Discorder

Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) Jun 1, 2005

Item Metadata

Download

Media
discorder-1.0050109.pdf
Metadata
JSON: discorder-1.0050109.json
JSON-LD: discorder-1.0050109-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): discorder-1.0050109-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: discorder-1.0050109-rdf.json
Turtle: discorder-1.0050109-turtle.txt
N-Triples: discorder-1.0050109-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: discorder-1.0050109-source.json
Full Text
discorder-1.0050109-fulltext.txt
Citation
discorder-1.0050109.ris

Full Text

 mad nMtgaaltieAom/ cJfa/ /0/.9/m/
Tolan McNeil Depistado Ayun Halliday
The Weakerthans 13&God The Treliks Duplex
iPod DJs Chet Nine Inch Nails The Paddingtons
AndrewAndrewAndrew Andrew Andrew Thee Exciters
And You Will Know Us by the Trail of Dead Immortal
Technique Marie Brassard The Devil LCD Soundsystem
& M.LA. Gruff Rhys The Stands Hood Wolf Eyes The
Dead Science Hrsta The Duke Spirit Great Aunt Ida
The Locust Waffles  Ex-Editor Snow Patrol The Books
June 2005 &03L
A§fO AVAILABLE;
LIMITED EDITION WITH i©*iSSa>VD
WHIli QUANTtriES LAST
WWW.GORILLAZ.COM
DiSCORDER, June 2005 That magazine from CiTR 101.9fm. June 2005.
EDITRIX
KatSiddJe
AD MANAGER
Jason Bennet
PRODUCTION AAANAGER
Dory Kornfeld
ART DICTATOR
Graeme Worthy
TA EDITOR
Vampyra Draculea
RLA EDITOR
Kimberley Day
LAYOUT & DESIGN
Graeme Worthy
Jason Bennet
Kimberley Day
Dory Kornfeld
KatSiddle
Kirsten Pudas
PRODUCTION
i    Dory Kornfeld
Graeme Worthy
Kat Siddle
Michelle Chua
Jason Bennet
Saelan Twerdy
Joceline Andersen
Caroline Walker
The Waffles
CALENDAR ART
Kirsten Pudas
ON THE DIAL
Bryce Dunn
CHARTS
Luke Meat
DATEBOOK EDITOR
Robb Sonic  .
DISTRIBUTION
Lasse Lutick
US DISTRO
Frankie Rumbletone
PUBLISHER
Student Radio Society
of UBC
FEATURES
Ayun Halliday
p.9
Great Aunt Ida
p.10
iPods Djs
P. 11
The Hip Hop Game
p. 15
Hood
p. 16
REGULARS
Perpetually Imminent Disaster p. 3
Dear Airhead p. 3
p.5
P5
p.7
P7
p.8
p. 13
p. 17
p. 18
p. 20
p.21
Charts p. 21
Program Guide p. 22
Strut Fret and Flicker
p.5
Riff Raff
P5
DJ Profile
p.7
Mix Tape
P7
Textually Active
p.8
Calendar
p. 13
Under Review
p. 17
Real Live Action
What the Hell
p. 18
p. 20
Finding Joy
p.21
Notes io this Issue:
The word "Discorder" on the cover, and on the top of this page, is.in Polonaise which
we later discovered was also all over Beck's most recent album as well. This makes me
a little sheepish thinking about how I'm 'ripping him off' or something.
The section headers for our columns are all in Chinese Rocks, which I love so very
much, mostly because it is all rough looking. It has been used all over so many posters
and so many magazines that i'm not ripping anyone off, more like contriubuting to
a long tradition.
All of this makes Adobe Jenson Pro, which also features on the cover, and for all
the bylines look a little plain. All of this makes me feel like I'm suffering.from Creeping
Font Syndrome, and I will probably die-under a mountain of type.
I took the photo on the cover with my new camera, a very nice Fuji Rnepix
e550.
The shoes are hanging from a line along the Union St. bike route
Our body font, as usual, is Century Gothic, and Future Bold n
Jl those arrogantly large flourishes a
it love to use for decoration.
© DiSCORDER 2005 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. AH rights
reserved. Circulation 17,500. Subscriptions, payable in advance, to Canadian residents are $15 for
one year, to residents of the USA are $15 US; $24 CDN elsewhere. Single copies are $2 (to cover
postage). Please make cheques or money orders payable to DiSCORDER Magazine. DEADLINES:
Copy deadline for the July issue is June 15,2005, not that any of you will care. Ad space is available
until June 27 and can be booked by calling Jason at 604.822.3017 ext. 3. Our rates are available upon
request. DiSCORDER is not responsible for loss, damage, or any other injury to unsolicited manuscripts,
unsolicited artwork (including but not limited to drawings, photographs, and transparencies), or
any other unsolicited material. Material can be submitted on disc or in type or via email. As always,
English is preferred, but we will accept French. Actually, we won't. Send email to DiSCORDER at
discorder@club.ams.ubc.ca. From UBC to Langley and Squamish to Bellingham, CiTR can be heard
at 101.9 fM as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White
Rock. Call the CiTR D J line at 822.2487, our office at 822.3017, or our news and sports lines at 822.3017
ext. 2. Fax us at 822.9364, e-mail us at: citrrhgr@mail.ams.ubc.ca, visit our web site at www.citr.ca
or just pick up a goddamn pen and write #233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1, CANADA.
SIfetuahy      j
Imminent Disaster j
DISCORDER Index tor June 2005
Letters to the Editor: 1
Months since we last published a Letter fo the Editor: 21
total inches of vinyl reviewed in Riff Raff: 35
Copies of the Mix Tape available (for free!) at the Secret Location: 5
Emails sent to Rob Brownridge imploring him to let us change "iPod" to "waffle" in his article: 2 ("At that time
you stffl couldn't play an waffle or CD player without looking like a dickhead," says Volk. "Then i heard that
photographer Ryan McGinleywas dee-jaying in New York with two waffles and no vinyl.")
Complementary iPods sent to DiSCORDER as a result of that article: 0
Total hours Mike Barrow spent combing the liner notes dHWjd's Outside Closer. 3
Age of Ida Nilsen's-Great Aunt Ida: 90
Number of people in the band Great Aunt Ida: 4
Combined age of members of Great Aunt Ida: 127 (estimated)
Number of times I re^^^bhopper by Ayun Halliday: 2
Number of times I read The Canadian Job Directory: 0
Lame day jobs Jobhopper describes in detail: 14
Subsequent months spent unemployed: 3
Fluid ounces of Malt Liquor consumed during production: 120
Estimated number of cellphone-wielding preteen gymnasts attending a conference at UBC this week: 17,000
Pre-teen dances held in the room next to the DiSCORDER office: 1
Reviews I meant to write but didn't: 5
Ratio of intended reviews vs. reviews actually completed: J 0:1
Review writers under age ten: 2
Combined ages of reviewers: 14
Child labour laws violated: 3
Total appearances of the word "pop" in this issue: 480
Times I have used lists to avoid writing anything of meaning in my editorial: 17 ^
Dear Airhead, i
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Dear Discorder,
I would like.to give my two cents on your May "GM Culture" issue. As a former editrix of the magazine,
as well as a witness/perpetrator to the various forms and modalities that 'giri'/feminist agitation has taken at
CiTR over the last ten years, I feel I can comment on this with, if not authority, then perhaps insight..
When 1 saw the announcement on the Discorder office door, long before the issue had gone into
production, that you would feature "Kathleen Hanna paper dots," my first reaction hovered between
appalled and resigned. 1 considered writing a letter then, in the hopes that it would stay your hand, but
apathy got the better of me and I butted out. Seeing that you've gone through with it, this is why I think that
the paper dolls were a bad idea:
RximJng Kathleen as a "patron saint" in your editorial, you effectively de-person her and make her
body, face, and image available for your own purposes. Putting aside the sex work baggage that has
followed her throughout her career (as she has mentioned in interviews, the fact that she worked as a
stripper during the early years of BUdni Kill was manipulated by the music press to strip her of her privacy
and imply that her body was therefore 'public domain")—why should a representation of her body do the
labour of explaining/symbolizing feminism for your readers? This strikes me as a singularly lazy and uninspired.
I know that there are dozens of intelligent, creative, feminist women (and men) writing for Discorder. Why
is appropriating someone else's body p assume without permission) a better editorial decision than giving
those writers the centre spread to create a real dialogue about "girl culture," as you call it?
As someone who personally struggled with the politfcs and pragmatics of puttwig together "women's
issues" for Discorder, I know how difficult it can be to satisfy all parties involved—including the many women
and men at CiTR who object to the notion of women's issues altogether. Those differences of opinion should
be fuel for debate, and should provide the energy for a reframing of how we tackle gender, representation,
sexuality and inequality on the radio and in print. Falling back on cheap symbolics and idol worship is too
easy.
On a more positive note, kudos for the great interviews with Jean Grae and Betti Forde.
Yours truly,
Barbara Andersen
Discorder. June 2005 — page 3 imU&ClTR E*,4. *****
ureseu* JUi-   -O
thursday june 9th
po girl
Tour Kick Off Party
with BOTTLENECK
and special guests
JT & THE CLOUDS
from Chicago
friday june 17th
a sheep at the wheel
11/ /        In
b/end
CO Release Party
with SECOND &
Stealing From Alexander
7PM EARLY SHOW
Saturday june 18th
a sheep at the wheel
hot
breakfast
CD ^Release Party
With JTHE SKATOMATICS
& ChHdren of Celebrities
Vancouver CD Release
Sunday June 19th
mani khaira
from Toronto with BEN SIGSTON
Vitus & Andrew Carter
bhe media club
695 CAMBIE ST.    604-608-2871   www.themedlaclub.ca
wKundmendent musicians unite.
^^^^^Brimuproductions.com for full show details
Red Cat Records
4307 jXain St.
Mew & Used CDs & Vinyl
ph. 708:94$|||temail buddy*redeat.ca
DiSCORDER, June 2005 By Bryce Dunn
gsg^p.
r'^^i^JI
I.  .^^p''
"z^1*' . ,^.^-$#>'
Hey kids, just back from Britain I am with a brand new
stack o' wax to share so we're gonna keep it in the
family and confine ourselves to jolly ol' England for this
column, beginning with a return visit from London's
The Treliks. Readers may remember months back
me fawning over their first 7", a cartoonish blend of
garage and punk with swirling organ and b-movie
kitsch. Well, the kids have toned down the sugar
buzz a little on their second outing, with "Stereo"
brandishing comparisons to the Thin White Duke [as
someone commented when I spun this at my regular
DJ night) doing disco-punk (yeah I hate that "term"
too, but whaddya gonna do?). I hear some Stranglers .
or Fall-like influences in there too, but it's still catchy
enough and "Hackney Girls" tears a. page from The
Buzzcocks songbook with a tune about fast-living
girls who've left our hapless protagonist out in the rain
and feeling blue, but there's still time for an organ
solo and we definitely need more of those in our life,
don't we? (Face Value Records, facevaluerecords.
com)
No organ solos for our next guests. Thee Exciters,
but no matter, "Johnny's Too Messed Up" to notice.
Instead, he's got other things on his mind, like how
four lads from Southampton make* such a joyful
racket, conjuring up mentors like The Milkshakes
on "Mummy's Little Boy" with its pop sensibilities, or
80's garage stalwarts The Miracle Workers on "Out
Of Our Hands" with its fuzzed-out bottom end and
mid-tempo bounce. Apparently with ease, as at
least one member of this gang has been at this
for quite a while, moonlighting in other acts like
The Hoodwinks (resulting in Vancouver's ska outfit
changing their name and style), so now you know
who to thank or throw tomatoes at, your choice.
Either way, this is good times. (Delicuentes Records,
delicuentesrecords@aol:com)
Back to London we go for The Duke Spirit, who
have made some fickle British press take notice with
their recently released album Cuts Across The Land
and undoubtedly will cut across the landscape of
anyone who digs early Gun Club, smoky soul like
Aretha or Irma, and alt-rock princesses Kim and PJ,
all the while maintaining a gritty rock 'n' roll presence
that kicks against the pricks of the current wave of
electro/nu/neo/wave that resides on English shores.
StrutJFret
ANiFLICKER
PEEPSHOW
Infrarouge
Tuesday TO May
Vancouver East Cultural Centre
Marie Brassard is a gentle, seductive soul who wants
us to feel the pain of others. To that end, she creates
and single-handedly portrays characters of such
fleshed-out sadness that we are in her pocket from
the moment she begins. The fact that she often
situates them in bizarre or otherworldly circumstances
never strains credibility; it just makes thei" stories seem
almost allegorical.
Peepshow's premise is that we live our lives as if
walled off from each other in parallel hallways. From
time to time, there's a crack in the wall, the secret
lives of others are revealed and we tumble around
together until solitude claims us again.
The scenarios that Brassard invites us to peep at
range from heartbreakingly innocent to dangerously
kinky but are linked by the deep loneliness that drives
people to seek relief either in wifhdrawal or extreme
encounters:' a precocious teenager ^encourages
an older man to stalk her because,- although she
doesn't want contact, she enjoys being desired by
someone she knows nothing about; a woman holds
an ex-lover's hand while he vomits in the street and
By Penelope Mulligan
is finally at peace because she understands that she
has fo take care of him; another woman returns a
neighbour's stray dog only to be drawn into his world
of fetish and bondage.
Other situations are more subtle, but their
sadness keeps on detonating: a woman finds that
reading old letters makes her "reflect on bad timing...
all those unfinished stories piling up behind me," and
a child recounts her betrayal by an education system
that tricks the brightest pupils into casting pearls
before swine and then punishes them for it.
The most disturbing tale concerns a woman who
keeps re-opening a long gash on her thigh in order to
remember the man who gave her the razor wound in
a sexual game years before. "The heart feels lighter
as the body takes it," she says. One doesn't have to
be into self-mutilation to understand that.
With help from sound designer Alexander
MacSween, Brassard processed her voice to span
age and gender in a way that has become an
integral part of her craft. At the start of the show,
however, it came dangerously close to being shtick
when she vamped onstage and gave a sinister
recitation of "Little Red Riding Hood" in a baritone
voice. The audience.ate it up, but entertaining as it
was, the sequence felt superficial and in retrospect,.
extraneous.  The   victim/predator  aspect  of  our
"Love Is An Unfamiliar Name," builds like a slow fire; a
few sparks and singer Leila Moss ignites and the band
blazes, hypnotizing and dangerous. Before it gets out
of control, we flip to "Honeysun" and the fire slowly
extinguishes itself in the form of a ballad, the final
wisp of smoke a single note from a guitar, safe and
soothing. Smokey The Bear will have his hands full
with these guys. (Loog Records, loogrecords.co.uk).
Feeling apologetically poetic there, I must snap
out of it right quick, with some snappy, happy pop
from those four lads from Liverpool...The Beatles...er,
I mean...The Stands! Ok, so they do harmonize the
hell out of a paper bag like John, Paul, George and
Ringo, and who can blame them? Jhis is music for
summer or for right now (as I look out the window and
see the alf-too-familiar streaks of rain hit the sidewalk.)
These two tracks, the seize-the-moment singalong of
"Do It Like You Like" and the warm and fuzzy ode to
finding that special someone, "Season To Be Loved"
are guaranteed winners, and if you put these guys
alongside The Singles or early Teenage Fanclub,
you'll be blissed out for days. (The Echo Label Ltd.,
www.echo.co.uk)
need to connect was clear enough in the stories
that followed and in the video image of a wolf that
intermittently prowled the upstage wall.
Besides, Brassard's greatest gift is her ability to
channel\jniversal emotions through the strangest
characters and stories. When least expected, we Snd
bits of oupelves littering the stage. ^L
THE PLUGHOLE
There are so many reasons to park yourself at
the Cinematheque this month that you might as
well leave a toothbrush there. The Terminal CHy FBm
Festival, four 1950s films from Polish master Andrzej
Wajda and, of course, the Pasolini blow-out are all
essential viewing.
What especially intrigued me was the pairing of
Catherine Breillat's Anatomy of Hell with Kim Ki-Duk's
Bad Guy. The South Korean filmmaker apparently
causes much controversy and offense, though after
viewing this 2001 effort, I still fail ta see why.
In Ki-Duk's story, a gangster fixates on a college
girl who publicly humiliates him by spitting in his
face. He then meticulously plans her come-down,
which turns out to be (everybody blush now) sexual
slavery in a Seoul brothel. But far from being shocking
and corrosive. Bad Guy plays fflce a potboiler with
a strained, clunky plot and really bad dialogue.
Yet having seen two of the director's other works,
including the brand-new and brilliant 3-lron, I can't
dismiss this one. It seems like an interesting sidestep into
territory in which he isn't quite so adept; a collection
of influences that he has earnestly absorbed but not
properly digested.
A lot of these influences feel French. The film is
shot like a po//cier, with city lights twinkling through
windscreens, dark alleys from which blokes get pulled
into doorways and beaten up and streets heaving
with hookers. Some of the most evocative scenes are
shot on a cloudy beach, the setting for many a Gallic
- And we wrap up our tour of the UK with
The Paddingtons, a boisterous power-pop outfit
from Hull who have scored big with a signing to
Poptones (started by Alan McGee, Creation Records
impresario) after only seeing the band live. Judging
on this single, a hyperkinetic buzz-punk tune called
"Panic Attack" there's much ado about these
youngsters with a knack for writings about knqcking
yourself off ("If you wanna die, go on commit
suicide...") but not without laughing about it first, and
The Clash-inspired, ska-inflected "Yarmouth Town", a
tribute to the quaint seaside port on The Isle Of Wight,
where I'm guessing the lads had some stories to tell
after visiting. Nonetheless, with a positive nod from
big-fish-in-the-English-pond Oasis, these guys will be
dining on more than just cod'n'chips in the very near
future. (Poptones Records, poptones.co.uk)
Thanks  for joining  me  on  my  pan-Atlantic
adventure! More reviews next month! <^
Bad Guy
epiphany. Ki-Dukis at his best when thingsxire guiet-^
there's a lovely scene where the gangster awakens
the sleeping girl in the bordello and she soundlessly
vomits onto his shoulder—and I wondered if the film
might be better with no dialogue. After all, ihe title
character himself is mute.
Though female/male conflict is fairly universal,
it's also cultural and Ki-Duk has theorized in interviews
that it's more low key in western film because for
some time, the relationship between the sexes has
been more stable there than in Asia. Enter Breillat.
In Anatomy, she dissects the sexual and emotional
tension between a (presumably straight) woman
and a gay man in a way that's gotten her blown
up by feminists and homosexuals alike. That it aH
comes down to holes and things to put in them is in
stark contrast to Ki-duk's boudoir scenes of almost
chivalrous restraint. He has said that he'd like to make
"a French version of Bad Guy, in a French way." Uh
oh. I'm trying to imagine it with Catherine Breillat as
his mentor and co-writer.
Bad Guy plays at the Pacific Cinematheque June 10-
13 (on a double bill with Anatomy of Hell June 10 A
13 only). 604-688-8202 or www.cinematheque.bc.ca
fortimes.fr
Discorder, June 2005 — page 5  D J FrIile    MixfTAre
Marielle Kho, host of We All
Fall Down, airing on Thursdays
from 1 -2 pm, on CiTR 101,9fm.
What is the band that you promote/
pidy the m»|§ifpfj,<
1 play the first five Ramones albums
• ai the 1fti|^S*also play a Jot of
Jeffie Genetic {Need A Wave),
' and the Devil Dogs.
Current obsession?
Oh... so many. I'd probably say...
The Smugglers. Because they
have the very sexy Bryce Dunn
playing drums. I'm obsessed
with so many bands right now,
it's hard to pick just one. But 1'm
Bryce's biggest fan. Really.
What's the strangest call you've
received oftVouwRbw?; . . *
There was this one guy who called
and requested Gang of Four.
jgffibft he called age||»questing
the same thing in a different
voice. And he kept calling, with
different voices every time. I'm
like, "Dude! I know you're the"
same guy who just called me, We
5 limes! I'll play thorn. I swearB'J   ~,i
Are you ok with being naked in the
sound room?
Yes, as long as I have another
naked, sweaty body right beside
What's the best, part of being a
programmer at CiTR?
It gives mHo good excuse to be
a music snob, and I get to hang
outwith all the other
CiTR DJs.
-'Diifli|M*ave a bike?
How often do you ride ft?
Not as often as I really should.
Do you wear your headphones
while you ridsfclr  * |
No. It never struck me as a safe
activity.
If 5 koalas were to take on 2
monkeys, who would win?
What kind of monkey? Because if it
was howler monkeys, the koalas
would lose. But if ft'^issthose little
k   rheus monkeys, thejcoalas would *
ft win.' Actually. I think the koalas
would lose no matter what, pst
JfPliecause they seem so docile
and aren't aggressive. I think I've
thought way too much about this
questionkPfc
sinewave
A  TON  OF  AUTOMATONS    12"
Sinewave's forthcoming CD, Unity Gain, has been a work
in progress over the past three years and includes the
debut single, A Ton of Automatons. This single sees
Sinewave trade in his drum & bass beats for some of the
sweetest vocoder vocals this side of Airs Moon Safari.
Available on iTunes
V/um^fepubU:
WIH IP J°d Sguos
{
${o\et\ bite-<& ww evfwvi^
loooo f\*efhes- maj^t^-HeldS
j€/\e yi\n\z pus - ma^iA. cKio
<V\l\\ VQ- 1A0A\<$ .r, r       -II
m
CP
headm' s*ia\\\ <ik<usV hertA\Y
girl- bcAilf -fe sfil\
C3.mfs roow\-\3coce sprw\asf<?'io
coTApilej by roUp   yo*e Zooi_.	
tj>
This  month's  mix tape
was made for us by Robb
Breckenridge
SO rtfw\ a Wil»wr^o«dqooa««s»c | i»k«.
co*»*u*t«S XA yo* vihi one, sow? tte
J0^^le 3a& f«>|W -rh€ clvHS^
0m. 05ED
msoyoBoxn
cnoueQECEQ
noyoiCEBES
cnmruteUDJQL^SXl
OOO caxCXDOQD CCOOO
Discorder, June 2005 — page 7 Airii
Starstruck: When a Fan Gets Close to Fame
Michael Jospeh Gross
Bloomsbury/Raincoast Books
So, you think you're pretty blase about fame, .
jfe$ Too cool to care about the latest Hollywood
$fek or pretty pop stars You're certainly not one of
those people—the ones who wait outside a concert
for four hours and then cling to their favorite rock
star crying until the tour manager gently brings them
back to reality with an embarrassed "Uh, there's other
people in line." Well, let's have a look in your closet—I
bet there's a collection of some sort of memorabilia
you wouldn't want your friends to find out about.
Maybe it's a white sequined glove, maybe it's every
magazine with an article on Trent Reznor from the
90s, maybe it's a Corey Feldman scrapbook; maybe
you speak Klingon. Whatever it is, there's probably
something there.
Fame seems to be deeply rooted in our
consciousness. Even monkeys seem to do this hero-
worship thing: there is a study showing monkeys will
give up their favourite treats to look at pictures of high
status monkeys. (In other words, it's not your fault.)
Nonetheless, we don't seem to like to talk about this
aspect of our culture. Most of the stories we hear
about fans are of the ones who went too far and
became stalkers, and this makes us uncomfortable.
Yet, if we weren't into celebrity news, otherwise
Entertainment Tonight wouldn't exist. (Those of us
who couldn't care less about movies and TV are
probably music freaks or sports fanatics.)
• Michael Gross sought to explore thts'^^&ory
and why we like fo shy away from it. ft^&k book, he
touches on subjects such as the creepy extremes
of autograph collecting (froiMMe "rack or rip" pros
to the "get 'em before they're dead" has-been
collecting at the Beverly Garland), lifestyle fans like
those women who follow Michael Jackson around
the world insisting he's innocent, the business of
entertainment reporting, and how the nature of
fame affects the famous themselves. In every section
of the book, we get a direct line into the world of
the people we are reading about through Gross'
compassionate and engaging style. He analyses and
questions what he sees, bringing their lives into his
own storyline and seeking understanding of himself
and his history through, their experiences.
Starstruck is both hilarious and thought-
provoking, and I think Gross makes strong cases for
the functionality of fandom at different points in
peoples' lives and the dysfunctionality of letting it
take over your life. Some of the people we meet are
funny, some are creepy, some are pitiful, but in all
cases we see a little of ourselves in them, and a bit
of them in us. Fandom is, after all, part of the human
experience.
Vampyra Draculea
HOLY CRAP, IT'S THATTIME AGAIN ALREADY?!?
OlKNdRft
Are you in a band that doesn't suck? Or are you a solo
musician with mad skills?
We are now accepting entries for SHiNDiG! 2005. Mail in
your minimum 3 song demo of original material (all styles
welcome) for an opportunity to play in CiTR's music
deathmatch! Toss your demo, contact information, and
anything else that you would want us to have to:
SHiNDiG! 2005.
c/o CiTR Radio
#233-6138 SUB Blvd.
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
Questions? Interested in becoming a
sponsor? For more information please visit
http://shindig.citr.ca You can also call us at
(604)822-1242 or email Ben at
benlai@citr.ca
DiSCORDER, June 2005 l_7he Qltijeejii/i/ ftfiouj
Domesticity has always piqued my interest, ever
since I read the Little House on the Prairie books
as a kid. Knit my own socks? Cool! Plant my own
garden? Sounds good! Tan my own leather?
Um, sure, okay! But as the youngest sibling, I've
never really been into the child-raising part ofI
domestic life. While Ayun Halliday doesn't make
motherhood sound appealing, necessarily—in
her first book she compared her then-four-year
old daughter to a swarm of pestilent flies—she
does make it sound like something that could
actually happen to someone like me. I'd like to
think that if I were a mother of two living in New
York, I would be a lot like Halliday, right down to
the disheveled hair and cool day job.
Halliday is the author of three very funny
memoirs and the East Village Inky, a long-running
zine chronicling the everyday misadventures
of Halliday, her two children, her playwright
husband Greg Kotis and their ragdoll-humping
cat Jambo. Each messy, hand-drawn issue of the
E.V.I, is narrated like a rambling story, or a self-
effacing list of minutia with little respect for page
margins. Halliday is at her best when recounting
less-than-shining moments, and her newest
collection of tarnished memories, Jobhopper. The
Checkered Career of a Down-Market Dilettante.
is her funniest yet. In it, she recounts lame job after
lame job, from telemarketer to naked model to
misfit drink server ("Hi, welcome to Club Land!
Can I, um, get you, um, a sex on the beach? Or
something?") Like most of her tales of woe, this
book stings as much as it delights, especially if
you have a few years of bad jobs ahead of you.
In fact, Jobhopper might have been responsible
for my decision to be ambitious this year and
hold out for an "interesting" summer job, instead
of taking an apron from the first Starbucks that
hired me. Mired in a job search that would leave
me unemployed for months, I took a break from
the resume tweaking to ask the author about her
deeply imperfect life and career.
DiSCORDER: How do you pronounce your first
name? I always say "Aye-yun."
Ayun Halliday: Stop saying that! It's like "ray gun,"
WBt with the accent on the ray and the edges
kind of blurry... that's the way things get done in
southern. Indiana, y'hear?
Right-o. What other witters do you like?
Like everyone else on the planet, David Sedan's.
I'm really partial to his pal, David Rakoff too.
I love the way%nda Barry's characters talk.
Speaking of writers who draw, I love Tony
Millionaire and both Bros. Hernandez. I love
John Waters' sarcasm. Ditto Antnorty Bourdain,
though I think he's probably a real bitch to work
for. Loved that poor tortured wonderful Spalding
Grey—he was a huge influence. I recently
completed Jonathan Safran Foer's Extremely
Loud and Incredibly Close and thought it was
wonderful...and I reckon John Updike, reviewing
it (unfavorably) for the New Yorker didn't actually
read every page because he called the main
character's cat a dog, which... well, I don't want
to spoil anything in the book, but when you read
it, you'll see why that's this unforgivable boo-
boo. I suppose the New Yorker's partly to blame,
but then, is it really the fact checker's job to call
someone whose book is being reviewed and
say, "Hey, we're just double checking that the
'dog' the famous author who's reviewing your
book says is a dog is really a dog and not a cat
or an iguana or a fish or something." Uh... what
was your question again?
Do you read a lot of other zines?
I'm surprised at how many I DON'T read. I was
just in the legendary Quimby's in Chicago and
was overwhelmed! Where to start? I bought
Snowmonkeys in Japan and Spaz and ... well, I
haven't gotten to the bottom of the pile yet, not
Kat Siddle is currently employed.
Unfortunatley, this cuts into her
reading time.
By Kat Siddle
by a long shot. And I'm going to Atomic Books
in Baltimore in a couple of weeks and I tell you
what, I'm bringing my cheque book! Some zines
*llsgii.really like are Hausfrau, the Lower East Side
Librarian, Paping and Not My Small Diary.
What are you working on next?
Dirty Sugar Cookies: Culinary Observaapns,
Questionable Taste. It' II be out fromSeal Press next
spring. Four%eeades of food: eating it, cooking
it, shopping for it, serving it in restaurants...
Reading Jobhopper, I get the impression that you
didn't expect to become a witter. How does your
"real We" stack up against your expectations?
How is it different than you thought it would be?
I expected to be an actress, but took no real steps
to actualize that as a plausible way of supporting
myself. My sense of how adults procure things
(apartments, furniture, insurance, vehicles) and
achieve professional success has not advanced
much since childhood. It was a series of lucky
breaks that led to my book contract. I think if
I'd pursued the traditional route of becoming a
published writer I would have failed. Fortunately,
I came to the attention of a small publisher who
responded to the idea of my ongoing DIY project
with excitement instead of disdain.
I had big ideas of where I would live and
what I would do when I was a child, but from
about sophomore year on, my expectations,
ambled along with those of many other white,
middle class, arts-indined, soon-to-be-college-
educated members of Generation X. And I
suppose those have been bom-out, although
Greg hitting it out of the park with Urinetown was
and is a thrill, both personally and practically.
What kind of stories do you tell your kids? Have
you ever thought of writing a children's book?
The other day, at Milo's request, I told—with no
great enthusiasm—an incoherent fable about a
worm who accidentally ventured out from the
log under which he'd spent his life thus far and
the altruistic vegetarian bird who attempts to
untie wtth her beak the knot in the worm's tail (or
head, hard to tell which end is which). Inky later
politely informed me, "No offense, but that story
was very boring." Amen to that, sister.
But yes, I do aspire to write a children's book
titled Always Lots of Heinies at the Zoo.
You know. When I get around to it.
A friend who does write children's books tells me
that she can write one in a couple of hours, but
incubating the idea can take a couple of years.
You paint a hilarious if occasionally unflattering
picture of yourself in your books and zine. Are you
as forthright in real life as you are in print?
In some greas, thank you. I think I'm getting more
plainspoken with age, but I tend, in person, to
want everyone to be happy. Outside the squalor
of my apartment, I behave as if things are always
going smoothly, in the hopes that they wiH start
to. I have trouble saying no.
Are you as hilarious in real life?
Doubtful, but I'm delighted to see it implied that I
achieve hilarity in print.
You like to write about "frying circumstances"—
misadventures while traveling, jobs that you don't
fit at, the parental grind. What Is it about minor
disaster that you find so interesting?
The language can be descriptive without being
overblown or high falutin'. I leave descriptions
of the Taj Mahal's beauty and the purple
mountain's majesty to those who are eithermore
poetically gifted or less afraid of coming off as
an asshole.
I think, too, for a certain kind of only child, who
grew up in a broken home where sex and bodily
functions were never discussed and where ihere
was an unspoken ban on emotional display,
it's liberating to describe the warts in alt their
unseemly glory.
Lastly, I'm looking for a day job right now. Got any
tips for jobhoppers?
Keep good notes. William Grimes of the New
York Times recently remarked that the bad job
memoir is a "particularly fecund subcategory."
And oh hey, if plugging websites is a part of the
mission, mine's http://www.ayunhalliday.com <t))>
Discorder, June 2005 — page I VANCOUVER'S fIRST EVER
(Stand fyjp &$€taj and (Stottonaxtf S&iAett
INST
byChris-A-Riffic
IWEPMESPM J\I1E 8T«    gjK   -J
^«0PtM§#GHT@ SONAR   g     gS-   /
WfeWater Street - vancouv^f^.       V^x i
uoo&open at 8pmiShow,begins at 9pm*FREE!jj£,
i ^IintimatenigMelcocal1*^^ im^PS^-
1   3^ B(j D37iCommerciait)rive • East Van}aBL j    pglppr
| J(£poors>t 7pnf-Show begins 8pm«FREE!|
:* ^pTUDENTS AND.YOUTH SHOWT^§>«
**-ly|" Edmonds Community Centre
*3  (7282 Kingswav St. Burnaby)
*   Doors ooenTat obm^Show DedNls Tom • FREE!I'.i ihmkt
«,OUTDOOR SHOW fl^GRANDVIEW PARK
3H;  (Commercial Dr, at Cnarfes Stjlast Vancouver)
*  Afternoon.show • 12noon to 6om - FREE!
sunpm jume trm
"HIP HOP AS A WEAPON AGAINST WAR AND OCCUPATION"
A free public forum @ the Britannia Community Centre
(Napier at Commercial Drive - East Van)
3:30pm to 6pm
WVOM*IZAT!OM AGAINST WAR ANP OCCUPATION - NVAWO
www. ^^^^^Ncai^M- ORcmwnov
CONTACT: INFO@MAWOVANCOUVER.ORG | 604-322-1764
DiSCORDER, June 2005
I wish someone had told me how to ask to play a
show at the Sugar Refinery. It would have taken me
a whole plate of perogies to drum up the courage to
bother Ida Nilsen at work. I would have written ddwn
what I wanted to say, and then blurted out some
gibberish and completely embarrassed myself.   %
To me, Ida was, and is, a larger-than-life figa».
She helped a lot of bands find their footing by bootank
them at the Refinery, and she is also a fantastic piano
player and singer. She's been in the bands Cunt, the
Gay, Radiogram, and, most notably, the Beans. Now
she sings and plays in the ait-folk four piece Great
Aunt Ida, alongside AnnyWffldnson on bass, Barry
Mirochnick on drums, jartl-JP Carter on trumpet and
effects. The CD release party for their new album.
Our Fall, will be on June 10th at the Western Front. J
spoke to Ida at her Vancouver home oyer root beer
and a big cookie.
DISCORDER: I was wondering if you were forced into
piano like everyone else.
Ida: I started when I was pretfy*%tle, througfYYhe
Suzuki Method.
Did they give you a song and have you fry to play It
on the piano straight away?
I remember, for the first little while, you weren't
supposed to look at the music at all. You just listen
to tapes, and then play it from the tapes. When I
was about eight or nine, I stopped doing that. I said
screw this and started reading-themusic.     - kfff "*»
The significance of Great Aunt Ida—is that the name
of an actual aunt of yours?
Yes. I haven't seen her since I was four. Every time I tell
someone my name, they always tell me they have a
Great Aunt Ida. But she exists. She lives on a farm by
herself. She's about 90.
I have two Ida moments that I would like to share
with you. I remember coming up lo you one time and
asking If you were in the band C-U-N-T, and you said,
"Oh, you mean CUNT?" I thought that was pretty cool.
My second memory was when I saw you wtth a whole
bunch of people at the Havana Theatre, and you
were riding a stationary bike.
Oh, that was Ben Wilson's thing. He's an experimental
jazz / new music guy. He used fo play at the Sugar
Refinery a lot.
I've heard you sing a little in other projects, but I've
never heard you really sing. Why have you waited so
long to be the lead singer? S
Because I didn't have anything to sing. I have felt
uncomfortable about my voice, but I haven't
actually written any songs for anyone to sing that
were really good. I hate to say this, but after the
Sugar Refinery closed down, all of a sudden, there
was more free space in my brain. It just cbme easy
i this album. Was that
and naturally after that.
There's hardly any guitar c
deliberate?
There's some spaceIflgjjB album, without guitar. I kind
of feel that JP has the guitar role in the band, with
the trumpet. He just got a Rat pedal.
What's that?
It's a metal-y, distortion noise pedal.
Why this direction? I've seen all your other projects,
and I've found this to be your most pop-y effort. What
did you want to sound like going into the studio?
!,l Anted it to have a certain mood more than a style.
Some of the songs on the album are the first that
ftver wrote, five years ago maybe. I wrote piano
compositions for years and years and years, and I
wrote instrumental ideas. But this was my first time
■ writing personal singer-songwriter stuff. I was really
excited, because I came up with one of the songs
on the record just before we finished recording. That
meant that I could ditch this other song that wasn't
working out.
Did you start out playing jazz standards in lounges?
No. I always wanted to do that. I took jazz lessons when
I was about fourteen, and I played in a jazz quartet
when I was sixteen, but I played upright bass.
You can rip it up on the piano, but the playing on this
record is very reserved.
I feel like I'm the rhythm guitar player, and I like to
keep up that role.
What happened fo the piano at the Sugar Refinery?
It's now in an amazing space that used to have
experimental jazz shows on Fridays and Saturdays.
Do you have other projects that you want to do?
Well, I miss the Beans a lot. I liked playing that way.
I haven't been doing that very much. I just play
here myself and with Great Aunt Ida. I miss the
collaborative thing with improvising. I'd like to do
more of that^
'*ty*~   Ti
The shirt Chris-A-Riffic is wearing
IcSfll
HAS A PICTURE OF A HORSE ON IT. He
Unicorns. "But Chris, that's not a
unicorn, that's a horse," peopie
uke to say. "1 know," he says in
Chris hosts a reaily good radio
1
Jl^ti
show on CiTR. It is called "Parts
Unknows" and is on Mondays at Andrew Andrew, The Internationallly Indistinguishable duo
MP3 players have been around since 1998, but it's Apple's iPod,
released in 2001, that has practically become a household item, and
if it has not gone that far yet, iPod is certainly a household name.
To date, 10 million iPods have been sold, with almost half in the first
quarter of 2005 alone. Now, iPods are infiltrating D J culture, from New
York to Vancouver and all scenes in between.
Vancouver's Andrew Volk, who DJs as AndrewAndrewAndrew,
is a 26 year old who started off as a vinyl-only DJ in 2001, founding
.'80s night at 'Shine' nightclub. In late 2003, he brought his iPod into
the mix.
"At that time you still couldn't play an iPod or CD player without
looking like a dickhead," says Volk. "Then I heard that photographer
Ryan McGinley was DJ-ing in New York with two iPods and no vinyl. I
realized vinyl is just to show people you're serious, but nobody takes it
seriously, they just want to dance. So I got an iPod—it's the ultimate."
It's not surprising that relative newcomers like Volk use iPods, but
even veterans often years, like Vancouver's DJ Leanne, are plugging
in. "I was the first one in Vancouver—or so they told me—to get the
pink iPod Mini," laughs Leanne. "That was in spring 2004, and I loaded
it up with songs and started using it at gigs."
Both these DJs use their iPod, in conjunction with vinyl, plugging
it into a mixer with a standard two-tumable setup. For DJ Leanne, the
reason is technical. "House music is very beat driven. With each new
track, you'vegot. to use the pitch or speed shift on the turntable and
then cue it up exactly to match the beat of the outgoing track," she
explains. "You can't do that with an iPod, so I use if selectively."
Of course, it's also about style. "There used to be a stigma
against using anything but vinyl; you looked like a lame suburban DJ,"
Volk says, "but iPods have broken through." MP3 players send out a
cool'/ don't care about the format, let's hear the good songs' vibe,
but the snobbery remains and Volk uses his iPod with vinyl "so people
don't notice it as much." The expense of owning two iPods, allowing
mixing, is also a barrier.
But in New York, the artist duo Andrew Andrew have been DJ-ing
with nothing but iPods since 2001. "The first time we touched the iPod
scroll reel was an amazing, empowering experience," says one half
of the intentionally indistinguishable duo. Hooked, they bought two
iPods and used them that very night. Soon they had a regular iPod-
only night at New York's 'Remote' club. "After digitizing an album to
our hard drive, we put it in our storage facility filled with vinyl and
CDs," says Andrew. The other Andrew adds, "Now we have a library
of 30,000 tracks, all on an external hard drive dedicated to music and
highly organized into playlists." At clubs, they use a four-channel mixer
with four iPods: two for each Andrew.
MP3 players aren't merely another tool for DJs, they are
"©
33 iZPocfo
25 O0ru£teu>3
By Rob Brownridge
changing DJ culture itself. The most obvious effect is in the music mix;
DJs no longer have to limit themselves to small selections from their
collections. As DJ Leanne points out, "you used to have to of carry
tons of records, which are very heavy. Now you've got way more
music and a huger variety in this tiny MP3 player." With thousands of
songs at the DJ's fingertips, anything goes.
"iPods have blown the doors open on the types of music that you
can play," enthuses Volk. "In this decade music's in a big upheaval
and people want to listen to everything." Volk claims people want a
diverse mix of popular songs, be they top 40 or indie, and care less
about "some elitist DJ extraordinaire with turntablism skills or obscure
b-sides." Andrew Andrew agree. "We've long said that the age of the
superstar DJ died in the 90s. Before you had this idea that the DJ was
telling you what to listen to, but now it's the other way around."
A less recognized effect of MP3 players is on where a DJ can
perform. With their unprecedented portability, MP3 players allow you
to throw a party anywhere. Aside from clubs and house parties, Volk
has DJed a skytrain party using two MP3 players and a ghetto blaster.
He also knows people planning a 'porta-party,' using MP3 players, a
local FM transmitter, and carloads of people roaming the city.
MP3 players are also radically changing DJ culture in a subtle
yet powerful way. With their user-friendly interface and low cost in
comparison with turntables and records, iPods allow almost anyone
to be the DJ. "It's part of the larger DIY trend," says Andrew Andrew.
"If I'm DJ-ing with an iPod, and you're in the crowd with an iPod, then
you could be the DJ too."
There is a sub-trend of iPod club nights where truly anyone
can have fifteen minutes of fame as the DJ. The first such night, at
the New York club Apt. (pronounced A-P-T), was started by Andrew
Andrew. "You walk into the club and take a number from a dispensing
machine," explains one Andrew. "You know, like at a butcher shop,"
interjects the other Andrew. "So you get a drink, sit down at a table,
and look through a book listing all the songs on the iPod," Andrew
continues. "When the 'now serving' sign above the bar shows your
number, you get to come up and play whatever you want. There is a
big game-show clock counting down your seven minutes in heaven."
Their idea has spread to clubs across the U.K., Europe and North
America, including Toronto's Chelsea Room. Says co-owner Broclc
Shepherd, "when regular people do small sets, instead of one DJ
all night, the vibe can change completely," says Shepherd. "It's a
lot more unexpected and makes for a fun, eclectic evening."
Here in Vancouver, a less random, more organized;
approach is going strong. Musicpeople, organized by Jonathan
Nodrick, happens every Saturday at the Bayside Lounge (1184
Denman @ Davie). Nodrick began by inviting people down the
club to play sets. Now, he gets calls from people wanting onto
the schedule. "We give people a couple of hours behind some,
turntables or an iPod to play the newest or rarest music they've)
got," explains Nodrick. "It's a real melting pot and you never
know if it's new, used, or even original."
Still, owning an iPod does not guarantee DJ success. As DJ
Leanne puts it, "if you're jusfbuilding a playlist on your iPod and letting
it go, that's not enough." As Andrew Andrew point out, "you have to
put songs together based on the crowd."
Looking into the crystal ball, the DJs interviewed all agree that
use of MP3 players will continue to grow. But, they say, three things
must happen to take it to the next level. First is a 'DJ friendly' MP3
player with the ability to pitch-shift, cue accurately, and duplicate
vinyl-scratch sounds. Second is a mini-mixer for MP3 players, and third
is a sound output better than the headphone jack. Regardless of
when such devices become available, it's clear that thanks to MP3
players, we can look forward to a more diverse mix of music in a more
diverse range of locations from a more diverse group of DJs. <jjjj>,
Rob Brownridge is a pleasant fellow who
hosts a radio show on CiTR called "Please
Rock the Door." It is on at 8:30 Tuesday
Vancouver's DJ Leanne
Discorder, June 2005 — page 11  ^2<
iii
u° £
* ©@
Ei£ <5 =
£ 2 X <
CM
QU-O-g
J2 © |D
•- h- o g
£ © ©£
O n ^
© a_ o
o»2
if §j?
<*  ft.2  O
b -> o ^
XQ  £<§>
CH
© -^   U
i£.y o
, <* t.
$$® ©
s>y-s
I*
i pq
3 © .£ TS
O ^ c n
-y.§S
.8*!?
stiff
O)
rifillii'
: o 2 R © 2 .2
00
oo
Hill?
IfUl
5EI.01
O -1 Q O &
o © u E ^
T3 jE -j-  O '=
£@l>§©
8.12*3  <•?!
c-SZ-g-S
2. io *- o E
lisli
§t O C g-g
U^-^p g 0
■t*S © .j?"
III
IIP?
Hi II
o © o © "-
©©^8?i
iEiE^CD ou
I <§> M T> o fe u     f
- - o .8 ts 5 S     I
5 £ £ 7 j_ JB $
!£cma>b.a
■__ -mm —" © © d
CH
2 £ SJP
o- oi!i>
«§ © © ©
iE@o£
oo8<S1
a a.—  i  ©
</? b c o   -
$ o.,? c a    J
52 = "- 2 <5 -Q
x^oES
O <g   „   2 co g
S?X^
|6I
•^f ©u
o | ^ o
© ,-?l
2.3 1
CO
CH
D  O  o ^ £
u** © a
■d o 5, j£ o -g
o< £© £ o
g 5 8 © ii °
c ° P m 2 <
< © <§ ol O if
o
#£ ©
III
£ g 12 5 g 1
O P D  © D  I
$S "2 go 5
© ** D -k -> £
.c o .c a ,; o
■■ © .y jg <^oc
2 ct @ 0 D iE
op
Ml"
CI
T3  ©
C   ©
H
£ |JS o
j»Y> OTJi
k5 © a- a
m "D i= .y
D©
CH
Eu
E-2
= "2
D) a)
o -^
00
CH
V.3<
fi's
l©l
60 ©<§>
.  'E iE © =
D    «TJ Jf?
|S2 v x <
cy
© o _]
T_ 0_   o
.y ■c's
©$ o
a 5 £
CM
cs
.24
fi *~ DTQ BARSUK! BIG DADA! DOMINO! NINJATUNE!
DiSCORDER, June 2005 9ke 9fy> 9fcp
'time
Pay attention to the way hip hop artists refer to their genre as "the
game." The game has been a growing reference since the late-1990s,
and it calls attention to the way hip hop is played. To be a successful
player, one must accumulate demonstrable wealth, present clearly
defined sex appeal, and hurl constant verbal threats at competing
players. The top-40 charts are the scoreboard, and artists are ranked
therein.
How can one "keep it real" yet at the same time be "playing
the game"? These seem to be the twin colloquialisms of mainstream
hip-hop artists, yet are completely contradictory all at once. Artists
want to convince us that the game is the reality, and thus playing is
living. Are we then to be convinced that trying to receive five stars in
a record review is a common goal amongst those in real life? When
a rapper adopts a thug image to sell' records in the game, does he
reflect the reality of those born into thug life?
Commercial art is incredibly successful at taking true events and
manufacturing them into a marketable message. Where does the
game meet the reality? Amazingly, game references in hip hop are
immune to the intrusions of reality. When Tupac Shakur and Biggie
Smalls were murdered, the deaths of two people became little
more than sentimentalism used by artists seeking to capitalize on
nostalgia. Their deaths are publicly mourned by artists who display
the same lyrical aggression and name-calling that likely motivated
the murders. The game allows for rappers to score points by both
threatening violence and mourning violent deaths, with no discussion
of the inherent paradox between the two. The moral of their deaths
became "don't playa-hate."
The recent arrival of an emcee calling himself The Game
illustrates this. His gangland background and near-death experience
won him sensational approval with fans, and his hard and true life led
him into the studio where he churned out hits wherein he sings,
I can shoot a video to it and spend half the budget
I'm gangster, let the .40 cat blow in public
More hatred inside my soul than 'Pac had.
If one hasn't been following the sensational news coming out
of New York's Hot 97 radio station, then know that The Game and
50 Cent exchanged heated insults through-different media outlets,
resulting in stabbings and shootings between their supporters. Then,
the artists met and reconciled publicly in one of the most hyped-up
star-stories of the year. The very real violence on the street added to
the sensational nature of the issue, rather than being an ugly, criminal
expression of fan rivalry.
As counter-movements arise vyith the swing of the pendulum,
there has been a reflex against the game-iftcation of the art. On his
most recent release, Mos Def sings,
I don't hate players/I don't love the game
I'm the shot-dock, way above the game
To be point-blank with you, motha-fuck the game
I got all this work homie, I ain't come to play.
Mos Def's colleague and comrade Talib Kweli ignores game-
language in his latest album, focusing instead on demonstrating his
love of hip hop and his love of life in his appropriately named album
The Beautiful Struggle. While Kweli and Mos Def may see beauty in the
dangerous struggles of Black America, emcee Immortal Technique
horror and shame. Kweli and Mos Def's idejflistic, light-at-the-
end-of-the-tunnel manifestos provide upliftingffleddership in the
movement to change the direction of hip hpp;frnmortal Technique
serves up constant, brutal reminders of the cyijical, cyclical world
beyond the studio and concert.
Immortal Technique's two studio albums, Re^ufiboary Vol I and
II are chock-full of dirty shock-and-awe lyricism. Hewitts you below the J
belt and then steps back and questions why the belt means anything^
He hates the players and the game. He hates the government, th»
rich and apathetic, the coffee-shop revolutionaries, and anyone
who speculates "what 'Pac would say." He calls himself "obnoxious  .
nigga," and proceeds to list awful, selfish, offensive acts side-by-side
with societal obscenities, equating the rudeness of jerking off on hotel
sheets with the complicit brutality of American companies that did
business with Hitler. His scraping .baritone and clear articulation cuts
you with every syllable of every word. He speaks frankly to those who
are interested in successful careers in hip hop: "The time has come
to realize your net worth in the market and stop being a fucking
commodity. And if you didn't understand what I just said, then you're
already waitin' to get fucked."
Mainstream hip hop, on the other hand, has embraced ilm
commodity status. Hip hop has been reinvented as a game foroasy
consumption. You can take risks in a game that you wouldn't in real
life. One can say things, wear things, and treat people a certain
way, in a reinvention of reality that need' never truly accept reality.
In a 2003 interview with The Believer, The Roots' drummer Ahmir
"?uestlove" Thompson likens hip hop to a high school: "The most
popular kids would be the toughest kids and the richest kids, the ones
who go to class bling-blinging or don't go at all." The popular fdd£ are ;
happy to think of their lives as a game—no seriousness, all sensattorC
The nerds of hip hop are well aware of the broader world and discuss
ugly, important issues, but the pure vicious intelligence of Immortal
Technique's lyrics reinforces Thompson's remark th<jrr^hip hop's so-
called alternative groups have been making it clear that just 'cuz
they're smart doesn't mean you can kick their ass."
Parental Advisory slickers don't prepare you for what Immortal
Technique delivers. He puts words and ideas together in a cesspool of
hard-to-swallow similes that may invoke a visceral reaction bordering
on disgust. But if you wait, and keep listening, he'll hypnotize you with
lyrics that spiral downward Hke spools of razor wire and leaving you
craving more. He's been to prison, and he takes you there; he saw
the Twin Towers fall, and he tells you what he perceived; he's seen
his people, blacks and latinos, starve themselves to death hooked
on crack. He gives you a glimpse of the system that he's up against;
and his questions make you wonder. How many niggas own a poppy
field? Or an Uzi factory? Where do the hardships come from, and
who's explaining the world to you?
Before criticizing Immortal Technique for being too ugly, too
extreme in his words, recall that Malcolm X was once asked if he
considered himself .an extremist. His answer: "Yes, I'm an extremist.
The black race is in extremely bad condition." The aptly titled
opening track of Vol. II, "Point of No Return" begins with a telephone
call from the imprisoned Mumia Abu Jamal, subtly daring anyone to
call that issue a "game.""Point of No Return" emphasizes that what's
done is done, and needs to be lived and suffered with. While games
have reset buttons, life is harsh. There is no reset button for Mumia
Abu Jamal, and no passing go if you can't move your family out of •
the projects.^
By Zach Goelman
"Obnoxious," Revolutionary V
[Viper Records 2003)
1
Zachary Goeman does not host a radio
show on CiTR, but he is availble tor
private lectures on topics such as middle
East Politics, Science Fiction, and Why
He Doesn't Think That Movie Was All
That Great Now That He's Thought About
It For A While. 9?of>il
She (SpSendut ^jo/a/roii
of (_9tifj/f/ei i*Pop
With a tip of the hat to the often unfunny George
Carlin, we can see that the term "pop" is perhaps one
of the most versatile in the musical dictionary: pop
(Coldplay), pop (The Beatles), pop (50 Cent), pop
(Blink 182), pop (Michael Jackson). Even Grime, the
anti-pop genre that has been hyped ad-nauseam is
at times only a shave away from being swallowed by
that all encompassing modifier; if you don't believe
me, check out Lady Sovereign's "Random": you
could call it Grime-Pop, or Pop-Grime, but you'd
probably come off looking like an idiot. The fact is that
pop is something that Leeds' Hood is well aware of; it
is something they have observed, used, and avoided
in their thirteen year career and the term popped up
a number of times in our interview.
Hood released their first 7" single in 1992, and
since then they have released sixteen more singles
and nine full-length albums. Yet despite averaging
almost two releases a year and maintaining an output
that has been steady rather than sporadic, Hood
remains rather reclusive. Their approach to touring,
exposure, and songwriting ensures that they are not
necessarily accessible.
"[Touring] can be a chore. We didn't tour for
years and years, but we've had little pockets where
we've done a lot. At first the lack of touring was a
necessity as the band was a hobby and we all had
day jobs or university courses. But later on there Were
times we chose to stay off the road and keep a low
profile," the band told me when asked about the
sparseness of their touring over the years.
"I'm utterly convinced," founding member
Richard Adams said, "that if you become part of
a scene or get hyped, then that prevents you from
existing somewhere down the line because people will
always be reminded of that scene. This is particularly
true in the UK. You have to stand out on your own. It's
the only way for us, we need to keep to ourselves and
to ignore what else is going on and follow our own
path." Hood have developed in relative isolation,
moving from rather non-descript, guitar driven, lo-fi
indie rock into a more progressive sound that employs
a greater range of instrumentation and electronics.
But remaining comfortable has an obvious price.
"Our location and lack of touring has kept
us away from the spotlight so that we can carry on
without distractions and make music that we wink is
good. We're in a fairly comfortable spot, I suppose,
but financially it's a nightmare—that's the doWfjjide."
With a humble D.i.Y. mentality, Hood are at a
point now where they are creating challenging music
for themselves and for their fans in a fashion that
keeps both comfortable. They balance an inclination
to incorporate pop stylings (they cite New Order, Red
House Painters, and old R.E.M. as early influences) with
their concern for writing interesting music.
"We do strive to have listenable songs that
you can sing in the shower. I think we do have pop
sensibilities because that's a large part of what we
listen to. It does frustrate us when people don't see
that in our songs," they told me.
The balance between remaining listenable
and making music that is too predictable is obviously
something that Hood takes into consideration. "A
lot of the albums that are doing well now are just
straightforward—you can see where the songs are
going from a mile off," Richard explained, "but we're
trying to engage the listener and make them think
about what a record ought to be."
Their critically acclaimed 2001 release Cold
House was a striking and very intentional move into
experimental glitch-rock territory (cLOUDD'EAD's
Dose One and Why? significantly helped shape the
record's sound). The critical response to Cold House
directly affected the construction of their latest
release. Outside Closer, a marked step towards the
said "pop-sensibilities."
"We thought the glitch-pop thing had run its
by Mike Barrow
course and it was time to move away from it. IJiink
with Cold House we deliberately tried to make qdScord.
'of its time.' With Outside Closer we tried to make it a
bit more timeless." Where Cold House bordered on
impenetrability, Outside Closer is accessible to the
point that the band was concerned that they had
veered too far into mainstream territory. "Well, we
thought Outside Closer was a bit commercial and
lacked surprise. How wrong could we be? I was quite
taken aback though when one or two people said
it was impenetrable or obscure. I really did seriously
think it was a move towards the mainstream [to the
point where I did get a bit worried about it]." Richard
told me.
According to internet rumours, Hood may be
calling it quits sometime in the near future. Those who
saw Hood here in Vancouver at the end of March may
have noticed some tension on stage; this piqued my
curiosity. Hood spent a tremendous amount of time in
the studio, (perhaps ensuring their coup de grace is
as good as it can be?) and then embarked on a rare
intercontinental tour. All this evidence seemed slightly
more than just circumstantial. I had to ask.
"I think with [Outside Closer] we all felt worn
down a bit by music. I think bands have their up times
and their down times and maybe we were feeling
towards the end of the recording that it was the end of
everything," he said, "but we have had those feelings
before and they have passed once something new
and exciting has come along." Whether Hood is
exercising some discretion remains to be seen. "[In
five years] I'd hope to be mainly a studio band being
creative in different ways and making records how we
like, without outside distraction," Richard forecasted.
Should Hood stay together, we can expect that
they will remain quiet creators of challenging music
that is anchored in pop, but never unadventurously.
When I asked what they were listening to in the tour-
van they simply replied, "Lady Sovereign." ^
Making an Abbey Road of Outside
Closer, I looked for some clues that may help
reveal what Hood will have in store in the
future. Firstly, the name of the album. Outside
Closer, can be pronounced cloze-er, rather
than closer. Secondly, the sign on the front of
the album reads "End of One Train Working".
Thirdly, the last two songs on the album are
titled "Closure" and "This is it Forever".
^Dupietv/ &ev£eweil 6ij &iiMieu
w*
Duplex
Ablum
{Mbit Records)
My household really likes Duplex. The songs
of theirs on the Sunny CD are constantly
played favourites, and Ablum has quickly
enchanted us. But, I wondered, does the
music made for children actually capture
the hearts of kids? While babysitting a few
weeks ago, I put the disc to the scrutinous
ears of two of my favourite kids, 9 year old
Nora and her 5 year old brother Quinn.
This is what they had to say.
DiSCORDER: Say your names and how old -
you are.
Nora: My name is Nora and I'm nine years
DiSCORDER, June 2005
Okay, so fhe CD we are going to listen to
is called Ablum, by a band called Duplex.
Of all the songs on this CD, what do you
want to listen to?
N: Um. "The Salad Song."
The Salad Song
What do you think so far?
N: I like it.
Does it make you want to dance?
N: Yeah, but I have something stuck to my
leg right now
What's stuck to your leg?
N: A Lincoln Logs box!
So Nora, what CDs do you listen to when
you choose music yourself? what*s your
favourite?
N: Cake.
Cake? What's your favourite Cake song?
N: "No Phone."
Okay, why?
N: I like Cake "No Phone" because I like
the tune. The words don't make very
much sense.
Do you think the words to this song make
any sense?
N: Yah.
Does it make you want to eat salad?
N: Mmm. No. Not exactly.
Q: Can I pick a song?
{Nora reads the track list aloud, from "Yr
Mama" to "Pooing and Peeing'1
Q: Pooing and peeing!! [giggles]
Quinn, does "Pooing and Peeing" make
you giggle?
[Quinn laughs]
Quinn! The words haven't even started yet
and you're laughing like a maniacl
[Quinn starts coughing]
Pooing and Peeing
[The song begins with "He was a-pooing,
and a-peeing at the same time"]
[Quinn starts laughing and coughing st the
same time, juice comes out of his nose.]
Have you ever heard a song about poo
before?
Q: Yeah, [sings] Poo and pee-was on the
wall! and down somebody's BUTT!
Do you think this song is better than that
one?
N: I think it's better, because that one
SUCKS!
In a song do you guys think it's important
that the words make any sense?
N:No.
What's the most imporatnt part of a song?
N: The nice rhythm.
Q: I want to listen to it again!!
Let's open the case. This is a picture of the
band. .These are some kids, and some of
these are their parents and some of these
are their friends. Do you think it would be
fun to be in a band like that?
N: Mm hmm.
Quinn, if you were going to be in a band,
what instrument would you want to play?
Q: The bass guitar.
And what would you call your band?
Q: The Burping Skulls!!!
What kind of music would you play?
Q: I would play, rock and roll...and ranch
music mixed together.
Like country music?
Q; Yeah, mixed together.
But what about you Nora? have you ever
thought about playing an instrument in a
band?
N: I already play piano, and I want to play
electric guitar
And if you started a band what would you
call your band?
N: Black Scorpion.
Ooh. that' kinda scary.
N: Or maybe ZaZas
Have you ever asked anybody to play in
a band with you?
Q: I would call my band The Naked Butts!
N: Well, Quinn wanted to be in the the
Black Scorpions for a while, but we didn't
really do it, and now Quinn's making up
by Dory Kornfeld
a band called the Burping Skulls, and my
friend Tara might be in our band.
So, Quinn and Nora, is there a last song on
the cd that you want to listen to?
N: "Heating Up the Milk."
"Heating up the Milk" it is. Do you guys
know what a duplex is?
N:No
Quinn, do you know what a duplex is?
Q: Stupid Butts
No, it's a house that's divided in two. Like
two houses attached together.
N: Why did they name their band that?
I don't know.  Can you think of any
reasons?
N: maybe they live in one.
["Peeing and Pooing" comes on again]
Q:  [giggles manically] I'm peeing and
pooing! 13&God
S/T
(Anticon)
Last summer Themselves toured
North America with the Notwist, and at
their performance at the Commodore
Ballroom, they collaborated onstage for
fhe first time ever. At least that's what I've
heard. I had left'fhe Commodore shortly
after the Notwist- began their set to go
drink at Vancouver's meathead hotspot:
The Cambie. Regardless, a collaboratiy^
release was inevitable and, for fans of
either group, highly anticipated.
The result, dubbed 13&god, is less
juvenile than the Notwist's Neon Golden
and more controlled than Themselves's
The No Music. This album is far less
adventurous or ambitious than many
of its Anticon predecessors, but n»
surprisingly, the losses in the experimental
column make for a tremendous net gain.
It stands as a calculated display of each
band's respective strengths and is rarely
marred by their weaknesses. Dark, quiet
and delicate, the album drifts almost
seamlessly through ten tracks of Adam
"Dose One" Drucker's cerebral unwindings
("Soft Atlas") and Markus Archer's gentle
vocalizations ("Perfect Speed"). Its strong
percussive backbone (courtesy of ,SP-
1200 wizard Jel, I presume) keeps the
album from drifting and allows the listener
to disengage and enjoy the album's
atmosphere and instrumentation.
Be warned though, 13&God may
be easy on the ears, but that doesn't
necessitate an easy listen. There is no
lack of thought-encouraging substance
for a discerning critic. From the sad and
ironic samples at the start of "Afterclap"
to Dose's philosophic garnishing overtop
the sparse piano of "Soft Atlas," 13&God's
intentionality provides ample food for
thought and sets a consistent mood
that guides you comfortably into an
existential K-Hole while you light up your
third cigarette in a row. Hopefully we
will hear more from this self-proclaimed
super-group; this first release is making me
think that I never should have gone to the
Cambie.^
Mike Barrow
Chet
Kauai
(The Hive)
If I reach far back, I can recall the
collective voices of the New Kids on the
Block having a profound impact on my
emotional state; At age eight. I had an
early start on polygamous dreams: the
cupcake of my heart was iced with the
names Danny, Johnny, Donnie, Jordan,
and of course Joey. Now there is only one
voice that has the same effect On me,
and if I was more eloquent I would write
endless love letters to it.
Ryan Beattie, you coy temptress,
your siren of a voice and the way it jumps
from octave to octave gives Mariah
Carey nightmares. You selfishly roped me
in with Tiger in the Windmv; then nothing
else mattered to me. MaBths went by, the
seasons changed, and not even a phone
call. I was about to give up, bitter and
jaded, until now, until Kauai. Tiger's lovely
droning melodies ring out trimjiplwit, and
the voice, good god, THE VOICE. Trapped
in a prison of Chef's design, I am once
l "®?'n 'e^ to the business of unrequited
love.
^».   Ebony Bertorelli
Despistado
The People Of and Their Verses
(Jade Tree)    ^^Jr
Guest Posted: Thu Dec 8, 2004 9:05
pm: They rule too much to break up, van
troubles is all.
Jade Tree Posted: ThumFeb 10 2005
9:38 am: Well it's time taay_mthe rumours.
It's not van problems....
I bet Tim Owen and Darren Walters
from Jade Tree Records spent a good
portion of January trying to convince the
former members of Despistado to stay
together. After three years of relentless
touring, their high-energy post rock had
won them a legion of fans across the
country. Jade Tree were on the verge of
releasing the follow-up to the successful
The Emergency Response EP when the
band decided to call it a day. The label
stuck by them though, and The People
Of and Their Verses recently became a
digital-only release available through
their website, www.jadetree.com.
Despistado have the post-punk
formula down pat, and they pull it off
better than most. The two guitars weave
their parts around each other, rapidly
switching back and forth between quiet
picking and fast angular chords, while the
drums and bass keep things ass-shakingly
danceable. Unfortunately most of the
songs feel like collections of smaller parts
and they start to blur together. There are
a few stand-out tracks ; "Burning House"
opens the album with a blast of energy
that's not found elsewhere on the album,
and Dagan Harding's yelping, while
consistent throughout, is especially strong
on "Magnetic Streetlights." Overall it's
a solid first record and it's a shame we
won't be able to see what they would
have done next.
Robb Sonic
Hrsta
Stem Stem in Electro
(Constellation Records)
I God bless them. Constellation
Records have released another group
in their (almost) exclusively Montreal
pure-blooded family/label tradition. This
time, they have incorporated an original
founding member of Godspeed You
Wack. Emperor! (Mike Moya), members/
associates of Hangedup, Sackville,
and A Silver Mt. Zion (Eric Craven and
Harris Newman), and a member of the
closely related. Set Fire to Flames (Brooke
Crouser). Of course, the trademark
Montreal paranoia is out in full force,
but the most obvious difference here is
the presence of more traditional song
structures, with vocals. Unfortunately, the
addition of vocals for me felt like a movie
adapted from a good book. Just like an
actor ruining one's perfect impression of a
literary character. Stem Stem almost feels
like a Godspeed album that is somewhat
more accessible, spelt out, and ultimately
predictable. There is a lot of good to be
found here, but as far as I'm concerned,
nothing that compares to the emotional
and physical power of the other bands.
Good to know they won't be quitting their
day jobs.
Soren Bros.
Gruff Rhys
Yr Atal Genhedlaeth
(Placid Casual/Rough Trade)
I wanted to write a review of the new
solo album by the lead singer of the Super
Furry Animals because I think they're a
great band and because I'm attracted
to the idea of hearing an album entirely
composed of Welsh songs. What I didn't
want was the repetitive nonsensical chant
found on every song (but especially on
"Rhagluniaeth Ysgafn," "Y Gwybodusion"
and "Ni Yw Y Byd") haunting me day in
and day out, taking over my mind in the
most vile, vicious way imaginable. You see,
in making an album that is completely
lyricallyisolated from the vast majority of its
listeners, Rhys chose to overcompensate
on the infectious melody §me. Luckily
perhaps, only a talented songwriter such
as Rhys could pull this off, acttlqlly coming
out with an immediately affecting, but
entirely incomprehensible album. For
the unsuspecting listener, however, this
album can be bev^Bemg, if not fully
dangerous.
SorenSros.
The Locust
Safety Second. Body Last
(Ipecac)
This ten-minutes-and-ten-seconds,
two track, five movement release from
San Diego's The Locust has been labeled
their most accessible to date. Yes, bassist/
singer Justin Pearson's voice still makes
me think of a crazy, angry, foot-stomping,
demon boy in the supermarket, but even
with all the instrumental deliberations of
this album, everything fits together like a
beautifully violent vacation.
This album is glorious for people like
me who had a previously low "30 second
Locust scream song" attention span.
Anytime the shattering insanity seems
like it'll be too much, they totally switch it
up with something peaceful and creepy
and then right when you think you're
safe, you're slammed again and then it's
over... (sigh)
Natalie Vermeer
Tolan McNeil
There Will Always Be a Salesman
(Red Cat Records)
In my mind Tolan McNeil is the
equivalent of Alfred from Batman. The
quiet guy behind the scenes who cleans
and showcases the nifty gadgets that
Batman and Robin get to fool around
with, who controls the particulars of a
mission from the safety of the mansion.
Lucky Mouse Studios in Victoria may
not be a mansion, but Tolan has put his
golden touch on the albums of bands like
Chet, Hank Pine and Lilly Fawn, Frog Eyes,
and Carolyn Mark. Seeing Tolan step
out of his role as producer creates great
anticipation. I mean if Alfred got to kick
ass, what would his roundhouse look like?
To be honest, with thfe album I was
hoping for a Dale Morningstar// Grew Up
on Sodom Road situation, and I may have
partially gotten my wish with McNeil's
genre hopping, but brHBance was not to
be had. Don't get me wrong. Salesman
is not bad. The majority of the album
had a down home aft-country feel with
songs like "One Will Be Late", and "Now
That's Not Fair." Unique stand out songs
like "Mom Mom Mom", and the cover
of Captain Beefheart's "The Cardboard
Cut-Out Sundown" gives it body. I
wouldn't discourage anyone from buying
this album as it's a definite bonus to any
collection. However, if you're cornered on
the street by the Joker and Catwoman,
There Will Always be a Salesman may not
save your ass.
Ebony Bertorelli
Nine Inch Nails
With Teeth
(Interscope)
Soon after Pretty Hate Machine
stomped out a unique style of industrial
rock in the late 80s—poppier than
contemporaries Ministry and Skinny
Puppy but still raw and aggressive—Nine
Inch Nails mastermind Trent Reznor
lost his focus as a musician. Personal
problems dominated every aspect of his
songwriting, resulting in the rage of the
Broken EP and the desolate soundscapes
of The Downward Spiral. More recently.
The Fragile's dramatic vision was marred
by lack of direction and sprawling sonic
excess.
After a five-and-a-half year break to
wrest himself from the grip of addiction,
Reznor has rediscovered his love of music.
With Teeth is the simplest and most song-
based disc from NIN since their debut.
Compared to The Fragile, it's an exercise
m restraint: instruments and effects enter
and disappear with clear and poignant
musical intention. Electric bass snakes
around stuttering glitch beats at the start
of "All The Love In The World," while the
title track drops from marching synth
lines and acerbic vocals info quavering,
earnest singing accompanied only by a
piano, before jolting back into the main
melody.
No new lyrical ground is broken, but
the familiar themes of angst and confusion
are toned down and more fluently
expressed than in the past. Spoken-word
sections, falsettos, and sustained notes
have control and confidence—and the
screams and howls, when they appear,
are more connected with the song than
with trying to exorcise personal demons.
With Teeth shows that after a decade of
being an architect of desolation, Trent
Reznor is still a master of crafting direct,
satisfying industrial-rock tunes,
Simon Foreman ^
Nine inch Nails
^
Discorder, June 2005 — page 17 I The Weakerthans
Constantines
Ida Nllson
April 30
Richard's on Richards
If   you   look   up   honesty   in   a
| dictionary,   you   will   find   two
definitions.      The      second      is
southeastern European
hpuseplant that has pretty purple
flowers. The first, though, refers to
the quality of being genuine and
t sincere, and these two bands
have recently been tagged fhe
most honest bands in Canada,
apparently with good reason.
To start off the night, Ida
Nllson (of Beans and Radiogram
fame/anonymity) played a fifteen
minute   set.   FIFTEEN   MINUTES.   I
I realize that she is a member of
neither of the main bands, and I
| only caught the last song of her
; solo-with-piano set, but to even
| attempt to win over a crowd in
fifteen minutes takes something
\ from deep inside the heart. Lets
\ just say that only an honest band
would invite such an honest local
singer-songwriter to open their
show.
The Constantines began
setting up their equipment
immediately, without being
pretentious or making a big deal
out of anything. The Constantines
e amazing every time I see them,
■ and of the 4 times I have seen
them, this time blew me away the
most. They have wicked guitar
solos and just generally awesome
power.
So I'm not the biggest fan
out there of The Weakerthans, but
; these guys were so honest that
: while they were playing one of
| their more popular songs, a boy
1 the front of the crowd passed
I out and Samson put the song
on hold, just to check if he was
alright (Awwwww). Also worthy of
\ mention is that I stopped to look
around me during their set, and
every single person in the room
I was straight-faced and mouthing
DiSCORDER, June 2005
the words to nearly every song,
looking deeply emotionally
connected to each other and the
band. While normally I would say
that this type of behaviour falls
closer to cultism than a response
to honesty (which, now that I think
about it, also ties in with the fact
that the Constantines insisted on
everyone holding their fists in the
air as some kind of salute...), the
fact is that these guys just have
honest faces, and isn't that what
really counts?
Soren Bros
The Dead Science
Eluvium
Sun Vow
Bill Horist
May 6
The Vera Project, Seattle
I'm going to review this show in
reverse order, because it was the
opener who turned what would
have been a memorable show
into an unforgettable one, and I
want to save the best for last.
The Dead Science pulled
off their unique mix of smoky
cabaret, jazz, and rock to the
point of perfection. Even though
the singer's voice rarely rose
above a seductive croon, the trio
attacked their instruments with a
discipline and passion rarely seen,
hammering through a brand new
set of songs not found on their
debut. Submariner, or their new
EP Bird Bones in the Bug House,
both underrated gems forged
in the depths of Seattle's vibrant
music scene. While many Seattle
bands have been catapulted to
relative tiers of fame, from Modest
Mouse to Death Cab to the Blood
Brothers, the Dead Science
perfectly illustrate how there is
still a slew of undiscovered bands
in Seattle that equally deserve to
break out onto the national scene
(if not more).
Eluvium was the only
disappointment of the night, as
the breath-robbing gorgeousness
of their newest, Talk Amongst the
Trees, was marred by squealing
feedback and other technical
difficulties. Its oceanic pulses of
ambience gently ascending to the
stratosphere were also replaced
by a stagnant pool of sound, pretty
on its own, but once stretched
past the ten minute mark, it failed
to hold the audience's attention.
They were especially
disappointing after following Sun
Vow, who nailed a similar formula
of calculated beauty, dressed in
post rock skin. Glacial melodies
erupted into triumphant climaxes,
recalling a more upbeat and to-.
the-point Explosions in the Sky.
They deftly balanced build-up
and release, remaining nimble
and engaging while retaining a
tremendous force and weight
behind their music, a mix rarely
achieved in post-rock.
But the true star of the night
was Bill Horist, a solo guitarist who
put on the most impressive musical
display I've ever seen. Most would
be quick to label the assault
on his guitar—with everything
from tweezers to broken car
parts—as experimental or avant-
garde, and then judge it by the
preconceptions of masturbatory
pretentiousness and abrasiveness
associated with those genres.
But far from being an obtuse
exercise in sonic exhibitionism,
the sounds he conjured were
otherworldly, chillingly beautiful
and overwhelming. Even though
I was watching everything he
was doing, I could swear for the
life of me there were a thousand
other musicians tucked away
somewhere in the room, conjuring
these sounds on his command. He
was so good, it was distracting; I'd
stop to save* the sheer brilliance
of what he'd just pulled off, only
to realize he'd done it three more
times while I was off reliving that
moment of sonic perfection. While
guitar heroics are often measured
by the speed of one's wank or the
sloppiness of indie aesthetics, it's
refreshing to see the real heroes
like Horist not only pushing the
boundaries of the guitar as a sonic
tool, but of music and its ability to
move the soul.
Ben Fussell
Snow Patrol
Embrace
May 6
Vogue Theatre
Embrace easily sells out shows
back home in England, but on
this side of the pond they were
filling the role of opening band.
Still, there were more than a few
overzealous British and Irish fans in
the room to witness their first visit
to Vancouver. Too bad the sound
system at the Vogue was hit-and-
miss as the band's vocals and
lyrics in their grandiose anthems
were often not loud enough.
If you needed proof of how
influential the band is in England,
look no further than their newest
single, "Gravity." Singer Danny
McNamara mentioned that Chris
Martin of Coldplay wrote the
pretty ballad and thought it was
more of an Embrace song, so he
gave it to the band. Now that's
what I call a gift.
Noticing that the audience
was a little too comfortable in their
seats, McNamara demonstrated
how to stand and look like you're
jumping to the music. With the
lesson over, everyone stood up
and the band kicked into the fun
and upbeat organ riff of "Save
Me." They ended their set with the
gorgeous haunting ballad, "Out of
Nothing."
Where did all these Snow
Patrolfanscomefrom?They started
off with feel-good "Chocolate"
and most of the set list was from
Final Straw including, "Wow,"
"Grazed Knees", and the moving
"Same." They also resurrected
their past with a Reindeer Section
tune and really had fun rocking
out. Guitarist Nathan Connolly got
to show off a great set of pipes on
back-up vocal duties. The new
addition of bassist Paul Wilson
raised the group's energy level
and punky side. Ripped out from
the pages of a Hollywood script,
singer Gary Lightbody locked eyes
with a random guy in the crowd;
he joked with the audience that
he owed this new "special love" to
the stage lights because they hit !
his hair at the right angle. Mental
note: invest in personal spotlight.
As a preview of things to  \
come,  they  played  three  new
tunes. Two were pure alt-rock and
the third was a lovely melody. The
crowd's energy surged once again  j
during the encore when Snow  ;
Patrol launched into the clap-
along beat and fun harmonies of
"Tiny Little Fractures." The crowd
also had a thrill singing the first few
verses of their the band's single,
"Run," and basked in the dazzling
glow of light and music.
Emily Khong
Wolf Eyes
Magneticring
May 7
Media Club
I was late to this show, so 1 didn't
get to see Magneticring, but a
friend of mine described his set
as "lots of knob-twiddling, sort of
music box meets haunted house
soundtrack." The old-school noise
fiends seemed underwhelmed,
but fhe kids ate it up. Good music
to fall asleep to, apparently,
though whether or not the artist
would take that as a compliment,
I couldn't say.
Wolf Eyes' set was pretty
different from the Sonic Youth- .
opener they put on at the
Commodore last summer. That
time, it was one 45-minute jam
that started as shapeless junkyard
drone-and-clang and built into an
awesome raw sewage rave-up
with an unholy groove that got the
crowd movin' and screamin'. For
the Media Clubls smaller audience
of dedicated Wolf Eyes fans, the
band was more interested in
shredding brainstems than moving
hips. Rather than working up a
rhythm, ail three members just bent
over their homemade implements
—suitcases full of dials and wires,
guitars and basses welded and
ducf-faped to unidentifiable
electronics—and cranked out
a howling feedback vortex that
went straight to the guts like
psychological, warfare.
This was no art-school
experiment, either. The members
of Wolf Eyes, are  thick-necked
Michelle Mayne Photo dudes, one sweaty and hairless,
, the other two invisible beneath
matted manes. These guys^e*
pizza-and-beer types, and their
noise is industrial catharsis, not
conceptual pretension. I likssMb
yflp^pf these noise storrreian
attempt' to exorcise the cultural
oblivion of a Midwest upbringing,
a kind of therapeutic vomiting
that gets something off the band's
chest while, staging a nihilistic
assault on the aural landscape
of suburbia. Of course, I have no
idea if the band would agree.
The audience reaction
varied. There were the true
heads at the front, the guys who
must really grasp this junk-sick
headspace: eyes closed, fists
Clenched, bent over with neck
muscles straining; 1 figure that
Wolf Eyes must be tike church for .
these dudes (and they were aH
dudes, believe me). There were
the keen hipsters, sharp-dressed
and screaming for more after
every song ('cuz noise is totally
the newhotness this season). And
finally, there was the crowd dt the
back; gawkers, randoms, and the
jaded noise hounds who've seen
it all before. There was plenty of
heckling from this peanut gallery,
but the "fuck you"-ing was more
collaborative than dismissive,
and jtvhegpiile, the singer, .had
fo pause between songs 'cuz he
felt il.{long story, apparently)-, the
crowd cheered him on: "Puke!
Pukef Puke!" I wouldn't blame him
for a touchy stomach—Wolf fyes
makes me feel queasy, too—but
I've gotta salute anybody that's
wiing to live in this bad-vibes
nightmare 24/7. It must take a lot
of fortitude.
Saelan Twerdy
LCD Soundsystem
MJ.A.
May 10
Commodore Ballroom
Thanks to the workings of the hype
machine, James Murphy (a.k.a.
LCD Soundsystem) and M.I.A.
held a sold-out dance party.
"Mommy, why aren't there
more girl MCs in the world?" M.I.A.
is one of the coolest British acts
to come 'round these parts and
was the perfect match to LCD.
Her comrades were a sidekick
vocalist, and DJ Diplo who started
the set with a hilarious scratch
session where images of a press
conference between Bush and
Tony Blair flashed in sync with
the beats. Both M.I.A and her
backup singer may be petite but
they owned the stage. Back-up
dancers need not apply 'cuz they
know how to strut.
Killer melodies like "Fire
Fire" were backed up by M.IA.'s
smooth rhymes and Diplo's
grooves. He sampled songs like
"Sweet Dreams" and "Baby Got
Back". M.IA.'s music has the
right amount of hip hop, reggae,
bhangra and dance-hall to keep
the dancing to a maximum.
Despite their girlish tone, the
ladies managed to sing with balls;
what they lacked in powerhouse
vocals was made up for in their
killer delivery. The night was a mix-
mash of everything. "10 Dollar"
sounded like an African chant
mixed with house beats and
lyrics like "suck you like a lollipop"
played off of their innocent faces.
M.I.A. ended the set with the do-
what-l-want lyrics of "Hombre."
The group got the loudest
cheering for an encore an opener
has received at The Commodore
in a while.
The album does not prepare
one for an LCD experience. James
Murphy, looking like he had just
finished a shift at a local music store,
filled the stage to capacity with a
drummer, electro/dub sampler
specialist, guitarist/drummer and
bassist/Moog player. The opening
number, "Beat Connection", was
the Grade-A choice for displaying
LCD's sound: a collision course
of bombastic new wave/disco/
garage rawk crashing into major
beats.
With no time to rest, the
band played tracks like, "Give It
Up," "On Repeat," and made-
for-the-80s "Tribulations" with its
awesome bass riff. The crowd
manically danced like it was going
out of style. Between breaths.
Murphy purposely introduced only
the drummer to the audience
and pointed to him for cheers
throughout the night. He even
rewarded a fan with one of his
own beers for singing all the lyrics.
Murphy's deadpan vocal delivery
of "Losing My Edge" was genius.
"Yeah" had the easiest chorus to
sing along to and was a fantastic
set closer. Its melody built up into
a complete wall of distortion and
Murphy screamed amongst all
the fuzz until the bassist was on his
knees plugging his ears. The only
thing to do was to stand in awe.
The crowd wanted more after the
encore, "Jump into the Fire" but
Murphy said they didn't know any
more songs.
Yeah, yeah, yeah...one of
the best live performances this
year.
Emily Khong
The Books
The Long Ranger
Mia Doi Todd
May 13
Chop Suey, Seattle
The only thing better than a
road trip, is a road trip to see
your favourite band. I've been
thoroughly devoted to The Books
since Thought for Food came
out in 2002, and they've only
grown in stature with each of
their fascinatingly self-contained
albums. Until now, though,
they've never toured. How could
they? Their sample-heavy music
has elements of voice, guitar,
cello, and other instruments,
but they're all chopped to bits,
processed and rearranged into
polyphonic collages. The pleasure
of listening to The Books is in the
way they constantly surprise you,
using startling juxtapositions of
voice  and  sound  to generate
warmth, humour, even
the miraculous through songs that
simply don't behave like songs.
With the release of this year's Lost
and Safe, however, you could
feel them gearing up to hit the
road. For the first time, they had
an album that felt played rather
than merely constructed, and if
they sacrificed a small amount
of unpredictability, they gained
a new level of thematic depth
and emotional resonance,
especially through their new
emphasis on lyrics. So it was with
great anticipation that I drove
to Seattle to see how The Books
would translate their electroacoustic folktronica into a live
performance.
There were two opening^
bands. The first was a disposable
dance-pop group called The.
Long Ranger, and the second wasj
the sublime Mia Doi Todd, who has
lent her wispy Joni Mitchell-isms to
songs by Prefuse 73 and The Postal
Service.
Then there was The Books.
With less than half a dozen live
appearances under their belts,"
they were flawless. Their samples
were integrated seamlessly with
the performance, as were a,
selection of videos that were*
only a small part of the night's
exhilarating sequence of surprises.
For an opener, they launched
into "That Right Ain't Shit" with
a passion. All those stuttering,*
glitched-out noises that you
thought were processed edits?!
They played them live. Paul del
Jong was banging on the strings!
of his cello with his bow in triple-
time while Nick Zammuto went
two-hand tapping up the neck
of a five-string bass. They brought*
Anne Doerner with them, who was!
a big part of 2003's The Lemon off
Pink, and she sang and played*
clavinet and banjo and some'
other instruments. About halfway
through their set, she broke up
Books material with a sultry Cajun
French folk song.
Nick's little brother Mikey,
perhaps familiar to fans as
Thought for Food's "Mikey Bass,"
came out after the second song
and proceeded to show off on
his acoustic bass. The age range is
one of the nicer things about this
band: the oldest member is over
twice as old as the youngest. It
makes them feel like a family. Their
videos were equally enchanting.
Some of them were old home
movies (Mikey on a trampoline,
Nick's adolescent head slowly
rising up in front of a TV with the
video for "Smells Like Teen Spirit"
playing on it, Paul as an infant
spitting out his food), some were
found video (Japanese schoolkids
in the video for "Tokyo") and
some of them were just words.
One of the best moments was
during "Smells Like Content"!
when every syllable being sung,
appeared on the screen as al
homonym: "garnered wisdom'l
became "gar/nerd/whiz/dumb."l
A repeated sample of the wordl
"meditation" became anagrams!
of     of itself: "I tamed Toni." "Do it ii
meat."
As a friend of mine once
said, most good bands do one of:
two things: they blow your mind
or they break your heart. The
Books do both, and the humour, j
humanity, and sincerity of their |
music registered all over thej
huge smiles on their faces when I
every song was greeted with
raucous applause. They seemed!
as surprised and happy as we«
were to find out what they were
capable of.
Saelan Twerdy
And You Will Know Us By The
Trail Of Dead
The (International) Noise
Conspiracy
We Are Wolves
May 20
Commodore Ballroom
Got down in enough time fo see
a majority of the Montreal trio
known as We Are Wolves; how
these guys scooped an impressive
bffl such as this is beyond me, but
they did get the crowd dancing.
No small feat, I assure you, but
as one member pounded out
primitive beats in time with the
other member plunking keys whilst
the third yelled and strummed
alternately between guitar and
bass, you had the recipe for some
hip-swihgin' even if it was ires
difficile to decipher the band's
lyrical content. That said, you
have to give them some credit for
entertaining us so early; perhaps
they'll   be   back  rockin'   some.
'smaller venues in the future.
The Swedes " were up
next, and for a band that's stl
weathering fhe storm of not havittb
a North American distribution deal
for ther most recent album Armed
Love (already a year and a half
old in their native Sc'andanavia),
they appeared nonplussed and
ready to rock our socks off For the
fifth jl) time, Vancouverwas witness
to one of fhe best live bands on
the planet today. Complete with
huge banner, matching green
camo jackets and truckloads
of energy, Dennis Lyxzen and
company focused their sights on
setting us straight when it comes
to making a difference in the
world but having a damn good
time while doing it. He also proved
he still has the moves that would
make even the Godfather Of
Soul blush, although at one point
it bordered on bizarre, as guitarist
Lars Stromberg and Dennis got
tangled and decided to make the
best of if by wrestling with each
other. The band cruised through
mostly new material from Armed
Love; and aJso squeezed out a
couple of oldies, most notably
"Capitalism Stole My Virginity," but
a few others from Survival Sickness
and A New Morning, Changing '
Weather ("Born Into A Mess,"
anyone?), couldn't have hurt.
After that dynamic display,
another land of dynamic stage was
set as the pride of Austin returned
again to Vancouver after giving.
the city its best performance
yet back in 2003 at Richard's On
Richards. .How they would top that
was, I'm sure, the question on the
minds of many in the audience,
but I was just awestruck the
minute the first chords were
played. Two drummers.is always a
sure-fire bet to get me amped on
a show, and there were moments
when I thought the bookstore
underneath was finally going
to get their insurance money
collected as the pummeling
of drums caused ripples that
resembled small earthquakes. I
couldn't name a song to save
my life, but I'm sure the majority
of content was culled from their
newest release Worlds Apart, and!
the intensity with which these
guys play is impressive^ taking
into account the number of
times instruments were swapped
between members.
To save the road crew the
headache of clean up, Trail
Of Dead kept the chaos to a
minimum, instead inviting nearly
the entire audience to create it
for them. Hence, a (ot of confused
yet cheerful crowd members
ended up on stage, leaving their
mark on the Commodore floor as
You Will Know Them By The Trail Of
Plastic Cups.
Bryce Dunn &
Quinn Omori Photo
Discorder, June 2005 — page 19 finoSno,  ^y iHAITS
1
^CADEAUX
CARIBOU
CHIXDIGGIT
Physical City
•The Milk of Human Kindness
Pink Razors
Live From the Short Attention Span
Our Thickness
Sound Document
bomlho 0
JFjIP^
ft^
KID KOALA
Ninja Tune M&^Jfrlt
0 a.
THE RUSSIAN FUTURISTS
Upper Class
Hit*
P:ANO
Brigadoon
Mint
7
THE PONYS
Celebration Castle
In The Red
8
SPOON
Gimmie Fiction
Merge
*t _
THE RAVEONETTES
Pretty In Black
Sony
=10
ONBDA
The Wedding
Three Gut
Ml.
ARCHETECTURE IN HELSINKI
In Case We Die
Bar None
iifc
YO LA TENGO
Prisoners Of Love
Matador
13
SILVER MT. ZION
Horses In the Sky
Constellation
HfSI
MANDO DIAO
Bring'Em In
Mute
£"%-{-
RESIDENTS
Animal Lover
Mute
ii
HOT HOT HEAT
EJevator
Sire
17
ELECTRIC EEL SHOCK
Go USA!
Gearhead
ARTIST
Title
Label
THE PEELS
The Peels
Dim Mak
CANNED HAMM
CAESERS
Erotic Thriller
Paper Tigers
Pro Am
EMI
BLOC PARTY
CASTLE PROJECT
• Silent Alarm
Diaries of a Broken Heart .
.Dim Mak
White Whale
FALCONFW^i^
FANTOMAS
Here's Your Ghost
Suspended Animation
Saved By Radio
HANGED UP
Clatter for Control
'Constellation
collaspINg OPPOSITES
EYEBALL SKELETON
MICE PARADE
EPOXIES
Mean Letters
k   #1
Bem-vindaVontade
Stop The Future
Independent
My Pal God
Bubble Core
Fat
NOVILLLERO
Aim For the holes In their Hearts
Mint
SLEATER-KINNEY
The Woods
SubPop
RAE SPOON
Your Trailer Door
Washboard
ELECTRELANE
Axes
Too Pure
THE GO BETWEENS
Oceans Apart
Yep Roc
GORDON B. ISNOR
Creatures AB Tonight
Lord Sir Skronk
III Eri   Inna 1 &_• Th
Fri June 3 @ The Marine Club
PARALLELS
WMIrNUMBERS
RuwMleijcme <psied£#iti
?!?!W?iWWW!fftWrtTWH
from Montreal The HIGH DIALS
The TRANSMITORS plus gu    "
SPffl MUSIC AND CITR 1D1.9 PRESENT TH! »BN
mm
WEDNESDAYS
Hfiiinnni
a
PNEUMA
HOOD OF FIRE
AVATAR
THE FIBHT UNITED
UNIT731
SECONDSTALL
IjUNI iNEf22ND   SyNE29THl
THELUMPS     PONDEROSA * DAMAGE WC
CULT OF GENIUS   THE MANVILS      GUITARSENAL
HEVINOVA      THREE HI US SCARECROW BALCONY
CHET RELEASE PARTY!
BLACKOUT BEACH
THE LONDON APARTMENTS
THE BELADEANS
NO-FI SOUL REBELLION
VANCOURTLAND RANGERS
KICK IN THE EYE
JOEL;
DOWN WITH LEES
CLOVER HONEY
2066 Kingswa v (at Victoria)
W NERVE ACTION
ANDRE CHYRS • RUN GMC
HE
SPARROW
THE NEINS CIRCA
PRINTS* THE SPINOFFS
MY PROJECTS BLUE
THE REGIONAL HATS
GO GHETTO TIGER
LUTHER WRIGHT
RICH HOPE &
MIKEY MANVILLE
ACOUSTIC MINDS d
THE COM EDOWNS plus guests
THE ROBOSEXUALS
CADEAUX • SECOND
Sunday, June 19 @ The Railway Clul
HAROLD RAY UVE IN CONCERT
THE BELADEANS • 9pm Sharp!
THE SEAMS • SCOTT
JACKSON & The r '
ANDREW BURDEN
YOU SAY PARTY! WE SAY DIE!
ANEMONES
ii!JirffllwwlB»il'!i(il.f^ffiaiii1
SWANK • THE NEW BLACK
2066 Kingsway (at Victoria)
 EMEU	
RAISED BY WOLVES
THE JOLTS
e 26 @ The WISE HALI
plus THE LANCASTERS 9pm Sh
WeiLJune29 @The Railway Club!
THEMDM'RODmWeCROOl
ftttp
J_P»*v%&
^isOrkestrinl
fimmtrmm
Discorder, June 2005 — page 21 Frdgrah Guide
For CiTR 101.9FM
LIST!
W_WtirWII_\_mP
SUNDAY
ARE YOU SERIOUS? MUSIC
9:00AM-12:00PM
All of time is measured by its art. This show presents the
most recent new music from around the world. Ears
open.
THE ROCKERS SHOW ^^T
12:00PM-3:00PM
Reggae inna all styles and fashion.
BLOOD ON WE SADDLE alt.
3:00PM-5:00PM
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-boots country.
AFROBEAT
3:00PM-5:00PM
In two hours, I take the listener for a spin—musically—
around the world; my passion is African music and
music from the Diaspora.
Afrobeat is where you can catch up on the latest in
the "World Music" scene and reminisce on the classic
collections. Don't miss it.
<uget_afrobeat@yahoo.com>
CHIPS WITH EVERYTHING att.
5:O0PM-6:00PM
British pop music from all decades.
SAINT TROPEZ alt.
5:O0PM-6:O0PM
International pop (Japanese, French, Swedish, British,
US, etc.), 60s soundtracks and lounge. Book your jet set
holiday now!
QUEER FM
6:00PM-8:00PM
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transsexual
communities of Vancouver. Lots of human interest
features, background on current issues, and great
music.
RHYTHMSINDIA
8:00PM-10:00PM
Rhythmslndia features a wide range of music from India,
including popular music from Indian movies from the
1930s to the present, classical music, semi-classical
music such as Ghazals and Bhajans, and also Qawwalis,
pop, and regional language numbers.
TRANCENDANCE
10:00PM-12:00AM
Join us in practicing the ancient art of rising above
common thought and ideas as your host DJ Smiley
Mike lays down the latest Jrance cuts to propel us into
the domain of the mystic-al.
<trancendance@hotmail.com>
ELECTRONIC SPECTRUM
12:00AM-3:00AM
FHJ.-IN
3:00PM-6:00AM
MONDAY
FILL-IN
6:00AM- 8:00AM
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
8:00AM-11:00AM
Your favourite brown-sters, James and Peter, offer a
savoury blend of the familiar and exotic in a blend of
aural deHghfs!
LIONS AND TIGERS AND BEARS...
11:00AM- 12:00PM
ALT. RADIO
12:00PM-1:00PM
Hosted by David B.
PARTS UNKNOWN
1:00PM-3:00PM
Underground pop for the minuses with the occasional
interview with your host, Chris.
FILL-IN
3:O0PM-4:OOPM
ABSOLUTE BEGINNERS
4:O0PM-5:O0PM
A chance for new CiTR DJs to flex ther musical muscle.
Surprises galore.
FILL-IN
5:00PM-6:00PM
SON OF NfTE DREEMS alt.
6:OOPM-7:30PM
SOLARIZATION alt.
6:00PM-6:30PM
MY ASS att.
6:30PM-7:30PM
Phelps, Albini, 'n' me.
WIGFLUX RADIO
7:30PM-9:00PM
Listen to Selecta Kr/stabelle for your reggae education.
THE JAZZ SHOW
9:00PM-12:00AM
Vancouver's longest running prime-time jazz program.
Hosted by the ever-suave, Gavin Walker. Features at
11:00, as listed
June 6: Exploring the Future is a rare album recorded
for a black-owned record label and demonstrated
what the black jazz players of L.A. were up to in the
late 50s. A- hard-driving quintet lead by bassist Curtis
Counce that featured legendary pianist/composer
Elmo Hope and tenor sax giant Harold Land.
June 13: Jazz Festival media director John Orysik and
Gavin devote the entire program to artists featured at
this year's 20th anniversary Vancouver International
Jazz Festival.
June 20: Tonight one of the great drum masters and
one who will be playing at this year's jazz fest. On tonight's feature Roy Haynes will be leading his quartet
of young players featuring the great alto saxist Frank
Strozier. This was in 1963 and at the jazz fest (June 25)
80 year old Haynes will be doing the same with a different group of young players.
June 27: The Pleasure Dome is the title of a fine album from one of the great young stars of today's
jazz scene. Trumpeter Jim Rotondi is a fine example
of a player who understands yet is not bound ny tradition. Jim, who has played in Vancouver and will
again leads a quintet of young New York-based players through a great set tonight. Check out what the
younger jazz guys are up to.
VENGEANCE IS MINE
12:O0AM-3:O0AM
All the best the world of punk rock has to offer, in the wee
hours of the mom. Hosted by Trevor.
FILL-IN
3:00AM - 6:30AM
TUESDAY
PACIFIC PICKIN'
6:30AM-8:00AM
Bluegrass, "old-time music and its derivatives with Arthur
and "The Lovely Andrea" Berman.
HIGHBRED VOICES att.
8:00AM-9:30AM
PLEASE ROCK THE DOOR alf.
8:00AM-9:30AM
Start your weekend ridiculously eariy with Vancouver's
super awesome fun time happy radio show. Playing
all the dance-punk, electro, rock, new wave, hip hop,
80's, etc. sh*t that your mom thinks is cool.
THIRD TIME'S THE CHARM
9:30AM-11:30AM
Open your ears and prepare for a shock! A harmless
note may make you a fan! Hear the menacing scourge
that is Rock and Roll! Deadlier than the most dangerous
criminal!
<bcminsixtynine@hotmail.com>
MORNING AFTER SHOW att.
11:30AM- 12:30PM
REEL TO REAL alt.
12:30PM-1:00PM
Movie reviews and criticism.
ENGAGING THE WORD att,
1:00PM-2:00PM
Canadian   authors,   fiction   writers   and   novelists
interviewed by James O'Hearn.
CIRCUIT TRACING
2:O0PM-3:30PM
EN AVANT LA MUSIQUE att.
3:30PM-5:00PM
«En Avant la musique!» se concentre sur le metissage
des genres musicaux au sein d'une francophonie
ouverte a tous les courants. This program focuses
on cross-cultural music and its influence on mostly
Francophone musicians.
TANSI KIYAW alt.
3:30PM-5:00PM
Tansi kiyaw? Is Michif-Cree (one of the Metis languages)
for "Hello, How are you?" and is a monthly Indigenous
music and spoken word show. Hosted b June Scudeler
(for those who know me from other shows-I'm Metis!),
the show will feature music and spoken word as well
as events and news from Indian country and special
guests. Contact me at jlscudel@ucalgary.ca with news,
even listings and ideas. Megwetch!
FILL"IN ISiii^
4:30PM-5:00PM
WENER'S BARBEQUE
5:00PM-6:00PM
Join the sports dept. for their coverage of the T-Birds.
FLEXYOURHEAD
6:00PM-8:00PM
Up the punx, down the emo! Keepin' it real since 1989,
yo.flexyourhead.vancouverhardcore.com
SALARIO MINIMO
8:00PM-10:00PM
THE LOVE DEN alt.
10:00PM-12:00AM
<loveden@hotmail.com>
ESCAPISM att.
10:00PM-12.00AM
es«cap*ism n: escape from the reality or routine of life by
absorbing the mind in entertainment or fantasy.
Host: DJ Satyricon.
<DJSatyricon@hotmail.com>
AURAL TENTACLES
12:O0AM-6:O0AM
It could be punk, ethno, global, trance, spoken word,
rock, the unusual and the weird, or it could be
something different. Hosted by DJ Pierre.
WEDNESDAY
FILL-IN
6:00AM- 7:00AM
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
7:00AM-9:00AM
CiTR NEWS AND ARTS
9:00AM-10:00AM
EXQUISITE CORPSE
10:00AM-11:30AM
Experimental, radio-art, sound coflage, filed recordings,
etc. Recommended for the insane.
ANOIZE
11:30AM-! :00PM
Luke Meat irritates and educates through musical
deconstruction. Recommended for the strong.
THE SHAKEatt.
l:OOPM-2:O0PM
MIRCHMASALAatt.
1:00PM-2:00PM
DEMOCRACY NOW
2:00PM-3:00PM
Independent ney* hosted by award-winning journalists
, Amy Goodman and Juan Gonzalez.
MOTORDADDY alt.
3:00PM-5:00PM
Cycle-riffic rawk and roll!
RUMBLETONE RADIO att.
3:00PM-5:00PM
Primitive, fuzzed-out garage mayhem!
NECESSARY VOICES
5:00PM-6:30PM
Socio-political, environmental activist news and spoken
word with some music, too. www.necessaryvoices.org
<necessaryvoices@telus .net>
AND SOMETIMES WHY alt.
6:30PM-8:00PM
(First Wednesday of every month.)
BLUE MONDAY alt.
6:30PM-8:OOPM
Vancouver's only industrial-elecfronic-retro-goth
program. Music to schtomp to, hosted by Coreen,
JUICE BOX
8:O0PM-9:O0PM
Developing your relational and individual sexual health,
expressing diversity, celebrating queerness and encouraging pleasure at all stages. Sexuality educators
Julia and Alix will quench your searcjn for responsible,
progressive sexuality over your life span!
www.juiceboxradio.com
FOLK OASIS
9:00PM-11:00PM
Roots music forfolkies and non-folkies... bluegrass, singer-
songwriters, wortdbeat, alt country, and more. Not a
mirage!
<folkoasis@canada.com>
HANS KLOSS' MISERY HOUR
11:00PM-2:00AM
This is pretty much, the best thing on radio.
FIRST FLOOR SOUND SYSTEM
2:00AM-6:00AM
THURSDAY
FILL - IN
6:00AM-8:00AM
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
8:00AM-10:00 AM
SWEET AND HOT
10:00AM-12:00PM
Sweet dance music and hot jazz from the 1920s 30s
and 40s.
UNPACK YOUR ADJECTIVES
12:00PM-1:00PM
WE ALL FALL DOWN
1:00PM-2:00PM
Punk rock, indie pop, and whatever else I deem
worthy. Hosted by a closet nerd.
THE ONOMATOPOEIA SHOW
2:00PM-3:00PM
Comix comix comix. Oh yeah, and some music with
Robin.
RHYMES AND REASONS
3:00PM-5:00PM
DJ Knowone slaves over hot-multi-track to bring a
fresh continuous mix of fresh every week. Made
from scratch, samples and just a few drops of
fame. Our tables also have plethora of guest DJs,
performers, interviews, giveaways. Strong Bad and
the  occasional  public  service  announcements.
<eno_wonk@yahoo.ca>
LOCAL KIDS MAKE GOOD
5:00PM-6:00PM att.
Local Dave brings you local music of all sorts. The
program most likely to play your band!   •
PEDAL REVOLUTIONARY att.
5:00PM-6:00PM
Viva la Velorution! DJ Helmet Hair and Chainbreaker
Jane  give  you  all  the  bike  news  and  views
you need and even cruise around while doing it!
www.bikesexual.org
NUTHOUSE RADIO THEATRE
6:00PM-7:30PM alt
Music inspired by Chocolate Thunder. Robert Robot
drops electro past and  present,  hip hop and
intergalactic funkmanship. <rbotlove@yahoo.com>
NUTHOUSE RADIO THEATRE
6:00PM-7:30PM alt.
Ail-original Canadfan radio drama and performance
art written and performed flve-to-air by our very
own team of playwrights and voice-actors. We also
welcome you to get involved, whether you are a
professional or inexperienced... CITR BROADCASTS AT 640 WATTS 24 HOURS A DAY. TUNE US IN AT 101.9FM, CABLE 10L9FM OR LISTEN TO US ONLINE AT WWW.CITR.CA
ON AIR WITH GREASED HAIR
7:30PM-9:OOPM
The best in roots, rock 'n' roll and rhythm and blues j
from 1942-1962 with your snappily-attired host, Gary
Olsen.
<ripitup55@telus.net>
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD RADIO HELL
9:00PM-11 :OOPM
Live From Thunderbird Radio Hell showcases local talent... LIVE! Honestly, don't even ask about the technical side of this. This month will probably be the best
month ever.
WORLD HEAT
11:00PM-1:00AM
An old punk rock heart considers the oneness of all
things and presents music of worlds near and far.
Your host, the great Daryl-ani, seeks reassurance via
<worldheat@hotmail.com>.
LAUGH TRACKS
1:00AM-2:00AM
BEATS FROM THE BASEMENT
2:00AM-6:00AM
FRIDAY
FILL-IN
6:00AM- 8:00AM
CAUGHT IN THE RED
8:00AM- 10:00AM
Trawling the trash heap of over 50 years' worth of real
rock 'n' roll debris.
SKA-T'S SCENE-IK DRIVE!
10:00AM-12:00PM
Email requests to: <djska_t@hotmail.com>
THESE ARE THE BREAKS
12:00PM-2:00PM
Top notch crate digger DJ Avi Shack mixes the
underground  hip  hop,  old  school  classics and
original breaks.
RADIO ZERO
2:00PM-3:30PM
NARDWUAR WE HUMAN SERVIETTE PRESENTS...
3:30PM-5:00PM
CiTR NEWS, SPORTS AND ARTS
5:00PM-6:O0PM
A  volunteer-produced,   student  and   community
newscast featuring news, sports and arts. Reports by
people like you. "Become the Media." :'^^^^^R
THE CANADIAN WAY (formerly THE NORTHERN WISH)
6:00PM-7:30PM
Independent Canadian music from almost every
genre imaginable covering the east coast to the left
coast and all points in between. Yes, even Montreal!
<thecanadianway@popstar.com>
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
7:30PM-9:00PM
David "Love" Jones brings you the best new and old
jazz, soul, Latin, samba, bossa and African music
from around the world.
www.africanrhythmsradio.com
HOMEBASS
9:00PM-12:00AM
Hosted by DJ Noah: techno but also some trance,
acid, tribal, etc. Guest DJs, interviews, retrospectives,
giveaways, and more.
I LIKE THE SCRIBBLES alt.
12:00AM-2:00AM
FILL-IN att.
12:00AM-2:00AM
THE VAMPIRE'S BALL
2:00AM-6:00AM
Dark, sinister music to soothe and/or move the
Dragon's soul. Hosted by Drake.
<thevampiresball@yahoo.ca>
SATURDAY
FILL-IN
6:00AM-8:00PM
THE SATURDAY EDGE
8:00AM-12:00PM
Studio guests, new releases, British comedy sketches,
folk music calendar and ticket giveaways.
8AM-9AM: African/World roots. 9AM-12PM: Celtic
music and performances.
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
12:00PM-1:00PM
A fine mix of streetpunk and old school hardcore
backed by band interviews, guest speakers, and
social commentary, www.streetpunkradio.com
<crashnburnradio@yahoo.ca>
POWERCHORD
1:00PM-3:00PM
Vancouver's only true metal show; local demo tapes,
imports,   and   other  rarities.   Gerald   Rattlehead,
Dwain, and Metal Ron do the ddmage.
CODE BLUE
3:00PM-5:00PM
From backwoods delta low-down slide to urban harp
honks, blues, and blues roots with your hosts Jim,
Andy and Paul.
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
5:00PM-6:00PM
The best mix of music, news, sports and commentary
from  around  the  local  and  international  Latin
American communities.
BATTLE ZONE
6:00PM-7:00PM
Each show will make you feel as though you're
listening in on conversations between political
insiders. As well, this guest and caller-driven programs
its guest from opposite ends of the corridor of public
argument against one another in ho-holds barred
debate that takes you behind today's headlines.
SHADOW JUGGLERS
7:00PM-9:00PM
An exciting chow of Drum n' Bass with Djs Jimungle I
& Bias on the ones and twos, plus gusts, Listen for |
givawas everyweek. Keep feelin da beatz.
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
9:00PM-1 1:00PM
PLUTONIAN NIGHTS
11:00PM-1:00AM
Cutting-edge, progressive organ music with resident I
Haitchc and various guest performers/DJs. Bye-bye
civilisation, keep smiling blue, where's me bloody
anesthetic then? http://plutonia.org
EARWAX
1:00AM-4:30AM
"noiz terror mindfuck hardcore like punk/beatz drop I
dem headz rock inna junglist mashup/distorf da
source full force with needlz on wax/my chaos runs
rampant when I free da jazz..." Out.
REGGAE LINKUP
4:30AM-9:00AM
Hardcore dancehall reggae. Hosted by Sister B.
7
8
9
10
11
12pm
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12am
2
3
4
5
6
SUNDAY
MONDAY
TUESiDAY       WEDNESiDAY      THURSiDAY
FRIDAY
SATURiDAY
REGGAE LINKUP
(RG)
ARE YOU SERIOUS?
MUSIC (EC)
ROCKERS
SHOW(RG)
BLOOD
ON THE
SADDLE (RT)
chips wm
EVERYIM6(P0)
AFROBEAT
(WO)
QUEER FM
(TK)
RHYTHMSINDIA
(WO)
TRANCENDANCE
(DC)
ELECTRONIC
SPECTRUM
(DC)
FILL-IN
FILL-IN
BREAKFAST WITH
THE BROWNS
(EC)
UONS AND TIGERS AND BEARS
ALT. RADIO (PO)
PARTS
UNKNOWN (PO)
ABSOLUTE BEGINNERS (EC)
WIGFLUX RADIO (RG)
THE JAZZ
SHOW
(JZ)
VENGEANCE
IS MINE!
(PU)
FILL-IN
HIGHBRED PLEASE ROCK
VOICES (WO)       THE DOOR (EC)
THIRD TIMES
THE CHARM (RR)
MORNING AFTER
SHOW (EC)
CIRCUIT TRACING
(DC/EC)
EN AVANT
LA MUSIQUE (FR)
WENER'S BBQ (SP)
FLEX YOUR
HEAD(HC)
SALARIO MINIMO
(WO)
THE LOVE
DEN
(EC)
ESCAPISM
(EC)
AURAL
TENTACLES
(EC)
FILL-IN
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
(EC)
OTR NEWS* ARTS (TK)
EXQUISITE CORPSE (EX)
ANOIZE (NO)
DEMOCRACY NOW (TK)
RUMBLETONE
RADIO
(RR)
MOTORDADDY
(RR)
NECESSARY VOICES (TK)
AND SOMETIMES
WHY (PO/EC)
JUICEBOX     (TK)
FOLK OASIS (RT)
HANS KLOSS'
MISERY HOUR
(HK)
FIRST FLOOR
SOUNDSYSTEM
(EC)
FILL-IN
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
(EC)
SWEET'N'HOT (EC)
UNPACK YOUR ADJECTIVES (PO/EC)
WE ALL FALL DOWN (EC)
THE ONOMATOPOEIA SHOW (TK)
RHYMES &
REASONS (HH)
LOCAL KIDS
MAKE GOOD (EC)
NUTHOUSE
RADIO THEATRE
PLANET LOVETRON
(M)
ON AIR WITH
GREASED HAIR (RR)
LIVE FROM...
THUNDERBIRD HELL (LM)
WORLD HEAT
(WO)
LAUGH TRACKS (TK)
BEATS FROM THE BASEMENT
(HH)
CAUGHT IN
THE RED (RR)
SKA-T'S
SCENIC DRIVE (SK)
THESE ARE THE
BREAKS (HH)
RADIO ZERO (EC)
NARDWUAR
PRESENTS (NW)
CiTR NEWS AND ARTS (TK)
THE CANADIAN WAY
(EC)
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
(WO)
HOMEBASS
(DC)
I LIKE THE
SCRIBBLES (EC)
THE VAMPIRE'S
BALL (GI/MT)
FILL-IN
THE
SATURDAY
EDGE(RT)
GENERATION ANNIHILATION (PU)
POWERCHORD
(MT)
CODE BLUE
(RT)
LEO RAMIREZ SHOW (WO)
RACHEL MARSLEN SHOW (TK)
SHADOW JUGGLERS ■
(DC)
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
(DC/EC)
PLUTONIAN
NIGHTS (DC)
EARWAX
(HH/DC)
REGGAE UNKUP(RG)
DOdance/electronic • EOeclectic • EX=experimental • FR-French language • GI=goth/industrial • HC=hardcore • HH=hiphop • HK"Hans Kloss • i2_\_^d}_efi June 2005 -
LM-live music • LOIounge • MT=metal • NO=noise • NW=Nardwuar • PO-pop • PU-punk • RG-reggae • RR-rock • RT>roots • SK=ska • SP-sporls • TK-talk • WO-world
7
8
9
10
11
12™
oSJt-
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12am
l
2
3
4
5
6
page 23 sit in on Zulu's Round Table Discussion june s crWcai listens
Lencjf uspyo^r ears
CHET ifi§ifk \
STEPHEN
MALKMUS
Face The
ThrthCD
Kau'ajffiJ
Having (et^nw^ma^^^af^mm^^t^^
The Arcade Fire Low Wsdast Mouse dwiftoiv.
Fuiusees '■': .:;-.r-;^*r-; er-i.k:..;i:   ." -:•;--^-p.;l •-,: i r.-:;- .-..,
tet, Chet, are p      to ertfWetfjfiijtwtek Internship
and assumefe rightful place amongst their atoremen- 0 J
tioned peers Building upon tim^^fcraciflffi.|i|^^^|
brooding aefthetic of their dabui ffie flger is in the Window
ed their enchanting arrangements lo {
sis that is Kauai Vocalist Ryan Beattie ha;
that infuses the band's epic interplay of cel i
pained, Malcolm Lowry-esque beauty. Sake
volcanoes, Chef's dolorous sonic phantasm
of becoming^entangledinkEsjOyl Highlight
Grew OM &*ce*t**.8lj^again' AVAILABLEJ^Hp*
CD 14.^8 p"
SPARROW^
The Early Years CD
Tie loser wi tett you thatwhen yd
:,. ,,,; ,-.:..,. .. . : ;.;,.,._ ■•■"-_.;■,;; \-..    7_,'■:■■ :■•,;»,• Oil"    I
regard the same green toed free-blown glasf arid find]
infinitepossMitiesmitspoignartlnm J^soii
Zumpatio is one such winnervHe iiaselegantiy waitzedi
mto many a Vancouver recording studio with ptef^tril
track. Bravei sizing up a song,;firsrjing its mlfflfnfsou
aH a night's f^fcr Vteewerls Al Koaser Mike Blot
42. (Ztimpano Destroyer and now Sgajrowp. WTtW
release in hisasspoeket, Jassiilsstaring the ';big-tim|
hand-selected joirraeym© band on the road he will sij
you dig up-beat pop wtlii hooks galore—andv/henSl
hooks. Jason ■..■;<;; r \.m. _..:_ — sun mis is for you'
guy. iVn" .r i i • ■) -. i --seconds r..<!, n
actually early recordings, it Is mfact the most Iraiftj
market Highlf$rtl>a<tei#dflig Late Last tflgM. Bone
CD 14.9^0
THE BOOgpF LISTS
Red Arro^O)
Daytime is overrateta ligW-bearn demarcating the
primetimefor ■ i . ::-i i- •. i i gottamt
the night sh|t, others^tst%ai^!i(i^tJsfsjEpefhirig
Chris Frey knows ml\:_%iW^Mif$£i^V^puM* et
i the indie underground in Jjj^ilstlce __m_tmf«fm4
Radio Berlin he speaks the ifttaMJBg$f#ep($b§st fc/tb
edge of time dividing the PM.fwmthe A.M.Here in the sphere
knows the jangling chords.ttet best foltow a bourbon stfst and
that can lull jone into smoke, m exptrierrced, tuneful hand, hoi'
throughout MrblissMirighttims swaggering, guiding our pass
bridge to chorus, fans rt Fetf Ride Roxy Mafic. Syri Barrett <
land denized tike note; There is a;nevif band in this city that'll t
burnt body fcgauzy sheets of noise and psychedelia, follow thj
rod  AVAILABLE Sipif*jr*
co 12^7;       ml/1
CAROLYN MAW(AND FRJENDS  '
Just Married:
AnAlbumofDuetfcJH)
::?;: :jii k c_\.:Vj\h.. •.:):.:: .kin ■:•
fehioned avagabond fyricaf delivery
keys. ' and .< i -i . 1|-~
S in the son benrtijss big tstaftd  '
:-J'..-:.::, are :!••:"::•/-••: -! #86$. £ttsm
te Mo»ins back to Cold Say &
;0,W : ikkiiHi:,;.
: h-d :k k: crt^slffflaJt '.•fi.:-'. S
"<V. h'.lzf) ,hklk ik'l &Et,WlXt,i
I'm also extra-paranofd-, ^J»*W« HadkafteK.
.'tl'    ■.   _.; s..-.ts§|   -   iJ ": ri'-.i: Dustin
8oflmajt;shit with tte Wac fe ba^' 1 ftjjtct t%%ace *
p$ %0&_fk*iti now Malkmus is sagge^&ng tt»l
sarnethingl Okay, here^ the troth;5.K.'s third J
post-Pavement rea^d conf^^.1hsfteapcte¥,'«*
greatness made clear .on tne sast seconds otP%|
tife^pic finalsr^lte" His latest argument iscroshl
itip;apoiy-iingualttesislhatassertslhatreiord f
collectors we the inest lamO-osln tte v«or>d Y^
te^*rgferen^^to the Groutidfiogs The Mo»a.
SMOG
A River AJ^^
Love CD
You ^■fflWij^^Mir
iknisff this ne^^^^J
fjy Bad Cowboy Bill (anftjRjfjt teat Bonnie Bill, sfi^-
-.•^»ooii|toH^^lfM^fe^a^ft^fi^
to«^B*eWfTOi[i^^!*l^b?sgi^t^&<
•k-|,;oi.-: tne'. : .u CO..; ^ .k.kuk iifSm _t fhs r;-..i-.f:-
Mr , •!;•":.• ::• ";::,-;. Jl := gp .' -k- . .khv:;-:^ A ftlVKf ^. r
Ain*! Toe.. I^ifn^^    i
:ter:forlof-i. snyepetitant ihdignanfjy drunkkdead- 1
hroke and ^aman Indeed this is abtiidnowphase
i^^csff^w^ftalready^nr^vre^i^j.. '
;::.-.>...•:!■, ,v: tie k-;.%i:i-.'k.M.;!, ..•:,v.: .! SSO t*«
*ii^a^the\v«?^l!^eiy4&^ldRo^TB^^^t
liset,.harness the supmmfrai^oish of theteatfad ?
■ tratJiSoA while wt«aiing;.dotvn fea§'$ sage $&&&■■''
Mil T__ south hasft't|ftaqgedBUl Callahan bi#tf -5
Eveiytfiinp -
siinfguefy Hybridized j
iby^fie street-siiiaTts
K_%t0k liberating aes
lcaWiTO*#ac&-
3i*Atfrt«iax,
m
sfreely bet^eeaAsfratWeeksand Inck
GameJaft Everytajsg ic£tat$is~j||£ie titk
^gosts: _\ pine
; Btdiessfyfescinating,Hebdensfusedpofyj
of styles serveato redefMethe pararneters
rrjodera music iSfi'cJtfws phmt fov/ardslhe 1
f ossibifitle; the producer a5 rna;' xaws
Ibftbass tieavy opener, "ArJoyOrealiyOSs
tarte as cm:.; ;irki;tr!ir;.-.r .;::•.-i.:i;i:'.si
primal beats before dis; Wo aha?
t Krautrockjazzi This is high higSldyiiy,   1
mi$M   2LP2H»
entnewr«
_ loalwfJiose abput to "hoi
; ifoher apsnd-ptrtentalSVprepared togfoo'ifek  ^
doymteffipo-styteSportfrig tiigjr signature deep
•ikuifijl r.OL:^... r,:k;:i^--5 Bapert tinker and Richard
'DorAiieisfer's neweiub- andoar positive esoarsusk
S»T
mp-tfMfp.
■ tions fjtjm"lrte'mj)a«y|j;The Walkabouts. Rockers
;#FIE ant the E^ptias-FrenGh nev7»rn&Satia v !
C'^f
j:
tmttsltMBp 'mCaroryi
BELLE AND
Push bamtan J-JS
to Open Old L §(W__W
Wguncls2C0   MDW
p^elle and
momM
Man Made 01
Yti:r--.ii;;ih;irtj
. Le ifgn gsjj^fl
|:?ilO';
Voi.oA
ents conceivedypu. in ani
it^^fedfyurff%^|
^rsetf^^'^^dabit
/ h-rViP'tii':.i! -k.^di j-:8ig Sim ffie
Tha Left Baaka, m FasfihaV oiw iwff- -
& ior Just Marri^fheadi
^O^S^KfJncIuSlBi^ 1
car. Luke Boiicet Corb
*r:p«r]Taps it's    1   Jn*
but not iim^d to  feaftBerner,p»ray$$glEy!
Lund and ^SSIver-He you.one 1;
tife! rmskm^^ivm^m^c..^mr
gave up orrduets after your zilhontii hearing of %
time you 9^**|^^-trt|^^fc^Q6|
Fireworks ^_W^^^^j_______^S_____\}
AVAILABLE ilWr"        m fcti "",l* "
CD 12.98
saw: pmtsm m mment untiljum: 30,, 2005
JefpS?r fec^aif pei ^4,feaLu»ni>
recordings, such as The JStata
Fallen Leaves, am
Good Sign
TW DIRTBOMBS
w:
to your ssriboek ii^i.i
wmtn'
Ottfc Piayers, StevfcWohriar Sim Club ESS,
! iilioft^aitft, Cheater idWfiss, you
can sj^^^p that yotleaf^aiins with a
- Milrf'wBlft&apeaifi;^u!armL*iral Ifstory.
- DravijsngotriJis Heh talent. lite magically tapping Ws Sis rear^eiritfpf |ock'r>*roilf
* Detroirs Ssfbsute have earned themselves
near-tegendary-s'iafes as oocKaw#s 6f rockas
mteMmMy #ofentjal. W^ fjp sucKers, Hick
Collins has more soul, arjere ppkv- mote boo-
- giefwoogJe grosvs, more gfafftkmdre hot
? sweat,- more:swin§, and more bgtweeri-the-
-•.shfeeis sti«m W^n^ar'^-v^rth ofjNME
1 sever bsys! few ts your lime to get into this
:'; traly amazifiM, This career-sp3fming 52
, ■. ■?.:■' V-.i: ;; .^!k::;ri':   ".VP l'
DirtboiteRosT: Sing a bunch of
I sifts Isih tt» blggsst Dirtbombs fan in the
world-has yet to hear. ■".
pmkM6tMkwohs
xmGvmmmx :
^afiickii^ Attack (Machine CO
MyftstlW|^^^ |
Belladima^f«
i m w
Take &stasy^p»«te OUP/tr
MAXIMO P^(o\
ACeitatoTrtig^pjP*
BEBa&BrW<!
THE HBfflAUZER
ftTak¥ljoiidari CH/UP     -
Jjv§ Sessions OT
The Woods C^/*
Irte^ay Wheelers to/If
f^Henhelt ed CO^ 11
The Silence Show £0   |
K0N0M0 No1 f
ConfiOtroniesC^/i^^ I
y'feftFFITI
_^_Wj_
fTmtrarfngirpi
are fun!
2CD 18.98
Zulu Records
1972-1976 W 4th Ave
Vancouver, j^|l|
tel 604.738.3232
www.zulurecords.com
STORE HOURS
MontoWed   10:30-7=00
"■^urs and Fri 10:30-9:00
4 0  9:30-6:30
! Sun 12:00-6:00
DiSCORDER, June 2005

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.discorder.1-0050109/manifest

Comment

Related Items