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Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) 1993-09-01

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  ALL & MY NAME
coming in November... 'ABOO
RIBAL WARE
piercings by Mike Bear Walsh
rally guaranteed, trained by Fakir Musarar
430    We it   Pentle
6   6   9   0   4   0   6 COMPACT DISCS
meicomes you each Te school Dear Airhead,
I was quick to find out that
Discorder doesn't have a classified ad section earlier today. I do,
however, have something that I
would like to bring to the attention
ofthe students of your lovely campus. In an attempt to get to as many
people as possible, could I ask that
you print this in your column so
that we can find the proper individual for a part-time position with
our company?
MCA Records Canada seeks
a "part-time service representative" who can make available up
to 10 (ten) hours a week.
REQUIREMENTS :
- must own your own car.
- have a passion for all types of
- good communication skills.
- a strong desire to learn about the
music business.
Those interested can send a
resume to :
MCA Records Canada
#103-3031 Viking Way
Richmond, B.C.
V6V 1W1
Attn : Branch Manager
We are really keen to find
the right person for this position
and it would be great if you could
include this information in your
column this issue. As you probably know, jobs like this are far
and few between so the more applicants we get from reading your
column, the better the individual
will be able to service your paper
and your radio station.
Thank you in advance,
Tim Tamashiro
Marketing Representative
MCA Records Canada
Dear Discorder,
Hello, I'm the host of Beaver
Country, the only Canadian Music
show in Los Angeles, at KSCR
104.7 FM (USC College radio). I
play indie, alternative & roots
music from across Canada, and
I'm always looking for more material. If you know of any bands
that might be interested in getting
L.A. airplay, they can reach me at
830 Childsway, Suite 716, Los
Angeles, CA. 90089
Brian Adams need not apply.
Thanks for being groovy,
Tom "Big Joe Muflaraw"
Dear Discorder,
In response to Wendy
Young's letter regarding facts
about Cub and her two word description of said band ("They
suck!"). I can only assume that
Wendy leads a somewhat shallow
and sorry life. And it's because of
this that I can only feel sorry for
her. Such letters wreak of jealousy
and when written with a such lack
of literate flair I can only think of
someone who maybe lacks any
sort of a vocabulary in which to
truly express one's self. Come on
Wendy, tell us what you really
think, quit beating around the bush.
While I admit that Cub's act may
not be for everyone and that's
what's great about this world
Wendy, one cannot deny their
popularity at this moment. They
have sold thousands of records,
which is more than you or me.
They have held audiences in the
palm of their collective hands at
the second stage at the Canada
Day celebration at Thunderbird
Stadium as well as a highly entertaining show recently at the Commodore Ballroom opening for
Shadowy Men.
It seems to me that far too
many people are trying far too
hard to figure this whole Cub thing
out. What's to figure out? A portion of the world's population,
don't worry Wendy, it's a small
one (people in Australia haven't
heard of Cub) happen to enjoy
Cub for what they are, FUN. And
hey, Wendy wouldn't it be wacky
if we could all get a little more fun
in our otherwise boring lives, then
agains maybe you' re working on a
cure for cancer or solving world
peace and have all the fun you can
As far as Discorder being a
propaganda machine for Cub, their
popularity in Calgary, Toronto or
New York has little if nothing to
do with Discorder magazine. Discorder could only ever hope to be
that powerful, leave the popularity propaganda to Spin or Rolling
Stone, they've pretty much sewn
that one up tight. So Discorder
writes and article on Cub, so what?
Haven't they also written about
Kreviss, Superconductor,
Facepuller and a host of other local bands and isn't that what a
local rag should concentrate on -
local musicians. Maybe you'd prefer another article on Ministry, Nirvana or Porno for Pyros, Wendy.
So look Wendy, you don't
like Cub, that's fine, lost of people
don't like you but they're not writing in to tell the world about it.
The success of Cub really has noth-
ing to do with you and why you
wasted a stamp to say only a few
pointless words makes me wonder
even more as to your motives for
sending the letter in the first place.
Wendy, go get your own guitar
and start your own band and I
promise not to say you suck.
Really.
Garnet Harry
Well put, Garnet. But before other
nasty letters start pouring into
Airhead complaining or complementing Cub, there are afew things
which need to be written first.
Airhead will not be the forum for a
monthly barrage of insults, cross-
insults,  cross-cross-insults and
death threats involving either local bands or authors, Airhead is
the sole domain of insulting us.
Now, Wendy King did make
an allegation in her article which
was true: that is the members of
Cub and Discorder have been
known to frequent some ofthe same
drinking establishments together,
where in fact it is not uncommon to
find a Mr. Garnet Harry, the King
of Kitsilano.
However, this nefarious association does not invalidate the
fact that Cub is among Vancouver's most popular bands, (indeed,
in the month of August alone, they
played over forty shows and before approximately 120,000 people). And it is this popularity which
promptedDiscoider to acknowledge their achievements, and not
any "incestuous" liaisons.  .
And as to our running an
Airhead letter from one of our columnists, while it is unusual and
should not be done on a regular
basis, Garnet's letter did strike
home a very important point;
namely, that the readers of Discorder should not be able to embrace every band for which we run
an article. Hell, not even the eve rly-
eclectic Mofo can honestly make
this claim.
We here at Discorder only
strive for one thing, understanding; actually make that two things,
community and understanding;
well actually, make that three
things, we strive for community,
understanding and, of course, family values.
mm
mm
H
SEPTEMBER 0  Ii
-(.(mW* this going on the radio?"
■"Nope."
"You promise?"
"Yep."
So begins my afternoon chat
with Dave Baker, the voice of
Mercury Rev. The guy selling
their t-shirts assured me that Dave
liked to do interviews, but that I
should be prepared for a Uttle
weirdness. This really didn't come
as any surprise considering the
music this New York combo
cranks out: beautiful flute melodies,explosive guitars, madman
vocals and a sound thicker than
that stuff you used to make paper
mache piggy banks with in kindergarten. But I'm not worried, I
can deal with weirdness.
"It's not Uke we're against
selUng a million records. Who's
against that? It's all a matter of
thinking. When we started get-
ti ng successful, as far as popularity and sales goes, was when we
weren't thinking about it. It'sUke
the whole thing about getting a
giri: when you're dating and you're
ing some shit, weird stuff, not
really for anybody but ourselves.
We were stealing stuff, you know,
equipment. Using things we could
find like TV'sand making some
noise. Just having these fun sessions. Then we started making
some tapes and this label from
England, Mint, askedif they could
put it out. We started to get more
complex, using 24-track studios,
but we weren't putting anything
specific together to get label interest, the labels came to us.
"We're not stupid, but at
the same ti me we' ve neverthought
of our stuff as something to sell,
it's just been what we want to do.
They say 'you want to do this on
a bigger level?' and wesay 'sure.'
"We' re just lucky that people give a shit about our stuff.
Then again, I always figured that
with billion s of people i n the world,
there's got to be a lot of people
that Uke you. Chances are, right?
Look at the variables.
"There's got to be at least a
thousand people that Uke you.
"Anyone should be able ta sell
athausandrecords But I never
figured we'd be tap forty in
Englmdjnwmwliatthefuch?
That makes no sense."
too eager, the girl doesn't give a
shit. But when you don't give a
shit and you just be yourself, it
ends up that the girls come: and
you know when it rains, it pours.
So we'redbingourstuff, not thinking about making any money at
it, and all of a sudden these labels
start saying you guys are great
blah blah blah and we get hooked
up. We' re not part of any movement or scene. We don't even
Uve in the same town; it's not
hke we're even a band."
Claiming not to be a band
seems Uke a convenient way to
dog criticisms and fan expectations, and when on stage Mercury Rev are a confusing entity.
Jonathan Donahue and Grasshopper play their guitars into their
amps, their backs fully turned to
the audience. They are joined in
this position by Dave Fridmann
and his bass, while Suzanne
Thorpe weaves her flute Unes
about the stage as if oblivious to
the other members of the band.
Jimmy Chambers, a dead ringer
for Al Pacino circa Scarface, holds
it together with strong rhythms.
As for Baker, he's off to the side
ofthe stage appearing as if he's
trying to decide whether he's in
the band or part ofthe audience,
shrugging his shoulders at the
crowd, spewing out his rambUngs
(oftentimes incoherently) and generally looking about as the audi-
Baker and the other members of Mercury Rev, however,
manage to puU off a great Uve
experience that dissolves into
chaos and leaves you wondering
how it all began in the first place.
"We were sitting around do-
Anyone should be able to sell a
thousand records. But I neverfig-
ured we'd be top forty in England, I mean what the fuck? That
No sense indeed. Sharing
chart positions with milUon-seU-
ers and dead rockers is not exactly where one would expect to
find Mercury Rev's first full
length, Yer selfIs Steam. Described
as "the Butthole Surfers reading
Pink Floyd", the album lacked
anything close to a single other
than the Dean Wareham- su ng "Car
Wash Hair," which is buried at
the end of the CD a la Nirvana.
Both Yerselfls Steam and their
new release, Boces, were produced by the band and engineered
by Fridmann. Lighter, yet as atypical as their first release, Boces
denied the label's request for a
lead off single and, instead, produced two songs over ten min-
"Do you have anythi ng against
pop?"
'Tot?"
'Pop music."
"Not pot. Wedon' t have anything against pot."
'Pop music. You know what
I'm saying?"
"No. Nobody has anything
against pop music. Hiked the Beatles.
They were pop."
"Do y ou think that bei ng on a
major label could ever hamper the
way that Mercury Rev creates
"The only thi ng that they said
we couldn't do in the contract was
make a children's album, and I
think we're working on that.
"Forthemost part, I'd say our
band would be making music regardless of whether we had the
money of a major label behind us or
not. We might not be touring, but
we'd be making some tapes and
doing shit. It could have been film.
We do a lot of films: videos and
stuff. It could have been those that
made us popular."
I tried to get some more information about these films and
videos but David skirted the issue
and just told me that Donahue did
all the album art. I started to lose
out to the sun as David became
agitated by the heat. Fearing that
the interview would soon be over,
I switch subjects quickly:
"How do you approach the
studio? Do you rehearse?"
"No, we don't rehearse songs.
That's the funniest thing: we all
agree, it's making music. Having
fun Uke that is a good thing. It's a
different process, it's hard to be-
Ueve, but there's a lot of rules."
I'm a Uttle confused about
this rule thing, but still concerned
about the death of this conversation I try to breath new Ufe into it
by inquiring about how they prepare for their Uve shows.
"We were going to rehearse
for this Lollapalooza thing but
our drummer had chicken pox so
we didn't get around to it."
"Then when was the last ti me
you   played together before to-
now. If you start valuing the
money thing you end up nowhere. If you value having a
good time, at the time, and make
stuff that challenges your mind
oremotions, you do better. What
good is it ifyou make a million
dollars by the time you are sixty,
then die the next day? You've
basically fucked your life."
The heat and sun are becoming a problem so we move
into the band's tent, which they
are sharing with some jugglers
and Tool (one of today's most
appropriately-named bands).
David introduces me to the rest
ofthe band. Tool is outside using their portable weight set, an
added perk that Jonathan claims
will be theirs: "it's all just a
matter of time." I'm offered a
drink from their cooler, filled
with pop. I grab one, noticing
that Tool's is full of imported
beer. Baker motions over to the
Tool guys, "You see, that would
be a new thing to do. Lift weights.
Why not?" Cooling off, the interview continues.
"I'm not saying live for
today, but going 'this year I'm
in grade six, then I'm in college, then I got two kids, then
I'm doingthis, then that...' lifestyle has been mapped out by
people that are dead. We' re doing
what we want to do. We're not
mapping out our careers, we're
mapping out our lives. We're
doing alright, but people still
We were going ta rehearse
for this Lollapalooza thing but
our drummer had chichen pox
so we didn't get around to it."
day's show?"
"Thelast tour. Wedid a mini
tour with Dinosaur Jr."
Still confused about his rule
thing, I questioned him about it:
"Rock is supposed to be tbe
thing where rules are broken. But
it ends up that a lot ofthe time you
break one rule and people go,
'Whoah! You're fucking brilliant!
You have too many ideas!'
"There's this attitude that
dictates that ifyou Uke one band,
you should like them for twenty
years; it all moves so slow. That's
why it's referred to as Dinosaur
Rock.
"We're weren't hearing what
we wanted to hear on the radio, so
we decided to make it ourselves.
There's a lot of people Uke that.
"You know who was like
that and didn't give a shit? Rappers. They were going, 'It'shope-
less, we don't give a shit! We're
down on the bottom, let's do
something'. They ended up doing * ^mething creative because
they weren't afraid of blowing
"With us, we're not afraid
of blowing it because we know
a lot of great jazz and blues
musicians that are on welfare
ask us what will happen when
we meet with success. We've
already got success, we' ve made
a record. We're successful because we got to make it. To us
power is doing what you want
to do, so we're doing what we
want, making a bunch of noise."
The conversation started
slipping into smaU talk and complaints about the heat, so I finished my soda, shook some
hands, and blazed out into the
Lollapalooza heat. I don't think
Dave noticed me leave because
he and the rest ofthe band were
too taken in by some juggler
doing stretches in front of a
I bumped into Dave later
on that day while Mascis and
company were rocking the
crowd. We spent a few minutes
watching the show together in
silence, exchanging a few brief
words before heading oursepa-
"I like that song. That's
pop, right?"
"Yep."
"Nothing wrong with that."
SEPTEMBER Q WE ATPQP! WOULD LIKE TO CONGRATULATE YOU ON YOUR ACCEPTANCE INTO UNIVERSITY AND WBH
YOU All THE BEST IN YOUR ACADEMC ENDEAVORS.
OK ENOUGH WITH TBE CRAP!
GET YOUR STUDENT LOAN OR YOUR UFE SAVINGS - PUT TT IN A PAPER BAG AND HEAD DOWN TO THE
EDGE OF SKID ROW - CROSSTOWN-WHERE THE QUALTIY OF UFE ON THE STREETS REAFFIRMS YOUR
SENSE OF SELF AND WELL BEING
SPECIFICAUT COME DOWN TO #134 W. HASTINGS ST. AT CAMBIE AND HASTINGS.
THATS ABOUT A BLOCK FROM THE CAMBIE, ITS ACROSS THE 3TT-__T FROM WOQLWORTH. TWO _4j0O_.
FROM THE TOWN PUMP AND THE HUNGRY EYE, AROUND THE CORNER FROM DELUXE JUNK AND
CABBAGES AND HNX. JUST UP THE STREET FROM TAPESTRY AND SCRATCH RECORDS, THROUGH THE
PARK AND DOWN THE HILL FROM BUST. IN THE HEART OF WAREHOUSE-PARTY-LAND, AND ON A
STREET WHERE EVERY SECOND GUY THAT WALKS PAST YOU ON THE STREET SAYS "SKUNKr.
SO COME TO POP! AT #154 W. HASTINGS ST.
MONDAY TO SATURDAY 11:00-6:00 (8:00 ON FRIDAYS)
LIQUIDATE YOUR LOAN! SEPTEMBER 13th - 25th!
GET COOL COMICS, MAGAZINES, BOOKS, VIDEOS, COFFEE &
CULTURE
FRI SEPT ?
QTR 101.9 fM AND THE 6E0BGU STRAIGHT PRESENL.
A BENEFIT f OR FRttNDS Of CLAYOQUOT SOUND
TO STOP THf CLtAR-CUTHNG Of OLD GROWTH FOREST IH BRITISH CCRUMBU
_>_"*
A
LOWEST OF THE LOW
MYSTERY MACHINE
GERRY HANNAH & THE WILD CRY
GUEST SPEAKER: NDP MP SVEND ROBINSON
PIUS: A KO* WSUHI SJHOf BY DOA: "TtH ONLY THIH6 GfiHH" OH AUWHAKYt TfXUaES RKORK. AU PROCHK FROM iiI£S TO GO TO FRJEKD5 Of
CLATOQUOT SOUNO. fOR MORE INFORMAHON ON THE Q_A-*0QU0T SOUND LOGGING BUXKAD., PUASE CAU 725-4218 (TOHNO). 1K1GETS $8 AT THI DOOR.
AND BECAUSE WE REALLY WANT YOUR
MONEY FOR TWO WEEKS JUST ABOUT
EVERY THING IN THE STORE IS 30% OFF
BL ind * melon
9cm
PICTURE A PSYCHEDELIC PICNIC ON
A FLOATING DREAM-CAPE WITH
COLOUR. ONLY MUSIC CAN
PAINT AND ONLY YOUR MIND CAN
SEE. ITS A GOOD WORKOUT FOR
YOUR IMAGINATION.-* MENTAL
RECESS AND BLIND MELON WANTS
TO TAKE YOUR HEAD AWAY.
pon't m&6 Buhp Melon with Pearl JVmi anp Neil Young
6EPT.4ATBCPLACE G
awd, our first interview...we
were just so nervous...I took
about six pisses within the span
of an hour as we paced nervously awaiting the arrival of
the much heralded Wool.
Well it had been about
three hours and Wool's van
By: Sean
Casey, Kip
Sprungman,
Jeff Dinnon
and Jason
James
still hadn't showed up. It probably would have been more
comfortable to wait inside 86th Street Music Hall, but we
weren't all that welcome there. Fumbling nervously with a
recorder wasn't such a good idea during House of Pain's sound
check. Our amateurish shenanigans got the attention of Danny
Boy and the promoter resulting in our being booted from the
Hall.
Our only hope was to head off Wool before they got
inside. Our pride, our manhood, and our first Discorder assignment were at stake. We had to get this interview or die trying.
A beat up blue van shaking violently, and almost on the
verge of a stall, screeched to a halt several hundred meters past
86th Street. Backing up the wrong way through four lanes of
traffic isn't highly recommended but, nevertheless, in staggered Wool.
Not even giving them enough time to breath, we fell
before Peter Stahl (vocalist, guitarist) and passionately pleaded
our case. He was more than accommodating. Under his tutelage we were once again welcome inside the 'Hall'. Letting the
recorder run we chatted freely.
Discorder: How has the tour      How do you prepare for a
been so far?
Peter Stahl: Pretty good,we did
Portland last night and then we
came up to Vancouver this morning. We've been on the road for
about four weeks now, starting
in Texas around the first
week of March. We came ^
up through the South we
and then hit Spring Break
in Florida during the
storm of the century.
Actually we've experienced a lot of weather on
this tour: floods, snow,
hail reaching the size of
golf balls, locusts, fights and
security...you know, the usual.
You're playing an all ages
gig tonight, it that important to you?
Yes, definitely, all our shows
on this tour are all ages. If they
weren't, it would eliminate a
large part of House of Pain's
audience. We prefer to keep
control of ourown affairs, however for this tour we have allowed a booking agent to do it.
Actually, five months ago we
played an all ages show at the
. Nappy Dugout.
show? Do you find it hard to
get out on stage?
For sure, I'm no different than
anyone else, even though I have
done a lot of shows myself. Before Wool I was in a punk band
On the punk scene the majority
of time your are playing in front
of white suburban kids, rather
than a diversity of people.
Do you have a follow up album to Buds pawn com ing out
soon?
Yes, but not that soon. The current
tour ends this weekand then we're
scheduled to do some shows with
Fugazi. After that we'll take a few
weeks off and work on some new
songs before leaving for Europe
with Rage Against the Machine
for a mini-tour. Once we
have finished all these
things, then we will go into
the studio to record our
new album,tentatively entitled Pushing Cloth.
Where will you be recording the new album?
Probably on the east coast
somewhere, (burp!!!) Excuse me. Check. Ha, ha.
Man! I hope I didn't get
your mike dirty. Most of
us, my brother and myself
and drummer Pete Moffet,
are from Washington D.C,
while our Bass player, Al,
is from the other Washington, Washington State.
Also, most of the people
we want to work with are
from the East Coast.
How has the audience
reacted to your music, after all you are
not the biggest
■^    band on the bill?
You could say that;
that u
i fair si
D.C.
Are you still friends with Dave
Grehl (ex-Scream drummer
now with Nirvana) at all?
Yes, definitely, he is one of my
good friends. Actually, he came
up with me to the Nappy show. It
was just him and Chris (Novaselic
of Nirvana), plus a few other friends
and a couple of fans. He would
probably be here tonight except
Nirvana played a benefit show last
night in San Francisco. Hopefully
we will do some shows with them
Music is basically for everybody, all races. Music is the basis
of all communication. To me it's a
shame music is split up into different labels and genres.
Most ofthe people that come
to the shows are there to have a
good time. Whereas if you are
opening up for Nirvana or the
Lemonheads you would probably
be playing in front of people that
are just such alternative nudnicks
that they would be just sitting there
and judging you with their arms
crossed making sure that their
friends were thinking this
band is cool. Wool ain't _^i
fuckin' cool, so we don't
go over too well with that.
The people who come to
see House of Pain seem to
be very open young Nubiles
ready to be penetrated with
s the early
70's new wave and punk coming
out of Britain, New York, D.C.
and California.
My father used to manage
bands in the 60's, so my brother
and I were always around bands.
It was the politics ofthe 60' s bands
which inspired me to have something to say with my music rather
than the "let's get fucked up" sorta
KnoW-nothing lyrics. Growing up
as a kid, going away to boarding
school, growing up without an old
man....for me, this is all about the
The people who come to see
House of Pain seem to be very
open young Nubiles ready to be
penetrated with our music.
lot ofpcople crying for fuckin'     1
help.
Being part of a notorious
LA. scene what is your
stand on drugs?
I think you should experiment
with everything in life and push
yourself to the limit with everything you do. But when something takes over your body and
controls your life, and your destiny, that is when you start to
hurt other people. You do not
only have a responsibility to
yourself, you have responsibility to insure that
you don't hurt ihem. I
just have a hard time dealing with those who abuse
drugs and abuse them-
What is in the van stereo as
we speak?
Right now, uhmmm it's the new
Kyuss album. Believe it or not,
they are on tour with Metallica in
Australia right now. It was just
five months ago that we did a tour
with them and another band called
musical experience.
What is your lyrical inspiration?
Just whatever. I mean with the
songs I write, I basically like to
tell a story or paint a picture. For
instance, "S.O.S." is basically a
^y   What is it like working under a major label?
Usually we are able to push
them to do what we want, like
releasing the album on 12 inch
vinyl. But, actually, we encourage people not to buy the album
up here at import prices, it is
just a fucking rip off. We've
ment. Actually, it
has been a really
good experience.
We were tentative
_S about this tour because we didn't
know that much about
Rage Agai nst the Machine.
However, it's been abless-
ing being on tour with them
and getting to know them.
The audience for the
shows must really be mixed...
Yeah, the crowd has not really
been a black audience, like most
people would assume for a rap
band. So far we have had mostly a
white crowd, which is kind of a
drag. On the punk scene the majority of time your are playing in
front of white suburban kids, rather
than a diversity of people.
The Obsessed. We went up and
down the West Coast but nobody
was there. Now they are opening
up for Metallica and we are opening up for House of Pain.
As far as music goes, I love
everything. I like a lot of soul, a
lot of blues and R and B. Also I'm
into a lot of early punk. Much of
the music than inspired me to be
ery for help. It was about me moving to L.A. and the shit that I saw.
Homelessness is so out of control.
Vancouver is so nice and clean
whereas in L.A. you get off the
highway and at every corner there
is someone begging for money.
Even four or five years ago it wasn' t
like that, it has just gotten progressively worse. Today you see a
been pushing to release the album up here in Canada through
Cargo, which looks like it may
happen. Only then will it be
available at a reasonable price.
Right now, I'd prefer you just
steal the fucking thing, or tape
it off a friend. Twenty-eight
bucks for a record is just outrageous, i
SEPTEMBER Q BY ROB  HARRISON
Exene Cervenka walked into the lobby of the Chateau Granville, struggling to carry a suitcase half as big as she
was. She and longtime bandmates John Doe, Tony Gilkyson and D.J. Bonebrake had tofly from California two
days after their last stop on a tour to announce their seventh release as a band, Hey Zeus. Resuming their roadwork
in a city that's been good to them in the past, I hoped that I'd be able to catch Exene OB a good day, one where
she'd be her colorful, quotable self. But when she saw me in the lobby and tossed a suspicious glance my way,
I was wishing I'd brought my glove. On a bad day with the (in)convenience of air travel, customs and rush hour
traffic, Cervenka's best stuff can be cranky and caustic at best. At that moment, I would have caught Roger
Clemens without a mask and chest protector than interview her.
Moments later she dragged herself and her luggage back to where I was conversing with a representative
of Polygram—their new distributor. "I was told there's someone here to talk to me," she inquired in her soft
Floridian accent. An introduction and a minute later, I was interviewing a member of a band whose place in the
history book (make that pamphlet) of Alternative music is secure. We sat down on a lobby couch.
While I was fiddling with my tape recorder, Exene eyed one of my Tattoos open from my tank topped arm.
"Hmmmrn...* bal," she discovered. (Exene owns quite a few of them herself.) As the interview progressed, I
wondered why she and the rest of X decided to come back and resume suffering the shit-kicking they were
receiving from the music press, and a few of their followers, six years ago.
You don't have to be an old fart to understand the history of X, but it helps. In 1988, Cervenka and her
confederates decided to mothball the band for a while, following the mixed reception to their last record See How
We Are. Many ofthe reviewers, and a few hardened fans, as liked the songs but focused oa tbe supposed
inadequacies of Gilkysoo's guitar work ("HE'S NO BILLY ZOOM").
So after a distinguished run that begun in the volatile Los Angeles punk movement of the early eighties and
that ended withaccusat ions of selling out by the alternative movement of thai period, they decided to take a break.
"We weren't at the rime taking a sabbatical, we just didn't book any gigs. We didn't feel like playing and didn't
realize k was going to take a while to do different things. It wasn't anything we thought or cared about. People
kept asking if we were going to play again and we didn't really ever know."
Tlie summer vacation lasted about three years. Doe immersed himself in film acting and made a solo record
(Meet John Doe —Geffen). Bonebrake became a hired gun drummer for Syd Straw, Michael Penn and Steve
Wynn. Cervenka and her family packed and picked up for Idaho, where she lived off and on for five years.
While living there she decided to take up music again. "I wasn't really planning on doing music, but then
I started writing songs and decided 'well, I do like this music thing after all'. I was hoping to just do writing so
I wouldn't have to keep going back to L.A. all the time. I like music".
The resultant discs (Old Wives' Tales, Running Sacred — Rhino, on which Gilkyson maintained his
working relationship with Cervenka by producing and playing guitar on both efforts) re-affirmed Exene's lyrical
abilities and helped her develop new ones she could apply when and if X got back together; "I started writing
music, which I couldn't have done if we hadn't have taken that time off. I had to get away from John, and I don't
mean that in a negative way, but our partnership was one where words and music did not fit together for us easily."
Cervenka's work habits also received an overhaul during the break. "For one thing, I'm sober personally.
Not that I wrote every song in the world when I was drunk or anything like that, but it's been almost two years,
so my perception of reality and my way of looking at the psychology of being an artist is different. The myth of
chemical enlightenment is banished like it should be, and that's good because that opens up all kinds of new ways
of expressing yourself."
The strength she acquired during the hiatus might, ironically enough, pull her and Doe back together as
collaborators again; "John and I don't write together as much, but I think we're going to now, so I think it's going
to return to how it used to be," stated Cervenka. "You should do the same thing over and over if it's working for
you. And if it doesn't, that's when you do something different. It's logical as an artist. Whatever's going to work
is what you do."
Returning to a healthier, more receptive market for alternative music hasn't dimmed Cervenka's memories
of tougher times; "It's a different society, different economy, different culture and outlook," she observed. "I'll
never forget the struggle of what we were doing and how difficult it was. Not too many people on this planet
would know how hard it was: Social Distortion know, Paul Westerburg knows, Soul Asylum know, and a lot of
bands that have broken up know, how thoroughly discouraging it was every step ofthe way. Which isn't to say
it wasn't a lot of fun being underground, but it was really upsetting that the radio was censuring music. We had
a good time battling and
Kind of makes you a little jeal-
at all," said Cervenka. "I'm to-
vindication for me and the rest of
Throughout X's travels on
others who drank the eighties
the same cup. "I did an interview
X and it's weird because my
radio, and he hears all these great
cause when you guys were first
weren't on the radio'. I said no,
radio either...BECAUSE THEY
Cervenka, her flag of sarcasm
ATHREATTO AMERICAN SO-
STOPPED. Every radio program-
one got to hear them. Thank you
a revolution in American con-
stop it, eventually happened."
Just out of curiosity, I had    WT' |990'S   -^ea_«_^    to ask Exene about her adopted home
town, since I'll be visiting L.A.   ^^OT^—j—. C$sS<^     for the first time at the end of August.
"Idon'tknow what I'd think of it     ^^O^Stta ^        Cr.A/.*3     if I was first coming there," laughed
Cervenka. "You won't be able to make any sense out of it, that's for
sure. It's the harshest city in the country. It's the scariest, worst city you could possibly live in. It's much worse
than New York; all of our bad U.S. foreign policy repercussions seem to land in L.A. You can' t absorb the exodus
of people, all the Koreans, Colombians, Central Americans, Mexicans, and all the other people from the rest of
the United States, as well as all the homeless people flocking to California because of the climate. You can't
absorb all those people, so you'll have a lot of tension."
people don't have to battle as much."
ous of the youngins', doesn' t it? "Not
tally thrilled and excited. It's total
the band."
this tour, Cervenka has talked with
cocktail of reverence and disgust from
with someone who said 'I really love
brother is sixteen and he turns on the
bands and I'm really pissed off be-
happening and I was a teenager, you
and The Replacements weren't on the
WERE REALLY SCARY," said
finally unfurling itself. "THEY WERE
CIETY AND THEY HAD TO BE
mer in the United States made sure no
very much for doing that. You thwarted
; and culture, but you didn't
iOE_^^oa5jQ:;_ THE COLONELS CO-EDS BREAK FROM BOPPING TO SAY
WELCOME BACK
AND THEY INVITE YOU TO TWIST THE SEPTEMBER BLUES
AWAY TO THE GROOVIEST TUNES ON CAMPUS
THE PIT PUB • INTHEBASEMENTOFTHE STUDENT UNION BUILDING. 6138 SUB BLVD. • 604-822-6511  _L#ESPITE the murderous effects of a music-blz beat-off of herculean proportions, real original music still exists In
Seattle. As the culture-appropriating behomoths move on In search of a fresh "buzz," bands like engine kid still grow
between the cracks, like weeds In the sidewalk. Greg, Brian and Chris formed engine kid about a year ago In the suburbs
of Seattle, and put out a 7" on their own label. Battery Records. Since then, they've been working with C/Z records,
readying for the release of their first album, Bear Catching Fish, at the end of September. This Interview took place
before the band opened for Sebadoh at the Town Pump. Tim from CKCU radio In Ottawa also took part In the Interview.
Who are you?
G: I'm Greg from engine kid and this is Brian from
engine kid.
How long has engine kid been together?
G: With Brian in the band almost a year, and about six
months before Brian was in the band.
If you had to be any type of fruit what type of fruit
would you be?
G: Geez, I don't know. I guess an orange, I don't know
why, I just like oranges. That's a Brian kind of question, what kind of fruit would you be Brian?
Brian: A pomegranate, there's a lot to offer there.
(Laughs)
Would you e'
r consider signing onto a major la-
G: I don't know, it would depend on what kind of deal
was involved and what sort of things were written into
the contract. It's not something I think about too often,
we haven't been approached by any.
T: How did you get the attention of C/Z?
G: They bought and liked the 7" we put out ourselves
and then they came to see us play and that was it. We
didn't really approach anybody.
How long have you had your nose?
G: My nose? I just recently purchased it.
B: I got mine at a two for one sale so I have one on
reserve in case something blows up.
Has engine kid always been based out of Seattle?
G: I live in the suburbs of Seattle and so does Brian,
Chris lives in the city. But I guess we are from Seattle.
Has the band been affected by the grunge craze?
B:No.
G: Not at all.
B: We're more affected by eighties power rock. (Laughs)
Has the local scene been devastated by grunge?
G: Yeah, it's pretty lame actually, there's not that many
good bands around. People aren't very receptive to any
new sounds. Also, a lot of people are tired of going to
clubs and seeing ripoff grunge bands. The all ages
scene is cool when it happens, lots of people show up
and everybody is really cool and open minded, but
there aren't many all ages shows.
Tell me about your straightedge past, don't you
have a special tattoo?
G: I don't know if it's directly related to straightedge,
I was really into it about five years ago and I had a
really good time playing in bands. It was fun.
Doesn't your tattoo say 'straightedge till death*?
G: It says 'true till death' actually, it doesn't have too
much to do with straightedge. I got it when I was
straightedge.
T: Do you see a new genre of music forming with
you and Codeine and Slint?
G: That kind of music has been around for awhile and
that's who we've been inspired by. As far as a new
Do you have any reservations about playing bars?
G: Sometimes I miss the feeling of having kids put on
shows and there being no business license involved,
it's more of a special thing. Bands probably play here
every night; people don't go for a special reason. When
kids put on all ages shows it has this intense sort of
feeling where it's like this could be closed down any
minute. If we had a choice we'd play all ages, but a lot
of times we don't have a choice.
Who's your favourite Vancouver band?
G: Aww shit, I'd have to say it's a toss up between
Stovebolt and uh, what's that other fucking band?
Aww, I don't know, I like Sparkmarker and Stovebolt,
they are really cool.
Is there much of a difference between your older
and newer music?
G: I think it's growing, I hope so at least. We're
getting tighter.
T: What can we expect from your new
album?
G: It sounds really live,
live than the CD5. The CD5 had
lot of reverb on it and a lot of effects
whereas the new album has
hardly any studio effects
on it. With the new album
we' ve developed our i
sound a little
T: Does it bug you
to be compared to
other bands?
G: It depends on who the
band is. I don't mind being compared to Slint because I really
like Slint and they are a big influence on the stuff I
they're really amazing. But it
does bug me when someone
off as sounding like the Smashing Pumpkit
thing. That's kind
Did your child-
your music in any
G: Dream, it's possible. If they did, would there be a
band called the Dreaming Trees?
G: Definitely, I think
if your writing c
personal experiences, in any way, your childhood
experiences affects your music. I had some pretty
interesting things happen to me during my childhood, a lot of things I write reflect it.
G: Uh, having gone through family divorces and
regular family bullshit.
Are there any cool bands still left in Seattle?
G: The band that's playing tonight, Silkworm, are
Are you big Neil Young fans?
G: Yeah, I love Neil Young. I just get a really good
feeling when I listen to his music, he's a big influ-
Does your personal political viewpoint effect your
music in any way?
G: I have lots of political opinions but I don't really
try to express them in my music; I think there's a lot
of bands who do that way better than I ever could. I   .
don't have a goal in mind when I write.
Ifyou found out that pencils were actually intelligent life forms and had there own underground
society would you risk your own life to save the
pencils' secret?
G: Yeah, I could handle writing with abic forthe rest
of my life, that would be O.K. But our bass player
Brian would uncover the whole thing, he wouldn't
give a shit.
What is the band's plans for the future?
G: After the Sebadoh shows we're going to take a
break and then the new album will be out. After that
we'll go back on tour and hopefully we can play an
all ages show in Vancouver, maybe we could even
play in Blast records again. Is that place still around,
Which band member smells the worst?
G: That would have to be the drummer. He uses all
these crazy creams and he brushes his teeth with
'Tom's Baking Powder'. He's disgusting.
Do you have any bizarre touring stories?
G: When we were on tour we kept on hearing that
Sparkmarker were homosexual. We were in San
Diego and some guy pulls me aside and says really
seriously, "I saw Kim from Sparkmarker kissing one
of the guys from Undertow in a full embrace, are
they gay?" So our goal on tour was to let everyone
know that Sparkmarker were indeed all homosexual
and that they were carrying the flag of homosexual
hardcore.
Which band member has the worst flatulence?
G: That would have to be Chris again, because when
*■   was going through his vegan phase he had the
smelling farts, as all vegans do.
What's your favourite food?
G: The Coffee Crisp, which you can onl y get
Canada.
Did you like thrash metal when you
G: I liked thrash metal when I was 15.
Well, first I got into metal and then I got
into punk, the two blended together and it
blur. My favourite band from Van-
the time was Fratricide.
Who was in Fratricide?
G: Eric was in that band and lhat Dan guy,
rocker Dan.
What do you think of Eric Thorkelsson?
s a great guy, he's kind of a
legend in Seattle and San Diego. Whenever we go down there people ask us
what happened to Eric from Headstart
or Headfirst or whatever the hell they
were called. Is he going to be here
tonight?
don't think he likes clubs.
Can you give u
.ny examples?
G:Oh.
Any last words?
G: Let's play some pinball! We're on a pinball
mission right now, our favourite game is The Adams
SEPTEMBER £) . Brother Vince and I are fans
of authentic gospel music.
(We even know the difference between real black gospel
and what the white churches pass
off as sacred music.) It's not too
often the we get the opportunity to
experience first-hand, or be welcomed into, a black church experience. After all, we live in Vancou-
God smiled on us, however,
when we attended-the first ever
Gospel Music Workshop of
American's (G.M.W.A.) Western
Regional Conference in Tacoma,
Wa. We were in the presence of
some of the best gospel choirs,
soloists, musicians, songwriters,
directors and
preachers from all
over the Western
States and "We
had church!"
(We're not wor-
worthy," was
heard from the
both of us all
weekend long.)
The Gospel
Music Workshop
of America was
begun in the late
sixties by the late
Rev. James
Cleveland. He had
the vision to bring
from the black churches in
America together in order to expose songwriters, musicians, singers and directors to one another
The workshop would be a
place to hear what others were
doing in the other parts ofthe country in order to develop a black
gospel network.
Today, the workshop has a
National Convention (this year in
Indianapolis) which will draw
20,000 members. It's main fea
tures include performances by
chapter choirs, seminars on the
fundamentals of gospel music, as
well as the forming, rehearsing,
performance and recording of a
Mass Choir.
The West Coast Regional
Conference mirrored all the features of the National Convention:
they had a Mass Choir made up of
all the delegates — even Brother
Vince and myself. We learned ten
new songs in two days, performing them at a concert which was
recorded by Pepper Co. Records.
(We're not worthy and we know
it).
On the first night of the Conference we were sitting in the
Bethlehem Baptist Church, listening to some of the best choirs
we're likely ever to hear, when, to
our surprise, in walked Billy
Billy Preston, who is the
keyboard player for the Daths and
a Grammy winner, sat down at
the organ and played a scorching
rendition of Thomas A. Dorsey's
standard "Precious Lord Take My
Hand." We also had a chance to
talk with him.
Billy Preston: It's good being here!
My sister (Rodenna Preston) is
one of the board members of this
Gospel Music Workshop. So I
came to support her. In fact, I'm
doing a song on the album as well.
Many people know you for your
Grammy winning album "I
Wrote a Simple Song," as well
as, your work with many greats
in rock history. But what are
your roots in gospel?
Gospel is definitely in my roots. I
started playing when I was three
years old. I'm from a musical family: my brother and sister play the
piano, and all my beginnings were
in the church choir.
My first big gig was playing
for Mahalia Jackson and I' ve been
blessed to have a chance to play
with a lot of people. I consider it a
blessing because I was never asked
to audition for anybody; they
would call me.
In recent years I've been getting closer to God because I ran
into trouble with drugs and being
out in that life. I'll do everything I
can, including using my music, to
glorify Him.
Please describe your journey for
us; what has it been like for you
of the past few years?
The past few years have been great.
Out of every trial there's a lesson
to be learned. I'm thankful to God
that I did get busted for drugs because I probably would never have
stopped.
I think you have to go through
something to get to some thing. Unfortunately, it had to be drugs. I' m
grateful to God that I survived all
that.
I've been around drugs all
my life because I was part of the
business. It became a normal thing
that I didn't think much about for
many years. By the grace of God,
I've been helped.
Of course, I went through
treatment, but it's a spiritual connection that you have
to make in order to
survive in this world
today. You have to
have God on your
side in order to make
I'm looking forward
to hearing the recording of yoursong
"Made A Way, To-
It's brand new. It was
Quincy Fielding. It
kind of tells my story.
This workshop is
amazing. People
coining together for three days
and making an album. Does it
usually work this way?
Usually they have a week to rehearse, but this is the first annual
(Western) regional meeting that
they've had. Everybody learns
their parts real quick. It's going to
be a good album.
Come to the Gospel Music Workshop of America! It's a good loving group, it's a good fellowship
because you're with people who
are doing the same thing and you
leam quite a bit.
We also had a chance to meet
Ed Smith, the Executive Director
of the G.M.W.A.
What was James Cleveland's vision for gospel? I know he influenced songwriting and gospel ar-
rangment a great deal. Were
in Detroit, Mich, some sixteen
years ago, to over half-a-million
people who are in over 184 chapters all over the world.
From Rev. Calvin Rhone, one
of the songwriters and directors,
we learned what the expression
"we had church means": "It's a
phrase of worship experience... I
believe that it's somewhat unique
to the black worship experience,
but it could also be used for the
Pentecostal or Charismatic worship experience where a lot of
anybody either."
Some church ladies:
"The Devil's a liar!"
"Sure He is!"
"Always has been!"
A Choir director from Seattle:
"I don't care if you can sing, do
scales, play piano like an octopus
with eight arms—if God   isn't in
it!!"
And...
"He didn't have nothing; he was as
there any other ways he was in-
E.S.: Well, yes. He wanted to see
that gospel music was done in a
very positive and first-class way.
That's why it was a burden on him
to start the workshop, where every
person can come and exchange
ideas and learn about staging gospel: to learn how to present it in a
very professional way.
He felt that he went to too
many churches where the musicians were just haphazardly doing
it. He felt that this was God's music and it should be done first class.
He then formed the convention. It grew from 19 people in a
litde hotel room in the Gordon Inn
people have their feelings involved. There is feel, a sense, of
the presence of the Lord. We are
so engulfed by this goodness and
His kindness and what He's done,
that we have a feeling. We have a
feeling to clap our hands. We have
a feeling to tap our feet. We have
a feeling to stand-up and shout.
We have a feeling to dance and
just feel full of joy. It's a personal
experience and you have to experience it for yourself to really understand it."
We also heard some great
lines: Rev. Kenneth Ulma before
his sermon: "I'm not trying to hit
anybody; I'm not trying to miss
broke as the Ten Commandments."
"Woman, marry that ugly man.
He'll be good to you."
The lady sitting next to me in the
Mass Choir:
"You're a hockey fan too! Love
the Kings, Gretzky won't let them
lose, don't mess with Gretzky.
And, from the Soul Food Vendor:
"Bean pie? You've never heard of
bean pie? That's because you're
Yeah,  like  we said,  we
weren't worthy.
Do you have any advice
young gospel musicians and
ists?
for
SEPTEMBER  (£ SECRETS   ENTRUSTED
TO A FEW
S
U
B
T
E
X
T
BY JUDITH BEEMAN
Welcome to subtext. Happy Reading!
Understanding Comics
(Tundra, 215 pgs, pb $24.95)
Scott McCloud is my kind of teacher! This comics expert has written a
book on the history of comics and
how to better appreciate them. Sub-
tided The Invisible Art, the study is
written entirely in comic form with
Scott himself as our guide. This
being an academic venture, Scott is
wearing a suit-jacket however this
is forgiven as he's wearing a Zot! t-
shirt underneath.
Various art concepts such as
closure, mood and identity are discussed. Scott compares the range
and style of comic artists from various generations; he gives us a history of comics (waaaay back in time
we go) and he is even shown jumping hurdles in the nude to graphical
ly explain his point. Now, that's
jfiW
itsmm
dedication.
Understanding Comics is for
anyone who wants to learn the visual language of comix. And any study
that would take the time to talk
about word balloons is okay by me.
It's all so inspiring: My wretched
doodling has vastly improved since
getting this. Empowerment through
comix recommended.
Virtual Light
(Bantam, 304 pgs, hb $24.95)
WilliamGibson's newbook Virtual
Light may well be his most accessible yet. Within its pages our everyday world is escalated to another
level twelve years in the future where
things are the same, yet different.
Barry Rydell, the male lead, is told
he looks like Tommy Lee Jones
while Chevette Washington, the female protaganist is a bicycle couri-
Rydell is a rent-a-cop down
on his luck who's just been bumped
from a lucrative appearance on the
Cops In Trouble televison show.
His troubles truly begin when he's
hired to drive a car for some shady
characters. His path is soon to cross
with Chevette, who rides the coolest
rice-paper bicycle around but has
stolen something she shouldn't have.
One enjoyable aspect of Gibson's books is they are basically
good versus evil tales. The bad guys in
this case are almost stereotypical —
would you believe a robotlike mad
Russian? — comy...but it works. Virtual Light is a belie vable take on what
our future could be.
From the Velvets to the Voidoids
(Penguin, 3*4 pgs, pb $17.99)
Those darn Sex Pistols, their outrageous behaviour encouraged by the
press led the world to believe that
theUKspawnedPunkRockin 1976.
And as for fashion, fer sure! they
were the originators.
Truly, though, the spirit of
punk was an American invention,
borne of idle youth in NY and other
cities. And we're talking as early as
1973! With such inspiration as the
Velvet Underground and MC5, the
music grew with the Country Blue
Grass and Blues Club (CBGB's)
becoming a major focal point for
punk rock in NYC.
From the Velvets to Voidoids
is the story of what went down
Stateside in the 70's, by those who
were there. There's Richard Lloyd
recounting Television's first performance; Biondie tells of splitting from
the Stillettoes; someone in Pere Ubu
explaining how David Thomas ac-
cidently hit his dad on the noggin
with a box of dog biscuits during a
gig-
There are photos as well: Patti
Smith's graduation shot; the Dead
Boys with long hair!; Iggy; tough
guys Suicide and the Dolls. This
book is an absolutely great history,
with interesting to read personal accounts from when these musicians
were young, skinny and unbitten by
the corporate bug.
1 Hear Me Fine
(Get To The Point, 94 pg $9.95)
Jarred Up
(Mecca Normal, cd)
So goofy old Rolling Stone mag
featured Mecca Normal in their 'New
Faces' column not so long ago... and
says they are from Vancouver,
Washington! Wrong. The duo, from
this Vancouver, are just enigmatic
today as when they started in the
early eighties: distribution through
the small-but-mighty K label and
touring has gained the band a devoted audience.
The timing of Jean S mith's first
book, / Hear Me Fine, coincides
with a collection of the bands singles and compilation tracks, Jarred
Up, with another new release Flood
Plain out soon.
/ Hear Me Fine is images,
places, and people. I'm only part
way through and have yet to figure
rylin,
Tr
cemed, as the action is leading
somewhere and
pleasant.
Jarred Up
on the other hand
has me gnashing
my teeth. Almost
two dozen songs
taken throughout
the groups career
and what do the
liner notes say?
Zip. Oh yeh, David- guitar, Jean-
vocals.(And this
on a fold out
page). Why not
give us the lyrics
(esp. as they real
ly a,
out), tell us about
the songs. Give
the listener a
chance to partici-
(DeB, 403 pgs, pb $6.99)
Now this looks promising. A novel
about an former pre- med student who
does some nip-and-tuck facelifts to
subsidize his art career. He's good
enough to gain attention from
Jaishree, a performance artist who
wants to transform herself, surgically, for her art. Author Brian
D'Amato's book reminds me of an
article in Art in America mag about
this women in Italy who has actually
been doing this very thing for quite
some time — she is transforming her
face and body to look like paintings
of the 'old masters'. This is being
documented with videotape and photos taken during the operations, during which she insists in being awake
people are neading
Ever wonder what People Are
Reading? I do. Author Michael
Turner, the dashing host of the
Reading Railroad, took the time
to write and tell subtext.
Much of my reading time is divided between editing r
scripts and scanning forthcoming books sent to me by publishers interested in having their i
thors read at the Reading Railroad series (every third Monday
@ the Railway Cluh -j).
Since I am writing this article in
August, I've decided to discuss
books that have either just been
published or will be published
shortly after this appears.
What follows, then, is a list of
nine books that I would recommend for fall reading:
Visions of Kerouac (Pottersfield
Press) by Ken McGoogan
A cleveriy told Jack-and-the-
beat -schtick story where the central character is joined by the
ghost of Kerouac on a romp
around North America The author's rendering of the "current"
Kerouac is pitch-perfect, suggesting to me that McGoogan is more
likelyawas-a-beatthana wanna-
beat. Easy to read, though the
book wanes a bit near the end.
Watch for the shifting point-of-
Homage to Lester Young (Ooli-
chan) by Jaime Reid
A long poem about the jazz great.
Reid's jam on Young is consistent with the style of his subject:
Always on the hep side of the
best, always in the pocket. And
unlike McGoogan, who blows a
bit too long on Kerouac Reid
knows when to put down his hom.
/ Can Hear Me Fine (Get To The
Point Books) by Jean Smith
An impressionistic tale of memory and dreams skewing time and
space from the singing side of
Mecca Normal. The characters
are weird and real; the writing
orange and brilliant. And for in-
check out the index!
Smith's best vocal perfor
Show Business (Serpent's Tail/High
Risk books) by Kevin Coyne
A series of prose pieces and dialogues about "the real worid of entertainment." coy ne, a fifty year olf
British rock star Uving in Germany
has an arid sense of humour — and
he uses it well with stories like The-
Has-Been, Johnny and the Psychiatrist, and Ezra Pound in his Cage.
Reminds me of my own book, Hard
Core Logo, only this one is informed by the Cliff Richard era.
Borderlines (Serpent's Tail/High
Risk Books) ed. by Kate Pullinger
An absorbing anthology of writing
on "home" and "exile" from the co-
publishers who brought you Show
Business. Rather than go into detail
on the nineteen stories (written by
authors such as Joe Ambrose,
Hooman Majd, and Audrey Thomas) included in this book, let me
just say that Serpent's Tail/High
Risk is one of the most interesting
newpublishers around today. Watch
for new books by John Giorno, Gary
Indiana, and Sapphire—as well as
this one.
Skinnier Leg OfThe Journey (Black
Cat collective) Rob Howatson, Anne
Jew and Lisa Marr
This is probably the most engaging
anthology I have read in some time.
More than mere travel writing, this
collection is about passage. All
three authors, contributing three
stories each, really shine here. And,
yes, Rob Howatson's eyes are the
ones he was born with.
Queeries: An Anthology of Gay
Male Prose (Arsenal Pulp Press)
edited by Dennis Dennisoff
Twenty-six authors (including
Stan Persky, Andy Quan, and David Watmough) contributed to this
dynamic book, the first anthology
of gay male prose ever published
in Canada. Although the writing is
solid and wide-ranging, the most
fascinating aspect of this collection is the authors' synopses ofthe
political intentions behind their
work. In terms of sheer insight,
this book swings both ways.
Dwell (Talonbooks) by Jeff
Derksen
A long poem by one ofthe young
lions of new lyric writing. What
I liked best about this book (indeed, about new lyric writing in
general) is the way it challenges
our narrative bias, the way our
reading-comprehension-writing
"skills" have been conditioned
by discursive power structures
(i.e. media, education, law,
health, politics). The Interface
passage is one of the best pieces
of writing I have read this year.
Paper, Scissors, Rock (Press
Gang) by Anne Decter
If I were an Olympic judge, I
would give this book perfect
marks for both technique and
style. Although a novel, this book
reads more like a long poem: A
tight weave of lyric and dialogue,
emotion and history. I learned
more about my country from this
book than I ever did from Mordecai Richler.
for. Dean R. Koontz calls Beauty
"The best first novel I've read in a
TRUE FACTS:
Hey, I went to the San Diego Comics Con! This is thee event for North
American comic culture enthusiasts
(Aug 19 - 22 this year). Guests included Bagge/Clowes, Robert Williams and Dave Sim. I'll report my
findings at a later date....local guy
Colin Upton is back to self-publishing and his mid-size Big Thing is a
mere two bucks. Three stories: "The
Life of St. Padua," the patron saint
for restoration of lost items (Mr.
Upton is my preferred source for
history lessons); "Chris," a new
semi-fictional tale and "Night-
mares,"adepressingtwopagerabout
sleepless nights....two other locals
who draw are Blaine Thurier and
Lester Smolenski. Their art will
grace upcoming issues of Dennis
Eichorn's Real Stuff comic. Denny
writes his (slighUy-embellished) true
tales and gets others to draw'em;
these will be part of an all-Canadian
drawn bonanza. Blaine, who also
does Everything _ Ducky has put
out his collection called Tales from
the Perineum, is available exclusively at Scratch and POP!. Fans of
Velvets Records, the 'star' ol Ducky,
will thrill to the adventures within.
Les also produces the tiny Goose
Flesh folding art piece; his wiggly
pencil style is original and
effective....Dark Horse Comics is
now producing Harvey Pekar's
American Splendor, the first issue,
# 17, is now out. As usual all stories
are written by Harvey: the artist-
include Jim Woodring, Joe Sacco
and longtime associate, Gary Dumm.
Harvey and his wife Joyce Brabner
are working on a graphic book, Our
Cancer Year, based on Harv's illness with all art by Frank
Stack.... VINYL HELL is a new zine
from LA devoted to remembering
the worst and most neglected records.
Issue # 1 includes Donny Most (from
Happy Days), The Move, Ruttles,
LMNOP, The Frisbees and someone named Craig Nuttycombe (I
swear!) and his LP "It's just a Lifetime". Photocopied. 2 bucks an issue/8 for a year, US funds, write
VinylHeD 1870 North Vermont Ave,
Suite 506, Los Angeles, Ca, 90027. Available frw in extremely limited quantities every montii ot coal plant across Canada, USA, UK,
France, Ireland, _ Jopon; eoch t«ue is hand-printed on 1950s Gestetrver duplicaTrng madiines. Ifyou
dig Rearmis, Francoise Hardy, Asrrud GUberto, CU taker, Sinatra, Small Faces, Desmond Dekker,
French movies, block turtlenecta, kissing, hugging i stuff; send me 12 Canadian stamps ar monetary
equivalent ($5 m the USA) ond HI mail you a copy monthly! One stamp for a sample issue is ok, tool
■ta ov-oge ol 810 short poems it whick Ralph (omemplcles coffee, hH "ilfn«u\ te b««rte jon records,
you know .stufl & Ibings. A remindet thai fife - and poetry doeui't have la be epk to be enjoyable'
CHRIS O'CONNOR; EYE WEEKLY
■Very Beotnik* FIZ MAGAZINE
RALPH ALFONSO, BOX 505,1288 Broughton St., Vancouver, BC, Cnnoda, V6G 5$
$15 US for 12 issues anywhere
in the continental USA.
524 for overseas.
""l   action is.
#233-6138 SUB Blvd., Yancou-*
Ver, BC VCT121 «*»'/!£*-
NINTH ANNUAL
VANCOUVER
FESTIVAL
SEPT. 9-19
ALL TICKETS ON SALE
SEPT. 1st
Pick up a Program Guide at
Book Warehouse, Theatre.,
or in the Sept. 9th Georgia Straight
Or call the Fringe Hotline:
873-9949
TTGE B@®IK
Vancouver's
Largest Selection
of Almost New and Used
Paperbacks and
Magazine Back Issues
Large Range of
Hard Cover Books
Thousands of New and
Collector's Comics
We Buy, Sell or Trade
1247 Granville near Davie
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Open 7 Days a Week
JOHN FLUEVOG SHOES
837 Granville st.
Vancouver, B.C.V6Z1K7
Phone 688-2828 VANCOUVER
FILM
Festival Highlights
Walk On The Wild Side
Midnight screenings at the Caprice Theatre
featuring
The Cronos Device
This post-modern vampire
movie from Mexico isn't
afraid to show its heart.
Fortress
Christopher Lambert is an
"innocent victim" in Stuart
Gordon's (Re-Animator)
futuristic high tech drama.
Full Contact
[This wonderfully crass
Hong Kong gangster
(overload has Chow Yun-
Fat on another revenge
(mission.
Trauma
Horror king Dario
Argento's latest masterpiece is sure to leave yourl
head rolling.
and more
Also at the Festival new films by
Jane Campion
Claude Chabrol
Stephen Frears
Peter Greenaway
Werner Herzog
Derek Jarman
Chen Kaige
Krzysztof Kieslowski
Mike Leigh
Ken Loach
Ross McElwee
Gus Van Sant
Paolo & Vittorio Taviani
Passes and Memberships go on sale September 20 and Individual Advance
Tickets on September 24.
Charge By Phone 685-8297 (Noon - 7p.m.)
B.C. Tel Film Festival Hotline - 685-8352 opens Sept. 20 (Noon - 7 p.m.)
THEATRES
CAPRICE • HOLLYWOOD • PACIFIC CINEMATHEQUE • RIDGE •
VANCOUVER CENTRE CINEMAS
The Vancouver Sun Guide will be available on September 17, and at
participating theatres, libraries, and the usual outlets.
SAM'S
INDIE STREET
TOQUE
lease
The most rock'em-sock'em, Canadian beer lovin', toque wagglin'
band ot binge rockophiles ever to crawl out from the Tundra.
TOE UQUOR
Toe Liquor
Funk, punk, metal, blues, for the scatotogist in all of us.
An orgasmic new release available soon.
FLASH BASTARD
Crypt City
What thou seeist there fair creature is thyself,
but follow us and we'll take you where no shadow stays.
TENACITY
Tenacity
Experience the fantasy of real life.
Pick up this guitar driven 12 song CD or cassette.
TINMEN
Pleasures of tee Dance
High caliber intelligent electronic melodic dance music.
This band is gonna knock your socks off. It's great to see this kind of
talent coming out of Vancouver.' - Joe Nickolls, Music Director, Z.95
ABRAHAM AND THE TRIBE
Riot
If you want music that sends a chill down your spine ...and reaches into the
deapths of your soul ..If you want music that makes you rock...
 RIOT, the debut release from Abraham and the Tribe
THE BOMBSHELLS
Tame
BUY IT!
PAISLEY SUITCASE
TkatAlnlthe Way It Was Meant Te Be
Laquered groove that will move the strictest soul,
ie White Rock quartet that plays nice skinned and strung instruments.
THE MODE TO JOY
The Harmony EP
90's Euro-style modem dance rock.
Currently getting major airplay on Z.95
ABANDONED YOUTH
Abandoned Youtk
Well it's about bloody time. On the shelves now, the 6 song
self-titled EP by Abandoned Youth.
Featuring "Young Stranger* and "Pushin' For Time", bo_i of
which have received national airplay.
ATTENTION ALL BANDS
IF YOU HAVE ANY DEMOS, CDs, OR 7 INCHES AVAILABLE, WE WILL
GLADLY SELL YOUR PRODUCT ON A CONSIGNMENT BASIS. FOR FURTHER
INFORMATION, CONTACT SELIM AT 684-3722 (568 SEYMOUR ST.)
EH-L lif.',','HTT
L !V_f!B_i i^SMUR^TJDJWNMN^F^UR FLOORS OF FUN! "Television
Drug of the nation
Breeding ignorance
And feeding radiation."
-The Beatnigs
The "boob tube" (interestingly, a
nickname that was devised before the advent of such T&A classics as Babewatch and Key Breast)
has taken a bad rap recently, both
in the print media and in the circles of conversation that I have
been known to frequent. Sure, television has created a few generations of brain deficient psycho-
the right to free speech, that is the
right to scream "Freeze or I'll
blow your mother-Iovin' head
off; and the right to graphically
portray violence and the degrada-
There is nothing wrong with
basic human freedoms of expression. There is something wrong
with hiding your petty trash behind grand words. Not only does
corporate TV not care a rat's ass
about the quality of their programming, they don' tcareagnat's
ass about how frequently the pap
they spew out airs. Were you
aware that Saved by the Bell (a
half-hour excuse to put teenaged
being the evil entity behind colourization,
Turner Broadcast Systems (TBS) and it- sibling stations, WGN and
TLA, seem to have
bought the entire contents
of the catalogue "One
Movies You
Thought You'd Never
Hear of Again" for the
exclusive benefit of their
audience. For every High
Noon TBS offers, you
also receive, like so much
unwanted junk mail, dubious submissions such
as Spaced Invaders, The
Seduction, Tarantulas:
Deadly Cargo, and
twenty Atlanta Braves
baseball games. It's
enough to make anyone
do the "Simpson Shud-
However  closely
this column resembles a
rant against television, it
is not. This is a rant £__
TV, for what it could be,
should be, and sometimes
is.  Mention the phrase
"state-run television" to
an American and their automatic
image is of mindless zombies
hooked on brainwashing propaganda. America is the
plac
eived.
The fact is that public television, be it state administered
or not, is often the most satisfying
choice for the viewer of anything
more than sub-standard intelligence. In a public television situ-
MONITOR BOOTH
paths, but does the moral imperative, and therefore blame, lie with
an assortment of tubes, wires, and
signals?
Small children become
hooked on ultra-violent, intelligence-numbing programming not
because their parents own a TV
set but because some greying,
balding, thrice married, executive-salaried asshole decides that
stuffing his already bursting wallet is more important than ensuring that people of all ages don't
have to put up with (or become
"addicted" to) seventeen murders
an hour and enough female
subserviance to populate an entire slave colony on Jupiter.
Instead of programming material that actually benefits humankind, the corporate television
power players ramble on about
giris into skimpy outfits) is broadcast into your home four times a
day? That Full House is on twice
a day and three times on Tuesdays? That 90210 (which is apparently more addictive than
smack and should not even be
watched once - you may be its
next victim!) airs two different
episodes every week, not including all its spin-offs and ripoffs?
Or that Cheers is on five times a
day on Thursdays, four times a
day on other weekdays, and once
each day of the weekend? I'll admit that Cheers was a better than
average network comedy that often featured some very sharp writing but does it have to be available twenty-six times a week?
To start naming some names,
Ted Turnerhas optioned the rights
to the title King Schlock. Besides
ation, the broadcaster is not responsible to commercial i nterests
to keep the station financially
afloat but, rather, to the audience
who fund such enterprises through
donation (e.g. PBS in the U.S.) or
through taxation (e.g. CBC in
Canada and BBC in Britain).
It is this relative liberty from
the interests ofthe almighty buck
that allow these types of stations
to break the yoke of conformity
that is imposed on commercial
stations. When Seinfeld, one of
network TV's most credible and
gut-funny shows, decided to run
their "Masturbation" episode,
eight out of ten of their regular
advertisers cancelled their spots
during the show. They pulled out
of very expensive prime time slots
on a very high rated "hip" show
because they were afraid most
viewers would be so offended by
the hint of masturbation (something 50% of all women and 90%
of all men admit to doing); that
the products being advertised in
the breaks would take on some
sort of taint and become
unmarketable. The slots were immediately filled by other sponsors and the episode received the
highest rating Seinfeld (ital) had
acheived to that point in its two
year run. But had the incident
occured with a less popular show,
those eight advertisers would
probably have succeeded in their
blatant attempt at censorship.
By contrast, last year CBC
cut their "Weeper". They decided,
without fanfare, that their audience after 10 pm were primarily
mature adults who could handle a
few undiluted and uncensored
swear words. Because of this decision, their Thursday Canadian
movie showcase was one of the
highlights of thei r schedule. Never
on an American non-cable channel would you be able to see such
controversial, and excellent, fare
as Leolo, Dead Ringers, and Jesus of Montreal in exactly the
same form as they were shown in
the theatres, save for a few commercial breaks.
If anything is offensive, it is
not the word "fuck" and not the
sight of an unclad penis but the
banality and homogeny of network TV.  Besides  the  holy
easily the most biting satire to hit
the box since The Kids in the Hall
debuted back in '88, is on HBO
and imported to Canada by CBC.
In the States, but only in some
markets and very late at night,
CBS broadcasts the aforementioned Kids; however the shows
are produced in the Toronto studios of CBC. Where In The World
Is Carmen Sandiego (not just a
kids game show but a truly entertaining way to pass the time until
dinner is ready) and the ever
hu mourous Sesame Street are both
PBS productions. From the BBC,
PBS regularly brings to North
America such small screen classics as Floyd on France (and Britain and Spain and Australia and
Ireland), Red Dwarf, Singing Detective, and Black Adder.
And then there is educational
TV which you can hardly be surprised to find that I'm advocating, considering the natural flow
from thinking to hating network
pablum television to enjoying
visually and intellectually stimulating stuff. This is where the
stigma associated with watching
shows that are "good for you"
ends. I refuse to apologise or explain my enthusiasm for such
beautifully mind boggling series
as Connections or The Day the
Universe Changed which are both
written and narrated by the ever-
charming James Burke. These series are both often rerun on TLC
and PBS, and they epitomise the
best of non-fiction television.
Using light humour, extensive research, well-costumed
dramatizations, and the profound
mind of Prof. Burke, both explain
elements of societal change in
western civilization from Roman
times to the present. The information relayed is never babified for
the audience, but the subjects discussed are simplified and elaborated on so that those (like myself) who may not be geniuses
can still get into the proceedings.
An interest in anything from painting to trains to sound technology
to the bomb is all that is required
to enjoy these series.
There are those people who,
despite anything they may read in
Discorder, will still only be inter-
estcdin infomcrcials, heavy metal
videos, and TNN's monster truck
and dirt bike Sunday extravaganza. The next time you sit down
in front of that wacky invention
called television, carefully consider your options, demand more
from those who are presenting
you with those options, and please
don't blame that innocent mess of
plastics, copper, and invisible
waves for the ills of a society it
was in vented to i mprove. It' s ti me
to pass the responsibility for the
ills of the medium on those who
abuse it so shamelessly for their
triui
of
Seinfeld, and
Northern Exposure (three shows
that, in their way,
challenge the
tight perameters
which they are
expected to function within), everything else
worth watching is
on cable or public television.
The Larry
Sanders   Show
Toasted TV Treats *
8 cups
250'F. oven                                     1 hour
% c. butter or margarine
I.   Heat oven.   Melt table (at in long dripping
1 t. salt (suit taste)
pan or roaster.   Mix in salt and other season
2 c. bite-size readv-to-eat
ings as desired.   Stir with a wooden spoon
wheat cereal
every 15 minutes to blend well.   Serve hot or
2 c. bite-size ready-to-cat
cold.
rice cereal
2.   If placed  in  tightly covered  container,  the
1  c.  ready-to-eat corn ar oar-
mixture wfll keep for several weeks.   Fof a
cereal
change, season with Worcestershire sauce, or
2 c. thin pretzel sticks
garlic salt.
K lb. mixed nuts
SEPTEMBER 0 Discorder: What has changed
for Nomeansno since Andy has
left?
Rob Wright: Andy's not there
anymore! (laughs)... at first
we just took a break, because
we weren't sure how we were
going to proceed. I ended up
being really bored, so I started
doing Mr. Wrong which was
really good because it was
quite different, a challenge,
aad it got me playing every
day.
The majori ty of the songs
on the new (Nomeansno)
album were written and
performed as Mr. Wrong
sons*, which is why I think
20
they tend to be a Uttle simpler
and longer and ponderous instead of the faster, more intricate stuff. When we listened to
the new album we said "Oh my
God, are people going to sit down
and listen to a whole hour of
this?" There were even a couple
of longer ones that we left off
because there wasn't even any
room on the CD.
Discorder: Some people have
compared the sound to your first
LP, Mama, which was also a
product of the band as a two-
Rob: I think it does sound that
way, but only because it has a
preponderance of my material
written on the bass, and that's
also what Mama was. Which
just shows you... I don't change
at all! I've been writing the
same songs for ten years, kids!
I don't know if the next
work will have the same quality to it, because we're starting
to work with other people. The
next thing we're going to do is
a fun compilation album on
Wrong Records. It may not
even be a Nomeansno album,
with lots of guests and covers
and weird stuff... sort of like a
CD magazine in music form.
Discorder: What is happening
with Wrong Records? I assume
it started out as an opportunity
to take more control over putting out your material.
Rob: Yeah, people were mailing us, asking for stuff, and we
wouldn't have anything we
could sell them. So we decided
to do a Uttle business selUng
our own T-shirts and albums...
and then there were a lot of
odd things too, things we were
on, 7 inches that were made
around the world, and people
would ask us about them. So
we ordered a whole bunch of
stuff, like the 7 inch from
Finland, and various bootlegs.
I don't know if we'll make it
into an official 'labd'' with
other bands who we'U try to
promote and get out there... I
mean, that's really hard. You'd
have to have a real organization, you'd have to get more
people involved and it would
have to make some money,
which it really doesn't do at
the moment. We're not planning to take over the world or
anything... it's a fun place to
put out side projects and other
things to occupy our time.
Discorder: You 've been in volved
in a lot of side projects over the
years: the Hansons, Show Biz
Giants, the record with Jello,
itch... how did you first approach
Nomeansno when it started?
Was is just another side project?
Rob: No, Nomeansno has always been the central thing
we've done. Especially when
we started playing two-piece,
that was the most focussed
thing... we had done four-track
recordings and played together in that form, but that was
more of a studio thing, just two
guys playing the instruments
and putting the songs out,
which is a whole other thing
than being a live band. We
wanted to be a live band, so we
started the two-piece and since
then, that's been the core of
what we've done. Andrew was
a huge part of the band, obvi- ously, but the essential beginning was myself and John, playing songs with a rhythm-section
emphasis and with a certain
idea and emotional content and
direction. That's why we've
carried on; when Andy left the
band we didn't say "well, we'U
go on to something else." As
long as me and John are playing together, it'll always be
Nomeansno.
Discorder: What is Andy doing
now? The story I heard was that
he was walking around Amsterdam with a gram of pot in his
pocketand thought "Hey, thisis
legal.'"andjust decided to stay...
Rob: He developed a relationship with a woman who had
managed a couple of our tours,
and eventually it got to the point
that his life was there. He just
got sick of the touring, which
had got quite... big. And he
wasn't really comfortable with
that, especially in Europe. He
turned thirty and decided he
had to take a left turn and do
something different. He's been
with us for eight or nine years,
which is a long time for a band
to be together in one format. I
don't really know if he's doing
anything musical at all... I think
he's doing demos and stuff but
whether or not he plans to be
seriously involved in the music
business again, I don't know.
Discorder: What do you think
it's been that has made Nomeansno different from other
"hardcore" bands?
Rob: I think it's because we
started a lot earlier than the
actual "hardcore" scene. The
bands we listened to when we
started playing music were the
Ramones, The Sex Pistols, the
Stranglers and then PiL and
the "second-wave" in England... a little more avant-
garde, where the attitude was
to try out new things... some
reggae rhythms, funk, try and
shake things up. The band was
never about actual politics, it
was more i nto the personal politics and sexual politics of person-to-person issues. When we
finally got touring, we were in
that hardcore "scene," but we
really weren't going the same
way as most of the bands were,
which was reaUy fast music,
intense, often very political
lyrics and a very, very rigid
' format... they wanted to be like
each other, rules of conduct,
things Uke that, with a very
"boys-club dib-dib-dib dob-
dob-dob" feel about it. We were
just a Uttle too old and politically-incorrect to go along with
it. I think what really makes us
different is we've always
wanted to be ourselves, and to
the extent that if you're going
to be yourself, you're going to
be different from everyone else.
Most bands, unfortunately, are
trying to be the band they really
Uke... and unfortunately they
usually succeed. People really
appreciate people who do
things their own way... that's
what people are looking for:
originality, that's what sparks
interest. It's totally wrong-
headed to look at someone else
and say "If I write songs Uke
them, I'll be like them!" By
doing that you're not going to
be true to what's truly inside
yourself. Personality comes
into it as well, not as image, but
actual people. Like the Minutemen, Mike Watt and D.
Boon, these are individual
people, and even if there were
things I didn't Uke, I've always
had a huge respect for that
band, and for fIREHOSE,
simply because they're them-
Discorder: It
reminds me ofthe
you live, it was at
an all-ages show
atthe Town Pump
in'86. There were
about 25 people
there, and as I
was watching the
maker... it can be all these
things, but it really has nothing
to do with what music really is.
If you go someplace and you're
the "rock star," some people
think that's cool, but most
people think it's just a pain in
the ass. I'm just a little to old to
be like that anyways... even if I
tried I don't think I could be
cool, especiaUy now... I'm a
forty-year-old man living in
New Westminster! I'm your
Dad, kids!
Discorder: Have you ever felt
any urge to try jumping into the
mainstream and fucking with
don't do that on a major label,
you're nothing. So why put
yourself in the position of ali
this pressure... for what? So
you'll sell a few more records
and not see any money out of
them? I think we make more
money now selling our 20-
30,000 copies of each album
than bands who seU 90-100,000
on a major label and who spent
$350,000 making it. The only
people who have to do that are
the people who are making full-
scale commercial pop music...
like Prince. I mean, what would
he be doing on Alternative
Tentacles?   I  have  nothing
this six-foot grey-
haired   guy   in
walking across
the dance floor,
bobbing his head
to the music and I
thought, "That
must be their
manager." And
then you climbed
up on stage and
started playing! I
thought you
would be so cool,
but you ended up
being geeky like
Rob: That's what
I think people ap-
Uke, I'm allergic
always been
three nerdy guys
from Victoria. I
think one of the
got into this style
thing is because
in Victoria there
weren't enough
people — you
couldn't divide
nh„e-o"nf would ^'IW  B   ^0^^BBT-Old
Westminster! I'm
have anything!
Everyone knew
everyone else, so
if you put on airs
people would just smirk. Not to things like Sonic Youth claim
say that people didn't have the they 're trying to do?
hair and the leather jackets,
but for us... I think I looked Rob: No... because the mainlike a punk rocker for about stream will fuck with you. I
two weeks a long time ago, and think Sonic Youth and others
then I thought "This is way too are good examples of that not
much trouble," people would doing anything for their music,
look at me funny in the streets and they've certainly put
and I might get beat up by themselves in alien positions
rednecks... and again, music is which don't fit what they do.
music, and it's very important For us, I don't think we're ever
in that function, but in terms of going to write the kind of music
man living in New
your Dad, kids!"
being    a    status-thing,
hierarchical-thing or a money-
that's going to sell 150,000 or
200,000 records, and if you
Discorder: What does playing in
Nomeansno do for you personally ? What do yo u get to express
through the medium ofthe band
that you might not communicate
otherwise?
Rob: I get to say "fuck you" to
everyone in the world! (laughs)
All those little simmering things
that most people carry around
as ulcers 24 hours a day, I get to
spit them out on stage to
people with some applause at
the end and a few dollars. It's
a way to communicate, and
way to get in contact with
people on a certain level that
most people don't ever get the
opportunity to. I have people
who write me from Texas who
I don't know, who talk to me
about their personal Uves and
say things about the music
that they've related to, and
you begin to realize that
you've made a connection
with these people, although
you've never really met them.
That's what music is about;
the   purpose   of
make you rich and
famous nor is it a
platform for
whatever political
axe you've got to
grind. It's about
making a connection with people
and sharing what
you have in common with
write a song that
comes out of some
sadness in your
life, and someone
hears that song
and feels sad, you
feelings, that you
That's how music
has always been...
people have got together, they've
beat on drums,
they sing, usually
among people
they know, in a
close, tribal or
communal relationship, and ex-
whatever they are
feeling... their
desires, their
rears... music
doesn't need any
other justification
than that. It
doesn't have to
have a "message,"
it doesn't have to
provide a lot of
money for a lot of
people...I'm not
saying you can't
write political and
meaningful songs,
a lot of people
have. Some people
make a good living
and have made a
big difference, it's
not necessarily bad. But the
more you move towards either of those ends, the more
y ou' re movi ng a way from the
central part of what music is,
which is to be with people.
That's the feeling you get
when you're at a great concert... it's Uke "wow!" Those
concerts I'll remember all my
Ufe... that moment, that's what
the value of it is. And that's
what the value is for me
personally, I get to be the
vehicle for that.
Discorder: How does that relate
to your songwriting process?
Rob: Songs that are really good,
that really move people do not
belong to the artists that wrote
them. The artist is the person
who managed to bring the song
out, but if you see the effect it
has on people, you realize that
it's a common thing. It's a Uttle
spooky, and I don't mean to get
mystical about it, but I really
feel that great songs and great
music is a gift that comes
through an artist, and the individual really doesn 't have anything to do with it. A lot of
people confuse themselves with
their music, and that's when
they begin to get fucked up and
think  they're God Almighty
powerful, but it's really not
them — that's where they get
confused. They're not the ones
who are doing it, they're the
ones which it's coming through.
Oftentimes a great artist will
suddenly stop producing great
art... why? Are they a different
person? No, it's just that what
they're saying, the things
they're trying to bring out
aren't being communicated
anymore, or they're no longer
what people are interested in,
what people are going through.
Which is when you find people
who do things in their lifetime
that no-one gives a shit about,
and a hundred years later
everyone goes "Wow! This is
so great!" Whatever that artist
was touching on, everyone else
didn't clue into it until a
hundred years later... unfortunately for them! And there's
something sort of religious
about music in that sense. It's a
spiritual thing — a way which
people, on levels you really
can't specify, can connect. And
everyone who wanders th rough
the dark on their own,y'know...
the individual, the great... ME -
that's really not the valuable
part, where you get the things
that drive you in life. The things
that are really important and
deep... they're shared by everyone, and everyone is connected by those things. And
that, to me, is the purpose of
music: to bring that connection out.
Discorder: Have the progressions in your lyrical con tent and
themes been a product of
changes on a spiritual or emotional level?
Rob: I think it hasn't progressed so much as it's been
refined. Ifyou listen to the songs
on Mama and you Usten to the
new songs, you find... the same
songs! And I think I've been
literally writing the same song
with different words and music
since that time. All I try to do is
maintain or refine the
understanding of what I'm doing, and by "understanding" I
mean the emotional as opposed
to intellectual; in a song Uke
"Kill Everyone Now" or "Machine" or "I Need You," you'll
find the same direction in songs
SEPTEMBER  ^ from Mama like "Red Devil," or
"Real Love" or "Victory."
They're all trying to get to a
place in the human heart where
people are sad and hopeful at the
same time, angry and needing
love at the same time. These
things are all fused together... I
is that I'm starting to lose a little
of the crap, the mental crap, that
goes along with lyric writing.
Songs I' ve written that have been
failures are songs like "Hunt the
She-Beast," it's this real sort of
intellectual little pompous thing
about sexual politics, and I listen
to it now and say "eeww, it's
such a lot of crap!" It's all
thinking - with a song Kke "Kill
Everyone Now," there's no
"thinking" in that song, there's
no"iflca." It doesn't explain anything and it really doesn't make
much sense, but it has an emotional content and understanding. I could analyze it and cut
this or that out, and say "it's
about individual suicide translated into mass suicide" or whatever, but the less I do that when
I'm writing, the more you just go
"BUt!" and it comes out from
somewhere — who knows. The
only craft involved is putting it
together so the impact of what
you're saying is heightened
instead of debilitated.
Discorder What would you say is
the differen ce between songs such
as "Metronome" and "Long
Days" and even "Victory" which
to me symbolize an attempt to
draw strength from inside oneself
in opposition to the outside world,
as opposed to songs like "Joyful
Reunion" or "The River" which
are more accepting of the circumstances that flow around you...
Rob: A song Uke "The River"
deals with the contradiction:
you're alone, and you're a part,
and that situation where neither
is really complete is a very hard
one to take because it doesn't
seem to be any meaning to it
"Joyful Reunion" is also that, in
terms of what drives you in your
life is the thing that might rip
you apart The violence of the
songs is usually a recognition of
the violence that's in life, that no
matter how comfortable your life
is, you're eventually going to
dissolve into a pile of bones. "Metronome" has a lot in common
with "The River" in the sense
that they mean two things at the
same time, "The River" _
is saying that we're al- J
ways alone, we really      m
to be swept away from one
another. But it also implies that
we're all on the same river
together, even if we can't really
see or understand each other in
the flow of thi ngs, and even if the
clear, it's a pretty violent process. "Victory" is the same thing,
it's really about defeat It'sabout
the only victory being the face
you show to that defeat, and perhaps the question of "what is
defeat?" I mean, we're all going
to die, is that something we
should be trying to avoid? Maybe
the issue isn't whether we Uve or
die, it'show you Uve. And maybe
the issue isn't to rid the world of
all evil, but how you deal with
evil. Human beings will always
have one foot in hell and one in
heaven, and if you try to avoid
either one, all you're going to be
is a caricature of a human being
— you're going to be pretending, you're going to try to be
getting away from Ufe. The more
ously past their prime, but to me,
that first Ramones album is
perhaps the most perfect piece
of music ever written. It was a
revelation to me when I first
bought K... I used to play it twelve
times a day and people would
say "Would you turn off that
shit!'... I mean, no-one liked this
music when I started listening to
it The same sort of thing hit me
with Hendrix as a teenager...
John Lee Hooker, Hank Williams. I think it's just people who,
by accident or design manage to
be themselves and let it come
out I don't like any of Hendrix's
songs... his words are all crap,
but when you take those solos...
there you've got it! And with the
Ramones, it was as if everything
was nothing: they couldn't play,
they had nothing to say, a bad
attitude about everything, and
yet they put fourteen close-to-
perfect Uttle pop songs on that
record. So I don't knowif they're
"heroes," but there are a lot of
you avoid the evil things, in terms
of facing up to them as they're
there, as they present themselves,
the more you're going to alienate yourself from the good things
in life as well. "Metronome" is
Uke "Machine," in that you are
controlled, you are part of a
machine, and you can't escape
that, and in some cases you never
would want to, because in a way,
that machine is the structure by
which you U ve. There's that band
called Rage Against The Machine, it's a very cUched a tt it ude
to be "against the powers that
oppress," but if people were really
faced with the dissolution of that
order, they'd just be grasping
for a new one! Because that's
what you hang your hat on, how
you get up on time in the morning
and stop at the stop sign... so all
if this stuff you don't want to
throw out... it keeps you safe and
gets you through the day. Everyone carries within them the
rules of conduct, and in many
ways we're not individuals, we
are communal creatures, part of
a huge human machine that we
all carry with us. These are contradictions which sort of whip
around... this is the source of the
inspiration that these songs end
up coming out as.
Discorder: Do you have any rock
heroes left?
Rob: Sure... Jimi Hendrix, The
Sex Pistols, The Ramones... I
i, The Ramones arc obvi-
bands who I look at and say "they
did this perfectly." I can't think
of any recently... it's more people I've met through the band,
like Snuff or The X from Holland. They're people I've got to
know as human beings, and
that's different from those 'legendary figures" that you don't
really know anything about...
Discorder: How about bass he-
Rob. Lemmy! I think that's the
very sound I've been looking for
all my Ufe... and people whose
names Ican't remember: the guy
who used to play for The Stranglers... terrible band nowadays,
always was in a way, an extremely
dodgy band, but amazing bass
playing and a menacing quality
to their music... Jah Wobble from
PiL.- I've always had a great
admiration for the bassist for
The Attractions: if you want to
hear an amazing bass player,
put on Get Happy and Usten to
the bass lines.
Discorder I'm at the point where
I want to jump off into the Guitar
Player section of the interview,
but I'11 try to restrain myself. Just
how long have you been playing?
Rob: Since I was 16 on guitar,
but I didn't play in front of
anyone until I was 23 or 24. I
then I started playing bass and
guitar because me and my
brother were recording on a four-
_u_
track. Basically what started our
musical career was a) the "new"
music, and b) the four-track,
because then we started making
those songs with two mikes in
our basement We did that for a
good two years before we ever
tried to play Uve in any context
That's another reason why the
new album is very much Uke
Mama, because it's a totally
studio thing, it wasn't done Uve
at all. The songs were played Uve
on all our other records, which is
maybe why Live And Cuddly is
one of the best representations
of what we did with Andy,
because with him we were basically a Uve band, and that's what
gotu
kfora
"Most bands* unfortunately, are trying
to be the band they really like... and
unfortunately they usually succeed."
lot of people, the Uve show was
first and the records were a close
second... if that! (laughs)
Discorder: On some of your earlier recordings with Andy it seemed
as though you were grasping for a
faithful studio sound, which didn't
happen until Wrong.
Rob: Yeah, and in a funny way,
that was probably the most successfully performed and recorded record, but to me, it's not one
of my fa vou rites at aU, because it
doesn't have that much depth. I
prefer Small Parts and the new
album, but I can see how people
would like them both less than
Wrong. And I knew when we
were doing it that it would be our
most popular record, and I also
knew it was the one I'd like the
least Not to say I don't like it, I
Uke it a lot — It's just that I Uke
things that are way less accessi-
I think when you've hit the disturbance level, you're actually
getting into the meat of things. If
you can bug people and disturb
them, they're not going to Uke
that much. That's why we'U
never be a commercial band,
because the majority of people
will never want to hear that kind
of music. If you're trying to
disturb people, you're defeating
your purpose by thinking that
you're going to seU a lot of
records. There will always be a
few people who are actually
searching for that kind of confrontation with music - but not
many. I tliink we're damn lucky
to be as popular as we are, I
always sort of thought it was a
fluke, actuaUy.
As you can see, Rob had a lot to
say; we talked for over an hour.
He was every bit as friendly and
open as he is on stage, and even
gave me a ride to the bus stop in
his station wagon. Nomeansno
will be doing a tour of Australia
this fall with Tom Holliston ofthe
Show Business Giants on guitar.
T
</'
22 rsSKgosfTjj^ /*•»»
R
ose
Uironicl
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DEAD  AND  GONE  TO  HEAVEN
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SPECIAL
1
The column f»iled to nuke an appearance in
Discorder la* month (did you notice?) »nd
I just wanted to say it was Kim's fault for
being on tour. Before I start reviews and
such I would jusl hke to observe lhat for
whateverreason,there'safairlyactivescene
in Vancouver these days. Your chan<
I    getting involved in a more organizational
level is only a phone call away: call W(
at 945-1975 to get in touch with the finest
Quest Co-op. It should go without saying
that lame bar-room 70's —
puds are not welcome.
l      \ bands
\ Free
\J con*P
a$ there,
«N*£ theV.
■„    f -odei
g *bey sounded m     *"
'from this recordiL
^eprogressedfromtheiri
th, v SOmc "dd-liona! memlvr.
*>' V.nagreuesplay tongue-i.^ES?*     "
touch of that rt
I guitar
slight
An excellent overview of Ihe different   t
i in the Vancouver scene is the Wade-
Free Vancouver compilation. Overall, this
comp is not as great as one would hope, but
there are a few standout tracks, and it reveals
Vancouver scene to be relatively varied
r me, the best songs are
^       performed by Feed Your Babyhead
s^    (quirky, odd noise with melodic erhoey vocals), (tod Sugar (with a hypnotically
catchy heavy riff), Facepuller (the CD is
y      almost worth having just for the heavy raw
r       crunch of this song) and Sludge (heavy
powerful rock, although not quite as amazing as some of the songs on their last demo).
There are a few real dogs on this comp, but
at M ppd. for 18 bands, Wade-Free Vancouver makes for an inexpensive survey of the
Vancouver scene. Write to: Wade-Free, c/o
C. Grotes, P.O. Box 52023, North Vancou-
The Touch and Go's play fantastic
guitar-edged pop in the tradition of Go Four
3 on their In your Pocket tape. What more
need 1 say? Write them at: 3541 East Pender
'^? Street, Vancouver, B.C. VSK2E2
may enjoy Issue # 1 of Offkiiter. Write: Tim 7 J
_ Grant, 3732 Point Grey Rd. Vancouver BC ' ■
£  V6R1B2.
__.,sG.oD#fi-»verypunkloo-ing
t__ssi-S5-5sll
Apparently, the guy behind the PR OF.
1 210 - Lab tape (455 E. 21st Ave., Vancou-
| ver, B.C., V5V 1R3, 874-4419) was the
'• formerdrummerandvocalistofCrawlAnd
■'. Trust U«. if that means anything to you. I
ti suppose I would have to classify this under
'experimental,' although 'self indulgent'
might do just as well. A mindless repetition
j ofmaniacalelectronicdrumbeatsandstrange
POMALKE-'
-
Who
Gus are managing!*)
ous people with their Rope Hunt tape ($5   i
ppd., P.O. Box 8187 Victoria B.C., V8W
|  3R8), for a very good reason. The tape
demonstrates a raw, distorted noise that man-
1   ages to be furiously energetic and catchy as
hell - the san* time. I've heard they're        < ^ ^   -^tf. /£^***£
lievable Uve, so one can only hope     ~    SOBgs        yiy Doise ^   * <*. AU #Us
iy Vancouver soon. ^  grouPof J** c°nvnitted lo ' knd °'b*<i
-     ZINES
Since Vancouver has had a fairly ac
live summer, what with the large number of   •**_>
•lltges shows, the 'Under the Volcano'        T?
event and the 'frenzy' anarchist gathering,   rf^
*mongotherthings,IwM,edtotakethetirne   *■*
to talk about some of the local bands I've   *
forgotten to mention at other times.
i ..fortunately mi
^ed up my dates
;H
wilderness man
he*"51' _,;,h mv 'wiM-tik-- —
me mountains with my ^^ i
f* foomm-e at *****£*»      w Van f
■^j^sa--.-
6*4
_ bands sue,. ~ic.toad,but 1
tosU.tto»n|Ury^ ^soon. |
1 did see »*othWWT:yR_nc,d show. And
Ahou* MoOierwell I W ^
Oame.wai^^^i.ve Child W
„en)ed to enjoy if, >f blvis would've
\n Seattle 5 yesti ago they
-yc-eversawabunchc^^g^ £
Rcteon with a strange hi-speed blend rf^ pJ
hmhnycaJunandcc^ttyishfc*mU«,you U __,
toow what I'm talking about when I s.Mh* ^ ,_,
Pott-ohead are the ultimate busking band. fj> **^
""^^wted by technical diffioul- T"j >_
--c^S-^i    -
'h^^^^^i^^-
^♦y-ewe. ^"^rfptw-an!!.        J   For a copy of th>S_
£ eZue* dnnking b-ri, even if *>»t>
do all start to sound the same r
cSS.trSi—*«•"- S^_*-=-__r___;:) "
it, but it's only 25 ce
wiui the Smugglers.
_£-3_s=S
jr sssrsgssss
-/•*    B.C. Canada, V8R5T2.
1*W
Where the
hdliseverytody^^seemt.
{_,_. you if ye"1**
Y TOM MIL
I   ^;^S — clever
ff^-rRONT
Wil
the cruel
elephant
concert productions present:
This is to confirm your worst fears. The cruel elephant is back.
Back I tell you! And we're not gonna take it anymore. This town
was pretty weak for good shows unless they were the odd big
buck multinational corporate controlled rock show worth going
to. So do your part and don't contribute to the exploitation of
third world countries or our own. Think Ihe cruel elephant. We
now have the best sound system of all the cruel elephants,
provided by the experts at Audio Applications. The next time
you go to a show and wonder how this all got so predictable.
Think Change. Think INDEPENDENT. Think the cruel elephant..
Vancouver's only live alternative venue since 1990.1 could list a
bunch of amazing shows that happened in the past so you
could say "WOW, I didn't know they played, that must have
been awesome!* or smugly say, "Yeah, I was at that show, it
rocked my world." It's not just a Punk thing. Ifs not just a noise
thing. It's not just a Grunge (for lack of a better word) thing. It's
not just an Art thing. It's a rock thing for all people of this fine city
and beyond. Those who forget the past will be forced to repeat
it, and that's okay by me. Well as far as music goes anyway. Suck
up a little history and don't miss a show or you'll be sorry!
Friday Aug. 27 - ITCH W/ THE SHOW BUSINESS GIANTS
Friday/Saturday Sept. 3/4 - STOP VIOLENCE! A benefit for
rape relief and women's shelters in memory of Tina Thompson
Friday featuring RUMPLESTEELSKIN w/ ROOTABEGGARS
w/ DROPDOLLS w/ DEMPSY STONE and Saturday featuring
ELVIS LOVE CHILD w/ DJ LIEBOWITZ, the piano player from
San Fran, w/ SHE w/ BUNK Friday Sept. 10 - Mint/Zulu
recording artists TANK HOG w/. from Portland. APARTMENT
3-G (ex Poison Idea, formerly Mule) w/ FIDDLEHEAD from
Atlanta on Allied Records Saturday Sept 11 - Edmonton's
THE LOVED ONE w/ TICKLE TRUNK w/ HORSEY Friday/
Saturday Sept 17/18 - ELECTION BENEFIT for the Gnu
Democratic Rhino Reform Party. More fun than a champagne
enema! Bring your strap on liver, you'll need it! Meet the
candidates! Spank the candidates! Get spankedd by the
candidates! An orgy of freak culture featuring FAITH NO
LESS. JANE'S AFFLICTION and many special guests. Sign up
for the first annual Steve Fonyo Pub Crawl to follow the Terry
Fox Run on Sunday Sept. 19.
' If I can i drink 'til I throw up, I don 'I wanl to be a pari ot your
stinking revolution!' - Hunter S. Thompson
Friday Sept. 24 - Album release party (on all three formats!).
Bonerrecording artists.from Vancouver, SUPERCONDUCTOR
w/ the nordic metal of THORSEN Saturday Sept. 25 -
Epitaph recording artistsS.N.F.U.w/ATOMIC61 from Seattle/
Portland. 'Like a bomb going oft In your basement. * - NME
Releases by Sympathy for the Record Industry (LA), Baylor
(NY).IntellectualConvulsion (France). and Beechwood Music
(UK) Friday Oct. 1 - An Alternative Tentacle Fest with A.T.
recording artists VICTIM'S FAMILY and PORCH (ex Primus)
w/ TBA Saturday Oct. 2 - The garage jazz core of
COCTAILS w/ Cargo recording artists PITCH BLEND Friday
Oct. 8 - Touch N Go recording artists SEAM w/ Winnipeg's
BULLET PROOF NOTHING More to come including BLISS,
UNREST, STEREO LAB, ZENI GEVA (Japan). MUDWIMMIN,
ETHYL MEAT PLOW and THE SHOW BUSINESS GIANTS to
name a few. All this and more at 930 STATION ST. Beside (N)
the new bus station. Behind (E) the Old American Hotel on
Main St. Four blocks north of the Main St. Skytrain Station.
Beside (S) the Venables off-ramp of the Georgia Viaduct.
(Take Main St. exit heading east on the viaduct and go
straaight Instead of turning.) Ample parking and close to
major transit traansfer points.
-- Doors at 10:30. Show at 11:00. No Minors -
- Purchase tix at the door the day of the show -
DON'T FORGET the cruel elephant's famous CRUEL 70S DISCO
NIGHT every Tuesday at the fabulous Commodore Ballroom.
Tix only S3 GST included. Disco gear on? No lining up! All
request all the time. 'Gel down tonight, babyl' PLUS! Sunday
Sept. 26 - NEUROSIS w/7 YEAR BITCH w/HITTING BIRTH w/
GOD AND TEXAS at the Commodore. TIX S10 in advance,
S12 at the door
the    cruel    elephant    loves    you
Good Boy Productions
#4-302 West Second Avenue,
Vancouver, BCV5Y1C8
«-som.m^,Fox 254-7239 zM.TllMMAIIlMlTi.
smasW^8'8
SMASHING PUMPIKINS - Siamese Dream
"I was trying to get tbe sound of things like
coughing angels, the king and queen of the prom setting
themselves on fire, losers getting laid, high hopes being
ripped down and fizzling out"
- Billy Corgan
Siamese Dream, SMASHING PUMPKINS'
,  second full length release, is over an hour's worth of
spiritual and sonic transcendence. Its thirteen songs are
massive yet sharply focussed, overwhelmingly yet
frighteningly direct.
SMASHING PUMPKINS' love of entropy
and noise is equalled only by their penchant for
tunefulness. The band harnesses chaos without
sacrificing power and spins glassine melodies. On
Siamese Dream t the band reaches a level of
mastery, transferring this highly developed craft
into a breathtaking emotional wallop. Every song
hits pressure points that most people have either
repressed or forgotten. The resulting chills,
pheromones, and endorphins are only slightly less
dangerous than real drugs...or real love...
CRACKER - Kerosene Hat
" Songwriting is like stripping," drawls
CRACKERS's David Lowery, "Some dancers just go a
little further than others."
Kerosene Hat marks a watershed in David
Lowery's career, which spans eight albums with
Camper Van Beethoven and CRACKER.
Demonstrating an artful flare for burlesque,
CRACKER'S new album peels down to its bare artistic
essence. Among the collection of vignettes and
oddities, you'll still find the up-tempo humour that
fuelled CRACKER'S acclaimed self-titled
1992 debut, and its hit single, Teen Angst".
Yet a darker streak underscores many of
Kerosene Hat's new rockers, exemplified by  L
the debut single, "low" and its film noir video I
featuring Lowery in a boxing ring with Sandra I
Bernhard a la Raging Bull.. J
Lowery admits, "I get a big kick out of I
occaisionally writing songs like "Teen Angst" j
-1 think its a really eloquent little tirade. I feel j
comfortable with using irony and sarcasm in
my songs."
r **ywem*9*%*m**W*w**\W**WeM
SYLVIAN/FRIPP - The First Day
Two of music's most notable visionaries,
DAVID SYLVIAN and ROBERT FRIPP, have
joined forces; The First Day is the realization of
their longtime desire to collaborate on a full length
album.
Throughout their respective careers, both
SYLVIAN and FRIPP have embraced a wide
variety of influences - ranging from rock to jazz to
THESE
| VERVE-A Storm in Heaven
j "Best album of 1993" - Alternative Press
I VERVE has rapidly emerged as an intriguing,
I sometimes unnerving group of musicians that don't
I hesitate to take chances. A Storm in Heaven,
I VERVE'S debut album is set against a backdrop of
1 echoing guitar mantras and engrossing rhythms,
I awash in feedback and attitude. A Storm in Heaven is
I described by Alternative Press as "all crisscrossing
I tingles, headspinning wonder, kaleidoscope visions,
I freefalling bliss, orgasmic shudders, etc."
Spin named them a group "destined to shine
electronic to orchestral - in the process of
(   creating provocative, challenging music. Both j
artists have distinguished themselves in
ensembles as well as solo artists.
DAVID SYLVIAN fills attained
prominence with his band Japan, one of the
I most refreshingly original British groups of
. the late 70's and early 80's. ROBERT FRIPP
is well known as the founder of Britain's
innovative King Crimson and has production
credits with Peter Gabriel and the Roches.
brighdy in 1993...passionate rode "n' roll with
grand ambitions.
The group, however, measures their
success one listener at a time, or as Richard
Ashcroft (vocals for the group) puts it: "If I
can move a person emotionally and take them
to another place, it would mean more to me
than being on "Top of the Pops" or seeing us in I
the Top Ten. Its a big world out there and none I
of those things compare with touching sane-   ■
one with your music."
;NOW AVAILABLE __________ ^________**
RED McJANN GETS HER MONEYS WORTH
Oooh, I get to go to Highwood, the
gran-daddy of the Lollapaloozas, the
gear white-capper and sleazy cousin to
the more honorable In-Fest which happened nary a week prior to Highwood
'93.
How in the world doe. Alberta
think it can get away with having not
one but TWO economy-sized
Woodstocks, both outrageously priced
for your average canuck GAIN-
chequing sociali er ..non-conformist?
How does Alberta(the Texas of Canada)
think it will sustain the interest and
dollars of several thousand fickle North
American slackers under the guise of
"Hey we're havin' a whikkid pardee
somewhere in tbe Canadian prairies...
ya gotta come and bring lots of cash!"
It sounds impossible and totally
unreasonable, but I'm almost certain
that next to the Calgary stampede, these
big indie shindigs are Alberta's only
plausable tourist attraction that have
any relation to some kind of 'culture'.
Oh and what culture! Pepsi cans
standing six feet high as the gods of
good hick and prosperity that all our
little modern primitives have come to
adore and endure. I didn't have to pay
to get in and I didn't have to suck
anyone off to get here. The world slowly
turns and I jes sit here and impress
Friday Aug. 13, dawn...
People are cramming their tents
as close to the highway as possible
while we select a posh site beside the
Smithrite. The two sunglasses vendors
I arrived with (whom are my saving
grace as far as admission goes) leave in
search of brotherhood and beer.
Meanwhile I sit in the van and
take a slow pan of the campers around
me. No one is my brother yet In fact,
the only people awake are some diehard hay head festival arena puds: misguided faith-riddled partiers that wili
yell "WUUU WUU!!" for the rest <*
their Woodstock-missin' lives. This
particular gaggle was standing around,
drinking, and listening to Hawaii-era
Elvis: wasted days and wasted nights.
...10:15 a.m
I drag my sorry ass to the gale to
get my stinking wristband. The vendors are just starting to set up and are
more than mirroring the mood I'm in.
A fiesty nine-year-old snaps the band
on me and I'm practically back to sleep
already. Halfway back to the van, a
security guard yells "I know,
lemm ieguess, you' re BORED already,
aincha?!" I cheerily explain to him that
I'm really quite taken with the goings-
on but I now must rest I marveled in
the pop culture splendor of it all, rolling gently into a nap that would last
until late in the day.
...lata in tha day
You can't just jump into a
crowd sans amphetamines. The
crowd provides too much distraction, the few thoughts you
lazy head become erased. You
don't think at all. You let the crowd
start thinking for you. You become
angry. You are angry at yourself for
losing control. You are angry at the
crowd for luring you into this void, and
you must MOSH. You get anxious and
MOSH like the animal you ve, MOSH
like the WIND, damn you, mosh all tbe
pain and suffering awayyyy...
I dunno, maybe you can just sit
in your little van and write little knee-
jerk sociological rants for your little
paper...
I opted for the latter as King
Missile took the stage. While I love
listening to that crazy "Detachable
Penis" song on the radio and I think
that the Scorcese tribute on the flipside
of their hit-packed cassette was just
d-S right-on and solid, Uve they are no
treat.
I've been tent-bopping the two
stages for hours and I have to say it
warms my heart to see the beer gardens
empty and the local band tent nearly
tent right now; it sounds better than
King Missile but it's a whopping two
dollars that I really should save to buy
a Pepsi later. Gotta have it
The really good band I saw was
Squat from Calgary (conveniently opposite of D.R.I on the big stage). Perhaps I only really liked them because
the Boo Jovi-looking security guy who
doubled as the M.C. rushed the stage
after they played and blurted "That
was Squat, they're largely misunderstood, but perhaps that -because they're
light years ahead of their time!"
Squat are four lovely women
from Calgary who probably don't want
to stay at
the freakshow in the      sportycarsalready(oneofthembroug_t      tumes. Instead, they were relentless.
to you by McDonald's).	
Indy cars... good Christ, it's ali too
much right now.
Saturday Aug. 141:30 pm
The morning started with another Calgary bandcalled Rougue Pope.
Suprisingly un-folky, their angst and
dissonance was well suited to their
11:00 time slot and die inside of my
Mudhoney closed the big stage
last night The promoter only allowed
them to play half their set, so that he
would only have to pay them half their
appearance fee.
None-
...I could write some fruity copy about thm
quiet turmoil of finding an empty Port-o-lmt,
but I find this whole story so far to be embarrassingly light on substance so I will now fust
stare at the glaring floodlights In the parking
lot being used for the Oval races next door...
bouse when they come to play in your
town, but they will anyway if you
entice them with a decanter of chilled
Robitussen DM. They're on some Calgary indie comp CD coming out in the
fall and that's really all I know.
I could write some fruity copy
about the quiet turmoil of finding an
empty Port-o-let, but I find this whole
story so far to be embarrassingly light
on substance so I will now just stare at
the glaring floodlights in the parking
lot being used for the Oval races next
door. I've counted seven demolished
theless, they posed relentlessly during
the fireworks display and inspired a
crowd of hungry headbangers to chant
"KISS!! KISS!! KISS!!" an hour later
in the second tent With the big money
festivities wrapping up at midnight,
the crowd was rabid for more.
The festival gave them 10 Days
Late (formerly Playhouse) from Vancouver. Call me partisan, but I think
they rocked the crowd out of
dissappointment 10 Days Late don't
tend to wimp out behind a thin curtain
of lousy attitudes and 'daring' cos-
can't remember the last time I heard a
member of an all mammary band say
(oh, I'm not saying it's a good thing)
"Go ahead and fuckin' MOSSHH."
They wanned the crowd up nice
for Porksword, who are from Saskatch-
ewan. These crazy guys had everyone
turning their heads to their buddy and
sayin' "I just gotta see them for the
Four bald guys with varying degrees of facial hair, sporting black satin
Johnny Cash blouses, got on stage and
belted out a happy medley of Black
Flag and Devo. This brutal and punishing sound kicked my primal urges into
overdrive, compelling me to lose all
rational decorum and submit to instinct I headed over to the dumpster
and got drunk.
Alcohol! The last great hope for
the socially challenged, my very last
drug of choice, completely free and
knee-deep accessable by this time
of the night (2:30), and certainly
not as much of a corporate push in
this year's festival as in the last one.
I nuzzle up to my surrogate boyfriend, the warm, throbbing generator, and swilled back two cool cans of
Black Ice, getting right into Porksword
with the help of the cloud of gas surrounding me. I select another full Pilsner
Hi-Can and go back into the tent.
Porksword are beginning to sound more
Killdozer inspired and I'm getting into
it even harder. I'm so full of courage I
go right into the mosh and smother
some confused arena rocker into submission. I slept alone.
Saturday, Aug. 14 7:30 pm
This is smack-dab in the middle ofthe
festival and that makes it the most
populated chunk, I'd imagine. The field
looks fairly sparse however, and the
looming debt sinks into the atmosfear.
I wish I could go off on some diatribe
about how I did coke with Mark Arm,
talked about politics with Bad Religion (cancelled) and hell, even twisted
oneupwithTommyChong(whothreat-
ened to steal all the Marshal's if he
did't get paid), but I'm just not that
cool and I guess that's reflected in the
people that eventually DO condescend
to talk to me:
Skater guy from Victoria: WeU, I
just don't know how to pick up chicks.
Me: Maybe you're just always going
after the wrong ones. What about all
those like, Sassy-type girts with the
bobbed hair and the baggy...
Skater: I TRIED those girls but they
just look at me like "what the fuck do
you wantT
Mf.Doyouknowevenwhatyouwant?
Skater: I just want to eat your pussy, I
just want to lick your clit.
Me: uhhh ,well, aaaaahk...
Skater: Would that turn you on if I
licked your clit?
Me: Well,mmmm... yeah, I guess so...
My Friend: Aw, he's for sure on a
Skater: No, I'm just being honest I
guess I'm not supposed to go and say
shit out loud like that, I guess you don't
like it Why don't you want me to eat
you out?
Me: Uh, I just don't get really turned
on by people...that I don't know, I
mean right now you're so easy...
Skater: O.K., O.K. yeah, I get it I just
really want to get laid...
Me: Hey, that giri over there, she
smiled at me but I bet she wants you.
Skater: Ah, hey I could score...aw I'm
not even that stoked, look she's goin
over to some stupid guy.
Me: You're right, she is.
Skater: They always go over to some
stupid guy.
Me: Bye!
The day rolled on. I saw nothing
in the program that would entice me
from just wandering around.
Of course, I found out around 5
pm that The Evaporators played at 2
pm. Why, why, WHY, do I manage to
catch all rucking FOUR ofthe Ripcordz
and Random Killing preformances, but
fail to see one of the six bands that I
could possibly get excited over out of
the 10,000-or-so bands I care nothing
The Muffs were the last band I
saw before I got dragged back home
and, thankfully, they were good.
So make your own ending up,
slag me for not being thorough, or just
weep yourself gently to sleep gently
while listening to your old Joy Division records: I'II most likely hang around
waiting for The Next Big Thing to
come along.
SEPTEMBER  Q Earlier this year I had the pristine
opportunity to witness the pride
of Alabama, Man Or Astro
Man?. Besides their astounding
live shows of instro-surf, several
televisions and shlocky stage
props, Man Or Astro Man? are
also dedicated to keeping their
fans' dental care in the upright
position. Aside from selling t-
shirts and records, they have their
very own patented "Teeth Paste"
so you can "put your Man Or
Astro Man where your mouth is."
Hey, I've been using it for three
months now; it's great stuff.
And now kids, you can have
special musical accompaniment
when teeth brushing, for
Nanaimo's Lance Rock Records
have just released a Man Or Ast ro
Man? EP entitled Supersonic Tooth -
brush Hel-
sort of way, OK? Oh, and for a
painful seven minutes, try reading the highly disturbing liner
notes on the inside sleeve. (One
Day I Stopped Breathing Records,
5321 7th Ave., NE, Seattle, WA,
98105, USA).
And from New York, the
Shrieking Violet* who are a
fun-filled, all-chick band who's
four-song EP starts out slightly
arty and then gets it all a really
rockin'. Shrieking Violets are like
the Muffs meets Jonie Mitchell
with strong "don't gimme no shit"
Big Apple vocals: tough stuff with
fun energy, especially on "Bad
Chinese Food". (Broken Rekkids,
P.O. Box 460402, SF.CA, 94146,
USA).
The only Canadian
gent  thi
tbe pop variety. The simple difference? A couple of good, catchy
tunes. It's a nice surprise, since
it's pretty rare for me to like anything out of the AmRep stable.
(Amphetamine Reptile Records,
2645 First Ave., S, Minneapolis,
MN, 55408, USA).
And for all the closet witches out
there, Sheffield, England's The
Mourning After have cackle-
out a spell-bindin' blast of '60's
garage-rauncb in the organ
drenched variety similar to like
minded Canadians like the
Haunted or the Worst. Although
completely retro, this stuff rocks
damn hard and manages to grow
on me (like a fungus) with each
play. Greg Garlic would love this!
(Merry Go-Round Records, Flat
One, 347 Queenstown Road, London, SW8 4LH England).
And for those of you who
like what I hate, go snag tbe
Don Caballero single
on Touch and Go.
InstruMENTAL noise-
dirge that bores me to
death. (Touch And Go,
P.O. Box 25520, Chicago,
IL, 60625, USA).
there tell me tbe name of
New York's kings of slop-
rock 'n' roll? If you
screamed "The A-
Bones" you are a thou-
sandpercentcee-rectum! ,
This time out the dukes of
draft-on-tap have done a
Northwest tribute single
for Estrus, poundin' out Paul Re-
) and the Raiders' "Louie Go
Home," and the Sonics' "Maintaining My Cool." "Louie" is
probably the most psychedelic
stuff you'll ever hear from these
ball bashers. As well, it's great
that "Maintaining" has finally
been given justice, as opposed to
the glaring anomaly that the
Marshmallow Overcoat
spewed out years ago on the
Sonics' tribute album. The
dead-on cover art take-off of
the Raiders' Here They
Come! album is hilarious as
well. Great record. (Estrus,
Box 2125, Bellingham, WA,
98227-2125, USA).
Anybody remember last
months rave review of local
metallists Thorsen and their
take on Viking Metal? Well,
here, folks, is the real thing...
direct from Boras, Sweden
comes S.L.R., a really dumb
metal combo. Harald, Lars, Peder,
sure. With the slowed down
"Skeletor" vocals and the major
metal finger fluttering, these
rock'n'roll warriors are a match
made by the gods for a split si ngle
with Thorsen. (Backadalsgatan
9A, 50254 Boras, Sweden).
and Micke trumpet some mighty
ungodly rock here, that's for damn
Please, Lord, help me wade
through these difficult listens!
Her Fault: "Scar" b/w
"Fourteen Days"... deranged melodic hardcore, sliding downhill
into a psychedelic snooze-a-tbon.
tiling about it is the paper
bag, d.i.y. cover. (Buckshot
Records, 16136 Tukwilla Rd.,
Poulabo, WA, 98370, USA).
On a more posit ve chord, all
the way from Orlando, FL. comes
Red Bug, who's songs rollick
and roll with southern delight.
The a-side's "Blue Light Special"
is a country bop tune, soundin'
much like Seattle's Picketts or
Van's own Hard Rock Miners.
Whereas the b-side's "Downtown" depicts more of an R.E.M./
Y.F.F. jangle pop barrage. A nice
departure from all the gloomy
grunge I gotta listen to. (Canned
Corn Records, P.O. Box 2946,
Orlando, FLA, 32802-2946,
USA).
And finally, yet another
black vinyl slab from the "Gentlemen Of Rock And Roll"
Thee Headcoats. This single, entitled "We Hate The
Fuckin' NME," is in reference
to an article that appeared in
Britain's New Music Express
which "awarded" Thee
Headcoats with the title of
"Wannabe Inflammatory But
Can't Quite Pull It Off Pathetic
Pop Persona Of Idiot '60's Revivalists." Whew, quite a
mouthful! Class-A punk Billy
Childish leads his Headcoats
on a counter-attack with a
poundin' two chord emotional
slam-fest, spitting on the UK
rag. Over on the b-side, the men
pull an about-face to let drummer Bruce Brand take over to
do his best Peter Sellers impression (circa tbe BBC's Goonies)
while singing the Beatles'
"Help!": totally pathetic and
totally brilliant. The most impressive thing about this single
must be the back cover's liner
notes, where it lists all of Thee
Headcoats' record labels: 17(!)
different labels in total, spanning eight different countries
world-wide! And if that ain't
worth some positive press and
respect in their own country, I
fail to know what is! (Damaged
Goods, P.O. Box 671, London,
E17 6NF, England).
round-house
right to the
pearly
,  Ala-
tmm
bama style.
And as
is with all
Astro gear,
the four songs are interspersed
with humorous b-movie samples,
all laced up in a brilliant colourful
package. So for a more peppy,
brighter (and younger) version of
some of the more familiar Canadian instro bands, catch a breaker
southbound to the anti-cavity,
floss-beat of Man Or Astro Man?
Oh, and be sure to seek out the LP
on Estrus. (Lance Rock Records,
1223 College Dr., Nanaimo, BC,
V9R 5Z5).
Just in town recently were Sunny
Day Real Estate who play that
stuff like Sparkmarker which I
have so much trouble describing.
I could use several easy cop-out
descriptions like"hardcore," or
maybe "straight-edge," or I could
throw some "angst" in there... hell,
why not "Fugazi"? Actually, nah,
I'll skip em this time. How bout I
just say that I liked it in a vague
28 0E3^g^£»i_p3
lows ofthe Mariti
rock and roll
though the "fuzzed out" vocal effect backfires, making the vocals
sound more muffled than the intentional distortion. All-in-all,
they are catchy and hep, they've
even got the screamin' KurtBloch
guitar licks down pat! (Cinnamon
Toast Records, 2464 Robie St.,
Halifax, NS, B3K4N1).
Old Man are a group from
Seattle who play mediocre pop of
the punk variety and have failed
to impress me too much on this
debut outing on Top Drawer
Records. They've got the potential, so maybe next time. (Top
Drawer, 4219 5th Ave., NE, Seattle, WA, 98105, USA).
On the opposite face of the
same card, the geographically
anonymous Vertigo slide to new
heights with some now punk of Pond
Eric's Trip
Six Finger Satellite
The Town Pump
Thursday July 29
I despise keeping people in suspense,
so as backwards as it may be, I'll
give you my conclusion now: GOOD
SHOW!
I missed Six Finger Satellite (I
know, bad reviewer, bad!) but I
managed to catch some tasty morsels about them from the crowd.
Apparently the band felt up members of the audience as well as each
other. The drummer power-puked.
The music was called "artsy", "layered" and "White trash, cowboy-
assed, wierdo shit."
As Eric's Trip launched into
their set, I walked into the Pump.
The air was charged with a voluminous powerbuzz Uke the hum of a
transformer station. This tension
periodically warped itself into a
squeal of feedback and discordant
guitar. Despite this intense undercurrent, the feel was very dreamlike.
This atmosphere was enhanced by
the stage lighting, just two yellow
lightbulbs on the floor. Simple, but a
nice change from the usual gaudy
overhead multiple coloured lights.
The whole deal was nicely offset by
bassist Julie Doirnon's wait-like
voice, which matches well with Rick
White's tremoring vocals.
I was reluctantly jolted out of
this trance-like state by the energetic power-pop-punk presence of
Portland's Pond. Guitarist-vocalist
Charlie looked almost impossibly
joyful as he bounced around the
stage, reminding me of a Dr. Seuss
character, while bassist/voice guy
Chris, energetically wielding his
bass, nearly took off my nose.
Although I was personally
more into Eric's Trips' trip, I was
quite impressed with the passion,
enthusiasm, and tuneful talents of
Pond. And since this was the last
show on the tour, we were treated to
a bit of on stage anarchy, as they
chucked around their guitars and
mangled the drum kit. Then again,
maybe they just didn't want to do an
Jules D.
The Town Pump
Saturday July 29th
It was a dull so
filled me as I entered the Town Pump,
unexplainably nervous, I sipped on
a Long Island double. I was more
than early and therefore nabbed a
table on the raised seating area right
next to the speaker (my ears regretted this choice for days). Pure's
guitarist Todd Simko was hustling
about and putting the finishing
touches on the lights.
About two hours later Moist
wandered confidently on the stage
and I let out a low sigh, thinking that
it would be yet another hour until
things would start to get interesting.
Singer David Usher's emotional
vocals...magical. Moist is definitely
a performance-oriented band, and
they enraptured the young audience.
As they neared their inevitable end I
was left wondering, what could possibly top this?
By the time Pure strolled on
stage, the audience was boiling. Lead
singer Jordy Birch's stage style has
changed considerably over the past
couple of months, before me now
stood a more determined, aggressive performer. Yet strangely, he
failed to hold my attention, almost
fading into the background. He remained, for the most part, focused
on the back of the wall, ignoring the
crowd behind him.
Two burly bouncers andatech-
guy were draggi ng people out of the
audience and pushing them across
the stage. Simko and bassist Dave
Hadley (who, incidentally, sported
the coolest pair of long-johns),
seemed incredibly cramped, as they
did their trademark tandem bouncing.
For the most part Pure gave
the crowd a tightly knit, high-energy
performance. The high point of the
evening came at the very end with a
coverversionof Kiss' "RockV Roll
All Night." Unfortunately they
fucked it up, someone stopped playing and it all just ended abrupty.
However, the audience couldn't care
less as they were too fully entangled
in the Pure experience.
Kelowna Vincent
Bad Brains
Didjits
Trigger Happy
Shades of Culture
The Town Pump
Sunday, August 1st
"Black men shouldn't play that kind
of music"- one Vancouver restaurant employee's response to a description of Bad Brains.
When I first heard this bone-
gender or culture; for example, Bad
Brains plays an incredibly powerful
mix of reggae and punk while their
lyrics reflect their religious inspiration. That there aren't many other
all-black bands playing this type of
music does not mean that the band is
trying to fit into a genre that is not
their own...rants over, now on with
the review.
The Town Pump got rocked
August 1 st harder than I' ve ever seen
it get rocked before. Being the unreliable degenerate that I am, I missed
the first two bands so you' 11 just ha ve
to let your imagination go. But those
Didjits... Was it me or was the lead
singeratongue-flicking moron whose
annoying stage antics nullified his
headed remark I was really pissed
off, and then it got me thinkin'. I
started thinkin' about popular conceptions of punk rock and "black
music" and how Bad Brains subverts and confuses all these "popular conceptions." Musicians
shouldn't be relegated to a certain
type of music strictly based on their
ftancid photo by Trish Kely
bands' potential? Besides having a
wanker for a lead singer, the Didjits
suffered as any mediocre-to-good
band would from having to open for
those Washington D.C. kings of in-
your-face punk-reggae-rock Bad
Brains who were mesmerizing.
This was just one of those
shows you had to see to understand.
Vinyl, cassette, CD and written attempts to recreate the Uve energy
that is Bad Brains have all failed.
The new lead vocalist belted out old
songs and soon-to-be-released
tracks. He dispelled those nasty rumours what that he is not as good as
H.R.. In fact, the crowd took instantly to worshipping him.
A good thrashy pit brewed up,
but again, it'd be nice to see more
women bouncing around and stage
diving. (I' mone to talk, I stood in the
shadows in awe.) The cherry on top
of this decadent Sunday evening was
the story of the new lead vocalist
taking pity on my ticketless friend
and walking him in, saying as they
passed a beefy doorman: "He's with
me." Lovely man. Lovely show.
Kirsty
Didjits
Muffs
Sinister Six
The Off Ramp, Seattle
Tuesday, August 3rd
I love the Muffs. So they didn't play
in Vancouver? But they did play in
Seattle with the Didjits AND Sinis-
terSix! Bullocks toall those chumps
who had to pay a Bad Brains-Bad-
Dreadlocked-type ticket price to see
the Didjits! Get this, I got to go to
Seattle, "hang," see three rockin'
bands, and it was all for free!
Tlie Sinister Six played a
slightly uninspired set of
(dreadlocked!?!) garage mania,
reminiscent of Girl Trouble and the
Supersuckers, but with the charisma
of neither.
Tlie Muffs came on! Wliooaa,
I'ma lucky guy! Two sassy, rockin'
chicks and two semi-rockin' guys
(what tlie hell happened to original
Muffs' drummer Criss Crass, by the
way?) who tore up the stage with all
the amazing pop gems leader Kim
Shattuck has penned so ruggedly
into hits. Oooo... this band is good.
Her raucous screams got a Uttle bit
on my nerves, but I guess I can live
willi that.
After a couple more
margaritas and lager, I witnessed the
Didjits: one guy (Rick, lead singer,
guitarist, song writer, brain) totally
into it, and two bangers on bass and
drums along for the ride. Or at least
tliat was my perception of the sight
before mine eyes. They rocked hard,
you know, punk, but it was a Muffs
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Red Sugar
Compression 1010
Saturday, August 7th
It was late, almost 3AM, at the after
hours joint and Red Sugar (the third of
three bands) still appeared oo the stage.
I was hanging by the door, kind of
bored and depressed, too tired to real) y
make a decision, which was the only
reason why I hadn' t already gone home
and gone to sleep. The ongoing conversation was about how ROCK
MUSIC wasn't so much dead in the
1990's as just not fresh anymore.
Suddenly, there's apoct on stage
making weird birdcall sounds that
to do with mating rituals and male
sexual energy, I believe). He's getting
louder and more aggressive every second, and Red Sugar are filing on stage
behind him, plugging their guitars in
and malting free-form noise, rising in
intensity as the poet climaxes and finally stumbles off the front ofthe stage
into the sparse front-room crowd. Red
Sugar meanwhile have taken this as
their cue and kick into a BIG psychedelic wall of melodic noise that's
riding asolid groove and dropping just
enough folky twang to remind us what
This goes on for a long, long
time before the noise subsides a bit and
there's room for a few vocals, big
serious words about God and the human soul and other vital concerns.
Needless to say, I'm well into A.
The song keeps chugging along,
repetitive, loud and true, and suddenly
I remember a friend last seen chilling
out in another part of the party. I go
looking for him. He doesn't want to
leave his comfortable seat, but I even-
tuallyconvincehimthattheRedSugar
experience is not to be missed; we
head back to the main room where the
first song is still happening, just in time
for the last chorus and final climactic
blow out The small crowd is apprecia-
ti ve. They make a lot of noise.
The second song is a cover:
Roger Millar's "King of the Road"
(ya, that one - the hobo anthem). Red
Sugar do it raw, good-natured justice.
I am very impressed and by this point
energized enough to realize how tired
I really am, so as they start their third
song, I finally split the party. Rock
may not be fresh anymore, but it certainly is not dead. It's not even sleeping. Red Sugar are very cool, maybe
even godlike. I suspect I will see them
again soon.
Swervedriver
Rock City
Nottingham, England
Saturday, August 7
A dnimmer makes all the difference,
and I'm not saying that just because I
live with one. If anyone remembers
the faroe that was Swervedriver's premiere Vancouver performance (openers Poster Children stole the stage and
the crowd's respect from under their
upturned noses), they'll know that the
band that stumbled its way through an
incomprehensible set that night was an
incomplete and uninspired melee of
musicians and technicians (the sound
e ngineer). Fortunately, tonight the band
was in its homeland and therefore had
the same time. Swervedriver played
host on the bottom floor and a packed
crowd of, oh, let's say, 200-300 people. Thxat figure is kind of disheartening consideri ng Heine ken draught was
flowing freely for 1 pound. Even more
troubling was the fact that a larger
portion of people showed up afler the
performance to dance to the likes of
Nirvana, Smashing Pumpkins, Sonic
Youth and other North American
"coalige roack" sensations.
What did these people miss?
TheymissedSwervedriverintopform.
The majority of the band's material for
the evening was from their forthcoming record (the "Duel" single is out as
you read this), complemented by old
faves Uke "Rave Down." Sadly, some
of their best songs ("Son of Mustang
Ford," "Pileup," "Never Lose That
Feeling Again" and "Sandblasted")
were never even hinted at Although
Swervedriver can be a powerful and
original Uve act, it takes more than
hints from their Uve performance to
clue us into the genius that they can
conjure in the studio.
Paul t Brooks
Punkfest 93
The Forge
Portland, Or
Saturday August 7/8
We left for Portland all fuzzyheaded in
the early morning, sipping black coffee, while rushing down the 1-5. The
Forge is in an abandoned, dilapidated
industrial sideof Portland. Westoodin
this snakey, slow line-up as each person was frisked and wristbanded before being released into the concert
shack. Just before I got too bored, we
hear some yelling and the crowd of
punkish kids that had previously been
hanging out rushed the gates, demanding to be let in. The bouncers
didn't take too kindly to this display,
and a loud, somewhat violent ruckus
The punks claimed to be squatters from Hollywood who travelled to
Portland in a porcelain white pickup
with Jiffy markings. They also claimed
to have no money for tickets. They had
great dyed hair, tattoos, piercings,
leather jackets.boots and beer in seeming abundance, so they felt that the
gate should just admit them for free.
Come on kids! What did you expect?
That 24 bands would play for
FREE????(although,itwould'vebeen
After more pushing and yelling,
we found ourselves (squatters included) inside the show and catching
the last few songs of MDC. The show
atmosphere was a spectacle: punks
enjoying the continuous circular slam
pit, complete with fearless stage diving. Some guy jumped from the speaker
stack, but when the crowd shifted, he
hit the concrete floor.
Thebands we DID see included:
Butt Trumpet (my favourite);
Guttermouth, and a bunch of funny
skater guys hurting beersinto the audience (their bassist eventually puked
onstage and just walked off in the
middle of a number). The White Trash
Debutantes dragged guys onstage to
dance in their underwear or less, cul-
minati ng in one of the recruits taking a
leak on the other guys and al] over the
stage. The Dayglo Abortions got a
huge response. DI and reunited oldies
Channel 3 completed the show, which
the cops shut down at midnight.
We missed the second day with
DOA and others, but according to
reUable sources that did make it there
(they could make it anywhere! -ed)
informed us that the promoter's girlfriend tried to rip off all of the proceeds
collected from ticketAeer sales. Apparently those big bouncers were all
over her and later (under police supervision) destroyed the promoter's
Caddy as retaliation far the attempted
ripoff that could have left both bouncers and bands unpaid Whew!!
Guinness Gurt
NFA Yaletown Blockbuster
Rancid
BNU
cub
Rotorcloud
Strain
1000 -Block Hamilton St
Sunday August 8
The folks at NFA rule in the books of
many who buy big clothes and don't
care if they ever grow into 'em. They
just might rule in mine as well. Ofthe
five assembled bands, I couldn't find
one band that didn't qualify as great at
what they da
The afternoon outdoor concert/
skate jam got off to a loud start with
local hardcore boys Strain. Both the
openness and reverb (courtesy of the
soundman and nearby buildings)
complimented singer Jody Taylor's
booming voice and proved that Strain's
sound is well suited to such outdoor
venues. The band was tight and Jody is
slowly overcoming his shyness with
the crowd as he actually managed to
tell us the names of the songs for once.
Rotorcloud representing the
"modern rock" genre, were pretty
poppy but not overly so. They were
almost as apologetic for their inability
to skate as cub, the next band on the
bill were.
Cub's performance gave way to
some obvious tension on stage and a
noticeable increase in tempo, which
seemed to confuse cub's drummer.
I'm not sure if they wanted to finish
their set quickly or if they felt that the
music should match the speed of the
skaters who continued to "jam" on the
street below, but what we heard was
speed cuddle cere. Nevertheless, cub
was an appropriate rep for Vancouver
giri bands (you decide if that's good or
bad).
BNU, the best suburban punk
band in town, followed with a set of
catchy tunes that were very pleasing to
Ihe ear. The guitarist's facial expressions were almost as amusing as the
gyratin' singer who, in his great wisdom, convinced every meathead to
put down his board (but not his beer!)
and slam into other meatheads. BNU's
singer had created a moshing monster
and by the time Berkley' s Rancid took
the stage, stupidity had pretty well
taken over.
Rancid's bassist made his fingers fly at lightning speed and left me
contemplating exactly how many incarnations it will take me to reach that
level of skill. These boys definitely
have the punk rock thing down pat,
I went away from this show
satisfied and thankful to the NFAers
for a day which cost me nothing and
gave me so much.
Trish Kelly UNDER REVIEW
DUB SYNDICATE
Live at the T&C
(On-U Sound)
BURNING SPEAR
The World Should Know
(Heatbeat)
Two of the best reggae bands
have just provided listeners with
new releases: a live album from
a band that rarely performs live,
and a studio disc by one that
tours relentlessly. Give praise!
Recorded Uve at the Town
and Country Club in London,
Dub Syndicate prove that they
are every bit as good on stage as
they are in the studio. This 1991
incarnation of the On-U house
band consists of Roots Radics
drummer Style Scott,
percussionist Talvin Singh,
Junior Moses on bass, Carl
Gentles on keyboards and
guitarists Renford Bailey and
Skip MacDonald, formerly of
Tackhead.
Reggae crooner Bim
Sherman lays down some soulful
vocals. He is joined by the vocal
trio Akabu and Lee Perry, who's
voice is mixed into a version of
Secret Laboratory Dub even
though he wasn't at the gig.
Credit must also be given to
Adrian Sherwood who's mixing
and dubbings help make Live at
the T <_ C a most enjoyable
recording.
On Burning Spear's latest,
The World Should Know,
Winston Rodney sings "music is
what I have, music is what I
...the me
ic,  the i
ssage l
i  the
message," and this pretty well
sums up the Burning Spear creed.
Since 1969 Burning Spear
has been spreading the word,
refining the riddums and
entertaining reggae fans from the
stage. Check out the Live In Paris
recording and/or video if you
have yet to catch them in the
flesh. While not all that much is
different from the last couple of
releases, The World Should
Know is a fair offering from
Winston and the Burning Band.
It is a good place to start if you
are unfamiliar with the band and
their music.
Both Dub Syndicate and
Burning Spear represent the best
in today's roots reggae music.
Put a Uttle sunshine into your
mind and move to the grooves
Norm van Rassel
MOIST
Motet
(Independent)
I was first introduced to the
sounds of Moist in a backward
manner. A member ofthe band
accompained by a MOIST
sticker. A congenial guy, he
couldn't resist the opportunity to
self-promote.  I Ustened half-
Yes, Moist is heavily
influenced by Peart Jam, The
Red Hot Chili Peppers and
several other bands that are just
dangling on the edge of my
tongue. Memories flow freely
when the guitar, or keyboards
hit a seris of familiar notes but
this is all part of the music's
enchanment.
Lead singer David Usher's
voice is the strong point here,
full of such energy and honest,
driving emotion that just pulls
you right in and wraps you up. In
particular, the keyboards make
the most difference on this tape,
adding the necessary spice in the
otherwise guitar oriented music.
Favorite tracks of mine include
the harsh and sensual "Push,"
the emotional "Believe Me,"
"Kid Conductor" and "Picture
Elvis."
It's unfortunate that Moist
is not released on CD, for then it
would be far less timeconsuming
to repeat a song over and over
and over again.
Kelowna Vincent
SUPERCONDUCTOR
Hit Songe For Girle (11
Exitosas Para Las Chicaa
Lietae)
(Boner)
It's a common case, although
eccentric practise, foran artist to
be condemned by fans and critics .
when said artist decides to leave
theirpredicted work and broaden
their bounds. The unfortunate
and familiar consequence is that
the artist leaves fans unhappy,
critics basking in their own
malicious      rhetoric      and,
their talents
strictly   for  the
good ofthe people
icho
intently and was convinced to
catch the band the next day at the
Pit Pub at UBC. I was more
impressed with the physical
attributions that the band
posessed rather than their
musical ones. As a friend stated:
"That boy was born with the
looks to lead a band."
Indeed, Moist is comprised
of five very handsome young
men, so I watched and admired
then left and forgot. It wasn't
until five months later, when they
were a last minute addition as an
opening band at the Town Pump,
that I actually began to pay
dinero),  OR the
artist desists from
being a reservoir
of creativity.
The latter being
case, however, as
most soldier on
with their loyal fan
base and continue
on in high spirits,
now a shallow
mockery of
themselves (pick any band from
the 70's or, Heaven forbid, the
60's which are still around - the
Rolling Stones will do). The
artist displays a misinterpreted
sense of achievement and an
uncanny will (pick any band from
the 70's or 60's which is stiU
around - the Rolling Stones will
suffice again).
Take,  for instance,  Van
Halen.
No-
otherr
:. Iv,
impressed that the very next day
Idug deeply fortheirdebut disc,
but managed only a cassette and
have been happily entertained
i Halen is an
ing example for a couple
reasons: Van Halen chose to step
outside their musical confines
not once, but twice (as stated
above, most learn the first time).
Their first backward
advance came with the release
of the Diver Down album:
seemingly superscribed by the
band's lead vocalist, David Lee
Roth (we'U get to him later),
Diver Down misrepresented Van
Halen as a group when, in fact,
the album was actually born of
Roth's wet dreams. Featuring
very few origi nal tunes, and even
more Jazz/Motown/Country
covers like "Big Bad Bill (is
Sweet William Now)" (with
Edward and Alex's dad guesting
on clarinet), "Dancing in the
Streets" and "Happy Trails," Van
Halen left a lot of fans scratching
their heads — but happy that
there was still
Judas Priest's
British Steel to
Usten to.
Jimmy Webb bridge on "E-Z
Bake Oven."But you didn't need
me to tell you that.
Paul t. Brooks
NOMEANSNO
Why Do They Call Me Mr.
Happy?
(Alternative Tentacles)
Norn
fanat
trill
undoubtedly find Why Do They
Call Me Mr. Happy ? as satisfying
as any oftheir efforts, but for me
Nomeansno peaked on Wrong
wisdom, then V<
Halen
omniscient: the
1984 LP was
released and, yes,
it had keyboards.
This time the final
product was a
bastard child oft he
band's two heavyweight egos:
David Lee Roth
and Edward Van
Halen.
Edward had come into his
own as a guitar deity, but he was
looking to expand on his
virtuosity (finding that
expansion in keyboards, his first
attempt spawned a number one
hit: "Jump.") and David... well,
David was just David (we'll get
to him later). Misconstruing that
number one hit as a green light
for further keyboard
compositions, enter 5150, exit
David Lee Roth, and enter
Sammy Hagar.
Now this brings us to an
even more interesting offshoot
in the compromise/desist
creativity theory. Whereas most
bands would have interpreted the
waning success of Diver Down
and 1984, in comparison to the
high watermark standards of
their first three LPs as signalling
an imminent break-up album,
Van Halen chose to shuffle their
Une-up.
The flamboyant and
audacious David Lee Roth
was served the pink slip to
further pursue his
meanderings in Beach
Boys' covers, Hair Club for
Men recruitment and larger-
than-Ufe libido exorcisms,
while Sammy "I Can't
Drive 55" Hagar took up
the vocal chores for Van
Halen and their staunch (but
dwindUng) fans.
The music world was
n subject to not only
but t
iclui
i that
were wrong with the initial
equation  -  nobody  ever
liked Sammy, and they soon
learned to hate David.
But what does all this have
to do with Superconductor's Hit
Songs For Girls you ask?
Absolutely nothing, except for
the fact that Superconductor has
probably made the best pop
album of the year, including a
great Poppy Family-cum-
Smashing     Pumpkins-cum-
and have not attained that level
of energy since then.
Like any Nomeansno
album, there are moments on Mr.
Happy which demonstrates the
band's ability to provide
incredibly tight energetic bursts.
But these moments are buried by
overindulgent 'musicianship'
which is found on ofthe rest of
the record.
Tom Milne
MATTHEW SWEET
Altered Beast
(Zoo)
Despite what the record
company's ad for this album
would have you believe, Altered
Beast is more than a "dinosaur
act" collection of the talents of
an "all-star cast" of guitar pop's
past masters. No indeed, it is
First and foremost, Altered
Beast is a collection of truly fine
pop songs. Period. Sure, thegreat
guest musicians don't hurt -
check out Robert Quine's
wailing, tear-jerking guitar solo
in "Devil with the Green Eye"—
but they're essentially just icing
on the cake.
And what a cake it is:
ingenius and deceptively simple
pop hooks that reach out and
grab you and won't let you go;
angry power chords and
scorching death blues bravado;
sweet, subtle melodies that all
but drive you to tears;
arrangements that are layered
without being busy; and lyrics
that brim with emotional
intensity.
Matthew Sweet achieves
sentiment without syrup, angst
without whininess, anger without
machismo, and melancholy
without mercy. Hell, it's so good
that I got a freebee and then
bought it anyway!
The god of pop lives,
BELIEVE!!!!
John Ounpuu
PENNYWISE
Unknown Road
(Epitaph)
Clean chords, thick energy,
powerful vocals, this second
offering from Pennywise (from
Hermosa Beach, CA — the same
town as punk legends Black Flag
and the Descendants) keeps the
sound sharp, quick and loud.
Throughout Unknown
Road, Penny wise urge us to "start
giving your best" and remind us
that "it's your life.". Don't get
me wrong, their heart is in the
right place, but after fourteen
tracks,this urging becomes, well
how you say... nagging. Good
message, and lots of it.
Individually, tracks like
"Homesick," "Clear Your Mind"
and "Dying to Know" reveal
what Pennywise is all about:
fresh, driving rock.
It's worth noting that these
up and coming no-school punk
rockers have already had their
music featured in various surf/
skate/snowboard videos (not to
mention an ad in the latest
Transworld)!
Penny wise are off to a good
start. However, it remains to be
seeniftheirtight, squeaky-clean
sound comes off in a live
performance. Stay tuned.
Skyler
TRANCE MISSION
Trance Mission
(City of Tribes)
from San Francisco." I
have no idea if the four
members of this group
are from Oz, but it sure
sounds as though
someone was foolish
enough to lug a couple
of Korgs to Ayer's Rock.
Trance Mission play a
lot     of     traditional
a didgeridoo — that
thing that makes that
spring-like sound. They
even use instruments
I've never heard of such as
riqqigub-gubbi, kaytals, p'iri,
khaen, kalimba, and a bodhran.
Sounds like they come from the
Klingon dictionary, don't they?
Now, is it good? That's
beyond me.
Maybe if I lived in the
outback and took inducive trips
to the dreamland and played
W.C. Bull Roaper I'd understand
SEPTEMBER   © it.   Right  now,   though,   its
comparable to stuff you might
find on the Extreme label. That's
as close as I'm gonna get.
Trip
FUGAZI
In on the kill taker
(Dischord)
The name Fugazi is synonymous
to uncompromising hardcore
punk rock. After all these years,
and numerous indie-label
albums, In on the Kill Taker
continues to thrill me. It's no
surprise that Fugazi's influence
is prevalent in newer bands such
as Quicksand and Paw.
After listening to the 12
heavy and intense songs on this
album, I felt a bit psychologically
disturbed, which is an indication
of a well made album.
All the elements that make
up Fugazi are present: loud and
sick-sounding guitars, angry
vocals, and a tight rhythm
section. Togetherthey sound Uke
melodious cacophony.
I strongly recommend this
Vince
U.R.G.E. OVERKILL
Saturation
(Geffen)
In a vastly improved world,
U.R.G.E. Overkill would be
bigger than both REM. and U2.
The carefree, coffee-and-pie vibe
exuded by this Chicago trio
would be the teen spirit of the
day. No need for any band's
harsh social and poUtical tirades,
no calls to save the rain forests -
only cool nffs and more martinis:
Alas, Saturation is
probably not destined to sell
several million copies, but it is
U.R.G.E.'s best record to date.
Unlike the loungy and uneven
Stull E. P., Saturation reUes more
on the band's
considerable pop
prowess.
Add an obvious, yet
flawless, tastein seventies
rock (I hear vintage KISS,
Cheap Trick, Bowie and
more!) and some punk
chops, and the result is an
album that rocks
loud'n'proud.
Here's to hopin' the
boys can afford premium
vodka in those martinis
Sean Harvey
THE DOUGHBOYS
Crush
(A&M)
Stealing melodies from songs
heard on mid-eighties LG 73 isn' t
usually a good way to begin an
album. The Doughboys do this
on Crush, but that's not to say
they're a top 40 band. With their
generally rock-radio tunes, t hese
guys could make it big in Canada
Unfortunately, the album
features many songs that are
relatively indistinguishable from
one another (yes, even after only
one listening). It' s listenable, but
I can't say that it's worth buying
except maybe for the cover art
work, which could easily entice
unsuspecting shoppers.
Sometimes sounding Uke
Drivin' And Cryin' or Soul
Asylum (whose current album I
would give the same criticisms),
the Doughboys could stand some
wrwTr aMpMiW
kneading. This aside, the songs
"End of the Hall" and "Shine"
are kinda catchy, but after
hearing a few ofthe songs, the
rest ofthe songs sound identical.
It may very well be that this
is the kind of CD that grows on
you after about 5 or more
playings, but for now I' U have to
keep it in the back of my mind
and hopefully go back to Crush
at some later date.
Brian Wieser
DAVID  SYLVAIN  and
ROBERT FRIPP
The Firet Day
(Virgin)
Imagine yourself lying in a boat,
drifting down a river on a
summer's day. They sky is blue,
there's a gentle breeze, and 77ie
First Day would be quietly
playing as accompaniment.
I've puttered around
cleaning my apartment to
this, as well as having a
nice doze on the couch.
If you're familiar with
either Japan or David
Sylvain's solo work, you
know not to expect
anything jarring; Sylvain
warbles in his
unmistakeable voice in a
most relaxing fashion.
Robert Fripp, a guitarist
that has worked with Brian
Eno, doesn't intrude into
the mix, even though he
does do some wanking.
"20th Century Dreaming"
(a shaman's song) and
"Darshan" (the road to
graceland) take up one entire
side; the songs could certainly
use some trimming, however, the
album is lush aural experience.
June Scudeler
FUNLAND
Sweetneee
(Arista)
Funland is pop music with heavy
guitars and drippy melodies that
would normally strike one as
extremely cheezy (especially
considering the Air Supply
cover) but Sweetness is, instead,
profoundly satisfying.
From start to finish,
Funland provide one ofthe most
solid pop-rock efforts that I have
heard in years.
Tom Milne
Paul Westerberg
14 Songs
(Sire)
WeU, here's the Paul album... all
we need to do is wait a couple of
weeks for the Slim Dunlap CD
to come out and all of us
Replacements freaks will be able
to rate each ofthe band members'
solo efforts against one another.
So far, Chris Mars rocks.
Tommy Stinson's Bash & Pop
is, well, whatever; now it' s Paul' s
turn at the plate. Technically,
most would call this his second
solo CD, counting All Shook
Always considered a more
literate songwriter than the
'Mats' style would let on, Paul
plays it to the hilt on 14 Songs.
These songs, while pretty good
(better than I could write), are
just a litde too self-indulgent for
my liking, as is both the fake
Westerberg novel on the cover
and the numerous photos of
himself inside.
Not to say 74 Song* is crap,
though; I mean, it's no Sting
album or anything. "Knockin'
on Mine," "First Glimmer" and
other songs do demonstrate that
Westerberg can write enjoyable
songs— "Black Eyed Susan,"
the best track, was done in his
kitchen lo-fi and Paul's vocals
are terrific. However, there is no
evidence ofthe fun and rawness
that the Replacements once had.
This album provides
support for the theory that Capt.
Kirk, Spock and McCoy were
three facets of a single being;
it's obvious that if the best parts
of Mars', Stinson's and
Westerberg's (and possibly
Dunlap's?) albums were
combined, we would have one
hell of a record.
Mofo
SIX FINGER SATELLITE
The Pigeon is the Moet
Popular Bird
(Sub Pop)
Six Finger Satellite's new release
sounds neat, and I don't quite
know howwhat to say or how to
describe it.
From the catchy neo-disco/
noise of Laughing Larry, to the
odd soundscapes between each
of the songs, Jeremiah Ryan's
often distorted, always
aggressive vocals caught my
attention as one ofthe Satellite's
strongest points. Also, I felt that
ten actual songs of the 21 tracks
were well suited by having
eleven surrounding tracks of
noise to make for a fairly strong
CD. Most of it sounds Uke music
on an elevator to hell - but I
mean that in a good way.
Brian Wieser
MOFO'S PSYCHOSONIC PIX
Hey there, U'l campers! You know,
there is a difference between Us-
tening to these goofy little platters
I mention and devoting an entire
night of your Ufe to dancing to
them. I saw an enormous line of
people outside of the Commodore
on 'Disco Nite' the other nite and
just shook my head in pity. It seems
there is an ever growing number of
people who lack a life inthis 'burg.
Now, fine, ifyou get a charge
out of putting on one of the rare
grooves hke "Get the Funk Outa
My Face" (Bros. Johnson) or "Boogie Fever" (Sylvers) for a gag (I
know I do), but to shake your sorry
ass for a whole evening of some of
the most heinous tunage in record-
32 E_f^«G£n_I_7-3
ed history just to either get pissed
cheaply or make a pathetic attempt to
get laid, puts you amongst the culturally challenged — hke the peoph
who watch Studs or who are mem
bers of the Reform Party.
Sorry to bring it up, but I don'
want you to get the idea that I, Mofo,
would condone that sort of life-style
(the music, not the drinking and getting laid parts) just because I inform
you of the few good (or the craziest)
disco plates there are! As I've said
before. I can't beheve that there are
so many jokers out there listening to
music their parents liked.
You've probably heard about
the developing crusade against used
CD shops in the U.S. Now, I'm all for
forcing shop owners to pay royalties to a group that can get the
moolah to the performers, but hearing Garth Brooks (who's sold more
records than Canada has Uving humans) pout 'n' whine about losing
money somehow doesn't get my
sympathy.
Anyway, on to the auditory
poison I call the Psych opsonic Psix-
pak!! I've added a genre description as well to help you peg the
record's style. Lemme
know what you think
This past month I got a
lotta seven inchers this
time from the fine shops
on Hastings St., like:
SONNY
"Laugh   At   Me"/
"Tony"
(Atco)
Wow! A very bitter
$onny starts off by dedicating the song to his
critics andtoCher, singing the equivalent of
"I'mrubber and you're
glue, etc." The music is
total Neil Diamond "I
Am, I Said"- type, big drum stuff.
The record was so overplayed it
had this very eerie distortion quality to it. Quite unsettUng stuff.
GENRE: Celebrity schmaltz
CHEEZABILITY RATING: 89
AL GILBERT
"Grade 7 Honky Tonk Tap" /
"Grade 3 Song & Tap"
(Training Aid)
Tap trauma courtesy Al et al. You
have no idea how awful these 45's
truly are until you hear 'em. Al
i overtop a piano
that's extremely out of tune, and the
tapper is completely off time. If all
tap records are Uke this, no wonder
it's a dead art.
GENRE: Educational jollies
CHEEZABILITY RATING: 86
SANDPIPERS (featuring the
Mitch Miller Orchestra)
Farmyard Friends
(Golden)
MITCHELL AYERS
"Number 7 Theme"
(No. 7)
I found two copies of this seven inch
at the same store! One fo the songs
main attraction is that Bill Baker &
company put it on their "50 Cent
Record Hour" compilation! Other
letters I've gotten from the lower
mainland mentioned it, too. It's as if
it was only distributed around Vancouver. Could this have been an
experiment in subUminal suggestion? I dunno, but after listening to
this, I sure could use a smoke.
GENRE: Promotional
CHEEZABILITY RATING: 80
BANJO BARONS
Happy Days Are Here Again!
(Vocalion LP)
I'm a sucker for a good banjo orchestra! There are about a dozen of
'em here doing all the usual banjo
stuff with a ragtime lean. What more
can I say?
***3 COMPLBTr.
This seven inch comes with a cool
oversize sleeve that some indie band-
should make for their releases. It
really sticks out. Farmyard Friends
is actually a compilation 45's of three
previously released singles: "Little
Pig Polka," "ittle White Duck" and
"The Animals of Farmer Jones." And
you thought only indie labels did
this! Groovy story/songs about barnyard fun.
GENRE: Children's tales
CHEEZABILITY RATING: 90
THE PICK O' THE MONTH
THE GOLDEN HEIR SINGERS
Talkin' About Love
(Master)
This LP comes from Master, the
folks that brought you the Tex
Yearout—the record I mentioned
early this year. Yup, more Jesus
stuff. The Golden Heirs come from
ChilUwack, and are about the squares! cats you've ever seen! This album is full of all the uncomfortable
sexual allusions all these fervent
Christian discs seem to have, as
well as the shifting of responsibility
from oneself to God for one's actions. It's also kinda weird to hear a
preppy trio sing about "flesh hanging off Job" in a peppy way. Best 75
cents I spent this month!!!
GENRE: 12 Inches of Jesus
CHEEZABILITY: 95
_"**       ing out. By the way,
keep sending me those
tapes' n' stuff; I'm hoping to do a Psampler of
reader's pix by December (knock wood!).
Until then, you'll have
to be satisfied with one
of my first two Psam-
plers. Just drop me a
Une (and $5/tape), a
stamp or two and your
address.
Hey Mofo!
2054 E. Broadway
Vancouver, BC, V5N
1W7 PHONE
291-0049
VOLUNTEERS
NEEDED
Are you an outgoing, spontaneous
man or woman over the age of 19
with a never-say-die attitude and a
good sense of humour?
We are a non-profit society that
helps young offenders and children
aged 8 to 12 who are at risk of getting
into trouble.
If you have about three hours per
week available for at least the next
six months we'd really like to hear
from you. We believe that one-to-one
interaction with a well-adjusted adult
can improve the behaviour of a
troubled child.
Interested? Please call us today.
HELP US
SPREAD IT
AROUND...
...if you'd like to have Discorder
dropped off at your place of business,
call Linda at (604) 822-3017. ilfdfe
Ik    l,     ! a-jA
CiTR
ONCE AGAIN HOSTS THE ULTIMATE
BAND COMPETITION!
at the RAILWAY CLUB starting September 14th,
its thirteen . •'    DAYS of the of musical
competition, the
mi; ofthe of musical
of fabulous prizes, and the
of jokes-for-beer
SEPT. 14
STRAIN
SPIRITUAL HEROINE
RIPPLE
SEPT.21
ASHES
HUGO
WRETCHED ETHYL
SEPT. 28
YOU COULD
BE HERE!!!
WE'RE STILL ACCEPTING TAPES. IF YOU WANT TO BE A PART OF
THE CRAZY ©lM<%'93 FAMILY, GET YOUR TAPE IN NOW!
K.6N6GAM ffUoW QZ.OUP |~
-"-^'    4^ \__i._____*J *F& RECORDING
^mmw
@t*S
I recording!
.. 1 WID CiTR Hot Wednesdays at the Pit Pub... The Pursuit of Happiness
at PNE Exhibition Bowl... Zolty Cracker at the Railway... Voivod with Damn
the Machine at the Town Pump... Original Sinners at the Yale... George
Barrett at Graceland... Ron Johnston Trio at Alma Street Cafe... The
American Friend (7pm) and Wings ol Desire (9:30pm) at the Ridge...
Lumiere & Melies (7:30pm) and First Films (9:35pm) at Pacific
Cinematheque...
2 THU CiTR presents Lucinda Williams with Herald Nix al the Town
Pump... Colour Wheel at the Railway... Sub-Sonic Thursdays at the Pit Pub
featuring Acoustically Inclined and Happy Man... Andre Thibeault & Adel
Awad at Cathedral Place... Psychedelphia at Graceland... The Wailin'
Walker Blues Band at the Yale... Ron Johnston al Alma Street Cafe... The
Fall at Ihe Backstage (Seattle)... Thomas Anfield & Melo Edindjiklian's
exhibition Different Roots opens at Soul Art Gallery (until the 26th)... The
American Friend (7pm) and Wings of Desire (9:30pm) at the Ridge... Bad
Thing (7:30pm) at Pacific Cinematheque...
3 FRI CiTR presents Friends of Clayoquot Sound benefit featuring DOA
with Mystery Machine and Gerry Hannah Band at the Commodore Ballroom... Vancouver Rape Relief Benefit featuring Rumplesteelskin,
Rootabeggars, Dropdolls, Dempsy Stone at Station Street Arts Centre...
The Blue Shadows at the Railway... The Wailin' Walker Blues Band at the
Yale... David Hawkes at Graceland... Bumbershoot at Seattle Centre
(Seattle)... Three of Hearts (7:30pm) and Sliver (9:35pm) at Ihe Ridge...
The Mystery of Picasso (7:30pm) and Le Fantastique (9:20pm) at Pacific
Cinematheque...
4 SAT CiTR presents Soul by the Sea: gospel music from 50-voice
Washington choir at the Kitsilano Showboat (5pm)... Vancouver Rape
Relief Benefit featuring Thistle, Elvis Love Child, DJ Liebowitz, She, Bunk
at Station Street Arts Centre... The Blue Shadows at the Railway... DJ Noah
at Graceland... Neil Young with Booker T & the MGs, Pearl Jam and Blind
Melon at BC Place... The Wailin' Walker Blues Band at the Yale... Dwight
Yoakam with Carlene Carter at Pacific Coliseum... Trooper at the Commodore Ballroom... Bumbershoot at Seattle Centre (Seattle)... Three of Hearts
(7:30pm) and Sliver (9:35pm) at the Ridge... The Mystery of Picasso
(7:30pm) and Rare Cocteau (9:20pm) at Pacific Cinematheque... Anvil
Press 3-Day Novel Contest at SFU Harbour Centre...
5 SUN Bumbershoot at Seattle Centre (Seattle)... Three of Hearts (7:30pm)
and Sliver (9:35pm) at the Ridge... Paris I (7:30pm) and Paris II (9:10pm)
at Pacific Cinematheque... Anvil Press 3-Day Novel Contest at SFU Harbour Centre...
6 MON Oliver & the Elements at the Yale... April Wine with Harem Scarem
at the Vogue... Da Flava at Graceland... El Mariachi (7:30pm) and Bad
Lieutenant (9:15pm) at the Ridge... Paris I (7:30pm) and Paris II (9:10pm)
at Pacific Cinematheque... The Art of Dempsey Bob, Myth Maker and
Transformer exhibition and Robert Bateman's exhibition Natural Visions
closes at UBC Museum of Anthropology... Anvil Press 3-Day Novel Contest at SFU Harbour Centre...
7 TUI Roots Roundup on UBC SUB Plaza (noon)... Cruel 70s Disco at the
Commodore Ballroom... Acoustically Inclined at the Railway... Noise Bar
at Graceland... Ellen Mcllwaineat the Yale... El Mariachi (7:30pm) and Bad
Lieutenant (9:15pm) at the Ridge...
8 WED CiTR Hot Wednesdays at the Pit Pub... CiTR presents Lonesome
Canadians, Sick Sick Yeah, Sister Lovers at the Town Pump... Acoustically
Inclined at the Railway... Otherparts at the Glass Slipper... Zolty Cracker
on UBC SUB Plaza (noon)... UB40 with Gin Blossoms at the Orpheum...
Ellen Mcllwaine at the Yale... George Barrett at Graceland... Volere Volare
(7:30pm) and Johnny Stecchino (9:25pm) at the Ridge... First Films
(7:30pm) and Farrebique (9:30pm) at Pacific Cinematheque...
• THU Sub-Sonic Thursdays at the Pit Pub featuring Rumplesteelskin...
cub on UBC SUB Plaza (noon)... Bob's Your Uncle at the Railway... Ellen
Mcllwaine at the Yale... Ron Samworth Trio at Cathedral Place... The
Cranberries with Counting Crows at the Town Pump... Psychedelphia al
Graceland... The Amazing El Grande de Coca-Cola at Vancouver East
Cultural Centre... Fringe Festival '93... Volere Volare (7:30pm) and Johnny
Stecchino (9:25pm) at the Ridge... Perestroyka (7:30pm) at Pacific
Cinematheque...
I O FRI 10th Annual AMS Welcome Back BBQ at Maclnnes Field featuring
Acoustically Inclined, John Bottomley, Jr. Gone Wild and more... Tankhog
with Apartment 3-G and Fiddlehead at Station Street Arts Centre... Hard-
ons al the Town Pump... Bob's Your Uncle at the Railway... Ellen Mcllwaine
at the Yale... Ziggy Marley & the Melody Makers at the Commodore
Ballroom... David Hawkes at Graceland... Moody Blues with Vancouver
Symphony Orchestra at Deer Lake Park... The Amazing El Grande de Coca-
Cola at Vancouver East Cultural Centre... Fringe Festival '93... Chinese
Film Festival: Heartstrings (7:30pm) and Spring Festival (9:30pm) at the
Ridge... 3 By Resnais (7:30pm) and 3 by Franju (9:05pm) at Pacific
Cinematheque...
1 1 SAT The Loved One with Tickle Trunk at Station Street Arts Centre...
Bolivia Schools Project Benefit featuring Kin Lalat at the WISE Club...
Bob's Your Uncle at the Railway... Ellen Mcllwaine at the Yale... Anthrax
with White Zombie and Quicksand at PNE Aquastage... Ziggy Marley & Ihe
Melody Makers at Ihe Commodore Ballroom... DJ Noah at Graceland... The
Amazing El Grande de Coca-Cola at Vancouver East Cullural Centre...
Fringe Festival '93... Chinese Film Festival: Bell of Purity Temple (7:30pm)
and Heartstrings (9:30pm) at the Ridge.. 3 By Resnais (7:30pm) and 3 by
Franju (9:05pm) at Pacific Cinematheque...
I 2 SUN CiTR presents Perfume Tree at Graceland... Cameron Wilson,
Reg Quiring and Janet Steinberg at UBC Recital Hall... Babalunde Glatunji
and the Drums of Passion at Vancouver East Cultural Centre... The Odds
at the Backstage Lounge (Arts Club)... Fringe Festival '93... Chinese Film
Festival: Spring Festival (7:30pm) and No Regrets about Youth (9:30pm)
al the Ridge... War / La Guerre (7:30pm) and Far from Vietnam (9:25pm)
at Pacific Cinematheque... Vancouver Record Collectors Association's
Record/CD Swap Meet at Kitsilano Community Centre... The Life and
Works of Charles Rennie Mackintosh lecture by M. Joan Martin, Dip. Dec.
Arts at UBC Museum of Anthropology...
1 3 MON Oliver & the Elements at the Yale... Da Flava al Graceland...
Random Acts & Christine Taylor at Vancouver East Cultural Centre...
Fringe Festival '93... Chinese Film Festival: Those Left Behind (7:30pm)
and Bell of Purity Temple (9:30pm) at the Ridge... Poetry in Motion
(7:30pm) and Far from Vietnam (9:15pm) at Pacific Cinematheque...
14 TUE CiTR Shindig '93 opens at the Railway featuring Strain, Spiritual
Heroine and Zero Lama... The Margo Tufo Band at the Yale... Noise Bar at
Graceland... Random Acts & Christine Taylor at Vancouver East Cultural
Centre... Cruel 70s Disco at the Commodore Ballroom... Fringe Festival
'93... Chinese Film Festival: No Regrets about Youth (7:30pm) and Those
Left Behind (9:30pm) at the Ridge...
1 5 WED CiTR Hot Wednesdays at the Pit Pub... Wyckham Porteus at the
Railway... George Barrett at Graceland... The Margo Tufo Band at the
Yale... Strange Angels at Vancouver East Cultural Centre... Fringe Festival
'93... Chinese Film Festival: Bell of Purity Temple (7:30pm) and No
Regrets about Youth (9:30pm) and the Ridge... Allonsanfan (7:30pm) at
Pacific Cinematheque...
1 6 THU Sub-Sonic Thursdays at the Pit Pub featuring Moist and Colour
Wheel... Wyckham Porteus at the Railway... The Margo Tufo Band at the
Yale... Psychedelphia at Graceland... Clay and Cloth: Celebrations of Life
and Death in Borneo featuring Randy Raine-Reusch at UBC Museum of
Anthropology... The Amazing El Grande de Coca-Cola at Vancouver East
Cultural Centre... Fringe Festival '93... Chinese Film Festival: Spring
Festival (7:30pm) and Heartstrings (9:30pm) at the Ridge... Spellbound
(7:30pm) at Pacific Cinematheque...
1 7 FRI Babkas at the Glass Slipper... Linda McRae & Friends at the
Railway... Gnu Democratic Rhino Reform Party election benefit at Station
Street Arts Centre... The Margo Tufo Band at the Yale... David Hawkes al
Graceland... The Amazing El Grande de Coca-Cola at Vancouver East
Cultural Centre... Johnny Winter with Wailin' Walker Band at the Commodore Ballroom... Fringe Festival '93... The Last Days of Chez Nous (7:30pm)
and My Brilliant Career (9:30pm) at the Ridge... Me and My Brother
(7:30pm) and Pull My Daisy (9:20pm) at Pacific Cinematheque...
1 8 SAT CiTR presents Juliana Hatfield Three with Madder Rose at the
Town Pump... Linda McRae & Friends at the Railway... Van Manakas Trio
at the Glass Slipper... Gnu Democratic Rhino Reform Party election benefit
at Station Street Arts Centre... The Margo Tufo Band at the Yale... DJ Noah
at Graceland... The Amazing El Grande de Coca-Cola at Vancouver East
Cultural Centre... Fringe Festival '93... Tbe Last Days of Chez Nous
(7:30pm) and My Brilliant Career (9:30pm) at the Ridge... Keep Busy and
other shorts (7:30pm) and Hunter & Last Supper (9:20pm) at Pacific
Cinematheque...
19 SUN Planned Parenthood Benefit featuring Joelle Rabu at Vancouver
East Cultural Centre... Barney Bental & the Legendary Hearts at the
Backstage Lounge (Arts Club)... Fringe Festival '93... The Last Days of
Chez Nous (7:30pm) and My Brilliant Career (9:30pm) at the Ridge...
People of France (7:30pm) and But What Do These Women Want? (9:15pm)
at Pacific Cinematheque... Forbidden Fruit exhibition at UBC Museum of
Anthropology... 13th Annual Terry Fox Run...
20 MON Reading Railroad at the Railway... Oliver & the Elements al the
Yale... Da Flava at Graceland... Beyond the Fringe al Vancouver East
Cultural Centre... Withnail & I (7:30pm) and Peter's Friends (9:30pm) al
the Ridge... People of France (7:30pm) and The Yellow Cruise (9:15pm) at
Pacific Cinematheque...
21 TUE CiTR Shindig '93 at the Railway featuring Ashes, Hugo and
Wretched Ethyl... Eddie Kirkland at the Yale... Noise Bar at Graceland...
Beyond the Fringe at Vancouver East Cullural Centre... Cruel 70s Disco at
the Commodore Ballroom... Withnail & I (7:30pm) and Peter's Friends
(9:30pm) at the Ridge...
22 WED CiTR Hot Wednesdays at the Pit Pub... Pig Farm at the Railway...
Eddie Kirkland at the Yale... George Barrel! at Graceland... Beyond the
Fringe at Vancouver East Cultural Centre... Susan Liebik exhibition opens
at Vancouver East Cultural Centre (until Oct. 19)... Utz (7:30pm) and Close
to Eden (9:30pm) at the Ridge... 1860 (7:15 & 9:15pm) at Pacific
Cinematheque...
23 THU Sub-Sonic Thursdays at the Pit Pub featuring Pigfarm and Dear
God... Terror of Tiny Town at the Railway... Eddie Kirkland at Ihe Yale...
Psychedelphia at Graceland... Urbana at UBC Museum of Anthropology...
Beyond the Fringe at Vancouver East Cultural Centre... Utz (7:30pm) and
Close lo Eden (9:30pm) at the Ridge... Women Do This Everyday (7:30pm)
at PacificCinematheque...
24 FRI Superconductor with Thorsen at Station Street Arts Centre...
Eugene Ripper at the Railway... Garnet Rogers at the WISE Hall... Eddie
Kirkland at the Yale... Paul Plimley solo piano at the Glass Slipper... David
Hawkes at Graceland... Rose Chronicles at Zulu Records (4pm)... Beyond
the Fringe at Vancouver East Cultural Centre... Sleepless in Seattle (7:30pm)
and When Harry Mel Sally (9:35pm) at the Ridge... Sans Soleil (7:30pm)
and Les AnnSes Declic (9:30pm) at Pacific Cinematheque... Vancouver
Rape Relief & Women's Shelter's annual Take Back Ihe Night march
(7:30pm, Vancouver Ar! Gallery)...
25 SAT SNFU with Atomic 61 at Station Street Arts Centre... Eugene
Ripper at the Railway... Coat Cooke Quintet at the Glass Slipper... Eddie
Kirkland at the Yale... Garnet Rogers at the WISE Hall... DJ Noah at
Graceland... Tab Benoit at the Backstage (Seattle)... Beyond the Fringe at
Vancouver East Cultural Centre... Sleepless in Seattle (7:30pm) and When
Harry Met Sally (9:35pm) at the Ridge... Sans Soleil (7:30pm) and Innovations and Image (9:30pm) at Pacific Cinematheque...
26 SUN CiTR presents Neurosis with 7 Year Bitch, Hitting Birth and God
& Texas at the Commodore Ballroom... CiTR presents Sloan at the New
York Theatre... Otlmar Liebert & Luna Negra at Ihe Vogue... Joe Lovano
Quartet at Arts Club Revue Theatre... Thomas Anfield & Melo Edindjiklian's
exhibition Different Roots closes at Soul Art Gallery... Sleepless in Seattle
(7:30pm) and When Harry Met Sally (9:35pm) at the Ridge... The Grin
Without a Cat (7:30pm) at Pacific Cinematheque... Brown Stonewares of
the Yixing Kilns - The Carol Potter Peckham Collection exhibition closes
at UBC Museum of Anthropology... 7th Annual Walk/Run for AIDS at
Ceperley Park...
27 MON Lonesome Canadians at the Railway... Tanahill Weavers at the
WISE Hall... Osee Anderson at the Yale... Da Flava at Graceland... Visions
of Light: The Art ot Cinematography (7:30pm) and Blade Runner: The
Director's Cut (9:20pm) at the Ridge... Innovations and Image (7:30pm)
and Les Annies Declin (9pm) at Pacific Cinematheque...
28 TUE CiTR Shindig '93 at the Railway... Cruel 70s Disco at the
Commodore Ballroom... Matthew Sweet at the Town Pump... Osee Anderson
at the Yale... Noise Bar at Graceland... Ballet British Columbia Gala al the
Orpheum... Visions of Light: The Art of Cinematography (7:30pm) and
Blade Runner: The Director's Cut (9:20pm) at the Ridge...
29 WED CiTR Hot Wednesdays at the Pit Pub... Supersuckers at the Town
Pump... Osee Anderson at the Yale... George Barrett at Graceland... The
Seventh Seal (7:30pm) and Smiles of a Summer Night (9:30pm) at the
Ridge... The Leopard (7:30pm) at Pacific Cinematheque...
30 THU Sub-Sonic Thursdays at the Pit Pub featuring Sweet Jones and
Twilight Rituals... Tex Tiles & the True Moral Fibres of the South at the
Railway... Jim Byrnes at the Yale... Heather Bishop at Vancouver East
Cultural Centre...Psychedelphiaat Graceland...The Seventh Seal (7:30pm)
and Smiles of a Summer Night (9:30pm) at the Ridge... A Fine Madness
(7:30pm) at Pacific Cinematheque...
1 FRI Victim's Family wilh Porch at Station Street Arts Centre... Michelle
Shocked at the Commodore Ballroom... Jim Byrnes at the Yale... Workshop
de Lyon at Vancouver East Cultural Centre... David Hawkes at Graceland...
2 SAT The Cocktails with Pitch Blend at Station Street Arts Centre... cub
with The Mommyheads, Kid Champion and Mark at the Anza Club... Jimmy
Cliff at the Commodore Ballroom... Before the Generation Loss: Video's
Earliest Years curated by Michael Goldberg at Video In...
5 TUE CiTR Shindig '93 at the Railway... Cruel 70s Disco at the Commodore Ballroom...
6 WED CiTR Hot Wednesdays at the Pit Pub...
7 THU Sub-Sonic Thursdays at the Pit Pub...
8 FRI Seam with Bullet Proof Nothing at Station Street Arts Centre...
SEPTEMBER  © SEPTEMBER 93 LONG VINYL 50
1 VARIOUS ARTISTS
WADE-FREE VANCOUVER
CLUB GROTESQUE
2 BUM
WANNA SMASH SENSATION
POPLLAMA
3 THE SMUGGLERS
IN THE HAU OF FAME
POPLLAMA
4 BJORK
DEBUT
ELEKTRA
5 HUEVOS RANCHEROS
ENDSVHIEI
C/Z
6 POLYGON WINDOW
SURFING ON THE SINE WAVES
WARP
7 TRANCE MISSION
TRANCE MISSION
CITY OF TRIBES
S CRACKERBASH
TIN TOY
EMPTY
S FLUF
MANGRAVY
HEADHUNTER
10 NOMEANSNO
WHY DO THEY CALL ME MR....?
ALTER TENT
11  LIZ PHAIR
EXILE IN GUYVILLE
MATADOR
12 C.E.B.
COUNTIN' ENDLESS BANK
RUFFHOUSE
13 MATTHEW SWEET
ALTERED BEAST
ZOO
14 BAILTER SPACE
ROBOT WORLD
MATADOR
15 UNWOUND
FAKE TRAIN
KILL ROCK STARS
16 BOSS HOG
GIRL POSITIVE                     AMPHETAMINE REPTILE
17   MECCA NORMAL
JARRED UP
K
18 PALACE BROTHERS
THERE IS NOONE WHAT WILL...
DRAG CITY
1ft SHOW BUSINESS GIANTS
MAYBE IT'S JUST ME
WRONG
20 PENNYWISE
UNKNOWN ROAD
EPnAPH
21 SILVER JEWS
THE AR-ONA RECORD
DRAG CITY
22 SMASHING PUMPKINS
SIAMESE DREAM
VIRGIN
23 TIGER TRAP
TIGER TRAP
K
24   URGE OVERKILL
SATURATION
GEFFEN
25 BAD RELIGION
RECIPE FOR HATE
EPITAPH
26 CHEMLAB
BURN OUT AT THE HYDROGEN-
FIFTH COLUMN
27 KICKING GIANT
HALO
SPARTA
26 THE CREAMERS
HURRY UP AWAIT
TRIPLEX
2S JUNGLE BROTHERS
J. BEEZ WIT THE REMEDY
WARNER
30 MOONSHAKE
EVA LUNA
MATADOR
31  ROYAL TRUX
CATS AND DOGS
DRAG CITY
32 PAIN TEENS
DESTROY ME LOVER
TPANCE
33 SWERVEDRIVER
NEVER LOSE THAT FEEUNG
CREATION
34 THE HAFLER TRIO
A THIRSTY FISH
KUT
35 ENGINE WD
ASTRONAUT
C/Z
36 VERVE
A STORM IN HEAVEN
VERNON YARD
37 ZIGGY MARLEY ANDTHE ...
JOY AND BLUES
VIRGIN
36 GREG GINN
GETTING EVEN
CRUZ
3ft CAUSTIC RESIN
BODY LOVE BODY HATE
C/Z
40 THE BATS
SILVERBEET
MAMMOTH
41 FUGAZI
IN ON THE KILL TAKER
TOUCH AND GO
42 PHLEG CAMP
YA RED FAIR SCRATCH
CARGO
43 BAND OF SUSANS
VEl
RESTLESS
44 DOGBOWL
PROJECT SUCCESSS
SHIMMY-DISC
45 REVOLVER
COLD WATER FLAT
CAROLINE
46 JOHNBOY
PtSTOLSWING
TRANCE
47 THE QUEERS
LOVE SONGS FOR THE RETARDED
LOOKOUT
46 SACRIFICE
APOCALYPSE INSIDE
METAL BLADE
4ft CATHARINE WHEEL
CHROME
MERCURY
50 SMOG
JULIUS CAESAR
DRAG CITY
SEPTEMBER 93 INDIE HOME JOBS
SEPTEMBER 93 SHORT VINYL 35
1   BRAND NEW UNIT
SUMMERTIME 7'
3 MIN MILE
2  STAND GT
TOASTING GEARS 7'
EN  GUARD
3  CLUTCH
PASSIVE RESTRAINTS
RELATIVITY
4  KAM
NEVAAGAINl?
EASTWEST
5  THE WOGGLES
THIRD RAIL 7'
LANCE
6  CUB
HOT DOG DAY T
MINT
7   LEATHER UPPERS
FOUR SONG 7'
FAMOUS
8   HARDSHIP POST
SUGARCANE 7'
MAG WHEEL
ft  GAME FACE
BEACH CHAIR 7'
NET WORK
10  THRUSH HERMIT
AMMO 7'
CINNAMON TOAST
11   LESGLUETONES
FOURTYFTVE
CINNAMON TOAST
12  THE WORST
TUNES FROM THE TOMB
SCREAMING APPLE
13  JOYRIDE
SHE'S A REBEL 7'
DOCTOR DREAM
14  THE KENT 3
1 AM THE KING 7'
GENERIC
15  APRIL MARCH
VOO DOO DOLL 7'
KOKOPOP
16  SILKWORM
VIOLET 7'
BLATANT
17   LEONARD CONAN
PUB SLOP 7'
CINNAMON TOAST
18  JUDGE NOTHING
FOUR SONG 7'
MUD
1ft  THE ROPERS
SUNBATHE 7'
SLUMBERLAND
20  NIMROD/ROUGHAGE
GETTING RAINED ON 7'
SCRATCH
21   HOLY ROLLERS
WATCHING THE GRASS GROW 7'            DISCHORD
22  THE HANSON BROTHERS
BRAD 7'
WRONG
23  ROCKET FROM THE CRYPT
PIGEON EATER 7'
MERGE
24  THE MOUNTAIN GOATS
CHILE DE ARBOl 7'
AJAX
25   BOTTOM FEEDERS
TONIGHT. GOLDEN CURLS 7
REKKIDS
26 JOYBANG
POUR EYES 7*
THIRD EYE
27   THE SPIT MUFFINS
KTT PICKLES 7'
DIAMANTE NEGRO
28  ST. JOHNNY
GO TO SLEEP 7'
AJAX
2S  GIRLS AGAINST BOYS
BULLETPROOF CUPD T
TOUCH AND GO
30  TRULY
LESLIE'S COUGHING UP BLOOD 7'         SUB POP
31   THIRTY OUGHT SIX
HUCK7'
CANDY-ASS
32  THE SUEDE CHAIN
MISSISSIPPI 7'
MUD
33  GALEN HEROD
MR. FROTIAN T
BOAT
34  BRIGHT BLACK
BRIGHT BLACK 7'
SOUTHERN
35  JEFFERIES ft KILROY
CROSSOVER 7'
AJAX
1 HORSEY
GO LIGHT
2 POOR OLD LU
BARTHOLOMEW HK5GINS
3 TIGER BEAT
ONE DOZEN HAPPY DAYS
4 THE MINSTRELS
JULIAS EYE'S
3 COAL
ACE OF SPADES
• SINUS ENVY
SHRIEKING VIOLETS
7 LOTUS EATERS
GOD
• CUSTERS LAST BANDSTAND
RETINAL AFTERIMAGE
• QUAHOGS
CHINA DOLL
10 TERROR T 4 THE BEAT ASSASSINATOR
TRUE  2 THA  GAME
11 REAL MACKENZIES
PLIERS
12 TOUCH AND GO'S
GOOD   MORNING   MIDNIGHT
13 STRAIN
CATARACT
14 ROTORCLOUD
LET   GO
13 TEN FEET TALL
ROUND    ONE
10 SURFDUSTERS
HEADLESS BATTALION
17 FIELD DAY
PET
10 ACOUSTICALLY INCLINED
50   BUCKS
1» BROCA'SAREA
HALF IN LOVE
20 HONEY
PILLOW KNIVES
21 VINAIGRETTES
I WAS SCARED
22 WINDWALKER
BLACKBIRD
23 REAL MACKENZIES
I    AM    A   SCOT
24 UNGRATEFUL LIVING
BORN TO BE DEFIED
25 SNOWDOGS
MISUNDERSTANDING
20 GENETIC CONTROL
LOVE RAT
27 MEET DABY
GO   GO   ROUND
20 ORBIT IN BLOOM
THROUGH    YOU
20 HAZARD
BORING DAY IN THE PARK
30 PRISONERS
SEXY.     HE     AIN'T
31 GRAIN
HARD  ENOUGH  TO   SAY
32 ONDINE
YESTERDAY
33 MANC OBSESSION
ANCIENT CELTIC DRINKING PARTY
34 BLAISE PASCAL
SPOTLIGHT  KIDD
33 INBREDS
FINAL WORDS
GREYHAIRS REMEMBER
DISCORDER CHARTS 10 YEARS AGO
1 BAUHAUS
BURNING   FROM   THE   INSIDE
2 KING SUNNY ADE
SYNCHRO-SYSTEM
3 ELVIS COSTELLO
PUNCH   THE   CLOCK
4 SURPLUS STOCK
DANCE    ERSATZ
5 MALCOLM MCCLAREN
DUCK    ROCK
6 VIOLENT FEMMES
VIOLENT   FEMMES
7 PETE SHELLY
XL1
8 AZTEC CAMERA
HIGH   LAND.   HARD   RAIN
ft TALKING HEADS
SPEAKING   IN    TONGUES
10 MOFUNGO
OUT   OF   LINE
36 E_£^°___^D_^ BUoy md Theknota Monk • nol only Ihe best
oflriendsbuttiebestmu>KWpai*wrs .Pianist/
composer and Jazz Giant, Monk joins lie 1967
ed ton ol An* s Jazz Messengers ind mage
takes place One ol tie most __sual recofrfng
dales in Jazz Nstory... listen and Gavin wit teD
you the whole story
SepL X ■ As usual hs ime ol year an
educational feature on tie Jazz Show: tus
tme, tie great alto taxophonitt JJian 'C_>
nonbal* Adderly narrates The History ol Jazz*
with musical examples (roni the music's bejjn-
nings to I960 (when tie album was taped).
Despite being 30 years rid this record st* has
greal and entertainment value.
Sept 27 - Earl *Bud* Powel was bom this
day 1924 and died in New York on J_y 31,
1966. .a sick and broken man at age 41. Powell
was to tie piano what Charlie Parker-id Dizzy
Giespie were to lie saxophone and tmnpel
Powel was tie most tragic figure ol tw Modem
Jazz (Bop) revolution ol Iw lories... but also
one of Iw most br***.. tonight we hear tut
m1951.
SUNDAYS
ARE YOU SERIOUS? MUSIC »:00AM-12:0OPM
Al ol Ime is measured by its art. Most broad-
music from around Iw worid. Ears open.
Hosled by Paul Steenhuisen and lan
Crutchley.
THE ROCKERS SHOW 12:15-3:00PM Reggae
ima al styles and fashion. George BarreL
Mike Cherry and Peter Williams alternate as
and African- American Gospel music. Your
rotating hosts are Vence Yeh and Dave
LangMe (every second week).
BLACK HUSK t:00-l:OOPM Everyting from
Iw African-American tradHon: Blues, Gospel, Jazz, So_, R&B, Funk, Hip Hop, and
current Dance Tracks. Moddy vinyl to shiny
CD's. Your host, Lachlan Murray.
GEETANJAU 9:00-10:00PM Geelanjali is a
one-hour radio show whkh features a wide
range of music from Ma This includes classic- music, boll Hindustani and Ornate,
popiiar musk from Indan movies from tw
1930-8 to tw 1990., Serri-dasscal musk
such as Ghazals and Bhajans, and also
Ouawwaks, Fok Songs, etc. Hosled by J.
Dhar, A. Patel and V. Ranjan.
RADIO FREE AMERICA 10:0OPM-12:00AM
Join host Dave Emory and colleague Nip
Tut* lor some extraor_naiy politic- research
guaranteed to make you tunk twice. Bring
your tape deck and two C-90s. Originally
broadcast on KFJC (Los Altos, California).
MONDAYS
THE MORNING SHOW 7:30.:15AM Wake 14)
will tie QTR Moming Show. Al tw news,
sports and weaiher you need to start your
day. Plus what's happening at UBC each day
will UBC Digest, a fealure interview and
more. Topped off wilt Iw BBC World Sec-
vke News at 8:00AM, live from London,
England.
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS 1:15-
11:00AM Your favourite brown-slers, James
and Peler, offer a savoury blend ol Iw familiar
and exofc in an excitingly luscious blend of
aural delights! Tune in and enjoy each weekly
brown plate spedal.
THE STUPID RADIO SHOW 11.-M AM-140 PM
Our noon feature is'Crucilbt in your ear*. Our
MEKANIKAL OBJEKT NOIZE 1:15-3:00PM
CiTR.onty al industrial /industrial/ambient
show will different features every week. Witt
your (* pals June and Ren. Rhys FUber hales
STRAIGHT OUTTA JALLUNDHAR 4:00-
5:00PM Let DJ's Jindwa and Btidwa immerse you in radioactive Bhungral "Chakkh
de phutay*. Usten to al our favorite Pirjtbi
lunes - remixes and originals. Brraaaah!
THE CiTR DMNER REPORT 5:00-5:30PM Al
Iw latest on campus: news, sports, an kv
depti interview, twatre or Bm review, edito-
host lan Gum.
THUNDERSTRUCK 5:304:00PM CiTR's weekly
wrap-up of everyting anyone needs lo know
about UBC. Thunderbird sports.
BOXER SHORT BOYZ 7:004:00PM Just a
couple of guys who ike lo walk around in Iheir
boxer shorts with twirbig fat guts hanging oul
Jerome Broadway and Garnet Timothy Harry
alternate weeks.
THEJAZZSHOWS:00PM-12:00AM Vancouver's
longest running prime erne jazz program.
Hosted by the ever-suave Gavin Walker. Features at 11.
Sept 6 - Tonight's fealure is a tribute to
Iw great pianist/composer Kenny Drew who
ded on Aug. 4 last at 64. Kenny played with
everyone (Charlie Parker, John Coltrane, etc.)
and was one of the foremost exponents of the
*Bud Powel School* ol playing. Kenny's das-
sk FJue Note album 'Undercurrent" with his
compositions and arrangements is our tribute
...Art
StptU-Tonfohtii
SCREAMING INCONSISTENCIES: With Kelowna
Vincent & Jennie: Wwt can I say? Jennie
Midni^it-1.30am. Kelowna. Case(1:30am-
3am). Mystical, magkal and it makes ya sleep.
TUESDAYS
MADONNA DEATHWATCH 1:00-11:00AM Bryce
and Scooter get tie U.R.G.E.!
HaEN- HUT 11:00AM-1:00PM This month we're
out in tw yard - for Helen's Picnicf Stories,
tunes, recipes and a checked tabledoti. Is it a
date?
BLOOOONTHESADOLE1:15-3:00PM Couitry
music to scrape tw cowsril off your boots to.
With yer host-poke Jeff Gray.
MEET KM BEAN 6:OO-7:0OPM Rap, hp hop.and
Super Dope Lyrics- so ly tiat youll do 3-5 just
for getting cai_ht listening to tia stuff. Requests are taken...if you can get through on tw
phone! Ida Bean's on Iw bp!
THE UNHEARD MUSK 7:OO-9:0OPM Meat tie
unherd where tie uteard and tw hordes ol
hardy herd are heard, courtesy of host and
demo dredor Dale Sawyer. Herd 141!
WOLF AT THE DOOR 9:00PM-12:00AM Alternating Tuesdays with Stamina Daddy. The latest in dance music and interesting drama every
second week. Will Lipus Yondeiboy.
STAMINA DADDY 9:00PM-12:00AM Bootsies on
tw sbmps and tw speaium is always warm
Wih your hosts: Bepi Crespan and Greg.
Alternating with Wolf at lie Door.
AURAL TENTACLES MDNITE UNTIL THE
MOON DROPS Ftn for tie whole lamily to
enjoy! Weird chunks ol news, odd pieces of
kiwage, Pierre and tw 2AM WWOD.
WEDNESDAYS
THE YACHT CLUB 11:30AM-1:1SPM A nautical
tour ol tw four comers of the musical worid.
Drop anchor. Hosled by Matt & DJ. Gav.
NOOLEY TUNES 1:15-3:0OPMSpiraingtw best
and wont of CiTH's playf st, only tw most
orignal requests wil be remotely considered.
Emphasis wil be on new material from a round
Iw world, regardless ol musical dassiicaion.
NORMAN- KITCHEN 3:0O-5:0OPM Today's Spedal: Peanut butter and Bacon sandwiches.
With your host, tw Reverend Norman.
ESOTERIK 5:3O-7:0OPM Esolerrorists Trip and
Gustav blend Etmo-industnal-gotielic musk
with bad philosophy. Generaknobilmaduig!
Zwecks dekonditionierung allerl Nehmnt
Aufstelungl
AND SOMETIMES WHY 7:0O4:00PM Megan
Mallett and Miko Hoffman play elevator music
tw way it should be.
OPEN COUNTRY JOY 12:004:00AM, 1STWED.
OF EVERY MONTH. Don't let tw ?#?%?•?
TALES FROM THE INFINITE LIVINGROOM
12:00-?:0OAM, 2ND, 3RD, 4TH WED. OF
EVERY MONTH. Join Chris Pariah as he
guides you Ihrough Iw scapes and dream
images of tw Infinite Livingroom, tw only
place where tw utterly absurd meets tie pro-
foundtyr
THURSDAYS
SHOUR-ONAVA 7:304:00AM Shour-o-nava are
names of two main modes of Iranian music.
This show is dedicated to Iranian musk ranging from Iradttonal, folk, ethnic, mystic, old
and contemporary pop. Musk of various parol Iran ie. Azerbaijani, Kurdsh, Lori, etc. are
covered. We really like lo hear from all ol our
Isteners to be able to gear tie show towards
MID-MORNING COCTAILS 10:00-11:30 AM Let
the dulcet tones ol Tania and her aifierior
mak-tastes ease you into yet another day of
SUN
FLEX YOUR HEAD 3:00.:OOPM
— HARD ERIC-
•—ERIC CORE-
GET IN THE RING S:3OO:00PM Join Mike ar
OUT FOR KICKS 6:00-7:30PM No Biikenstodts,
notingpoftkaly coned We donlgelpaidso
you're damn right we have fin with il Hosted
by Chris B.
EDSVILLE, POP.6 7:3O-9:0OPM Roots of Rock
W Rol - If you don't get into Rock „ Rol
Heaven donl blame me! Hosted by Edde J.
UVE FROM THUNDERBIRD RADIO HELL 1:00-
11:00PM Local muzaakc Irom 9. Uve baru
play lha Hues Item 10.
Sept I -Big Tai Garden
Sept II - Seamen
Sept 23 - Tickle trunk
RADIO T.Y. 11:0OPM-1:00AM Alternating Thursdays with Gigablast. Wittmeyer and Nero!
SUMMER OF HATE 1:00AM*h.n.ver we drop
Thrilling car chases, heart-slopping light
serquences, dashing young men in bghl fitting
pants. Yes we do our own stunts. Special
thanks lo Sam OBEN, Caffeine Charle, Zev
Asher, the pest control guy, James last, Jus-
bn Siiivan and Mrs Mills for al pitching rt
twir damdest to make tw show a cuddy bal
ol fun with a sfo^ily prickly exterior. Chunks.
FRIDAYS
VENUS FLYTRAP _ LOVE DEN t:15-10:00AM
Greg is your giide on your journey to Venus
Flytrap's world reknown love den. Getting
there is half the kn Remember to pack a
lunch, some candes and maybe a wire brush.
Al aboard! Love and hugs, Greg xoxx.
I BEE NORMAL 1040-11:00AM Pioneers of Rado Sound advocating tie mentally^hyskaJry
challenged community wth conscious tunes
Wid painfully honest hilarity 'ouch*. Skeene's
the music, Conway's tw voice. The whole is
THE PEAKING CANUCK 1100AM1:00PM If
you are suffering an identity crisis you may
want tot one into lis show more than once.
Your host Bob WiKston chrorides Canada to
20th Century sound.
LO-F11:00_:30PM jobs suck! rory does tw right
THE
SATURDAY
>:n H
AFRICAN
SHOW
HEIMLICH
MANOUVRE
ting and goes back to schodwhie velvet and
rowena enjoy twir sabbatical... but where's
ardie?
NARDWUAR THE HUMAN SERVIETTE PRESENTS... l:3O400PMWtile light!
THE CiTR DMNER REPORT 5:0O-5:20PM With
"The Voice ol Reason." our weekly look back
at the week in tie news, tongues firmly ri
cheek.
ITS NOT EASY BEING GREEN 5:30 - 1:00PM
Kelowna babbles mosty about 'taking pix.*,
leadng men and twir hair and anything else
lhat may come to mkid on a Friday afternoon.
(Yeah, right Cati- Dave)  Guests ...usually.
COCKTAILS WITH DARYL AND SUSI 0:00-
1:00PM Undergrouid souid system-style
mas-mix rado.
FOR THE RECORD 1:300:45PM Excerpts from
Dave Emory's Radio Free America Series.
HOMEBASS 9:0OPM-12:3OAM Dope jams and
fresh beats for a groovy evening with DJ
Noah on he wheels of steel.
UMP SINK 12:30AM-Moming   Anotwr year
passes, limp Sink is two. Join al of your Limp
Sink pals as ihey share their social problems
with you. Hosled by Ihe G42 players.
Fri Pip*-
Join the Rre Pipe right into Ihe pyre. This month
features tw last live Rre Pipe ever found in
North America. Tune in SepL 24 to find out
what ■David* Fritter and Postnan Tar, your
radio friends, wi be 141 to next month.
Tha Doctor Ki/ldare Show-
Ingerdents: 1 Pinch of Honesty
2 Cups ol Willingness
1 Lifetime of Values
Sir constantly over Med/Low heat until reduced to
a shiny texture ol peacekil bliss.
SepL 3 - The Doctor KJIdare Show
Sept 10 - Ump Sink 1103, The Death of
tw Rre Pipe
Sept 17 - The Doctor Kildare Show
Sept 24 - Limp Sink 2nd Anniversary
Spedal
SATURDAYS
THE SATURDAY EDGE l:00AM-12:00PM Now
in its 8th year on the air, The Edge on Fo*
features musk you won't hear anywhere else:
new releases in tw realm ol Celtic, Fdk and
Roots; stodo guests, British comedy sketches;
and Briish soccer results at 11:30 AM. 6-9
9-12 noon: Cellk
and Metal Ron do the damage.
THE AFRICAN SHOW 3:00.:00PM Il's a music
ting Irom al "Africa.* It's an awareness ting
ofself andothers. Ifs an African house party.
Stories, musk, dance lun. Welcome! Your
hosts: Umerah and Mawele.
THE SATURDAY MAGAZNE   6:00 .:30PM
UBC's weekend news. Al the latest news,
kukmanPDS.
THE HEIMUCHMANOUVREI:00-10:00PM Sophisticated rado for tw alter drrwr crowd.
GROOVE JUMPING 10:0OPM-1:00AM Terry
and John? Justin and Tom? Choose your
hunks!
SOMETHING 1:004:00AM A cute little blurb
with a aiiwersive undertone and a sli^it connotation that tie host gets some kind of joke
that you donl
WHOM   &   HOW
ARTS JOHN SEMINOFF
BOARD CHAIR HARRY HERTSCHEG
CURRENT AFFAIRS ANGUS WILSON
DEMOS/CASSETTES DALE SAWYER
ENGINEER RICHARD ANDERSON
ENTERTAINMENT CHRIS   CHEN
LIBRARIAN VINCE      YEH
MOBILE SOUND DRU   PAVLOV
MUSIC JUSTIN LEIGH
PRESIDENT DRU PAVLOV
PRODUCTION HELEN G.
ADAM SLOAN
SPORTS BRIAN WEISER
STATION MANAGER  LINDA SCHOLTEN
VICE PRESIDENT JEREMY PRICE
VOLUNTEER COONDMATOR JON RUSKM
HE 604/822-3017
UNE 604/822-2487 (UBC-CiTR)
W8  UNE      604/822-5334  (822 JEDI)
XUNE 604/822-9364
VOY ID CITRJ-M
SEPTEMBER Q)   1869 W 4th Ave..
Vancouver, BC
V6J1M4
CANADA
tel 604.738.3232
STORE HOURS
Mon to Wed 10:30-7:00
Thurs and Fri 10:30-9:00
Sat 9:30-6:30
Sun 12:00-6:00
THE NEWEST - THE COOLEST - THE ZULUEST
Tar
• Toast
Pulverising riffs, churning bass
and a stop start precision that
envelops you, picks you up and
then slams you down, only to do
it all over again and again and
again. It feels soooooo good!
lhat's Tar's Toast.
IMPORT (available mid sept)
14.98cd/9.98cass
Yo La Tengo
• Shaker
Hoboken New Jersey's finest. A
critics band, so sign up now. A
simple, three-song sample of what
good songwriting and a pure heart
IMPORT
7.98cdep
Jesus Lizard
• Lash
A long-time favorite, the Lizard
lash out with this new El'. Using a
studio/stage combo release, it's a
tease of sorts, but these guys are
psycho-freaks and this record will
do some serious damage.
IMPORT (available mid sept)
7.98cd/5.98cass
9.98 triple vinyl 7" gatefold
Superconductor
• Hit Songs for Girls
1 first heard it on a beach, then in
a fast car, then my best friend told
me about it. Now I wanna tell you
about it, 'cos 1 know it's what you
need, what we all need. A sunny
ray on a bad day, and then some.
Hey, these are hit songs for
everyone.
1498cd/8.98cass
Unrest
® Perfect Teeth
For all you Crest kids, worried
about the decay of pop culture.
Washington DCs Unrest provides
an easy smile with another
sample of deftly-crafted songwriting and worry-free jangles.
Come  to  Zulu  for  a  check-up!
IMPORT
12.98cd/8.98cass
Pennywise
• Unknown Road
Another in the long line of punk
rock smash releases on Epitaph
Records, Unknown Road picks up
where Pennywise left off with
their previous self-titled release. If
you rock to Bad Religion, you
should get Pennywise.
IMPORT
U.98cd/9.98cass
Stereolab
• Transient
Fueled by their Moog grooves,
angelic vocals, and spacey
guitars, the Lab again weather
themselves from the realm of
banal English dream pop. A long
player guaranteed to spin you to
the moon!
IMPORT
U.98cd/9.98cass
%
Breeders
•  Cannonball
Another batch of breathy pop
songs from the Deal twins.
Following last year's Safari, this
one starts with a bang and floats
over the three-rings below. Cotton
candy not included.
7.98cdep
Boss Hog
® girl+
A strident release! of bluesy jazzy
noise that just rocks. Propelled by
the sultry vocals of Cristina and
the off-cuff blues licks of Jon
Spencer, girl+ makes some crazy
moves and locks you into the
perfect groove. Boss Hog! thank
you very much.
IMPORT
 11.98cdep
Orbital
® Orbital 2
Finally, the domestic release of
the well-received second lp by
one of the pioneer outfits of the
ambient music scene. A hot item
in high demand. Be the first on
your block.
IMPORT
U.98cd/9.98cass
OFFICIAL ZULU GEAR!
The cap is back!
M jk   ar
Now you can cover
your upper body in
official Zulu Records
gear. The new, high-
duality Zulu Tshirt is
joined by the return
of the classic Zulu
Baseball cap. The cap,
"known around the
world," is 100% wool,
and has the Zulu logo
embroidered on the
front by highly-
trained craftspeople.
Tshirt $10.98
Baseball Cap $12.98
phc
IMPORT BLOW-OUT!
Zulu needs to clear out some
stock to make room for a new
pile of stuff. We stayed up all
night to mark down hundreds
of hard-to-find and one-of-
a-kind cds. The prices have
been slashed, most 50% off
their regular Zulu price. Look
for the yellow-ish stickers
throughout the store. You
won't see many of these
titles ever again, so move
fast or get left behind.
NEW FROM ZULU
(THE LABEL)
Perfume
Tree
REMOTE
cdep
Zulu Records would like to announce
the imminent release of Perfume Tree's
newest CD-EP "Remote". Available from
all the usual outlets mid-September.
Perfume Tree Live!
September 12 'Graceland
$5 advance / $7 at the door

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