, or even song titles. Just
bear with me. Jughead's Revenge's last album was the one
that got me to like this band, for
whom I didn't much care previously. Image is Everything was a
great album. Just Joined is ...good.
Note the difference. Songs like
"Domino," the one which might be
called "Punk's Not Cool Anymore,"
and the last one (sung by somebody else — hey, don't ask me
who) are standouts, featuring their
trademark satire and slam-bang
punk rock. The rest of the album is
mired in mediocrity, though, and
doesn't do much for me. It's still
good, solid fun, but doesn't leave
much of an impression.
Trevor Fielding
LUNGFISH
Artificial Horizon
(Dischord)
Lungfish take the slow and
heavy route through 1 1 thoughtful songs on their latest Dischord
release. Five of these 1 1 songs
are instrumental and provide a
sort of meditative padding for the
lyrical intensity of pieces like
"Love Will Ruin Your Mind" and
"Slip of Existence." "Shed The
World" is the strongest song on
the album, a slice of vision. It ends
with the following sentiment, which
I hold to my heart as the authoritative truth of an inspired poet:
"Don't shun the world, shed
it/ If anyone you meet does not
believe it/ Tell them the talking
trees have decreed it."
The Invisible Barbara
THE MAKE-UP
In Mass Mind CD
Blue is Beautiful video
(Dischord)
The Make-up gospel ministry
is back with a double dose of that
maximum soul/gospel yeh-yeh
sound that they've been setting
the woods on fire with since
1994. In Mass Mind finds them
at the peak of their powers, effortlessly moving from MC5-fla-
voured psychedelic scorchers like
"Live in the Rhythm Hive," to driv-
"Watch it With that Thing," to
rousing, spiritual odysseys like "Do
you Like Gospel Music?" and
"Caught up in the Rapture," to pulsing, soul rugcutters like "Drop the
Needle" and "Centre of the Earth."
Last year's simultaneous releases of Sound Verite (K) and
After Dark (Dischord) was certainly a bold move, showcasing
increasing inventiveness in the
studio as well as the majesty of
The Make-up's performative abilities — somehow, though, what
should have been a coup de
grace to a sick industry, a sick
society, a sick world, and all you
sickos who live your lives contentedly day-by-day in such a world,
came up a little short.
With In Mass Mind, The
Make-up have managed to marry
prowess with focus and vision.
YEAHHH! That's right, baby, the
soul is back and she's pissed.
Lookout! "Watch It With That
Thing" on its own is a revelation;
it may be THE Revelation. Here,
in a song about master-slave dynamics, instead of simplistically
decrying such dynamics or adopting a privileged point of observation outside of such dynamics,
Ian "el gato" Svenonius steps
defiantly into the role of the slave,
or, rather, he admits to his position as a slave: "I know my place,
I'm a slave ... there's no underground railroad, and there's nowhere to go anyway ... I know
my place, I'm for sale ... oooh,
YEAH! YEAH! YEAH!" Creating
a link between slavery and one's
alienated existence within late
capitalism is bold; creating such
a link and drawing upon America's history of human slavery is
downright provocative. In a
sense, it reminds me of the work
of someone like Rainer Werner
Fassbinder, who in the mid-
1970s started creating complex
filmic texts which were not only
critiques of capitalism, racism,
exploitation, etc., but were also
textual expressions of the dynamics involved. At one point,
Fassbinder considered naming
one of these projects Slaves of
Order and Tranquility.
While In Mass Mind finds
The Make-up at the peak of their
powers, 8/ue is Beautiful, a
16mm film "abouf'/featuring
The Make-up made by one
James Schneider as some kind
of project for the Corcoran
School for the Arts (evidently),
is much more of a trifle. The film
is ostensibly about The Makeup's attempt to escape the USA
and attain refuge in Canada
because of the political oppression they've been subject to in
their native land. But essentially,
the "plot" is just an excuse for a
lot of nicely shot documentary-
style footage of the band in action on stage and on the road.
Unfortunately, the emphasis on
the road trip and the gigs means
that the band's "message" and
lan's notorious skills as a
monologist and ranter get pushed
to the side. Much of the footage
(especially the live stuff) is great,
however, and the film is not without its seductive charms. I got the
feeling that this was primarily
Schneider's version/vision of The
Make-up and that, if the band took
on a similar project in the future, they
should most certainly work with
■ith whom they could cre-
TOTAL VISION.
THE MALCHIKS
Skavant-Garde
(Spawner)
Is it against CiTR law to review a
Malchiks album? I mean, isn't
it just a given that they're great
sides, hasn't every member of
Discorder's readership been to a
Malchiks bzzr garden ... I mean,
concert? So I don't have to say
something like, "this 40 million-
piece outfit has finally done the
unthinkable, yada yada yada ..."
Do I? You know what they sound
like. I'd say, "Go get the album,"
but you probably already have
it. It's catchy, it's quirky, it's witty,
it's good. They say stuff that you
wish you had thought of. Their
songs should be the highlight of
every mixed tape. I think my personal favourite track is "Lover
Boy" (cuz deep down, don't we
all love Tina Turner?), but heck,
it's all great.
alia SACKVILLE
These Last Songs
(Mag Wheel)
Picture a rural farmhouse or an isolated log cabin in the woods on a
chilly, grey, autumn day. These are
the kinds of images Montreal's
Sackville brings to mind. Most
of the songs — like "Upstate," "Invisible Ink," and "Clothesline" —
are meandering and lethargic,
occasionally letting loose into short
fits of noise. "Music to kill yourself
by," is how a friend of mine described it. "Her Ghost Will One
Day Rise Again" is probably my
favourite song; it's a little less dirgy
than the rest, kind of gospely in
fact, though I'll stop short of calling it uplifting.
Although their instrumentation
(including violin, banjo, table steel,
organ and even a saw) might hint
at it, you can't quite pin the country label on them. I try my darndest
not to compare one band to another, but I've gotta succumb and
point out that Sackville sound an
awful lot like Rex or Palace. It just
seems too obvious not to mention.
I don't know whether or not
there's any significance to the album title.
Fred derF
SWERVEDRIVER
99fh Dream
(Zero Hour)
The music scene has changed a
lot in the last five to seven years;
grunge has pretty much come and
gone, electronica's now in. It seems
everyone's long since forgotten
My Bloody Valentine and the
scores of much-hyped British "guitar" bands that were so abundant
a few years ago. But
Swervedriver is one "guitar"
band I always thought was deserving of all the hype.
No, I haven't really listened to
them much since 1993's Mezcal
Head (I still haven't heard 1995's
Ejector Seat Reservation). But this
album, 99th Dream, has definitely
rekindled my interest in the band.
My very first impression of the album, produced once again by
Alan Moulder (My Bloody Valentine, Smashing Pumpkins),
was that it sounded a bit too thin
and gritty, but I've grown to like its
rawness. I think I was half expecting the polish of the Mezcal Head
album. Adam Franklin's lazy vocals are still buried deep in the mix
and they've still got countless layers of heavily processed guitars and
spacey effects swirling in, out, and
around — their trademark sound.
This album is a bit sparser,
dreamier, and a little more toned
down than before. On average,
the songs are a bit shorter than they
used to be, though there are still a
couple of tunes over seven minutes.
It seems Swervedriver's now more
focused on song than riff. "Stellar
Caprice" is a great loungey instrumental that wouldn't be altogether
out of place on a Friends of
Dean Martinez or Calexico
album, yet it still sounds like
Swervedriver. And, thankfully, they
haven't completely abandoned
their more straightforward, melodic
tunes like "These Times" and "Up
From The Sea," and they're still capable of rocking out, which they do
here and there throughout the album.
I don't think there's anyone that
can pull off this genre as well as
Swervedriver can. And hey, I made
it all the way through without saying "shoegazer."
Fred derF
TEEN IDOLS
Teen Idols
(Honest Don's)
Hands down, this is the best album
I've heard all year. Fast, catchy,
rockin' punk in the same
Ramones-worship vein as The
Queers and Screeching Weasel. From the opener, "Come
Dance With Me", straight through
to "Anybody Else," Nashville's
Teen idols whip through 14 consecutive hits without a clunker in the
bunch. Witness "1989," "I'm Not
the One," or "Peanut Butter Girl" ...
the proof, my friends, in the pudding. Honest Don's already impressive roster takes a giant leap with
the addition of this very fine band.
Trevor Fielding
PHIL WESTERN
The Escapist
(Map)
Escape from what? If anything Phil,
aka Philth of Download aka
Cap'm Stargazer, aka one half of
Off and Gone, aka something
to do with Skinny Puppy, has
rounded up another reason to keep
living in Vancouver: we deceive
ourselves into believing this is Lotus Land. Or perhaps the album
just deceives for us, the deception
seen most on the last track, "Stay
Clean," with its haunting melodies
that just wants to make you snuggle with something furry, smoke the
funny and die crying. Beautiful
soundscapes and ethereal beats
are punctured by industrial stabs,
invoking the modernist aspect of
the cover art. This is obviously music
assembled from traveling the world,
perhaps a mental voyage, as the
inside photos show. Well worth it.
Tobias
WIZO
Kraut & Ruben
(Fat)
You don't know how long I've been
waiting for this. A new album from
the best band in Deutschland? Oh,
baby. It's not exactly new, mind
you. Kraut & Ruben is a collection
of (only) eight previously released
songs: three from 1996's
Herrenhandtasche, a couple from
the German edition of
Uuuaargghhl, plus some covers
and compilation tracks. As always,
it's the ones in German that are
my favourites, even though I
haven't a clue what they're saying.
This is another superb release from
Wizo. We can only hope for two
things: the next one is a bit longer,
and the tour scheduler realizes that
Canada has a west coast, too.
Trevor Fielding
VARIOUS ARTISTS
Foxtrot
(Graal/World Serpent)
This compilation was put together
by John Balance and his close circle of "friends and loved ones" to
help pay for the alcoholism treat-,
ment he is currently undergoing.
The resulting album is an interesting collection of oddities and miscellany from the World Serpent
gang. John's partner, Peter
Christopherson, starts Foxtrot off
with "In My Head a Crystal Sphere
of Heavy Fluid" (dedicated to the
memory of William S.
Burroughs), a rather slow, mellow piece which features synthesized flute and blues guitar. The
Inflatable Sideshow's "Bone
Frequency," with its cut-up voices
and heavy guitars, is considerably
heavier and, at moments, sounds
almost "mainstream industrial." Fortunately, the song is mixed eccentrically enough to escape the damnation of that tag. Good old
Nurse With Wound, of whom
I've never been particularly fond
at a level beyond the intellectual,
contributes two tracks, one of
which seems to be an old regurgitation framed by BBC radio commentary. The second track is an
almost tolerable ten-minute whitewash of synthesizer tones and
power-tool skree whose frequencies mess up your brain. Coil themselves are in fine form on "Blue Rats
(Blue Cheese Mix)" and
"Heartworms."
Both songs are quite dancey,
but no dj in his or her right mind
would play them after 12 midnight
or before 4 in the morning, unless
he or she was quite mad or intent
upon frightening the young'uns.
And, finally, Current 93 do "A
Dream of the InMostLight." Since
C93's InMostLight trilogy is a current
(ha) obsession of mine, this long
song, little more than an eternal
wash of guitar fuzz and childish
voices, pleases me to no end, if only
for its titular association with such a
grand and marvellous piece of work.
I wish Mr. Balance a successful
recovery and hope that this project
provides some monetary support.
The Invisible Barbara
SOUNDTRACK
Shooting Fish
(EMI)
There isn't much to say about the
Shooting Fish soundtrack. It's a
compilation of cute, funny songs
by cute, funny bands to go with
the cute, funny movie. The tunes
are fun and boppy, selected from
recent hit British pop albums, such
as "Neighbourhood" and "Me &
You Vs. the World" from Space's
LP Spiders, and "Bluetonic" from
The Bluetones' Expecting to Fly.
The spread of songs will turn you
into a bouncing muppet if you are
into, dare I use the defunct catch
phrase, Brit-pop (ACKI), but if you
are the type who is sickened by
happy pop, STAY AWAY. Don't say
I didn't warn you.
Tunes by Strangelove, Silver Sun, Dubstar, The Divine
Comedy and The Wannadies
grace the compilation, but the most
enjoyable tracks are definitely the
yummy Hal David/Burt
Bacharach tunes sung by our
favourite psychic friend, Dionne
Warwick ("Do You Know the
Way to San Jose"), and Jackie
De Shannon ("What the World
Needs Now Is Love"). You get the
picture. Top off the sweet,
chocolatey goodness with swelling
movie music performed by the
Warsaw Symphony Orchestra, and there you have it. Buy it if
Duld
alia hussey
THE EVAPORATORS
THEE GOBLINS
THE SKABLINS
THE MURDER CITY DEVILS
HEAD
THEE PIRATES
Friday, April 24
Cambrian Hall
BLACK MARKET BABIES
THE MURDER CITY DEVILS
THE GO-DEVILS
Saturday, April 25
The  Columbia
First off, let me clear something up.
RockV Roll: Elvis, Jerry Lee,
Gene Vincent, The Rolling Stones,
Jimi, The New York Dolls, Patti,
Suicide, The Clash, X-Ray Spex,
The Cramps, etc.
Rock: The Beach Boys, The
Who, Gary Glitter, The Ramones,
The Sex Pistols, Pink Floyd, Boston, Reo Speedwagon, etc.
OK, now that I've taken care
of that matter ...
Any time you get a chance to
see The Murder City Devils,
I say DO IT — not only are they
one of the best bands going in
this day and age, one of the only
bands worth a toss, but they're
without a doubt one of the very
best bands you'll ever see live
(yeah, YOU!). Many thanks to
Nardwuar the Human Serviette for bringing the M.C.D.
up along with Head and Thee
Pirates for his 1 1 th anniversary
wild west comedy-fest, and many
more thanks to Nardo for re-christening the Cambrian Hall proper.
Missed Thee Pirates, but apparently they were a hoot AND
they're available for birthday
parties, baptisms, confirmations,
etc. Head was punk of that
straight-ahead, three-chord variety that I tend to avoid like scabies. The Murder City Devils
came on next and delivered a
blistering, sweaty, impassioned
set to a largely sedentary audience — meanwhile, a few of us
did The Werewolf in fevered,
trance-like states. After mini-sets
by Thee Goblins (not to be confused with The Goblins) and the
rude soundz of The Skablins,
The Evaporators came on and
loosed their bizarro charms upon
the eager crowd. There's no question about it, The Evaporators are
a crack band and when you
match that up with Nardwuar's
hypnotic powers, not to mention
his vintage 1983-4 Thriller tops
and bottoms that would make
Tennille proud, you've got a potent combination. This outing saw
The Evaporators shredding garage punk numbers as they've
rarely shredded 'em before, but
also continuing to branch out into
other territories, such as kandy-
koated reggae and disco beats
(think Leo Sayer on ludes).
Sheer mayhem.
Night two of the-Murder-City-
Devils-storm-Vancouver found them
moving from what was essentially
a theatre space (hell, there was
even a balcony) to the down-n-dirty
punk hovel lhat is the Columbia —
perfect. They thrived on its low
stage, its cramped space, its "ambience," and pulled out all the
stops. When I thought they couldn't
go any further, they closed with
"Flashbulb," their adrenaline-fueled
paean to taking the stage on a
Saturday night, and their set-closer
tribute to Ignatius Pop on metallic k.o., "Broken Glass," complete
with flaming farfisa.
The Go-Devils (not the Japanese ones) opened up the night
with some light aritzia-punk; The
Black Market Babies (B.C. not
D.C.) closed the night with some
faux thunders cum interior cum
pop. Singer-boy wanted to be the
crowd's dog and, sure enough,
by the end of the night he'd been
ridiculed, gobbed upon, and
doused with stale beer. Some performers achieve some kind of
twisted transcendence by becoming a pariah-figure; others just get
shat upon.
MUSCLE BITCHES
PUNCHED UNCONSCIOUS
BLOODHAG
Friday, May 8
Starfish Room
First up was Seattle's Bloodhag.
Each song was a two-minute blast
of frenetic heavy metal named
after a noted science fiction author. What? Yes, Bloodhag are
very literate fellows. They threw
out books to the crowd, took a
literacy poll, and were thoroughly
unappreciated — more's the pity.
Next was, I suppose, Punched
Unconscious. I spent their entire set hoping they'd stop. Their
frontman sounded a lot like
Anthony Michael Hall when
he gets drunk in Weird Science.
I didn't like them at all. Nuff said.
The Muscle Bitches were last
... wow. As it turns out, the guy
from P.U. is the Bitches' bass
player. Well, this band is incredible, just bursting at the seams
with showmanship. Their set included, but was certainly not limited to, flaming cymbals, leather
G-strings, miniature guitars, flaming ex-members, battling crustaceans, flaming miniature guitars,
operatic singing voices, baritone
sax, riffs to make Iron Maiden
weep, and stage presence in the
league of Gwar. All this enshrouded in epic amounts of
smoke ... this is one amazing
Trevor Fielding
GARY NUMAN
SWITCHBLADE SYMPHONY
Thursday, May 14
Starfish Room
The mood inside the Starfish
Room that night was one of in
tense anticipation as we all
waited for the arrival of Gary
Numan. The black-clad group
huddled close to the barrier put
up to protect our hero from
overzealous fans. And, trust me,
the fence came in handy The
opening band, Switchblade
Symphony, put on a respectable show. I liked the music, but
more than that, their hair was
amazing!
With the crowd geared up,
the red lights shone on stage and
out walked the man everyone
had been waiting to see (some
for up to 20 years). Having never
put much stock in rock stars, I was
shocked to feel myself swoon in
his presence. But the real thrill of
the night came when Gary hit the
first few chords of "Cars," and
the crowd started to dance in unison until the ground shook under our feet. In an interview with
the King of the Synthesizer, Gary
mentioned that he would have
to win back all the fans he lost
in the mid-'80s with a great live
show, and he delivered. He was
so well received, this trooper
played two encores, finishing the
evening with an outstanding rendition of "Me! I disconnect from
you." A fellow Numanoid told
me at a bus stop after the show
that someone offered him $100
for his ticket, but he wouldn't have
sold it for anything. I think this is
a fitting tribute to a man who
played the best concert I have
ever been to in my life.
Shane Vander Meer
NEW BOMB TURKS
Sunday, May 17
Starfish Room
Even though it had been about
three years since the last time they
were here, it didn't take long for
The New Bomb Turks to blast
off and take everyone along for
the ride. Actually, bassist Matt
Reber seemed a little pissed off
during the first couple of songs -
- maybe it was that bass sound,
which didn't appear right to me
at first either, but then we both
got used to it. Singer Eric
Davidson commanded the most
attention, steering the rock and
roll juggernaut through four albums (OK, five if you include the
Pissin' Out the Poison double LP)
and numerous singles. He made
the most out of the newly erected
partition around the stage, much
like a troublesome toddler tries
to escape the confines of his playpen. And we, the audience, were
more than willing to set him free.
I don't think I've yelled louder,
sang along more, and jumped
around with such excitement than
at this show. Prime example:
when guitarist Jim Weber slashed
out the chords to their cover of
Wire's "Mr. Suit," the result was
a pure, manic and intense moment of unbridled energy that I
haven't seen out of a Vancouver
crowd in a long time. If you
haven't got any New Bomb Turks
(including their brand new boss
platter At Rope's End), do yourself a favour and add the
Columbus, Ohio, crew to your
collection. You won't be sorry.
Bryce Dunn
19   ®LR§2t!2l3ffi On The Dia
SUNDAYS
ARE YOU SERIOUS? MUSK   8:30-
12:00PM All of time is measured by
its art. This show presents the most
recent new music from around the
world. Ears open.
THE ROCKERS SHOW 12:00-3:OOPM
Reggae inna all styles and fashion.
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE alt. 3:00-
5:00PM Real cowshit caught in yer
boots country.
WIRELESS alt. 3:00-5:O0PM
QUEER FM 6-00-8-OOPM Dedicated
to the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and
-al
of
Vancouver and listened to by
everyone. Lots of human interest
features, background on current
issues and great music from musicians
of all sexual preferences and gender
SUN
identities.
HELLO INDIA 8:00-9:00PM
GEETANJAU      9:00-10:00PM
Geetanjali features a wide range of
music from India, including classical
music, both Hindustani and Carnatic,
popular music from Indian movies from
Ihe 1930's to the 1990's, semrclassical
music such as Ghazals and Bhajans,
and also Quawwalis, folk songs, elc.
THE SHOW 10:00PM-12:00AM
Strictly Hip Hop - Strictly
Underground - Strictly Vinyl With
your hosts Mr. Checka, Flip Out & J
Swing on the 1 & 2's.
IN THE GRIP OF INCOHERENCY
12:00-4:00AM Drop yer gear and
stay up late. Naked radio for naked
people. Get bent. Love Dave. Eclectic
MON
MONDAYS
BREAKFASTWITH THE BROWNS 8:15-
11:00AM Your favourite brown-sters,
James and Peter, offer a savoury blend of
the familiar and exotic in a blend of aural
delights! Tune in and enjoy each weekly
brown plate special. Instrumental, trance,
lounge and ambience.
THE STUPID RADIO SHOW 11:00 AM-
1 KK) PM Playing a spectrum of music
from garage band to big band, acoustic
to electric.
NEEDLEPOINT 1:00-3:00PM
Mismatched flop rock, a quick ride
downtown. Don't miss the Snow White
Float. I love the Snow White Float.
THE MEAT-EATING VEGAN 3:00-
4:00PM I endeavour to feature dead air,
verbal flatulence (only when I speak), a
work of music by a twentieth-century
composer—can you say minimalist? —
and whatever else appeals to me. Fag
and dyke positive. Mail in your requests,
because I am not a humarvanswering
EVIL VS. GOOD 4K)0-5*00PM Who
will triumph? Hardcore/punk from
beyond the grave.
BBC WORLD NEWS SERVICE 5:00-
5:30PM
BIRDWATCHERS 5:30-6:00PM Join
the Sports department for their eye
on the T-birds.
HANS KLAUS' MISERY HOUR alt.
6*00-7:00PM Mixofmostdepressing,
unheard and unlistenable melodies, tunes
and voices.
RADIO BLUE WARSAW alt. 6:00-
7:00PM Join Library queens Helen G.
and Kim on their inlo quests set to only
the best music.
HIP HOP HAVOC 7:OO-9fl0PM
THE JAZZ SHOW 9£0PM-12:00AM
Vancouver's longest running prime time
jazz program. Hosted by the ever-suave
Gavin Walker. Features at 11.
June  l:"Boss Tenor", A classic by
saxophone master Gene Ammons.
June 8: Ira Sullivan w/"Blue Stroll."
June 15:  1998 Jazz Festival focus
TUE
WED
THU
June 22: Canadian-born trumpeter/
composer Kenny Wheeler, "Siren's
Song."
June 29: Pianist / compsoer Mai
Waldron with soprano saxophonist
Steve Lacy and The Super Quartet.
DRUM'N" SPACE 12:00-4:00AM
Vancouver's only drum 'n' bass show.
Futuristic urban breakbeatat 160bpm.
TUESDAYS
J-POP WONDERLAND 6:30-8:30 AM
Japanese early morning imports!
AROUND THE MIDDUE EAST IN AN
HOUR8:30-9:30AMMiddleeaslern
music for your morning drive.
THIRD TIME'S THE CHARM 9:30-
11:30AM Torrid trash-rock, sleazy
surf and pulsatin' punk provide the perfect
scissor kick to your head every Tuesday
man. There's no second chance when
Kung-Fu is used for evil with drunken fist
Bryce. Kilfyaa!!!!
FIVE HOUR LUNCH 11:30AM-
1:00PM "Have a rock V roll
McDonald's for lunch today!"
POLYFILLER 2KX)-3:30PM
TWO WORDS: AVANT GARDE FOLK.
LADY DEATHSTRIKE'S BENTO 3:30-
5:00PM Power to the people! Feminist
FRI
news, hiphop Iracks, lesbionic rock and
sushi galore!
DIGESTIVE TRACKS 6:00-7KX)PM
Underground hip hop music. Live on-air
mixing by DJ Flipout. Old school to next
school tracks. Chew on that shit.
THE UNHEARD MUSIC 7:00-
9:00PM Meat the unherd where
the unheard and the hordes of hardly
herd are heard, courtesy of host and
demo director Dale Sawyer. Herd
up! New music, independent bands.
RITMO LATINO 9:00-10:00PM Get
on board Vancouver's only tropical
fiesta express with your loco hosts
Rolando, Romy, and Paulo as they
shake it and wiggle it to the latest in
Salsa, Merengue, Cumbia and other
fiery fiesta favourites. Latin music so
hot it'll give you a tan! jjRADIO
SABROSA!!
WITCHDOCTOR HIGHBALL alt.
10*O0PM-12KX)AM Noise, ambient,
electronic, hip hop, free jazz, christian
better living Ip's, the occasional amateur
radio play, whatever.
AURAL TENTACLES 12KJ0AM-VERY
LATE Warning: This show is moody
and unpredictable. It encourages
insomnia and may prove to be hazard-
SAT
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BBC
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suburban
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Breakfast
with the
Browns
around the
middle east
teenage
dream date
the  last  desk
Steve G.
third time's
the charm
DISKAL
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STUPID
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Five
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Lunch
CANADIAN
LUNCH
MOCKERS
SHOW
love
sucks
These are the
breaks
wonderland
needlepoint
Colonel Sander's
Hicaeoiat
Steve and Mike
POWER
CHORD
B.A.
Sugarcube Factory
Justin's  t i rb e
Little
Twin
Stars
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BLOOD 0]S TJJE
SADDLE
ThcMeat-f^linSVc&n
motor
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FLEX
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Luckv
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CADY
DEATWSTRIKE'S
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c-sotcriK/
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Out For Kicks
Far East
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Alrican Rhythms
BADIO
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hip hop havoc
THE UNHEARD
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on air with
greased hair
Hello India
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KITMO LATINO
Folk Oasis
LIVE  FROM
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Venus
Flytrap/
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20 June 1998 ous to your health. Listener discretion is
advised. Ambient, ethnic, funk, pop,
dance, punk, electronic, synth, blues,
and unusual rock.
WEDNESDAYS
SUBURBAN JUNGLE 6:30-9*00AM
Some cheese for your morning bagel
DIGITAL ALARM CHRONOMETER
10*OOAM-12:OOPM electronic
LOVE SUCKS 12-00-2-00PM Music at
work. (Cut up mixed genres — eclectic,
electric included but not mandatory).
MOTORDADOY 3:00-5rf>0PM "eat,
sleep, ride, listen to Motordaddy,
repeat."
NOOZE 5*00PM-5:30PM
On vacation.
RACHEL'S SONG 5:30-6*00PM Info
on health and the environment, with a
focus on Vancouver. Topics ranging
from recycling and conservation projects
to diet, health, and consuption and
sustainability in the urban context.
Comments and ideas are welcome.
ESOTERIKalt.6:00-7:30PMAmbient/
electronic/industrial/ethnic/
experimental music for those of us who
know about the illithids.
SOLID STATE alt. 6:00-7:30PM
Featuring the latest in techno, trance,
acid and progressive house.
Spotlights on local artists, ticket
giveaways, & live performances.
Hosted by M-Path.
AND SOMETIMES WHY alt. 7:30-
9:00PM dirty three, longstocking,
nutter butters... these are a few of
our fave-oh-writ things, la la lal
MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW alt.
7:30-9:00PM    Girl music of all '
shapes and sizes.
FOLK OASIS 9HX)-10:00PM The
show that's not afraid to call itself
folk. Featuring the best in local and
international acoustic-roots music:
Singer-songwriters, Cajun, Celtic and
beyond!
STRAIGHT OUTTA JALLUNDHAR
10*00PM-12*O0AMletDJsJindwa
and Bindwa immerse you in radioactive Bhungra! "Chakkh de phutay."
Listen to all our favourite Punjabi
tunes — remixes and originals. Brraaaahl
OPEN SEASON 12*00- 4:00AM
Mixed bag of suprises coming your
THURSDAYS
THE ARMO CONNECTION   6:30-
8:30AM Bringing you the best in west
coast rap.
THE LAST DESK 8:30-10:00AM Listen
carefully as Johnny B brings you
CiTR's  classical   music   show.
Featuring Canadian composers,
amateur hour & more. Radio con
fuoco, for the masses.
FlUBUSTERalt. 10*00-1 l:30AMFrom
accordiantofhebackwoodsvia swingin'
lounge sounds... this show is a genre
free zone.
MUSIC FOR ROBOTS alt. 10:00-
11:30AM Viva La Robotica Revolution.
Estrogen-charged robots on Planet
Noiz.
CANADIAN LUNCH    11:30AM-
1:00PM From Tofino lo Gander, Baffin
Island to Portage La Prairie. TheallCanadian
soundtrack for your midday snack!
SIEVE & MIKE 1-00-2-OOPM Crashing
ihe boys' club in the pit. Hard and fast,
heavy and slow. Listen to it, baby.
(hardcore).
JUSTIN'S TIME 2-00-3-OOPM Serving
up your weekly dose of Shirley Horn and
other jazz-filled confections.
FLEX YOUR HEAD 3:00-5:00PM
Hardcore and punk rock since 1989.
www.geocities.com/SunsetStrip/
club/6479/
BBC WORLD NEWS SERVICE  5:00-
5:30PM
ENTERTAINMENT DESK alt. 5:30-
6:00PM Movie reviews and criticism.
OUT FOR KICKS 6*00-7:30PM No
Birkenstocks, nothing politically correct.
We don't get paid so you're damn right
we have fun wilh it. Hosted by Chris B.
ON AIR WITH GREASED HAIR 7:30-
9:00PM Roots of rock & roll.
UVE FROM THUNDERBIRD RADIO
HELL 9*00-11-OOPM Local muzak
from 9. Live bandz from 10-11.
SLIPPERY SLOT 11:00PM-1:00AM
Farm animals, plush toys and Napalm
Death. These are a few of my favourite
things. It's all about shootin' the shit and
rock n' roll, baby.
FRIDAYS
CAUGHT IN THE RED 6:30-8:30AM
garage rock and other things.
VENUS FLYTRAP'S LOVE DEN 8:30-
10:00AM Join Greg in the love den
for a cocktail. We'll hear retro stuff,
groovy jazz, and thicker stuff too.
See you here ... and bring some ice.
SKATS SCENE-IK DRIVE! 10:00AM-
12:00PM Scotty and Julie, playing
the music that gets them dancing and
singing in the DJ booth... (no, really!)
LITTLE TWIN STARS 2:0O-3:30PM
Underground, experimental, indie and
women. Jacuzzi space rock at its finest.
NARDWUAR THE HUMAN SERVIETTE PRESENTS... 3:30-4:00PM
NOIZ 4KK)-5KX)PM seMed.
NOOZE 5:00-5:30PM On vacation
FAR EAST SIDE SOUNDS alt. 6:00-
9:00PM Sounds of the transpacific
underground, from west Java to east Detroit.
Sound system operator, Don Chow.
AFRICAN RHYTHMS alt. 6:00-
9:00PM David "Love" Jones brings
you the best new and old jazz, soul,
Latin, samba, bossa & African music
from around the world.
HOMEBASS 9:00PM-12:00AM The
original live mixed dance program in
Vancouver. Hosted by DJ Noah, the
main focus of the show is techno, but
also includes some trance, acid, tribal,
etc. Guest DJ's, interviews,
retrospectives, giveaways, and more
are part of the flavour of homebass.
LIMP SINK 12:00-6:30AM The show
that does not hate you. Lullabies for
the christ-child with Mister G42 and
the late Postman Pat. (Industrial-
ex per i m ental-psych edeiic-noise-
gothic — complete with a German-
English dictionary and a shiny space
suit). Alternates weeks with Tobias'
Paradigm Shift (Rant, phone-in and
kiss your mother with the guests).
1:00PM All kinds of music spoken
word, interviews. Phone in for comments
or requests.Tune in and expose yourself
to new music and ideas.
POWERCHORD 1:00-3:00PM
Vancouver's only true metal show;
local demo tapes, imports and other
rarities. Gerald Rattlehead and Metal
Ron do the damage.
LUCKY SCRATCH 3:00-5:00PM
Blues and blues roots with your hosts
Anna and AJ.
RADIO FREE AMERICA 6:00-
8:00PM Join host Dave Emory and
colleague Nip Tuck for some extraordinary political research guaranteed to
make you think. Originally broadcast
on KFJC (Los Altos, Cal.).
LIVEI AT THE HI-HAT!! alt.
10:00PM-1:00AM "Live!-shows
and bands — admission $6.00 —
Performers are subject to change."
REBEL JAZZ alt. 10:00PM-1:00AM
High. Low. In the middle. All around.
Sense. Nonsense. Happy. Sad.
Context. Truth. Lies. Shiva. Shava.
None of the above. All of the above.
And a sea of synthesis.
EARWAXalt. 1:00AM-DAWN "Little
bit of drum, bit of bass and a whole
lot of noize." Late-night radio
soundclash destined to fist you hard.
Zine features, phat experimental
chunes, and the occasional turntable
symphony. "Money, we'll rock you
on 'til the break of dawn."—G. Smiley
CiTR
101,9 fi
it's the mary tyler moore Jf   show!
Harry Hertsd
Thomas Hicks
SATURDAYS
THE SATURDAY EDGE   8:00AM-
12:00PM   Music you won't
anywhere else, studio guests,
releases, British comedy sketche
Production    Shane Vander Meer
Programming Namiko Ku
Ala Hussey
i        AEsonCole
folk
:alendc
icke?
giveaways,  plus  World Cup
Report at 11:30 AM. 8-9AM:
African/World roots. 9AM-12PM:
Celtic music and performances.
LICORICE   ALLSORTS   12:00-
.. Linda Scholten
Traffic Klaudia Zapala
Vice President       Jerome Yang
Volunteer Coordinator Anna Friz
punk, post-
rock, pop,
up,
down,
or just
every
which way
but
bad news,
it's to be
found here!
sten to the good
grrrl soundz of the
mary tyler moore
show, Wednesday
mornings 9-10...
and, starting June
17th, Wednesday
evenings 7:30-9,
alternating with
And Sometimes
Why.
2i ijmgsmm CiTR
charts
1=14
WHAT'S BEING PLAYED ON 101.9 FM
June 98
Long
Vinyl
June 98 Short Vinyl
1        evaporators/goblin
i gotta rash
nardwuar/mint
1        junior varsity              pep rally rock!                   twist like this
2       fugazi
end hits
dischord
2       bonfire madigan       s/t                                                           k
3       murder city devils
s/t                         die
young stay pretty
3       bunnygrunt/rizzo     split 7"                                        kittyboo
4       various artists
selector dub narcotic
k
4       the cannanes             it's a fine line                               harriet
5       gaze
mitsumeru
k
5       gaze                         seedless                                               k
6      chixdiggit!
born on the first of July     honest don's
6       the murder city devils  dancing shoes     die young stay pretty
7       perfume tree
feeler
world domination
7       sleater kinney...             free to fight                            candyass
8       calexico
the black light
quarterstick
8       mant from u.n.c.l.e. friends to none                      lance rock
9       tullycraft
city of subarus
cher doll
9       the go devils              end                                                  feline
10     david kristian
cricklewood
alien8
10    the kiss offs                how to deliver ihe kiss that kills    peek-a-boo
11     saboteurs
espionage garage
american pop
11     kitty craft                     kitty craft                                            rover
12     red aunts
ghetto blaster
epitaph
12    sarah dougher          s/t                                                           k
13    red monkey
make the moment
slampt
13    myiavajrte/mad planet   split                                                harriet
14    makeup
in mass mind
dischord
14    various artists            fireworks                                              ihl
15    the beans
portage
zulu
15    local rabbits              pops & company             murderecords
16    godspeed you ...
f#a#~
kranky
16    ladies who lunch       everybody's happy ...        grand royal
17    dirty three
ocean songs
touch & go
17    the colorifics              vista cruiser                      collective fruit
18    weakerthans
fallow           g-7 welc
oming committee
18    jale                             true what you say                sealed fate
19    various artists
funkungfusion
ninja tune
19    melt-banana!              s/t                                         slap a ham
20    braid
frame & canvas
polyvinyl
20    tullycraft/rizzo          split 7"                                          harriet
kill rock stars
jade tree
22 bangs
23 sloan
24 Joan of arc
tiger beat
navy blues
how memory works
third time's the charm top ten
25    little red car wreck
motor like a mother
yoyo
tuesdays      9:30-11:303111
26    veda hille
here is a picture
page
1    new bomb turks                                                         at ropes end LP
27    compound red
always a  pleasure
desoto
2    murder city devils                                                dancing shoes 7"
28    tortoise
tnt
thrill jockey
3   the hookers                                                       salon's highway IP
29    new bomb turks
at rope's end
epitaph
4   chixdiggitl/groovie ghoulies                            live@starfish room
30    quasi
featuring "birds"
up
5    the vendettas                                                                            s/t LP
31     June of 44
four great points
quarterstick
6   avail                                                                      over the james LP
32    forecasts farewell
s/t
independent
7   gasoline                                                                let's go harley 7"
33    various artists
girl crazy!
remedial
8    the chosen                                                                  new world 7"
34    massive attack
mezzanine
virgin
9   tight bros                                                            take you higher 7"
35    dianogah
as seen from above
ohiogold
10 gearhead                                                                         zine #7
HOW THE CHARTS WORK .
The monthly charts are compiled based on the number of times a CD/LP
("long vinyl"), 7" ("short vinyl"), or demo tape ("indie home jobs") on CiTR's
playlist was played by our djs during the previous month (ie, "June" charts
reflect airply in May). Weekly charts can be received via email. Send mail to
"majordomo@unixg.ubc.ca" with the command: subscribe citr-charts*
June 98 Indie Home Jobs
1        full sketch
sketchersize
2       captain cook and the nootka sc
und             i'm glad for you
3       run chico run
pusha girl
4       london paris
unmatched sock
5       the self esteem project
you and your crew
6       the dirtmitts
amaze me
7       the tremolo falls
twister
8       verona
war towers
9       emulsifier
up the down side
10    the go devils
trigger me
11     the hounds of buskerville
blowin' off some steam
12    dreamy angel
laundromatte queen
13    thee goblins
golden tokens
14    touch & gos
campus radio boy
15    the dirtmitts
wee turtles
16    all purpose
not fuckin' fair
17    reserve 34
sixteen, clumsy and shy
18    thee pirates
the pirate song
19    jP5
fuzzyhead pills
20    celestial magenta
in return
•tuft
%**
e\
what we listened to ...
inbreds (winning hearts) • promise ring (nothing feels
good) • fugazi (end hits) • sloan (navy blues)
• huevos rancheros (endsville) • versus (two cents
plus tax) • Jessica bailiff (even in silence) •
supergrass • rufus wainwright (s/t) • daau (we need
new animals) • secret stars (genealogies)
filibuster
top
ten
overplayed albums
thursdays
alt.
1 O :
oo-ii:3oam
1    bongwater
power      of      pussy]
2   sook-yin lee
lavinia's tongue
3   v/a
planet squeezebox
4   captain beefheart
trout mask replica
5   big rude jake
blue pariah
6   calexico
spoke
7   black cabbage
"F160"
(ok, sc
it's a song, not an album)
8   zolty cracker
flush
9   anything
,
by freakwater
lOwaco brothers
cowboy in flames
live! at the hi-hat! top ten (more or less)
s a t u r d a y's     alt.     io:oopm-iam
1    suicide                                            23    minutes    over    brusselsl
2   fugazi
end          hitsl
3   marlon magas
them any moods of\
4   murder city devils
"dancin'        shoes']
5   transom
surveillance and cybotron
6   the make-up
inmassmindl
7    ...and you will know u
s by the trail of dead        "when we begin to steal'
8   pan american
s/t\
9   evan lurie
"love lost'l
10 shellac
"didn't we derseve a look at you...'
discorder top  ten  chocolates
2 bar
3 milk
U   truffle
5    easter bunny
VO    doughnut
covered coffee beans
pecan pie
10 bittersweet
22 June 1998 Datebook.
WHAT'S HAPPENING IN JUNE
MAY FRI 29 Los Lobos@Piaza of Nations; Christine
Duncan@WISE Hall; Velvet@Chameleon; Tara Maclean,
Sean Macdonald, Dreamlogic@Victory;
NewMusicWest@various venues
SAT 30 Matthew Herbert@Sonar; Maggini String
Quartet@Roundhouse; Crash@Chameleon; Thrill Squad,
Hyperpsyche,      Earthboy@Van      Press      Club;
Brundlefly@Starfish; NewMusic West@various venues
SUN 31 Vancouver Rape Relief & Women's Shelter
20th Annual Walkathon@Stanley Park; Vancouver New
Music Ensemble@Vogue
JUNE MON 1 Jazz Fish@Naam
TUE    2    Breathe    Underwater,    Sometimes   Y,
Glimmer@Starfish
WED 3 Enema, Vinyl, Phrapp@Starfish
THU 4 Mike Watt & the Black Gang Crew, Kinnie
Starr@Starfish
FRI 5 Versus, Elevator Through, Tremolo Falls@Starfish;
Citroen, Mi Novia@Brickyard; Friday Fest: Forecasts
Farewell, Fridge Art Tiara, Paradigm Shift, Graphic
Nature, Truck@Minoru Pavillion; 2nd Annual Int'l
Sasquatch Symposium@lnternational House, UBC; People Playing Music@ltalian Cultural Centre; Deadcats,
Rocky Craig@Railway       ^
SAT 6 Paul Kelly, Bob Kemmis@Starfish; Esthero@Sonar;
2nd Annual Int'l Sasquatch Symposium@Freddy Wood
Theatre, UBC; Trenchant, Malchiks@Railway
SUN 7 CiTR PRESENTS: Tortoise, Isotope
217@Palladium; 2nd Annual Int'l Sasquatch
Symposium@Freddy Wood Theatre, UBC
The Abyss 315 E. Broadway (side entrance) 488 6219
Anderson's Restaurant (Jazz on the Creek) 684 3777
Anza Club 3 W. 8th (Mount Pleasant) 876 7128
Arts Hotline 684 2787
Bassix 217W.Hastings (atCambie) 689 7734
Backstage Lounge  1585 Johnston (Granville Island) 687 1354
Black Sheep Books 2742 W. 4th (at MacDonald) 732 5087
The Blinding Light 256 E. Georgia (between Main & Gore)
The Brickyard 315 Carrall St. 685 3978
Cafe Deux Soleils 2096 Commercial (the Drive) 254 1195
Cafe Vieux Montreal 317 E. Broadway (Mount Pleasant)     873 1331
Caprice Theatre 965 Granville (Granville Mall) 683 6099
Celebrities 1022 Davie (at Burrard) 689 3180
Chameleon Urban Lounge 801 W. Georgia (Downtown) 669 0806
Chan Centre for the Performing Arts 6265 Crescent Rd (UBC)
Club Mardi Gras 398 Richards St. 687 5007
CN Imax Theatre 999 Canada Place 682 4629
Columbia Hotel 303 Columbia (at Cordova) 683 3757
Commodore Lanes 838 Granville (Granville Mall) 681 1531
Cordova Cafe 307 Cordova  (Gastown) 683 5637
Crosstown Traffic 316 W. Hastings (downtown) 669 7573
Denman Place Cinema   1030 Denman  (West End) 683 2201
Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Garden Main Hall 578 Carrall St. 662 3207
DV8 515 Davie (downtown) 682 4388
Firehall Arts Centre 80 E. Cordova  (at Main) 689 0926
Food Not Bombs Vancouver 872 6719
Frederic Wood Theatre (UBC) 822 2678
Garage Pub 2889 E. Hastings  (downtown) 822 9364
Gastown Theatre 36 Powell  (Gastown) 684 MASK
The Gate  1176 Granville (downtown) 688 8701
Greg's Place 45844 Yale Rd. (Chilliwack) 795 3334
The Grind Gallery 4124 Main (Mt. Pleasant) 322 6057
SUBMISSIONS TO DATEBOOK ARE FREE!
TO HAVE YOUR EVENT LISTED, FAX ALL THE RELEVANT INFO (WHO, WHERE, WHEN) TO
822 9364, ATTENTION "DATEBOOK." DEADLINE FOR THE JULY ISSUE IS JUNE 15TH!
MON  8  Big  Bad Voodoo Daddy, Jazzmanian
Devils@Richard's on Richards; Comedy Train: Dave
Nystrom, Duncan Minette@Railway Club
TUE 9 Shania Twain, Leahy@GM Place
WED 10 Larry VoienDuo@Naam
THU 11 Unit, Threat from Outer Space, Bill's Psychotic
Mother@Starfish
FRI 12 Roadside Monument, Rot:lronsmile, Fridge Art
Tiara, Forecasts Farewell@The Space; Woebegone,
Rootabeggars@Starfish; Surfdusters,
Saddlesores@Railway
SAT    13   CiTR   PRESENTS:    Dirty   Three,
Calexico@Starfish
MON 15JazzFish@Naam
TUE 16 Bruce Jefferson@Naam
WED  17 K's Choice, The Tories@Starfish; Richie
Furay@Rtchard's
THU 18 Hum@Starfish
FRI     19    NOW    Orchestra@Western     Front;
Molestics@Whip; Wynton Marsalis@Orpheum; Mollies
Revenge, Edgar@Railway
SAT 20 CiTR PRESENTS: lnbreds@Starfish; Ray
Condo and His Ricochets, New York Jimmy and the Vic
Storm and the Cabaret Girls@Waldorf Hotel; Mollies
Revenge, Edgar@Railway
MON 22 Becca Jane@Naam
TUE 23 Unsane, Kittens, Closed Caption Radio@Starfish
WED 24 Garage Rock Nite with The Spitfires@Starfish;
Time of Her Life: Daisy Duke@Jupiter Cafe
THU 25 Swervedriver, Bardo Pond, Transistor Sound
& Lighting Co.©Starfish; The Emptys@Railway
FRI 26 Destroyer, Gaze@Vancouver Press Club; Jungle, Bionic, Tricky Woo@Starfish
SAT 27 CiTR PRESENTS: Duotang, Weakerthans,
Plumtree@Starfish; Hard Rubber
Orchestra@Performance Works
MON 29 Jesus Lizard, Firewater@Starfish; Grrrls with
Guitars: Calliope, Anne Leader, Monica Lee@Railway
Club; Man or Astroman@Doublewide, Bellingham
TUE 30 All, Hagfish, Zeke@Starfish
SPECIAL EVENTS
Spring! 2nd Annual Vancouver
International New Music Festival
A rare chance to experience the best and
most innovative composers today! Featuring orchestras, ensembles, & guest soloists
performing 48 new works and 19 world premieres; plus feature artist, James MacMillan.
Runs Friday, May 29-Saturday, June 6 at
various venues. For info, 606.6440 or
www.newmusic.org
Modern Abstract Paintings 1984-1996
James K-M presents his first solo exhibition
in 8 years, featuring bold, abstract paintings
in oil and acrylic on wood and canvas. Runs
May 29-June 19 at Moon Base, 231 Carrall
St. Fore more info, 608.0913
du Maurier International Jazz Festival
The Coastal Jazz and Blues Society continues to bring to Vancouver a diverse collection of jazzy talent. Catch new music faves,
old standards, and more! Runs June 19-28
at various venues around the lower mainland, plus free shows in Gastown. Jazz
hotline: 872.5200
VENUES • BARS • THEATERS • RESTAURANTS • RECORD STORES
Hollywood Theatre 3123 W Broadway (Kitsilano) 738 3211
Hot Jazz Society 2120 Main  (Mt. Pleasant) 873 4131
It's A Secret 1221 Granville St. (downtown) 688 7755
Jericho Arts Centre  1600 Discovery (Pt. Grey) 224 8007
Jupiter Cafe & Billiards      1216 (near Demon St)
La Quena  1111 Commercial  (the Drive) 2516626
The Lotus Club 455 Abbott (Gastown) 685 7777
Lucky's 3972 Main 875 9858
Luv-A-Fair 1275 Seymour (downtown) 685 3288
Mars 1320 Richards (downtown) 230 MARS
Maximum Blues Pub  1176 Granville (downtown) 688 8701
Medialuna  1926 W Broadway
Minoru Pavillion     7191 Granville (Richmond)
Moon Base Gallery 231 Carrall St. (gastown) 608.0913
Mora 6 Powell (Gastown) 689 0649
Naam Restaurant 2724 W 4th Ave (kitsilano) 738 7151
Old American Pub 928 Main (downtown) 682 3291
Orpheum Theatre Smithe & Seymour (downtown) 665 3050
Pacific Cinematheque  1131 Howe (downtown) 688 3456
Palladium (formerly Graceland) 1250 Richards (downtown) 688 2648
Paradise 27 Church  (New West) 525 0371
Paradise Cinema 919 Granville  (Granville Mall) 681 1732
Park Theatre 3440 Cambie (South Vancouver) 876 2747
Picadilly Pub 630 W. Pender (at Seymour) 682 3221
Pitt Gallery 317 W. Hastings (downtown) 6816740
Plaza Theatre 881 Granville (Granville Mall) 685 7050
Purple Onion  15 Water St. (gastown) 602 9442
Queen Elizabeth Theatre Hamilton & Georgia 665 3050
Raffels Lounge   1221 Granville (downtown) 473 1593
The Rage 750 Pacific Blvd. South  (Plaza of Nations) 685 5585
Railway Club 579 Dunsmuir (at Seymour) 681 1625
Richard's On Richards  1036 Richards (downtown) 687 6794
Ridge Cinema  3131 Arbutus (at 16th Ave.)
Russian Hall 600 Campbell  (Chinatown)
Scratch Records  109 W. Cordova (Gastown)
Seylynn Hall   605 Mountain Hwy (North Van)
Shadbolt Centre for the Arts 6450 Deer Lake Ave. (Bby)
Sonar 66 Water (Gastown)
Southhill Candy Shop 4198 Main  (at 26th)
Squish'd Knish 4470 Main (at 29th)
The Space 316 Hastings (downtown)
Starfish Room  1055 Homer (downtown)
Starlight Cinema 935 Denman  (West End)
Station Street Arts Centre 930 Station  (off Main)
St. Regis Hotel 602 Dunsmiur (downtown)
StoneTemple Cabaret  1082 Granville St. (downtown)
Sugar Refinery   1115 Granville (downtown)
Theatre E  254 E. Hastings (Chinatown)
Thunderbird Ent. Centre 120 W. 16th St. (N. Van)
Vancouver E. Cultural Centre  1895 Venables (at Victoria)
Vancouver Little Theatre 3102 Main  (Mt. Pleasant)
Vancouver Press Club 2215 Granville  (S.Granville)
Varsity Theatre 4375 W. 10th  (Point Grey)
Vert/Washout   1020 Granville  (dowtown)
Video In Studios  1965 Main  (Mt. Pleasant)
Virgin Mega Store 788 Burrard (at Robson)
Vogue Theatre 918 Granville (Granville Mall)
Waterfront Theatre   1405 Anderson  (Granville Is.)
Western Front (303 E. 8th Ave)
Whip Gallery 209 E. 6th Ave (at Main)
W.I.S.E. Hall  1882Adanac (the Drive)
Women In Print 3566 W 4th  (Kitsilano)
Yale Blues Pub  1300 Granville (downtown)
Zulu Records! 869 W. 4th  (Kitsilano)
738 6311
874 6200
687 6355
291 6864
683 6695
876 7463
879 9017
682 4171
689 0096
688 3312
681 8915
988 2473
254 9578
876 4165
738 7015
222 2235
872 2999
872 8337
669 2289
331 7909
685 6217
876 9343
254 5858
732 4128
681 9253
738 3232 EXHIBITING THIS JUNE AT ZULU
ome O^ Out ^avoutlte jAttlsts 3n T^escdence
ARAB STRAP
Philophobia CD/2LP
Recently discovered at the Glasgow Art College, Matador Records wasted
no time in inking these stark popsters to a North American deal. Here
joined by members of Belle & Sebastian, this duo's sparse sound quietly
queries the edges of love, despair, and the ebbing tides of procreation (read
shagging!). A lyrically brilliant listen, sure to arouse any curiosity!
CD 16.98    2LP 14.98
CALEXICO
The Black Light cd/lp
Zulu favourites and Arizona's famous sons, CALEXICO will be visiting Zulu
and performing in the store on Saturday June 13 @ 5:30 prior to their
evening show at the Starfish Room with The Dirty Three. The Black Light
shines its dark glow on the ambient side of country as John Convertino and
Joey Burns mix border radio instrumentals, moody acoustic numbers and
mariachi to carry you off on a giant river of sand. Truly beautiful. Don't miss
the opportunity to see one of the most celebrated rhythm sections of the
past decade perform within the cozy four walls of Zulu Records and shine
their Black Light on you!
CD 16.98    LP 12.98
SNUFF
Tweet Tweet My Love cd/lp
Ever-consistent punkers, SNUFF returns to the Fat Wreck Chords
frying pan with another strong outing of "bankers'n'mash"
punk/pop. Following up Demmamusabebonk. this new platter features 14 songs waiting to rub you out!
CD 16.98      LP12.98 PS... Vinyl available late June
ROCKET FROM THE CRYPT
RFTCCD
Rock music has its share of talented tunesmiths and arrangers. If
you haven't already heard of him, get ready to add ROCKET front
man John Reis to the list. He's good, very good. Not to mention the
rest of the band; they do what's right, true and necessary (oh those
horns). And these boys are stylish enough to receive U.K. press too.
They deserve it, if only for their haircuts and clothes. If Elvis, Tommy
James, Boyce and Heart, Brian Wilson, Burt Bacharach, Phil
Spector, Barry Gordy, etc. were all hip to garage rock, then they'd be
into RFTC. This is it. RFTC have got the soul.
CD 16.98  Available June 2nd
ANION TOBIN
Permutation CD
!   TOBIN s first Ninja Tune record Bricolage was a top choice here at Zulu;
I we all loved it. Permutation keeps up the jazzy drum and bass goodness.
|   And with more sophisticated and engaging song structures, things have got-
:■  ten even better — TOBIN doesn't bother to trudge along the expected rou-
:   tines of the genre. A very fine "turn" to hear.
;   CD 16.98  Available first week of June
JEFF BUCKLEY
Sketches For My Sweetheart
The Drunk 2CD
With mixed emotions, this much anticipated posthumous 2CD collection
of song "sketches" arrives to our ears. Documenting much of the
I  recording sessions prior to his tragic death, we are here given a glimpse of
JEFF BUCKLEY'S sublime world. A songbird'with pure goals, survived by
s  music in all its emotional complexity, his song is ours.
2CD 26.98  Abo available: 3LP import, $46.98
DUOTANG
The Cons & The Pros CD
From the land of cheap beer at the Royal Albert comes Winnipeg's
tangy duo with their sophomore effort, twelve songs that contin-
l  ue up the escalator from where their debut album, Smash The
Ships And liaise The Beams, left off. Engineered and produced by
j  TO hall-of-famer Brenndan McGuire, The Cons _ The Pros adds
horns, organ and dynamic vocal harmonies to the equation.
;  DUOTANG plays the Starfish Room on Saturday June 27 with
Plumtree and The Weakerthans, preceded by a Zulu Records in-
store performance on Wednesday June 24 @ 4:30.
CD 14.98
NICK CAVE & THE BAD SEEDS
The Best Of CD
NICK CAVE & THE BAD SEEDS The Best Of spans the moods and
modes of one of the most prolific and influential songsmiths in
j  recent history. After umpteen albums and a book or two, this pur-
j  veyor of the dark and dreary has decided what he deems his best
|  songs and it's all on one CD. A great starting point for all those
;  who've wondered and a must have for all those who know.
CD 16.98
GIRLS VS BOYS
Freakonica CD
Dark, dirty, sexy, urban and suave, the boys of GVSB know how to
move your ass: with big bottomed grooves, of course.
Freakonica is a major label debut that fulfills the momentum and
promise of GVSB's indie discography. Yes indeed, the beats get big
and loud, and the rock hooks are good and solid — like you like 'em
to be. And no, they're not a dance outfit, but you'll give it up anyway.
GVSB satisfy your urges.
CD 16.98
SERGE GAINSBOURG
L'Histoire De Melody Nelson CD (reissue)
Best known for his notorious song Je T'Aime...Moi Non Plus —
which features the sexy breathing and moaning of Jane Birkin —
GAINSBOURG is now receiving renewed interest; his time has come
again. For example, both Jarvis Cocker and Mick Harvey pay him
tribute, and emulate his cultured persona, style and iconoclasm. Also
recognized as a prolific songwriter for other artists, GAINSBOURG s
own renderings have considerable charm: they are seductive, urbane
and intelligent. Come get aquainted with this fount of suavity and
taste.
CD 16.98
MORE MORE MORE I
| PLASTICMAN Consumed CD
I BILL LASWELL Oscillations 2 CO
I PETER GREEN The Robert Johnson Songbock CO
I various artists Burt Bacharach Songbook cd
Rx Bedside Toxicology CD
I BARRY ADAMSON Can't Get Loose CD-EP/12"
I JOAN OF ARC How Memory Works CD/LP
I PROJECT 2 Space Groove 2CDs
l ST. ETIENNE Good Humour CD/2LP
Gl BLUES Gl Blues CD
l BUGHOUSE 5 Everything Must Go CD
BRADY:
BEANS Portage (still)
CUT CHEMIST MEETS
SHORTKUT VERSION 1.1 Live
@ The Futureprimitive
Sound...
REFUSED The Shape of Punk to
Come
MASSIVE ATTACK Mezzanine
CALEXICO The Black Light
DIRTY THREE Ocean Songs
DESTROYER City of Daughters
JOHN ZORN Circle Maker
CHRISTINE:
SAINT ETIENNE Good Humor
VARIOUS Funkungfusion
PIZZICATO 5 Happy at the End...
(remix)
BERNARD BUTLER People Move
On
RADIOHEAD Airbag/ How Am I
Driving?
CUT CHEMIST MEETS
SHORTKUT VERSION 1.1 Live
@ The Futureprimitive
Sound...
MASSIVE ATTACK Mezzanine
PULP This is Hardcore
OST The Knack & How to Get
it (re-issue)
VARIOUS 20th Century Blues
GRANT H:
PERE UBU Pennsylvania
PAN AMERICAN Pan American
DAVID KILGOUR And the Heavy
8's
CALEXICO The Black Light
DIRTY THREE Ocean Songs
FUGAZI End Hits
KEN:
CALIFONE Califone
BEVIS FROND North Circular
FINLEY QUAYE Maverick A
Strike
MORCHEEBA Big Calm
CALEXICO The Black Light
GASTR DEL SOL Camofleur
HAYDEN The Closer I Get
KEVIN:
QUASI Featuring "Birds"
HAI KARATE Hai Karate
NEW BOMB TURKS At Ropes
End
EVAPORATORS I Gotta Rash (w/
;   Goblins)
: VARIOUS All Punk Rods
PERNICE BROTHERS Overcome
\   By Happiness
MIKO:
BANGS Tiger Beat
ARTO LINDSAY Noon Chill
SECRET STARS Geneologies
RED MONKEY Make the
Moment
DIRTY THREE Ocean Songs
FUGAZI End Hits
SONG OHIA Impala
QUASI Featuring Birds
NIC:
IK Push The
Into the Sun
3 (yes!)
Button
SEAN LEI
BEANS P
ASTRUD new CD
LE MANS Mi Novela
Biographica
ARAB STRAP Philophilia
DONKEY ENGINE Donkey
Engine
PULP This is Hardcore
PAUL
DANKO JONES Danko Jones
VARIOUS ARTISTS The Get It!
HAGFISH new CD
LOVE AS LAUGHTER #1 USA
VARIOUS ARTISTS Pow City
ROCKET FROM THE CRYPT
RFTC
SLOAN Navy Blues
ROBYNN:
SECRET CHIEFS 3 Huroalya
EVAPORATORS I Gotta Rash
(w/ Goblins)
PRAXIS Transmutations Live
MONEY MARK Push The
Button
GERBILS Are You Sleepy
1869 W 4th Ave.
Vancouver. BC
V6J1M4
tel 738.3232
STORE HOURS
ZULU INSTORES THIS MONTH: CALEXICO Saturday J
13 @ 5:30pm... DUOTANG Wednesday June 24 @ -

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