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 JAPEMB6«#Wm/TWffJil6I#«B«lir$ !|IAKE MAGAZINE FROM 5JTR 101.J
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DISCORDER'S 2010 FAVOUJIITES/,
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SI^**0'"S*te*M"' 20% Off Nesw & 40% Off Used
Xmaseve  and   Boxing   Day
HAM   T07PM
^Friday December 24th
a Sunday December 26th
11 AM to 7pm EDITOR
Jordie Yow
ART DIRECTOR
Lindsey Hampton
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Debby Reis
COPY EDITORS
Sarah Berman, Steve Louie,
Debby Reis
AD MANAGER
Maegan Thomas
UNDER REVIEW EDITOR
Sarah Berman
RLA EDITOR
Steve Louie
WEB EDITOR
Reilly Wood
CALENDAR LISTINGS
Debby Reis, Jordie Yow
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
Corey Ratch
PROGRAM GUIDE
Bryce Dunn, Debby Reis
OFFICIAL TWEETERS
Dorothy Neufeld, Debby Reis
CiTR STATION MANAGER
Brenda Grunau
PUBLISHER
Student Radio Society of UBC
PROMOTIONS INTERN
Dorothy Neufeld
COVER
Simon Redekop
JANCEMBER
WRITERS
Andrea Bennett, Sarah Berman, Nathaniel Bryce,
Katherine Boothroyd, Slavko Bucifal, Sarah Charrouf,
Robert Fougere, Andy Hudson, Andrew Kai-Yin McKenzie,
Tony Kess, Kamil Krawczyk, Miranda Martini, Kaitlin
McNabb, Mark PaulHus, Will Pedley, Andy Resto, Alec
J. Ross,Maegan Thomas, Christian Voveris, Sally White,
Ming Wong, Alicia Wooding, Angela Yen, Jordie Yow
PHOTOGRAPHERS & ILLUSTRATORS
Merida Anderson, Curtis Collier, Tyler Crich, Anne
Emberline, Robert Fougere, Michael Irvine, Steve Louie,
Simon Redekop
PROOFREADERS
Sarah Berman, Chris-a-riffic (briefly), Simon Foreman,
Steve Louie, Debby Reis, Maegan Thomas
©Discorder 2010 by the Student Radio Society of the
University of British Columbia. All rights reserved.
Circulation 8,500. Discorder is published almost monthly by
CiTR, which can be heard at 101.9 FM, online at www.citr.ca,
as well as through all major cable systems in the Lower
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#233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T1Z1, Canada.
DISCORDER.CA IS HOME TO LOADS OF CONTENT WE CANT
FIT INTO THE PRINT ISSUE OF THE MAGAZINE, LIKE EXTRA
FEATURES, REAL LIVE ACTION AND UNDER REVIEW.
CHECK DISCORDER.CA REGULARLY FOR NEW ARTICLES,
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can provide you
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you love. To
donate visit www.
citr.ca/donate. EDITOR'S NOTE
TABLE OF CONTENTS //JANCEMBER 2010/11
Dear Discorder:
It has been lovely making this
magazine for you to read, but I am
afraid that I must be leaving. I have
learned a lot editing this magazine.
It has always been challenging and
(except financially) it has been very
rewarding. I will miss everyone that
I have worked with on the magazine
and I wish you all the best—and look
forward to seeing you about town. It
is a happy moment though because
that means Discorder will be getting
a new editor who Will be taking the
magazine in exciting new directions,
and that editor could be you, or
someone you know. Check out our ad
for the position (below) for details or
check www.discorder.ca for the link
to the posting.
You'll also notice that there's
twice the normal magazine here! We
are very excited to have collaborated
with Vancouver Is Awesome to give
them a chance to put out a physical
• incarnation of their excellent website
which is devoted to the positive aspects
of Vancouver. If you're ever feeling
gloomy about living in Vancouver,
a quick visit to their website will
pick you up and remind you what a
great city we live in. Bob Kronbauer
and Co. have put together a lovely
looking issue that you can read by
flipping over the magazine. When
you're done, I suggest visiting their
website, www.vancouverisawesome.ca,
and bookmarking it. They are very
organized and lovely people. We're
going to be having a party with them
on Jan. 7 at the Biltmore. You should
come out and enjoy yourself. It's long
enough after New Year's that your
hangover will probably have worn off
and your liver will be well rested.
Also, as this is the final issue of
the year, it has a lot of year end lists
which, as a fan of music, you probably
love to argue about. You can vote for
your favourite bands, albums, shows
etc. by participating in our Reader
Poll. Check out page 23 for details.
You can find our favourite local
bands of the year on page 18 and our
favourite albums of the year in Under
Review on page YY. Try not to get too
worked up about them, this is just
one magazine's opinion. However,
I would like to point out that other
people and magazines who make
similar lists are all wrong unless their
list was identical to ours.
Cheers,
•   Jordie Yow
DISCORDER NEEDS A NEW EDITOR!
j Discorder Magazine is a special project of CiTRioi.9 FM, the campus and community
radio station atthe University ofBritish Columbia. Discorderis published 11 times ayear
byUBC's StudentRadio Society and distributed for free throughout Vancouver.
• As the creative director of a music and arts magazine, applicants require strong
knowledge of current independent and local music, art and culture. As the head
editor, applicants must be excellent writers with a good grasp of language, spelling
and punctuation. Experience in alternative/independent media is preferred but not
required. Knowledge of desktop publishing is an asset.
• Other assets include
Leadership and creative vision; organizational skills and the ability to multi-task,
volunteer management; excellent communication skills; strong initiative; ability to
stay calm under pressure
Salary: $450 per issue (honourarium is under review)
More detailed info is available on our website at www.discorder.ca and click on the
link to "Discorder Editor Job Posting" on theleft.
• To apply, send a resume and a cover letter to Brenda Grunau, CiTRStation Manager,
at dtimgrQDarns.ubc.ca by Monday, Dec. 13 at 10:00 a.m.. We may interview in
advance of the deadline.
08 / OS MUTANTES
The controversial frontman of Brazil's most important psychedelic band.
took an hour to chat with one of our reporters about how things are now
and how they used to be. It's really quite interesting and he's an opinionatd
guy. It's a good read.
11 / D.B. BUXTON
You've probably seen this guy busking for drunks on Granville Street. Ever
wondered what it's like and if perhaps he plays music off the street? This
Q&Aisforyou.
12 / YOU SAY PARTY
Man this band hand really gone through a lot. One of their members took
some time from their European tour to talk to us for the first time since a
big band upheaval including the death of drummer Devon Clifford and the
addition of new members.
14 / FLASH PALACE
The local intricate post-rockers described their own music as anever-era^g"
laser beam unleashed inside the Taj Mahal. You should probably checkout
this article just to make sure we're not lying about this.
16/OK VANCOUVER OK
One of our reporters took some time to visit Jeff Johnson, a.k.a. OK Vancouver
OK, and get into his head. Did you know he's planning a grandiose musical?
Also, he makes lovely music, you should check it out.
18 / OUR 15 FAVOURITE BANDS OF 2010
Twenty-five Discorder contributors cast their votes and we came up with
the 15 bands we think are the "hottest" of the year, by "hot? we mean both
busy doing stuff this year and the bestest. Not like sexy or spicy or their
physical body temperature.
07 / TEXTUALLY ACTIVE / MmkMM.
2 0 / CALENDAR / by cud* comer
26 /PROGRAM GUIDE
24  / ART PROJECT / SimouRedekop
39   /  CHARTS./   CiTR's Top 100 Albums of the Year
GO
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Mi
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29'/ UNDER REVIEW
Animal Bodies / Babe Rainbow / Boogie Monster / Caving / Falkknds / the
Good Ones / Kids & Explosions / Olenka & the Autumn Lovers / the Russian
Futurists / Small Black / Tight Solid / Twin Crystals / Zola Jesus
35 / REAL LIVE ACTION
Best Coast / Dean Wareham plays Galaxie 500 / the Morning Benders / Myelin
Sheaths / the Soft Pack / She & Him / Teenage Fanclub
GO
>
c4 VEGAN
GLUTENTREE
PIZZA
AND OTHER 3TUFF
* ♦    *     $
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1701 POWELL ST.MANLOUvSc WWWlAI0RINKPEttH.COM
EVENT
CALENDAR
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Sitka
Books
&
Art
Hello.
We have books
Iff lit
2025 West 4th Ave
Vancouver, BC
V6J1N3 .
phone: 604-734-2025
fax: 604-734-2056
www.sitkabooksandart.com
info@sitkabooksandart.com
READ LOCAL
Come and visit us. Okay? TEXTUALLY ACTIVE //
GRANT LAWRENCE - ADVENTURES IN SOLITUDE
PUBLISHER: HARBOUR PUBLISHING CO.
BY MAEGAN THOMAS
As accessible and wryly funny as his writing, Grant Lawrence visited
the Vancouver Book Club (a Vancouver is Awesome initiative) and
talked about his experiences living, writing and touring his first book,
Adventures in Solitude. (Plus, there was free wine so that was great.)
Adventures in Solitude is the account of how Grant Lawrence grew
to love the wonders and dangers of a little place called Desolation Sound, and
it is largely a tale of his own self discovery. The Sound is available only with a
boat and an iron will; it is a glorious paradise in the summer and so dangerously
stormy and secluded in the winter as to drive people batshit crazy (a.k.a. "going
bush"). The collection of stories and ruminations in Adventures in Solitude are
funny, poignant, informative, deeply personal, violent and strange—most
often they are a combination of two, three or all of these. The characters, from
Russell the yuppie lawyer turned warmhearted hermit stoner to bizarro-land
Santa Claus Bernard the German to the morose Captain Vancouver to Lawrence
and his family and friends, each go through captivating journeys that highlight
Lawrence's talents as a storyteller.
When he visited Vancouver is Awesome, Discorder was there and got to
know a little bit about the inspiration and development of his Adventures. We
discussed family relationships, the place of "truth" in writing, Canadian
literature and the public lashing of Captain Vancouver after his return from
his "discovery" of what Grant describes as "the bipolar central character" of
the book. Having been a rock star, a radio host and now successful a author,
it's a surprise to learn that his ultimate dream job is yet to be had—late night
talk show host a la" Johnny Carson.
Lawrence is a paragon of Canadian credibility for a multitude of reasons, one
of which is his position as "host with the most" of the CBC Radio 3 Podcast.
One of the features of this institution is the "90-second egg," where Grant
puts rapid fire questions to his guests, leaving no room for thought or lies. I
put a version of this tradition to Grant about Adventures in Solitude, as well as
his adventures in music and radio. l&l^lvi
Introduce yourself:
Grant Lawrence, CBC radio host/musician/author.
Hometown;
West Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Best band name from CBC3 podcast:
The Apostle of Hustle
Worst band name:
AIDS Wolf
Best tour moment so far:
Book tour or rock tour? Book tour: Boyd Devercttitxp
Stanley Cup Champion with the Detroit Red Wings,
; came to the book launch in Toronto! Rock tour:
Flying in to Japan in 2000 and finding out our first
show in Tokyo was sold-ouL
Worst tour moment:
Book tour: Doing the Vancouver Is Awesome book
club discussion with a fully formed chocolate chip
stuck to my lower lip, everyone thinking it was untreated, month-old herpes. [Authors note: We thought
he had a cut! We were being polite! Grant's stories often
center on injury or potential injury and he did in fact cut
himself at the reading.] Rock tour: getting violent food
poisoning in England, hallucinating that the Queen
Mother was shitting on my chest, missing two gigs,
eventually ending up in a Welsh hospital being
treated by the female Bill Cosby of Wales.
Tegan or Sara?
Both are very funny/cool, but I'll say Tegan since I
know her better.
Last thing you stole:
Geez... tough one, believe it or not Probably something from... Starbucks? Their cashiers confuse easily. More like not charging me by mistake rather than
stealing. Is there a difference? [Author^rr&te: Yes.]
What do you believe but cannot prove?
That all the stories in Adventures in Solitude are true,
sort of.
If you could only bring one album to Desolation
Sound what would it be?
Billy Joel Glass Houses
Favourite "Canadian Definition" [Author's note: The
podcast also sometimes Jeatures a segment where a guest
gives their jdvourit? term that is noted specifically as Canadian in the dictionary.]
Crokinole! The greatest Canadian board game of
all time!
If you could have one superhero power what
would it be?
To be invisible.
What's your worst fear?
Fire.
First band you saw live:
ZZTop
What is your best quality?
Loyalty
Worst quality?
Temper
Favourite smell:
Baking chocolate chip cookies / gasoline. [Author's
note: I purposefully did not clarify this response as it is
very entertaifflng to imagine Grant really loving the smell
ofthose items combined.]
What's the most memorable record shop you've
visited in Canada:
Fred's Record Shop, St. John's Newfoundland.
Who needs a slap about the face?
Rob Ford, Mayor of Toronto.
What is Canada?
A massive small town.
The Vancouver Bookclub was generously hosted by thejtm
and jrteiyIff Sitka Books on West 4th Avenue. After you
read the rest of our Jancember edition, check out an excerpt
of Adventures in Solitude in the Vancouueris Awesome
print edition by jlipping this ©hole thing over. ^ ; &YA80REW KAI-YIN MACKENZIE
f|ii|sjRATION BY TYLER CRICH
WITH TRANSCRIPTION ASSISTANCE FROM:
ANDY HUDSON, KAITLIN MCNABB, SARALYN PURDIE,
ANDY RESTO, SALLY WHITE, ALICIA WOODING
/
7
/
ergio Dias is-Ae leader of the genre defining Tropicalia band Os
Mutantes (the Mutants). In 2009, Os Mutantes released their first
album since the '70s, Haih... Or Amortecedor, and are currently
on tour with Ariel Pink's Haunted Graffiti. Just before leaving
on tour Sergio Dias took some time out of packing to chat with
Discorder. This conversation was over an hour long, but we've
distilled it down to the best bits.
DISCORDER: To start, I'd like to ask you, especially for all the people that may
not know a lot about Os Mutantes and the whole Tropicalia movement, just to
give your own three minute history of eveiything up until now.
SERGIO DIAS: Wow. [laughs]
D: You might be able to have more than three minutes.
SD: Yeah I can. During the '60s the world suffered a huge transformation,
it happened, you know, in America, there was a big change in politics and in
social movements and in arts and everything. It was a huge vortex of energy
in the entire world—and»the world then was much much larger than it is
today. You know today is a very small world. It's so easy to be anywhere and
to get information. And the beautiful thing is that all these thing happened
simultaneously in the '60s and at the same time that was happening, things
like the Flower Power movement in America, or Beatle Mania in England ...
I think the reason why it was so weird, I think it's because Brazil at the time
received information in very truncated bits and pieces, kind of a kaleidoscope
of everything. For instance for the Flower Power, we didn't get the Power, just
the Flower, and there was no idea what was going on in Vietnam. We heard
about it, but we didn't know how much involvement was in this. We had our
own problems here, with the coup d'etat and the military government here,
so we were basically reflecting what we were feeling and we didn't really have
any concrete connection to any of those movements in Europe or America but'
it was a very pretty thing to see because it was so instinctive and ... without
any planning. And it's beautiful to look back and see how that tiling could
happen, and in Brazil it was very, very strong very powerful. Television then
was a nice place to be 'cause there was a lot of cultural and musical programs
... and all those tilings were followed by the entire country and so it was an
amazing thing to see. So besides all the political problems we were going
through with the military and the government and torture and the movement
against it, and there was all this crazy movemehtwhich was the Tropicalismo
[ed. another name/or Tropicalia] which was basically—I wouldn't call it anarchy because it was freedom of thought really. So it was funny 'cause they couldn't
really label us [in the Tropicalismo movement] because we had elements of
everything, a bit of American influence, English influence and there was the
Communist party and all this messy like the witches brew, you know, of all
these angry ingredients and I think the music and art that came at the time
reflected this moment. It was so unique.... It was an amazing cascade of different styles and different modes that were coming and changing everything
day by day and that was an a amazing thing 'cause you learn to assimilate the
things very fast and you would respond to it very fast and I think that's basically
what Tropicalismo did in Brazil.
D: Yeah. Getting back to the musical thing... It'sftumy because, initially, well
I'm not sure if you would consider yourself a political band or not?
$D: I don't think we're a political band, you know, we're political beings. All the
sayings... permeates our lives, permeates our spirits, and we ...ehewitand spititout,
you know, and the way that, whatever comes, all the information is welcome.
D: I want to ask about this quote from the liner notes off your second album
Mutantes, by Nelson Mora: "He who lives in a consumer society has two alternatives: either participate or be devoured by it; there is no escape from these
options." He's talking about your commercials for Shell Oil. Like, what do .
you think about it?
SD: We did a commercial for Shell, but we did it, and we put it on the album
as a song ["Algo Mais"]. We didn't treat it as a thing made specially for this '
purpose. I wrote the song, and... we liked it as much as any other song, so we
used it in the album as music. I mean, as a piece of composition, you know, it
is in the album. I think we, on the other hand, we can devour it also and put
it out in another form.
0; And, it's interesting, the way it goes with your name. I mean, it's almost
like you're mutating. You're mutating that ad, in a way.
SD: Yeah, because the thing is, if you're never exposed, for example, to the
bad things, let's say, or if your immune system is not ever violated, you're too
fragile. You cannot be that fragile. I think it's very important for us, as human
beings or artists, to be exposed to whatever media that exists, and to be able to
make art on any of these medias. That's the trick, that's the important tiling.
For example, let's say, the guy—I don't remember his name—the guy who did
all those posters in America, remember? In the Second World War?
D: I don't know his name, but I know the ones you're talking about.
SD: Yeah, he did a fantastic job. Or for example, even the French artist [Henri de
Toulouse-Lautrec], who did the posters for the Moulin Rouge, beautiful art that he created. He was doing that, and he was making [money]. With this, he
created an entire new perspective of art, and he was doing it basically for hire.
... And this is, to put it on the same level of any other great artist in France,
which is fantastic. And, for example, this guy in the States—which I don't
remember his name, I'm sorry—he was so important in the posters, you know,
and was beautiful, the stuff that he did. And there is so many weird things in
the, world for them. Like that girl [Leni Riefenstahl] that did Adolf Hitler's
films. She invented a bunch of new ways of filmingJike moving cameras and
all this stuff. When she did the commercial things for the Nazi movement, and
even if it was that terrible, evil thing, if you looked at the art aspect, thellte is the
development of art in there. So it is important to be exposed to good and evil.
There is no white without black. You have to have a balance. And with yourself,
I think you have to be able to live with all these things, to be able to recognize
what is good for you and what is not good for you.
D: It's interesting, like, this sort of yin-yang, light-dark thing, because to an
extent your, you and Os Mutantes, you were enemies of the state, in a way.
SD: But, the state was our enemy, before we decided to do anything. They
were the enemy, you know, I mean we were considered the enemy, and they
were attacking us.... So we started fighting back. That's the natural law of
survival, you know, if you're attacked, you
fight back. And in terms of art during that
period, whenever the censorship, for example, came and said "Oh, you cannot use
the word sword in your songs," we would
never change thaword. We would mutilate
the song and put a noise on top of it. Like,
there is a place where it says "armadura e
lanca" which is like, "armor and spear to
ruffle," and that was not permitted. So we
putra noise on top of it, like [makes sound
of static or distortion].... And when we used
to perform, we'd just sing with the right
lyrics. So we record it and we show that it
was censored, you know, that was our way of doing it. We didn't explode any
bombs or anything like that, but just the way that we were, you know, I think
that was enough to bother a bunch of people.
D: Do you consider yourself a contrarian? A devil's advocate?
SD: A what? I don't understand, sorry.
D: Somebody who says something that's against the norm at any given time,
not necessarily meaning what they say but somebody that's sort of shaking
" up the system a little bit. stlNIl
SD: I love that. I think it's very necessary. I think the worst thing in the world
is a place where it's always blue sky, there's no rain and nothing happened.
No, I think you need some tornadoes around, or some earthquakes here and
there so you can shake the ground. Otherwise you just fall asleep. I think it's
very important to face things and to be able at least to joke about it. I mean,
you don't need to be a radical poet that is doing protest songs. Sometimes if
you make a good joke out of it, it's more effective.
D: Speaking of the radical poets doing protest songs, what was your relationship, you and Os Mutantes, to people like Gilberto Gil and Tom Ze, contemporaries who may have been more political than others at the time. How did
you get into that scene?
SD: Well, we were kids. You have to realize that when I was playing with Gil, I
was 16 years old. Even though I was coming from a family of politicians—my
father was the right arm for one of the governors of Sao Paulo or whatever,
and politics was in the house, but never as a huge topic. On the politics side,
for the Mutantes, it was totally an anarchical thing because we were kids, and
VOT ARE LIKE A SIMPLE
ANTENNA REALLY THAT
IS PICKING UP SOME KIND
OF SPECIAL RADIO WAVE
AND IT IS BASICALLY THE
MUTANTES WAVE.        I
kids are anarchical. We are against, always, because basically that's nature.
You know, you have to be against the status quo to be able to become a new
generation. I think this is basically the longevity of your youth, for how long
you are able to keep being like this.... But the great thing for me now was,
for example, when we released the last album, Haih... Or Amortecedor. I was
lucky enough to re-encounter Tom Ze, in 20071 think, when we first played
in Brazil and he played at the same show. We finally could communicate in an
intellectual level. At the [original] time [we met], you know, what would I say
to the guy? I was just a kid playing guitar. I was even a virgin, I had never even
kissed a girl probably. And now, you know, I think he became one of my best
musical partners. And the job that we did in Haih... Or Amortecedor is something
that I'm so damn proud of....
D: What's your relationship like with the contemporary music scene? Like
right now, your tour with Ariel Pink, who's one of the more challenging major
artists in the world right now, how did that come about? Did you seek them
out? Did he seek you out?
SD: No, I don't know them yet I know their music, but we're gonna meet now
at the show. I don't know exactly how this marriage happened, but I think it
was probably the sensible thing to do, to put Ariel Pink and Mutantes together,
'        because probably we are the same with a
different kind of perspective. I think it will
be a fantastic experience for both bands
beside the audience because we are going
to be able to enjoy each other and this is
what it's all about, you know, living side by
side on stage. That's the great thing. I think
it's going to be a great thing, and maybe
something fresh will come out of that.
D: Hm. Because it's really interesting the
new Os Mutantes album, Haih... [laughs]
SD:Haih... Or Amortecedor.
D:Haih... Or Amortecedor. This has not been
my strong suit, pronunciation, especially in
foreign languages. [The album] surprised me that it's distinctively Os Mutantes,
even though you are the only member left from the band back when you were
like Os Mutantes all capital letters. It still sounds like, you sakLyou had that
frame of reference when you were recording the album that that's what you
were trying to do and it works.
SD: Yeah, I think it's my job, in terms of putting this album together, was
basically to filter.... When you are under the Mutantes umbrella, it is a total
different kind of magic. For example, I would never write a song like "2000
e Agarrum," as a solo artist. It doesn't work. I don't know why. But for Os
Mutantes, it makes total sense. And I'm able to do it And when I'm playing
or doing a solo album or something like that, I would go to a total different
direction and it's amazing to see this happening. You know you have no power
at all over this thing. And see that you are like a simple antenna really that is
picking up some kind of special radio wave and it is basically the Mutantes
wave. And it is a fantastic thing because—you should see it happen—most of
what you hear on the album is always first take and that is fantastic because it
is so fresh. For example, Bia [Mendes] singing "Querida Querida," that was
her first take and she never sang in that region before and I just told her do it,
"Try this, try that" and she just did and she just did it in a way. And she was
always saying "Oh let me try again, let me try again" and I said "No way," that's
the take because I knew it was great. And the guitars are always first take and
the singing. Most of the stuffis all first take.
D: So no auto-tune huh?
SD: No way! )
10 OB BUXTON
THE B IS FOR BUSKING
(NOT REALLY)
WRITTEN AND PHOTOGRAPHED BY ROBERT FOUGERE
If you've walked down Granville Street on a Saturday night within the last
year, there is a good chance that you've already met Daniel Benjamin Buxton. And chances are you weren'twalking when you passed him: you were
probably shaking or shimmying. It's obvious to even the most obscenely
drunk passerby that he didn't start playing yesterday. DB Buxton is an
Edmonton institution, haying spent ovelT'i decade of shivery winters on the
street earning his living and his stripes strumming his heart away. Edmonton's
loss is Vancouver's gain as he has recently chased his dreams from Dirt City fo
Rain City and his loyal fans are looking forward to seeing Canada's premier
bluesman collecting his comeuppance. With new management and a new solo
album on the horizon in the new year, Discorder photographer Robert Fougere
caught up with DB Buxton for a quick sit down.
DISCORDER: What's your motivation for playing on the street?
DB BUXTON: I started doing it when I was really young and it really was just
survival. I didn't do it because I thought it was particularly cool or fun.
D: Why do you think more talented musicians don't busk?
DBB: Because it's4*orrifying! It's awful. It's so painful. If you don't care about
music it's easy to do.
D: What do you think is the friendliest Canadian city for busking?
DBB: I would say a place like Toronto or Montreal treat me the best, but that's
because I've been doing it so long. I'm so good at doing it, but if I was bad,
mm songs am written by %£
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INS ON AROUND YOU Am TO RESPOND
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I'm sure I'd do really terrible. Toronto is a place where if you're really good,
people will appreciate it and they will step outside of their boundaries to show
you they appreciate it. Vancouver, by contrast, is not like that. People are nicer.
They're on average more arty, more cultured, but they're also more standoffish.
When I'm busking here, I mean, I really have to work crowds hard because
people will not exit their zones: they're shyer people.
D: How much do you hate playing for drunks?
DBB: When I was young, I didn't use to do any drugs or drink. In my early
teens I was kind of wild, but in my later teens I was trying to be super serious
about life and at that time it really did depress me and I really kind of hated
mankind a lot. You see the worst of people all the time and it makes you bitter.
As I got older Izcaliartd part of that was my fault I was elevating myself in my
mind as being this genius who has no opportunity or is stuck in this shitty
situation and I realized I was kind of on my own high horse and realized I
had to stop hating on people and relax and understand that this is life. This is
where I'm at If you're gonna be an artist, you have to be true to reality, with
where you're at Good songs are written by responding honestly to what's
., going on around you and to respond honestly you have to be part of what's
going on around you.
0/Yow've got your trademark guitar, your trademark haircut; how important
is your stage persona to your music?
DBB: In my early 20s I was completely obsessed. I was so sure that I was gonna
be die next Prince or David Bowie or something like that. I was very conscious
of these things. When I would do my posters, when I would do anything, it was
about creating that image for myself: something that I thought really stood
out What I didn't realize at the time was that I was just throwing that out into
nowhere. There was no sense of context I just felt that if I act like that, if I
present myself like I'm going to be a star, it would just happen. It'll line up.
In Edmonton, that can't be true. I kind of retreated from that because I took
that about as far as I could within that context
D: I've read in your bio that you feel as though you're slowly stumbling towards
success. What's your idea of success?
DBB: I would define success for myself as finding my audience, you know,
that exists out there in the world but currently doesn't know who I am. But
they're out there, whoever they are. That's number one. Number two is being
able to have the power to do things the way that I want to be able to do them. I
wouldn't define it as having a bunch of money in my pockets or being famous.
Although I'm not anti-those things! fc
11 ■W S4K fiflff H4j''fMUplB WAY SINCE 2003, AND IN WE LAST
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XLENCE AND HARD PEEUNSS. ON 1
DISCORDER: First off, how is Europe?
YOU SAY PARTY: Coming back to Europe after three years
absent has been amazing! The audiences have been strong in their
response to us, as if no time has passed. They all know the songs
from XXXX and that's been really rewarding. After the band fight at
the end of 2007, we weren't sure when we were going to return and
this tour has been incredibly healing after the loss of Devon.
D: It looks like it just took a few years and now critics are raving about your albums. That buzz is spreading across Canadian
campuses and you have gained international recognition. How
different do you feel now, compared to when you were playing
.music in Becky [Ninkovic]'s basement?
YSP: The biggest change has been the lineup changes. Having
Krista [Loewen] leave the band this past summer has also been
hard. She was there in Becky's basement at the first practice. The
desire to have fun and play music and entertain is still the same.
The Smoking Spokes (our original bike gang) disbanded years
ago and we've grown and adjusted through the lineup changes.
Yet we've never picked anyone to be in our band that hasn't had
a strong connection to Abbotsford in some way. So to have Al
Boyle and Robert Andow in the band now, they understand the
original spirit that the band has, they've known us even longer
than the band itself.
D: "Lonely's Lunch" is quite the epic music video, where did the
idea for it come from? Also, why was it shot on location in India?
YSP: After making so many music videos with the band itself
performing in the video, we decided that we needed to do something differently. We approached Sean Wainsteim, who directed
our "Monster" video in Prague back in 2007, with the idea to try
something new. He was intrigued by the opportunity and the challenge and presented us a treatment for the video. Abbotsford has a
strong Sikh community that is well integrated into the community
at large, and so the suggestion of India didn't seem that foreign to
us at all. We're very happy with the results and the response that
the video has been receiving.
D: Remixxxx is out and it's delicious. I enjoyed the Teen Daze
and Los Campesinos remixes. How did you get in touch with the
artists who did the remixes? Was it a joint effort? Or did the label
handle it?
YSP: I'm friends with both Teen Daze and Tom [Campesinos]
from Los Campesinos. It was just a matter of writing them emails
asking them if they were interested. It was great to get such awesome remixes from them. (A lot of the other remixers we knew.)
The label suggested two other remixes for the album but ultimately
we had total control of what songs made it and what songs didn't.
For remix records, I feel the band takes on the role of curator as
opposed to being the artist Usually the music media and fans criticize remix records, but I've always taken on the attitude that this is
our chance to expose our fans to great artists they may not know.
D: During 2008 you all took some time off from the band. Was
this a joint decision?
YSP: This was a decision of necessity. [In] 2007 we toured our
selves into the ground. Not many people realize that You Say Party! We Say Die!
toured for 16 straight weeks without coming home. At the end of week 14 we
had a huge band fight in Berlin and it seemed [like] the end of the band. We
managed (with the help of our tour manager Liv Lunde) to resolve the conflict
between the two camps in the band and help us get back to a place where we
were able to finish the remainjwo weeks of the tour. What people don't know
is what's even further behind that. Becky's health was the worst it's ever been.
Having lost nearly 30 pounds and touring on despite being sick and without a
voice during the day, we pushed through sheer exhaustion. The rest of the band
was crumbling and we weren't sure why were even a band at all. Getting home
at the end of 2007 and re-evaluting our lives, both personally and together as
a band, we realized that we had done ourselves a great disservice. We had to
turn down another opportunity to return to Europe in January/February 2008,
opening in arenas, and instead focus on healing and recovering. It was months
before Becky and I could even return to work. But in March 2008, we took the
opportunity to tour China and that was another major turning point
D: These past six months have been a time of transition for your band and
us at Discorder are truly sorry for your loss of drummer Devon Clifford. Why
did you decide to continue on as a band, and how has Devon's death altered
your outlook?
YSP: Losing Devon has been a huge loss for this band. Many people in Vancouver knew Devon and what an amazing personality he was. He touched so
many lives. He was a protector in this band and he watched over all of us. It
was Derek [Adam], three weeks after Devon's passing who said we needed
to carry on, to work harder than ever and carry Devon's spirit on. Becky and I
were moved and felt we had to do the same as well. Every night at our shows
on this European tour Becky has lit a flame and dedicated it to Devon. It's been
incredibly emotional and incredibly healing. The response from the crowds
has been nothing but positive and been instrumental in the process of grieving
the loss of such an amazing drummer, friend and band mate.
D: Your current roster has Al Boyle of Hard Feelings on drums and Robert
Andow from Gang Violence on keys, how has Boyle's and Andow's musical
style contributed to your sound?
YSP: Al and Robert have got to be two of the very best musicians in Vancouver
and we count ourselves very lucky to have them apart of our band. We've played
shows opening for their previous bands (WPP, Cadeaux) and have known them
both a very very long time. Devon was very close with both of them and it seemed
only logical to have them join our band and help us carry on Devon's spirit
D: Although touring is nothing new to you, does homesickness still affect
you?
YSP: Not me, my grandmother told me shortly after high school that I was
plagued with Wanderlust and it's true. Prior to founding YSPIWSD! I was hitch-1
hiking Canada. Seeing Edmondon band the Wolfhote in Charlottetown, P.E.I., I
realized that travelling was great, but playing a show every night and travelling
was even better. So I came back to Abbotsford and started this band.
D: What is next for You Say Party?
YSP: We've demo'd six brand new songs this fall and we've got plans to
write more over winter. We're planning a Canadian tour in the spring with
Paperbag label mates Young Galaxy. Also, since I recently received my proper
paperwork to return to the USA, for the first time in four years, You Say Party
will be returning to touring regularly in the US! Very exciting! After that we plan
to get back into the studio and record another record, fc
W  1 WANT TO MAKE
THIS SOUND LIKE
IT'S BESIDE A HOT
DOG STAN^r
BY SARAH BERMAN
PH0T0 BY MICHAEL IRVINE
If a never-ending laser beam were unleashed inside the Taj Mahal, would
it make a sound? .
Though they have no scientific evidence to back it up, all four members
of Flash Palace are willing to bet it would sound like an intricately woven
post-rock jam with carefully hidden Josh Groban samples. At least that's
the soundscape bassistEllis Sam described while discussing his band's debut
EP Some Misinterpreted Sunsets.
"There's probably a guy from Peru or Poland walking around and everyone
has their shoes off," explained Sam, who also supplies electronic samples
and "vocal drones" on the record* "And this laser is just constantly bouncing
around."
Bouncing light is an appropriate metaphor, as the band's creative process
seems to involve a jumbled back-and-forth exchange between sounds and
visuals. "We grew up with lots of TV and video games with lots of repeated
imagery and sound," Sam said. With a scene from the 1989 computer game
Sim City frozen on the television screen in front of us—in a house where three
of the band members live—lasers and architectural imagery somehow begin
to make sense.
"We used to watch TV and put music on and try to sync it up," drummer
Mac Lawrie explained. A common practice among stoners and bored teenagers
everywhere, this pastime seems to inspire poignant loops and transitions on
tracks like "sasa" and "double/day."
"We actually did that last night with Carl Sagan and Super Mario," chimed
in guitarist Samuel Dzierzawa. "He explains the fourth dimension," added Jon
Scherk, another multi-instrumentalist and singer in the band.
Members of Flash Palace consistently finish each others' sentences. And
it's no wonder: the four 19- and 20-year-olds have been friends and making
music together since the seventh grade.
"These guys used to be in a band called the Butterfly Lovers," explained
Sam, noting the group sounded like a math-rockier version of Tool. "They
put out a thousand copies of their first EP, and gave everyone at high school a
CD. It was pretty Sweet. I was a fan."
Then Jon and I were in a pop band called Us Us Us," he continued. "And
together we started this math rock band Called Trusty Backpack. It was pretty
awkward. Funny. Like lots of loops and me yelling a lot."
It wasn't until last year's Shindig battle of the bands that the name Flash
Palace finally stuck. "I just kind of blurted it out" Sam recalled (the group was
calling themselves Tigerhead at the time). "But I lisped it so it sounded like
'Flesh Palace.' So people were saying 'sweet job Flesh Palace.' It was weird."
Flash Palace/Tigerheadiiidn't advance to the semi-finals on that fateful
evening. (Much to the chagrin of Discorder writerikenda Grunau, who wrote
that the foursome "rocked out like Tortoise." She subsequently declared them
"the best set of the night") [ed. For those curious both Flash Palace and Jody Glenham
tost this night to Lengthy List of Lovers.]
Equally motivated by Enya, grapefruits and pre-show chicken burgers, Sam
said Flash Palace creates entirely new soundscapes during each of their live
performances. "We don't want to play the same set over and over," he said.
"We're there to make one big piece of music that like, feels right to us,"
he said. "In our sets we don't try and stop our music—we just try and keep it
continually going, which I think puts people off because they're like 'When
do I clap?' you know, 'When do I yell 'Yeah! Sweeti'?'"
"We work up to our shows," added Scherk. "We get as many new ideas into
that show so it's interesting." The young band recently opened for Brasstronaut
at the Rickshaw, and has even had a chance to play alongside Deakin, a former
member of Animal Collective.
But when asked if their shows have been well received, responses were
decidedly modest. "Nobody booed," Lawrie said.
Though the band's recorded work feels undeniably fresh, Flash Palace's
musical influences are surprisingly vintage. "Marvin Gaye is one of my favourite
musicians," Sam gushed. "He just gets in that really spiritual place in his music
and you can't replicate that"
And Sam makes a point of noting his love of Enya is by no means ironic. "My
dad played me the Enigma CD and the Enya CD like every day," he explained.
"I put it on the other day, and the amount of subtle techno beats and then
long delayed vocals ... that kind of like new age sound kind of creeps in on
everything I write."
Apart from the "classics" (in quotations because Limp Bizkit was also
mentioned in this category), Flash Palace are quick to praise similar bedroom
composers.
"Azeda Booth is probably one of our favourite bands, and they're probably
one of the most underrated bands in Canada," Sam said. "They've just made
their own sonic world."
Flash Palace are on their way to achieving their own sonic world, having
recently moved in to a shared house in East Van. After years of angry neighbours,
the band finally has a wood-panelled basement jam space to call their own.
"We've been here about a month," Scherk said. "We were working out of
our parents' basements and always changing jam spaces. And so we thought
having our own space would be the best thing to do."
Beginning in 2011, the band plans to put shows on hold for a while to focus
on recording a second album. "We're going to record all our new album here.
And do like, all the proper technical tweaks at a bigger studio," Sam said. "We
get in a room together and just keep on jamming out parts and like talk with
our instruments a lot" &)*$■
"We're going to work really hard on it,",he added. "I'm always thinking
like, where can I take the sound. Like, I want to make this sound like ifs beside
a hot dog stand."
"That's the golden chalice," Scherk agreed, fc
4 OK VANCOUVER OK
BY WILL PEDLEY / ILLUSTRATION BY ANNE EMBERLINE
MAKING
SENSE
THROUGH
SONG TF YOU'RE HAVING A GOOD
TIME, THEN HAVE A REALLY GOOD TIME AND JUST
BE HAPPY THAT YOU ARE
HAPPY RIGHT THEN, IN
THE MOMENT, BECAUSE
THAT'S ALL THERE IS.
Since 2005 OK Vancouver OK, otherwise known as Jeff Johnson,
has released four albums, each one with songs as consistently engaging, entertaining, surprising and moving as the last From the
playful melodica driven collaboration with Chris-a-Riffic, "Love's
So Great," to the simultaneously dramatic but pretty piano of "This
Saint Jeffrey," to the delicate, shimmering acoustic guitar of "My Favourite
Everytime," Johnson exhibits a kaleidoscopic depth of feeling and sound that
shares similarities with, but is not limited to, the likes of Phil Elyerum, Bill
Callahan or Tim Kinsella.
While his recorded output showcases his ability to take the listener on
an immersive sonic expedition, Johnson's five performances offer a very
different experience.
"I feel like I'm a receptor of energies. Every time I play I'm always conscious
of what's going on around me, which has an effect on what I'm doing. I want
to try to present something worth listening to, something real. A lot of the
time I'm ad-libbing or experimenting with songs, changing songs in the
moment because I feel like it," Johnson explained.
As well as being a talented multi-instrumentalist, Johnson possesses a
very powerful voice that conveys a tremendous weight of emotion. When
he's singing at full volume and his vocal chords seem to be on the brink of
collapse—the effect is both disarming and poignant.
"For me [singing is] a way to vent and get these feelings out. Maybe I'll
choose to play a song because I want to remember somebody or I want to
remember a feeling. I want to do the best I can to perform these songs how
I felt when I originally wrote them," Johnson said.
OK Vancouver OK's latest album, I Feel Nice/Houses, will be released sometime
between now and February. "It'll be at the right time," Johnson assured.
Among the highlights of the album is "JeffTree," a song about reincarnation
with a simple two chord acoustic strum and a heart-breakingly exquisite melody
sung with a tender dexterity. Another understated arrangement is used to
great effect on the hypnotic, reverb heavy "Life's A Beach," which epitomizes
one of the defining characteristics of OK Vancouver OK—the convergence of
tragic beauty and uncontained joy. In contrast, the clicks, booms and whirrs
of "I Feel Nice" are jarring and harsh with Johnson making a cheap keyboard
sound huge and enveloping. The result is like being underwater—unnerving
yet liberating. , .$-0^
His last album, I Get So Drunk About Songs About Love, was released in 2007.
So how does he feel about the long gap between releases? "It feels bad but it
had to be that way," Johnson explained. "The circumstances of my life had led
me to travelling and exploring and living in Europe with no money for months
in the middle of winter, which led me to realise 'Oh shit! How am I going to
get home? I've got to set myself up a tour and make some money,' and I did.
And the most incredible things happened along that journey."
Considering the remarkable quality of the music, it is odd that OK
Vancouver OK is still relatively unknown and indeed, unsigned. It isn't
something that Johnson has ever pursued, and although he hasn't
formally been approached by a record label, reps have shown interest at
his performances, asking him to send them demos. "If I had a weird feeling
' about it then I wouldn't even bother," Johnson said.
"I don't want to record for a label, I like to do it myself," he elaborated.
"It's a really hard one for me because on one hand I'd like to be able to
perform in front of more people, but on the other hand I'm scared of that
because along with all the good, there's going to be just as much bad. I
have to be ready for that to happen. Maybe I don't want that I'm happy
right now. If I had a huge stage and thousands of people, what would I
1 even do with that? How am I supposed to source how I feel and the energy
of the room?"
In addition to the release of his new album, Johnson is also planning a
musical. "I got really excited about that but I've learned that there are so
many more things that I need to do before I can make it as great as I want
it to be," he said. "It might take me 20 years, but it is something worth
doing. [The musical] is inspired by a friend of mine [Patrick Geraghty of
Role Mach.]... It's gonna be big. It's going to have a huge volcano in it and
it's gonna be really pretty. There are no words, no singing, just music and I
have in my mind that there will be over a hundred people in the cast"
It would be easy to be sceptical that such an elaborate and somewhat
bewildering plan could ever be made a reality. However, when it comes
from the vivid imagination that fuels OK Vancouver OK, it might just be
possible. It might just be absolutely awesome.
"There's an idea that you have, that I have, to live" goes a line in the
song "Life's A Beach." When asked, Johnson elaborated on his lyrics, "I
feel like everyone knows what I'm talking about in some kind of way and
sometimes it's so difficult for me to explain in words. But it's this idea to
feel like a child or to feel free and to feel like you're being loved. I hope
that everyone has felt that—to live and to feel really alive, to not have to go
home because work tomorrow says so. If you're having a good time, then
have a really good time and just be happy that you are happy right then, in
the moment, because that's all there is."
Like many songwriters before him, Johnson is simply attempting to make
sense of the world, share his ideologies and articulate his thoughts through
song. On paper, itisn't immediately clear what he means but, when heard
in the context of OK Vancouver OK, somehow it all makes sense. k
17 ' that better everyday magazine fiwt CiTR WIS[flu
ADVERTISE WITH BISC0RBtfi;WI1.tIffi*T YOU REAL
NICE AND GIVE YOU pAMN GOOD Dl$L
m 6ET A DISCOUNT, WEB ADS ON OUR SITE ARE
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CONTACT OUR AD MANAGER AT:
PR0MOTI0N$.DISCORDER@GJMAILCaM
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mm& ON A UNICORN
8YMINTERNET
PRtSENTS THE CD RELEASE DP
JANUARY THIRTEENTH
REOCEOARHUSICCOH       MYSPWE.COM/REDCEDARMUSIG RDER'S FAVOURITE 15 LOCAL BANDS OF 2010
AS ALL GOOD MUSIC JOURNALISTS KNOW, THE END OF THE YEAR MEANS THAT ITS TIME TO MAKE A LIST OF WHAT
WAS IMPORTANT THAT HAPPENED IN MUSIC THIS YEAR. SO ABOUT 25 OF US AT DISCORDER GOT OUR HEADS TOGETHER
AND HAMMERED OUT WHAT WE THOUGHT THE HOTTEST LOCAL BANDS OF THE YEAR WERE. AFTER ALL THE VOTES
WERE CAST AND THE LISTS WERE MADE, THIS IS WHAT WE CAME UP WITH. YOU MAY DISAGREE. THAT IS OK, LISTS
ARELIKETHAT. (YOU CAN HAVE YOUR OWN SAY ABOUT WHAT MUSIC WAS IMPORTANT BY TAKING DISCORDER'S 2010
READER POLL. SEE PAGE 23 FOR DETAILS!)
AfTOTo Guom
i. Adrian Teacher, Amanda Panda and Jay Oliver's
band have been ontiie tip of everyone in Vancouver's
tongue all year. Their stellar 2010 album, Mount
Benson, contained a combo of heartwarming songs
that balance a punk d.i.y. attitude with beautiful pop
songwriting and masterful rock showmanship.
They are master performers and the only complaint
I've ever heard about one of their shows is that it
was too short.
MASSr*oM»r
2. Unfamiliar Records' genre-spanning band,
Brasstronaut, put Mt. Chimaera out this year, and it
rightly garnered a lot of praise in the Canadian music press. The band's genre is hard to pin down, but
there's no denying their talent shines through.
FlffEMJiT
3. Before their album Public Domain was even officially named, their fans were fervently swapping
around demos of the songs that would become this
album. You could see that this band hit a nerve when
they'd play to an audience who knew the words so
well that lead singer Megan McDonald would just
hand her mic to someone in the audience and sip
her chardonnay while whoever was holding the mic
allowed as many people as possible to sing along.
AU*£0Ur YIMLOTAff
4." The irhmensely talented songwriter Mac DeMarco's band is one of the best in town. The songs
he writes and performs, seemingly effortlessly, are
little lo-fi gems and well worth the listen. They are
excellent and can't get enough credit.
electronica, reggae, pop and dub, and consistently
gets their audiences moving.
KlfllAM
5. It's good to know that people in Vancouver still
like to dance and Humans proves it with every show
and recording they release. Their music draws on
The songstress has garnered praise across Canada.
You should pick up her album.
HACK HMMAlN     Mf**wS
6. Probably the most established band on this list,
their place here is to show thatyou don't need to be
new to be one of the most talked about and interesting bands in Vancouver. Check out their latest,
Wilderness Heart, if you don't believe us.
n. The proud Vancouverite band has been making
TV appearances and dropping excellent singles
this year. They are a big influence at home and the
next generation has even started playing covers of
their music.
BABE ftjfcijvtov*    %\$%N B.C.
7. Cam Reed, a.k.a. Babe Rainbow, seems to open for
every band since he released his EP Shaved. The dark
dubby album that brought him international acclaim
has also drawn attention to Reed's musical abilities,
which have often been overshadowed by his ability to
organize music festivals, like Music Waste.
12. If you like metal than you already know why
Bison B.C. is on this list They are the best metal
band Vancouver has to offer and their music gets
all our metal writers' ears to perk up. Their latest
album Dark Ages came out this year and was definitely
one of the best releases.
LADYHAWK AH**
. Grimey dirt rockers Ladyhawk, a staple of Vancouver's live scene, haven't put out a new album
since 2008, nevertheless, the fact that so many of our
contributors voted for them indicates thatyou don't
need an album to be talked about and recognized
as one of the best bands of the year, you just need
a stupendous live show.
ftfWMA/VGAJ*
9. We think Dan Mangan's importance can be
summed up by what Nathaniel Bryce said when
he put him on his list. "Come on, he's sold out
the Vogue four times this year and pretty much
everywhere else as well." How many local bands
can sell out the Vogue four times in one year? We
can't think of any others.
13. If there's one flaw with Vancouver's noise scene,
it's that it's hard to listen to the music outside of
live performances, but Ahna has made an excellent
effort to fix that by putting out their debut self-titled
album, an intense dark and crushing release.
AAT-«ft
14. When will these guys release something for
people to put into their music playing machines?
The duo makes excellent dance/punk/noise music
and plays lots of shows. If you haven't seen them
then you have not yet acknowledged that your father
probably wanted to fuck Isabella Rossellini.
SlAtAWN*
fANSHAW
10. Finally, after five years of playing in the city,
Olivia Fetherstonhaugh (more commonly known
as Fanshaw) released Dark Eyes on Mint Records.
15. We wish these guys would move to Vancouver
so we could all see them play more often, but the
Victoria natives play here enough to build a following for their bluesy garage rock. One of the funnest
bands this side of the Rockies.
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^o©e© (212) Productions
Blim
Gumdrops
Pacific
Scratch Records
454 W Cordova St.
115 East Pender St.
2029 W 4th Ave.
Cinematheque
1 East Hastings
604-685-2426
604-872-8180
604-733-1037
1131 Howe St.
604-688-8202
604-687-6355
Antisocial
Bonerattle Music
Hart and Sole
Temple of the
Skateboard Shop
2012 Commercial Dr.
Clothing Inc
People's Co-op
Modern Girl
2337 Main St.
604-251-BONE
843 Granville St.
Bookstore
2695 Main St.
604-708-5678
Devil May Wear
604-630-9151
1391 Commercial Dr.
604-253-6422
778-737-8953
Audiopile
3957 Main St.
Highfife Records
True Value Vintage
2016 Commercial Dr.
604-216-2515
1317 Commtecial Dr.
Prussin Music
710 Robson St,
604-253-7453
Dream Apparel +
604-251-6964
3607 W Broadway
604-736-3036
604-685-5403
Band Merch Canada
Articles for People
Hitz Boutique
Vinyl Records
www.bandmerch.ca
311 W Cordova St.
316 W Cordova St.
Red Cat Records
319 W Hastings Si
604-683-7326
604-662-3334
4332 Main St.
604-488-1234
Banyen Books
3608 W 4th Ave.
604-708-9422
The Eatery
The Kiss Store
The Wallflower
604-732-7912     i
3431 W Broadway
319CambieSt.
The Regional
Modern Diner
604-738-5298
604-675-9972
Assembly of Text
2420 Main St.
Baru Cafe
3934 Main St.
604-568-7554
2535 Alma St.
The Fall Tattooing
Koerner's Pub
604-877-2247
604-222-9171
644 Seymour St.
6371 Crescent Road
Westcoast Music
604-676-3066
604-822-0983
R/X Comics
3454 w Broadway
Beatstreet Records
2418 Main St.
604-682-4422
439 W Hastings St.
Flaming Angels
Lucky's Comics
604-454-5099
604-683-3344
Boutique
3972 Main St.
Woo Vintage
4307 Main St.
604-875-9858
Rufus' Guitar Shop
Clothing
BigMama
604-689-3224
2621 Alma St.
4366 Main St.
www.bigmama.ca
Fresh is Best Salsa
Neptoon Records
3561 Main Street
604-222-1717
604-687-8200
The Bike Kitchen
2972 W Broadway
604-324-1229
Zoo Zhop
6138 SUB Blvd.
778-737-2442
223 Main St.
604-822-BIKE
604-875-9958
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SUNDAY
MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
7
CiTRGhostMix
' CSTR Ghost Mbr
Pacific Pitkin' (Roots)
CfTR Ghost Mix
CiTRGhostMix
>    CiTRGhostMix
fNtitof SunjSse >
\', (Ictectc)
CiTRGhostMix
The Saturday Edge
- !3U>0tS)
1 -
Breakfast With The
Browns (Eclectic)
Souadte of Africa
(World)       #
Suburban Jungle
(Eclectic)
End ofthe World
News (Talk)
Synchronicity (Talk)
a
Third Time's The
Charm (Rock) .,
19
Shookshookta(TaJk)
Pop Drones -
(Eclectic^         * 1 Sttf&tAndHotfTazz)
- Ska-T's Scenic Drive
(Ska)
11
KolNode
di (World)
Stranded
(Eclectic)
Morning After Show
(Eclectic)
Anoize (Noise)
1&m
AJt Radio (Talk)
Duncan's Donuts
(E&Nsetic)
Generation Atuntulation
(Punk}
1
The Rockers Show
(Reggae)
Parts Unknown (Pop)
Laugh Tracks (Talk)
The Green Majority
(Talk)
We All Fall Down
(Eclectic)
Barnburner
(Eclectic) •
Power Chord
(Metal)
2
Qm 'Em the Boot
(World)
DenK>mcy Now (Talk)
Ink Studs (Talk)
Radio 2ero (Dance)
3
Blood On
The Saddle
^Root») -
tafiUbl
Mantis Cabinet
(Eclectic)
Wings (Talk) | Prof (Talk)
Rumbletone Radio A
Go Go (Rode)
Japanese Musicquest
(World)
Code Bine (Roots)
Radio Freethinker
mm
French Connection
f Nardwuar Presents
-   (Nardwuar}
4
The 1^ (Eclectic}
to The Cage With Bards
5
Chips
(Pop)
Fill In
News ioi (Talk)
Thunderbird Eye
(Talk)
Arts Report (Talk)
Native Solidarity News
(Talk),
News 101 (Talk)
The Leo Ramirez Show
(World)
S
Career Past Track {Talk
Flex Your Head
(Hardcore)
Reel to Real (Talk)
CiTR Sports Live
-NashaVoltia (World)
Sor« Throats, Clapping Hands (Eclectic)
ExplodingHead
(Eclectic)
squantch
(Eel)
Shameless
(Eclectic)
Queer FM (Talk)
f
TSh^AWm j Techno ""
. (World) jftofwssisio
Exquisite Corpse
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Notes from the
$8
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PolkOasis (Roots)
Underground
(Electrosfc/Hip-hop)
q                  Mondo Trasho
9                      (Eclectic)
Crimes And Treasons
(Hip-hop)
Synaptic Sandwich
<   g)ance/Electronic/
. Eclectic),' *'
«•            T*anSeeaiW    j *•*■»•«
Sexy In Van City
(Talk)
Radio Hell (Lira)
Shake A Tail Feather
(Soul/R&B)
The Vampires Ball
(Industrial^
CITR Ghost Mix
(Dancer
11
CabaRadio (Talk)
Hans ^o^M_wn\r
Hour (Hans Kloss)
FunkMyLife
(Soul/Dance)
'    CfTR-GhostMix
12am
TlirWdowaPM -
(Dance/Electronic)
CiTRGhostMix
IpplTcntacles   •.".
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1
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3
4      .
5
CiTRGhostMix
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CiTRGhostMix
7
8
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7
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19
11
12am
1
2
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4
5
26 SUNDAY
SHOOKSHOOKTA
fTalk) io-nam
A program targeted to
Ethiopian people that  "
encourages education and
personal development.
KOLNODEDI
(World) nam-i2pm
Beautiful arresting beats
and voices emanating from
all continents, corners and
voids. Always rhythmic,
always captivating. Always
crossing borders.
THE ROCKERS SHOW
(Reggae) i2:3pm
Reggae inna all styles and
fashion.
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
(Roots) 3-5pm
Alternatina Sundays
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-
boots country.
CHIPS WITH EVERYTHING
(Pop) 5-6pm
Alternating Sundays
British pop music from all
decades. International pop
(Japanese, French, Swedish,
British, US, etc.), '6os soundtracks and lounge.
QUEER FM
fTalk) 6-8pm
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian,
bisexual and transexual communities ofVancouver. Lots
of human interest features,
background on current issues and great music.
queerfmradio(p)gmail.com
RHYTHMSINDIA
(World) 8-gpm
Alternatina Sundays
Featuring a wide range of
music from India, including
popular music from the 1930s
to the present; Ghazals and
Bhajans, Qawwalis, pop and
regional language numbers.
TECHNO PROGRESSIVO
(Dance) 8-9pm
Alternatina Sundays
A mix of the latest house music, tech-house, prog-house
and techno.
MONDOTRASHO
(Eclectic) 9-iopm
The one and the only
Mondo Trasho with Maxwell
Maxwell—don't miss it!
TRANCENDANCE
(Dance) iopm-nam
Join us in practicing the
ancient art of rising above
common* ideas as your host
DJ Smiley Mike lays down the
latest trance cuts.
trancendance@)
hotmail.com
THROWDOWN FM
(Dance / Electronic) 12-iam
Hosts Downtown Stacee
Brown and Jen Slator are
proud to announce that
playlists for each and every
show will be 100 per cent
Vancouver, BC based underground music of the sub-
bass generation. This means
you'll never hear a track
that's not from our west
coast province of BC We call
ourselves collecthreJy: The
Local Union 604. Throw-
downFM@gmail.com
MONDAY
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
(Eclectic) 8-nam
Your favourite Brownsters,
James and Peter, offer a
savoury blend of the familiar and exotic in a blend of
aural delights.
breakfastwiththebrowns@>
hotmail.com
STRANDED
(Eclectic) uam-i2pm
Join your host Matthew for
a weekly mix of exciting
sounds, past and present,
from his Australian homeland. And journey with him
as he features fresh tunes
and explores the alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
ALTERNATIVE RADIO
(Talk) 12-ipm
Hosted by David Barsamian.
PARTS UNKNOWN
(Pop) i-3pm
An indie pop show since
1999, it's like a marshmal-
lowsandwich: soft and
sweet and best enjoyed
when poked with a stick
and held close to a fire.
MANTIS CABINET
(Eclectic) 3"4pm
THE RIB
(Eclectic) 4-5pm
Explore the avant-garde
world of music with host
Robyn Jacob on the Rib.
From new electronic and
experimental music to
improvised jazz and new
classical! So weird it will
blow your mind!
NEWS 101
(Talk) 5-6pm
Vancouver's only live,
volunteer-produced,
student and community
newscast. Every week, we
take a look back at the
week's local, national and
international news, as seen
from a fully independent
media perspective.
CAREER FAST TRACK
fTalk) 6-6:3opm
Join host and author
Philippe Desrochers as he
teaches you how ^dramatically increase your income
doing work you love.
SORE THROATS, CLAPPING
HANDS
(Eclectic) 6:30-7:3opm
Sore Throats Clapping
Hands relies on simple
melodies and poignant lyricism to drive our passions.
We embrace music that
takes little production and,
for that reason, is extremely
accessible to play, share,
create and enjoy—BtM$H$f;
that can be produced with
little more than dapping
hands and sore throats.
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
(Eclectic) 7:30-9pm
THE JAZZ SHOW
(Jazz) 9pm-i2am
Vancouver's longest
running prime-time jazz
program. Hosted by Gavin
Walker. Features at npm.
Dec. 6: Celebrating Jazz
legend Dave Brubeck's 91st
birthday with Jazz At Oberlin.
Dec. 13: Tenor saxophonist
Teddy Edwards and his octet:
BackToAualon.
Dec. 20: The Christmas
Show: Dexter Gordon, the
MJQ, Chet Baker, the Hip Story
of Scrooge plus the legendary
Miles Davis Christmas Eye
session with Thelonious
Monk and Milt Jackson et al.
Dec. 27: Trumpet great Kenny
Dorham: Trompeta Toccata.
Jan. 3: Alto saxophone legend
John Jenkins' birthday:John
Jenkins and Kenny Burrell.
Jan. 10: Drum great Max
Roach's birthday: Max Roach
+4 with Sonny Rollins and
Kenny Dorham.
Jan. 17: It's pianist Cedar
Walton's birthday. Cedar
Walton Live at Boomers with
Clifford Jordan.
Jan. 24: Legendary drummer
Lennie McBrowne's birthday:
Lennie McBroume & the Four
Souls-Eastern Lights.
Jan. 31: Bassist/composer/
firebrand Charles Mingus:
Cumbia and Jazz Fusion.
TUESDAY
PACIFIC PICKIN'
(Roots) 6-8am
Bluegrass, old-time music,
and its derivatives with Arthur and the lovely Andrea
Berman.
pacificpickin@yahoo.com
SOUNDS OF AFRICA
(World) 8-9:3oam
Showcasing music, current
affairs & news from across
the African continent and
the diaspora, you will learn
all about beat and rhythm
and it will certainly kick-
start your day.  .
THIRD TIME'S THE CHARM
(Rock) 9:30-ii:3oam
Open your ears and prepare
for a shock! A harmless    '
note may make you a fan!
Deadlier than the most
dangerous criminals!
borninsixtynine(5)
hotmail.com
MORNING AFTER SHOW
(Eclectic) n:3oam-ipm
An eclectic mix of Canadian
indie with rock, experimental, world, reggae, punk
and ska from Canada, Latin
America and Europe. The
Morning After Show has
local bands playing live on
the Morning After Sessions.
Hosted by Oswaldo Perez
Cabrera.
LAUGH TRACKS
fTalk) i-2pm
Laugh Tracks is a show about
comedy. Kliph Nesteroff
from the 'zine, Generation
Exploitation, hosts.
generationexp!oit(cDyahoo.
com, musicalbooKcD
yahoo.ca
GIVE'EM THE BOOT
(World) 2-3pm
Sample the various flavours of Italian folk music
from north to south,
traditional to modern on
this bilingual Italian/English show. Un programma
bilingue che esplora
il mondo della musica
etnica italiana.
WINGS
(Talk) 3-3:30pm
Alternating Tuesdays
PROF TALK
fTalk) 3-3:3opm
Alternating Tuesdays
Bringing UBC's professors
on air to talk about current/
past events at the local and
international level. Aiming
to provide a space for faculty and doctoral level students to engage in dialogue
and share their current
research, and to provide a
space for interdisciplinary
thinking. Interviews with
professors from a variety of
disciplines.
http://ubcproftalk.
wordpress.com
proftalk@gmail.com
RADIO FREETHINKER
(Talk) 3:30-4:3opm
Promoting skepticism, critical thinking and science, we
examine popular extraordinary claims and subject
them to critical analysis.
The *eai world is a beautiful
and fascinating place and
we want people to see it
through the lens of reality
as opposed to superstition.
IN THE CAGE WITH BARDS
03alJ#4:3O-5pm
Join Carlin Bardsley as he
welcomes the top names
in Canadian Mixed Martial
Arts to put up their dukes
and discuss the fastest
growing sport in the world.
Recaps, interviews, tunes
and more... it's the most
fun you can have without
being punched in die face!
THUNDERBIRD EYE
(Talk) 5-6pm
Your weekly roundup of UBC
Thunderbird sports action
from on campus and off with
your host Wilson Wong.
FLEX YOUR HEAD
(Hardcore) 6-8pm
Punk rock and hardcore since
1989. Bands and guests from
around the world.
27 LIFE ON JUMPSTREET
(Dance) 8-9pm
CRIMES & TREASONS
(Hip-hop) 9-npm
crimesandtreasons@
gmail.com
CABARADIO
(Talk) npm-i2:3oam
For the world of Cabaret.
Tune in for interviews,
skits, musical guests and
more. It's Radio with sass!
WEDNESDAY
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
(Eclectic) 8-ioam
Live from the Jungle Room,
join radio host Jack Velvet
for an eclectic mix of music,
sound bites, information and
inanity. Not to be missed!
dj@jackvelvet.net
POP DRONES
(Eclectic) io-n:3oam
ANOIZE
(Noise) n:3oam-ipm
An hour and a half of avant-
rock, noize, plunderphonic,
psychedelic and outsider
aspects of audio. An experience for those wno want to
be educated and EARitated.
lukemeat@hotmail.com
THE GREEN MAJORITY
(Talk) i-2pm
Canada's only environmental news hour, syndicated by
CIUT 89.5 FM Toronto or
wuM.greenmajority.ca.
DEMOCRACY NOW
(Talk) 2-3pm
RUMBLETONE RADIO
A GO GO
(Rock) 3-5pm
Primitive, fuzzed-out
garage mayhem!
ARTS REPORT
(Talk) 5-6pm
REEL TO REAL
(Talk) 6-6:3opm
Movie reviews and criticism.
SAMSQUANTCH'S
HIDEAWAY
(Eclectic) 6:30-8pm
Alternating Wednesdays    •
All-Canadian music with a
focus on indie-rock/pop.
anitabinder@hotmail.com
SHAMELESS
(Eclectic) 6:30-8pm
Alternating Wednesdays
Dedicated to giving local
music acts a crack at some
airplay. When not playing
the PR shtick, you can hear
some faves you never knew
you liked.
FOLK OASIS
(Roots) 8-iopm
Two hours of eclectic folk/
roots music, with a big emphasis on our local scene.
C'mon in! A kumbaya-free
zone since 1997.
folkoasis@gmail. com
SEXY IN VAN CITY
(Talk) io-npm
Your weekly dose of education and entertainment in
the realm of relationships
and sexuality.
sexyinvancity.com/category/
sexy-in-vancity-radio
HANS KLOSS' MISERY HOUR
(Hans Kloss) npm-iam
Pretty much the best thing
on radio.
THURSDAY
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
(Talk) 8-ioam
SWEET AND HOT
(Jazz) ioam-i2pm
Sweet dance music and hot
jazz from the 1920s, '30s
and '40s.
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
(Eclectic) 12-ipm
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by Duncan, sponsored by donuts.
duncansdonuts.
woidpress.com
WE ALL FALL DOWN
(Eclectic) i-2pm
Punk rock, indie pop and
whatever else I deem worthy. Hosted by a closet nerd,
www.weallfalldowncitr.
blogspotca
INK STUDS
(Talk) 2-3pm
Underground and indie
comix. Each week, we interview a different creator to
get their unique perspective
on comix and discuss their
upcoming works.
JAPANESE MUSICQUEST
(World) 3-3:30pm
Syndicated from CJLY
Kootenay Co-op Radio in
Nelson, B.C.
FRENCH CONNECTION
(World) 3:30-5pm
French language and music.
NATIVE SOLIDARITY NEWS
(Talk) 5-6pm
A national radio service and
part of an international network of information and action in support of indigenous
peoples' survival and dignity.
ARE YOU AWARE
(Eclectic) 6-7:3opm
Celebrating the message
behind the music: Profiling
music and musicians that
take the route of positive
action over apathy.
EXQUISITE CORPSE
(Experimental) 7:30-9pm
Experimental, radio-art,
sound collage, field recordings, etc. Recommended for
the insane.
artcorpse@yahoo.com
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
(Live Music) 9-npm
Featuring live band(s) every
week performing in the
CiTR Lounge. Most are from
Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country and around the world.
FUNK MY LIFE
(Soul/Dance) npm-i2am
Grooving out tunes with a
bit of soul and a lot of funk,
from the birth of rhythm and
blues to the golden age of
motown, to contemporary
dance remixes of classic soul
hits. We explore Brazilian
funk, Japanese breakbeat
anthems, the British motown
remix scene, Canadian soul
and disco that your parents
probably made out to and the
classics of American soul.
Soul in the City's Oker hosts
with guests to bring that
extra bounce to your step.
AURAL TENTACLES
(Eclectic) i2-6am
It could be global, trance,
spoken word, rock, the
unusual and the weird, or it
could be something different. Hosted by Dj Pierre.
auraltentacles@hotmail.com
FRIDAY
FRIDAY SUNRISE
(Eclectic) 7:30-9am
An eclectic mix of indie
rock, hip-hop and reggae to
bring you up with the sun.
SYNCHRONICITY
(Talk) 9-ioam
Join host Marie B and
discuss spirituality, health
and feeling good. Tune in
and tap into good vibrations
that help you remember
why you're here: to have
fun! This is not your average
spirituality show.
SKA-T'S SCENIC DRIVE
(Ska) ioam-i2pm
Canada's longest running
Ska radio program.
djska_t@hotmail.com
CITR LISTENER HOUR
(Eclectic) 12-ipm
Tune in each week as you,
the CiTR fan, gets to program an hour of adventure
for the whole world to hear!
For more info, contact
program coordinator Bryce
Dunn at citrprogramming@
club.ams.ubc.ca.
BARNBURNER
(Eclectic) i-2pm
The greasier side of rock
'n' roll, rhythm 'n' blues,
and country... Crack a beer,
order some BBQ and get
your boogie on.
RADIO ZERO
(Dance) 2-3:30pm
An international mix of
super-fresh weekend party
jams from New Wave to
foreign electro, baile, Bollywood and whatever else.
www.radiozero.com
NARDWUAR
(Nardumar) 3:30-5pm
Join Nardwuar the Human
Serviette for Clam Chowder flavoured entertainment. Doot doola doot
doo...doot doo!
nardwuar@nardwuar.com
NEWS 101
(Talk) 5-6pm
See Monday for description.
CITR SPORTS LIVE
(Talk) 6-io:3opm
SHAKE A TAIL FEATHER
(Soul/R&B) io:30-i2am
The finest in classic soul
and rhythm & blues
from the late '50s to the
early '70s, including lesser
known artists, regional hits
and lost soul gems.
THE VAMPIRE'S BALL
(Industrial) i2-4am
Dark, sinister music to
soothe and/or move the
Dragon's soul. Industrial,
goth and a touch of metal
too. Blog: thevampiresball.
blogspotcom.
thevampiresball@gmail.com
SATURDAY
THE SATURDAY EDGE
(Roots) 8am-i2pm
A personal guide to world
and roots music—with
African, Latin and European
music in the first half, followed by Celtic, blues,
songwriters, Cajun and
whatever else fits!
steveedge3@mac.c0m
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
(Punk) 12-ipm
A fine mix of streetpunk
and old-school hardcore
backed by band interviews,
guest speakers and social
commentary.
crashnburnradio@yahoo.ca
generationannihilation.com
POWER CHORD
(Metal) i-3pm
Vancouver's longest running metal show. If you're
into music that's on the
heavier/darker side of the
spectrum, then you'll like
it. Sonic assault provided by
Geoff the Metal Pimp.
CODE BLUE
(Roots) 3"5pm
From backwoods delta
low-down slide to urban .
harp honks, blues and
blues roots with your hosts
Jim, Andy and Paul.
codeblue@buddy-system.org
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
(World) 5-6pm
The best of mix of Latin
American music.
leoramirez@canada.com
NASHAVOLNA
(World) 6-7pm
News, arts, entertainment and
music for the Russian community, local and abroad,
nashavolna.ca
NOTES FROM THE
UNDERGROUND
(Electronic/Hip-hop/More)
7-9pm
Start your Saturday night
off right with our weekly
showcase of the local
underground DJ and electronic music scene,
notesundergroundradio.
blogspotcom
notesundergroundradio@
gmail.com
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
(Dance/Electronic/Eclectic)
9-npm
If you like everything from
electro/techno/trance/8-bit
music/retro '80s this is the
show for you!
www. synap ticsandwich .net
28 UNDER
REVIE
__ ^4«m4c#
i^|||:|^l^^^^^|
DISCORDER'S
FAVOURITE
ALBUMS
OF
2010
1. CARIBOU-SWIM
2. FINE MIST-PUBLIC DOMAIN
3. ARIEL PINK'S HAUNTED GRAFFITI - BEFORE TODAY
4. SLEIGH BELLS-TREATS
5. HUMANS-AVEC MES MECS
6. APOLLO GHOSTS - MOUNT BENSON
7. DIAMOND RINGS - SPECIAL AFFECTIONS
8. JAPANDROIDS - NO SINGLES
9. LCD SOUNDSYSTEM - THIS IS HAPPENING
10. BABE RAINBOW-SHAVED EP
11. BLACK MOUNTAIN - WILDERNESS HEART
12. CROCODILES-SLEEP FOREVER
13. NO AGE - EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN
14.SHAD-TS0L
15. FANSHAW-DARK EYES
16. TORO Y MOI - LEAVE EVERYWHERE
17. BRASSTRONAUT - MT. CHIMAERA
18. BEACH HOUSE-TEEN DREAM
19. HANNAH GEORGAS - THIS IS GOOD
20. BISON B.C.-DARK AGES
ANIMAL BODIES
ANIMAL BODIES
(Needs More RAM)
Animal Bodies' debut of their
self-titled album is shrouded in
mystery. Aside from the fact that
they are from Vancouver and their
release is courtesy of the record label
operated out of the Zoo Zhop, there
is no mention anywhere about how
many members are in the band,
whose voice is twisting about, or the
significance of the rambiings. The
mystique is part of the'experience
as the listener is greeted with
electronic chaos and a sense of blind
fury introducing the band's ghostly,
New Wave, post-punk sotmd.-- -
There are three common threads
gluing the album together: the synths
are programmed in such a black sea
of fuzz that even the darkness might
jump; each song introduces a two
or three chord pattern that stays
consistent throughout the track
but builds with turbulent electronic
blips; and there is never an attempt
at chorus. After all, this is not a.
pop affair.
"Thoughts and Consequences,"
sets the tone with a fast and furious
blur of analog beats, rapid guitar
abuse, an almost middle eastern
vibe provided by a roaming and
slightly off-kilter synth sound, and
heavily reverbed vocals echoing in
the background—call it sonic bedlam
with a beat.
"Jungle Cathedral" slows things
a bit with a smoother pulse. The
mood is provided by a somewhat
catchy guitar riff that's played like
a bass over top a softer electro-beat
and cerebral synths in the backdrop.
Whoever is singing tends to use her
voice almost like a guitar—constandy
bending the pitch from low to high in
order to hit the intended note. This
characteristic becomes entrenched
in the first four songs and forms
the basis of the sound. The brief
interlude from the fury and darkness
quickly returns with "Sequence 99"
and "Tomb Table Testimony." Both
are very similar in composition to
the first track, complete with the
bended howls, sinister synths and
racing beats.
The album ends with two tracks
of complete dark ambient textures
layered, intertwined and void of any
rhythm elements—it is a fitting end to
an intense listening experience.
—Slafcko Bucifal
BABE RAINBOW
LET ME BUY U, ANNE DRANK VOL 1 & 2
(Independent)
I like Babe Rainbow. And rap music.
A lot. Maybe I like rap music more
than you—not that this is a competition. I was genuinely excited when I
was assigned to review an album that
combines Vancouver-produced dark,
atmospheric electronic music and
some of my favourite semi-obscure
rap tracks.
Disappointingly, the nonsensically
titled Let Me Buy U, Anne Drank Volumes 1
& 2 is not a well-matched marriage of
these musical styles. I can understand
that this is a pet proj ect and a chance to
pay homage to, and put a personal spin
on a favourite genre; Babe Rainbow
has frequently cited rap as one of
his musical influences in previous
interviews. But the end product of
29\ 3r
v
these mixes doesn't sound like an
artist paying respect to a favourite
genre. This mixtape sounds like a
producer forcing the music sampled
to conform to his particular aesthetic,
Often with unappealing results.
Basically, the tracks of several
groups and rappers are all slowed to
meet Babe Rainbow's sluggish beat-per-
minute ratio. These altered vocals leave
a variety of rappers all sounding like the
same dude. And that dude has a deep
voice. And he raps reallll slowww.
Particularly disappointing is
the remix of "National Anthem" by
Freddie Gibbs, while the remixes of
"Hell on Earth" by Mobb Deep and
"Bloodbath" by the Dayton Family
fare better, sounding more menacing
than their original incarnations. Still,
these two successes are exceptions to
the rest of the monotonous mixtape.
While not an all-out failure, if you're a
fan of rap, and a fan of Babe Rainbow,
it's probably best to listen to them
independently.
—Tony Kess 4&^&f
BOOGIE MONSTER
ZECHIMECHI
(Needs More RAM)
Ladies and gentlemen, children of
all ages! You've read legends of the
Big Foot, you've seen pictures of the
Loch Ness monster, but have you ever
heard the carnal howl of the Boogie
Monster? Come this way one and all,
step inside Zechimechi and succumb
to the infamous beast with its furry
coat and gnashing teeth. Watch as
the Boogie Monster takes a pile of
instruments and throws them into
a blender, gleefully switching the
speeds from pulse, to grind, to
crush—somehow blending everything
into a thick melody.
Hold on as the Boogie Monster
flies through n tracks like a Kansas
whirlwind, sucking up everyone in its
path and taking them to a beyond place
(and they said tornados don't happen
in Vancouver). Go ahead and try not to
get lost in the infectious cacophony of
Zechimechi, a mirrored maze ofbuzzing
guitars, looping melodies and blasting
beats. It is the soundtrack to a chaotic
circus where Dr. JMnkenstein is the
ring master and Willy Wonka is the
organ grinder.
Dance monkeys dance! The Boogie
Monster is big and scary and loud
and hilarious. The Boogie Monster
is the life of the party! (Whew, 200
words about Boogie Monster without
an obvious reference to lightning
Bolt!—err—oops).
—MarkPaulHus
I CAVING 3
| U.S. CAVES
I (Ache)
The ethereal World of glitch and crunk
is a haven of music unexplored by
many. Andy Dixon, the man behind
Caving, delivers the goods on all fronts
of his newest mixtape, U.S. Caves.
Taking modern hits and obliterating
them beyond radio play, U.S. Caves
recreates some of the most prominent
pop songs of the past few years into
something much more sij|&ter. This
bass-heavy exploration brings the
goods—and much more—to satisfy
the most adventurous of souls.
Popular musicians have been
taken by Caving and brought forth in
a new light; mixes from the past have
been flipped over and rearranged into
something new and bone-crushingly
fresh. Artists, such as Fergie and
Drake, have been remixed and
dropped with that heavy club bass.
"London Bridge" is no longer a
mediocre pop song; it's a club jam full
of deep synths, modulated beats and
heavily gated vocals. Britney Spears
and her single "Gimme More" is no
longer suitable for Top 40 radio; it's
been rearranged in such a dark way
that it bears more resemblance to a
hard hit of dubstep than anything it
was before. The production is clever
and striking; Caving knows how to
amp up the sound of a track and make
it pulse through the listener's mind.
No more treble highs and subtle
lows, these tracks are full of deep
frequencies and pounding beats.
Though unique in sound, the
overall album is relatively eerie;
some of the beats formed here are
so experimental they come across
strange. The final track, a mix of
Ciara's "1, 2, Step," takes the pop
singer's vocals and tunes them down
more than a few steps. The result is
a dub beat that has Ciara's creeping
vocals haunting the listener, pitch-
shifted in an unreal way. Even pop
artist Lil Wayne has been remodelled
by Dixon's unique imagination;
"Lollipop" is just as dance ready as it
was before, but now modified to suit
the taste of a much sawier listening
audience. This isn't a run of the mill
collection of poorly remixed tunes—
it's an actual exploration into the
world of sound. Caving has taken it
upon himself to take some of the most
overplayed music and actually make
it fresh and interesting again—and
thafs talent.
—Kamil Krawayk
FALKLANDS
THINK ABOUT IT
I (Clamour)
Simple, yet extremely compelling,
Falklands' debut LP, Think About It, is
a definite throwback to the heydays
of good ol' rock 'n' roll. Powered
by overdriven guitars, thriving bass
rhythms, exhilarating drums and
strong vocals, these ten tracks evoke
a sense of style and class—despite
the homely set up of it all. Falklands
deliver a retrospective sound that is
sorely missed in the music world. The
songs found on Think About It evoke
a sense of youth, bridging the gap
between the generation that grew
up listening to Thin Lizzy and the
Replacements, allowing newcomers
to the genre to gain a common
appreciation for all that is pleasant
to the ears.
Produced by Jesse Gander (behind
acts such as the the Iranzmitors,
Japandroids), Think About It delivers
on most fronts. The musicianship is
top-notch, but rather elementary; the
guitar work is clever and entertaining,
but not very technical. Solos are
sparse amidst the reminiscently
crunchy riffs. No one aspect of the
music is overpowering. Gander has
done an excellent job at making
sure the music flows together and
really sings. The album lacks some
diversity, but it holds up well in the
end by changing the tone of each
song. From "Saint Vinny," a hard,
balls-to-the-wall rocker, to the slower
and more ballad-like "Hell Is Up,"
this album delivers enough variety
to stay interesting throughout There
are some clever licks to be found on
each track, and "Yellow Rose" has
the most fond guitar playing (and
30 guitar solos) found on the release,
but alas, it's the drumming that
steals the show: precise, strong and
a contributing force to the Falklands'
sonic landscapes.
Lyrically, the band does a fair
job conveying meaning; the songs
are not mindless messes of poetry,
but rather crafted pieces of thought
"Earthquake," for example, is a very
pop-driven track, and thankfully, not
void of meaning. Simple lines, like
"Should I sacrifice / another healthy
laugh for your excessive taste" may
seem trivial, but hold well in context—
nothing too deep or too obscure, but
just right to get across a point and
have a good time all at once.
The Falklands deliver something
that is scarce in bands today: fun.
They're young, adventitious, and
definitely talented, a small jewel
from the cold borders of Canada.
Full of energy, it's no surprise that
this quartet can bring the best of both
power-pop and classic rock into a
tempting package that just evokes
the thrill of good ol' rock 'n' roll in
the hearts of both young and old.
Capturing the moment, these boys
sure know how to steal the show.
. —Kamil Krawczyk
THE GOOD ONES
KIGALI Y' IZAHABU
(Dead Oceans)
Beauty can shine brightly even in the
most forgotten dusty corners of the
earth, offering little glimmers of pure
hope and love that beat strongly with
the pulse of life. It was out from the
shadows that producer Ian Brennan
spotted two figures approaching,
carrying a weathered four-stringed
guitar between them and the glow of
something special. Part way through
a two-week quest in Rwanda in search
of interesting music that moved him,
Brennan knew at first glance that he
had found what he was after. That
night two of the three musicians
known as the Good Ones played
him a haunting pretty song called
"Sara," promising to return the next
evening with their third member for
a "proper" recording session. This
session, 12 songs done in one take
over the course of an evening, is
Kigali T Izahabu, a stunning album
that acts almost as a field recording
or snapshot of a life most have never
seen nor heard. Sung in their native
Kinyarwanda street tongue, these
songs rely on feeling and inflection.
Played simply with beat up guitars, the
tapping of a foot and some wonderful
harmonies, the Good Ones' sparse
joyous acoustic love songs of faith
and friendship tap into a deep well
of goodness and offer a glimpse into
the resiliency and strength of spirit.
These hopeful street songs act as a call
to gather and to stand strong in the
face of it all. Indeed, the humble folk
songs, played out on a porch in some
dusty messed up part of the earth, are
a rare gem worth digging for.
—Nathaniel Bryce
KIDS & EXPLOSIONS
SHIT COMPUTER
(independent)
Skit Computer is the debut album of
mashup artist Kids & Explosions.
Comparisons to Girl Talk, poster child
of the mashup genre, are inevitable,
but Kids & Explosions offers a more
soulful, less frenetic sound while still
delivering on insanely catchy hooks.
The self-described "boy who
makes songs by stealing others and
making them worse" is actually
Toronto's Josh Raskin, director of
the Oscar nominated short, I Met
the Walrus. He throws everyone from
Notorious B.I.G. to Elliott Smith
together, chopping them up until
they lose all context and take on an
entirely new form.
Set to the sweet, gentle background
oflron & Wine, "Swear Words" offers
an extremely gratifying release of any
pent-up Tourette's urges you may have,
before finishing with a Cyndi Lauper
sucker punch. "Babies Are the Future"
mixes David Bowie with a healthy
dose of a children's choir in one of
the album's best dance tracks.
Where he really proves himself
though is on tracks like "Slow
Song" which weaves together Feist
and Tupac, creating a satisfyingly
melancholy rainy day song.
Shit Computer is just a lot of fun
and it grows on you with each listen.
With a perfect mix of booty jams and
introspective heartache, it's likely to
stay in your party repertoire for weeks
to come. %!&§£
—Sally White
0LENKA& THE AUTUMN LOVERS
ANB NOW WE SING
(Oh! Records)
On their sophomore album, And Now
We Sing, Olenka & the Autumn Lovers
deliver exactly what they promise.
With no indie-rock pretension or
clutter, the London, Ontario six-piece
leaps immediately into an irresistible
collection of Eastern European-
inflected folk tunes that capture the
redemptive flashes of brilliance in
even the most dismal corners.
It's rare to come across an album
with so few missteps. As a PhD student
in English, Krakus might be expected
to have a wordy, dense narrative style.
As it turns out, her education mostly
manifests itself in simple and evocative
writing that knows where to embellish.
and where to leave well enough alone.
Meanwhile, her rhythmic, syncopated
vocal technique functions like an
all-purpose instrument, imitating a
xylophone and a violin in almost the
same breath. Combining this with the
heavy string section and tasteful use
of trumpet, the band's overall sound
is reminiscent of both My Brightest
Diamond and the Decemberists but
is derivative of neither.
With the whole album clocking
at just over 40 minutes, And Now We
Sing k barely long enough to fill up an
entire commute. In that time, it whirls
you down alleyways and through
. churchyards, through country romps
and Balkan stomps at a fierce pace
that only occasionally slows up for
a folk dance.
Opener and standout track
"Odessa" is exemplary of the amount
of content Krakus can pack into no
time at all: In just under two minutes,
the titular character watches each of
her family members collapse under the
weight of their problems. It is hectic
and bleak, but the crunchy guitars and
relentlessly catchy melody make it go
down so easy that by the time it's over
you'll barely remember where you are
or what you were doing.
—Miranda Martini
THE RUSSIAN FUTURISTS
THE WEIGHTS ON THE WHEELS
(Upper Class)
The Russian Futurists (a.k.a Matthew
Adam Heart) are back with album
number four, The Weight's in the Wheels.
The Ontario native is probably best
know for his punchy pop tracks.
Remember that super catchy song
"Paul Simon?" That's him.
"Hoeing Weeds Sowing Seeds"
is the first track and single off the
album. Dancy-dance sounds that
swing from one speaker to another,
it is a very clear indication of what you
are in for with this album.
The Weight's on the Wheels consists
of enthusiastic, upbeat, track after
track. "One Night, One Kiss" is a cute
little duet featuring guest vocalist
Rum Minnikin and some very well
integrated castanet action.
"zoo Shopping Days 'till
Christmas" gets the award for
best use of a drum machine on the
album and the beat-tastik "Plates" is
continued on page 34
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another killer.
There are so many influences here
it is pointless to list them. The Weight's
on the Wheels has a familiar vibe, yet it is
still an original offering. A polished,
warm album that holds the listeners
attention from start to finish.
Best listen to the album with
headphones to get everything that ingoing on here. A really cool album for
those of you who like your pop music
sanguine and drum machines loud.
—Katherine Boothroyd
SMALL BLACK
NEW CHAIN
(Jagjaguwar)
When Casio first introduced their
line of keyboards and samplers in
the early '80s, they were intended
mostly as a toy—especially when
compared to their professional studio counterparts. Thirty years later,
one room urban recording studios
have sprung up like flowers in bloom
and those old lo-fi micros synths have
become somewhat of a staple piece of
hardware. Clearly, it's not what you
use but how you use it Brooklyn's
Small Black successfully converts
the lo-fi fuzz to create a contagious,
dreamy, heavily textured pop sound
enveloped by a fog of ambient chill.
Somewhere in amongst the tumble
of noise and reverb, danceable moments and catchy melodies keep New
Chain moving forward while the '80s
electronic stew demonstrates respect
for its vintage underpinnings.
At times, the musical layers of
sound and noise make it difficult to
discern Josh Kolenik's lyrics thereby
making it nearly impossible to sing
along using the correct words, but
it hardly matters as the seamless
integration between the '80s
dance rhythms and melting synth
patterns will encourage a sing-out-
loud response and have you using
nonsensical words to fill in the
blanks. While this action may appear
a little odd during those uninhibited
moments in public, anyone sharing
the experience will understand that
; there are just too many catchy bits and
memorable tunes to resist the urge.
Small Black's first full length is a
complete and satisfying spin. While
never derailing from their mushy
nebulous of sound, each track has a
distinct feel accomplished by a general
refrain from repeating elements or
motifs. It is not clear whether Small
Black search for that perfect sound,
or if die perfect sounds just happens
fortuitously as a result of tinkering
with their gear, but it is evident that
the careful arrangement of layers
upon layers and bits upon bits form
a pleasing listening experience from
start to finish.
—Slavko Bucifal
TIGHT SOLID
I WH.RIT0FF
j (Independent)
Walk it Off, the first release from
Vancouver trio Tight Solid, sounds
like something that came out of the
Pacific Northwest in the late '80s or
early '90s. This is grunge in its purest
form; we're talking pre- "Teen Sfiir*
entry-level grunge. The only thing that
would make Walk it Of/more authentic
\ is if it was released on cassette with
a photocopied come, ormaybe vinyl,
but only if it was pressed one copy at
a time in someone's basement Burn-
side (Treacherous Machete), Shmoo
Ritchee (the Organ) and Ryan Walter
Wagner (the WPP) have compiled nine
tracks of raw and honest rock and roll
full driven by punk ethos. The opening track "Ode to the Devil" is a dark
journey guided by trashy riffs and a
driving rhythm that push you off a
cliff into a sludgy bridge. "She's So
In Control" finds itself somewhere
between the Stooges and Danzig era
Misfits. Things wind down a bit for
the short and sweet love ballad "A
Great Love," but quickly crank back
up for the hardcore blast "The '70s in
Quebec". Walk it Off is a genuine collection of rock and roll songs that are
both tight and solid and reminiscent
of the last true movement in popular
music.
—Mork Paulhus
TWIN CRYSTALS
CHILD LIFE
(Self-Released)
Jesse Taylor, Jordan Alexander and
Jeremiah Haywood, who comprise
the local band Twin Crystals, have
recently recorded and self-released
their twentieth(ish) album Child Life.
This album can be had on cassette
or as a digital download. The noise
inspired punk band has recorded pro-
lifically, and this is the latest taste to
their always-evolving sound.     *
Though they've released 20 albums
now, many are splits and a few more
are recorded from live shows. Some
of their older recordings have a spacey
dance to them, feel, something like
guitar-keyboardist Taylor's other
band Channels 3x4, but Child Life is
definitely more reminiscent of old LA.
punk. Think Wipers meets a toned-
down Ex Models (they're recent it's
true) with lo-fi male vocals.
Anxious and scattered, but
altogether fluid, Twin Crystals hits
so many levels. There's grunginess to
the guitar and keyboard and nostalgia
to the vocals that nearly recede into
the background while Alexander
furiously sweats over the drums. Their
recordings are true to their live sound,
and are just as good. Child
Life is a rad addition to the
Twin Crystals discography,
and Twin Crystals is a
prominent part of the
Vancouver punk scene that
you really should hear, if
you haven't already.
—Sarah Charrouf
so powerful, and it compliments the
overall fuzzy backdrop. This brighter-
than-before EP kicks off with "Poor
Animal," a celebratory dance for
the free spirits, a la Florence & the
Machine's style and vocals. "Tower,"
- reverts back to a bit more of her
previous gothic flavour. In the middle
is "Sea Talk," and as the name implies,
it has reverb waves sweeping with her
ethereal voice draping over top, like
the ocean with aqua sinews twisting
or like aurora borealis lazily stretching
across the sky in viscous liquid while
she sings the simple lyrics, "I don't
ever want stay away from you." The
closer, "Lightsick," which boasts real
piano (none of that synth), rides on
spiritually until it fades. Valusia is a
wholly mystical and majestic effort,
and perhaps, a small tasting sample
of the meaty LP ahead.
—Ming Wong
ZOLA JESUS
J VALUSIA
I (Sacred Bones)
Zola Jesus has been busy.
Within 2009 to present
she has released two LPs
and four EPs and this fall
she has had three back-
to-back tours supporting
Fever Ray and the xx with
plenty of headlining tours
throughout And now, the
21 year old, bom Nika Roza
Danilove ofWisconsin, can
add Valusia, a four song EP,
to her achievements.
Her background
training in opera helped
develop her voice to be
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October 16" j the Biltmore
Teenage Fanclub, along with XTC and a bunch of other '8os/'90s British
bands, form a special part of the soundtrack of my childhood. My brother
and I both played on travelling hockey teams and my father would tell us that
it was time to develop some cultural pride before slipping a tape into the deck
and air-guitaring to "What You Do To Me." So when I heard they were headed
to Vancouver, I was so down for the show. In fact, I may have spent the weeks
preceding the show sharing most of their 1991 album Bandiua^onesqu* with
everyone. On repeat.
Vancouver-based band the Shilohs opened the show with an appropriately
Brit-pop and surf-rock feel—a definite Big Star influence, with dashes of Buddy
Holly. The vocals sometimes sounded a bit like Davy Jones of the Monkees (I
checked with my friend, who came with me, and she agreed. So odd but true).
The Shilohs, who just released their first self-titled EP, rocked a mix of up-tempo
and slower, more sentimental songs. Their set was tight and presented a classic
West Coast melange approach to standard pop rock.
Teenage Fanclub hit the stage next. "They look like dads," my friend Erika
said. Again, true. Norman Blake (vocals, guitar), Raymond McGinley (vocals,
lead guitar), Gerard Love (vocals, bass) and Francis MacDonald (drums), who've
been together in one form or another since 1989, look like dads. They also have
hot accents (Erika verified this.) The crowd at the Biltmore was also a little
older than I'm used to, but then, my own dad was at the TFC show in Toronto
earlier this year (I had him send me their setlist for comparison's sake). The
Fannies (don't judge me) played a good mix of old and new songs—a whole
bunch from 2010's Shadows, alongside tracks from Bandumflonesque, Grand Prix
and Songs fiom Northern Britain.
TFC's newer songs are simultaneously familiar and innovative; "Baby
Lee" (from 2010's Shadows), for example, is a catchy, melodic song melding a
glockenspiel with TFC's tried and true approach to vocals and rhythm. "When
" <LStiU Have Thee" (also from Shadows) is a solid love song with some on-point
awesome lyrics: "The Rolling Stones wrote a song for me / It's a minor song
in a major key... It's a modern hymn for the you and me."
My favourite songs of the evening were from what the band warmly referredteas their "back catalogue"—"Sparky's Dream" and the night's closer, "Everything
Flows." "The Concept" (from Bandwa^onesque), the last song of the set before
the encore, had the entire crowd singing along. As the show ended and the
Biltmore cleared out into its lovely triangular parking lot I felta wave of hockey
nostalgia and headed home early enough to be in bed by midnight
—Andrea Bennett $MwM
I THE MORNING BENDERS/TWWI SISTER/CULTS
October 20 / Venue,  _"j
I guess you can't expect a huge crowd on a Wednesday night But I still feel bad
for those who missed the Morning Benders show. They should have skipped
studying for midterms like me.
After a short, catchy set from a young group called Cults (not to be confused
with the Cult), Long Island's Twin Sister hit the stage. They instantly won me
over with their cool, relaxing demeanor and their spacey disco sound. There's
a subtle mystery to lead singer Andrea Estella's breathy vocals and stage
presence and I thoroughly enjoyed the cute conversation attempts guitarist
Eric Cardona had with the crowd. Estella and Cardona had a great dynamic
and really knew how to trade off and let each other have their moment A good
example is with me airy tune, "Lady Daydream." The twangy, echoey guitar
hit so perfectly just as Estella pulled back her vocals. Twin Sister ended on a
high with a groovy cover of La Boinda's "I Wanna Be Your Lover," followed by,
"All Around and Away We Go." Even on these dance induced songs, there's
always this layer of futuristic/dreamy ambience that make their music that
much more appealing. Next time Twin Sister is in town, you can bet they'll be
headlining their own show.
The Morning Benders' sophomore album, Big Echo, proved they are a
band in the midst of transition. They have moved away from the conventional
35 W--'' $*3§ j
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KURT VILE & THE SOFT PACK BY STEVE LOUIE
California, indie-pop sound, and it was interesting seeing them balance their
old sound with the new. Songs like "Pleasure Sighs" evoked images of the
coast and ocean waves, but without the generic, happy, "fun in the sun" vibe.
It glided flawlessly into the atmospheric tune "Stitches," and everything just
felt ethereal and hypnotic. Mid way through the set, the band didn't bother
with a smooth transition into their upbeat indie-pop songs like "All Day
Day Light" or "Boarded Doors." Front man Christopher Chu basically just
said; "So now we're going play some songs that you can dance to. You guys
look like you want to dance." Whether it was the atmospheric tunes or the
straightforward pop songs, the Morning Benders played with such precision
and neatness. The guitar licks, harmonies and even their intense "freak outs"
sounded clean and crisp.
As expected, the band closed with "Excuses." It was one big sing-along
and Chu looked confident leading the crowd of fans. The "dum da dum"
vocals were looped and eerily, they echoed in the background as the band
played louder. The song ended with a mesmerizing instrumental outro: all
four members crouched down to the effects panel and started manipulating
the sounds until gradually, each layer was removed and all that was left was
the vocals. It sounds cool, but I didn't get to appreciate any of it! I failed to
mention orte thing. Throughout the entire show, this drunken moron kept
yelling things out. And so while the band was doing this really neat experiment,
this idiotic drunk guy started singing irritatingly loud. He killed the moment,
and everyone wanted to punch him in the face. Luckily, the Morning Benders
did come back on stage for an encore. They played their latest song, "Virgins,"
with no rude interruptions.
Within a year, the Morning Benders have played in Vancouver three times.
But, even if you caught the last shows, don't expect anything redundant. It's
exciting seeing them evolve and test out new things, so you don't want to
overlook their live shows...even if there is a stupid drunk fan yelling every
five seconds.
—Angela Yen
fsiilfc^
October 24 / the Orpheum
Things you will hear at a She & Him concert: "I love you Zooey!", "Zooey,
you're beautiful!" and the occasional, "Woo, M. Ward." On their final stop of
their North American tour, She & Him played to a sea of adoring Vancouver
fans. They included girls dressed just like Zooey Deschanel and guys hoping
to date her.     '^iP
Sisters, Lily and Abigail Chapin, were the openers and they played a set of
simple folk-pop songs. The Chapin Sisters are also the backup singers for She &
Him, so you can get a sense of how easily they can harmonize and complement
each other's vocals. They seemed very serious and intense until they played
their acoustic cover of Britney Spears' "Toxic." It's probably more gimmicky
than anything else, but still entertaining. Deschanel joined them on stage for
the last two songs and that was probably the most exciting part.
She & Him, plus the backing band, wasted no time getting into the bubbly
tune, "I Was Made For You." Immediately, enthusiastic foot tapping ensued.
Rather early in the set, She & Him played "Thieves." It's a personal favourite
and I was surprised that they treated it more like a filler. Deschanel's distinct
voice, which sounds so wonderful on the studio version of the song, hadn't
quite warmed up yet. Ward, however, had no problem delving into his decorative
guitar solos. I'll admit, I was probably one of the few people who was more
stoked to see the "Him" portion of She & Him. But, anyone can tell you that
Ward is a seasoned musician and he is mesmerizing to watch as he plays his
guitar with such ease and style. It was on the heartfelt ballad "Take It Back"
where Deschanel's voice really wooed me. Her voice had definitely warmed
up by then. She had that beautiful and nostalgic tone, where you get hints of
legends like Ella Fitzgerald or Patsy Cline.
The highlight ofthe show was when it was simply Deschanel and Ward
on stage. They treated the crowd to a couple of covers which included their
sensual rendition of "You Really Got a Hold On Me." Ward got to show off
his deep, velvety voice, which people sometimes forget is distinguished in its
own right. That vocal exchange during the callback was the best chemistry
Deschanel and Ward had the entire night.
The backing band then returned, and for "In the Sun," the audience was
invited to dance and sing along. Everyone was itching to jump up and down.
So, as it usually goes at the Orpheum, the audience quickly flooded to the front
ofthe stage. The show definitely took a turn and became an upbeat dance fest.
During the encore, all the songs were covers and they ended with "I Put A Spell
On You." Deschanel belted it out and pushed her voice as far is it could go.
The stripped-down, bolt-busting cover forced the cheering crowd to do one
thing: continue with the "I love you Zooey!" and "You're amazing!" comments.
One girl in particular, who was just blown away by the strength of Deschanel's
voice, exclaimed, "Wow! That was FAN-tastic!" It was indeed.
—Angela Yen
October 29 /-the Cobalt  ,;,...„".;•:
Only a little over half an hour late, Sonny & the Sunsets took to the stage at the
Cobalt on this night to open for Best Coast. The concert had preempted the
usual Friday night crowd, but no one seemed to be complaining, least of all
No More Strangers' usual DJ Tristan Orchard, who kept people entertained
between sets.
36 MAYELIN SHEATHS BY STEVE LOUIE
Sonny & the Sunsets looked and sounded like veteran musicians, used to
the world of live performance and a bit world weary, but excellent musicians
every one of them. The four of them didn't provide any surprises, but they are
very good at playing sunny pop music that would be well received by those in
the mood for the Beach Boys or New Pornographers.
Many great bands have offnights and this, unfortunately, was one of those for
the vocals of Bethany Cosentino, lead singer of Best Coast. Her voice, which on
record manages to simultaneously convey both a sappy longing and cool disdain,
is usually the standout part of any Best Coast song, but this night it didn't live
up to the standard set by the recordings. Checking out a sampling of reviews
of previous performances did not indicate that Cosentino's underwhelming
vocals were a regular problem, so hopefully this night will just go down as a
night forgotten amidst a tour full of much more successful evenings.
Luckily Cosentino didn't let us down in her ability as a musician, so despite
her voice sounding weak on some tracks, she effortlessly played her mint
green guitar. Backing her were band members Bobb Bruno (on guitar) and Ali
Koehler (the band's third drummer). They did not disappoint, playing excellent
music that kept the music sounding as fresh and exciting as anything on the
record. The band ripped through their excellent repertoire of hazy surflgarage
pop playing some ofthe audience's favourite songs such as "Crazy For You,"
"Summer Mood," "Boyfriend" and the closer "Each and Every Day." The crowd,
happy to be at the sold-out show, enjoyed themselves, singing and dancing
along when the mood struck them. Though the audience didn't howl enough
to encourage an encore, no fans were driven from the show early.
Was it a disappointment that this excellent band hadn't lived up to our
perhaps unreasonable expectations? Yes,.but that didn't change the fact that
Best Coast is one ofthe few bands touring right now that provides an original
and excellently executed take on modern music and well worth seeing if the
opportunity arises.
[Update: though unofficial I've heard rumours that Cosentino was sick this,
night and that would explain the problems with her vocals at this concert.]
—Jordie Yow
| November 5 / the Biltmore [
Ubiquity breeds annoyance. In the early 2000s bands like the Soft Pack were
bloody everywhere.
Floppy of hair and tight of jeans, bands like the Strokes, BRMC and the White
Stripes were massive, and as with the emergence of any successful subgenre or
movement (see grunge in the '90s), hundreds of other bands suddenly seemed
to materialise out of nothing overnight. While "The New Rock Revolution"
(as it was dubbed by NME) has never really gone away, its all prevailing reach
has at least retreated a bit, which means that instead of dismissing the Soft
Pack as also-rans in an already overpopulated genre, we can appreciate them
on face value and realize that they have a lot to offer and enjoy, as they proved
with their headlining slot at the Biltmore.
A few hours earlier, support act Kurt Vile performed an acoustic in-store set
across town at Zulu Records. Getting off to a very tentative start, he fumbled
through a very unsure "He's Alright." If he was busking on Granville, you may
very well have juslt walked past That is until he played "Blackberry Song." A
sweetly beautiful song, its graceful simplicity translated brilliantly in the confines
ofthe surroundings, better in fact than it does on his latest album, Childish
Prodigy. Even if there were only flashes of greatness, one might realistically
suspect that Vile was a little nervous, because after all, who doesn't feel the
oppressive judgemental gaze ofthe Zulu staff?
Later on at the.Biltmore and with his band the Violators backing him, Vile
seemed much more at ease. His vocal phrasing and delivery occasionally came
across like a more stoned and less fervent Bob Dylan as on "Inside Looking
Out" Vile seemed relaxed to the point where his laid-back style almost became
boring and was saved only by the comparative enthusiasm of his bandmates.
A propulsive rendition of "Freak Train" kept the momentum moving and as if
to seek redemption from anyone who witnessed the underwhelming version
of "He's Alright" earlier on—he played it again this time with much more
conviction and set the record straight
Opening with a wry and intentionally awkward cover ofthe Rolling Stones'
"Start Me Up," the Soft Pack swiftly switched gears into a raucous "Right and
Wrong." One ofthe refreshing things about the band is their nondescript
appearance. It shouldn't matter how a band dresses but it does play a part in
how they're appreciated and the fact that they're not in the requisite uniform
of their genre makes them seem aH the more sincere and authentic. In a live
setting, the songs from their recent eponymous album have much more energy
and edge, "Parasites" being particularly effective.
The highlight ofthe night had to be the perfect pop ofthe very Buzzcocks-
esque "More or Less," which exhibited the core strength ofthe band—the ability
to adeptly combine their garage rock and post-punk influences into songwriting
that easily stands up against all that has come before them.
—Will Pedley
i November 12 / The Zoo Zhop
Walking in through the narrow hallway ofthe Zoo Zhop on a rainy Friday night,
I was ready for just about anything. The recently established record store's
modest back room—furnished with nothing but a single fluorescent light, a fan
and an oddly placed sheet—was already full of raw and uncontained energy as
I stepped in. Vancouver's home-brewed punks, TimeCopz, were already in full
swing, blaring out their frantic set to a surprisingly diverse crowd of a variety
ages and backgrounds. Making the most of their basic trio set-up, the band
filled the place with charged rifts and shout-out choruses, although the backup
vocals were often better heard than the almost inaudible lead vocalist.
After a strenuous sound check the Shrapnelles, an imposing all-girl outfit
from Alberta took to the stage. With tastefully reverbed Gretsch guitar licks and
haunting four-piece harmonies, the girls played a tight set that was received
with a visible increase in the level of chaos among the tightly packed audience,
eventually resulting in quite a few discarded beer cans flying at the band. After
getting whacked twice in a row, the Shrapnelles' front-woman, Greasy, reacted
with a storming outburst of unfeigned ire in her vocals, which almost immediately
set the crowd back under control. The band proved to be in control of their act
leaving none indifferent to their "pussy power" as they so aptly coined it,
Headliners Myelin Sheaths promptly took over wasting no unnecessary time
37 on set up. By this point the crowd unraveled into full motion, whether it was all
the booze finally getting its money's worth, or the Alberta raw garage-punk-
quartet's overwhelming drive, or a good combination both, the atmosphere
was irresistible and it was becoming nearly impossible to stand back idly. As
the band unleashed its hook-laden set with catchy numbers like "Half-Wit"
and "What's Yer Diagnosis," the mosh pit was borderline dangerously wild
with crowd surfing and back-flips galore. The flagship piece "Mental Twist"
proved to be a blast, overall making for a great, energetic set
On the down side, the sound suffered from a very rudimentary set-up,
occasionally drowning out guitar solos and making lyrics unintelligible for the
majority ofthe time. However, this proved to be no barrier for the unstoppable
breed of garage-punk that sounded this night. Powerful choruses and foot-
stomping beats, compensated for a lack of crispness, and the completely
down-to-earth feel ofthe Zoo Zhop proved to be a fitting setting for this type
of madness, creating a very personal experience. The venue itself has some
great potential, which it could realize with some investment into the sound
system as well as a possible addition of a bar on-site.
—Christian Voueris
DEAN WAREHAM PLAYS GALAXIE 500 / THE SHILOHS
November 15 / the Biltmore
A blast from the past? To a certain extent, but there was something missing.
Sitting around waiting for a show that started half an hour later than expected
never helps an impression, but there seemed to be a certain air of confusion,
a lack of preparation, or excitement in the crowd. It began when the curtains
opened on local opening act the Shilohs, who were greeted with a good ten feet
of empty floor space, forcing the frontman to crack a joke about a VIP section.
They rolled through their set of indie-pop, encouraged by meager applause from
a seemingly less than enthusiastic audience. They even attempted to increase
the feeling of nostalgia with a cover ofthe Feelies; the subsequent disappointment foreshadowed the main event to come. The curtains now opened on
Dean Wareham, and again there was a slight pause before scattered whistles
and cheers were heard. As he, his wife and two other band members began to
glide through the classics, I couldn't avoid a particular feeling of strain; I'm
making an effort to convince myself that this is Galaxie 500, a band whom I
assumed I would never be able to see. It's been 20 years, isn't this supposed to
be special? But it wasn't, and surrounding Wareham was the constant reminder
that it just wasn't quite the real thing.
There certainly were highlights and plenty of positives. The sound was good;
the guitars were mellow, simplistic yet beautiful; the progression of two or three
basic chords which magically distinguished Galaxie 500—unique somehow in
its simplicity—was certainly there, it all sounded fine. Even Wareham's voice
still sounded great, the high-pitched whines and prolonged drawls contrasted
sharply with the low, nearly incomprehensible, grumble heard in a few offbeat
comments in between songs ("It's a windy night in Vancouver." "This is a song
about trees turning into mud and mud turning back into trees.")
"Snowstorm" took on a new life in the live setting; its beauty seemed
accentuated outside the context ofthe original album. These were all good
things, and the set list certainly covered the most crucial tracks, but "Flowers"
was just "Flowers," "Blue Thunder" was just "Blue Thunder" and "Tugboat"
was just "Tugboat" The expected atmosphere of revival, nostalgia and novelty
was lacking for me. This realization of the artificiality and strain ofthe show
was solidified after a lackluster return to the stage for the encore, concluding
the show with their cover of Joy Division/New Order's "Ceremony." I wish the
connection with Ian Curtis, or the feeling of being within Galaxie 500's heyday
had been imparted to me, but I left primarily in a state of disappointment hy
virtue of not being a part of Dean Wareham's golden years.
—Andy Resto
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38 //
CiTR 10
1.9 FM CH
ARTS strictlythe dopest hitz °f 201°
#
ARTIST
ALBUM
LABEL
#
ARTIST
ALBUM
LABEL
1
Apollo Ghosts *+
Mount Benson
Indie
51
Fond of Tigers**
Continent & Western
Drip Audio
2
Women*
Public Strain
Flemish Eye
52
Eamon McGrath**
Peace Maker
White Whale
3
The Pack A.D*+
We Kill Computers
Mint
53
The Black Keys
Brothers
Nonesuch /
4
Caribou"
Swim
Merge
54
Old Man Luedecke*
My Hands... Love Songs
Black Hen
5
Mark Sultan*.
$
Vice
55
Overnight Lows
City of Rotten EyesLabel
Goner
6
Fanshaw**
Dark Eyes
Mint
56
Dungen
SkitlAllt
Mexican Summer
7
Ahna**
s/t
Broadway to Boundary
57
Grinderman
2
Epitaph
8
Defektors**
The Bottom of the City
Nominal
58
LosSaicos
Demolicionl... Recordings
Munster
9
Shane Turner Overdrive*+
s/t
Indie
59
Brasstronaut**
Mt Chimaera
Unfamilliar
10
.Black Mountain*
Wilderness Heart
Jagjagwuar
60
Faux Amis**
s/t
Indie
11
Nil Sensae**
TV Death & the Devil
Nominal
61
Wawes
King of the Beach
Fat Possum
12
Rodney Decroo*+
Queen Mary Trash
Northern Elecrtic
62
The Mohawk Lodge**
Crimes
White Whale
13
Petroleum By-Product**
Superficial Artificial
Mona Mona
63
The Sadies*
Darker Circles
Yep Roc
14
Swans
My Father WuT Guide Me...
Young God
64
Woods
At Echo Lake
Woodsist
15
Moon Duo
Escape
Woodist
65
Loscil*
Endless Halls
Kranky
16
Fan Death**
A Coin For the Well EP
Last Gang
66
Sonny & the Sunsets
Tomorrow is Alright
Soft Abuse
17
FineMist*+
Public Domain
Indie
67
Sun Wizard**
Maybe They Were Right
Indie
18
The Orpheans*+
Ellison's Tomb Single/ Turn Out the Lights
Neptoon
68
The Besnard Lakes*
Are the Roaring Night
Jagjagwuar
19
Modern Creatures /Twin Crystals**
Split EP
Nan in the Coffin
69
Kidnap Kids**
You Would... Ratboy Grave
Indie       *
20
White Lung*+
It's the Evil
Deranged
70
Make Love*
s/t
Indie
21
The Molestics*+
A Farewell to Hokum
Indie
71
Jay Arner**
Bird of Prey
Indie
22
New Pornographers*+
Together
Last Gang
72
Easy Star All Stars
Dubber Side ofthe Moon
Easy Star
23
Arcade Fire*
The Suburbs
Merge
73
ShiYi*+
s/t
HolyDrakness
24
The Salteens*+
Grey Eyes
Boompa
74
The Vaselines
Sex With an X
Sub Pop
25
SexChurch*+
6 Songs by Sex Church
Convulsive
75
The Green Hour Band**
Coming of Clockwise
Scratch
26
B.A. Johnston*
Thank You for Being a Friend
Just Friends
76
Tokyo Police Club*
Champ
Dine Alone
27
Tamelmpala
Innerspeaker
Modular
77
SSRIs**
Effeminate... Windchimes
Indie
28
Joey Only Outlaw Band*
Transgression Trail
HA4TLD
78
Various Artists
Next S&p...Soweto... 1969-1976
Strut
29
The Laundronauts**
The Laundronauts Come Clean
Spincycle
79
The Telepathic Butterflies*
Wow & Flutter
Rainbow Quartz
30
Frog Eyes*
Paul's Tomb: A Triumph
Dead Oceans
80
The Tallest Man On Earth
WMHunt
Dead Oceans
31
Various Artists
Flipper Psychout
Vampi Soul
81
Charlotte Gainsbourg
IRM
Because
32
The Summerlad*
Blue Skinned
Happy Apple
82
Love Is All
Two Thousand... Injuries
Polyvinyl
33
Devils Hotrod*
Dirty Rocks For Broken Hearts
Stumble
83
Willowz
Everyone
DimMak
34
Various Artists**
Hockey Dad Records Compilation
Hockey Dad
84
Sean Nicholas Savage*
Spread Free Like a Butterfly
Arbutus           '^f/*^'
35
Various Artists
Deep Wireless 7: Radio Art Compilation
New... In Sound Art
85
Various Artists
Daptone Gold
Daptone
36
No Bunny
First Blood
Goner
86
Lake Doucet & the White Falcon"
Steel City Trawler
Six Shooter
'
37
Humans**
s/t
Blood 8r Water
87
SunAraw
Off Duty/Boat Trip
Woodsist
38
Happy Birthday
s/t
Sub Pop
88
Library Voices*
Denim on Denim
Young Soul
39
The Nymphets*
Slow Song
Indie
89
The Radio Dept.
Clinging to a Scheme
Labrador
40
Crocodiles
Sleep Forever
Fat Possum
90
Spoon
Transference
Merge
41
The Shilohs**
s/t
Indie
91
The Black Angels
Phosphene Dream
Blue Horizon
42
Gigi**
Maintenant
Tomlab
92
Ariel Pink's Haunted Graffiti
Before Today
4AD
43
Hot Panda*
How Come J5w Dead?
Mint
93
Drive By Truckers
The Big To-Do.
ATO
44
Gorillaz
Plustk Beach
EMI
94
Hard Drugs**
s/t
Stay Gold
45
Dum Dum Girls
.1 Will Be
Sub Pop
95
Deer Tick
The Black Dirt Sessions
Partisan
46
Fucked Up
Couple Tracks
Matador
96
Eddy Current Suppression Ring
Rush To Relax
Goner
47
Neil Young*
Le Noise    ,
Reprise
97
Best Coast
Crazy PorYou
Mexican Summer
48
Ty Segal
Melted
Goner
98
If Then Do*
M70
Indie
49
Jonsi .
Go             t&rt&Jk
XL
99
Hellsongs*
Hymns in the Key of 666
Aporia
50
The Dreadnoughts*
Polka's Not Dead
Stomp
100
Trentemoller
Into The Great Wide Yonder
In My Room
CiTR's charts reflect what's been played on the air by CiTR's lovely DJs last month. Records with asterisks (*) are Canadian. Those with a plus (+) are local.
Most of these excellent albums can be found at fine independent music stores across Vancouver. If you can't find them, give CiTR's music coordinator a shout
at (604) 812-8733. His name is Luke Meat. If you ask nicely he'll tell you how to find them. Check out other great campus/community radio charts at www.
earshot-online.com. 1f€| '^SKM^P^--'"
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HHRISTMAS EXTENDED HOURS
DEC 16th-23«i OPEN LATE-9PM
DEC 24th         OPEN UNTIL 6PM [
DEC 2P                     CLOSED i
DEC 26th                  9AM-6PM ^
BSffilfiSk
~W}$il I Endless Fails
^£W|f^urs Tomb: A Triumph
IP™- Transference
Grinderman - Grinderman 2
Neil Young -Lelpa
The National-High Vfoiet
iCDSoundsystem-ThislsHappening^OA^^
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Apollo Ghosts-Mount Benson I"* Fa" - Yo,?* 'Wifl Be
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Zulu Records
1972-1976 W 4th Ave
Vancouver, BC
tel 604.738.3232
www.zulurecords.com
STORE HOURS
Mon to Wed
10:30-
-7:00
Thurs and Fri
10:30-
-9:00
Sat
9:30-
-6:30
Sun
12:00-
-6:00 A
i
Li Wmm^makmm^a^mmmm
11th Hour Orchestra
Agent Muldah
Basketball
Bevvy Swift
Calamalka
Daega Sound
Dewey Decibel
DJ Cure
Eradik
Holistic
Johnny Dubs
Kadiri / Cascade + Guests
LadyVishus
Librarian
Mandai
Max Ulis
Mista Chatman
Myles Away
Nils
NOG
Selecta Brown
Self Evident
Michael Red
Sweet Anomaly
Taal Mala
Tank Girl
Tar ran
That African
The Funk Hunters
Tusk
XI
&0BB**
5 rooms, more than 30 DJs and live bands, media art installations,, performance, hors d'ouevres,
silent auction. Celebrate light and welcome in the new year at this major benefit event in aid of W2.
Our new community media arts space opens this winter in the Woodward's heritage building!
Tickets available at Beatstreet, Puff x3, Zulu, Peoples Co-op Books, The Fall, W2 and online at
w2lights.eventbrite.com j^ iw/iw\v^ -J^ ^ ||f| @ IjH^jgB MMtyt liflMS! BASS***
W2 STORYEUM
Community Media Arts VANCOUVER IS
AWESOMEXOM
PUBLISHER
VANCOUVER IS AWESOME INC
EDITOR IN CHIEF
Bob Kronbauer
MANAGING VISUAL EDITOR
Christine McAvoy
DESIGN
Tyler Quarles, Calen Knauf
EDITORS
Lizzy Karp, Michael Tedesco,  Kim Werker, Graham Clark,
Oano Pendygrasse
CONTRIBUTORS
Ken Lum, Jessica Delorme, Charles Demers, Grant Lawrence,
Karen Pinchin, Lana Gay, Jeannette Ordas
Cover Image: Bob Kronbauer
All Images Christine McAvoy unless otherwise credited
HEAD OFFICE:
115 East Pender
Vancouver, BC
V6A 1T6
contact@vancouverisawesome.com
UEflER FROM THE EDITOR
Vancouver Is Awesome Inc is a community based non-profit
organization dedicated to spreading a positive message about
the city of Vancouver and the arts and culture within it. Founded,
edited and maintained by folks who live here and who truly
love this city of ours, we produce events but the bulk of what
we do happens through our online presence where we deliver
light-hearted fun all day every day. With a mantra of "no bad
news" we only report on positive happenings and leave the
"real" news to traditional media and other web sites. We've
got ears to Vancouver's streets and are happy to serve as it's
cheerleaders, always delivering a celebratory message.
We're not saying that you shouldn't pay attention to the local
news and the actual issues that affect your city, in fact the world
would be an even more dangerous place if you did. We're just
saying that every once in awhile we all need to step back and
celebrate, and that sometimes it takes creating a place where
we can be conscious of that for it to actually happen. If I may
quote my friend and the author of the book Vancouver Special,
Charles Demers, what we've created is an "oasis". It's a place
CONTENTS
UNPLUGGED MAP
CHARLIE DEMERS:
THE PRESCRIPTION ERRORS
VANCOUVER EATS
GRANT LAWRENCE:
ADVENTURES IN SOLITUDE
DOGTOWN& VAN CITY KITTY
FUCKN AWESOME
THE PROOF: JESSICA DELORME
DIYVR
THE PROOF: KEN LUM
GRAHAM CLARK:
MONSTROUS LAUGHS
GREGOR ROBERTSON
VANCOUVER BOOK CLUB
LAST YEAR IN MUSIC
VANCOUVER THEN AND NOW
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that you can visit after you've caught up on everything that sucks
about the city you live in and are just looking for a reason to
smile and clap and find out about people doing great things.
More importantly it's a place where you can find out how to
join those people doing those great things, either in spirit or in
person. We're a resource as well as a connector and if this is
your first introduction to what we do then welcome to the world
ofV.I.A.1
When Discorder approached us and asked if we wanted lo
share this Jancember issue with them we were at first stunned,
then honoured, then excited, then overwhelmed and now finally
we are overjoyed that it all came together and that you're
reading these words. This is Vancouver Is Awesome's first
incarnation in print and as the founder and executive director
I must say that I sincerely hope you enjoy what you find in the
following pages. We really put our hearts into it.
- Bob Kronbauer
/&-■
a ON THE WATER
Jericho Sailing Centre
Located between Spanish Banks and Kits Beach, Jericho
Sailing Centre offers lessons and rentals of sail boats,
windsurfing boards, kayaks and stand-up paddleboards.
m    HIKING
Pacific Spirit Regional Park
Located just South East of UBC, Pacific
Spirit Regional Park offers Vancouverites
a wonderful dog-friendly wooded escape
from the city. VANCOUVER BS
AWESOME.COM
UfJPLtJGGEB
D
UNPLUG
pS^^N^OUTOOOR DESTtH
CARtOf V1A?;S UNPLUGGED fiI
MICHAEL TEDESCO. ..
HIKING
Baden Powell
Grouse Mountain to Mosquito Creek
Looking for a moderately difficult hike that is easy
to get in and out of then this section of the 40 km
Baden Powel trail is perfect.
Myrtle Park Skills Facility (Cove Cliff)
I Myrtle Park offers you a sanctioned place to test
; out your mountain biking skills in North Vancouver
j complete with jumps, bumps and teeter totters.
WW MOUNTAIN BIKING
Deep Cove
Don't own a kayak? No sweat, deep cove is the place to rent j
and launch kayaks and canoes in beautiful Indian Arm.
MOUNTAIN BIKING
Burnaby Mountain Air Bike Skills Facility
(N. face of Bwnaby Mountain off Barnett Hwy opposite   j
Barnet Marine Park)
A step up from Myrtle Park, the Burnaby Mountain Skills
Facility is a state.of the art mountain biking gauntlet
designed with test your medal. VANCOUVER IS
Enjoy this excerpt from Vancouver author Charles Demers' second
book, The Prescription Errors, recommended by the Vancouver Book
Club and available now from Arsenal Pulp Press.
CHARLIE DEMERS
THE PRESCRIPTION ERRORS
I didn't normally charge Sara for babysitting her son, Robeson, a little white boy
raised by lesbians and named for one of
the great Renaissance men of the twentieth century, Paul Robeson, the actor! the
athlete! the operatic singer! And most
importantly, the Communist! The great
timbre of that man's voice shook the world
and was an enormous contrast to the shy
and trembling eight year old who sat on
my couch, scared frozen by the film we'd
just watched, one whose title I was trying
to convince him not to share with his mothers when they picked him up. Seeing as
Sara and Nicole were paying me to look
after the boy tonight (a goodwill donation
inspired by the special brand of pity reserved for poor relations), I figured it would
be pretty shitty if they found out that I had
traumatized sweet Robeson with an age-
inappropriate movie selection. The irony
was - with his head pushed back against
the couch, eyes dropped and blank like
that - he looked more like the kid from The
Shining than any of the characters from the
Kubrick that we had watched.
"Remember, Robeson, it's just a movie,"
I called out from the bathroom in my tiny
East Vancouver basement suite. Hunched
over the sink, I took my head pills with a sip
of water from the tap. There's no diminutive
for "Robeson," which is tough, because I
needed one.
Sara and Nicole arrived at half-past ten,
and I kissed each on both cheeks (Nicole's
puffed and reddened from crying) as Robeson sat, still shaking, on the couch.
"Hello," sighed Sara, her long auburn hair pulled back into a ponytail
that reached nearly to her tailbone, and
seemed even longer when next to Nicole's
hjgh bun, pulled tight to highlight wooden
earrings. My cousin and I share a taste
for the Rubenesque: Sara's small, pointed
breasts and straight hips stood in remarkable and appealing contrast to Nicole's
breathtakingly full-hipped, heavy-breasted
and slope-shouldered form in a crumpled,
papery purple dress.
"Hi," I said. "How did the meeting go?"
"We'll see," said Nicole. "Not so well."
Sara was more visibly angry than her
partner, her face animated with fury as she
made her way into the kitchen, rummaging
in the cupboards for a clean glass while the
tap ran to cold. She settled on a mug.
"It was fucking bullshit, Daniel. The
meeting starts, and like always, there's one
parent there who's the ringleader, yeah?
And he's just the most sickening, perfect
caricature of these ignorant, suburban
alpha - He's just going on and on about
'gay recruitment,' and he's just absolutely
over the edge... And then the meeting proceeds and we find out that he's the local
pastor, and that more than half the kids, the
white ones anyways, are his on Sundays
anyhow! And so it's like, we can fight until
we're blue in the face to make sure that the
book stays in the library, but he's got every
weekend to make sure it never takes root."
"Jesus," I said, helpless. "Did they ban
the book?"
"They decide later," explained Nicole.
"Tonight wasn't meant for that. It won't be
for months, maybe next year even."
Nicole had written and illustrated a
children's book called Turtledoves, a
story about Shelley and Slowey, two girl •
turtles ("gurtles") who spend their time
asking questions of their fellow pond
animals about their homes, and end by
sharing a shell between the two of them.
While the book had faced no serious op
position here in the city, some of the Parents' Councils in the more religious, rural
areas and suburbs were opposed to allowing stories dealing with "same-sex issues"
- Turtles! Sharing a shell! (Keep in mind I
haven't left anything out about anal beads,
okay?) - into the elementary schools.
Nicole and Sara had been out tonight
at a parents' meeting in Surrey, where, apparently, one of the local pastors - whose
children attended the public elementary
school after the private religious facility
that he had administered had run into tax
problems - was trying to make political hay
by leading a higji-profile campaign against
the book's presence. For months now, these
kinds of fights had been taking the wind
out of Nicole's sails in particular, siphoning hours of sleep into waking anxiety.
Having been crying, likely since leaving
Surrey, she now reached into her purse
for eye drops, a mnemonic visual cue that
elicited an excited whimper from Robeson
on the couch, and signaled to me that my
shortcomings as a babysitter might soon be
readily apparent.
"What's wrong, Jelly Bean?" asked
Sara.
"Oh, it's nothing," I answered for him.
"He's just a little scared from the movie
we watched tonight."
"Aw, don't be scared, Jelly Bean," said
Sara as she smiled and bent to kiss the
boy on his forehead. "Do you want a
little glass of milk?"
Robeson again emitted a muted shriek,
this one more panicked than the last.
Sensing that something was very wrong,
Sara turned to me and asked, suspiciously: "What movie did you show him?"
"It was nothing, I - " I was stammering, ashamed. Darting my eyes from side
Q4 VANCOUVER IS
to side evasively, I was distracted by my
reflection in the hideous, gold-veined mirror near to the entrance of the kitchen
and I was thrown, foggy-headed, into reluctant honesty. "A Clockwork Orange."
"What?" Sara screamed. Her eyes
peeled open in an anger that shook her
long ponytail as she shot herself erect.
"You showed him A Clockwork Orange, Daniel?" asked Nicole.
"What in Christ's nqme is the matter
with you?"
"I had forgotten - I'm sorry. I was in
and out of the room, I don't know. He
liked the cover, and he really wanted to
see it, and I'd forgot - I forgot just how
- fuck - I didn't remember how bad it
was."
"Daniel!" screamed Sara, driving the
stake further into my heart, "Singin' in the
Rain is one of Robeson's favourite movies! He loves that song! What is wrong
with you? He's eight years old! Don't you
remember how shook up you were at his
age by Lord of the Flies?"
In fact, I had been ten. Back then,
around the time that my mother died,
my friend Vito's father had shown us a
contemporary film adaptation of Golding's
opus at a sleepover. Vito was my best childhood friend, my next-door neighbour (surely 'best friend' and 'next-door neighbour'
are synonyms until age eleven at least?)
and we were each half-and-half kids who
identified only with our stronger-flavoured
ethnic roots. Regardless of the equal parts
Irish and Scottish running through our
veins, we were Italian and Quebecois, respectively, wearing our Romantic fathers'
surnames (not to mention Vito's al dente
Christian name) as proof-positive.
Our houses had been built by the same
people, in the sixties, and so the layouts
were identical: Visiting Vito was, therefore,
like experiencing an Italian translation
of my own home - the same dimensions,
only filled with couches and vases that had
seemed hyper-modern for a month and a
half, and were after that nothing more than
gaudy throwbacks, evidence of someone's
semi-fascist Mediterranean vision of a future that, thank God, had never happened.
They had a kitchen with the window in the
same place, but the room smelled of onions
instead of nothing. Vito would retrieve porno movies from the deeply engraved, ornate, and monstrous cabinet in his father's
room (whose counterpart, at our place,
housed my Anglo grandmother's Hummel
figurines), and play them while I shuddered
at the sight of enormous, throbbing, veiny
cocks that looked nothing like the tiny pink
protrusion in my pants, the one dwarfed
even by my own modestly sized, hairless
balls. Pussy Pumpers, though, was only the
second most traumatizing film that I was
ever subjected to in the midst of the Little
Italy next door.
Vito and I had gotten into a fight downstairs in his family's basement one afternoon over a play-car that we had imagined, made out of his heavy red couch,
with a drum skin from his father's set for
the steering wheel and a drumstick for the
gearshift. In order to explain to us the necessity of orderliness and democracy in
decision-making, his father rented Lord of
the'Flies and made us watch it.
I had been terrified by the picture,
mostly because I was at that time the
hated, youngest, fattest member of a
frustrated suburban baseball team whose
roster fit Golding's cast of characters with
Aft
f ^ j^^^^^^
an eerily accurate parallel. I remember
it washing over me the way my grade
eleven English teacher defined an Oceanic Experience - a sudden burst of meta-
consciousness wherein I, the dugout, and
the chalk lines leading from base to base
became one, and understanding set in
with a cloud of terror calmer (yet deeper-
set) than the breathy panic of normal pre-
teen fear. Kenny, our coach's son, was an
easy Ralph, and the sociopathic Brody,
our tallest, best-looking, and most violent
player, was Jack. I was Piggy. And I remember, all of ten years old, realizing
that if the Burnaby Metro Mosquito Division baseball squad, in our white, green,
and yellow uniforms, were ever stranded
on some tiny tropical island, I would be
dead within days, a shattered conch and
bloated corpse the only evidence that I
had ever, even existed.
My fear of Brody's truly violent and
malicious potential was confirmed, two
or three years later, when he and a
group of other boys stomped our neighbour across the street with such brutal
abandon that the black-and-white newspaper pictures of Peter, their, victim,
could only be described as cartoonish
when they appeared the next week. A
few nights before the beating, Peter had
come across a group of teenagers (like
neighbour for best friend, 'teenager' was
shorthand for 'violent thug' on my block,
and not wholly without reason) vandalizing a construction site just down from our
place. A few days later, when picking up
his kids after class, he recognized one of
the young men, smoking a cigarette outside the school.
Middle-aged men castrated by Saturday morning soccer do stupid things.
They are aware that, having accomplished little by way of athletics or art
or politics in their time on earth, their final chance at glory or notoriety is to be
the freakish, accidental hero of one of
the emergencies of quotidian life. Peter
chose to pounce on his destiny (read: this
kid with the cigarette), thereby inviting
the boy's friends - standing in the wings
and led by Brody - to stomp him within
an inch of his life with the shoes that their
parents had bought them.
His face collapsed in on itself. Giant
purple-brown circles obscured his tiny,
red eyes. Stitches railroaded his cheeks
and forehead. His jaw remained wired
shut for weeks. Some time later, Brody's
horde threw a bottle through his living
room window, just to let him know that
they knew where he lived.
I sighed in relief that our team had
never played any road games, but was
unable to so much as look at the cover of
Golding's book all through high school.
Retrospectively, it had become clear that
at least part of the terror had been the
result of my as-yet undiagnosed mental
illness. The OCD that I would only later
be given pills and counselling for, at this
early time, had the island boys' savagery
running on a constant loop in my mind's
eye for months, maybe more than a year,
and so I had long since considered the
Lord of the Flies trauma to be a product
of something altogether more particular
than simple childhood sensitivity.
And yet here, now, was poor Robeson,
wetting his mother's shoulder with mucous and tears, and talking about "that
man shaking in the wheelchair." It wasn't
toojate for somebody to drop a rock on
my head.
□ 5 VANCOUVER IS
VANCOUVER EATS
■.ij.ii)jij.ij.iJi)ji.iiLjjjjy^.ijJ.).i.aj.iJ.iJ.iiyu.iiJJJ,iJ.iujJ..m).y.TaRi
GROUSE GRIND
\
k
INGREDIENTS:
4 medium grouse breasts (two birds, can
substitute pheasant or small chicken breasts)
2 cups grouse stock (or chicken, or vegetable)
1 cup wild rice
6 strips thickly sliced bacon
2 shallots, diced
1 cup sliced mushrooms (preferably chanterelle, but can use button or porcini)
Vt. cup dried cranberries
Vi cup celery, diced
1 tbsp thyme + dill
Vi tsp salt + pepper
V2 cup dry bread cubes (or toasted bread,
no crusts)
1. In a medium pot, bring rice and 4
cups water to a boil over high heat.
Stir, reduce heat to
medium-low and cover. Simmer for 30
minutes, then take off heat and let sit
for 30 minutes
until excess water is absorbed.
2. Meanwhile... cut2 strips bacon into
16-inch lardons and fry over medium
heat until crisp. Drain
bacon on paper towel.
3. Saute shallots in remaining bacon
fat over medium heat for one minute.
Add mushrooms,
celery,  cranberries,  thyme,  salt and
pepper and cook until tender. Add
crispy bacon and dill and
stir to combine.
4. Combine cooked wild rice with
half of vegetable mixture (mushrooms,
celery, bacon, etc.) and
pour into a greased 9-inch casserole
pan.
5. To make the stuffing, combine
bread cubes with the other half of the
vegetable mixture in a
medium bowl.
6. Whisk egg into one cup of stock
and pour over stuffing.
7. On a cutting board, lay 2 strips of
bacon and put one grouse breast on
top. Mound ¥2 cup of
stuffing  on  top,  cover with  second
breast and wrap with bacon. Secure
bacon with toothpicks.
Repeat with remaining bacon, breasts
and stuffing.
8. Nestle wrapped breasts on rice and
vegetable mixture, pour remaining
stock over top and cover
with   aluminium   foil.   Bake  at  350
degrees for one hour and uncover for
last 15 minutes to crisp
bacon.
9. To serve, cut breasts in half (between
the bacon!) and serve on a mound of
rice mixture. Drizzle
with balsamic or red wine vinegar and
garnish with a sprig of dill. Pairs with
winter ale, merlot
and impressing friends.
* recipe makes four servings, can be
easily halved or doubled
- Karen Pinchin
tvia||
I Vl/IA     I  Watch the making of this recipe at
*■•*■■   http://vimeo.com/17148645
Q6 VANCOUVER IS
AWESOMEXOM
RAINCITY RISOTTO
INGREDIENTS:
2 tbsp Olive Oil
2 tbsp Butter
2 cloves of Garlic, chopped
1 Red Pepper, diced
1 cup sliced Mushrooms
1 cup Corn
1 Onion, chopped
1 Zucchini, diced
1 tsp Rosemary
1 tsp Hot Pepper Flakes
4 V2 - 5 cups Vegetable (or Chicken) Stock
1 cup of Parmesan Cheese *fresh, not powder
1 Lemon (used to get 1 tbsp Zest and 2 tbsp
Juice)
1 I/2 cups Arborio Rice
In a large frying pan heat half of the
olive oil and butter (medium heat).
Add onions, garlic, mushrooms, and
cook for 5 mins or so.
Add   zucchini,   red   pepper,   corn,
rosemary, salt & pepper, hot pepper
flakes. Cook and stir until most liquid
has evaporated. Set aside.
In a large pot, add the rest of the olive
oil and butter. Heat lemon rind and
rice on high for 1 min. Grab a pal to
help you stir!
Stir   in   1/2   cup   of  stock   until   it   is
absorbed.  Keep doing this until all
of the stock is used and rice is tender
(approx 20mins).
Stir in cheese, lemon juice and veggie
mix well and serve.
High five your pal who helped you
stir!
- Lana Gay
t
ItvtaH
TlflA K3  Watch the making of this recipe at
1 VIM liil   http://vimeo.com/! 7150019
□ 7 Enjoy this excerpt from CBC personality Grant Lawrence's first
book, Adventures In Solitude, recommended by the Vancouver
Book Club and available now from Harbour Publishing.
TAKE ME TO THE RIOT
■.I.TOJDJUI.IU.IiUll.llimilll.U.liJJ.IIJl
Every summer my parents would invite me back to the cabin
and every summer I would refuse to go. "Too busy, touring,
recording ..." I would state with self-importance. It hurt them.
I was rudely rejecting what they had hoped would become
a Lawrence family legacy, something I would embrace and
cherish. Dad eventually stopped bringing up Desolation Sound
altogether, but Mom would always try. "But you loved it up
there so much," she would say.
"So what?" I'd snap back. "I'm way too busy and it's too
far away. I can't go back there, okay? It sucks." The truth was
I was an egotistical, irresponsible, morally corrupt, immature
and insensitive teenager who thought the world revolved
around me. I wanted nothing to do with my dorky family, let
alone our cabin. I Wanted to finally be cool, like Lou Reed
in the Velvet Underground or Scott McCaughey in the Young
Fresh Fellows. I wanted to trade in my Coke-bottle science-
teacher glasses, the massive lenses of which covered over half
of my face, and replace them with John Lennon granny glasses
and Bob Dylan Ray-Ban shades. I wanted to write songs,
record albums, tour with my band and see the world. When
I wasn't doing that, I wanted to get drunk and party with my
friends in the city. Of course, I still lived at home, and I was
broke.
Since my parents were up in Desolation Sound so much
in the warmer months, when I wasn't touring I was somehow
entrusted with our family home in West Vancouver. Many times
unbeknownst to my parents it became the de facto, parentless,
party house. One summer, when the band had an unusual
amount of time off, the parties were frequent and growing in
size by the week. My parents were blissfully unaware and I
was confident that I could clean up any mess so they wouldn't
notice a thing. I'm not really sure what happened that one
□ <  particular hot August night, but what started out as a small
summer bash turned into one of those massive, out-of-control
house parties that people read about in the paper every
once in a while. Teens streamed in from all over the city . .
. word somehow travelled so fast that groups of kids in the '
hundredswere charging down our driveway, a scene that
resembled a cross between Braveheart and Degrassi Junior
High. Soon our house, yard and street were jam-packed with
partying teens. It was officially an out-of-control house party.
The police showed up in force, found me and said they
needed my permission to clear the house. If I didn't give them
that permission, I would be staring at a fine in the thousands.
It was probably a bluff, but I was scared, so I gave them the
green light. The police blitzkrieged the property, chasing
screaming, drunken teenagers throughout my childhood home,
over the couches, down the stairs, through the halls and out
into the yard. Several groups of teens resisted, fighting back
against the cops. A complete meleeensued. Police dogs were
unleashed and billy clubs were swung. A small group of my
closest friends watched in horror from our upstairs window
as a bourgeois battle royale raged between the cops and
the West Vancouver teen-elite. In the chaos, a cute Smugglers
groupie flung herself up against me, begging me to keep her
"safe from the cops." And so, like Nero fiddling while Rome
burned, I made out with her in the laundry room as the teen
riot ensued outside.
Eventually, after about an hour of mayhem, calm came back
to a beer-can littered Bellevue Avenue. My neighbours slowly
emerged from their homes like villagers who had survived
a Viking raid. They were livid. Wreckage and debris was
strewn up and down the block. Amazingly, the only damage
sustained to the Lawrence family home was a solitary broken
window, and my family wouldn't be back for two weeks . .
. I could clean up the street and fix the window. By the time
my parents were back, most of the neighbours would have
forgotten about it or be on summer vacation themselves. I was
soaked in sweat, fresh from an awkward teenage make-out
session, and freaked right out, but in the clear. Unfortunately,
those cops had really cracked some heads. Several kids had
been whacked with billy clubs and some were even attacked
and bitten by a police dog. The media got hold of the story
like a German shepherd on a teenage butt cheek and wouldn't
let go.
Meanwhile, a couple of days later amid the secluded
serenity.of Desolation Sound, my parents and sister decided to
take a day trip into Lund. They stopped by the Lund General
Store where Mom bought a few Jiffy-markered-up groceries.
Heather grabbed the latest Archie Digest and Dad picked up a
daily Province newspaper. He glanced at the cover, and then
folded the paper under his arm. Twenty feet from the general
store Dad stopped in his tracks, his face contorted into a
grimace. "What's wrong?" Mom asked. Slowly, Dad unfolded
the newspaper and stared incredulously at the front cover
of the provincial paper : emblazoned across the top of the
page in bold, black letters was the headline : BELLEVUE BASH
CRASHED. Beneath it was a full-colour picture of a teenaged
girl showing a police dog's teeth marks in her bruised and
bloody thigh. Filling out the picture behind her was the beach
in front of our West Vancouver family home.
"Jesus effing Christ!" They were on the next ferry home,
cutting short their vatation by two weeks. I was in more trouble
than I had ever been in my life, my parents screaming at me
that I wouldn't have a choice but to go with them the next
time they went to the cabin. I screamed back in stupidity that
I would never go back, that I hated the place and that I had a
music career to uphold. My still-bookish, nerdy and-innocent
little sister Heather was caught in the middle, flinching as the
various doors of our house slammed loudly all around her.
The coincidence of an unfortunate newspaper headline and a g
visit to Lund gave my parents reason to cut short their vacation
that summer.
Qio Classifieds 986-6222   Office, Editorial 985-2131   Display Advertising 980-0511   Distribution 986-1337
Bellevue bash crashed
□ i HAPPY TAILS
Name: Luca
Breed: (Chocolate) Labrador
retriever
Hood: The Drive
Favourite Snack: Meat ends from
Santa Barbara
Other Info: Born in Delta, Luca
enjoys chasing squirrels, sneaking
onto the couch and long hikes in
Squamish. Dislikes stairs, guitars and
dog jocks. You might not know it yet,
but he loves you.
Name: Blue
Breed/Colouring: Himilayan
Hood: Cambie Village
Habits: keeping feet warm,
constantly wanting to go outside,
sounding like a pigeon and being
cross-eyed
Hangouts: The couch mostly
□ 12 flickn
awesome
We went through all of
the 8,421 user-generated
images from our Flickr
Pool and deliberated on
an all time favourite. Chris
Morisawa took the cake
with this image.
VANCOUVER WAS AWESOME!
■ J:IJ.I!IJiJ.lJl^i.|)llJIIII.^J:l.l.l.l^l.lJ[UIIII,|.ll.l^»L.i.l.«J.III^J.U.IIJ.IIII)l.>'I^IIJ:[M VANCOUVER IS
JESSICA PELORME
it
Jessica  Delorme  is a throbbing-heart-painter-wild-pony-eyed- Show, a Gallery Assistant at LES Gallery and leads expressive
heartstring-plucker.   She   is   as   ethereal   and   grounded   as art workshops at Gallery Gachet.
the stories she conjures, and as clever. Aside from making - Josee Gordon-Davis
Vancouver awesome, she is Curatorial Director of the Cheaper
1) The view from my bed.
2) The Woods. Listening to records with friends.
3) My favorite Vancouver photographer, Kyle Scully's extensive
camera collection.
4) Brainstorming wall at my studio.
5) Rauschenberg inspired studio shot.
6) Some of my recent paintings.
7) View from my studio window.
8) Patti Smith on the front cover of Modern Painters. My favorite
magazine,
with my favorite icon.
What neighborhood do you live in?
I currently live in Mt. Pleasant. I love the people and the pace.
What do you do and where?
I am a visual artist. I mostly paint. When I am not-in the studio
I work as the Curatorial Director for the Cheaper Show, and
as the Gallery Assistant at the LES Gallery. I also just began a
workshop at Gallery Gachet teaching the merit of keeping a
visual journal.
What are you working on?
In my studio I have been exploring the relationship between
identity and space. I have always been fascinated by how our
social and physical environments influence our development
of self. In this vain, my new series develops vessels-ie baskets,
clothing, bathtubs, homes, etc. into abstract spaces. Through
these images, I aim to translate how we compartmentalize our
identities as a reaction to different surroundings.
Where can we find your work?
jessicadelorme.com
Ql4 The future called.
It asked you to talk green.
This year, people from all over the city gave us their ideas on how
to make Vancouver the greenest city in the world by 2020.
Now we've built a draft action plan and we want to know what you think.
Are we on target? What should be our highest priority?
talkgreentous.ca
0Zmor
VANCOUVER
TALK
VANCOUVER
VANCOUVER
GREEN   CAPITAL PAPERDOLLS
DiYVR is a weekly VancouverlsAwesome.clK
feature about all things crafts and do-it-yourself.
We're psyched to have this opportunity to get
real, if you will, in tangible print form. So go
grab some crayons or markers and scissors,
colour these guys in, cut them out, and have
endless dress-up fun. Fire up your imagination,
it's time to play.
- Kim Werker
CI 16 VANCOUVER IS
C/Paper dc
'Paper dolls by Jeannette Ordas, who sells her work atwww.thebeautifulproject.etsy.com and writes a food blog at:
www.everybodylikessandwiches.com ^
Ql7 KEN LUM
MJJJ!ll5Ul.llJ!HIIJ^5I.IUM:l!t.lJJ:i^JL'JA^!IJ»!l[>JJ:lUi-W BrT"
Ken Lum is an internationally recognized artist who speculates
on and imagines others' lived realities. For over 25 years
and to great acclaim, he has been making and exhibiting
art for both galleries and the public realm. Think of the iconic
Monument for East Vancouver (2010) which looms over Clark
Drive at East 6th. Lum is a prolific writer, art critic, and curator
as well as an excellent teacher. If the city of Vancouver has
been central to his development, the strength of his work has
propelled him elsewhere. He has exhibited, lectured and taught
in cities throughout the world including Berlin, Cologne, Kassel,
Hangzhou, Istanbul, Munich, New York, Paris, San Francisco,
and Shanghai. Many of his texts on art have been published
in prestigious journals and books, and he is co-founder and
founding editor of Yishu Journal of Contemporary Chinese Art.
- Kitty Scott     [$&4
1) Half the walls of my place have art sitting on the floor
2) View from a taxi window or another trip to the airport
3) No shit. Words to live by.
4) I was born in the year of the Monkey.
5) Jaime Hayon lamp with Rodney Graham art or more stuff that
sits on other stuff that was meant for another use.
6) My assistant says "Hey, let me take a picture of you" with a
work from 1993.
7) The weather is always on view in my loft. Sometimes I just lie
on a tatami mat and stare up at the skylight. I can be incredibly
happy just doing that.
8) Our dog Waling, saved from the Chilliwack Animal Rescue
Society.
What neighbourhood do you live in?
At the intersection between Fairview, Mount Pleasant, City Hall-
Cambie and the Olympic Village.
What do you do and where?
I am an artist. Where is wherever my work takes me.
Where can we find your work?
In Vancouver, you can find my work sometimes inside at the
Vancouver Art Gallery but always outside on the parapet of the
building.   Also, at the intersection of 6th and Great Northern
Way. And, on an outside facing wall of the City of Vancouver's
National Works yard in Strathcona.
□ AWESQME.COM
MONSTROUS LAUGHS £5)g
iH^ifiii'iUfiiin-ifn-ii'iinaaaaa
My friend Sean Proudlove is a man of many ideas. One day
he came up with an idea for a pub crawl. He said a group of
comedians should get together and drink at every establishment
that used to host a comedy night. It didn't take long for both of
us to figure out that this would take forever and result in everyone dying of alcohol consumption. In a round about way, I'm
saying there have been a lot of places that have played host to
a comedy night.       Ii|tl!|
There is seemingly no criteria for where someone will decide
to start putting on a show. From punk bars to sports bars (both
share a commonality that the last thing in the world they give a
shit about is comedy) all you need is a microphone and a willing bunch of comics.
It isn't until you are delivering jokes in a karaoke bar or trying
to convey your unique world view to a hotel lounge full of racists
that you begin to see the value in someone making a comedy
night work. It's not an easy undertaking, but I am proud to say
most of the comics I respect have taken on hosting a comedy
night at one point or another.
Another hole in the pub crawl idea was that a lot of the rooms
~in town stopped being rooms only because the venue changed
hands and the attitude towards a comedy night changed with it.
A few of my favorite rooms of all time have fallen at the hands
of business men who looked around this coastal city and said to
themselves, "You know what the denizens of this town seem to
be short of? A sushi restaurant!" In fact one such room was
turned into a sushi restaurant next door to a sushi restaurant
(which was next door to another rarity, a Starbucks).
If a comedy night survives at all, it is an achievement in
and of itself. I have an abiding affection for anyone who
• attempts it, no matter how doomed the venture may be. It
also brings me a sense of peace to know that when one falls
another will pop up. I also know that during the course of
the rising and setting of the sun on these venues there will always be elders in the scene telling the newer comics, "It was
the best when this or that room was around." This is always
true and always false. It's true because usually that particular
room holds a place in your heart because it reflects that beginning time in your pursuit when everything is exciting and
energy filled. It is false, because the newer comics are having
that experience right now whenever they perform. The room
is just a reflection.
That's not to say there haven't been some memorable
and sustaining one-night comedy-rooms. Probably the most
mourned comedy establishment is the Urban Well. For years,
every week, a pre-Corner Gas Brent Butt would host crowds
packed to the rafters (the place was always in trouble for
breaking fire codes). It would also play host to Urban Improv,
a still sustaining improv troupe (at a place called Rowan's
Roof). Last I checked the old Urban Well is now a place
where the only thing packed is a plethora of sushi rolls
Patrick Maliha has run a room since I've known him.
He was previously at the now boarded up Balthazar's and
continues to this day at a place called Darby's every Tuesday. Years ago Dylan Rhymer and Aubrey Tennant started a
comedy night at a place called El Cocal, called "The Laugh
Gallery". I would inherit this show and fun it out of El Cocal and a place called Rime, until it changed it's name to
Lime (I couldn't make that up if I wanted to) which was...you
guessed it, a sushi restaurant. The Laugh Gallery still exists
along with it's mascot: a golden Cookie Monster cookie jar
barely held together wtth duct tape that holds tickets for prize
draws. It happens a few times a year and will ride again at
St. Mary's Ukrainian Hall on New Years Eve.
There are still comedy nights happening every night of the
week in every corner of the city. A website called comedy-
couch.com created by Raegan Birch can tell you where to go.
If you like comedy, make your way out to one of these
shows and maybe one day you'll be able to finish up a sushi
dinner and say, "You know what? One night I saw a great
comedy show here."
You can buy tickets for the Laugh Gallery New Years Eve
Show at Neptoon Records.
Q19 WKOUVHtJl
AWESOMEXOM
VANCOUVERS MOST AWESOME:
GREGOR ROBERTSON
Words: Bob Kronbauer
Photos: Christine McAvoy
Over the past couple of years Vancouver Is Awesome has managed to secure interviews with high
profile celebrities and artists such as Michael J Fox, Cqrly Pope, Douglas Coupland, Will Sasso,
Ry0n Reynolds and a slew of others. We get them to talk about their favourite things about our
city in a series entitled Vancouver's Most Awesome and not only do they resonate with us locals
but they also attract eyeballs from around the internet to take a peek at the great stuff that's happening here.
Through a variety of methods which include connecting with agents, friends of friends, and
even reaching out to them directly on Twitter, it's always a combination of a few different methods
that lead to us locking down an interview with people in the public eye who connect with, or are
actually from, our city. And when it comes to the public eyes perhaps no one is more visible in
Vancouver than our current mayor,.Gregor Robertson. While he's not the typical brand of celebrity
we've interviewed, he not only has a high local Q rating but is also one of the busiest dudes in
town. He was almost as hard to pin down as Marty McFly but we managed to capture a few
minutes of his time on the day before our print deadline in order to bring you his thoughts on some
of his favourite things (and one not-so-favourite thing) about this city. This is the Vancouver's Most
Awesome: Gregor Robertson interview.
Q20 What makes Vancouver awesome?
Awesome people in an awesome setting. Definitely, thecapiba*
is unbeatable.
Has Nardwuar ever interviewed you?
The Human Serviette? No. We've met briefly but he's never
interviewed me, I haven't had a chance to really connect with
him.
Would you let him interview you?
Yeah, sure!
Which mayor do you think has done the best job
in the history of Vancouver?
Art Phillips in the mid 70's, I think he was a great mayor and.
really transformational in the city. He put an end to the freeway push, they built the viaducts but that was it. He became
Why didn't Barack Obama make It up?
I don't know, there was talk about him coming. Joe Bfden was
here though, he and his 48 car motorcade,
Literally?
Yeah, it was the biggest one.
What's your favourite TV show that's been filmed
here?
I liked Da Vinci's Inquest. Chris Haddock's work is great.
Who was your favourite Beachcomber?
[Laughs] I liked Relic, he was a classic! y^> >
What does Vancouver need mare off
Affordable homes.
What does Vancouver n^d !•§§ of?
Traffic, 111
mayor right in the middle of that and stopped that. Obviously
the community going nuts over it was the reason it got turned
around but he did a lot of really progressive things and i think
he was way ahead of his time.
Who's your favourite Vancouver Canuck of all
time?
Bobby Schmautz. Schmautzy! My recollection from when I
was a kid is that he was scrappy and he scored lots of goals.
The Canucks sucked in the early years but he was one of the
stars that stood out and made people happy. He was a hilarious guy, a real character.
What was your favourite event that you attended
during the Games?
Just being in the streets. All the other stuff was great but the
street party action was legendary. That was the most amazing
thing.
Did you get a lot of high fives after the men's gold
medal hockey game?
Yeeh, it was serious high five time.
I imagine you also shook a lot of hands during the
Games. Any standouts?
The athletes were fantastic to meet, you know during the actual games either before or after their events. And I had fun
with Maelle Ricker. We did a thing together at the Live site
where we honoured the Canadian snowboard team in front
of crmassiye crowd before Damian Marley played, and that
was really fun.
What are you gonna do when you're done with
politics?
Catch up on my sleep.
If I gave you 100 dollars right now what would
you spend it on?
I'd take mysweetheart to a live music show.
What was the last show you went and saw?
Dan Mangan at the Vogue a couple weeks ago, the second
night that he played. It was a great show. He's on fire, ifs so
great to see locals hit the big time.
Q21 VANCOUVER IS
flwInBSOMtCOM
VANCOUVER BOOK CLUB
AND THE 100 MILE LIBRARY
wmm-HwiifVM
ffS0N%S BRITISH  iCOLUMBIA
PIoSrW'-.. , ?    V   'mm
Sure you've heard the importance about eating locally and
supporting small business in your neighborhood but what
about reading locally? Vancouver is not only the backdrop to
some of the finest stories but home to some to some incred
ible bookstores, writers and publishers. The Vancouver Book
Club has created the 100 Mile Library to celebrate the art of
reading local. Here are a few of our latest favourites to get you
started...
□ 22 VANCOUVER IS
For armchair architects,- A Guidebook to Contemporary Architecture by Chris McDonald
_^ For lovers of comedy, the darker variety - The Presctif&ion Errors by Charles Demers
For history buffs - The Mon Game by Lee Henderson
For the nostalgic type - City of Love and Revolution: Vancouver in the Sixties by Lawrence Aronsen
For pop culture and poetry addicts - [sic] by Nikki Reim^j\%
-^ For fans of character driven, fast-paced fiction - The Three Fates of Henrik Nordmark by Christopher Meades
w For museum and ^Si^^if^uJars- Visions of British ColumbicfwjffScott Steedman and Bruce Grenville.
For those who want a glimpse at the future - Darwin's Bastards edited by Zsuzsi Gartner
For locavores - Harvested Here: Delicious Thinking about Local Food edited by David Beers
For photography lovers - A Room in the City by 0abor<3«aKStzonyi
For a trip to the archives - Vancouver Then and Now by Francis Mansbridge
-> For chefs, amateur or well-seasoned - V7/'s at Home by Meeru Dhalwala arid Vikram Vij
This season's Vancouver Book Club pick is The Devil You a casual yet provocative discussion about the book with the
Know by Jenn Farrell. Head on over to your nearest library or author, some of Vancouver's most attractive book lovers and
independent bookstore and grab a copy. Join us for our third a few surprises. For more information and to say hello write
Vancouver Book C[ub meeting this January where we'll have books@vancouverisawesome.com.
Q23 VANCOUVER IS
LAST YEAR IN MUSIC
UM>aJ^tUikafciiliLTHMliMili^l
#*'?#
W^
41ST AND HOME:
Best Music Moment in
Vancouver in 2010:
(Thorn): Probably Sufjan's
choreographed robot dance during that
25 minute outotune song?
(Garth): Totally. *high five exchange*
(George): Yeah. That was... a iing.
Describe Your Perfect Sunday:
(Garth): Rambo marathon.
(Thorn): Followed by Conan, or
Commando.
(George): Maybe just watching the
opening montage of Commando
over and over again. Or..rwo Rambo
marathons.
ADALINE
lost Music Moment in
Vancouver in 2010:
The Cultural Olympiad Music Festival during the Olympics. We were
all getting to play for thousands
of people and alongside some of
the best artists in the world. The
energy was pretty great.
AIDAN KNIGHT
Best Musk Moment in
Vancouver in 2010:
Call me an egomaniac, but my best
musical moment was hearing 'Jasper' being
played by an incredible group of kids from St,
James Music Academy on September 16th
2010.1 was invited over for a community
dinner in the Lower East Side by my friend
Jocelyn Price. We arrived worrying about
our gear and left full of food, happy kids
and (this will sound cheesy) unforgettable
memories. Thafs the first lime I've heard
someone I don't know play my song
for me (let alone an incredible choir of
singers), ifs weird and comforting all at
the same time, like gnocchi.
(Garth): Conan! What is best in life?  ,
dbtu): *in Austrian acent* He
crush your enemies, to see them
driven before you, and to hear the
lamentations of their women"
(George): That sounds like my perfect
Sunday.
Favourite Show In Vancouver
(Your Own):
(George): Maybe our CD release? Not
for our performance, but that lineup
was insane. (In Medias Res, Aidan
Knight, We are the City, 41st and
Home)
(Thorn): Yeah.J still don't get how we
pulled that off.
Describe Your Perfect
Sunday:
Sunday brunch, mimosas, good
company, long afternoon nap,
campfire en the beach, music.
Favourite Vancouver Writing
Spot:
Roof of the parking lot on Granville
at Cordova
Describe Your Perfect Sunday:
Eating a bowl, hearing my friend Ben play
a new song, and then drinking a bitter
beer with my friends on a tugboat before
sunset. Sounds like a music video. But that
actually happened!
Most Inspiring Moment in
Vancouver:
Seeing my Mends in We Are The City play
at The Commodore ballroom last year.
Zach and I ended up jumping up and down
and hugging in the air like Sailor Moon. I
don't think we've ever cheered more for
2nd place, ever. I love those dudes.
□ 24 BEND SINISTER
Best Musk Moment in
Vancouver in 2010:
Well this might be biased but i loved
having Tariq, Dan Werb, Jody Glenham
and Jordan Daniels all play sets at show
at my apartment with myself as well. It
was a amazing night of performances
and a party in the true Vancouver DIY
fashion!
Describe Your Perfect Sunday:
I guess i'd get up and go for brunch
somewhere with good caesars and
home made sausages then come home
and noodle on the piano for a while,
meet up with some friends and go to
BRASSTRONAUT
Best Musk Moment in
Vancouver in 2010:
This one comes from Edo: When
Jens Lekman signed my forehead.
Describe Your Perfect Sunday:
Brunch at the Whip, head to 3rd
beach, have a round of frorf, go
to splitz burger for dinner, have a
beer(s) at the narrows, head to a
show at the Biltmore/China Cloud/
Hannah Georgas
Best Musk Moment in
Vancouver in 2010:
One of my favourite musical moments in Vancouver was watching
Julian Casablancas play at The '
Commodore. I am a huge fan of
Phrazes For The Young and I adore
The Strokes. It was pretty special
to see him in real life. I also have
a little crush.
Describe Your Perfect
Sunday:
A perfect Sunday would involve a
nice little sleep in, a sunny day, a
QE pitch and putt with a 6 pack, then
go for oysters at rodneys for happy hour
between 5-6 with my lady then come
home play a game of SETTLERS Of
CATAN with the neighbours and fancy
snacks and then settle down to a sweet
movie on our projector!
Best Pre-Gig Meal in
Vancouver:
A HOT DOG from outside BILTMORE
Best Post-Gig Meal in
Vancouver:
This Asian seafood late-night place at
27th and Main which serves beer §3
Little Mountain/Media Club/
Railway/Orpheum/Commodore/
Malkin Bowl/etc and top it off by
checking out the Rat show at the
Kea before falling asleep to the
sound of Vancouver rain on my
window.
Favourite Vancouver Beach:
3rd beach.'buff said.
late breakfast at Seb's and several
episodes of Eastbound and Down.
Favourite Past time in
Vancouver:
One of my favourites things to do
in Vancouver is going tot coffee. I
love the setting in Our Town. I also
love to swim and run. lout Lake is
really beautiful spot and I try to get
out there as much as I can.
□ 25 VANCOUVER IS
JASPER SLOAN-YIP
Best Music Moment in
Vancouver in 2010:
Seeing Wilco at David Lam Park
during the Olympics. I waited in the
rain for 3 hours.
Describe Your Perfect
Sunday:
Up at 9, omelette with sausages
and coffee, quick shower, bike to
all the music shops in Vancouver
and handle merchandise, stop for
chicken noodle soup and a pood
JILL BARBER
Best Music Moment in
Vancouver in 2010:
My favourite musical moment of the
year was attending "Atlantic House",
a showcase of Atlantic Canadian artists
held at the Arts Club Theatre on Granville Island during the Olympic. Having moved to Vancouver from Halifax
a couple of years ago, it was incredible
to have all of my musical friends in my
new home city. To celebrate, my husband Grant Lawrence and I threw an
Olympic-sized cocktail shakeup with
SAID THE WHALE
Best Musk Moment in
Vancouver in 2010:
The final show of our Malahat
Revue tour with Jeremy Fisher, Hannah Georgas and Aidan Knight. We
played stage 5 at the Vancouver
Folk Fest, and the crowd was
wild. Incredible turn out. We had
all just biked 300 kilometres around
the Gulf Islands - our muscles were
sore and our skin was sunburnt, but
our spirits were high. In the middle
of our seethe sun was replaced
by stage lights, and the moon was
rising. It was the perfect ending to
sandwich, drink a beer and read
classic novel, go h6me, write a hit
single, visit my parents and eat
dinner with them, watch a good
movie, night cap or two, fall into
deep, peaceful sleep.
Favourite Vancouver
Neighbourhood/Street:
Kitsilano
a cross-Canada mix of musicians...
everyone from Two Hour' Traffic to
Said The Whale, David Myles to Dan
Mangan, Rose Cousins to Hannah
Georgas. It was a delightful musical
cocktail!
Describe Your Perfect Sunday:
Coffee, paper, CBC Radio and my
husband, all within arms' reach.
Favourite Vancouver Festival:
Vancouver Writers and Readers
Festival
the most incredible tour we've ever
been on.
Describe Your Perfect Sunday:
11 am wake up. Breakyat
De Dutch Wooden Shoe Cafe'
on Cambie Street. Write an
entire song. Revel in glory of
productivity. Canucks game at
4pm. Canucks win. Thai food for
dinner. Local microbrew to wash it
down. Planet Earth in HD. Bedtime.
Favourite Vancouver Mode of
Transportation:
□ 26 VANCOUVER IS
TREELINES
jHi
091
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Best Music Moment in
Vancouver in 2010:
When we found out we won CBC
Radio 3's Song of the Summer
contest.
Describe Your Perfect
Sunday:
Wake up, eat breakfast, go get
coffee and work on band stuff at
turks, come home, play guitar,
plan dinner, go get ingredients and
some beer (preferably Phillips Blue
WE ARE THE CITY/
THEZOLAS/
HENRY & THE
NIGHTCRAWIERS*
(*Zach, Henry, Cayne & Andy wrote
this in a van mid-tour)
Best Musk Moment m
Vancouver in 201 (h
WATC: [Cayne] Listening to Brian Eno
in a dark room in Mt. Pleasant. Wait,
no thafs too pretentious.
Henry and The Nightcrawlers: Finally
releasing my first alburn. Ifs every
teenage boy's dream.
The Zolas: For me it was when "The
Suburbs" came out. I listened to that
and hiked around the city. I bet half
the people reading the did something
nearly identical.
Describe Your Perfect Sunday:
The Zolas: Morning: A healthy breakfast wfltj friends at someone else's
house. Afternoon: Write a new song
I'm excited about. Quick dip at the
local Y. Evening: The Sunday Service
improv show. If you haven't been,
look it up and bring a date.
WATC: [Cayne] Sunday for me is no
different than any other day of the
week. I really believe that every day
should be filled with the most produc-
Buck), make dinner, eat/drink
with friends, watch a movie, more
beer with friends, play more guitar,
read, sleep.
Favourite Vancouver Band/
Artist:
Steph Macpherson because she's
the kindest human on the planet.
rive things possible. To me that means
spending as much time with the
awesomest people I can. Some prime
examples of these people would be:
my best friend Andy and my family.
Also if I could squeeze in some time at
the local Y, thafs excellent.
Henry: I inline skate down to the
batting cage. Sometimes if I'm not
feeling like batting, I aquacize down
at the local Y. Sometimes I meet Andy
and we spot each other at the bench
Favourite Venue it Vancouver
Henry: Billy Bishop Legion Hall.
WATC: The Orpheum
The Zolas: The Commodore.
Favourite Show m Vancouver
(Someone else's):
The Zolas: Arcade Fire at The Pacific
Coliseum. I dug the album so much
they probably could have played like
shit and I would have still loved it. I'm
going with my mom to Leonard Cohen
on Dec. 2nd, I should mention, so I
smell a potential contender.
Henry: Brasstronaut at St. James Hall.
WATC: Tegan and Sarah at the
Orpheum. Tight, solid show. Every
song was a hit.
CHECK OUT OUR LAST YEAR IN MUSIC PLAYLiST OVER AT
http://radio3.cbc.cq/#/p!ay/Vancouver!sAwesome/playlis}/VIA-MAGAZINE-SPEC!AL-EDITION-PLAYLIST
1327 VANCOUVER THEN & NOW *qgr
in \\\\\\\ma.^.^mmmmmmmmmmmm^mmmm^Ki   0we?ome
The book Vancouver 7/jen one/ Now, published by Thunder Bay Press, is 144 pages of comparative
photographs of our city quite literally then and now. Drawing on historical photographs from the City
Of Vancouver Archives, the Vancouver Public Library and the North Vancouver Museum, photographer
Karl Mondon used these images as reference before going out and shooting the same locations pres- llll^i
ent day. Showing how much our city has changed over vast periods of time, these presented here are
a couple of our favourites. They remind us of the constant change that our city continues to go through
year after year, for better or for worse. We look forward to the release of Vancouver Then and Then
and Now in 2059.
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