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  2_ST§ PRESENTS
ZIGOY MARLEY
■____■ AND THE MELODY MAKERS  —
wilh special guests Tke ^milySWWi
THURSDAY AUGUST 30
doors 8pm • showtime 10pm
86 ST. MUSIC HALL
tickets: all T?cKMr£**=7mV9±
outlets as well as Zulu, Track, Highlife.
Black Swan Records and Barret
Electronics or charge by phone
«... »■ 260-4444 (0-faf
ON SALE NOW   ^tt
Produced by Perryscope __^°__£__3
CONTENTS
AUGUST • 1990 Issue #91
HARDCORE SCHMOOZING
Len Morgan shakes hands atthe NMS  7
INSPIRAL CARPETS
Greg Garlick hoovers the Manchester landscape  9
FRANK CHICKENS
James Boldt and Peter Sickert bathe in the glory of excess raughter 10
SWAGGER
The Blue Aeroplanes caught on the edge of mega-stardom by Pete Lutwyche 13
SHUFFLE DEMONS
Demon Tommy Paley chats with the fellas over greasy burgers 14
MY FAMOUS MISTAKES
The story of a legendary band - by J.B. Hohm 18
BETTY'N'ME
Nardwuar gets tied up at Canada Customs 20
AIRHEAD
Remember: high power-popularity-mainstream-bad    5
REAL LIVE ACTION
Dead Milkmen, Caterwaul, Robyn Hitchcock and more 16
UNDER REVIEW
We listen to 'em, we write about 'em, you read 'em. Simple 17
LOCAL MOTION
Let's get Janis - she listens to everything!! 19
COMIX ARE ALL I READ
The last installment from Leigh R. Wolf 20
ON THE DIAL
It's like TV Guide, but it's for radio 22
SPINUST
New names but it's the same. Sort of 22
DISCORDER DATEBOOK
What's on, what's hot, what's hip and what isnt 24
HELLS KITCHEN
Viola samples the victuals of college educated motherfuckers 26
DANCING ON THE CLOUDS
Marc Yuill and Julian Lawrence 21
BORDUM
Bryce Rasmussen 25
FOR OFF CE USE ONLY
EDITOR K. Michael Smith ART DIRECTOR Geoff Coates DISCORDERLY ORDERLY Bill Baker EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS
Chrie Buchanan, Viola Funk, Um Marr, Lydia Schymaneky PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS Usa Lutman, Lydia Schymaflaky WRITERS James Boldt, Viola Funk, Q reg Garlick, Brian Hohm, Pete Lutwyche, Janis McKenzie, Un Morgan, John
Ruskin, Peter Sickert, Leigh Wolf PHOTOGRAPHERS Robynn Iwata, Leonard Whistler GRAPHICS Geoff Coates,
Audra Heal WORD PROCESSING Randy Iwata COVER PHOTO Robynn Iwata SPINLIST Randy Iwata, Uoyd Uliana
ADVERTISING Uoyd Uliana ADVERTISING PRODUCTION BID Baker LOCAL DISTRIBUTION Matt Stefflch SUBSCRIPTIONS/MAIL DISTRIBUTION Lydia Schymansky PROGRAM GUIDE/DATEBOOK/DELIVERY FRIEND Randy Iwata
ACCOUNTS Unda Scholten TECHNICAL SUPPORT Sue Ahn, Ted Auasem PUBLISHER Barbara Hgood
DISCORDER Copyright© 1990 by The Student Radio Society of the Uniwrsity of British Columbia. All Rights Reserved Discorder is Th»t
Magazine from CiTR fM 102, and is published twelve times a year by The Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. Discorder
is primed in Canada on paper manufactured in Canada. Discorder prints whal it wants to, mduding the CiTR On the Dial program guide and the CiTR
SpinList playlist chart. Circulation is 17500 copies distributed free of charge to over 200 locations. Twelve-month subscriptions are $15 in Canada,
$13 (US) lo the US, and 124 elsewhere. Please make cheques or money orders payable to Discorder Magazine. ■Nomenclature of in assassination
cabal" -W.Torbill.  Deadline for ads and submissions is the 15th ofthe month. Talk lo us - we want your stuff: if wc like it, well use it If not, we'll
CITR 101.9 fM is 1800 watts of stcrcophcnic bliss on cable fM from UBC to Langley, Squamish to Point Roberts, but not on Shaw Cable in White
Rock (ifyou want it, youll find a way). CiTR is now available on moat clock radios and in cars too. Office hours for Discorder, CiTR, and CiTR
1 arc MoD-Fri, 10am -4fan (please avoid Friday i9_do_i).C_ the CrTR/Diacordcr Office al 228-3017 for editorial, advertising,
enquiries; CiTR Newn-Sport. at 222-2487, or the GTR DJ line at 228-CiTR. Wri«eIoi__6138SUB BlvdVu*»uverBC WT2A5.
MONDAY
highball night
TUESDAY
classix night
WEDNESDAY
with dj slick
no cover
THURSDAY
with dj  david hawkes
no cover
FRIDAY
industrial hell
with   dj  david hawkes
SATURDAY
dub hell with dj george
SUNDAY 8-12
big drink specials :RIDAYfAUCUST17   7 PM
EXHIBITION BOWL
• ADELAIDE (AUSTRALIA)
• HONG KONG • SWANSEA
(WALES) • EDINBURGH
(SCOTLAND) • TORONTO
• WINNIPEG • SASKATOON
• EDMONTON
• VANCOUVER • VICTORIA
The firsl Fringe Festival in
1947 was the spontaneous -
and successful - reaction of 8
theatre groups after being
turned away from the
Edinburgh Festival due to lack
of space. Undaunted, they
decided to stay and stage their
productions around the
periphery or "fringe" of the
Edinburgh Festival. These
productions on the "fringe"
drew strong audiences and
proved that there was a
demand for innovative, young
theatre, for choice and risk-
taking. Now in its 5th decade,
a growing network of Fringe
Festivals unite artists and
audiences across the globe.
The historic Mount Pleasant
area will once again host this
11 day festival of fun and
excitement. Now in its
planning stages, this year's
festival looks like a winner!
We are extremely excited
about the programming which
includes performing groups
from all around the world and
great mixture of classic and
contemporary productions....
there is truly something for
everyone at the Fringe!
FESTIVAL '90
MAGIC IN THE MAKING
THE FRINGE FESTIVAL
PROGRAM GUIDE
The program guide is the
official program for the Fringe
Festival. It contains all
pertinent information on the
festival, the venues and the
performances.
The guide contains an up to
date schedule of the shows
listing times, dates, and the
location of each show. There
is also a brief description of
each show including the
author, director, actors, length
of show and rating.
The guide also gives
information on locations of
venues, ticket information,
info, centres, merchandise, the
outdoor site, the cafes and the
Fringe Club.
Throughout the guide are
advertisements from the
theatre companies advertising
their shows. There is also a
great opportunity for retail
advertisers to reach the Fringe
audience through display ads
in the program guide. Rates
are reasonable, and with a
distribution of 100,000 copies,
your message is sure to reach
a wide cross-section of people
September 6 to 16
Look for the Fringe
Festival Program Guide
in your August 19
Vancouver Courier, or
at any 7-11 store in
Greater Vancouver, after
August 19.
^^^LJ^^^LJ^^^k
® © Y
Y
liPQE!?
VANCOUVERS ALTERNATIVE RECORD STORE
DOWNTOWN
VANCOUVER
534 Seymour St.
669-6644
TO    G-WUDKIi    OS    G_@W
RECORDS • CDS • CASSETTES
RAP • REGGAE » POP » HOUSE » JAZZ » SOUL « ROCK » BLUES BRAVE MISSION
Dear Airhead,
We are highly insulted. We, the children
of the first wave of post
punk, commonly known
as Goths, now hold you,
your reporters and your
publication in contempt.
How dare you insult The
Mission (June issue) and
what they stand for and
believe in and in turn us
for we are one in the same
with them, sharing their
beliefs, etc.
The music they create
reflects our emotions and
anguish.
We're sorry, we forget that today all you posers  no longer find the
human experience such as
joy, outrage, hope, love,
jealousy, fear, dreams,
loneliness, and doubt
fashionable. The majesty,
elegance and subtle grace
of the art has been
spoiled by specifics.
But we do take heart
in knowing that you and
your audience are all pretenders to the throne,
simple want to bes. You'll
change with the direction
of the wind, Flavour of the
Month Club. Because you
lack substance in your life
that's why you listen to
trash and insult honest and
integrity filled music.
We shudder to think
that the monumental
works of Joy Division,
The Cure, Bauhaus and
such uninfluential bands
as Skinny Puppy, Alien
Sex Fiend, Psyche, Killing Joke, Teardrops Explode and even The
Damned have come to
naught.
We find this music
(even if it is six to ten
years old) as haunting and
moving as when we first
heard it on Brave New
PRESENTS
DGC/WEA Recording Artist
(formerly of X)
KirVIFVI  ROGERS
THURSDAY AUGUST 9
Doors 8 pm • Showtime 10:30 pm
TOWN PUMP
66 Water Street
683-6695/681-2222
Tickets Available At The Door Only
Produced by Perryscope
, OtTtol
/gjfftkllr.
Waves.
Mainly because we
true children of post punk
don't abandon what we
love for the sake of looking cool for an endearing
second of time.
Always,
Zoe Annastasia
'Scuse us. We thought the
whole idea of Goth was to
abandon what you love for
the sake of looking cool
for an endearing second
of time. Sorry, our mistake.
TOO MANY?
Dear Airhead,
Re: "The Man Fox"
letter from Jim Johnston,
July 1990 edition:
Reply:"Toomany
morons listen to the radio
in Vancouver! My support
goes to CiTR...if you'd
increase your power a
little more.I wouldn't
have to resort to listening
to(and thereby "supporting") CFOX, etc.
Steve .Seeder
JJ.'s Favourite
Critic
CiTR doesn't want to increase its power 'cause it
would no longer be alternative. If lots of people
could hear us then CiTR
couldbecome popular i.e.
mainstream instead of alternative. And alternative
is what CiTR should be,
right? CiTR wants to
remain pure, unsoiled by
the crass commercialism
of high power radio. Furthermore, if people could
hear us they would try and
put a stop to the puerile
activities we enjoy so
immensely.
CiTR must remain
the domain ofthe elite few.
If the general populace
were to become aware of
CiTR it would lose its
value of exclusivity -
CiTR must not be tainted
by the baseness of general popularity. It must
remain the bastion of the
alternative.
So remember:
High Power=Popularity
= Mainstream= Bad
Low Power = Exclusivity
= Alternative =Good
ONCE AGAIN, FOR THOSE
OF YOU WHO WEREN'T
LISTENING:
CiTR is now accepting tapes
from bands interested in
competing in Shindig '90.
Send your demo or whatever
including name, phone #,
and some info about you'r
band) to: Shindig '90, c/o
CiTR, #233-6138 SUB Blvd.,
Vancouver, BC V6T 2A5. OK?
WANTED: DISCORDER EDITOR
"I 've had it, you know/' exclaimed K. Michael
Smith, as he threw in the towel on his
prestigious, fun, and educational job as
editor of Vancouver's hippest music magazine slash radio program guide (DiSCORDER), a job that pays $250 per month plus
all the adoration and admiration one can
stand, a job that almost anyone could get
provided they send a resume, covering letter, and a few samples of their written work
to DiSCORDER c/o CiTR, #233 - 6138 SUB
Boulevard, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A5 before
August 10," ...I just can't stand all the
autograph hounds. ..the thrill seekers...every
day another young gun who wants to prove
he's the 'fastest in the west'...all that
needless killing-oh the senseless violence"  I he 11th annual New
r I ^ Music   Seminar   was
M    took place from July
 |l3 to 18 in New York
City. More than 8000 of the
world's music business folk
gathered at a Times Square
hotel to talk, listen, do business and witness 350 performances by almost as many
bands at 30 Manhattan
nightclubs. Many delegates
thought the proceedings
should have been called the
New Money Seminar. Others
questioned if there was anything "New" about it at all.
When Modern English is
showcasing themselves on the
comeback trail, and is given a
headlining spot at the opening
gala, can you really say the
focus of the seminar is upon
new music?
There was a lot of talk at
the seminars. College stations
bitched at the record companies about not getting their
product, record companies
bitched at college stations for
not returning their calls; promoters bitched at the lack of
clubs, clubs bitched about the
lack of money; bands bemoaned the death of the "you
can sleep on my floor if I can
sleep on yours" camaraderie.
The whole industry agreed to
rally behind 2 Live Crew in
their battle to allow freedom
of speech in Florida, saddened that it had to be such a
talentless group of true perverts they were supporting.
I travelled with my friend
Scott to see what it was all
about, to get a sense of the big
industry vacuum, to see my
Toronto friends I knew would
congregate there, and to do
the New York tourist thing. I
missed at least as many great
bands as I saw and I can safely
say that I only met one percent
of the folks I would have liked
to. I did meet David Lynch
(he's a Music Director at
WHUS in Connecticut) and
learned that there will be a
comeback David Cassidy album on Enigma, that Henry
Rollins' next album will be
out on Chrysalis, and that
there's to be another Chic LP
and an Axl Rose/Ice-T version of "Welcome to the
Jungle."
Travelogue from New York
City
Friday July 13
This was obviously the best
day to fly cross-country on an
airplane. Mid-air collisions
aside, I was at least expecting
to lose my luggage or get lost
in Brooklyn on my way in
from JFK International. However, touching down and getting my gear together and
actually finding myself on a
subway headed straight for
Midtown Manhattan, I could
rest easy and open my eyes.
Where's the subway graffiti?
Who are the scary people? I'm
not seeing any colossal buildings. Once at Times Square I
didn't find rows and rows of
cabs pulling off without disgruntled passengers.
Immediately we try to
find accommodation. After an
hour spent yo-yoing in Manhattan we're back smack dab
in the middle of Times
Square, half, no... a quarter of
a block from the Seminar
hotel. But they only had one
bed left and it was reserved
for 8:00. It was now 9:30 and
the guy hadn't shown up.
They could give us his bed
and one of us could sleep on
the floor. "Yah, yah!!" Our
money was coming out of our
pockets as the 8:00 kid walked
in. We resorted to pleading
and the other kid got sent
away.
We decided to hit the
town. The Friday night atmosphere in Greenwich Village
prompted us to wander, and
discover some cool record
shops that are open until midnight. Checked out Das Da-
men's last five songs at the
Marquee Club in way West
Chelsea. A former bus garage, the Marquee is a cement
Luv-A-Fair. This being my
first New York nightclub and
excited to finally be here, I
did what I was warned time
and time against: bought my
first (and last) beer in a New
York club. Outside and down
the block it is perfectly legal
to pick up a can and drink it on
the street. The cost of this
hovers in the $1 to $1.25
range. In the club it'll invariably be $4 or more.
Hit Jerry Rubin's Limelight Disco not far away, not
knowing that George Clinton's new band, Hot Sauce,
was playing in the same
neighbourhood.Cabbed home
(also for the first and last time)
to find someone had stolen
my bed sheets.
Saturday, July 14
Breakfast at the hostel ($3),
picked up my New Music
Seminar pass and bag full of
promo goodies, then off to
Central Park to see what was
to be the best show of the
week, Jazz Passengers' Mark
Ribot's new band. The already muggy air was filling
SCHMOOZEFEST
BY
LEN MORGAN
up with these annoying green
sand fleas that I figured were
only attracted to me. Cotrp^
with the prevalence of marijuana smoke, it almost turned
into an unpleasant situation.
And when the James Brown
All-Stars took the stage, it did.
That night we saw Soul Asylum's Dave Pirner jamming
with Die Kreuzen at CBGB's.
What we missed: Christmas,
Gary Lucas Gods & Monsters,
Pussywillows    and    Alice
Sunday, July 15
Wfoke up early and went to a
panel discussion about indie
dance records. They appear to
b4 making lotsa dollars. When
jmember of the  audience
ked if payola was always a
cessary   evil,   the   whole
nel went silent, the modera-
■ cleared her throat, and - I
was the president of
Boy Records - dis-
; issue by saying it
; worthy of a whole
di_
didn't haverthe time hefe.
Ml wandered the conven
tiorkfloors Irving to look into
pebfle's fa|es. Everyone else
was looking at the mandatory
badges we had to wear on
chains around our necks.
"Oh, hi... Len. You're from,"
squinting to read, Discorder.
What's that?" At that point, I
resolved to address strangers
a topic \*
with: "What kind
you LOVE?   Whilt's in your
veins? rrfUr*!" «*fe
Sunday night found me
back at CBGB's for a Matador Records showcase of
New York bands. Railroad
Jerk were original and abrasive and had good spngs. They
gave me a shirt ind I liked
them lots. Saw Dust Devils,
Urge Overkill and, down the
street at the Knitting Factory,
Bongwater. For a laugh I
trudged up to the Palladium -
what a huge (and rich) place
that is - to see Modern English. Who I missed: Teenage
Fan Club, Urb; <n Dance
Squad, France'sMano Negra,
Digital Underground, God's
Little Monkeys and Shimmy
Disc artists Tuli Kupferberg
and When People Were
Shorter and Lived Near The
Water.
Monday, July 16
Today I saw the Statue of
Liberty, Wall Stre*t etc. instead of sitting through the
keynote address by Laurie
Anderson and industry heavy
Irving Azoff. When I got to
the seminar it was buzzing
with 8000 plus people roaming the exhibition floor for
freebies (myself included). Of
note is a pencil that I picked
up from some publishing
company that was bent into a
treble  clef. Thankfully, the
Canadian Suite was open on
one ofthe hotel's top floors. It
provided an air conditioned
retreat from the street outside
and the fervor of the seminar
schmooze. Wax Trax Records
had a party in their suite, as
did the New Orleans Music
Convention.
Elevators were jammed
with delegates, and a half-
hour wait in either direction
was not unusual. At night I
caught Lava Hay looking
exhausted. Rights of the Accused forsaking their punk
roots, Scrawl being inept and
Galaxie 500 sounding just
like their records. I missed
Queen Latifah, A Tribe
Called Quest, Thee Hypnotics, Cop Shoot Cop, Nuclear
Assault and Lunachicks.
Tuesday, July 17
Another day of hardcore
schmoozing. Another tactic
was tried to keep the party
overflow to a minimum: don't
tell anyone where the hospitality rooms are. From five
o'clock on swarms of vultures
stalked the hotel's upper
floors for signs of free beer
and grub. Today's panel discussions were at least lively.
Paul Simon and Public En 7
emy producers the Shocklee
brothers argued the sampling
copyright issue back and
forth. Nile Rodgers admitted
that he sampled a section of
PE's new record for the forthcoming Chic comeback album, and Rick Rubin, for the
most part, stayed out of the
debate. Later on Ice-T had it
out with Vernon Reid over the
"Nigger"-word, with Out-
week Magazine editor Victoria Starr over the "Bitch"-
word and with Nona Hendryx
over the "Motherfucker"-
word. The MD from some
down south radio station
turned to me and asked,
"What's misogyny?"
To the Ritz it was, for the
Wax Trax/Nettwerk showcase. Consolidated captured
everyone's attention but you
couldn't hear the words; Meat
Beat Manifesto has a trio of
exuberant dancers but you
could hear the words. The hip
hop beat started to grind on
me and I high-tailed it to the
Toronto showcase just in time
to hear the whole ofthe Rheostatics set. The original four
are back at it and reminded me
of all I liked and didn't like
about them. Capitol Canada's
new signing Leslie Spit Tree-
o were next and I took the
time to feed on Ray's Original
Pizza (which is different that
Original   Ray's   Pizza,   and
different still from Famous
Ray's Pizza). I didn't make it
back for Jellyfish Babies, who
I know to be great, nor to the
East Village to see Head of
David, but I did run into three
Finns from a band called 22
Pistepirko. We ducked into a
biker bar and talked Finnish
punk rock for two hours.
Four in the morning on
the subway, I figured, was the
best time to get into an argument about El Salvador with
two Marines. They brought up
burning the flag and I wisely
kept shut. Also wanted to see
Hothouse Flowers that night
but I settled for an autograph.
Wednesday, July 18
The last day of the seminar and I decided that five
days of getting to bed at 4:00
AM was wearing me down. I
only attended one seminar,
and poked my head into another one just in time to hear
someone say, "If I meet one
more college station MD who
plays Soundgarden, I'm
gonna punch him out." I
cheered. Took the afternoon
off and went shopping for
records, then to the East Village where there are 21 (ya,
we counted 'em) Indian restaurants all on one side of the
same block. The 21st one was
recommended - isn't that
always the way? - but I'm
never taking advice from
anyone in Dumptruck again. I
had some hard entertainment
choices that night, but I decided to head straight to the
Palladium to see the Dead
Milkmen, Dirty Dozen Brass
Band, 2 Live Crew (I conscientiously objected and sat in
the lobby for most of their set)
and Fishbone. I thought there
was a lot of sweat for the
headliners, but it was nothing
compared to when I got to the
Marquee for Soul Asylum.
Bands I missed: Gin Blossoms, Agitpop, 808 State,
Happy Mondays, Dumptruck
and a showcase of USSR
bands.
Thursday, July 19
Gee, the heat doesn't get
to you unless you're in a bad
mood to start with. We had to
get up early to check out.
Then we had time to kill before the flight, which we knew
was a stop-over, which we
figured we wouldn't get fed
on, which didn't have an inflight movie, and the list goes
on... Most importantly, we
were having a great time but
we had to leave New York.&
AUGUST 1990 7 AUGUST   CONCERTS
From Toronto THE BOURBON TABERNACLE
CHOIR with guests EMILY STOP
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY 2|
FRIDAY 3
SATURDAY 4
40 presents from San Francisco
ROCK 1040 presents SAVOY BROWN with
guests THE PERSUADERS
THE NERVOUS FELLAS with guests THE LAST
WILD SONS
LORRAINE SEGATO formerly of The Parachute
Club
WEDNESDAY 81
THURSDAY 9B
Toronto DORIAN GRAY with guests TURF
)pe presents WEA recording i
SATURDAY 11
SUNDAY 12|
WEDNESDAY 15
THURSDAY 16
FRI-SAT 17-18
SUNDAY 19
MONDAY 20|
TUESDAY 21
FRIDAY 24|
SATURDAY 25
THURSDAY 30|
FRIDAY
Rock 1040 presents Enigma recording artists
SKYDIGGERS with guests THE CATHERINE
WHEEL
HARD ROCK MINERS
GREEN HOUSE with guests THE UNKNOWN
.abwe THE FOUR BROTHERS
From Los Angeles TUPELO CHAIN SEX with
guests WIDESPREAD PANIC
BOB'S YOUR UNCLE
ART BERGMANN
sland recording artists BUCKWHEAT ZYDECO
TOWN PUMP
SUB
UBC STUDENT UNION BUILDING
LOWER CONCOURSE
ALL AGES WELCOME
mm
WITH
SPECIAL
|       GUESTS
__.   THURSDAY
AUGUST  16
fj. ^^ TjrXT locations as well as Barrett Electror
1\SVVJN Zulu, Black Swan, and Highlife
P U M P CHARGE BYPHONE
"Js,t, 280-4444
PO
\ 56 Water Street   Gostowi Manchester is the current British musical hot spot. The list of
talked about bands is headed by The
Stone Roses, Happy Mondays and
the relatively new kid on the block,
Inspiral Carpets. The Carpets' vinyl
output began with a flexi disc of the
song "Garage Full of Flowers," included with the Manchester fanzine,
"Debris," in January 1987. Following releases included numerous successful singles, a Peel session, and
the number two British LP, "Life."
Now there is the first North American release via Rough Trade, the
"Cool As Fuck!" EP, which features
the Carpets' UK hits and B-sides:
"Joe," "Find Out Why," "So Far,"
"Out of Time" and "Plane Crash."
The Inspiral Carpets - singer,
Tom Hingley; organist, Clint Boon;
guitarist, Graham Lambert; bassist,
Martyn Walsh and drummer, Craig
Gill - play a kind of small "p" psychedelic pop with heavy doses of
Farfisa organ and somewhat Julian
Cope sounding vocals. Discorder
recently talked to the group's nineteen year old drummer about the
press, rap music, flares and other
stuff.
/ think the reason you guys signed
with Mute was that they had the best
stuff to give you for free, wasn't it?
Craig: Yeah (laughs), sort of. It's
not got products. The bands that are
on there are on there because the
people like them. It's not because
they've got products there to
make'em money. That appealed to
/ guess they (Mute) don't have too
much interference.
C: No, not at all.
Do you think the Subpop stuff is a bit
overhyped in Britain?
C: Not overhyped, no. 'Cause it's
hardly heard of. There's some Sub-
pop records we'd like to get a hold of
in England that we can't. A lot ofthe
stuff we get through Blast First because it's is part of Mute. There's not
that many people that are aware of it
in England.
What did you think ofthe Buzzcocks
reforming?
C: I don't really believe in it. I didn't
really mind them reforming so much.
It was just when they had Flag of
Convenience which was going under
the name of Buzzcocks. That's a
joke. It's a ripoff. They should have
been sued for it really. Steve Diggle
carried on without the others' consent and a friend of mine was drumming for him. There's no point in
calling it the Buzzcocks if it's not the
original lineup.
What do you think of rap?
PIR
M\ m^ ||a.,  i% I;*-;'
ARP&_a'3
W^m ■__?
ETSali
C: I really like it. It's been a big
influence on our music for quite a
long time. At one time in Manchester
people were very narrow minded.
You had house music fans, dance
music fans and then you had indie
kids; and they didn't crossover whatsoever. There was a time when we
had 808 State supporting us and
people used to boo them off stage
'cause no one liked house. The indie
kids who were into us didn't like
dance music. Now there's a big
crossover and people like both. It's
trendy now to like 808 State as well
as us. But at that time people didn't
understand dance music at all. It was
the same on both sides - dance music
hated guitar bands, guitar bands
hated dance music. But it was never
so with us; we was always into dance
music. That's why we had 808 State
open for us. So hopefully we helped
the crossover. It's only now that
people are noticing that in our music.
But hip hop and stuff inspired my
drumming just as much as '60s stuff
inspired Clint on the organ. I've been
a big fan of Public Enemy for quite a
few years; seen them play a few
times.
/ read that the infamous Manchester
nightspot The Hacienda Club ran
into some trouble and might be
closed down.
C: Yeah, the authorities want to
closeitdown.They'researchin' everybody on the way in now to check
there are no drugs going in the place.
A girl died in the Hacienda. They
said it was ecstasy and stuff but you
can get it anywhere; you don't have
to just be in there. They're just
clampin' down 'cause that girl died
and her mum and dad are pressin'
charges and stuff.
It gets such bad press. The press
says you can't go in there and leave
your drink without getting something put in it. But nobody's ever put
anything in my drink. I wish they
would sometimes. Who goes around
putting £30 tablets of ecstasy in your
drink? Nobody does that. Nobody's
that daft. The girl's mom said she
must have had it put in fiferthifffW
the story is she had two. So if she's
foolish enough to have two, it's her
own fault.
If we go on about it it's endorsing drugs. In England people look at
us as having a "no drugs" stance. We
don't tell anyone what to do. It's just
we don't like endorsing things. If
kids want to experiment with drugs
then that's fine by me. And that
should be a conscious decision. It
shouldn't be because some pop band
does it. Whichever way you look at
it, you're influential and people are
gonna start doing whatever you do
so if you mention ecstasy and stuff
like that then kids are going to start
trying it because of that. And you
don't want to be responsible for
anybody's death. There is a lot to be
said for drugs, there's a lot to be
talked about, but in the press isn't
really the place to say it.
/ used to go in Eastern Bloc record
store when I was in Manchester.
C: It's owned by a member of 808
State actually. Three of them started
it up and one of them's doing 808
State now.
And they've got their own record
label now too?
C: Yeah, they started us out; they
financed us when we did "Joe."
When we started out on our own
label, they financed that through
Creed - Cow through Creed. They 've
always had their own records. When
808 State first started putting out
records they did it through Creed.
They lent us the money and took a
cut or whatever. When we was a
small band they were selling most of
our records 'cause we was on a label
Sailed Playtime. It was no good and
we said we want^J^p leave and they
-"•n*astern Bloc) seen the potential in it
'cause they seen how many records
we were selling. The first single we
had out sold out in a week; a thousand copies sold in a week, most of
them in that shop. And Red Rhino
want bust. They were the distributors. After that we just sat back a bit
because we wanted to get a distribution deal.
You did a ? and the Mysterians song.
But you don't do very many covers
do you?
C: No, not really. We did a Stones
one as well, "Gimme Shelter." I
suppose if we ever did a cover again
it would be a recent one. If you've
done a couple of covers from the
'60s you can get attached to the '60s
too much. When wf did "Gimme
Shelter" it was just omebody asked
us to do a Stones song for this compilation Stones album. We hadn't all
heard the original when we did it so
we did it like writing up one of our
own songs. There was only two
people in the band who'd heard the
original so we had no preconceptions of how it should have sounded.
What do you think of The Stone
Roses?
C: I think they're a good band. I've
got sympathy for them because they
can't really win because if they do a
massive gig for loads of people
they'll get quite a few complaints
about the sound and stuff like that.
But they can't win because if they
play in a two thousand seat venue
then what are they supposed to do,
play there every night for a year? Or
pack people in on one night and kill
people? You gotta play to the
amount of people that actually want
to go and see you whirch was like
eighteen thousand people (at the
Spike Island gig). So they did it in a
field. With the Stone Roses at that
gig it didn't matter how the band
played; they could have just come
on stage and farted and people
wouldn't have been bothered 'cause
it was just like a day out. It was like
a festival atmosphere. And that's
all it is - a good day out. It doesn't
matter whether you can hear the
band at the end of the day. That's
the way I look at it. It's a bonus if
the band has good sound.
Is it difficult for a band starting
C: No, it's dead easy at the moment.
A band starts out and then that's it.
They've already got a record deal
and they've already got loads of
money flying about. So it's not as
hard as it used to be.
So are you guys wearing flares? Are
they coming back?
C: No. The Stone Roses started
wearing them and then people started
wearing them. It's only the Stone
Roses that really wear them. I don't
really like them. I'm not against
anyone wearing them, I just don't
like them. I think it will pass on; it's
just a passing thing. Next week it'll
be something else. I'll stick to wearing baggy jeans 'cause they're comfortable and they look all right.
There was a revival in about '82
with semi-flares. It was football
fashion by the football fans from
Manchester. The football fans from
London always had snazzier sports
gear so the Manchester fans did it as
a rebellion. It was like, 'This is our
fashion." That's all it was.
You guys seem to be pretty friendly
with the people at the New Music
Express. They seem to do a lot of
articles on the stuff out ofManches-
C: You've got to keep a bit of a
distance. You can't become too
friendly really. Sometimes they're
going to start slagging you off and
we know that. They've got a job to
do to be critics. They're giving
Manchester good press now but in
two months time they might not.
They might be knockin' it. So we
don't want to get too closely involved. That's why we keep our
distance with the press people. Good
press is alright but you've got to be a
good band which is what it boils
down to. It's not just about being
from Manchester and being young
and being nicely dressed.®1
AUGUST 1990 9 *y>W# ^PSi*rcer#
10 DISCORDER
t AUGUST 1990 11 VANCOUVER'S HOTTEST BLUES NIGHTCLUB
Jul. 31 - Aug. 4
Aug. 6
Aug. 7-11
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Aug. 17 & 18
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Aug. 26
Aug. 27
Aug. 28
Aug. 29 - 31
Sep. 1
Big Joe Duskin with the
Demons
The Demons
Incognito
Johnny V
Jim Byrnes
Mike Jacobs
James Harman
Special Blues Vocal Jam
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The Demons
John Hammond with guests
The Demons
The Demons
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129?
G&tse a first heard ofthe Blue Aeroplanes from a friend who went
to the university in their home
town of Bristol, England. He mentioned large numbers of guitars and
a manic dancer, armed with a ra-
zorblade, who frantically slashed a
sheet of plastic that separated the
band from the audience.This
caught my attention. So I listened to
all the Blue Aeroplanes on import
that I could find.
"Swagger," the band's first
North American release (apartfrom
the compilation "Friendlover-
plane"), came out in April. It
showed the Aeroplanes with a radically different line-up, but still with
three guitarists and the dancer. The
press kit was none too subtle, basically doing their friendship with
REM to death and giving the band
the North American "Hard Sell."
The album itself has a very interesting mix of jangle pop and almost
folky songs, with some of the guitar
work reminiscent of the classic
Fairport Convention lineup that
included Richard Thompson. Gerard Langley's vocals are mostly just
spoken, fragmented but cohesive,
sentences - Well, you try and describe them! - taking on not just the
usual topic of love, but also less
explored emotions and situations.
I got the opportunity to interview the Blue Aeroplanes when they
were in Vancouver supporting
(some would say "blowing off
stage") The Church. I headed down
to the Chateau Granville at the
appointed time on the afternoon of
the show only to find that the band
were still en route from Seattle. So I
spent an hour drinking coffee with
the band's English manager and
the local record company rep, which
reinforced my impression that the
group was getting the big corporate
push to fame and fortune.
The manager asked me if we
played "rotation" at CiTR ("No, we
play what we want"). He then reeled
off abbreviated names of
"hot,""alternative" bands who
were "shifting big units" at the
moment such as "The Roses," "The
Mondays," "Sinead" (shifting
mega units!), and "The Lemon
Drops." He bemoaned the fact that
Vancouver didn't have a "Real
High Power Alternative Station"
and heaped praise on "Much" for
being more receptive to alternative
music than MTV(!). The only time I
got my own back was when he asked
me what was "hot" at CiTR on the
moment. I answered that Llwybr
Llaethog's brand of Welsh language industrial dub and assorted
Finnish hardcore bands were really
causing dj pulses to race.
Luckily, at this point The Blue
Aeroplanes showed up (minus Gerard who had disappeared between
the tour bus and the hotel). I was
introduced to Rodney Allen, the
young rhythm guitarist and co-
writer of a lot ofthe group's songs.
I decided to find out what he thought
of all this showbiz stuff.
Discorder: You obviously think
that supporting bands is a good
way to play in North America.
Rodney: Well, if we were to come
over and headline, we're getting
good college play and a lot of press,
but that means we might do well in
big places like New York and stuff
like that and play to 50 people somewhere like Baltimore. It*
much better to play
with a band that
has a bit of
following.
The point is
that if we can
support a band
that has got 1000
people to watch
them, then every
single time we
can get at least
600 of them really going.
D: It doesn't
limit you in your
set?
R: The Church
are being really
good; we have
the same sound
as they do. Some
bands get a bit
precious about it
and you're only
allowed to use
two channels on
a 24 channel
desk. You don't
get to play as
long, but I think
that when an audience isn't completely aware of
you, you don't
want to play two
hours to them
anyway.
D: On record,
your three guitar lineup is noticeable, but
then most bands
overdub guitars
now anyway.lt
must be live that the full multi-guitar sound is best appreciated.
R:ll means that you don't have to get
your friend on to reproduce the studio sound. Quite often to me it
doesn't look right, it never fits in.
We went to see The Mission at
Wembley, and they all came on,
loads of dry ice, all wearing black,
all with these top hats on and everything. They look like a band. Then
half way through, their roadie comes
on to play some extra guitar - he's
got a white T-shirt on. It's just not
rock 'n' roll at all.
D: Guitarists have legendary egos.
How do three guitarists get on?
Who gets to play the meaty parts?
J.: It doesn't really affect me 'cause
I can't play any of the thin strings.
I'm strictly rhythm, so I'm alright
'cause none of the other two want to
play rhythm so I know my part
straight away. The others don't argue at all. We all have incredible
egos in this band, but when it comes
to guitar solos and writing songs, we
almost shy back and say, "No, no,
let's do yours. No, you do the solo on
this song." There's a lot of rivalry
but it kind of works in reverse for us.
D: From the press kit it seems that
you're getting the big push, something I didn't expect considering
the laid back nature ofthe band up
to now. Where do you want to take
it all?
R: When you first pick up a guitar,
you want to play to all your friends at
school. Then you want to play at the
best venue in your town and so it all ,
progresses. You can't say to yourself, "Well, I want to be as big as U2,
or by the same token, as big as The
House Of Love." Everything's relative.
D: Can you foresee a time when
you're just so fed up with the
hassles of touring?
R: Not really. I really enjoy touring.
You just have to know when it's time
to walk off and have a wander around
on your own. As long as things are
progressing then it's okay. Since I
joined the band nothing's really gone
drastically wrong. We keep progressing all the time. I'd play to 100
people anywhere but I'd hate to play
to 800 people and then the next time
I played there play to 500 people.
That's where it can get depressing.
The whole Spinal Tap thing.
D: How do bands like The Church
and REM make the leap from college radio to superstardom?
the Blue Aeroplanes alter their
style to follow
them?
R: Some
bands get
played on
college radio
and then all of a
sudden they release a record
with quite obvious poppy songs
on it. We would
never do that;
REM would
never do that.
You can make
music in a way
that's accessible
to both (college
and commercial
listeners) and
that's what
REM have been
,_V>ing from day
one. It just takes
some time to get
through. I don't
think there's
any difference
between "Swagger" and "Spitting Out Miracles" (the previous album).
We always write
good songs. It's
also that when
we started out
we were seen as
a weird band
'cause it was the
fashion to have
a four piece with
a cute girl
singer. Now the fashion's changed.
At this point Gerard Langley, vocalist, lyric writer and founding member ofthe Blue A eroplanes, appears
and joins us.
D.Gerard, are you happy with
where you are now? Things seem
to be hotting up around you; getting more like a circus.
Gerard: I don't mind that. It's all got
a social application as far as I'm concerned. I tend to enjoy most of it. As
long as I can get a certain amount of
privacy within the whole thing then I
actually like being busy. Most of the
band do. We like playing. I can
imagine that if we do five tours of the
States on pretty much the same level
it might start to get a bit... We've
never really done that; everyth-
ingthat we've done has been one
stage up. It keeps the interest - each
time you tour you get a better bus.
D: Will you be doing a headlining
tour of North America next time?
G: We almost certainly will, yeah.
We'll do kind of one stage down
from The Church, although some of
the venues we've played with The
Church want us back anyway.
D: I could say to you, "Have you
got any secret ambition to be playing 50,000 seat arenas?"
G: It's not an ambition. My ambition
is to make good records. But what
happens to you happens because of
those records. If one were to sell two
million then you'd just try and deal
with that in as dignified a way as
possible. I'm quite prepared to just
see what happens and then adjust
accordingly. I don't think I've any
ambitions except to make an album
I'm absolutely happy with.
D: Isn't that one of those impossible things that would mean the
end of your creativity?
G: No, not at all. Then your ambition
becomes to make five albums you're
happy with. I'm happy with most of
our records, within the limitations in
which they were conceived. The
object is to remove as many of those
limitations as possible.
D: Here's a stock question. What
are your lyrical influences?
G: Influences come from everywhere . television, Hollywood, as
much as writers. Poetry, W.H.
Auden. I read mostly contemporary
American writers. I don't like British writing at all.
D: What do you think of the music
business that surrounds you? Do
you see it as a necessary evil?
G: It's necessary; I don't know if it's
evil. Say you work in an office, it's
like thinking they should pay you
just the same but you don't have to
go in and work. I wouldn't be so
arrogant as to think I'll write something I like, stick it out, and expect it
to sell millions just 'cause I'm so
brilliant. A lot of it is work but I
never expected in life that I wouldn't
have to work. Being on stage is the
fun, the rest of it's the work.
D: Well, you could easily say, "If I
work in this way, and follow this
style of songwriting, then I've got
a better chance of making BIG
BUCKS."
G: Some people do that, but the reason that we do what we do, dealing
with people, with reps, even doing
this interview, is the work. It's not
unpleasant. I enjoy it but the reason
that you do it is so that you don't
have to write a song that'll go down
well, say, in the Northwestern market. We write songs that we like,
there's no other criteria. After that,
if it helps it to get into the shops to go
and meet a lot of people from a record discount chain, then we'll do it.
It gives us independence.
And with that, trying to play
the system without losing integrity,
they were off to a MuchMusic video
interview. Ah, the hectic world of
the up and coming rock star. ®*
AUGUST 1990 13 Many people have told
me  that the reason
  they don't like jazz is
that it is not fun. Jazz does
have an air of impersonality
to it. However, there seems to
be an answer. After three albums and many extensive
tours (two in Europe), The
Shuffle Demons have become
one of the best jazz bands in
Canada. They seem to have a
really young following
mainly due to their fun style
that mixes jazz with rap, reggae and blues. Present is the
standard jazz style developed
by such giants as Sonny Rollins and Charlie Mingus, but
it's been modernized into a
type of music unique to The
Shuffle Demons.
The group was in Vancouver promoting their new
release "What Do You
Want?" on June 15 and 16. I
talked to alto sax player
Demon Richard Underhill at a
food fair on Granville Mall.
We were later joined by percussionist Demon Stich Winston and bassist Demon
George. This is what they had
to say.
On being a bridge to get
younger people to like jazz.
Demon Richard: It's certainly hard to be on a pedestal
and say we are converting
people to jazz but hopefully
we can sort of walk that line.
It's a difficult line to walk.
14 DISCORDER
People tend to be involved in
sects: "I'm a dixieland lover
and that's it," or "I love bebop
and everything else is terrible." Some people tend to
say that in jazz. What we're
doing is risky in that some of
the regular jazz fans can be
alienated by the fact that we
do vocal tunes and that sort of
stuff. But I think it's important to try and walk that line.
It helps us in getting a bigger
audience for what we do and it
helps the audience grow and
appreciate jazz  a  little  bit
Demon George: We do a lot
of different hybrid types of
jazz-related music but we do a
lot of improvisation which is
probably unusual for a dance
club or a dance scene. It's
done in the spirit of fun and
high energy and it comes off
and the electricity is transferable, so to speak. That's satisfying for us as musicians and
it's satisfying for them as
dancers, or whatever. If
they're enjoying the music.
the improvisations are what
surprisingly they are [enjoying]. You look and they're
clapping after solos. It's really rewarding to see that as
well as seeing them having
fun dancing.
On audience participation.
Demon Stich: That's something that we have always
tried to do. Like you were
talking about before that
younger people feel separated
from jazz because it's too
serious; we're trying to break
that wall. I think that's something that sort of got lost in the
music was the joy element,
the fun element, which you
really saw in the older jazz
like Fats Waller and people
like that. It was really fun to
go and hear the music. I think
that sort of got lost somewhere along the line. It's good
to see that it's coming back.
We try to get the audience
involved to break down those
barriers.
Demon Stich: That's why we
like to do that walking
through the audience thing
because it brings you so close
to the audience. Also, it lets
them participate when we do
that walk around. It is as
important a part of it as we
are. It's another thing that we
try to do to bridge the gap.
On what Shuffle Demons are
listening to now.
Demon Richard: In the van
there's all sorts of different
tapes, from Duke Ellington to
world music tapes.
Demon George: I like singers. Sometimes I listen more
to singers than bass players
because I like the freedom of
not having to put your fingers
to find the note. It's a real
liberating thing to hear these
guys whipping through
scales. I like Indian singers, I
like African singers, I like
Middle Eastern Music and
Native Indian stuff. In the car
it's great. Parry will bring all
his Sonny Rollins tapes and
different people will bring
different tapes. We listen to
each other's stuff.
Demon Stich: My main love
is jazz but I like all kinds of
music. I like a lot of the stuff
that George mentioned. For
me the black music tradition
is really what I'm into: funk,
r&b, reggae, blues, soul mu
sic, James Brown, all that
stuff. Because that's where
they come from. I think everyone in the band definitely
identifies with that tradition,
probably more so than the
white European tradition although I like some of that
music too. I don't know about
these guys, but I like 20th
century classical music,
Stravinsky,Perez,
Schomberg.
Demon Richard: I think we
all have an appreciation for
the black tradition-it's such a
rich tradition, there's so much
going on- but we do keep our
ears open to a lot of other
different things. There's so
much music going on that it's
hard to find what feels right
for you. What I'm looking for
is the feeling that is communicated. It's not necessarily the
technique of what they're
playing or the revolutionary
harmonies or anything like
that. If the feeling comes
across then that's what I'm
looking for when I listen to
music and it can happen in
any sort of music.
On playing music by dead
people.
Demon George: You're focussing on just a part of the
kind of music we do, some of
the jazz standards that we
have revamped. But if you
look at the individual people
in the band, they're all fairly
original sounding musicians
in themselves; they have their
own thing. So although we
have all these influences and a
lot of the jazz tradition that we
is dated back to the
'60s, I think we all have individual sounds that are our
own. Stich has his own sound,
I have my own bass style,
Richard has his own sax style,
Dave Parker has his own writing style and playing style,
and Perry White is an amazing saxophone player. We all
have our own strengths and
hopefully people see us as
originals as people, as musicians, and isn't that what
we're trying to come off as as
well.
Demon Stich: I don't think
that we're a "jazz band." I
think we're jazz influenced in
a lot of the music that we do
but a lot of the jazz purists
wouldn't call us a jazz band.
But quite frankly I don't care,
it's all music. When you really look at it, jazz is a very
small part of it. It's great, I
love it, but I don't want to
confine myself to one thing.
I'm a musician, not just a jazz
musician.
Demon Richard: Then again,
I've talked to jazz purists who
say what we are doing is really what they believe to be
jazz 'cause we're taking different styles of music and
improvising with them and
that is part of the tradition of
jazz as well. So I agree with
what Stich is saying, but there
are different ways of looking
at it. It is all about categoriz- ing things, which can often be
more divisive than helpful.
Demon George: Sorry, if I
could add one more thing, we
have this personal vibration
thing; hopefully people can
listen to the Demons on the
radio and whether it is a rap
oriented tune or a jazz oriented tune they could say that
must be The
Shuffle
Demons
because that
is Stich
Winston on
the drums or
Richard
Underhill \P
on the sax.
The idea is
to be recognized for how you play.
Demon Richard: Yeah, and I
think when you were saying
that a certain period of jazz
ended in 1969, I still think a
number of people continued
to progress and grow since
then. But there was a certain
amount of the playing community that decided that what
John Coltrane was doing was
the peak, the pinnacle of what
you could do on the saxophone so they had to sort of
sound like that. I think the
only way to do something new
is to come up with your own
sound, processed in your way.
I mean you have to sound like
the people before you because
you have to learn from them,
but you also have to meld it
and shape it in your own way.
I think that is what we are
trying to do, and lots of others
as well, but I think there is a
certain element of the jazz
community that wants to
sound like a very, very good
copy of what went on before
and that is kind of...
Demon Stich: ...easy to do
and it is a hard thing to get out
of, but if you look at those
guys, the ones these people
are copying, they didn't do
that, they learned from the
people before them and then
took it into a new area and
tried to developed their own
thing. I think a lot of people
miss the point that you have to
take your past influences and
study and respect them, but
then try to come up with
something of your own because that is what I think
music is all about.
Demon George: Yeah, basically I think any musician
should be able to be heard on
the radio and recognized
immediately   without   their
name being said. Everybody
should aim for that rather then
being "preservation hall"
musicians although there is a
place for that also. I mean we
have to keep that going. We
have to keep the history of the
music alive, but if I was to
speak to young musicians 1
would tell them to find their
own sound and it is going to
be a harder
road to find
your own
sound and be
recognized
because there
is the challenge of working through
the jazz community that
sometimes
puts pressure on young musicians to sound a certain way
or else they won't get the gigs.
One thing I was always wondering about jazz bands is:
let's say someone starts improvising, doing something
really weird that the others
didn't really want to do, can
the others take you back, or
do they have to follow you
where ever you go?
Demon George: That is interesting. I guess you have to
stay open because sometimes
two members of the band will
make two totally opposite
decisions in a given moment
and sometimes that works!
You have to have the total
perception of the band, and
where the music is going. The
hardest thing about playing
every night is to not use the
same tricks that worked the
night before and to be right in
the moment. When we are all
in tune with the moment it
works whether it is dissonant
Demon Stich: There has to be
some openness and some give
and take. It is almost like a
relationship because you
can't be too set in your ways.
The best thing to do is to
always come to practise sessions and gigs with an open
mind and no preconceived
notions on how the music
should sound. You should
approach the music that way.
Demon Richard: Because
the moment is the most important part because it is what
is happening now and it is
what people are experiencing.
I definitely have to agree with
the other guys, because I
know that certain times it is
that holding on to what has
happened in the past that has
destroyed the moment and if
you do that too much you can
become very stale. Because
pretty soon the music won't
be fun anymore at all. It becomes a job. I mean although
it is a job, you can have fun
with it.
Demon Stich: That is the
danger of success in music,
even commercial success, is
resting on your laurels because it can tend to make an
artist stagnant. You have to be
careful.
Demon George: It is because
they are afraid to fall, because
when you take chances you
will fall once in awhile. Most
of the time you don't and
something really wonderful
will happen musically. When
we are on stage we have to be
aware of the whole scene
because sometimes the dance
floor will be full of people and
it crosses your mind that you
want to keep the beat going
and keep them dancing and at
the same time the music wants
to go into this chaotic place.
Sometimes I'm confused
about what to do, but usually
it works out if you balance the
beat with the unexpected
stuff. Like we were doing a
tune in 5/4 last night which,
technically, shouldn't be
danceable, but they were all
dancing quite well to it. It is a
tune that is in composition
that we are working on, so
every night it
is quite different. That is one
of the nicest
things that
happens because we have
a few tunes
that are in
there raw state
and we know that they will
put us in our state of alertness
that requires us to be right
there.
Demon Stich: Getting back
to that point about being flexible, sometimes we will find
ourselves playing for people
who are really into dancing
and so we can accommodate
that. Other times we can be in
the circumstance where
people are really in the mood
for listening and then we
aren't as concerned with
keeping a groove and we can
go into other areas. That is
part of the flexibility of the
band and I don't really look
on it as compromising because we like to do it all. I like
to play danceable music and I
really like to play creative,
freer stuff. So, I think that is
one of the strong parts of the
band and one of the reasons
we can stay alive and stay
pretty successful.
On choosing cover tunes.
Demon   Richard:   We   all
know the song. We just kind
of happen on to these things. I
guess we don't do it enough
where we sit down and really
plan it out. What I like about
things recently is that we have
gotten away from covers a bit
more than usual. We are developing more of our own
stuff; and that's good because
I've always respected a band
that just plays their own music. And yet, I've always really enjoyed interpreting standards or interpreting songs
that people know. That's a
good way to get people interested in the band because they
know the groundwork of the
song and then you add your
own icing to it and change it.
But recently we have been
doing mainly Shuffle Demon
things. It feeds on itself and it
becomes more of an organic
unit and more of your own.
If our versions sound
original then that is good
because that is what we are
going for. We aren't doing
anything really conscious to
make it sound like us. I've always wondered, if someone
does a cover exactly the same
way the original was done
then what is the point. Why
not just lis-
ten to the
^f original?
With our
version of
Monk's "I
Mean You,"
I think
Monk
would want
you to take his tune and
change it a little bit and make
it your own and put it out. To
me, it's redundant if you are
just doing exactly the same
thing.
Demon Stich: You are never
going to sound as good as The-
lonius Monk anyway, so why
try and play exactly like him.
You may as well play like
yourself. None of us play the
piano professionally, anyway. But these guys don't try
to sound like Charlie Rouse or
Johnny Griffen, who both
played in Monk's band for a
number of years.
On classification and genre.
Demon George: I think to
make a mark in the music
world, you have to have the
magicof being unclassifiable.
Look at some of the people
who have come out and made
names for themselves. They
have created a lot of question
to whether they are jazz, rock
or country. I guess if you can
make people talk, and be in
the cracks, so to speak, like
k.d. lang. Her personality is
such that it is unclassifiable
with respect to what has gone
on before. She has the strength
of personality to carve
her own way
and look how
far she's
gone. We all
have so many
different influences in
the band, but
the combination ofthe five of us, well, you
can't really put your finger on
it. That is the way it should be,
kind of like a breath of fresh
air hopefully.
On the evolution ofthe band.
Demon Stich: We started out
just as a bunch of friends playing on the street. We had no
idea that it would turn into
what it is now. It's changed
quite a bit. It just kept growing, we started getting media
attention, we started getting
club gigs, we went to Europe
for three months in the summer of '85 and we did a
busking tour. We came back
with our first album, we made
a video, we got some grants,
we started touring Canada, we
did a six week stint at Expo
which was a really big thing
for us. We got some jazz festival gigs and now it's really
been growing musically.
We've been exploring new
territories. We'd been in Europe in the spring for six
weeks and we had some real
gigs, playing on the street.
We're going to be spending a
lot of time there this year.
We're starting to explore different markets. We're just
taking it day by day and it
sure is a lot different than it
used to be.
Demon Richard: The nice
thing about it was there were
no preconceptions. Five of us .
didn't get together and go,
"Okay, we want to create this
nice jazz pop band, make
videos and all that." We didn't
have this goal in mind. It was
just like, "Just have fun, make
some extra cash, blah blah
blah." It grew on its own. It
was like a plant or something
that we just kept feeding and
watering and watched it grow.
It's hard to be disappointed.
There are disappointments
along the way but over all, it
was a fluke. So any positive
thing you get out of it is wonderful.
On "East Berlin Angst."
Demon Richard: It's a true
story. We went over to Germany when the fclimate wasn't
so nice and friendly as it is
now. The
East Berlin-
9 ers are great
£ people   and
we really like
them. They
;are very laid
back and do
|not worry at
jail. They are
hardly goal
or success orienited at all. Yet,
the border guards were still
quite stringent. On our recent
tour we, unfortunately, didn't
get back to Berlin. We ended
up in some small Bavarian
towns instead of heading up
north to Berlin for the wall
smashing.
Demon Stich: We saw a lot of
little East German cars on the
Autobahn. That was about the
closest we got to East Germany.
Demon George: What about
the fashion show? We played
a fashion show in Hoff, Germany. We played this event
were it was The Shuffle
Demons from Canada and
some East German models
demonstrating their new
modern clothes. So, we did a
few tunes and they did a few
clothes demonstrations. It
was actually quite successful
and interesting. The West
Germans had a new experience also, seeing the East
German models, as much as it
Demon Richard: It was interesting. There have been
lots of changes there, but I
think that it is unfortunate that
they will be swallowed up by
the fast food chains or whoever will get in there first and
exploit it. They were really
unhappy with not having democracy as part of their political system, but they were really fortunate by having free
university, a chance to get a
job and stuff like medical care
and they liked that. They
wanted to strike a happy
medium between their eastern
socialist world and the new
western one. I don't think they
CON'D ON PAGE 21	
AUGUST 1990 15 The Dead Milkmen
stars   perennially   waiting
their jaunt to the U.K., all
ones.
r-%       il
_
Town Pump
backstage.
a         RrA
1          1     ll/P
sporting newly shorn locks
His personal style was as
Wednesday, June 27
The   music   of   Robyn
1         nf-M
L L I \/ l
except  Matt.   Steve  Turner
great as his musical talent. In
Talk   to   me   about   a
Hitchcock was just as won
V               L
m»                  V
looked rather collegiate al
between songs he joked about
"Methodist Coloring Book":
derful and wacky. I'm not a
\ - #
APtI/xM
though you wouldn't think so
Canada and being "the white
the best song all night, sung
big fan of "folk" music, but
Al.TlfllN
after   witnessing   his   guitar
sheep of the family", smiling
by Joe. There was no artificial
Hitchcock and his guitar were
HU 1   ■If11
acrobatics, including a head-
all the while. After playing
c icrgy directed at some repressed group that they feel
entrancing.   Songs   such   as
"Madonna of the Wasps" and
^8»»__
stand. Dan Peters was equally
frantic, flailing away with un
his set, he took open requests
from the audience including
K_f^^l
sorry for; these are Philadel
"My   Wife   and   My   Dead
a
equalled tenacity on his drum
Waltzing   Matilda,   Misty,
phia^, Americans!, but, un
Wife," really attracted atten
1
kit. The audience showed ap
Stella by Starlight and an ex
like  Graham   Greene's,   not
tion   to   the  man's   unusual
^BV/>-\
i
proval by stage diving like
cellent, super fast version of
quiet ones. The whole floor of
guitar   stylings   and,   more
w
._"V
mad. Mark Arm reminded the
Cheek to Cheek, much to eve
The Pump was overcome by
importantly, his bizarre lyr
*\                     'MfcK>
__WM^ <_    __ti__l_
faithful that it was Ladies'
ryone's delight.
the contagious dynamic of the
ics. Sometimes he would cock
tt- <_■* "E_>-A _w X
wv <w _■
Night and it was the ladies'
It was all a lot of fun, and
band which led to the tradi
his head, seeming to think up
P;_      • •'' \i
turn to stage dive but only a
I still can't believe I enjoyed a
tional celebratory stage dives
the next tall tale on the spot.
t)   _*•     ■'2
r^\   JEe.'/
few brave female souls took
jazz concert without a saxo
etc., etc.
For   two   hours  I   was
J!?\          \
up the offer.
phone   in   it.   Oliver   Jones'
Not   too  novel   overall
transported  through  the  bi
>m*'y^
The   few   things   that
trio's current release is 'Just
except it has been a while
zarre (and mercifully air-con
^\SJ?k^   i '
vX__i^»l5
marTed the gig were the sound
Friends',   featuring   trumpet
since I've seen the audience
ditioned!) worldof Hitchcock
/"  ^v^TT***^ -■
**     w U___
and   a   few   other  technical
player Clark Terry.
humiliated   by   a   performer
and woe to you who missed it.
"          %&'     7^*.
______■
glitches, caused by the con
Tommy Paley
they paid to see. I last saw it at
June Scudeler
■'■•' '•-.'*                    \
~   1____P
stant stage diving. One song
The Waterboys' gig on Hal
mT
was stopped midway because
Mike Stern/Bob Berg Band
lowe'en   when   Mike   Scott
essentially told an overzcal-
ous fan to shut up and then
Caterwaul
Town Pump
Sunday, July 1
*&m^^-
Steve's guitar gave out.
Jazz Fest
A friend of mine once
was swathed in black polypro
ing ex-Milkshake Billy Child
energy they give off and I was
said that good music can never
mimicked the person's west-
Led   by   a  powerhouse
pylene garbage bags, which
ish, who also contributed to
kind  of disappointed  Billy
be played loud enough, but
em howl (the one accompa
singer named Betsy Martin,
obviously made things a lot
Mudhoney's   latest   single.
Childish came back on stage
bad music sounds worse the
nied by the flailing arm). At
Caterwaul was as hard and
warmer. Sweat began to drip
Thee   Headcoats   were  ulti
to do his collaboration song
louder it is. This philosophy
this  gig,   Rodney,   the   lead
melodic as on their latest re
down my back.
mately primitive; it sounded
with the band.
applies to the music of the
singer, directed the audience
lease, "Portent Hue."
This atmosphere seemed
like   they   weren't   miced
All in all, it was a perfect
Mike Stem/Bob Berg Band as
in various dance manoeuvcrs
Martin is the focus of this
to get the crowd going, kids
through    the    P.A.    They
setting: an abandoned garage
their music is very loud and,
and  a  chant.  The  Honkey:
hard rockin' band. Although
tossing each other about, and
sounded cavernous. Childish
for   three   garage   bands.
at the same time, really good.
"Dear, I think the new neigh
she's not very large physi
the  first  band  hadn't  even
and co. wore matching Sher
Couldn't ask for anything bet
For myself, it is interesting
bors are ethnic." The Vancou
cally, she has a strong wailing
gone on yet. Beat Happening
lock Holmes' hats and they
ter.
that I like their electric jazz
ver audience served as pup
voice that sounded as impres
were up first; I don't know
were polite, bowing after ev
Greg Garlick
fusion because my belief was
pets, served as fools.
Later, I asked Rodney,
sive live as it does on tape.
The rest of the band tended to
much about this three piece
ery song.
Oliver Jones
that electric instruments have
no place in jazz and that the
but   they   seemed  ^^^^^^am
"Do you believe in God?" At
stay in the background, pro
subdued ^^^A\\
^^^^^ short res-
Jazz Fest
electric guitar and the saxo
first he said no. When he saw
viding a throbbing backdrop
^^r^
_________ pite<
Oliver Jones opened the
phone cannot both be used as
that I was serious he said he
for her.
Br    ....
^
~
Vancouver Jazz Festival at
lead instruments effectively
did but not the same kind of
Unfortunately, as won
.    the Vancouver East Cultural
in the same song. This concert
God that other people believe
derful as Caterwaul was, the   .
^k Centre in splendid style. The
changed my mind.
in. Being an enquiring and
crowd   seemed   to   suffer _4
^^L Montreal piano player put
How the band combined
easily swayed mind, I wanted
from the "Sunday Night in _^H
^^on a fine solo display
Stern's incredible power on
to know more. So I, from a
Vancouver"   syndrome_^M
^^k for a packed enthusi-
the guitar with Berg's light
pseudo-devout Roman Catho
People had a tendency_^H
f
s_
^^^[^^astic audience.
ning attack on the tenor sax I
lic background, dared to ask.
to gawk at the band a_^H
-Ifc-.^
L        ^^k               I was wor-
don't know, but it worked.
Rodney talked spasmodically
if they had never seen^^B
jMk  ^
H^^ried that I would be
The two worked so well to
about The  Church  of Sub
one before. Too bad^H
r^l ;
s^^bored by a solo pi-
gether,  sharing  the lead in
Genius: an elitist group for
for the band, ex- ^H
_l
*-**■■-*   .
^■ano  concert but
every song and compliment
the non-elite. It has something
pending a lot of en- ^H
Jk
^H from   the   first
ing each other instead of tak
to do with an alien attack by
ergy for very little ^H
1
PGM W
^H song I, like eve-
ing anything away from the
Bob who will take away the
response,       but ^M
1
4-_-_-_-_P
^H ryone else, was
music. One final good note
"chosen people" on July 5,
hopefully     next ^H
H__F
"""^-BlL
^B totally     capti-
was the incredible drumming
1998, but I didn't find out at
time people will be^H
i_«
^BP
^■vated by Jones'
of Dennis Chambers. He did
what time.
more   awake   and^H
f    l|
•% flP
^Hl mastery   of  his
the most amazing ten minute
'
Toni-lynn
appreciative.           ^H
June Scudeler^H
*       %
W
^Rfinsturment   and
^^m his      excellent
solo, bringing down the house
and convincing me that he's
•
Robyn Hitchcock
A
^V handling of his au-
going to one of the big names
Tom Lee Music Hall
Mudhoney               ^__T
l
i
^^r dience.     Sensing
in  drumming   in   the   years
Wednesday, July 11
The International Mo^»||P
^^Fhow the crowd was
ahead.
He strode on stage with
torsports Garage, Se-^Spi
!__
_____
^^m feeling at all times, he
Another   great   festival
his guitar and started one of
attle, WA                        ^9jg
jk
^^F adjusted his song selec-
crowd thoroughly enjoyed the
his many hilarious and im
Saturday, July 14             ^H
m
^^^tion accordingly.
show, but I got very tired
promptu stories. This one was
I arrived in Seattle mi-^
~ ■*       m
^p       Most performers have a
about 3/4 of the way through
about how  he  fulfilled his
daftemoon and scrambled to
definite style, but Jones'com
because   the  energy   in  the
contractual   obligation   by
some   of  the   local  record
bined   blues,   jazz,   boogy-
music never let up and it was
merely   walking   from   his
stores, just managing to pro
rather^*^HBj||yjk *J§H?
^^j^^^: h e
woogy, gospel, classical and
an   exhausting   experience.
dressing room to the stage and
cure two Mudhoney tickets
^^^^^
^Htag^^^^r^^re aso n
many other influences made
This music really lends itself
remaining behind the stage
for the big gig that evening.
They wove a web ^^^^>^r__l
Hr^^^^^^why    everyone
him impossible to categorize.
well towards live perform
curtains. He mused that this
Although I had second
of rather interesting sounds
was   there:   Mudhoney!   As
This amazing flexibility was
ance and thus comes across
frustrated the audience since
thoughts once we arrived at
but very few of the audience
soon as they launched into
the major reason he drew such
quite flat on tape. Although I
we could see the curtains rip
the International Motorsports
members got caught up by it.
their first song,  the crowd
a diverse crowd yet satisfied
do recommend both Stem's
pling. He also claimed that
Garage, after about an hour of
I guess the crowd was expect
went into spasms. Mudhoney
everyone. Jones played fast
and Berg's new releases, I
between the folds of the cur
waiting we were finally let
ing a more powerful blast.
washed over the mass and
Ray Charles-like songs and
strongly suggest you catch
tains was a time vortex con-
inside. The first thing I no
Thee Headcoats took the
kicked out the jams. They
mixed them with some beauti
them live next time around.
ta ning hippies and aging rock
ticed was that the auto garage
stage right afterwards, featur-
looked great just coming off
ful, lyrical Keith Jarret-like
Tommy Paley
1(  DISCORDER The Stranglers
10
(CBS)
These four guys are like
gods to me, and each time they
release something new I can't
help thinking, "What happens
if this is shit?"
Deep sigh of relief. All
of you clustering about the
New Releases stand at A&B
can relax and fork over the
dough. Not only is this album
great, it carries quite a whal-
lop. Judging from their last
full album of new material,
"Dreamtime," I was expecting something quiet: not this.
Personally, I'm waiting for
my eviction notice. The old
broad who lives upstairs
probably knows the words to
all the songs by now.
The band, working this
time with producer Roy Thomas Baker, have trapped a
whole truck load of power
onto this one. There is no trace
of their softer side which surfaced on the last three or four
albums. No one who is a fan
of their older, punkish work
can now complain that The
Stranglers have lost their guts.
Okay, so they do a cover:
"96 Tears." But they're able
to take a dog-eared, overplayed C-ISL favourite and
inject it with the same life that
they've given to the rest of the
album. At only 35 minutes in
length its ten bouncy little
tunes have a certain freshness
which hasn't really proliferated since the days of The
Zombies or Tommy James.
And can Hugh Cornwell sing
or what? At the start of "Man
of the Earth," I have to sit
down and think Holy Shit!
Of course, 10 is worth
buying just to have a picture
of J.J. Burnel dressed up as
Maggie Thatcher.
Brent Copeland
Guru Josh
Infinity 12"
(BMG)
It seems that the UK has
cornered the market on house
and other styles of dance
music in that vein. Here's
another artist from the UK
whom I had never heard of
before and will probably
never hear of again. There are
a lot of artists into this type of
music who release one or two
cuts and then you never hear
from them again. Guru Josh
has put out the single "Infin-
ity-1990's-Time for the
Guru."
"Infinity" is a light track
that gives one the feeling of
walking in outer space or
dancing with angels. The cut
is centred around the trance
inducing sounds of a saxophone and flows into breaks
along the lines of Gino Latino
and S-Express. A nice light
snack just before bed. Also
check out the "Spacey Saxophone" mix on the B-side.
Noah Grant
Nick Cave
The Good Son
(Mute)
Yes, ol' Nick is back, off
heroin and with a new found
spirituality. Many musicians
find that the most creative
periods in their lives coincide
with periods o f intense chemi-
cal abuse and have the dilemma of continuing with the
hedonism, making great music, and dying a wonderful
rock 'n roll death, or cleaning
up and hoping that their creativity stays with them. Nick
Cave has taken the tough road
and used it to his advantage.
This album sounds for
the most part like a collection
of twisted Deep South gospel
songs. It's a direction that
Nick and his band The Bad
Seeds have been headed since
the early days. I think they've
captured the essence of the
Negro spiritual so perfectly
"Father why are all
the children weepin' ?
Oh they are merely
cryin' son.
Oh are they merely
crying Father?
Yes, the weepin' is yet
to come."
Typically   with   Nick
Kool Rock Jay and the DJ
Slice
Tales from the Dope Side
(BMG/Jlve)
These guys fall right into
the rapidly expanding field of
smooth (or over-produced)
rap. They do have positive
messages  in  most  of their
faster tempo and faster rap.
This song uses the sample
"cause I'm notorious" from
LL Cool J in addition to KR J's
ample rapping of the same
phrase.
It's good to hear a lot of
scratching on this album as it
seems to be appearing less and
less on records these days, but
unfortunately they are all the
same style. This album
sounds pretty good and is
better than some of them out
there, but you won't find any
revelations here.
Adam Sloan
CMX
Kolmikarkl
(Bad Vugum)
Maarti feels discontented as this is his last summer of freedom before having
to serve in the army and then
look for a job. He disembarks
from the tramway in a small,
grey suburb of Helsinki near
the dark, moody woods which
border the endless "realm of a
thousand lakes," lakes which
are always a silvery steel colour under the weak nordic
sun.
"Paska! I'm bored!" he
that it's hard to believe that
the music is being produced
by an anemic Australian with
a German band, some of
whom spend their time terrorizing with Einsturzende
Neubaten.
The album is full of the
usual Cave-isms-Pain, Loss,
the Outlaw, and above all,
throughout the entire album,
Sadness. Check out this verse
from "The Weeping Song":
Cave, the sadness is often
accompanied by black humour and even wallowing
delight. I never was a fan of
those rock 'n' roll deaths,
believing that music is not one
of the few things worth dying
for. It's good to see such a
strong album from the de-
toxed Nick Cave. Now what's
Shane McGowan up to these
days?
Peter Lutwyche
songs but they've already
been put on wax by the likes
of Public Enemy and BDP.
Their sound is very relaxed
which can be good, but they
rely too much on already
proven beats (you can hear
the funky drummer in three
tracks!) to which they add
bass lines, scratching and
rapping. "Notorious," the first
song on "The Slice Side," is
an  obvious  single  with its
mutters to himself. He's tired
of menacing the suburbs with
his gang of fellow moped
buddies, and he doesn't have
enough money to pay for the
beer which makes hanging out
in the square all day more
tolerable. And he's tired of
his parents always complaining about his hair, his clothes
and his musical tastes. And to
make matters worse, Jutta, his
girlfriend, has just gone off to
Germany to study in a univer- |
sity.
He walks up the six
flights of stairs to the fifty-six
square metre social housing
apartment which is the pride
of his parents. As usual he is
alone. He lies restlessly on his
bed, staring at the posters on
the wall of his musical heroes- The Sex Pistols, Husker
Du, and Terveet Kadet. But
his favourite band of late is a
new group called CMX. He
likes CMX's new album,
"Kolmikarki" because it is so
much different than all the
relentless Finnish hardcore
which he blares in his ears all
evening long. CMX is as good
as all those bands from Germany, England, and America
who somehow always seem to
pass Helsinki by...
Meanwhile, on a sunny,
relaxing day in the plush,
delicately scented "listening
lounge" of CITR Radio, a
content, perhaps even happy,
dj, all spiffy in his latest ethno
t-shirt and neon jammers and
a little giddy from his second
cafe latte of the day, touches
the needle down on the opening track of CMX's "Kolmikarki" in his dedicated weekly
study of new releases received at the station. Instantly
he is struck by the power and
intensity of the album, but
also its skill, variety, and the
growling voice of the lead
vocalist who sounds like a
cross between Bob Mould and
The Muppet Show's Swedish
Chef. CMX is not like all
those other Finnish hardcore
bands, which are so sparse and
monotonous. At least these
guys seem a little more happy,
the dj thinks. And each track
seems to sound so different-
sometimes folksy and methodical, and other times hard
rockin 'and solid thrashin',
tight enough to make all the
NoMeansNo-niks take note.
But why are the nordic
types always so depressed?
the dj muses. They consistently have the world's highest standard of living, they
are the oldest living people
next to the Japanese, and they
have all those fjords and
things. Maybe it's having to
drive all those boxy Volvos?
Or is that only in Sweden?
And, come to think of it,
where the heck is Finland
anyhow? All this thinking has
made the dj quite fatigued.
Carefully recording CMX's
"Kolmikarki" album in his
notes, he decides to take the
rest of the afternoon off and
go down to the beach and get
a Pepsi.
J. Boldt & P. Sickert
AUGUST 1990 17 Calgary. During the
Stampede. Hot July
days  when  oil  com-
 'pany employees dress
up as if they are cowboys. Any
excuse to party...
The backyard was crawling with Land Office personnel,
and spouses of Land Office personnel, the males wearing cowboy hats and string lies. The
living room and kitchen were
occupied by engineering types
from Reservoir and Exploration
- boots, dungarees, plaid shirts,
neckerchiefs - one guy had a
holster with what I hoped were
toy guns. Another one, quite
drunk, stopped me. He put a
hand under my chin and lifted
my head till our eyes met. He
breathed in my face, "Who are
you, boy?" Then he laughed. A
woman who gets off the elevator
one floor below mine pulled him
away from me and apologized.
"I think you want downstairs,"
she said.
Downstairs, the rumpus
room was a heterogeneous mix
of smaller departments including, somewhat to my relief, a
knot of faces from the Computing Center. I exchanged
"Wha'tcha drink in pardner"
with a few of ihem and then our
sentences became punctuated
with difficult pauses and long
glances down at the cans of beer
Thankfully, one of the
other programmers started to
complain about the latest specs
for her production graph package. In quick order several
pieces of conversation started in
our circle: the threat of another
operating system upgrade, IBM
suffocation of the industry, and
the merits of C relative to FORTRAN. I didn't say much, which
is the way I am when these same
people talk around the office
18 DISCORDER
coffee maker.
I noticed, on my way
downstairs, a guitar leaning
against an unfinished laundry
room wall. An engineer -1 think
he was in Research - saw it too,
and now he was strumming the
first few changes of 'Stairway to
Heaven.' His fingers stumbled
over the F major seventh and he
restarted the song, but lost it in
the same spot. He began a third
time, playing faster, as if momentum would carry him
through, but he missed the F-
seven again. Following his fifth
try I took the battered Gibson
from him and tuned it. Only as
an afterthought did I trip through
a   few   half-remembered   bass
I did a run of twelve bar
blues, and looked up to see personnel gathered around me.
They weren't all Computer personnel either. People from other
departments - some of whom I
recognized: Brad, or maybe
Brian, Offshore; the man with
clenching teeth. Accounting;
the lady with silver roots, Mail
Room - were listening as well. I
was out of practice and playing
an acoustic guitar instead of my
electric bass, slill, they thought I
was pretty good. They bunched
around me, careful not to touch
the guitar neck, while I ran
through everything I knew.
It was my supervisor's
wife who asked me if I played in
a band. "Well, I used to," I said,
"but we, I mean me- I, only
played in public once."
"Oh yeah, what were you
called?" It was the "Stairway to
Heaven" engineer who asked
this.
I tried to say "The Mistakes," but my tongue faintly
slipped on the "s"s and my
band's name came out "The
Misses Stake." Upstairs a stereo
played Deep Purple, but I hadn't
noticed it until then. Now I
could name the particular song
and the album it was from. "The
Mistakes" I repealed, partly to
correct my pronunciation and
partly to break the stillness
which suddenly gripped the
basement.
The "underground music
scene" was generally ignored by
the entertainment sections of the
local daily papers, and The
Mistakes were no exception.
We did, however, get a momentary splash of publicity from the
city news desks. Our lead
singer, Chris Miss, died following a gig, the one where I made
my debut and final appearance.
There's something about the
photo caption "A Fatal Mistake"
that obviously sticks in people's
minds. I say "obviously" because there was a white-haired
geologist at my elbow who
remembered some of the story.
He finally said, after everyone
in the room had been silent for at
least fifteen seconds, "The Fatal
Mistakes? I thought everybody
in that, er, rock group killed
themselves?"
"No," someone else said,
"just their drummer. Choked on
vomit." A few personnel
laughed.
"Stairway lo Heaven"
spoke up again, "No. It was
their lead singer. O.D.ed didn't
he?" He looked at me for confirmation. "You mean you played
in that Fatal Mistake?"
I bought my bass and amp
from a friend's older brother. He
had been laid off from Dome
Petroleum and needed to pay off
a credit card. I always wanted to
play an instrument-actually,
piano would have been my first
choice, but when I heard he was
selling his bass, not even my
parents could dissuade me. By
my second year of university,
bass had become the way I
unwound after classes. It was
relaxing, my release, to sit on
my bed and run through scales.
Even when art assignment kept
me at the terminals past midnight I would still practice for a
few minutes before I turned in.
If there was time I would invent
riffs, five or six notes long. I'd
play them over and over, my
fingers locked in a pattern of
movement and sound. It would
posses me: I would find myself
posing in pajamas before my
dresser mirror, the neck of my
black Fender pumping like an
oil well. Eventually it would
wind down; the riff would lose
its power. I would set down my
bass, unplug my amp, — the
volume control set below "2" so
as not to disturb my folks — shut
off the light, and be asleep in
There's a bulletin board in
this music store just south of
downtown. On it, between notices of guitars for sale and upcoming concerts, one can find
slips of paper which say things
like "Ear bleeding guitarist
wishes to join or start band.
Cramps, V.U., Psychic T.V.,
Early Floyd. See Max at the
National" or "Wanted: drummer
for all-girl slug-a-billy outfit.
Must have own kit. Verm, 283-
2097."
Close to the end of my third
year, I put up my own notice. At
home I had printed on a sheet of
loose leaf "Matthew Hat, Bass,
260-1996." On the way to the
store, however, I reworked it
several times and decided on
"Bitchin bassist looking for
band-Mat Hat 260-1996."
I stopped waiting for the
phone to ring about the same
time my summer job started. It
was my first computer job, and
although I was just a tape librarian, it was a big step up from
stapling boxes together or sorting geological samples. I took
the train downtown, standing,
my elbows level with those of
secretaries, clerks, and men in
two piece suits. Instead of runners and T-shirts, I began wearing black leather shoes, dress
shirts and sweaters. I even
bought three ties - a red one with
tiny white dots, a baby blue one
with little shields, and a yellow
one with stripes.
Coming home one Monday, I found a phone message
taken by my mother.
Matthew,
Stiff (crossed out) Steve
Prickly called you about rock
business, 220-3992
One phone call later and I
was in a band. A week later, one
rehearsal, one gig, and that band
was history. We practiced on a
Wednesday night in a warehouse near the old airport terminal. Not including me, there
were two members of the band
present: the lead guitarist, Stiv
Prickly, and a girl who didn't
speak, or play, or do much of
anything that night.
Stiv introduced us.
"That's our drummer, MT, like
in empty space." I tried to shake
her hand but she pulled away.
"Our ex-bassist covered
out on us," Stiv told me.
"Covered out?" I said.
"Yeah, right now that
heavy metalloid, sellout, bozo is
playing covers in a union bar
band. Been practicing with them
without tellin' us for over a
month. Found out last week and
gave him the punt. Damn cover
band. We," Stiv said this with
some pride, "We don't do covers.  All original material."
"Oh," I said.
"Anyway, we're supposed
to warm up for the Fury Heads
this Friday.   That's where you
"Fury Heads?"
"Yeah, it'll be packed with
underaged skateboard punks -
but what can you do, eh? A gig's
» gig"
"Wait, I don't know any
songs yet."
"Don't sweat bullets,
you'll do okay. We'll just put
you down a little in the mix."
He started showing me
songs. "This is called "Eyes on
Fire.' Goes C-F-C G-F-C." He
played it and expected me to
join in. When I caught up he
said "Okay, we do this six times
and then there's a break in G V
F, like this." I stopped and asked
him what kind of bass line he
wanted. He looked at me as if I
was strange, "Hey, when we're
in G, just play something G, and
dammit, don't get fancy." He
went on with the lesson. "This is
called "The Ninth Hour' and it
goes C D and then down to your
E." The songs kept coming; the
titles and tunes piled up in my
mind: "Scourged Flesh" in F B
flat and C, "The Return" in F and
E, "Forbid My Children" in G,
"Mustard Seed" in G flat minor,
"Betrayal," "Unverified Stigmata," "Forgiven." They began
to run together, all sound the
same. "His Head on His Coin,"
"something Harvest," "Spewed
Out of Mouth," "Pierced in the
Side."  Finally he stopped.
"Crazy titles," I said. "Are
there words?"
"Yeah, Chris writes them."
"Chris?"
"Oh yeah, Chris Miss, our
lead screamer. We don't practice with him.  Too wired."
"Wired?"
"Hyper, you know.
Worked up.  Out of control."
It may seem strange, but
the strongest memory I have of
Continued on page 26 There have been summers here at Local Motion
when we've received one or
two demo tapes in a week
(maybe all the musicians
were on tour, or off tree-
planting)- but this month has
brought ten local tapes and
twenty-four from out of
town. Obviously, there isn't
room to review them all, so,
for anyone who's interested,
here's how some kinds of
demos are given priority.
First of all, bands (whether
from Vancouver or somewhere else) that play the
Vancouver clubs quite often
will almost always get reviewed. But the band (or
artist) has to fit into that giant
category of "alternative" to
get playlisted at CiTR in the
first place, so, for example,
Top 40-type heavy metal
isn't likely to get written
about here, unless maybe
there's a specific point to be
made. But if there are too
many tapes from locally
known artists to fit into this
space, or not enough, this
humble reviewer practices a
more personal method of selection. Sometimes that
means not writing about
styles of music I don't feel
Obviously all this means that
Local Motion has its limitations, but just remember that
Discorder is always looking
for more writers, so anyone
who's interested in helping
out with reviews should call
the station (228-3017) and
offer their services.
This month's demos include new selections from
the extremely good (and deservedly popular) Paula
Rempel and Bruce A and the
Secular Atavists cassettes,
that I'd just like to mention
again even though they've
already been reviewed here:
"I Ride My Horse" and
"Everyday"* respectively.
And now for the newer additions:
@#*&!(pronounced "Cartoon Swear")-"Long Face."
This always quirky sounding
band seems to move toward
something closer to rock and
roll here, while still retaining
their distinctive style. At
least there's a tune discernible even to fans of easier-to-
listen-to types of music, a repetitive and catchy groove,
and a beat, adding yjj^ to
what's probably their most
accessible offering yet.
the Rainwalkers, Memory
Day has some of the same
shortcomings as that other
North Shore band. While
both songs are very pretty,
with lots of acoustic guitar
and, in the case of "Death of
a Friend," violins too, they
aren't breaking any new
ground. Everything sounds
sensitive and subdued; the
qualified to review, and
sometimes it just means
choosing my personal favourites of a given month.
Memory Day-"AddictIon
and Devotion," "Death of a
Friend." Managed by Brian
Watson, former drummer for
lyrics and vocals give the impression of well-bred, stoic
suffering that's so attractive
to teen-aged girls just start
ing to stay out late Saturday
nights. These are good
songs, but whatever energy
is here tends to get weighed
down by the production
(especially in the case of
"Death of a Friend," with its
not-quite-real-sounding violins). A video or two with the
singer shyly looking (with
big, sensitive eyes) into the
camera and then down at his
guitar ought to ensure Memory Day a place in the hearts
of Grapes of Wrath fans.
The Picasso Set-"Bitter
Lemon," "Toytown." Another subdued release- this is
the slowest and quietest so
far from The Picasso Set.
Both songs are quite nicely
recorded (in an all-night session at Profile), with Ian
Noble on drums. "Bitter
Lemon" has a sound quite
reminiscent of circa '67
Beatles, especially in the intro, making the more '90s,
synthetic keyboards that are
throughout most of the song
appear a little incongruous.
In that sense, "Toytown" is
more successful, but I have
to admit that I don't get the
joke, written on my cassette
label, that this song is about
the West Van Planning Department. So far. The Picasso Set's sound has been
most successful when the instruments and production are
an authentic '60s kind of fast-
moving pop, complemented
by Dave Lea-Smith's heartfelt (and Tom Verlainesque)
vocals- here everything
seems to be slowed down just
a little, and more than a little
sad. Vancouver isn't kind to
pop bands, and I wonder if
it's   this   realization   that's
given this group's most recent tape its introspective
and somewhat melancholy
flavour. If so, I hope someone can cheer the band up
just a little bit.
Video Barbeque-"Subway
5 p.m.," "The Stegasaurus
Stomp." Video Barbeque is
a lot tighter, more focussed,
and yes, accessible, here than
I remember them- this 6-song
cassette even includes a
cover of the "Mission Impossible" theme. "Subway,"
which is full of loud horns
and interspersed with lots of
voices saying things like "I
can't believe I missed the
bus," is indeed noisy and
fast-moving.In"Stegasaurus
Stomp," the singer is self-
possessed enough to ask the
dancing dinosaurs, "What
about extinction?" Loud, big
jazz with growly vocals, real
wit, and plenty of finger
snapping. All in all, lots of
energy here, and a very slick
product.
Planet of Splders-"Place I
Found," "Carnival." This
five song tape (recorded at
Fluid Studios) is much better
produced than their previous
demo, and the songs are quite
a bit different sounding, too:
"Carnival" could almost
have been inspired by the Replacements; "Place I Found"
even features some acoustic
guitar. While the vocals are
a little sloppy, Planet of Spiders is apparently quite successfully settling into a
sound, perhaps better heard
on a song from the tape that
wasn't playlisted- "I Was," a
really good example of the
hard pop tradition, with
growly singing and a style
something   like   the  Grue-
Uneven Steps-"Censor the
Bible." Someone should
warn Evan Symons about the
danger of sending out cassette inserts that say things
like: "Here's some tunes to
wretch [sic] over" (a lot of
reviewers would be tempted
to agree). But you have to
admit, the leader of Uneven
Steps (now without Dirt
drummer Jennifer Orme) is
nothing if not hard-working,
and, demonstrating Symons'
ongoing search for a sound,
"Censor the Bible" is quite
different from the band's last
demo. This is a pretty standard hard-rock guitar song,
with dreadful singing and,
for a twist, a tempo that
gradually slows down and
speeds up.
Emily Faryna-"Ding-A-
Llng,"  "Lonely  Sunday."
This 6-song cassette, The
Return of the Repressed,
recorded at Bullfrog and in
West Berlin, is available in
stores or by mail-order
through Spiral Records. And
this is the same Emily, I believe, who gave us "I've Got
a S teel B ar in my Head," back
in the early-mid '80s. Emily
still has her sense of humour-
"Ding-A-Long'"s musical
accompaniment could just as
easily be heard in a cheesy
monster movie, and in the
case of "Lonely Sunday" it's
almost a synth disco parody.
As for the lyrics, the extreme
delay on the vocals (especially with the second song)
means it's just about impossible to make them out,
which is a shame. Does this
mean we'll just have to go
see one of her performances?
It's probably not a bad idea.
LikeRain- "Fremont,
Nearly   Midnight."     The
band's from Seattle; the cassette, called Razorblade
Shoes, is in the stores; and
these ten songs were recorded at Conrad Uno's 8-
track Egg Studios (home of
the Young Fresh Fellows and
Fastbacks, among others).
This is a duo that would be
perfect at the Railway, but I
don't think they've been able
to come up to Vancouver yet.
The production on the tape is
nice, the sound is simple
(violin, vocals, and guitar),
and all the songs are good.
This song, in particular, has a
funny, almost medieval quality musically, while the
wavering vocals tell the sad
story of waiting for a drug
dealer of the opposite sex.
Like Rain's fresh sound is
not quite folk-pop, and somewhat like Lou Reed. A high-
quality cassette.
Watch Children-"Klnda
Retarded." Also American,
but this time from New Jersey. The note on the tape
cover, "Ex-Laughing
Soupdish," doesn't help me a
lot, but I have a personal
weakness for any band with
song titles like "Go-Go Action Girl," "Coconut Life-
saver," and "Watermelon
Soup," and these titles do say
it all. Love them or hate
them, the Watch Children
play quick simple garage-
pop songs with (no kidding)
silly lyrics. Often funny,
always sincere-sounding.
AUGUST 1990 19 \~W t all started innocently
JH enough as a lame,
square trip down to Seattle, in a desperate attempt to
catch wah-wah fuzzbox lords
Mudhoney at perhaps their
last gig for a "little" while.
Yeah, those munsters of
Northwest rawk didn't disappoint either: it was such an intense happening that even
Tad, Seattle's big huge piece
of shit equivalent to Ran-
dyBachman, stagedove into
the huge all-ages crowd. So
after three and a half hours of
pure Seattle puget power I left
the International Motor
Sports Garage with the feeling I'd seen the wildest, most
un-Tom Cochrane like concert a loser could imagine.
But to top it all off, upon leaving the Emerald City, in my
possession was one treasured
Betty Page "Captured Jungle-
Girl 3D" Magazine purchased
earlier in the day from Fallout
Records and Skateboards.
Sure I bought a few other
'zines; however, none could
compare to seeing Betty Page
in 3D.
Indeed, Ms. Page is a fitting reminder of all that was
pure in the 1950's-black hair,
conservative bathing suits,
and weaved ropes. Weaved
ropes? No joke, Betty Page
eitviETTPi
actually allowed herself to be
tied up for smelly 1950's rags
in various states of undress.
Rarely showing flesh, and
often mock catfighting other
beauties in battles climaxed
by tame spanking, Ms. Page
has quietly become one of the
most popular relics of post
war America. Her exploits
have been documented in a
wide range of publications:
Rolling Stone, Film Threat,
Spin and, as an added bonus
to all ya Betty lovers, there's
THE BETTY PAGES, a bite-
sized juicy journal devoted
exclusively to "the woman."
Nevertheless, despite her
legitimacy, the following
conversation took place between me, a boyish victim of
the popular culture, and Canada Customs.
n H
C.C. How long ya been away?
N.T.H.S. About 15 hours.
Where were ya?
At a rock concert in Seattle.
What band?
Mudhoney.
What are ya bringing back?
Seveojjpllars worth of magazines.
What type?
Rock magazines.
Let's see one.
I show her the other 'zine in
my possession, Psychotronic
Video. After pondering for a
bit she says.
You're going to have to go
inside.
Inside Canada Customs:
This is okay [pointing to Psychotronic Video], but you're
not going to be able to take
this [Betty Page 3-D Comix
Book] over the border.
Why?
It's Bondage.
C'mon, it's from 1950.
// you murdered someone is
1950, it would still be murder
today.
No, you'd be on parole!
We can't let you take this over
the border.
Was I stupid in buying this
then?
This magazine depicts Bondage, and although you could
probably buy one like it downtown, you can't take it across
the border. Do you want to
place a claim?
Aww, Aww...Forget it! Betty
Page's popular enough in
Canada.
And with that statement,
I abandoned to the crown one
Betty Page "Captured Jungle
Girl 3-D" Magazine.
Ahh shit. &
I digress. It is interesting to
note that comix have, in the last
five years, begun to be appreciated as more than just a staple of
children's free time. Up until the
mid-late eighties comix were still
primarily seen as a source of entertainment for illiterate adults,
nerdish adolescents, or precocious children. Then, somewhere
in time, attitudes shifted. In the
shadow of Andy Warhol and Roy
Lichtenstein the avante garde of
east coast culture stamped their
seal of approval on vehicles such
as RAW and artists such as Jooste
Swart. The spectre of illegitimacy that had plagued comix
since the mid-late fifties began
vanishing into the night. Not that
the plodders who hack away on
creating the seven millionth Batman story have begun receiving
invitations to swanky dinner parties and chi-chi gallery openings,
but, in fact, there has been a
subtle shift in the direction of
people's attentions.
This subtle shift is occuring
in direct correlation with another
emerging media that has also
changed the way people think
about what it is and what it does.
In 1985, the first computer sporting the GUI or graphical user
interface was made commercially available. This interface
was 180° turnaround from anything that had come before. Not
only did it make the relationship
between the computer and the
person using it easier and more
intuitive, it also made it easier to
understand what was being done.
It has been speculated that
20 DISCORDER
the human sense of sight is as
important to us as is the sense of
smell to a dog- that our visual
organs are the brains first sensory
probe into any evolutionary experience. Be that as it may, we
like to watch. We like to watch,
but by the time we're five we've
seen it all. What is left but the
practical manifestation of alternate realities? The ability to render and perceive renderings has
been a powerful ally of con-
ze the first cave
drawings in Lascaux. As we have
become more sophisticated in
our design of civilizations, so
have we become more precise in
our renderings of and our beliefs
about the world in which we live.
Imagine that the first person to
draw on a cave wall left the cave
totally imbued with the power
such an act of majesty allowed
them. Now imagine that the
population of Flin Flon, Manitoba suddenly, overnight,
stopped watching television and
started to create in their spare
time. Would anyone starve on
their streets? Would everyone
sleep better at night?      V
The graphic interface has
been with us a long time but up
until the last little while has been
the private domain of the elites of
our culture. For example, the
King who endlessly gazed at the
portrait by Da Vinci or the Empress who held the marble icons
of another culture in the palm of
her hand. What comix did at the
turn of the century was to program visualization into the minds
ofthe everyperson. This of course
coincides with the birth of the
Amercan dream in which a poor
person from Hells Kitchen could
brave all odds and rise to the top.
Before 1900 poor people simply
did not rise to the top of anything
other than the manure pile and
rarely there if at all. But comix
brought along fantasy which
spoke of possibilities and the
belief that things could be better
than they were. People began to
make room for change like they
never had before.
Radio, the primal tool of
visualization, made room for
motion pictures which in tun-
made room for television which
allowed for personal computers
which are clearing a path for in-
teractives which will create the
maps for virtuality. As well, each
age of technology brings with it a
social conscience that improves
upon the one before. Now imagine, if you will, a technology that
impels us to be creative, introspective, and involved. It would
serve as a psychic mirror ready to
align our perceptions when we
lose our way. It would be an active part of our lives in that it
would combine the communication aspect of the telephone and
the visual impact of television
with the interactive process involved in reading a book. Yet it
would demand that we create in
order to use it. We could not, as
with tv, film, and radio, sit back
and have the experience wash
over us like water on sand. It
would be useless without direct
involvement of the creative principle. And it would stagger us
with the intensity of the experience we would get from it's use.
What if it was five years away
from being -as common as the
Walkman?
Our culture seems on the
verge of changing as has never
been seen before. The first tentative steps towards global disarmament have just been taken. The
planet has just exhaled the bad air
of fifty years and is ready to take
another breath. Whether the air
we breath is clean or dirty is up to
us. How we use technology is
more important than what technology we use. This is not to say
that if we burned our slag in a
cleaner, more efficient way that
the forests would be less damaged. It is only to suggest that any
awareness of the effects of technology on our thoughts and actions may lead us to a place where
we can comprehend the whole of
our thoughts and actions. Thus,
the tool is compelling the tool-
maker to leam about itself.
So the tribe is relearning
how to learn and the the image of
how to do so is firmly planted in
our heads. That the imagination
has played and will play a large
part of this change is understood.
But is it accepted that only in a
state of flexible creativity can we
learn fast enough what it is we
need to know? Comix like Harvey Pekar's American Splendor,
Chester Brown's Yummy Fur
and Colin Upton's Big Thing are
clearing the way for non-artisans
to put their lives in a healthy
perspective with the creative use
of interactive technologies. The
autobiographical/introspective
nature of their work is a valid
reflection of the stories we will
soon be telling with found
sounds, images, and words. The
ability to communicate one's
story is found in parallel with the
ability to communicate one's
needs. The smart money sez that
our needs in the upcoming decade of change will reflect the
improved social conscience of a
culture in the midst of a new technology.   (There   is   little   con-
This will be the
last installment
of "Comix" by
Leigh R. Wolf, have the chance anymore
because they have been
thrown in the fast lane with
the rest of the Mercedeses.
But what can you do?
Demon Stich: It was also interesting talking to some of
the underground West Germans. They really weren't
happy with the prospect of an
east/west merger. They were
very afraid that there were a
lot of Nazis in East Germany
and West Germany who
would get together if the two
merged, and it would be a
scary thing. They were really
concerned about that. Did you
guys get that?
Demon Richard: A little bit.
Demon George: It's weird,
because I think a lot of the
West Germans think that they
L. are superior to the East Ger-
mai_i because of their industrial developments. But I've
talked to a lot of East Germans and they have something very special in terms of
a personal pride that may be a
vacuum in the West; and
maybe, hopefully, they will
learn something from the East
. h   and vice versa.
On East German jazz.
Demon Richard: Well, we
don't really know. I don't
know. George took a trip out
east to Hungary and saw lots
of interesting things. There is
a great Soviet band called the
Gamelen Trio. Did you ever
see those guys in Holland? I
saw a concert of their's where
the sax player was putting his
leg over his head, but they
were improvising by going
along a parallel level to another parallel. It was really
'j^Ss   good.
Demon Stich: They've
reached international status, I
s*, think. They've done a world
tour. I think they went to
Canada as well.
Demon George: I heard some
great stuff when I was in
Hungary. I know that there
are some great Polish bands
and other East block nations
have   some   amazing   musi
cians. Visual art is very
strong, but they were at a disadvantage for a long time
because even if they were hot,
it would be hard for them to
get an international audience
by vinyl or touring because it
would be hard to get out.
There was a black cloud hanging over them for the longest
time. Like "Why am I doing
this, nobody is ever going to
hear me." Amazing, creative,
free musicians -1 really hope
they get out.
Demon Richard: I think that
it is easier to develop a free
music because there is not that
driving for success. There is
not that "We've got to reach
the public schools" or "We've
got to make money." There
isn't that feeling because the
artists are already subsidized,
and there are less opportunities. So, people just do their
own thing. That's a good
thing.
On Ornette Coleman.
Demon Stitch: He still makes
very little money. I read in an
article a few years ago where
he says that he it is still a
Demon Stich: Yeah, a lot of
our important influences are
outside of music. The other
arts, politics. These guys are
really into politics. You have
to be. As an artist you have to
struggle paying the rent. It's
true. Most of the great innovators weren't accepted when
they first came on the scene.
Eventually the cream comes
to the top; they can't be de-
On George's influences.
Demon George: If people ask
me what kind of bass players I
listen too, I guess I've listened
to a little bit of everyone. I've
tried not to listen to too much
of anyone. Not because I don't
want to learn from them, but
it's more like that I didn't
want to graft too much of their
stuff that they have discovered onto my stuff. Maybe
that is unusual, but I've always thought that if I'm ever
going to sound like myself
maybe I should not listen too
much to anyone else. What I
get into more now is what kind
of state of mind do I have to be
in to find ideas. My influences
are really mental things and
not just musical.
be aware of everything.
Demon Richard: I think
George and Stich make good
points. I think we are at a point
in our careers where we are
happy with the basics of how
we sound as musicians and we
are comfortable enough that
we have something original to
say. We are still trying to
develop, but the basic sound
of how we are is formulated
and now it is time to grow on
it. I agree with George that
I always try to listen to a variety of players because I've
always had a fear that if I listen to anyone too much, well,
I don't want to sound too
much like anyone. But I want
to get as many influences as I
can, that I can combine to
arrive at something of my
own.
As mentioned in the interview, many people complain
that most great jazz artists are
dead and that jazz is an old
person's music. Well, these
guys are changing that perception. They are making jazz
fun again, like it supposedly
was in the '50s. Not only are
they fun to listen to, but they
also have developed into one
of the best live bands in Canada.
For  those of you  who
missed them, they will be
back again. In the meantime,
all three of the Demons' releases, "Streetniks," "Bop or
Rap" and "What Do You
Want," are available in Vancouver. So, for those who say
you don't like jazz because it
is not alive, danceable or fun,
you'll have to think of some
new excuses.®1
AUGUST 1990 21 H0:[t«M-(.I*I.I.IiI-I*r,4c_l
REVOLTING COCKS
BAD BRAINS
THE STRANGLERS
RAMONES Al
HDV
BOB'S YOUR UNCLE
CARL STONE
BEAT FARMERS
UZUME TAIKO
STRAWBERRY ZOTS
THE FLU'D
BOOTSAUCE
LLWYBR LLAETHOG
JOHN OSWALD
AZTEC CAMERA
SHINEHEAD
MARK STEWART
IN THE NURSERY
JOHN DOE
PSYCHIC TV
ERIC B AND RAKIM
Frlnfle/Altematlve Tentadee
Pod PolyGr«m/4AD
Beer*, Sow* ♦ Outer* Cargo/Wax Trax
77m Youth An Getting Reelleee Caroline
10 CBS/Epic
I the Stuff (end Mon) Volume On* WEA/Sire
Sex, Drug* * Violence
Tele of 2 Lege gr. I
Four Piecee Electro-Acouetic
Loud, Plowed, and... Llvel Gavln/Curto
Chlraehl Aural Tradition
Cere, Flower*. Telephone* BMG RCA
Glue Sub Pop
77m Brown Album PolyGram
Be? Concrete/Pinpoint
Plunderphonic Fun Mutic
Strey WEA/Sire/Repri.e
77m Reel Rock WEA/Elektra
LE.prit
MCA
Sub Pop
A&M Virgin
WEA/Metal Blade
Bridge
PolyG ram/Mercury
THAT PETROL EMOTION Chemtcrezy
GWAR Scumdoge ofthe Unlveree
SHARTSE COLLEGE OF...     Tibetan Buddhlem
THIRD WORLD Serioua Buelneaa
SLEEPCHAMBER    Sleep or Forever Hold Your Piece
DIVINE STYLER... Word Power CBS/Epic/Rhyme Syndicate
COFFIN BREAK Ruptun
VARIOUS ARTISTS Variety Recording* 3 CBC/Varlety Recording*
CMX Kolmikarki Bed Vugum
DEAD MILKMEN Uetaphyaical C    	
VARIOUS ARTISTS    Beat Run Feat Volume 1 llexldiec MCR Company
THE JESUS LIZARD Head Touch and Go
LAVA HAY Lava Hay Nettwerk
C. FADELA & O SAHRAOUI Hana Han* MCALI.ndM.ng,
RUBIES See the Money In My Smile MCA/TVT
LENE LOVICH
PROPAGANDA
VARIOUS ARTISTS
BABES IN TOYLAND
MARK LANEGAN
BEATS INTERNATIONAL
VARIOUS ARTISTS
TheBI
March
1234
le Alright
Spanking Machine
The Winding Sheet
Let Th*m E*t Bingo
7» All In th* Same Gang
UNITED YOUTH OF THE U.S. Uae Your Unedited Sense
EXXOR Aephtlt Paradla*
SEX PISTOLS      Llv* at Chelmeford Top Security Priaon
Juetin Time/Pathfinder
A&M/Vlrgir
M.l.co
'E THE Li
VARIOUS
THE WILD SWANS
VIC CHESNUTT
TORONAGA
INSPIRAL CARPETS
FRIGHTWIG
MAHLATHNI _ THE...
HAYWIRE
THE NURSERY
ETTA JAMES
NEUROSIS
HIGH CIRCLE
NOISE UNIT
YARD TRAUMA
SKIN YARD
What Kind of Heaven Do You Want?
SubPop
PolyGr am/London
WEA
UYUS
Deeert Engine
Enigma/Reatlee*
WEA/Metal Blade
Rebel
CBS/Epic/RutNeM
God'* Gift
Cool a* Fuck EP
Phone S*xy
77m t*
Shadow* on th* Wall
WEA/Sire
MCA/ChryaaH*
Mule/Cow
PolyGrem/Urben Africa
We Bite
Cargo/Wax Trax
MCA/I.l.nd
Grinding Into Emptineae
Flat Sized Chunk*
THE TEN COMMANDMENTS Home Firee Burning
SWAMP ZOMBIES Scratch and Sniff Car Cr—h
DEE-UTE Sampla-Delic
THEE HEADCOATS The Eerl* olSutvedom
MONO MEN Slop Drtggln' Me Down
T21 Pity th* Picture*
LOUDON WAINWRIGHT III Thertpy
KULT Conm—lona of* Knlf*...
• ;GRUMH... A Hard D*y* Knight
STEEL POLE BATH TUB Lurch
RAUNCH HANDS Haw Swig
THE DEATH FOLK Dtthtolk
JAWBREAKER Unfun
WEA/Elektra
Crypt
Cargo/PIAS
BMG/Silverlone
Cargo/Wax Trax
Cargo/Wax Trax
Crypt
"Dysfunctional" 12" Mix
CONSOLIDATED
CLOCKDVA "Sound Mirror" 12" Cargo/Wi
MUDHONEY "You're Gone"/"You Make Me Die" 7" Sub Pop
ORDER "World in Motion" 12"        PolyGram/Factory/MCA
ICE CUBE "Amerikkka's Moat Wanted" 12" Priority
REVENGE "Pineapple Face" 12" Capitol/Factory
AJAX "Mind the Gap" 12" Cargo/Wax Trax
GURU JOSH "Infinity" ir BMG/RCA
TACKHEAD "Demolition Houee (Remix)" 12" MCA/TVT
PARIS "Break the Grip of Shame" 12" PolyGram/Tommy Boy
LUNACHICKS "Cookie Mon.ter'/-'Complication" 7" Blast First
DICKLESS "rm a Man'TSaddle Tramp" 7" Sub Pop
JON HASSELL "Voiosprint" 12" WEA/Opal
MORRISSEY
MITCHIE MEE "Jamaican Funk" 1
PHASE 'N' RHYTHM "Swollen Pocket." 12"
THE NEON JUDGEMENT "WIS" 12"
BEATS INTERNATIONAL    "Wont Talk About It" 12"
AFROS "Fas! It" 12"
TAGC "Broadcast Test" 12"
DESKEE "Let There Be House" 12"
HILT "Gat Stuck" ir
SNAP! "The Power" 12"
1-12"
WEA/Sire
WEA/Fir»t Priority
Tommy Boy
Cargo/Wax Trax
PolyGram/London
CBS/RAL/JML
Cargo/Wax Trax
BMG/RCA
"Anytime Anyplace" 12"
Cargo/Wax Trax
Tommy Boy
CBS/Epic
STETSA SONIC
SUICIDAL TENDENCIES
THE BROOD
DAVID J "II Bs Your Chauffeur" 12" BMG'RC A/Beggars Banquet
"Put Your Body In It" 12" Infinite Beat
THE NEON JUDGEMENT      "Game, ol Love" 12" Cargo/Wax Trax
BLACK BOX "Everybody Everybody" ir        BMG/De Construction
PASKA Super Double Mega Mail Hits 7" EP Bad Vugum
CULL ROBG "The Power" ir Electric/Somersault
PROFESSOR GRIFF Pawns In the Game" 12" Eiectric/Luke
PUPPY -Worlock" 12" Nettwer.
The Ring' ir GDMrTssmania
THE WEDDING PRESENT
22 DISCORDER
12"
BMG/RCA
ARE YOU SERIOUS?  MUSIC 8:00AM-
12:00PM
Ths newest new music:   Llgetl. Dho-
mont. Schlttke. Lutakowski. Bvtwistle.
Information on concerts, recordings.
compose n.
THE IRUNCH REPORT  12 00-12 1SPM
News, sports, weather and more wtth
the CITR News. Sports and Weather
Departments.
THE ROCKERS SHOW  12 16-3 00PM
Reggae. Rock Steady and Ska with
George Barrett.
(LUES AND SOUL SHOW  * 00-5 OOPM
Blues, rhythm and blues, (unk. gospel
and soul provided by tochlan Murray
away to Chlcaaogo. home of the
THE SUNDAY NEWS MAG 5 00-5
CiTRs In-depth cur
magazine show. Coveroge and
analysis of UBC News plus news and
sports, daily editorial commentary,
entertainment reviews and reports on
events here at UBC. all In a comprehensive and comprehensible magazine package.  And we promise, no
HEARSAY  5.30-6 OOPM
CiTRs literary arts program needs YOU
to submit your works (or on-air performance or reading (by you or us.
your choice)
EtECTRONIC SMOKE SIGNALS/DECOMPOSITIONS 4:00-8:00PM
Information, news. Interviews, political analysis from the global cultures
of resistance hosted by Horaclo de la
Cueva. alternating Sundays with
eclectic music and caustic alphabets/spoken word hosted by Kim
Trainor.
RADIO FREE AMERICA 10:00PM-
12:00 AM
Join host Dave Emory and colleague
Nip Tuck for some extraodinary political research guaranteed to make
you think twice. Bring your tape deck
ond two C-90$. Originally broadcast
on KFJC (Los Altos. California).
THE MORNING SHOW  7 30-8 ISAM
From the famous siren to the noWf-
famous BBC Radio News Reel, wake
up wtth the CiTR Moming Show. Infor-
and 'scenic view' reports, features,
entertainment reviews and Alberta
hog prices.
BREAKFAST WITH THE IROWNS   8:16-
11'
Are you blue?  Get Brown!
jrfa-
»eter
offer a savoury blend of the familiar
ond exotic In an excitingly luscious
blend of aural delghts! Tune in and
enjoy eoch weekly brown plate spe-
AVANTPIC  7:OO-9.-O0PM
Avant-garde   thuggery  with   Pets
Lutwyche. First Tuesday eoch month:
World Music Exploration.
■ft'.' J 4 »]. I**.-, 11: V_c__H
THE MORNINC SHOW  730-815AM
See Monday for details.
WHITE NOISE 8:1S-10:OOAM
The bastard bve chid of 70s progressive and 80s electronic.   Improvised
fusions of traditional rhythms from
around the globe.   Burroughs. Pyn-
masters   of  the
tenor   saxophone
Recentty unearth
ed. tonight's session
took place in Ne
w York in 1965. and
Not for anger and despair, but for peace and a kind of home.
Suicide note of Lewis Hill, founder of KPFA Berkeley - 1957
THE CiTR DINNER REPORT 5 00-530PM
See Sunday for details.
SPORTS DIGEST 5 30-600PM
Join the CITR Sports Department for
al the latest in Thunderbird varsity
sports action and sports everywhere
else for that matter!
FACING THE MUSIC  6 00-800PM
A music/informational  hour with an
emphasis on topics related to aware-
THE JAZZ SHOW  9:00PM-12:00AM
Vancouver's longest running prime
time jazz program.   Hosted by the
ever-suave Gavin Walker.   Features
at 11.
6th Sack to Back-the most elegant
and blue voice of the Ellngton band:
alto saxophonist Johnny Hodges wtth
a small group Including The Duke himself on piano In a program of blues.
13th Pianist Bud Powell, the most
neglected and misunderstood crea-
sesslons tonight: one wtth a trio (wtth
drummer Max Roach) and one solo.
20th The late Dexter Gordon, star of
the film Round Midnight, one of the
Charlie Parkers
70th birthday, an extra-long feature
beginning at 10 o'clock.
b______- _ 11 *_»T V_o___B___
THE MORNING SHOW 7:30-8:ISAM
See Monday for details.
THE AFTERNOON REPORT 1:00-1:1SPM
See Monday for details.
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE  1:15-300PM
Country music to scrape the cowshit
off your boots to. With yer host-poke
Jeff Gray.
THE UNHEARD MUSIC 3:00-5 OOPM
Demo Director Dale Sawyer provides
some Insight Into the best and the
worst of the newest Conadian music.
And he's not telling you which b
THE CITR DINNER REPORT S:00-6:30PM
See Monday for details.
B.C. FOLK  530-700PM
The thoughts and music of B.C. folk'
artists, hosted by Barb Waldern and
Wayne Davis.
MIDDAY PHALLACY 11:00AM-1:00PM
Daisy checked out and her evl twin
Tania now inflicts the airwaves with
eclecticism. If it's phallic, it plays.
THE AFTERNOON REPORT 1:00-1:1SPM
See Monday (or details.
PAULA SMUG  3:00-S:OOPM
The only alternative to KLYN.
THE CiTR DINNER REPORT 5:00-5:30PM
See Monday for details.
LIVE  FROM THE  KNITTING  FACTORY
-:00-7:OOPM
Concerts recorded in the fall of 1989
in the heart of the NYC arts district
JIGGLE   7 00-9 OOPM
Mikey s here. Gavin's here.  Six years
of combined DJ experience, 40 years
of lovin' experience.  Games, hiking,
drugs, orgies, impetuous banter an
adolescent paradise.
PERMANENT CULTURE SHOCK    9:00-
12:00AM
Permanent   (per-md-ndnt):   lasting.
intented to last, indefinitely
Culture (kdl-chdr): (1) the civilisation
of a given race or nation at a given
time or over all time: (2) the raising of
microorganisms in specially prepared
media (or scientific study.
B_____ i: 111: W i7: V_:.-___■
THE MORNING SHOW 7:30-8:15AM
See Monday (or detoils.
NOW YOU HAS JAZZ 8:IS- 10:00AM
Jazz with Tommy Paley.
HANFORD NUCLEAR PIZZA PIE  10.00-
11:00AM
Rowena went to get a Pibb. got lost,
ended up In NYC. tapped her ruby
slippers 3x & cried 'there's no place
like homer Poof! She's back with her
OR-to-AK show. Helo?
THE AFTERNOON REPORT 1:00-1:15PM
See Monday for details.
FLEX YOUR HEAD  3 00-500PM
-HARD —
—ERIC-
-CORE	
THE CiTR DINNER REPORT 5:00-5:30PM
See Monday for details.
ARTS CAFE  S:30-«:00PM
Be updated, be with It, be informed
about Art. theatre, film and any other
cultural event happening in Vancou-
SUNDAY          MONDAY       TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
_____ ■ irmfs _<re_w_
AVaB:1£M
7_.ll_MM.S_1!
_■-__-_._-_-■_■
ARE
YOU
SERIOUS?
MUSIC
ROCKERS
SHOW
BREAKFAST
WITH THE
BROWNS
YOU COULD
BE HERE
WHITE NOISE
NOW YOU HAS
JAZZ
SCRAMBLED
EGGS
THE
SATURDAY
EDGE
ON
FOLK
POWER
CHORD
YOU COULD
BE HERE
HANFORD
NUCLEAR PIZZA PIE
VIOVING IMAGES
YOU COULD
BE HERE
YOU COULD
BE HERE
MID-DAY
PHALLACY
NOW YOU HAS
JAZZ FEATURE
THEVENUS
FLYTRAP SHOW
YOU COULD
YOU COULD
BE HERE
BLOOD ON
THE SADDLE
MEDIA
CONTROL
ECLECTIC
KOOL-AIDE
ITS NOT EASY
BEING GREEN
BLUES AND SOUL
SHOW
YOU COULD
BE HERE
THE UNHEARD
MUSIC
PAULA'S
MUG
FLEX YOUR
HEAD
IN EFFECT
NARDWUAR
..VALUE OF NOISE
suWi^g
SPORTS DIGEST
B.C. FOLK
THE YAP GAP
ARTS CAI
RANDOM SAM...
ELECTRONIC
SMOKE SIGNALS/
DECOMPOSITION!
FACING THE
KNITTING
FACTORY
TOPOFDABOPS
AND NOW THIS
YOU COULD
BE HERE
THE BOXER
SHORT BOYZ
AVANT-PIG
JIGGLE
OUT FOR
KICKS
HOME VIDEO
I.N.T.E.R.N.A.
T.l.O.NAL
PLAYLOUD
(THIS IS NOT A
TEST)
THE NEW
AFRICAN
SHOW
THE JAZZ
SHOW WTTH
GAVIN
WALKER
BEAT HEADS
VERSUS WOLF
ATTHE DOOR
PERMANENT
CULTURE
SHOCK
THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
HOME
BASS
ONE STEP
BEYOND/RADIO
FREE AMERICA
RADIO FREE
PARKING
SOUND OF
REALITY
IN THE
GRIP OF
INCOHERENCY
OPEN
COUNTRY
JOY
AURAL
TENTACLES
OPEN
SEASON
YOU COULD
BE HERE
MEGA
BLASTI
YOU COULD
BE HERE TOP OF THE BOPS 4:00-7:OOPM
Trhl Lopez. Ronnie Self, and The Phantom all love you.     Marc Coulevln
brings R n' R to It roots.
OUT FOR KICKS7:0O-9:0OPM
Wld beat protest youth wtth Pat and
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD RADIO HEH
2nd Fat Americans
9th  Mary
16th Toxic Jimmy and Jody Elvis Cranston celebrate the death of Elvis
30th Deadhead Cool
SOUND OF REALITY 11:00PM -1:00AM
Experimental Radio, with Vision!
Featuring environmental sounds,
found noises. Information/propaganda and the world's ethnic and
experimental musics from the auditory fringe. Live! Contributions welcome. Practitioner Anthony Roberts.
MECABLAST1 1:00-4:00AM
Compact discs and concepts on
autorepeat. band specials, turntable
feedbackgammon courtesy uncle
mifty. stagnating creativity: welcome
to late night radio where the Ghetto
Boys are considered artistic.
■b_____ _;J I >7_\ *_■___■
THE MORNINC SHOW  7:30-8:15AM
See Monday (or details.
MOVING IMASES   10:30-11:00AM
Join host Ken Maclntyre as he takes
through the sliver
:klotot
■e with film rx
THE VENUS FLYTRAP SHOW 11:00AM-
1:00PM
Greg Elsie Is your guide through these
two hours of music and fun. Tons o'
new tunes. And disco tool
THE AFTERNOON REPORT 1:00-1:15PM
See Monday for details.
ITS NOT EASY BEING CREEN 1:15-
2:30PM
The greenest of the CITR DJ crop try to
germinate and take root on the air. If
you are Interested in CITR programming opportunities, call the Program
Director at 228-3017.
ABSOLUTE VALUE OF NOISE PART ONE
2:30-3:30 AND PARTTWO4:00-6:00PM
Found sounds, tape loops, compositions of organised ond unorganised
aurality. power electricians and
sound collage: 100 % Canadian industrialism.
NARDWUAR  THE   HUMAN   SERVIETTE
PRESENTS...  3:30-4:00PM
A   dumb   stupid   half   hour   of
THE CiTR DINNER REPORT 5:00-5:31
See Monday for details.
AND NOW Ti
dthis. /
id this...
FOR THE RECORD  «:30-4:45PM
Excerpts from Dave Emory's Radio
Free America Series.
HOME VIDEO INTERNATIONAL   4:46-
9:00PM
Radio adaptations of movies. Taping
this program is strictly prohibited.
HOMEBASS 9:00PM- 1230AM
Turn your home into your very own
club. Get out your flared pants, put
on your dancing shoes and prepare
yourself for 3 1/2 hours of house, new
beat and a little disco and rap thrown
in to liven things up. Dope jams and
a groovy evening with
DJN.
CT_MiJ.i»jr_Y£l
THE SATURDAY EDGE 8:00AM-12:00PM
Steve Edge hosts Vancouver's biggest and best acoustic/roots/rogue
folk music radio show. Now in its sixth
year on CiTR! Roots music from
around the world, new releases, studio guests, and the World Cup Foot-
POWERCHORD  12:16-3:00PM
Vancouver's only true metal show
with the underground speed to mainstream metal; local demo tapes,
imports and other rarities. Gerald
Rattlehead and Metal Ron do the
damage.
IN EFFECT 3:00-5:00PM
The Hip Hop Beat brought to you by
DJ's Somethin' Smooth. BZ Jam and
THE SATURDAY MAG  6:0O-S:30PM
Join host Richard Vilus... See Monday
(or detail
THE YAP GAP 6:SO-4:0OPM
Hear (igures In the Arts world talk
about  their works,  other  people's
works and anything else that occurs
to them. Hosted by Antje Rauwerda.
THE   NEW   AFRICAN   SHOW      8.00-
10:00PM
World of Africa Dance Party
We welcome each other home
We the children of Africa
We welcome you
All you of the other heritages
Of our beautKul world
In peace, harmony and oneness
To our house party
-B______r-rw-*.-f.-______H
CITR provides free aktime for Community Access by groups and Individuals. If you or your group would
Ike to say something to someone
Director.
_-___iyi7ar<;_i.-_-_-_i
CiTR wants you to become Involved
wtth your friendly UBC Radio Station
which broadcasts at 1800 watts to
the campus and beyond. Opportunities abound! Wheeeel Programming, producing, editing, writing,
engineering, operatatlng. announcing, hosting, etc etc. Come by the
studios during normal business hours.
B_________T.7.V< ;/,________■
ARTS ANTJE RAUWERDA
DEMOS/CASSETTES DALE SAWYER
MOBILE SOUND LINDA SCHOLTEN
MUSIC	
 LLOYD ULIANA. RANDY IWATA
NEWS KIM TRAINOR
PRESIDENT ROBYNN IWATA
PRODUCTION MIKE LYSENG
PROGRAMMING RANDY IWATA
STATION MANAGER	
 LINDA SCHOLTEN
TRAFFIC TOMMY PALEY
VICE PRESIDENT .. BARBARA ELGOOD
VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR	
 BILL BAKER
B_-___-__r.w ;m i __________
BUSINESS LINE 604/228-3017
DJ UNE 604/228-2487 (228-CITR7
NEWS LINE ... 604/222-2487 (222-CdR)
FAX LINE 604/228-6093
STAND IN LINE... ROOM 233. SECOND
FLOOR OF THE STUDENT UNION BUILDING. 6138 SUB BOULEVARD. UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. VANCOUVER. BC. CANADA V6T 2A5
BW'7*.-f'.f/t'/'__'/A:T;__.
CITR presents the first annual rap
contest to be held on August 31 and
September 1 in the SUB Ballroom here
on the UBC Campusl You can win
prizes! Categories: MC... DJ... MC &
DJ... MC ADJ*. Dancers... All ages!
Wtth special guests EQ. To register or
for more Information, cal CITR at 228-
3017.
mmWkWi:ilU>][eW:Il*%m
That local band competition Is back,
n the process of organising
" i band competition
3t the Railway Club
(579 Dunsmuir). Bands Interested In
entering Shindig 90 should submit a
cassette to the Shindig Coordinator
complete with bio and phone numbers. For more Information, call 228-
WHit:mviii:m:iim
ploce on the campus of the University
of British Columbia In the third week
of November. It is a week-long extravaganza of fun and frivolity (or
your ears, your eyes and your nose.
Bands and artists Interested Inpartlcl-
pating during this week are encouraged to tak to Nardwuar at 228-3017.
Also CITR invttes artists to participate
during Clubs Days September 19-21.
CiTR
fM
101.9
PRESENTS
Shindig 9t
■.UlTtll-fl'l
lJt\. 1 **. 1*9 _t_l tl 17 el W •. i: 1 =£-_■
THE PICASSO SET
"Toytown"
2-song demo cassette
MC TERROR T
"Livin"'
THE MINT 100
"Mister Inbetween"
HOLLOWHEADS
3-song demo cassette
PAULA REMPEL
"1 Ride My Horse"
2-song demo cassette
DARKLING THRUSHES
"Hall of Soula"
FURNACEFACE
"Disco"
CHRIS HOUSTON
'Just Once for Kicks"
War of da Dude.
MARY
"Loving Ivy"
3-song demo cassette
PRISONSHAKE
"Act Uke Nothing's Wrong"
I'm Really Fucked Now
SMUGGLERS
"Up and Down"
3-song demo cassette
BRUCE A ft THE SECULAR...       "All Torn Up"
EARTHUNG
"Garden of Earthly Delight'
HEADSTARTI
"Calling You"
1-song demo cassette
DEATH SENTENCE
"Eye on You"    Vancouver Rocks Compilation
JACK FEELS RNE
"Black Sky"
5-song demo cassette
LA CIAPA RUSA
Csriin Di Maggio'TPoIca Antics'                          Faruaji
UKE RAIN
"Fremont, Nearly Midnight"
Razorblade Shoes
TOXIC JIMMY
"Shark Attack"
SHUFFLE DEMONS
"Chssss on Brssd"
What Do You Want
THE WORST
"Ths Creepy Thing"
TANKHOG
"Reptilion"
NO FUN
RATTLED ROOSTERS
"Cut Across Shorty"
Rock-a-Doodle-Bluee
ANTONIO MARANGOLO                    "Hafa"
Sovrano
DEAN COTTRILL
"Nobody's Businsss"
Handful of Grooves
SECT
"Hand of Glory"
2-song demo cassette
BACTERIA
"Industry"
demo caasette
THE LAST WILD SONS
"Around Town"
LWS
BIG AS UFE
"Mesning of Life"
JEAN BRISSON
"Lovers (Take a Chance)"
6-song demo csssette
SAD HAPPY
"Social Retard"
CHIEFS OF BELIEF
"Ralae a Hand"
DIRT
"Headlights"
385
EUGENE RIPPER _ THE NORTH "Again _ Again"
MC TERROR T
"Rappin' Rappin' Rhymin "
1-song demo csssette
LOVE CAMP 7
HOWE SOUND
"Somebody Girl"
THE IMAGINEERS
"This la Nevada Calling"
The Imagineers
NINTH CONFIGURATION               "Grade 11"
Vegas
GROUP 48
3-song demo csssette
JIMMY ROYS 5 STAR..
"Everybody's Talking"
6-song demo cassette
THE MINT 100
"Summer of Discontent"
5-song demo csssette
JOJOKA
"Aviary (i) "Crow"'
Jojoks
LAST RAY PRODUCTIONS      "Imaginary Love"
3-song demo csssette
LIST OF MRS. ARSON
"The Load Holgen"
/90B
THE LOGIC CONSPIRACY              "1 Hate"
4-song demo csssette
MARILIA
"The Boat and the Volcano"
Riverbost Goddess
PORK QUEEN
"Beaconsend"    From the Cain Toad Sessions
NOVALTONE
"A Question of Love"
3-song demo csssette
MEMORY DAY
"Addiction and Devotion"
NATURAL ELEMENTS
Winter Moon
ODE TO CLAUDE
Ode to Claude
PLANET OF SPIDERS
"A Place 1 Found"
5-song demo csssette
PURDINS
"Tony'a New One"
VIDEO BAR-B-QUE
The Stegasaurus Stomp"
6-song demo caasette
RHYTHM ACTIVISM
"Polaki Fiat"          Perogys, Pssta, and Liberty
SUCTION
TREMBUNG MIMSIES
"Ride the Wild Surf, You...'
George Jetson's Karma
WATCH CHILDREN
"Kinda Retarded"
GERRY HANNAH
Whereabouts Unknown
WOODY AND THE TEMPERS  "A Long Way Down"
Eponymous
Y.O.Y.
"It's Too Lste"
UNEVEN STEPS
"Censor the Bible"
demo caasette
PLANET OF SPIDERS
5-song demo cassette
TOUCH AND GO'S
"Beaver Inn, Bellingham"
3-song demo csssette
w
CiTR's RAP COMPETITION
AUGUST 31,  SEPTEMBER 01
SUB    BALLROOM    UBC
PRIZES TO BE WON
REGISTER NOW
(OR GET MORE INFORMATION)
CALL CiTR RADIO
(10 AM-4 PM WEEKDAYS)
228-3017
wiTHraa
tHM
FIRST      PRIZE
STUDIO TIME
COURTESY OF
fJk$^
PROFESSIONAL QUALITY DEMOS
FULLY EQUIPPED 8 TRACK
$12/hr INCLUDES ENGINEER
DEADBEAT
STUDIOS
(604) 687-5803 DISCO
DER
DATEBOOK
•14 Nil it ths Railway
Club... I If Jos Dsskla it the Yah... Lelder and
Keyboard Music of Mozart's Tims featuring
lorttpiano at the UBC School of Music
(8PM)... Vaasemr Clunker Matlc Fssthral
corrtlnjss at ths SL George's School Cam-
 ot Wednesdays at I'   *~
Coda. The Tsrsscs Dsvisa Trilogy. A Cerpe
Perd., Peeing Op.r. Mass, Ls Cesar Decou
vsrt. Salat Victor!, Faa Dews Tkars, 0«t si
Oar Tliae. and Jama Baldwin: tha Price sf a
Ticket.. Tke XXI Istsraatlesal Tesrass si
Animation opens at Ihc Ridge... Nsac •■ tha
Rae (7:30PM 6 8:45PM) tt the SUB Theatre.
UBC... Drawing the Llaa (an exhibition by
fenlmmon tl.ch.rldg.. Llnrd Jeasc end
UBC... S Bl
it Theatre... Wane Wlad la Chlaa
continues at the Van East Cultural Centre
(5PM t 6:30PM)... Ths Peach Cluh opens at
the Station Street Arts Center featuring tha
Ronnie Burke Theetre of Marlonettec
(8:30PM) Arla_crate continues at Studio
58, VCC Langera Campua (8PM).. I
(7:15PM) and L'Ecllccs (9:30PM) et
elite Cinematheque... 1tM (7:30PM) tl the
SUB Theatre. UBC... Exhibition ol new worthy Jim Cummlaa continues et Smaah Gallery... Home/Video continues et the Clochard
Gallery... Peter Hu|er photography exhibition
opens it the UBC Fine Arte Gallery Mark
Gridy't Ths Snail Mua.um: Part I and
Kathryn Walter: Aa Inttalletion continue at
the Contemporary Ar1 Gallery   Depict Ion end
It the Tl- Jim C.nnlat exhibition continues at Smash
Gallery... Home/Video continues at the
Clochard Gallery... Mark Grady'e Tba Snail
Maacen: Part I and Katkrya Waller: Aa In
THURSDAY 2 CITR prsssnta The
Stanley Jordan Trio at tha Commodore
Herald Nil at tha Railway Club ..Spunkwith
theBomhahalle atThe Cruel Elephant... Brava
Wavsa, Lovsra and Madmsn, Melancholy
Dream, and Ths Prulrocktat 86 Street... UBC
Mutic for Summer Evenings with Pianist
Nicole Les at the Recital Hall. Music Building.
UBC (8PM). Big Joe Duakln it the Yale
CITR Cool Thurcdays at the Pit Pub, UBC...
Radclytle... Ths Wall of...and A Lonely Ro-
(8:30PM)... 5 Blood Alley continues at the
Tamahnous Theatre Studio... Warn Wind in
China continues at the Van East Cultural
Centre (8:30PM). Ths Punch Clah continues
at the Station Street Arts Center (8:30PM)...
Aristocreti continues at Studio 58. VCC Lin-
gin Campus (8PM). La Notte (7:15PM) and
L'Ecllite (9:30PM) at the Pacific Cinematheque... Nunc on ths Run (7:30PM &
9:45PM) atthe SUB Theatre. UBC... Depletion
and Resletancs: A Group Multl Madia Viaual
Art, Video, Film end Psrfornanca Exhibition
opens at the Pitt Gallery (8PM)... Zapped:
works by ZiZt opena it Imagination Market
(7PM)... Jim Cummins exhibition continue!
at Smash Gallery... Home/Video continues at
the Clochard Gallery.. Mark Grady's Tha
Snail Museum: Part I (artiste talk at 8PM)
and Kathryn Walter: An Installation continue
at the Contemporary Art Gallery...
FRIDAY 3 Blue Laaaoo at the Railway
Club... Nervous Fellas with the Laat Wild
(one it Club 88... Bob'a Your Uncle with
guests Rawling Cross at the Commodore...
Spunk with the Bombshells at The Cruel Elephant... Big Jos Duakln at the Yale... Stain
Valley Festival starts Vancouver Chamber
Music Festival continues at the St. George's
School Campus... Radclytle... Tha Well of...
and A Lonely Romance continues at the Firehall Arts Centre (8:30PM)... S Blood Alley
continues at the Tamahnous Theatre Studio...
Warn Wlad In China continues at the Van
East Cultural Centre (8.30PM)... Ths Punch
Cluh continues at the Station Street Arts
Center (8:30PM)... Aristocrats continues at
Sludio 58, VCC Langara Campus (8PM). Out
on Screen: The 2nd Annual Gay and Leabian
Flin Festival opens at the Pacific Cinematheque featuring Olivia, Days ol Greek
Notts SATURDAY 4 Nam... Fellas with
the tast Wild tons at the Town Pump Blue
Laaaoo at the Railway Club Big Jos Daakla
at   tha   Yale...   Stsln   Valley   F.itlv.l
continues Radclyffs... Th. Wsll ol.. and A
Lon.ty Romance continues at the Firehall
Arte Centre (5PM & 8 30PM) . 5 Blood Alley
closes at the Tamahnous Theatre Studio...
Warn Wind In Chita continues at the Van
Eatt Cultural Centre (5PM & 8:30PM)... The
Punch Clah continues at the Station Street
Arts Center (8 30PM) Aristocrats continues
at Studio 58. VCC Langara Campus (8PM).
Ths 2nd Annual Gay snd Laabian Film
Festival continues at the Pacific Cinematheque.. 2nd Annual Lanterna lor Peace
send-off at Sunset Beach (6PM). Roger a
Ms (7:30PM & 9:45PM) at the SUB Theatre.
UBC... exhibition of works by Christopher
John Osborne opens at the Hub ot
Scandal.. Jin Cummins exhibition continues
at Smash Gallery... Home/Video continues at
the Clochard Gallery.. Mark Grady's The
Small Museum: Part I and Kathryn Waller:
An Installation continue at the Contemporary
Art Gallery...
SUNDAY 5   terrain, tsgsto at the
Town Pump... Contort Music of Sixteenth
Century Italy featuring recorder players Lii
Baker, Karen Epp, Peter Hannan, Alison Msl-
ville and David Ohanneslsn and harpsichordist Valerie Weeka at the UBC School of
Mutic (8PM)... Stain Valley festival continues Aristocrats continues at Studio 58. VCC
Langara Campus (3PM & 8PM)... Ths 2nd
Annual Gay and Leabian Filn Fsativsl continues at the Pacific Cinematheque... Roger *
Ms (7:30PM & 9:45PM) at the SUB Theatre,
UBC... Chrletophsr John Oaborne exhibition
continues at the Hub ol Scandal... Jim
Cummina exhibition continues at Smash Gallery . Home/Video continues at the Clochard
Gallery... Mark Grady's Ths Small Museum:
Part I and Kathryn Walter: An Installation
continue at the Contemporary Art Gallery...
WordswithoutBorders: Literary Festival and
Book Fair as part ol Celebration 90 Gay Games
and Cutural Festival begins it the SFU downtown campus...
MONDAYS   Oh Yeah! at the Railway
Club... The Demona at the Yale City Swing
ind Tap Troupe it the Commodore... Stein
Valley Feetlval closes Vancouver Chamber Mutic Festival continues at the St.
Georges School Campus... Radclyffe... The
Well of... and A Lonely Romancacontinues
at the Firehall Arts Centre (8:30PM)... Wtrm
Wind In Chlnt continues it the Vin Eitt Cultural Centre (8:30PM)... Thi Punch Club
continue! it the Station Street Arts Center
(8:30PM)...Ths 2ndAnnualGayandLeabian
Film Fsatival continues it the Pacific Cinematheque Christopher John Osborne exhibition continues at the Hub of Scandal Jim
Cummins exhibition continues it Smith Gallery . Home/Video continues it the Clochard
Gallery The small Unseen: Part I and
Kttkrya Welter: Aa lastalla-.a continue it
the Contemporary Art Gallery
TUESDAY 7   Belled ia Lead at the
Railway Club UBC lor Summer Evenings
with the Purcsll String Quartet at the Recital
Hall. Music Building, UBC (8PM) Incognito
at the Yale.. CiTR World Beat Music st the Pit
Pub. UBC... Reoclytl. The Wall ol. and A
lonely Romance continues et the Firehall
Arte Centre (8.30PM) .. Warn Wlad la Ckiaa
continues at the Van Eaat Cullural Centre
(8 30PM) Tba Panch Oak continues at Ihe
Station Street Arts Center (8:30PM)... Aristocrat, continues tt Studio 58. VCC Langara
Campus (8PM) Tke 2nd Annual Cay and
Leabian Filn Festhrel continues et the Pacilic Cinematheque... Sedan North: Baah
Back (an evening ot video by Gay and Leabian
artiste and activists. 8PM) it Video Inn...
Christopher John Osborne exhrtion continues at the Hub of Scandal... Jin Cummins
exhibition continues at Smaah Gallery...
Hone/Video closes at the Clochard Gallery...
Tke Small Museum Part I and Kathryn Walter: Aa Installation (artist's talk it 8PM)
continue it the Contemponry Art Gallery...
WEDNESDAYS Boii.dmlead.t
the Railway Club . Incognito it the Yale...
Vancouver Chamber Muaic Festival continues at the St. George's School Campus... CiTR
Hot Wednesday! at Ihe Pit Pub. UBC... Radclytle...Th.W.llol.andALonuh/Romanc.
conlinuea at the Firehall Arts Centre (5PM &
8:30PM)... Warm Wind in China continues at
the Van Eatt Cultural Centre (5FM &
8:30PM)... The Punch Club continues at the
Station Street Arts Center (5PM & 8:30PM)...
Aristocrat! continues at Studio 58. VCC Langara Campus (8PM)... The 2nd Annual Gay
and Lttbian Film Fsitjvil continues at the
Pacific Cinematheque... Sodom North: Baah
Back (an evening of video by Gay and Lesbian
artists and activists. 8PM)...  Christopher
ol Scandal... Jim Cummina exhibition continues at Smash Gallery... Tba Snail Museum:
Part I and Kathryn Walter: An Installation
continue at the Contemporary Art Gallery...
THURSDAYS John Do. with guest
Klmm Rogers at the Town Pump... Amanda
Hughea at the Railway Club... No Retreat,
Toxic Jimmy, The Water, and The Way at 86
Street... Incognito et the Yale... CITR Cool
Thursdays at the Pit Pub, UBC... Radclytle...
The Well of.. .and A Lonely Romance continue! it the Firehall Arts Centre (8:30PM)...
Eitt Cultural Centre (8:30PM)... The Punch
Club continues it the Station Street Arts
Center (8:30PM)... Aristocrats continues at
Studio 58. VCC Langara Campus (8PM)...
Dancelehration! at the Commodore... The
2nd Annual Gay and Lsebian Filn F.stival
continues at the Pacific Cinematheque...
Christopher John Oiborne exhibition continue! at the Hub of Scandal... Jim Cummina
exhibition continue! at Smash Gallery... The
Small Museum: Part I and kathryn Walter.
An InttaNation continue at the Contemporary
Art Gallery...
FRIDAY 10 El Grupo Fiesta Ay Mara
at La Quena... Mika and Ingrid ol the Hard
Rock Miners and the Wingnuts at the Garden
Room, UBC Graduate Student Centre (8PM)...
Ihe Orpheum featuring Kato alitor., Heidi
Archibald, Ferret. Betty.and Katari Take
Radclytle... The Wall ol and A Lonely Ro-
naaca continues it the Firehall Arts Centre
(8:30PM)... Warn Wlad la Ckiaa contlnuet
at the Van Eatt Cultural Centre (8:30PM)..
The Patch Cl.b continues it the Station Arte
Center (8PM 6 10PM)... Aristocrats continues at Studio 56. VCC Langara Camput
(8PM). Daatelebrstleal It the Commodore... TW tad Annul Gey and Leek lat Filn
Fssthral contlnuet it the Pacific Cinematheque... Cbriatspber Jobi Osborne exhibition continues it the Hub of Scandal... Jin
Cannlat txhlbitton continues it Smith
Gallery... The f nail Museum Parti cloaei it
the Contemponry Art Gallery...
SATURDAY 11 Flota.m and J.1-
aan with Prong ind Taakkog it the New York
Theatre Loadsa Qslrskoys with guests
National Velvet tt 86 Street... Hard Rock
Miaart it the Town Pump... Anaada Hughes
it the Rilhviy Club... Incognito at the Yale...
Aristocrats closes it Sludio 58. VCC Langara
Camput (8PM) Radclyffe... Tke Wall el...
ind A Lonely Romance closes it the Firehall
Art! Centre (5PM &8-30PM) .Warm Wind in
China continue! at the Van East Cultural
Centre (5PM & 8:30PM)... The Punch Club
continues at the Station Art! Center
(8:30PM)... Ths 2nd Annual Gay and Leabian
Film Festival continue! at the Pacific Cinematheque... Christopher John Osborne exhibition continue! at the Hub of Scandal... Jin
Cummina exhibition closes at Smash Gallery...
SUNDAY 12 2nd Annual Island
Splash '90 featuring Rai Cloud and the Soni
ol Selaaale 1 Band. Rae Kldut and Roots
Connection, The Cultivator, and others at the
Caledonia Park in Nanaimo. BC (11AM -
6PM)... The Method at the Town Pump...
Little Caaaar with guests Burning Tree it 86
Street... The 2nd Annual Gay and Ltthltn
Film Festival close! it the Pacific Cinematheque... Christopher John Osborne exhibition continue! at the Hub of Scandal...
MONDAY 13 LetAmaione.de
Guinea at the Saturno... Thirteen at the Railway Club... Johnny V at the Yale... Warn
Wind in China continues at the Van Eatt Cultural Centre (8.30PM).. The Panch Club
continue! it the Station Street Arte Center
(8.30PM)... Chri.tophtr John Oiborne exhi-
tion continue! it the Hub ol Scandal. .
TUESDAY 14 CITR presents Sulci-
Town Pump... Brass Jay Pa
iagtoi lours, at the Garden Room. UBC
Graduate Student Centre (8PM) Johnny V it
the Yale CiTR Cool Thursdays at the Pit Pub.
UBC... Wim Wind In Ckiaa contlnuet it ths
Vin Eatt Cultural Centre (8:30PM)... Tke
Punch Cluh continual at the Station Street
Arts Center (8:30PM). . Hlrathimt. Mea
Anear (7:30PM) and tkoet tke Piano Player
(9:15pm) it F    "
the Hub of Scandal...
FRIDAY   17    Tupelo Chain Sex with
at the Pit Pub. UBC... Warn Wind In China
continue! at the Van Eait Cultural Centre
(8:30PM)... The Punch Club continue! at the
Station Street Art! Center (8:30PM)... Chrit-
theH
•t the!
Archimedes  Tixl  Driven  Dub...  Amanda
Hughsa at the Railway Club... Incognito at the
WEDNESDAY 15 Green House
with The Unknown at Ihe Town Pump...
Johnny V at the Yale... CITR Hot Wednesdays
at the Pit Pub, UBC... Warn Wind In China
continue! at the Van Eitt Cultural Centre
(5PM & 8:30PM)... Thi Punch Club continues
at the Stition Street Arte Center (8:30PM)...
Love and Other 4-L.tter Words: Films by
Mike Hoolboom (7:30PM) it Pacific Cinematheque... Chrittophsr John Osborn. exhibition contlnuet it the Hub ol Scandal...
THURSDAY 16 Fou
Pump... Escape Irom New York Tour with
D.hor.h H.rry. Ranaast, Jam; Htrriaoa
and Ton Tan Clah at the PNE Exhibition
Bowl... Jin Byrnes it the Yale... Warn Wlad
In Ckiaa continues at thi Vin Eitt Cultural
Centre (8 30PM) . The Peach Clah contlnuet
it the Station Street Arte Center (8:30PM).
Drive. He bid (7:30PM) ind 200 Mot.li
(9:15PM) it Pacific Cinematheque... Christopher John Oeborae exhibition continues it
the Hub ol Scandal...
SATURDAY 18    crm *******
Thi rd World witk guests tkt Almighty Dread
Bind atthe Commodore Ballroom... Tupelo
Chain Set with Wldetpread Panic it the
Town Pump Trinl Lopez at the PNE Exhibition Bowl (8:30PM). ..Jim Byrntt at the Yale...
Warm Wind In Chlnn continue! at the Van
Eait Cultural Centre (5PM & 8:30PM)... The
Punch Club continue! at the Station Street
Arte Center (8 30PM)... Drive, He Said
(7:30PM) and 200 Motels (9:15PM) at Pacilic
Cinematheque... Christopher John Oiborne
exhibition continue! at the Hub ol Scandal...
SUNDAY 19 She at the Town
Pump... Kid Sensation and Sir Mlt-a-lst at
the PNE Exhibition Bowl (8:30PM)... The Decameron (7:30PM) and The Canterbury Tales
(9:35PM) it the Pacific Cinematheque...
Christopher John Osborne exhibition contlnuet it the Hub of Scandal The Vtncouvtr
International Card Show at the Heritage Hall
(10AM - 5PM)...
MONDAY 20 Fait Folk Under-
ground at the Railway Club featuring Deadhead Cool. Atpirin Moon Twins, and Bruce
Jay Patkow of the Washington Squares...
Mika Jacobs at the Yale.. Bob Dylan at the
PNE Exhibition Bowl... Warm Wind in China
continues at the Van Eait Cultural Centre
(8:30PM)... Tha Punch Club continue! at the
Station Street Arte Center (8:30PM)... The
Decameron (7:30PM) and The Canterbury
Talei(9:35PM) atthe Pacific Cinematheque...
Chrlatopher John Oaborne exhibition continue! at the Hub of Scandal...
TUESDAY 21 Mystery Train at the
Railway Club... Mika Jacoba at the Yale...
CiTR World Beat Music at the Pit Pub. UBC...
Warm Wind In China continues at the Van
Eatt Cultural Centre (8:30PM)... The Punch
Cluh continue! at the Station Street Art!
Center (8:30PM)... Christopher John
Oiborne exhibition continues at the Hub of
Scandal...
WEDNESDAY 22 Screaming for
Rita at the Railway Club... Mike Jacob! at the
Yale... CiTR Hot Wednesday! at the Pit Pub,
UBC... Warm Wind In China continue! at the
Van Eait Cultural Centre (5PM & 8:30PM)...
The Punch Club continue! at the Station
Street Arte Center (8:30PM)... X (7:30PM)
and The Wild One (9:20PM) at the Pacific
THURSDAY 23 j.m..H.m...i
the Ytle., Screaming tar Rita at the Railway
Club... CiTR Cool Thurtdtyt it the PH Pub.
UBC... Wirm Wlad la China contlnuet it the
Vin Eatt Cultural Centre (8 30PM). The
Panch Clah continues tt the Station Street
Arts Center (8 30PM) X (7:30PM) ind Tae
Wild One (9.20PM) it the Pacific Cinematheque... Christopher John Ot horns exhibition continues at thi Hub of Scandal
R.sl.tenc. continues It the Pitt Gallery
FRIDAY 24 Soe'tYo.rUncliatthe
Town Pump... Shadowy Man on a Shadowy
Planet at the Railway Club... Wayne Newton
atthe PNE Exhibition Bowl (8:30PM)... Janet
Harmaa at the Yale... Warn Wind In Ckiaa
continues at the Van East Cultural Centre
(8:30PM)... Tke Punch dak continues at ths
Station Street Arte Center (8PM & 10PM)...
Er.tarh.ad (7:30PM) and Dun. (9:15PM) at
the Pacific Cinematheque... Christopher John
Osborn. exhibition continues at the Hub of
Scandal...
SATURDAY 25 Art Bergmann at
the Town Pump... Shadowy M Shadowy Planet at the Railway Club... Jamea Herman at the Yale... Warn Wind In China closet
it the Vin Eitt Cultural Centre (5PM &
8:30PM)... The Punch Club close! it the Stition Street Arte Center (8:30PM)... Enter
bead (7:30PM) and Dune (9:15PM) at the
Pacific Cinematheque... Christopher John
Oiborne exhibition continue! at the Hub ol
Scandal..
SUNDAY 26 Special Bluea Vocal
Jan at the Yale... Tha Arabian Night!
(7:15PM) and Salo, or th.120D.ytof Sodom
(9:40PM) at the Pacific Cinematheque...
MONDAY 27 Th. Sw.gm.n at the
Railway Club... Oliver and the El.mints at
the Yale... The Arabian Nights (7:15PM) and
Salo, er the 120 Days ol Sodom (9:40PM) at
the Pacific Cinematheque...
TUESDAY 28 Rory Block at the Van
Eatt Cultural Centre... The Swegmen at the
Railway Club... Mae Moore and Spirit of the
Wait it the PNE Exhibition Bowl (8:30PM)...
The Demone it the Yale... CiTR World Beat
Mutic it the Pit Pub. UBC...
WEDNESDAY  28     Hard Rock
Mintrt it the Railway Club... John Hammond
it the Yale... CITR Hot Wednesdays at the Pit
Pub. UBC... The Witch Hunt (7:30PM) and
Ths les Palace (9:20PM) at the Pacific Cinematheque... Chrletophsr John Oaborne exhibition continues at the Hub ot Scandal...
THURSDAY 30 CiTR presents
Ziggy Marley snd the Melody Makers with
guests The Family Stand at 86 Street... Hard
Rock Minora at the Railway Club... John
Hammond at the Yale... CiTR Cool Thursdays
at the Rt Pub, UBC... Tke Witch Hunt
(7:30PM) and The Ice Palace (9:20PM) at the
Pacific Cinematheque... Christopher John
Osborne exhibition closes at the Hub of Scan-
FRIDAY 31 Tom Russel at the Town
Pump... Etoulfee Band at the W.I.S.E. Club...
Hard Rock Miners atthe Railway Club... John
it the Y.
.. CiTR pi
>n continue! at the Hub of Scandal...
Sound War Chapter One (all ages rap and
dance music competition) at the SUB Ballroom, UBC... Breathing Together: Revolution of the Electric Family (7:30PM) and
Head (9:15PM) atthe Pacific C
Depiction and Resistance cc
Pitt Gallery... ^PIP?
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-mar wettv imucm *tfA,:> ur THt5 CoMic.'h€H\ lhat week was not Friday night,
but Friday moming. I had been
up late, till 11:30, practicing whal
1 could remember from the rehearsal, and at work on Friday
morning I dozed off in front of
my terminal. Vividly, I remember waking up, my supervisor
lapping my shoulder and my
video screen full of requests for
tapes to be mounted. I rushed to
the tape library, trying to remember half a dozen tape IDs, but all
I could think about was losing my
job. How will I tell my parents?
How will it look on a resume?
But my boss didn't say anything:
no reprimands, no questions, not
even a joke at my expense. Itwas
as if the incident never happened.
That night I arrived at the
Englewood Beehive at 6:30,
sporting a Central American
looking beret. I bought it specifically for the gig. The place
seemed deserted, but as I walked
into the main hall, a voice called
out from behind me, "Who the
hell are you?" It was the doorman. "You tiyin' to crash," he
growled.
"No, I'm in the band."
"Bullshit. You're no Fury
Head."
"No," I said quickly, "I
mean the umm, warm up band.
The Misses Takes, err, Mistakes.
We play first. I'm the bassist.
Mat Hat." I offered him my hand.
"Bullshit.   You don'l play
I waited outside for two
hours until Stiv and MT arrived.
By 10:30 Chris still hadn't
shown, though this didn't seem
to bother Stiv very much. I heard
him mumble once, as he and MT
went for more beer, "Damn lead
screamer. Never around for set
up. Never around for sound
check." I was pacing by the stage
when a tall sickly-looking guy
brushed by me. He mounted the
risers. The stage lights on his
unkempt hair made a glowing
ring around his head. I stood and
watched him, fearful for our
equipment. Should I rush forward and force him off the front
ofthe stage? Do I, in low but firm
tones, talk to him, convince him
to leave? The guy went to a
microphone. "One day Christ
and his disciples were out walking when a man possessed by
demons fell upon them."
Somebody grabbed my arm.
It was Stiv. "Let's go," he said.
So we, Stiv, MT and I, got on
stage with this guy still ranting at
the audience. "Christ asked the
man his name and the demons answered * Legion, for we are
many.'" He looked around himself , at the band and audience in a
360 degree shuffle. "Those who
have ears to hear, let them hear."
MT started to hammer her kit
with more energy than I thought
possible from anyone. Her arms
flailed between two toms and a
cymbal, then her beat settled
down as she worked in the kick
drum at her feet. Stiv began
power chording a song which I
vaguely remembered from the
practice. He had called it 'No
Death,' but the guy at the mike
screamed the words and 1 could
not understand any of it; I was too
, busy trying to decide if the song
26 DISCORDER
was in C or A, whether the chorus
was in G or E flat. I don't think it
made much difference; I could
not hear myself.
Following 'No Death' the
crazy man, microphone in hand,
came to my comer of the stage.
"What's your name?" he asked.
"Matthew Hat, er. Mat." I
was a little nervous and I offered
him my hand.
"Enter my kingdom, Hatter
Mat" he said. He tossed my beret
into the crowd and placed his
hands on my head.
The show went on. Between songs the skateboard
punks threw paper cups, mostly
empty. Chris' singing was unintelligible, but he made up for it t y
speaking between the songs. He
would talk about anything thi*.
came into his head: sparrows, the
law, fishing. As for my playing,
I had to guess my way through
most of it. I was turned down low
enough nol to do any damage;
Stiv and MT - she was going
berserk behind her kit - drowned
out any mistakes I made.
Technically, we were not
booed off. Stiv had broken three
strings  and was tuning  a new
guitar. Chris was using the break
to tell a story about growing
wheat. The crowd had been
largely indifferent early in the
set, but now they were chanting
"Fury Heads, Fury Heads, Fury
Heads." Chris was trying to explain aboul young plants withering in drought. He stopped. Turning a full circle he looked around
himself. He said something
about "Giving us Barabus," then
walked off the front of the stage,
through the crowd, and out the
double doors at the back. While
we were hauling our amps I heard
Stiv mumble, "Damn lead
screamers. Never around for set
up. Never around for sound
check.   Never around for break
When I got home Mom and
Dad had already gone to bed. I
tried to sleep but wound up
watching an Elvis movie over a
couple glasses of milk.
Next moming on the radio,
the overnight fatality report ran
longer than usual. One young
man drowned in the Glenmore
Reservoir when his motorcycle
went over a guard rail. Another
man lost control of his car on
17th Avenue and drove through
the false brick front of a funeral
chapel. A third died near the
stockyards on Blackfoot. The
truck he was driving, full of live
hogs, flipped near the Ogden
tumoff. Another man was found
unconscious in the middle of a
crosswalk. After backing up the
midnight traffic for several
blocks, he was rushed to hospital
and pronounced dead on arrival.
It turned out that this man had
been lead singer in a local punk
band. Both of the city newspapers ran photos of him poised
over a microphone - the captions
punned on the band's name. One
ofthe papers devoted an editorial
to the evils and excesses of punk
rock, and in the following weeks
there were letters to the editor
from concerned parents. I didn't
tell mine where I was that Friday;
Mom and Dad remained oblivious to the event.
Monday night I finally got
through to Stiv. I was greeted by
a female voice shouting "He
livesl I saw him on the Malll He
lives! He" This was followed
by scuffling noises. Stiv came on
the line.  "Who is this?" he said.
"Mat." After a long pause I
added "Your bassist."
"Oh yeah, guess you heard
the news. The cops were here and
everything."
"What happened?"
"I dunno. Maybe there was
a bubble in his insulin."
"Insulin?"
"Didn't you know?" The
female voice could be heard in
the background and Stiv paused
to yell "Shut up."
"The paper says drugs."
"Aww, all anybody is selling these days is caffeine pills.
Listen, I guess the band is kind of
on hold till we get a new
screamer.   What's your number
I gave Stiv my number, but
he never phoned me back.
Stampede ends in mid-July.
The oil company employees pack
up their western duds. Things
return to normal...
A week after the stampede
party our floor's summer student
receptionist misrouted a call to
my office phone. "Who is this?"
demanded the voice at the other
"Matthew Hat, Software
Development," I said.
"Ohh, you're the punk
rocker, right?"
I could not place the voice,
and it sent my mind spinning.
There must have been gossip at
the party, word spread upstairs to
the Reservoir and Exploration
engineers masquerading as cowboys. By Monday the whole
company, perhaps the entire oil
patch, had heard. The name
Matthew Hat was now linked
with punk rock - dark rendezvous
at the old National Hotel with
dirty, greasy people who stuck
spikes into their veins.
"I recognize your voice
from Sharon's. You're the one
who grabbed the guitar from me,
right?"
No, I was not stained. Word
of my gig with Chris Miss and
The Mistakes never left lhat basement rumpus room; only this one
guy, the "Stairway to Heaven"
engineer, remembered.
After I got him off the line,
the receptionist misrouted another call my way. The phone
rang and I picked it up and answered "Matthew Hat, Software
Development." It rang again and
again, at least twenty times that
day. Each time I picked it up and
answered the same way, "Matthew   Hat,   Software   Develop-
I think it was former
CiTR president Lane who
once, returning to the Discorder offices bearing a platter of
Subway fries awash in a sea of
ketchup, jokingly suggested,
"Hey Viola, you should do a
review of UBC food..." Lane,
your worst nightmare (and
probably that of a whole slew
of other readers) is about to
come true. Herewith, a compendium of noteworthy - for
whatever reason - victual
purveyors on-campus.
Subway - Hey, I spend 40-
odd hours a week at Ubyss in
the throes of 9-to-5 slavery; it
was inevitable that sooner or
later I'd expose myself to the
aforementioned fries. Aces! -
a heaping plateful for a measly $.85, no ketchup
thangyuvurrymuch, and,
well, yeah, after the umpteenth mouthful, these recently-gelid little critters do
get to be a bit much. But hey.
Look at it as a character-
building exercise in gluttony.
Subway is, of course, a
full-service cafeteria (if that
ain't a contradiction in terms)
and, as such, offers a plethora
of food choices. Lots of stuff
in the way of cholesterol-
consciousness-raising from
the grill; an intermittent ethnic corner with Italian and
Chinese "cuisine" during the
lunch and dinner hours; custom sandwiches from the deli;
and ample salad, dessert and
beverage sections. Have I
missed anything? Probably,
but they're not giving me any
meal tickets for this, so fuck
'em. As this issue goes to
press. Subway has just begun
to stock the sought-after, but-
previously-unavailable-in-
the-vicinity, O'Ryan's pota-
toe chips in two sizes. BUT
they scrupulously avoid carrying my favourite Koala
Springs flave, Apple &
Blackcurrant.
Greens      'n'      Gourmet
"...Ain't that listed under
'Hamburgers' on the White
Spot menu?" you ask. Tell a
lie. Few know of this culinary
hideaway (probably, one reasons, because of the extreme
hokiness of the name), but it's
there all right, servin' up a
truly magnificent buffet while
UBC is in session. Mosey on
down to the subterranean
confines (the basement, idiot)
of the Graduate Student
Centre and load up your plate
for something like a dollar per
lOOg's. When's the last time
you got stoned for that cheap?
- and with the kind of food
that happens here, it's almost
HeirsfKitchen
BEANZ
'TODAY
possible to do just that. 99.9%
vegetarian (well, nothing in
here has ever been positively
identified as meat), sprout-y,
pasta-y, oozing-with-nutri-
tional-merit grub. And for
dessert, Ponderosa cake. Life
is good. (11 AM - 1:45 PM,
weekdays September through
April)
Mmmm, now, while
we're on the topic of the few
and far between Great Eats at
the university, Tortellini's
barbecue will not get away
without mention. This is another seasonal event, taking
place weather permitting on
the SUB plaza 11 AM-2 PM
during late spring 'n' summer. For 2 1/2 bucks you get a
hamboiger bun with lettuce
and tomato, served up alongside a pile o' fairly decent
coleslaw and, after the obligatory wait in the grill line-up, a
barbecued hunk a cow flesh,
topped with process cheese
food. Whatever vegetarian
inclinations I may harbour go
out the window faced with
this meaty treat. There's a hot
dog option too, but I haven't
explored it yet. Vi says "deal."
Lickety-"Spit" back inside
ye olde SUB, just by the entrance to Subwaydom, is like
a massively scaled-down,
minimalist rendition of said
cafeteria (- Hey look, are we
discussing architecture or
reviewing restaurants here? -
Well, neither, but... ). Perfect
for those on the fly- or so it
claims to be, I've never tried
it myself; and they now
"proudly serve Starbuck's
Coffee." Ya. Good name anyhow.
Over yonder round the
corner from Lickety-Spit
lurks Sub-Cetera, a kiosk
that I only ever utilise in
spring, to buy Easter Creme
Eggs when the craving
strikes. 'Round the next corner is, yes, the dreaded Blue
Chip Cookies, evil supplan-
ters of the righteous Duke's,
Tres politically incorrect,
true; but their Colombian
rules. Not only that, but the
other day I was pleasantly
surprised to hear, no, not the
latest U2 single, but the opening track from "Glass
Houses" issuing brazenly
from the BCC sound system.
Blast from Grade Eight, or
what?! What I wanna know
though is, why don't they
actually have a cookie with
blue chips in it?
Tortellini's; the Pit Pub;
The Delly; the rumoured-to-
be-lethal hospital cafeteria...
all these are university eating
experiences that still lie ahead
of me. However, I'm sure
Lane would be happy to bring
me reports from the field
Right, Lane?... Lane? DOUBLE TROUBLE
MEET THEM
IN PERSON
at 0&6 SOUND, 556 SEYMOUR ST.
SATURDAY AUG. 11 @ 3:00 P.M.
SEE   THEM   LIVE
at Qjfo SATURDAY AUG. 11
Presented by
6138 SUB BLVD VANCOUVER 

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