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JULY/AUGUST 2010/THAT GONE FISHIN' MAGAZINE FROM CiTR 101.9 FM
EPENDENT MUSIC COMMUNTY FOR OVER 25 YEARS
>l
I HM»ER
SLAM DUNK
///////////////////////////// SHAD
HI I III!Ill I 111 THESHILOHS
/////////////////////ARIEL PINK
////////////////////// THE LIONS
lllllllll RECORD STORES
//////PARTY PHOTOGRAPHY
ft
i
CTK&lfe
m
B EDITOR
Jordie Yow
ART DIRECTOR
Lindsey Hampton
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Debby Reis
COPY EDITORS
Alison 'The Axe" Atkinson, Susanne
Dewein, Steve Louie, Debby Reis, Alec
J. Ross, Mine'Salkin
AD MANAGER
David Stansfield
UNDER REVIEW EDITOR
Mine'Salkin
RLA EDITOR
Steve Louie
WEB EDITOR
Reilly Wood
INTERN
Susanne Dewein
CALENDAR LISTINGS
Susanne Dewein, Debby Reis
ACCOUNTS MANAGER
Corey Ratch
PROGRAM GUIDE
Bryce Dunn, Debby Reis
OFFICIAL TWEETERS
Susanne Dewein, Debby Reis,
Maeflan Thomas
CiTR STATION MANAGER
Brenda Grunau
PUBLISHER
Student Radio Society of UBC
COVER
Ryan Walter Warner
EDITOR'S NOTE
Dear Discorder:
This is our last issue of the summer, we won't be printing in August, but we will still exist. We're heading on
vacation for the rest of the summer: visiting music festivals,
kicking it on the beach and hanging with our buds. We'll
be back in September to welcome all the students back to
school so make sure you look for us then. In the meantime
we'll continue to put new content on our website (www.
discorder.ca) including our regular stream of reviews and
the occasional feature and column popping up to keep
everyone busy. When we cut back like this it's not out of
any desire to stop providing commentary on Vancouver's
vibrant music scene.
If you happen to know anyone who you think should
advertise with us. Tell them how much you like our magazine and point them in our direction. We've got great
advertising rates. It really would mean a lot to us if you
did. These sorts of things are always better when they
come from a friend.
But as we take a break from our print edition we leave
you with a lot to mull over. Ariel Pink of Ariel Pink's Haunted Graffiti talks about his past, present and future with
our reporter Colin Throness on page 14, our production
manager Debby Reis chatted with a number of the owner's
ofVancouver's favourite record stores and got them to share
some intriguing stories with us on page 16, and I managed
to meet up with a number of party photographers in town
to take a look at how the genre has developed over time
on page 37. But you know what the most exciting thing
in this issue is? Slam Dunk. They're on our cover and you
should check out Julie Colero's article about them on page
8. When you're done reading all those things we also have
some entertaining features on the Shilohs (page 12) and
Shad (page 10).
I won't be writing another one of these until September
though so enjoy your summer. I sure will! I'm off to Sled
Island; you can read all about it on our website.
Cheers,
Jordie Yow
CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE!
DISCORDER.CA IS HOME TO LOADS OF CONTENT WE CANT FIT INTO THE PRINT
ISSUE OF THE MAGAZINE, LIKE EXTRA FEATURES, REAL LIVE ACTION AND
UNDER REVIEW.
CHECK DISCORDER.CA REGULARLY FOR NEW ARTICLES, PHOTOS AND ALL
THINGS MUSIC RELATED!
JUNE
WRITERS
John Bartlett, Sarah Berman, Katherine Boothroyd, Nathaniel Bryce, Slavko Bucifal, Sarah Charrouf, Penny Clark, Julie
Colero, Susanne Dewein, Bryce Dunn, Luisa Fisher, Brenda Grunau, Sarshar Hosseinnia, Andy Hudson, Justin Langille,
Mark PaulHus, Jenn Perutka, Andrew Reeves, Gavin Reid, Debby Reis, Colin Throness, Jasper Walley, Jordie Yow
PHOTOGRAPHERS & ILLUSTRATORS
Melanie Coles, Tyler Crich, Aisha Davidson, Cody Fennell, Robert Fougere, the Futurists, Lindsay's Diet, the Lions,
Steve Louie, Ryan Walter Wagner, Kurtis Wilson, Mike Withers
PROOFREADERS
Susanne Dewein, Simon Foreman, Olivia Meek, Debby Reis
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2
SUB Blvd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T1Z1, Canada.        \ TABLE* CONTENTS
JULY/AUGUST 2010
DISCORDER.CA
Slv>OCT|M-E
SB
>"yo  0|W/6('You      W*U^A    r\o(_C?''
08/SLAM DUNK
Do the Slam Dunk with Victoria's wonderful burrito eating garage quartet.
They are pretty much our favourite.
10/SHAD
Sarah Berman had a chance to chat with one of Canada's best up and coming
rappers just before he played a show at the Biltmore.
12/THESHILOHS
They recored their country tinged rock EP in the middle of the night in a
haunted office tower. It is well worth a listen, and this profile on them is
well worth a read!
14/ARIEL PINK'S HAUNTED GRAFFITI
Ariel Pink reached our own Colin Throness to talk about his past, present
and future (and of course his new album Before Today).
16/ONCE UPON A RECORD STORE
The owners of some of our favourite record stores sat down to chat with us
about some of the best—and weirdest—things that have happened during
their time selling discs.
37/PARTY PHOTOGRAPHY
Like to party? Like to look at yourself partying? You're not alone. Once dismissed as a fashionable trend, party photography has stuck it out in Vancouver
since the early 'oos and we thought it was about time we revisited the form.
/ 28/UNDERREVIEW
g2 05/RIFFRAFF
**™jj    East Bay Grease / Radio Reelers / Spastic Panther / The Throwaways
Jj 20 / CALENDAR
*w«i   Art by Kurtis Wilson
«3 DonPDAM nunc u4 31 j REAL L,VE ACTION
i    ULl    Li I PRO G RAM  GUIDE Q2   Born Ruffians/Bowl Your Own Waste /The Buzzcocks /First Aid Kit /Frog
The Brains / LCD Soundsystem / Male Bonding / Thee Manipulators / Phan-
togram / Radio Radio / Slam Dunk / Shane Turner Overdrive / The Telepathic
Butterflies / Tobacco / The Winks / Wintersleep
25 /ART PROJECT
The Lions
39 /CHARTS
Eyes / Girls / LCD Soundsystem / Massive Attack / Matmos VANCOUVER 4^
PRIDE SOCIETY
AND
PRESENT
educate
cSebrate
WWW VANCOUVERPR1DE CA
El
"telus Cfii^rS-
June 26 East Side Pride
July f7 Gay Day @Playfand
July 24 Picnic in the Park
July 27 Pride in Art
July 29 Pride Movie Night
Juiy 30 Davie Street Pride Party
July St Terry Wallace Breakfast
Aug 01 Sunset Beach Pride Festival
Aug Of Youth Dance
PRIDE PA**P£
&FESTIVAL*
i 2S« M   • f
69
www.xtra.caj
STEP 1: Circle one or more of the following as it applies to you.
Homo
Politically Minded
Nelly
Fag
Hot
Edgy
Gay
Friendly
Fierce
Dyke
Open Minded
Lesbro
Queer
Activist
EMO
Lesbian
Queen
Bold
Bi
Questioning
Fag Hag
Trans
Fabulous
Kinky
Curious
Heteroflexible
Cub/Bear/Otter
Good in Bed
Straight Acting
Well Hung
STEP 2: If you circled any of the above, check out Xtra online and in print.
Now.
Xiraf
VANCOUVER'S
GAY& LESBIAN
NEWS
Cruise us on
Facebook and Twitter
www.xtra.ca BY BRYCE DUNN
JUST HEAD
Hello once again! Summer is upon us and the living is easy, as they
say, but ifs always better when good music is playing. To begin,
why not indulge in the summer sounds of the Throwaways, from
their newly minted split release with the Spastic Panthers. In fact,
there is even a "Summer Song" to get you in the lovesick mood,
and that spills over into their ode to "Mikey Erg!" leader of the now defunct
seminal pop-punk group the Ergs! (Just for the record guys, in reference to
the lyric, "I don't know where you are today or what you're doing now" he's
in the awesome band Psyched To Die, check' em out!). The other two tracks,
"Pterodactyl Clap" and "Got A Problem?" sound like a thrashier, noisier version of the Brentwoods or the Tourettes. Live, these gals and guy rip it up:
yours truly has watched them and grinned from ear to ear as a result. I can't
say I feel the same about the Spastic Panthers, however, as they barrel through
four songs of mid-'8os hardcore/skate rock that just don't do much for me.
It's played expertly enough and they seem to be having a blast, but I have difficulty getting past a song called " (I'm Gonna) Punch You In The Dink" that's
sung by a bunch of guys approaching an age not befitting the exploits of a
troublemaking three year old. Know what I mean? While "Volatile," a short
and bulbous blast of Black Flag worship, fares better as a sequel to their Rock
and Roll Beasts EP, it doesn't stray far from the formula of the hardcore punk
style of Jerry's Kids or the Circle Jerks.
Here's a question: are you setting yourself up for failure by calling your
newest EP Too Dumb To Quit? Knowing that this tide has probably been used a
million times over to signal the death knell of any band past its prime, ifs good
to know that the Radio Reelers don't take themselves too seriously. They are,
however, serious enough to rock the heck out on their latest slab. Four songs of
fast living, flre-breathin' rock (with choice covers of the Problematics and the
Pogues, no less) grace my wine-coloured copy. I reviewed a single in 2001O),
and they haven't changed one iota thanks to their Ramones-meets-Devil Dogs
songbook. Too dumb to quit? Nay, too smart to die.
Finally, when you think of the City by the Bay, you think of the Golden Gate
Bridge, Alcatraz and Fisherman's Wharf as picturesque cultural landmarks.
Now,those San Fr#q|sco icons have been tainted with a significant amount
of East Bay Grease, my friends, and the stuff is sticky and tricky to remove.
Led by the enigmatic entertainer Harold Ray (formerly of HRLIC) along with
members of Drunk Horse, Red Meat and the Deadly Snakes, East Bay Grease
makes music to drink, fight and love to and their debut is a can of whoop-ass.
Ifs unleashed by a honky-tonked version of the Nervous Eaters proto-punk
classic "Just Head" along with two of their own: "Happily Married Man" and
"Brass Digger" (the latter tune noteworthy because of its tongue planted firmly
in tobacco-stuffed cheek ode to desperate women looking for love in all the
wrong places). But lest you think Johnny Lee is the only point of reference,
think Tower of Power and whiskey-soaked boogie rock, and you've gotyourself
covered in East Bay Grease, too.
See you in a few!
TheThrowaways/Spastic Panthers: Handsome Dan Records,
www. handsomedanrecords.com
Radio Reelers: Meaty Beaty Records, myspace.com/meatybeatyrecords
East Bay Grease: Classic Bar Music, www.classicbarmusic.com
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citr.ca  PHOTO BY RYAN WAITER WA6NER
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■ i\|              Irk       m5« Four friends from Victoria, Jordan Minkoff (guitar/vox), Caitiin Gallupe
(bass/vox), Luke Posri (drums/catwails) and Duncan MacConnell (guitar/vox),
found themselves in a riotous new formation almost two years ago, when they
were asked to do some .cover tunes at a cancer benefit show. The four-piece
performed songs by the Sonics, Fleetwood Mac and the Traveling Wilburys,
The set was so well received that the group decided to take things to the next
level by hunkering down and writing some songs of their own. All four band
members are already long-time Victoria veterans, even though they're all still
in their early 20s (Post! and MinkofFplay in Colourbook, MacConnell is in
Cobras Cobras Cobras, and Gallupe now plays in her brother Brooke's band,
Immaculate Machine), and so are well-versed in being in a band. "I liked going
back and doing the ol' punk rock stuff, together with the best buds I had; it
made sense. I was sick of doofin' round!" joked Postl.
At first, the band stayed close to home, playing house parties and small
shows for friends, "so they could have a good time on weekends, " explained
Minkoff. Thankfully, Slam Dunk decided that other music fans needed to have
fun weekends, too.
"At first we were doing house parties in Victoria and that's about it It was
only last February when we first played off the Island, because we decided to
book a tour to California while Jordan and I still had musician's work visas
from another band. We played Santa Barbara before we ever played Vancouver,
squeezed into a 20-band, thrashy bill," explained Gallupe. "We all just sort of
love touring so it doesn't seem like too much effort.''
They make touring look effortless, although staying in touch while on the
road is a little more challenging for the group. I managed to get a hold of Minkoff
on a friend's phone somewhere
cording to the group. Minkoff said that "playing Victoria has gotten kind of
crazy lately. For small people at least. Last time we played in Victoria people
started pushing before we started playing. It's usually a nice kind of happy
pushing but falling over and get danced upon don't feel too good." Duncan
MacConnell thinks it's great when fans get up and in their face, "as long as
they don't steal the mics and never return 'em! All our friends know all the
words because they hear them all the time and usually they're crowd surfing
even when there is no music."
According to Caidin Gallupe, "the only real diehards we get are usually 40-
something-year-olds who tell us they haven't felt so alive since they saw so and
so in 1980- whatever." That's a compliment if ever I've heard one, and the band
seems pretty stoked that they're winning over so many people so quickly.
While it's undeniable to anyone who's seen Slam Dunk play that they are the
rockingest, it must be said that the band's recordings are excellent, too. The
band's got a 7" out on Old Life Records that Minkoff said "sounds nice." There
are other songs available online, but they're apparency not up to snuff.
"We just re-recorded everything because we couldn't stand it. It was pretty
unlistenable. It took a while to get tight enough," Jordan said, explaining the
band's need to redo some tunes. "It was pretty sloppy before that"
Sloppy doesn^a^SIatti Dunk justice, though. True, they seem like a goofy
lot but they know how to get shit done. "So farwe've done everything ourselves,"
explained Gallupe. "Tour, shirts, demo CDs, a 7". We built a whole table on
my back porch for silkscreening everything. We did the 7" ourselves with some
help from our friends' labels, Old Life and Fan Club Music Club."
Hopefully, the band's hard work will pay off. Gallupe said "it would be
nice to have someone release our
outside of Brandon, ManitolMr WE TRY TO KEEP A SENSED full-length," but there's nothing
mid-June. Whether the two will still j]/}/!#/T IT tJR FI ^F WF MIGHT FNIJ IIP stoPPinSthebandfcomgo'mgthe
be on good terms once she gets the —— ■ ~     g y- -jr— -•■ - .— ■- 'mJ^^MTWnW~iM7fTU d'lV' r°Ute * WhUe longer'
bill for the call is another story, but   WlmKINb AT LONG & M^MUADE,   WITH     "It would all be a whole lot
Minkoff was happy to wax poetic jEfjATFF^S    MlMf) f^URHMATIf^  TIINFffK       easier if someone just gave us a
on the ins and outs of the touring
lifestyle and how a joke band can grow into so much more than a joke.
"I wouldn't say the band is a joke at all. We actually take writing the songs
seriously. We want 'em to be seriously good! But we try to keep a sense of humour
about it or else we might end up working at Long & Mcquade. With goatees.
And chromatic tuners." That frightening future is still a long way off, as Slam
Dunk is too busy touring our basements to settle down at a day job and groom
their wild and wooly facial hair (does not apply to all band members).
Fresh as anyone can be after sleeping in an over-crowded van and standing
outside of a gas station in the middle of the Prairies, Minkoff explained that on
this tour, "we're basically just a shuttle service" for friends along for the ride.
Nine bodies crammed into an eight-seater van is, apparently, somebody's idea
of a good time. Before setting out on the road, Minkoff established a set of van
rules, the most important of which seems to involve giving the newly-acquired
tour saxophonist Kain Bryson ("He's really small, so he fits well in the van,
and he's always in a good mood!") last dibs on driving music choices. As of
the Manitoba pit stop, everything was running according to plan.
"We're all best friends—we all love to eat together and play together," he
continued. The cross-Canada tour is a little different than the band's Cali tour,
as the drives are longer and the sleeps are shorter, but everybody seems in good
spirits, focusing on the common goals of rocking some serious house parties
and making it to Sled Island to perform on a bill with Les Savy Fav, a band with
similarly outlandish stage antics and terrifyingly devoted fans.
Slam Dunk fans can get a little unruly at times, but that's all the better, ac-
big pile of cash!* joked Minkoff.
"It's just hard when ya broke! Maybe we will put an ad up on Craigslist for a
pile of cask Maybe a missed connection with a pile of bash, we could meet
the pile somewhere and take it home."
Apparently dreams like these are what great bands are made of. "I'm trying to convince everyone to go on tour again [after the cross-Canada tour] so
I don't have to find anywhere to live," said Minkoff, and, for once, I get the
feeling he's being serious.
That seriousness doesn't last very long around Slam Dunk-ville as Gallupe is
quickly bringing up their plans to start "a travelling burrito stand called 'Slam
Dunk Burrito Stand.' Available for any kind of function."
"We offer this as a stand-alone catering affair, sans music, or as an edible
compliment to our live show," joked Luke Postl. The four friends, when not
busting out great party anthems on stage or in the basement, like to play in
Gallupe's backyard to the chickens.
Slam Dunk had a really positive experience at Music Waste, but can't see the
same thing working on the Island. "I definitely appreciate the venues Vancouver has right now. Victoria is super dry—all we have is Caitlin's backyard and
Logan's, which has a great Sunday brunch menu, but thafs only talk radio,
no bands," said Posri.
If you want to get in on the fun,, Slam Dunk will be rippin' it up at Glory
Days on July 17 and can probably be found fueling their burrito-driven antics
down the street at Budgie's before the show.
Viva Slam Dunkus!  jfe ■ TETRIS.
■ THF/SKILL OF LUCK, m
M GEOGRAPHY IS DESTINY-
BEING EXTRA CANADIAN =
THE INTERNET BLOWING HIS M!ND
IT WAS DAYLIGHT OUTSIDE, BUT YOU WOULDN'T HAVE GUESSED IT FROM THE SUBTERRANEAN LIGHTING
INSIDE THE BILTMORE CABARET. HIP-HOP WORDSMITH SHAD AND I SHARED A RED VELVET BOOTH,
WHILE HIS BASSIST IAN KOITER ABSENT-MINDEDLY GROOVED IN THE BACKGROUND.
At that moment, we were contemplating the finer points of the 1984 video
game Tetris.
"I play a lot of Tetris on my computer. It calms me down in a weird way," he
said. "There's definitely a rhythm to it. I find it relaxing."
This unexpected tangent came amid discussion of Shad's third record
TSOL, which was released May 25.1 had asked whether the letters on his album
cover were meant to resemble those geometric Tetris pieces that perpetually
fall from the sky.
"Yeah. You know what? Nobody's ever asked me about that," he said, adding that there's a latent philosophical reasoning behind the nostalgic puzzle
game reference. "It's sort of about fitting things together, and breaking down
walls, too."
These are precisely the type of poignant armchair insights stitched throughout Shad's autobiographical songwriting. The 28-year-old MC is an expert
storyteller.
"I've alwaysbetn a fan of lyrics that are pointed and conversational—lyrics
that get your attention," he said. "I've never been a fan of lyrics that are just like
vague, romantic phrases strung together. I don't find that engaging at all."
While his songs are quick to comment on the state of popular culture,
there's also an endearing element of personal confession throughout his
10 music. TSOL's raucous single "Yaa, I Get
It" reveals that like many of us, Shad still
depends on a student line of credit as
he wraps up a masters degree in liberal
studies at Vancouver's own Simon Fraser
University.
On the subject of funding an education
with a rap career, Shad doesn't recommend it: "Somehow it's worked out for
me, but it's like the dumbest idea ever,"
he said with a laugh. "It's the fastest way
to get poor, for sure."
Though his perceptive rhymes, '90s-
inspired flow and explosive live presence
seem to readily explain how he's overcoming those odds, Shad modestly attributed
much of his success to luck.
"That's one of my greatest skills,"
he said, matter of factly. "I don't know
what it is but I've definitely been very
fortunate."
The man has a point. Shad's first album When This is Over was funded by a
talent contest put on by a Kitchener, Ont
radio station in 2005. His sophomore album, The Old Prince, was short-listed for
2008's Polaris Prize and even earned him
a Juno nomination for Best Rap Album.
His newest was just chosen for the Polaris Prize long list.
For Shad, his career has always been about being at the right place at the
right time. "We think we determine so much about our lives. As if we have all
this 'choice' and 'agency.' But really a lot of your life is determined by where
and when you were born.
"If you look to your right and your left and you look at your best friends,
they're probably the kids who lived on your street the kids you sat beside in
class or the kid who happened to live next door in residence."
Even in conversation, Shad's words seemed thoughtful and entirely relatable.
The above philosophical conundrum manifests as the phrase "geography is
destiny" on a brief interlude track titled "Call Waiting." When asked about his
own geographical destiny, Shad has a few different answers up his sleeve.
"It's a pretty complicated question," he mused. "I say I grew up in London,
Ontario. That's where I've spent the bulk of my life. It's where some of my
best friends still live.
Still, Shad has a few other places he also considers home. "I was born in
Kenya, but my family is really from Rwanda. My parents live there now with
my little brother, so that's a significant kind of home as well."
IT'S THE FASTEST
WAY TO GET POOR,
FOR SURE,
"And Vancouver is where I live; it's where I pay rent" he added. (It's probably worth noting Shad is wearing a black shirt with "VNCVR" spelled out in
bright multi-coloured text)
Luckily, the hip-hop everyman has no trouble holding down several identities.
"I'm Canadian and I'm something else, which is a very common experience
for Canadians. In that sense I feel extra Canadian."
With his first cross-Canada headlining tour already underway, Shad is
making the most of the indie scenery Vancouver has to offer.
"I like working with people within my vicinity," he said. "I think that it just
feels natural to work with the people around you."
True to his word, local indie darling Hannah Georgas shared the stage
with Shad during his Biltmore performance June 3. And if the list of guest
musicians on his latest album is any indication, collaborating across genres
is something Shad takes to heart
"I'm a fan of all different kinds of musk. I think everybody is," he said. "I sit
down and talk about music with my DJ [T LO] or Brendan Canning [of Broken
Social Scene] and we'll be having the same conversation."
Canning and bandmate Lisa Lobsinger both contribute guest vocals and
instrumentation on TSOL (which, by the way, isn't an acronym for anything in
particular). Shad has also toured across Canada with Vancouver's Hey Ocean!,
and even played the Vans Warped Tour in 2009.
Halifax-based rapper Classified supplies the beat on the lively history lesson "A Good Name," in which Shad cleverly reflects on the origin of his family
namesake: Shadrach Kabango.
"You know, my name is spelled pretty phonetically. Some people are intimidated by the sound of it but I'm like, take a deep breath, trust your instincts
and you'll probably get it right"
Having already test driven his new material in Victoria and Whistler, Shad
and his band are more than ready to ride out the Trans-Canada.
As for being cooped up in a tour van, Shad doesn't mind one bit It's
really not that hard. Most of the time you're driving. And by driving I mean
sitting," he said. "I've established some rules in my van, so that everything
runs smoothly."
"[The] driver picks music, unless the driver has requested a shotgun to
keep him awake. Then shotgun picks music," he explained. "And there's no
veto-ing. So there's never any quarrels over that"
Far from dreading the grueling tour schedule, Shad looks forward to catching up on episodes of Bored to Death and Eli Stone.
"I love going on the Internet and watching TV. It still blows my mind," he
said, noting that he's built a reputation for lagging behind the technology curve.
"I'm probably the only person I know my age that still wants to sit down and
talk about the Internet and how amazing it is."
Despite being more than a little mystified by Twitter, Shad has unwittingly
set the Interwebs abuzz. The positive reviews keep rolling in, and if TSOL's
recent Polaris long list nomination is any indication, luck's got nothing to
do with it. j|
// //THESHILOHS
BYJENNPERUTKA
ILLUSTRATION BY TYLER CRICH
I
ecordmg an EP in a building that's rumoured to be haunted in the
middle of the night during a heat wave would tend to make anyone
& tittle ex&Ky. Drummer Ben Frey of the Shilohs elaborated, "The
'JPJ^&^gWe recorded was at 5:30 in the morning... the laugh you
' hear in the beginning of the song 'Having a Good Time,' that's
me laughing at Johnny [Payne] talking to a stuffed lizard with a
cigarette m its mouth."
Despite the unique circumstances, what came out of the recording process
were beautifully crafted countrified pop and mellow folk jams on the Shilohs
debut self-titled EP.
I met Frey, bassist Dan Colussi and guitarist Mike Komaszczuk at Jonathan
Rogers Park, and ended up speaking to guitarist Johnny Payne over the phone the
next day as he's currently touring with his other band, Fanshaw. We discussed
the band's unorthodox recording process for their first EP, working with Steve
Bays and their future plans.
The band's beginnings stem from a mutual love of bands like Big Star,
Burrito Brothers, the Beatles and similar bands from the late '60s and early
'70s. Their love for that era is evident from the six songs that make up the EP.
Beginning with catchy pop tunes such as "History of Love," the EP progresses
into bluesy folk jams. "The chemistry was instant" said Payne, who the other
members describe as the ringleader of the group. "I knew I wanted those guys
in the band. They're some of my favourite people I've met. I loved Ben's drumming and his pleasant vibe. I had an instant connection with Mike, and Dan
is my brother from the Island. So playing and hanging out with those guys is
just great," he explained.
After writing a multitude of songs the band began to record their EP. They
12 1 mY FAVOURITE THl&GJNJM
WORLD § WH'm THEY DANCE*
hooked up with Steve Bays of Hot Hot Heat and recorded in his Tugboatl^fios,
located in the Dominion Building in the heart of downtown. Since thjjjflmdingj
is comprised mainly of offices, the band recorded the EP in the middle of the
night to avoid the noisy work day. "We wanted to do it live like Neil Young and
Crazy Horse style. So to do it in the middle of the night gave it a gritty feel,"
Payne said. "It helped us get in the mind-set and we'd save the quietest songs
that relied on intensity for the 5 a.m. session."
The guys were stoked about working with Steve Bays and the collaboration
came easy to them. As Frey explained, "Johnny is friends with Hot Hot Heat's
drummer [Paul Hawley] back from Victoria. He heard some of our demos and
saw us play and was psyched. He was buzzing off of what he could do and he
put so much energy into it and when we told him we wanted to go home he'd
be like, 'What? It's only 6 a.m.!'"
Payne added, "He was great to work with. It was the first thing he ever
produced aside from Hot Hot Heat, so there's something nice about it when
the producer is just as new to the process as the band. It leaves room for
experimentation."
Listening to the EP, there's a noticeable progression from the up-tempo
songs into ballads, so I asked the guys whether this was intentional. "We actually recorded ten songs, but we felt the six we chose worked perfectly together
and flowed sequentially. It's like watching a band play a set and they play a song
that didn't fit right. It could've gone anywhere else. If you don't structure it
properly, it ruins it," Frey said passionately.
Komaszczuk chimed in, "Ben's our set-list guy."
So will we hear these four scrapped songs any time soon? "They're done,"
Komaszczuk said.
|||||lfou think so?" asked Frey jokingly. "We could always do a B-side. And
HRe's always Record Store Day."
Iprhe band members are no strangers to the stage, having played in introspective rock and punk bands since high school and opening for Cold
War Kids last year. So what can you expect at one of their shows? "A typical
Shilohs show is us not bothering to do sound check cause there's a hockey
game upstairs," Frey joked. "No, that's only happened once. Generally, we're
getting a lot more tighter. We have a nice calm about us and our songs have
a lot of feeling to them."
According to Payne though, his concern was with the audience. "I always
hope we can play a show that will make people want to dance when we play
our fast songs and nostalgic when we play our slow songs. My favourite
thing in the world is when they dance," he said. The best compliment he ever
received to describe a Shilohs show was this: "This girl came up to me after
and said, '[your] music sounds like the type of music when you're on a road
trip. You're kind of tired, but you turn on the radio and realize you're having
a great time.'"
The Shilohs plan to head back into the studio in August to Work on their
first full-length album. "We definitely have some numbers that resemble
Chuck Berry, just mellower jams. They feel like when we first started [and] we
wanted to sound like Big Star," Frey said. This time, the band will be working with local producers JC/DC, best known for their work with Vancouver's
homegrown talent Destroyer and the New Pornographers. In the meantime,
you'll have a chance to check out the band for yourself come July 24 for their
EP release party at Little Mountain Studios. If you decide stop by, make sure
you dance. It'll make Johnny happy, fc
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BY COLIN THRONESS
ILLUSTRATION BY
AISHA DAVIDSON j Discorder: First of all, how's your day going, Ariel?
Ariel Pink: The day? Yeah, it's going good. We're about a week into our tour
and we're heading offfbr mainland Europe tomorrow. So we've got two weeks
left. And, yeah, things are going good.
D: It's eight days until your 32nd birthday. Actually, I'm 32 as well and I've
found that, more and more, these early thirties are very significant years fol
young men in our demographic. For many it's when we come to accept thai
our twenties are finally behind us and maybe it's time to ask ourselves if we]
really are or should be adults. Do you feel like an adult yet, Ariel?
AP: Absolutely, I feel like an adult. I alsSPRSMIlJWWSMHJIflrt'fttBW^ we're
all children, forever. [Laughs.] Everyone in their twenties h#^|^istwetfltes
mania and they kind of live as if it's the beginnjagAd end of the world. They
screw pf#el^liVes in all sorts of ways, rpafSI, fllf teens are like a false start
kind of thing, and the thirties, I don't|§|0jfjl<i» is for you, but I feel like
I'm mellowing out with age or something;
D: Yeah, I find that too. The reason! onng it up is because I've always fount!
I your music very nostalgic ft kind of#mimJs me of the melodies I'd make up
with my sisters when we were kids. And probably partly because it's very '80s
infused and full of emotion. There's also iiipteresting kind of dualityAnE
I music. On many levels it's very familiar and melodic and on other levelsIt'f
bizarre and kind of skewed. Can ye^talk a little about your creatjven^jCped
| in terms of that duality and how ifs ©solved over the years?
AP: Well, you knowthe duality is not really atluality, ifs linear. It^^p^^^^B
The '80s are aot?^|«f aftotjifer lec&ie. We're not just any other generjffcffi^;
suppose. BuClthT&itrjjiat whatever my eondttipn is or whatever i^HH^^e^ft.i,
of what I'm isping obviously speaks to pedple of our generating and mayls^/*
a generatio|||punger for other reasons. I could go on at length ;ibout£ Ik flrs** i
definitely, y|§pcnow, memories, and the whole nature of recording, and the. \
whole natalpHF recording the past, and the nat^^f^^i^^^hey1^ m*
things that are no^jr&tthe forefroataad have to be dealt with in some fqpn-C^'
another in order to consolidate whatever the future's gonna be.
D: You started recording over two decades ago and I noticed you also went to
I Beverly Hills High School. Can you tell me a little bit about your high school
I experience and how ft might have influenced those musical beginnings?
■HffWHHIffrTJRfJcy much traveled through the 10HMGU" jO^gfe' in those years.
It started before then of course. Starting with me liking [an] ...Itching heavy
metal, which was in my seventh grade year, I reached a plateau with heaviness,
with death metal and'even btei^fH&tal a little bit. But then when I started
high school I discovered death rock. It was kind of a downgrade in volume,
but like an upgrade in, kind of, more dark entries...I (ib|tt know. I thhriti??©
always been drawn to the darkness of music. So I pursued that througl^^pi.
school. I wasn't exactly a goth by any means, but I was Jefinitely attracted to
the netherworlds of music.
D: What about two decades from now? We're gonna be fifty-two pretty I
soon. What kind of crazy-ass shit do you think you're gonna be recording
■n 11)107       jit/, 1      m&
AP: Well, I don't know if I'll be recording by then. I hope that it's not just
up to me. I hope that there's plenty of younger artists that I can glean some
real inspiration from as opposed to just foraging my imaginary dad's record
collection. .' s&tfffito/ftfa wi$i.z$k. .-*
D: The album Before Today— released earlier this month by 4AD records—
certainly holds onto the integrity of your earlier music, even surpasses it, I
but it does mark a departure in your recording style—it's not as muddy and I
■self-reflexive, not as playful in terms of the medium of recording. Were you
looking to make it more accessible?
AP: Yeah, I mean it's not that much of a leap to make it more accessible. I suppose I could've made my other stuff more accessible, too. In fact, I think about
that often, just like remastering all the stuff that I did. I was so in a rush back
then, you know—the crazy twenties! But I was never satisfied one way or the
other with what I did in the past and nor am I satisfied now. I try to keep my
sights on just getting something to where I can listen to it and that's the kind
of minimum. I mean if I had to think to myself, "Oh, bring up that guitar," or
like fucking, "Take all the subs out of those drums." If I have to go [through]
that thought process when I hear something objectively—I mean I generally
just tend to produce things my way. I'll get people CDs and I'll store the new
iTunes graphic EQ settings, you know, make my own mix, audio hijacking,
whatever. I'm sure I probably would like the record more—I listened to the
record being fed through an amp the other day by total circumstance and it
sounded great. I'm like, okay^well now we can take the record and dub it about
fifty-five minions times and then we'll have an Ariel Pink record.
D: I read that you struggled with live performances earlier on in your career
land I'd imagine it has something to do with your recording methods being
[part of your craftsmanship. How has yourttve act evolved recently?
AP:Well, it's preoylllBipp^pigysolei'dl!§§pliiceI catnWHPm 2004. And then
releasing music all throughfifeat time has Ibeen essentially a means of creating
merchandise for my table and not muchdr*an opportunity to really pursue the
- EBra#|tftactly, you-lai^w? Ever since! started playing live I got myself into the
cycle of paying my ow^ fifis and stuff like that—making music, and making
music the sole vocation—-but it*s been h^Fli^t a moment free. So, I've
pursued playing live and I am kind of discovering not being in that comfort
zone for the first time nil long time. And doing that from the ground up has
taken a whif^^r me. Buil feet fir£ kind of been towards a similar aim since
the beginning. It's^all just rewards being able to get to the point where I can
sustain myself making the music. And probably by the time I actually figure it
V>ot thefts \£§h*t$e any musie^jft W putdpwn, But I hope not. I look forward
to the day w|ieh I've got free time and have to just clear my mind of all sorts
of other disoaetksti. --!
iflrTaWnoticeTO often very self-reTexive and seem to
littdlfp&rate elements of your personal life. How does that tie into your overall
credo or philosophy within ya^^i^^^^,^
AP: I think Wk visuals are important It's another thing that I have to always
de&i With in a semi-incompseteHtiV®', (with a live setting. It remains kind of
albwrteudget enterprise like the records. If I'm at the controls directing what
I do and teilitig people w&ai to do, it's really a pretty simple instruction. It's
just, jet me sjy&g the song and I'll stand there for you and mouth it and you
don't have to worry to hard about concepts or themes or anything like that
lt*s reafly the notion that things translate pretty simply, and in a very direct
way that they don*£ anymore. Maybe they used to when video was the new
techasplogy. But everybody gets too hung up on the producers, everybody gets
rjdoHbpig up on the directors, everybody gets too hung up on the musicians
landaffthe other rahMMia. I like the effect of something raw and unpolished,
just kinda speaking for itself—not necessarily raw and unpolished, mind you,
just something speaking for itself.
D: How are you enjoying Europe? Do you have a favourite city or a favourite venue?
AP: No. I think it's starting to just blend in. It's about time mat I find some other
place to tour. Europe lost its novelty for me. Florida! Now that's exotic.
|D: Yeah, well now it's gonna get even more exotic, right, with the oil spill.
AP: [Laughs.] Exactly. .    .
|D: Well, we look forward to seeing you in July, Ariel.
AP: Yeah, I don't know if it's been announced yet, but we're gonna be in
Canada again—I don't know what parts yet, it's starting in Winnipeg—but
we're gonna be doing the Flaming Lips tour in September. So, yeah, good
things afoot in the next year.
15 \m?
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Hurry of recordf stores oj*n »» | «CD Wars" reporting that A&B I
Jancouverindadiiigl^WaxSprds,!^^ ^^ .|r>; music beiow co$t>|
p,kora'S Classical Records Ltd,Pe%fkjn^ ft^Wiisfc prices the!
I Records, Phantasmagoria Rec0JP38#8fl rKj jpy^, fa Canada ^
I Tapes, Kelly's, Highlife Records, riot   ' tA||£ll, iaaa"
| Just Another Music Shop and Otis^:'PW^^?*^.^r^lf^^ 	
| Music with many dosing after just a    Beatstreet,  Scrape, Vinyl Records anT
I f?W»y^^JS^*^'^''':-'"Ski: Virgin Megastore open. Zulu moves to a £3
y'.:i->i^'0 higger location
'hiiips starts mass manufacturing
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I renting out CDs and "disk players," as
I are other record shops and video rental
I |tore$ JH||kj^^^^^^^;^_''''
I Scratch Records first t^pens •■;■<; -;
111
8fA Records, a nation wide chain, loses I
9 million in 18 months. Starts closing I
| 6o of their 260 stores across Canada.
The chain eventually collapses with I
remaining,jitores being bought up by I
.Music Vferid
l^Sam the Record Man on Seymour closes
.Mlr
■• Red Cat Records and Audiopile open
iHitit
Buddy, Red Cat Record's famous cat,
: dies. Virgin Megastores closes and I
rej^^ibyJ^W^
Record Store Day is founded to celebtan
independent record stores^
J A&B Sound on Seymour closes 1
I Zoo Zhop opens j
ONCE UPON A RECORD STORE//
BROWSING THE HISTORY OF INDEPENDENT RECORD STORES
BY DEBBY REIS,
WITH ASSISTANCE FROM
SUSANNE DEWEIN
ILLUSTRATIONS BY MELANIE COLES
& LINDSEY HAMPTON
There's really no record stores in malls anymore," Grant McDonagh,
Zulu Records' owner, pointed out while discussing the state of stores in
Vancouver—so unless you have a record store in your neighbourhood,
you may have forgotten about the time before mp3S when hanging out
in the record store was the way to learn about and collect music.
According to Scratch Records' Keith Parry, record stores still fill this niche.
"We've had dozens of in-store performances... and those... are [the] things
that feel like you're part of the community, you're a cultural ambassador,"
he said.
"You can usually learn something from someone that works at a record
store," Rob Frith, owner of Neptoon Records pointed out. "They may not be
into the same music you are, but it's usually something they have heard, or they
sell enough stuff that... they can say, 'Oh, well everyone is talking about this
record' and they can recommend something."
And the snobbery once associated with record store staff is rarely a problem
today. Although Parry admitted elitism has been part of Scratch's past ("When Carl
Newman worked at my store [he] wouldn't sell someone a Bad Religion record."),
today, record stores simply can't afford to turn people away. McDonagh agreed,
"There's a lot of dedicated people who have supported our store and other small
stores.... I give them total credit and I thank them so much," he said.
Nevertheless, when you walk into an independent record store, the music
you find will be the music the people who work there like. Parry pointed out that,
unlike chain stores that make decisions at a head office on the other side of the
country, the staff at a small store have the freedom to bring in their favourites.
For Red Cat Records, an artist owned shop, carrying local bands is a priority.
"Having a connection with touring and making records yourself and understanding how much effort it takes to make an album, [you know] that it is worthwhile to
come in and purchase an album on vinyl and support a band," said Dave Gowans,
Red Cat's co-owner and member of the Buttless Chaps and Cloudsplitter.
Speaking of vinyl, another favourite that many record stores have never
given up on ("It looks good. It sounds good," McDonagh said.), dealing with
format changes over the years has been trying.
"I remember that period, and it wasn't a very long period, maybe it was
two years I guess, but cassettes were king," McDonagh recalled. To prevent
theft Zulu kept cassettes in a tube and a stick was used to pop out the album
a customer wanted.
When CDs started appearing in the late '80s, many stores in Vancouver
were renting them and the players out, but soon major labels were pushing
CDs as the only format. "[They] did everything they could to kill vinyl,...
putting 10 extra tracks on the CD, by making the vinyl available weeks, if not
months after the release day," Parry said. And while replacing all your vinyl
with CDs made for good business for a short while, "in retrospect, it sucked,"
McDonagh said.        fyjp|f|
What made things extra difficult for independent record stores [ed. but arguably great for tonsumers] in Vancouver was A&B Sound's policy of pricing music
below cost. "I could walk in into the A&B store and buy new sale records cheaper
than I could get them wholesale," Parry said. The Province even ran an article
in 1994 about A&B Sound keeping CD prices the lowest in the world.
Vinyl started making a resurgence circa 2004, partially due to the rise in DJ
culture, which has helped independent record stores. "I don't think that it's the
saviour that a lot of people would like it to be," McDonagh lamented. Nevertheless,
he was happy when he recently converted CD bins back to vinyl bins. "It felt kind
of good, ripping these CD bins apart and turning them into vinyl bins. I have to
admit, that's the truth... [TJ got even with the industry a little bit"
The future of record stores may be a bit shaky, but their place in music's cultural
milieu is unquestionable. And with the opening of Zoo Zhop, a brand new record
store, last February, perhaps we can be hopeful that these sources of knowledge
and community will continue providing unique stories and connections.
16 toP C4T tECORK MEW 201o LMllQk.
RED CAT RECORDS
Dave Gowans wanted to open a record shop back in 2000, but he was focused
on his band, the Buttless Chaps, so instead of opening a store, he took a job at
Red Cat when Amy Honey and Andrew Pearson opened it in 2002.
When Pearson and Honey moved to Nova Scotia in 2007, Gowans reconsidered his dream of owning a record store. "I just didn't want to see the store close
or go out of business," Gowans said. "So I said to my friend, Lasse [Lutick],
'Well, do you want to do this five or six years later than planned?'"
Lutick said, "Yes." Although the store has moved three times since its
original inception, it's always been located on Main.
The store was named for Buddy, a rescued cat that lived in the store. "He
wasn't the most friendly cat and he hated children," Gowans recalled. At the
original location, Buddy lived in the back room and didn't have to deal with the
NEPTOON RECORDS
Rob Frith had been a big album and music poster collector for a long time
before the recession in 1980 affected his construction business. He'd even been
organizing bi-annual record swap meets since the mid-'70s (which continue
today at the Croatian Cultural Centre). He struggled with the decision, but
finally decided to open Neptoon Records on Fraser Street in January, 1981. And
it didn't take long for him to decjde it was the right thing to do. "I thought,
'Man, this is the life! I can't believe I listen to records all day! And people come
here and buy stuff!'" Frith explained.
After a methadone clinic opened nearby, however, the business took a turn
for the worse, instigating a move to Neptoon's current location on Main. Today,
Frith works with his son Ben (the drummer in Thee Manipulators), who had
an interesting encounter with Tom Waits in the store.
According to Frith, Ben noticed a man in the store that looked incredibly
like Tom Waits. "He kept coming up and asking like, with a record with a
public much, but he was an icon that appeared in Red Cat's advertising. When
Buddy died in 2005, Discorder created a eulogy that emulated Red Cat's ads.
"[It] was an image of Buddy's head photoshopped onto Led Belly holding a
guitar. And that caught the attention of Ry Cooder," Gowans explained.
"Ry contacted the store and became interested in the cat and started writing a concept album about a big orange cat that travels across, you know, '30s
depression era America,'" Gowans said." [Cooder] never met the cat in person
but asked for a lot of photos and got really inspired about the cat That record
came out right when we bought the store."
When asked if the business ever considered getting another cat, Gowans
pointed out that "Cat hair and records just doesn't go ... especially with a
35-pound orange tabby."
price tag on it: 'How much is this record?' [imitating Tom Waits]. 'Well, it's
right there, it's five dollars.' 'Oh, ok.'" The man did this repeatedly. He finally
went to pay, handing Ben his credit card. "So he looked at the credit card, and
it says 'Thomas Waits* on the credit card. So he says, 'Are you the Tom Waits?'
And he says, 'No, no, I'm not Tom Waits.' So anyways, [when] he leaves the
store, my son goes back, walking down the aisle where the records are and
[the man's] pulled out all the Tom Waits records and stuck them all in the
front of every row!"
Neptoon has had had other celebrity shoppers as well. When Peter Buck
of R.E.M. came in, Frith didn't recognize him. Frith asked Buck what he was
doing in town. Buck replied that he was recording an album. Frith asked what
band he was in and Buck replied, "Oh, R.E.M."
"I felt really embarrassed," Frith said, "[I'd] even seen [them] live for
crying out loud."
11 |§§ 'ZULUpECWDS
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ZULU RECORDS
"When I was a kid I found [Quintessence Records] to be kind of unusual. So I
used to hang there and just eventually got a job and I worked there for a couple
of years," Grant McDonagh explained. The store went out of business. "I needed
a job," he confessed when asked about the decision to open Zulu. 1981 was an
interesting year to start the store. Experimental avant-garde music was coming
out of New York, hip-hop was breaking into mainstream culture and MTV hit
the airwaves. By the mid-'8os Zulu was a label and a distributor. Eventually,
McDonagh found that collecting money from stores was too difficult and he
decided to end that aspect of the business.
McDonagh found a new source of income when movies started being shot in
the relocated Zulu, which had just expanded to include the building next door.
When Life or Something Like It, starring Angelina Jolie, was filmed in the shop, it
SCRATCH RECORDS
"All I could ever think of as a teenage record nerd was,... well, I just liked to
skip school and hang out at the record store," admitted Keith Parry, owner
of Scratch Records. He wanted to own his own record store, but was worried
about the reaction of the adults in his life. So, he took general arts classes and
then went to the Travis Institute of Recording Arts & Sciences before making
the decision to open Scratch. It was 1987 and he was 20 years old.
"I sort of just dove head first into Vancouver's music scene and learned
who all the bands were. I went out every night. I got involved. I put on shows,"
Parry said. He lived in the back of the store for the first three years when it was
located on Cambie. And while Parry made the store part of the neighbourhood, he did have one particularly bad encounter. "I had someone attack me
with a syringe."
A disheveled, homeless man came into the shop and was bothering a female
turned out to be a godsend. "I had this major bill come my way with these fire
doors that separate the two stores. And I didn't budget for it," he explained.
"It cost a lot of money.... The Universal cheque came in one hand and went to
the fire door people. So I'm really grateful to that terrible film."
When Billy Bragg played at Zulu last year, he reminded McDonagh about
gratitude as well. " [Bragg did] this great little spiel about how when he was a
kid, how important record stores were to him and if it wasn't for them, god
knows what trouble he would have gotten in," McDonagh recalled. "It was
just a place where he found refuge while he was going through difficult times,
and I guess you could say that we provided that for some people, including
ourselves!"
shopper. Parry asked him if he needed help.
"[He] pulled out a syringe with no cap on it and he attacked me with it. And
being in that neighbourhood, I had a club behind the counter. I never dreamed
I'd have to use it, but I did. And I hit the guy in his arm. And he still continued
and I hit him again, and he still continued, and a third time, I got his hand
really good. And he dropped it and he ran out" Parry explained. "That was
one of the intenser, craziest events."
Happier memories include an in-store performance by the Zip Code Rapists,
who couldn't get a gig due to their political incorrectness. "I remember kids being at that show, and the Zip Code Rapists giving drinks of whiskey and vodka
to anyone who could prove they were under age," Parry recalled. Scratch also
donated their dollar bin and records were smashed in good fun. "That would
never, ever happen at a bar." fc
18 20% Off New Vinyl
40% Off Used Vinyl & CD's
Saturday July 17th & Sunday July 18th
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H
CO //CiTR 101.9 FM PROGRAM GUIDE
DISCORDER SUGGESTS LISTENING TO CiTR ONLINE AT WWW.CiTR.CA EVERY DAY.
mm
7
a
9
10
11
12pm
1
2
3
4
5
8
7
a
9
10
11
1
2
3
4
5
SUNDAY
QTR Ghost Mix
MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
CiTR Ghost Mix      Pacific Pickin'(Roots)      CfTRShost Mix
Tana Radio (World)
Shookshootcfa(Talk)
KolNodedi (World)
The Rockers Show
(Reggae)
Breakfast With The
Bjrowns (Eclectic)
Stranded
(Eclectic)
Ak Radio CDdk)
Parts Unknown (Pop)
Blood On
[ji|||a||d)el   Fill in
(Roots) v
Chips    t SaintTro-
(Pop)      Pe* O^P)
Queer FMfTaikT
Mantis Cabinet
(Eclectic)
The Rib (Eclectic)
News ioi (Talk)
Sounds of Africa
(World)
Third Tune's The
Chatm(Rodc)
Morning After Show
(Eclectic)   j
Laugh Tracks (Talk)
Give'Em die Boot
(Talk)
Suburban Jungle
{Eclectic)
Pop Drones
(Eclectic)
Anoize (Noise)
The Green Majority
(Talk)
CiTR Ghost Mix
End of the World
News (Talk)
Sweet And Hot (JfiBtz)
Duncan's DOnuts
. (Eclectic)
We All Fall Down
(Eclectic)
Democracy Now (Talk)      InkStuds (Talk)
Career Fast Track (Talkj
Rhythms j Awesome
(W»ld> I (Bclectic)
Mondo Trasho
(Eclectic)
anscendance
(Dance)
ThrowdownFM
(Dance / Electronic)
CiTR Ghost Ma
Wings (Talk)
Radio Freethinker
■ (Talk)
IrTFhe Cage With Birds j
FUlIn
Rumbletone Radio A
Go Go (Rock)
Japanese Musicquest
(World)
French Connection
(World)
Sore Throats, Clapping Hands (Eclectic)
Exploding Head
Movies
(Eclectic)
1h$ JfasK Show (Jaws)
CiTR Ghost Mis
Arts Report (Talk)
1   Reel to Real (Talk)
Wnk^MOMJS^*M Shameless
„,    .      . squantch >'
(Hardcore) * (Eclectic)
Native Solidarity News
(Talk)
Are You Awaie
MlPcfectic)
LifeOnJumpstreet
(Stance)
Crimes And Treasons
(Hip-hop)
CabaRadio (Talk)
jyTRGhpSLMk
Folk Oasis (Roots)
Sexy In Van City
(ttBO
Exquisite Corpse,,
(Experimental)  '
1mm From ThunderbirdJ
Radio Hell (live)
Hans Kloss Misery
Hour (Hans Kloss)
CiTR Ghost Mix
Aural Tentacles
(Eclectic)
CiTR Ghost Mix
Friday Sunrise
(Eclectic)
Synchronicity (Talk)
Ska-T's Scenic Drive
(Ska)
CiTR Listener Hour
(Eclec^tv-
Barnburner
(Eclectic)
Radio Zero (Dance)
Nardwuar Presents
(Nardwuar)
News 101 (Talk)
CiTR Ghost Mix
The Saturday Edge
(Roots)
Generation Arutiiuk&oii
Power Chord
(Metal)
.CodeBlueCRoots)
The Leo Ramirez Show]
(World)
Hot Mess (Eclectic)
Nasha Volna (World)
African Rhjthms
'.. (Eclectic) -
Notes from the
„' x Underground
(Electtonic/Hip-hop)
^RwWv^dl Feather
(Soul/R&B)
The Vampire's Ball
(Industrial)
CiTR Ghost Mix
Synaptic Sandwich
(Dance/Electronic/
Bcketis?)
Beats From The
Basement (Hip-bop)
Dreamscene Radio
, (Dance)
CiTR Ghost Mix
1
I
3
4
5
22 -1
SUNDAY
TANA RADIO
(World) 9-ioam
SHOOKSHOOKTA
(Talk) io-nam
A program targeted to
Ethiopian people that
encourages education and
personal development
KOLNODEDI
(World) nam-12pm
Beautiful arresting beats
and voices emanating from
all continents, corners and
voids. Always rhythmic,
always captivating. Always
crossing borders.
THE ROCKERS SHOW
(Reggae) i2-3pm
Reggae inna all styles and
fashion.
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
(Roots) 3-5pm
Alternatina Sundays
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-
boots country.
CHIPS WITH EVERYTHING
(Pop) 5-6pm
Alternatina Sundays
British pop music from all
decades. International pop
Japanese, French, Swedish,
British, US, etc.), '60s soundtracks and lounge.
SAINT TROPEZ
(Pop) 5-6pm
Alternatina Sundays
Welcome to St. Tropez!
Playing underrated music
from several decades!
st. tropezioi. 9@gmail. com
QUEER FM
(Talk) 6-8pm
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian,
bisexual and transexual communities ofVancouver. Lots
of human interest features,
background on current issues and great music.
queerfmradio@gmail.com
RHYTHMSINDIA
(World) 8-gpm
Alternatina Sundays
Featuring a wide range of
music from India, including
popular music from the 1930s
to the present; Ghazals and
Bhajans, Qawwalis, pop and
regional language numbers.
ALL AWESOME IN YOUR EARS
(Eclectic) 8-gpm
Alternatina Sundays
MONDOTRASHO
(Eclectic) 9-iopm
The one and the only Mon-
do Trasho with Maxwell
Maxwell—don't miss it!
TRANCENDANCE
(Dance) iopm-i2am
Join us in practicing the
ancient art of rising above
common ideas as your host
DJ Smiley Mike lays down the
latest trance cuts.
trancendance@
hotmail.com
THROWDOWN FM
(Dance / Electronic) 12-iam
Hosts Downtown Stacee
Brown and Jen Slator are proud
to announce that our playlist
for each and every show will be
100 per cent Vancouver, B.C.
based underground music of
the sub-bass generation. This
means you'll never hear a track
that's not from our west coast
province of B.C. We call ourselves collectively: The Local
Union 604.ThrowdownFM@
gmail.com
MONDAY
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
(Eclectic) 8-nam
Your favourite Brownsters,
James and Peter, offer a
savoury blend of the familiar and exotic in a blend of
aural delights.
breakfastwiththebrowns@
hotmail.com
STRANDED
(Eclectic) nam-i2pm
Join your host Matthew for
a weekly mix of exciting
sounds, past and present,
from his Australian homeland. And journey with him
as he features fresh tunes
and explores the alternative
musical heritage of Canada.
ALTERNATIVE RADIO
(Talk) 12-ipm
Hosted by David Barsamian.
PARTS UNKNOWN
(Pop) i-3pm
An indie pop show since
1999, it's like a marshmal-
low sandwich: soft and
sweet and best enjoyed
when poked with a stick
and held close to a fire.
MANTIS CABINET
(Eclectic) 3-4pm
THE RIB
(Eclectic) 4-5pm
Explore the avant-garde
world of music with host
Robyn Jacob on the Rib.
From new electronic and
experimental music to
improvised jazz and new
classical! So weird it will
blow your mind!
NEWS 101
(Talk) 5-6pm
Vancouver's only live,
volunteer-produced,
student and community
newscast. Every week, we
take a look back at the
week's local, national and
international news, as seen
from a fully independent
media perspective.
CAREER FAST TRACK
(Talk) 6-6:3opm
Join host and author
Philippe Desrochers as
he teaches you how to
dramatically INCREASE
your income doing work
you LOVE.
SORE THROATS, CLAPPING
HANDS
(Eclectic) 6:30-7:30pm
Sore Throats Clapping
Hands relies on simple
melodies and poignant lyricism to drive our passions.
We embrace music that
takes little production and,
for that reason, is extremely
accessible to play, share,
create and enjoy—music
that can be produced with
little more than clapping
hands and sore throats.
EXPLODING HEAD MOVIES
(Eclectic) 7:30-9pm
THE JAZZ SHOW
(Jazz) gpm-i2am
Vancouver's longest
running prime-time jazz
program. Hosted by Gavin
Walker. Features at npm.
July 5: Blue Mitchell's Step
Liohtly
July 12: Bobby Timmons'
The Soul Man!
July 19: Jackie McLean's It's
Time!
July 26: Clifford Jordan's
Glass Bead Games
Aug. 2: Thad Jones/Mel
Lewis: Live at the Village
Vanauard
Aug. 9: Miles Davis' At The
Blackhaivk
Aug. 16: One For All's
Incorrigible
Aug. 23: The Individualism of
Gil Evans
Aug. 30: Johnny Lytle's Nice
And Easy
TUESDAY
PACIFIC PICKIN'
(Roots) 6-8am
Bluegrass, old-time music,
and its derivatives with
Arthur and the lovely
Andrea Berman.
pacificpickin@yahoo.com
SOUNDS OF AFRICA
(World) 8-9:3oam
Showcasing music, current
affairs & news from across
the African continent and
the diaspora. You will learn
all about beat and rhythm
and it will certainly kick-
start your day.
THIRD TIME'S THE CHARM
(Rock) 9:30-n:3oam
Open your ears and prepare
for a shock! A harmless
note may make you a fan!
Deadlier than the most
dangerous criminals!
borninsixtynine@
hotmail.com
MORNING AFTER SHOW
(Eclectic) n:3oam-ipm
An eclectic mix of Canadian
indie with rock, experimental, world, reggae, punk
and ska from Canada, Latin
America and Europe. The
Morning After Show has local bands playing live on the
Morning After Sessions.
LAUGH TRACKS
(Talk) i-2pm
Laugh Tracks is a show about
comedy. Kliph Nesteroff
from the 'zine, Generation
Exploitation, hosts.
generationexploit@y.ahoo.
com, musicalboot@
yahoo, ca
GIVE'EM THE BOOT
(World) 2-3pm
Sample the various
flavours of Italian folk
music from north to
south, traditional to
modern on this bilingual
Italian/English show. Un
programma bilingue che
esplora il mondo della
musica etnica italiana.
WINGS
(Talk) 3-3:30pm
RADIO FREETHINKER
(Talk) 3:30-4:3opm
Promoting skepticism, critical thinking and science, we
examine popular extraordinary claims and subject
them to critical analysis.
The real world is a beautiful
and fascinating place and
we want people to see it
through the lens of reality
as opposed to superstition.
IN THE CAGE WITH BIRDS
(Talk) 4:30-5pm
Join Carlin Bardsley as he
welcomes the top names
in Canadian Mixed Martial
Arts to put up their dukes
and discuss the fastest
growing sport in the world.
Recaps, interviews, tunes
and more... it's the most
fun you can have without
being punched in the face!
FLEX YOUR HEAD
(Hardcore) 6-8pm
Punk rock and hardcore since
1989. Bands and guests from
around the world.
LIFE ON JUMPSTREET
(Dance) 8-9pm
CRIMES & TREASONS
(Hip-hop) 9-npm
crimesandtreasons@
gmail.com
CABARADIO
(Talk) npm-i2:3oam
For the world of Cabaret.
Tune in for interviews,
skits, musical guests and
more. It's Radio with sass!
WEDNESDAY
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
(Eclectic) 8-ioam
Live from the Jungle Room,
join radio host Jack Velvet
for an eclectic mix of music,
sound bites, information and
inanity. Not to be missed!
dj@jackvelvet.net
POP DRONES
(Eclectic) io-ii:3oam
ANOIZE
(Noise) n:3oam-ipm
An hour and a half of avant-
rock, noize, plunderphonic,
psychedelic and outsider
aspects of audio. An experience for those who want to
23 be educated and EARitated.
lukemeat@hotmail.com
THE GREEN MAJORITY
(Talk) i-2pm
Canada's only environmental news hour, syndicated by
CIUT 89.5 FM Toronto or
uwiu.greenmajority.ca.
DEMOCRACY NOW
(Talk) 2-3pm
RUMBLETONE RADIO
A GO GO
(Rock) 3-spm
Primitive, fuzzed-out
garage mayhem!
ARTS REPORT
(Talk) 5-6pm
REEL TO REAL
(Talk) 6-6:3opm
Movie reviews and
criticism.
SAMSQUANTCH'S
HIDEAWAY
(Eclectic) 6:30-8pm
Alternatina Wednesdays
All-Canadian music with a
focus on indie-rock/pop.
anitabinder@hotmail.com
SHAMELESS
(Eclectic) 6:30-8pm
Alternating Wednesdays
Dedicated to giving local
music acts a crack at some
airplay. When not playing
the PRshtick, you can hear
some faves you never knew
you liked.
FOLK OASIS
(Roots) 8-iopm
Two hours of eclectic folk/
roots music, with a big emphasis on our local scene.
C'mon in! A kumbaya-free
zone since 1997.
folkoasis@gmail.com
SEXY IN VAN CITY
(Talk) io-npm
Your weekly dose of education and entertainment in
the realm of relationships
and sexuality.
sexyinvancity.com/category/
sexy-in-vancity-radio
HANS KLOSS' MISERY HOUR
(Hans Kloss) npm-iam
Pretty much the best thing
on radio.
THURSDAY
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
(Talk) 8-ioam
SWEET AND HOT
(Jazz) ioam-i2pm
Sweet dance music and hot
jazz from the 1920s, '30s
and '40s.
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
(Eclectic) 12-ipm
Sweet treats from the pop
underground. Hosted by Duncan, sponsored by donuts.
duncansdonuts.
wordpress.com
WE ALL FALL DOWN
(Eclectic) i-2pm
Punk rock, indie pop and
whatever else I deem worthy. Hosted by a closet nerd,
www.weallfalldowncitr.
blogspotca
INK STUDS
(Talk) 2-3pm
Underground and indie
comix. Each week, we interview a different creator to
get their unique perspective
on comix and discuss their
upcoming works.
JAPANESE MUSICQUEST
(World) 3-3:3opm
Syndicated from CJLY
Kootenay Co-op Radio in
Nelson, B.C.
FRENCH CONNECTION
(World) 3:30-5pm
French language and music.
NATIVE SOLIDARITY NEWS
(Talk) 5-6pm
A national radio service and
part of an international network of information and action in support of indigenous
peoples'survival and dignity.
ARE YOU AWARE
(Eclectic) 6-7:30pm
Celebrating the message
behind the music: Profiling
music and musicians that
take the route of positive
action over apathy.
EXQUISITE CORPSE
(Experimental) 7:30-9pm
Experimental, radio-art,
sound collage, field recordings, etc. Recommended for
the insane.
artcorpse@yahoo.com
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD
RADIO HELL
(Live Music) 9-iipm
Featuring live band(s) every
week performing in the
CiTR Lounge. Most are from
Vancouver, but sometimes
bands from across the country and around the world.
AURAL TENTACLES
(Eclectic) i2-6am
It could be global, trance,
spoken word, rock, the
unusual and the weird, or it
could be something different. Hosted by DJ Pierre.
auraltentacles@hotmail.com
FRIDAY
FRIDAY SUNRISE
(Eclectic) 7:30-9am
An eclectic mix of indie
rock, hip-hop and reggae to
bring you up with the sun.
SYNCHRONICS
(Talk) g-ioam
Join host Marie B and
discuss spirituality, health
and feeling good. Tune in
and tap into good vibrations
that help you remember
why you're here: to have
fun! This is not your average
spirituality show.
SKA-T'S SCENIC DRIVE
(Ska) ioam-i2pm
Canada's longest running
Ska radio program,
dj ska_t@hotmail. com
CITR LISTENER HOUR
(Eclectic) 12-ipm
Tune in each week as you,
the CiTR fan, gets to program an hour of adventure
for the whole world to hear!
For more info, contact
program coordinator Bryce
Dunn at citrprogramming@
club.ams.ubc.ca.
BARNBURNER
(Eclectic) i-2pm
The greasier side of rock
'n' roll, rhythm 'n' blues,
and country... Crack a beer,
order some BBQ, and get
your boogie on.
RADIO ZERO
(Dance) 2-3:30pm
An international mix of
super-fresh weekend party
jams from New Wave to
foreign electro, baile, Bollywood and whatever else.
www.radiozero.com
NARDWUAR
(Nardwuar) 3:30-5pm
Join Nardwuar the Human
Serviette for Clam Chowder flavoured entertainment. Doot doola doot
doo...doot doo!
nardwuar@nardwuar.com
NEWS 101
(Talk) 5-6pm
See Monday for description.
HOT MESS
(Eclectic) 6-7:3opm
With banging beats of rock,
funk, electro and more music
from the beautiful DJ Blonde
Tron and entertaining banter
from seasoned hosts Handsome, Jay and Eddy.
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
(Eclectic) 7:30-9pm
Your Host, David Love
Jones, plays a heavyweight
selection of classics from
the past, present and future
including jazz, soul, hip-
hop, Afro-Latin, funk and
eclectic Brazilian rhythms.
Plus interviews with local
and international artists.
Truly international flavour.
SHAKE A TAIL FEATHER
(Soul/R&B) io:30-i2am
The finest in classic soul
and rhythm & blues
from the late '50s to the
early '70s, including lesser
known artists, regional hits
and lost soul gems.
THE VAMPIRE'S BALL
(Industrial) 12-4010.
Dark, sinister music to
soothe and/or move the
Dragon's soul. Industrial,
goth and a touch of metal
too. Blog: thevampiresball.
blogspot.com.
thevampiresball@gmail.com
SATURDAY
THE SATURDAY EDGE
(Roots) 8am-i2pm
A personal guide to world
and roots music—with
African, Latin and European
music in the first half, followed by Celtic, blues,
songwriters, Cajun and
whatever else fits!
steveedge3@mac.c0m
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
(Punk) 12-ipm
A fine mix of streetpunk
and old-school hardcore
backed by band interviews,
guest speakers and social
commentary.
crashnburnradio@yahoo.ca
POWER CHORD
(Metal) i-3pm
Vancouver's longest running metal show. If you're
into music that's on the
- heavier/darker side of the
spectrum, then you'll like
it. Sonic assault provided by
Geoff the Metal Pimp.
CODE BLUE
(Roots) 3-spm
From backwoods delta
low-down slide to urban
harp honks, blues and
blues roots with your hosts
Jim, Andy and Paul.
codeblue@
buddy-system.org
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
(World) 5-6pm
The best of mix of Latin
American music.
leoramirez@canada. com
NASHAVOLNA
(World) 6-7pm
News, arts, entertainment and
music for the Russian community, local and abroad,
nashavolna.ca
NOTES FROM THE
UNDERGROUND
(Electronic/Hip-hop/More)
7-9pm
Start your Saturday night
off right with our weekly
showcase of the local
underground DJ and
electronic music scene.
notesundergroundradio.
blogspot.com
notesundergroundradio@
gmail.com
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
(Dance/Electronic/Eclectic)
9-npm
If you like everything from
electro/techno/trance/8-bit
music/retro '80s this is the
show for you!
www.synapticsandwich.net
BEATS FROM THE BASEMENT
(Hip-hop) npm-iam
Mr. Joi, being a cinemaphile
as well as a DJ, will surprise
you with the likes of:
French NewWave, Golden
Age, Noir, Action, Adventure, Comedy, Coming of
age Drama, Epic/Myth,
Fantasy, Gangster, Horror,
Romantic Comedy, Science
Fiction, Social Drama,
Thriller, the Art Film, the
Black Comedy, the Musical
and the Porno.
DREAMSCENE RADIO
(Dance) iam-3am
Immerse yourself in cutting edge electronic music
from every point on the
spectrum. Christoker spins
the latest tracks taking over
dance floors around the
world and introduces you to
the producers behind them.
Turn the stereo up and have
a dance party with your cat
(cats love Electro!)   . ART PROJECT //
THE
\t^-r/?t THE LIONS ARE TASHA BROTHERTON, MATTHEW BROWN, BARRY DOUPE, COLLIN
JOHANSON AND JAMES WHITMAN. THEY MOSTLY LIVE IN VANCOUVER AND THEY'VE BEEN
DRAWING TOGETHER SINCE 2003. SEE MORE OF THEIR WORK AT WWW.LIONSPILE.CA
26  THE BRAINS
ZOMBIE NATION
{Stomp Hzcat&s)
Some things should never die. pthers
should have never been born in the
first place, I don't know where,that
leaves die Brains, die Montreal-based
horror^ptjnk band that were voted
"Punk Band of the Year" by the Montreal Mirror, but most of the time when*
a zombie appears in a film, they're not**!
left undead for long. Still, for those 1
who do indulge in psychobilly, the
Brains are kind of a big deal. They
spent the last year touring Canada,
America, and Europe, and recording
Zombie Nation, their fourth full-length
album.
According to Chart Magazine, the
Brains are "quickly becoming one of
Canadian psychobilly's most revered
exports." One can only wonder what
other psychobilly bands Canada is currently "exporting." The next thing to
wonder is how a band that sings about
nothing more than zombies and broken hearts and plays the same ripping
power chords and walking bass lines
in every song can find enough material
to fill four full-length albums, but as
the Brains prove, there really is an attentive audience for this. Briefly put,
ifs not for the faint of heart, nor directed at a wide demographic outside
of those who drive a '52 Chevy pickup
to the Langley Home Depot to buy new
wood for your coffin bed. It's about
as predictable as a cherry tattoo on a
pin-up model.
However, to be fair, some people
like psychobilly, and those people
should totally hear Zombie Nation.
They'd probably really like it because
they do sound something like Nekro-
mantix. And notably, the bass player
and the drummer both played in the
Ripcordz. Put that in your flask and
drink it.
—Sar-ahCJ^f^pf^ .
LCD SOUNDSYSTEM
THIS IS HAPPENING
(DFA Records)
At the risk of sounding Jike,a,Kool-
Aid sipping bandwagoner, it must
be said that rumours of this album's
party potential have aot been greath/1
exaggeratedT^Se'critically untouchable new release from James Murphy's
electro-punk brainchild is only par-J
tially overblown, but probably foil
good reason.
From start to finish, This is Hap- \
pining remains a dance album. It is
"dumb body music," as Murphy told
Chuck Klosterman for an article that
appeared in The Guardian. Seven out
of nine tracks are lengthy, euphoria-
tinged crescendo s punctuated by
recurring (but never blatantly repetitive) lyrics.
For some people, this stuff is the
epitome of boring. With the exception
of the single "Drunk Girls," all the
songs on LCD's third and final release
clock over six minutes. Which, admittedly, can feel rather excruciating if
you don't dance or still get nightmares
about the time you were addicted to
chemical drugs.
But for everyone else, Murphy's
honest, self-deprecating take on those
abject relationships between lovers,
frenemies, label execs and Williams
burg strangers is both refreshing and
fun. "Dance Yrself Clean" and "Pow
Pow" stand out as feel-good self-
confirmations while "I Can Change"
and "You Wanted a Hit" cover more
acidic emotional territory.
Relatable, catchy as hell, and loaded with riff and sample references that
bearded record store managers won't
ever shut up about, This is Happening
has already proven to get a dance-
floor of relevant twenty-somethings
moving faster than a fire alarm at the
airport. It's basically science.
—Sarah Bmnan
PHANTOGRAM
eyelid mmt%
(Indicaffontana) *v •
When one thinks of die home "of trip
hop, spawning megp. bands like Por-
tishead and Massive Attack hailing
from die region of Bristol, England
usually come to mind. What can one*,
expect from a new duo hailing from
Saratoga Springs, New York? You
would be surprised. Phantogram's
debut album Eyelid Movies is a delicious blend of thick beats and dark!
melodies. Josh Carter and Sarah Bar- >
thel have rigged up a farm house as
their recording studio and produced
tracks worthy of major metropolitan
attention.
Daydreams are the inspiration
and certainly the collections of beats
and rhythms are perfectly suited
for daytime mind travels or night
time excursions. The opening track
and first single, "Mouthful of Diamonds" featuring heavy, oscillating
treatments, an off-kilter synth mo
tif, a meandering looped guitar and
BarthePs soft vocals, is something
one would expect from a UK band
boasting years of experience. "Turn
it Off" accomplishes the opposite
highlighted by quick smooth synth
noises and Carter's darker approach
to the lead role. "Futuristic Casket"
sounds epically uplifting for a downer
with an edgy vocal effect combined
with a penetrating hip-hop beat and
lullaby-like accompaniment during
the chorus. The best is yet to come
with the song "Let Me Go" which,
oddly enough, will keep you hooked to
the beautiful harmony sung over top
an infectious groove. Eyelid Movies is
an outstanding debut which sounds
like something straight out of the
'90s UK club scene with a modern
perspective.
The album is instant, memorable
and lasting.
—SlavkoBiKp   «
RADIO RADIO
BELMUNDO REGAL
(Bonsouud)
If you are digging outre' hip-hop
musk this record might make you
very happy. Radio Radio is a French-
Canadian hip*hop trio whose music
bears features of rap, disco and electro
worthy enough to make the Polaris
2010 long list.
They rap in what might at first listen seem to be an invented language,
a concoction of French and English.
This is Chiac, a French-Acadian dialect that the musical trio is currently
popularizing.
Aside from the energetic and colourful sound is the visual imagery
the group conjures, musically. The
image of smarmy guys with gold necklaces chilling on their yacht makes it
fun to listen to because it's authentic
and unpretentious. The romantic
photo of a sailing ship on the cover
of their second album is misleading,
and just as ironic as their lyrics are.
Standout track "Dekshoo" has got
some interesting lyrical play with
"Nice, nice / Avec mes Penny Loafers
/ Ou avec mes Deck Shoes" and so
does "9 Piece Luggage Set," where
they sing "Une valise, deux valises
c'est pas assez / Y faut ma 9 Piece Luggage Set / J'su Jet Set."
Occasional funk and brass elements
make this record a good and light listen j
for the summer. You might want to
give yourself some time to come to
appreciate their songs even if you're I
not the biggest rap enthusiast
-*-Susanne Dewci&
sum DUNK K      I
ONLY FUN EP
{Old Life Records)
Garage rockers Slam Dunk sound like
they were jamming ten yeartf ago and
were mysteriously teleported into a
parallel Earth where the people are
oppressedby some tyrannical wizard,
whom they defeated armed only with
their distortion pedals and frenetic
drumming.
In their press release,they offer a
"pre-2012 friendship", but the music
itself is refreshingly archaic, emanating what you might call a "pre-9/11
innocence." There are no synthesizers
or electronic beats, just straight-forward and earnest pop chord progressions with unassuming rhythm and
no need to expand beyond the tried
and true guitar-drums-bass combo.
The vocals, on heavier tracks like "Feral Child,"" still carry an expressive
soulfulness reminiscent ofJohnLen-
non's "Instant Karma" after he'd been
practicing primal scream therapy, or
early Isaac Brock of Modest Mouse.
At the same time, other tracks have
a smooth and dreamy vocal quality
that wavers between sounding like My
Bloody Valentine and the Ramones.
This isn't music that will blow your
mind with its originality, but in a culture saturated with millions of MyS-
pace music pages, novelty no longer
seems to be a legitimate criteria for
criticism. Slam Dunk is fun, upbeat,
playful, and whether or not you feel
like putting their 7" on your phonograph, you can tell their live shows
are sweaty, Pilsner-soaked Dionysian
revels. One gets the sense that the
band is like a pod of orcas: majestic to
behold in their natural habitat—a live
performance—but kind of melancholy
and underwhelming in the confined
aquarium of a studio release.
—AndreiuJUews^.
TOBACCO
MANIAC MEAT
(Antiam)
Maniac Meat k rucking dope. Funky
and weird, it pulsates like a human ]
heart in a cybernetic body. Hearkeningg
to an era when analog synthesizers
were whatt^^mirewas supposed to 1
sound like, it could be the soundtrack
to a dream of William S. Burroughs
stealing the TARDIS from Dr. Who
[ed. Standing jbr Time And Relative Dimensions In Space, this is the name ofDr. Who's
time machine/phone booth.] and using it
to slide through the kaleidoscopic arteries of space-time in search of junk
and permissive young boys. Tobacco's
music is unapologetically sleazy, dehumanized and eroticized. These are
some druggy vibes going on and not
anything organic like shrooms or
weed. This is chemical, but instead
of being alienating and repulsive it
kind of leers at you seductively and
makes you think maybe you're missing out on something, tempting you
into its underground lair of blinking
LCDs and little knobs that ache to
be tweaked. There is a fair share of
"living" drums and bass guitar that
balances out the thick layers of synth.
The vocals are almost entirely run
through effects that sound like C3-
PO's debauched bohemian cousin.
This is a good thing.
With track names like "Sweat-
mother," "Mexican Icecream," "Lick
the Witch" and "Motorlicker," one
might sense a certain preoccupation
with human moisture and anatomy.
On "Heavy Makeup" the infectious
hook repeats itself like a kindergartener chanting a schoolyard rhyme:
"You got sick from a lolly lolly lolly
pop / You feel free when you're killing me." "Fresh Hex" features Beck,
his vocals cut up in a way impossible
to duplicate live, and grooves hard.
This is very subwoofer-friendly music. If anything critical might be said,
listening to the whole album at once |
can make the constant synth sounds 1
lose their impact, but the individual f
tracks will thrive mixed into a "shuf-/
fie" playlist, or injected into a house
party that is a little too square and
sober and needs a dose of grimeand
lubricant to get through all thefrigid
Puritan sexual repression still Wafting
up from America.
~-*Andretv Reeves
MALE BONDING
NOTHINB HURTS
(Sub Pop Records}
Comprising of Rj#iiiiias Christian,
John Artihj|l$¥ebb and Kevin Charles
Hendrix, English rockers Male Bonding have a small but loyal following.
In their debut album, Nothing Hurts,
they manage to cram a mini tornado of
music into a bite-sized package.
Sounding like a cross between the
Yeah Yeah Yeahs and Apollo Ghosts,
Male Bonding has a very raw indie/garage feel. Although they are touted as
a punk band, they really have a smattering of influences that are evident
throughout the album. "Nothing
Used to Hurt" makes a definite nod
to the Clash in it On "Franklin," another standout track, there are sounds
and moments that are undeniably influenced by Joy Division. "Crooked
Scene" is the gem of this British offering. Short, fast and with a good beat,
it is a rollicking little jewel.
Each of the 13 tracks is short and
to the point. The entire album clocks
in under 35 minutes so it's good for
those of you with a short attention
span. Nothing Hurts is very accessible and it is over before you know
it. Sounds like these guys would be a
force to be reckoned with live. Good
debut.
—Katheritte3^c«hroyd.
SHANE TURNER OVERDRIVE
SHARE TURNER OVERDRIVE
(SepUtad)
Shane Turner is nostranger to the music world. Since moving to Vancouver
eight years ago, Turner has been in
or around as &&&? bands as these
hands have fingers to count on. After
years of occupying his time with such
groups as Fanshaw, die Choir Practice,
Woodpigeon and more, Turner has
found the space to conceive and give
birth to his long gestating solo project,
Shane Turner Overdrive. There is no
denying the talent and intention Turner
brings to the table, and this collection
of tunes may be the icing on the indie
rocker's cake. The songs are recorded
lo-fi and live off the floor, warts and
all, which gives the album a nice human touch. Turner's voice is strong
yet fragile, his songs short and sweet
The album blends nicely together and
aside from a couple of near stumbles,
the thread binding the songs together
is seamless. Album opener "The Exit
Railings" is sweet like honey. Even
better is when it kicks into "Wigs," a
fuzzy rocker tone with the makings of
a favourite. Turner has produced a near
gem of an album, featuring some really
nice vocals, a plethora of instruments,
some strong and clever songwriting
and just enough rock to keep things
interesting. Though it clocks in at just
under 25 minutes, this album is good
enough to leave on repeat as that near
half hour turns into a daylong dreamlike listen.
—Nathaniel Bryce THEE MANIPULATORS
EASE UP ON THE BREAKDOWNS
{Mtptmn&mrii} *
Thee Manipulators have been blowing
up stages around Vancouver for 4 few
yearsy^#^alpf#^;'about time they
laid some tracks down. With resume's
boasting membership in now legendary Vancouver garage/punk bands like
the Hell Caminos, the Gung Ho's*
and the New Town Animals, it is no
wonder that this band's recently released album is a ball of garage rock
fury. Boogying keyboards and loud,
fuzzy riffs are set on top of bouncing drumbeats while Mike Roche's
explosive vocals tie things together
(and prove him to still be one of the
city's most charismatic frontmen). It
is garage tone with R&B boogie and
punk punch that will have you bopping in front of the bathroom mirror
with a hairbrush for a microphone!
Thee Manipulators have managed to
bottle their furious live energy and sell
it for private consumption. Ease Up On
The Breakdowns is a blast, boasting hits
like "Ooga Booga Man" and "Keep
BINGO IEAT LIVEI
m
DO WHAT YOU SHOULD
Graham BrOWII] West Coast roots rock
^■Mf* from ex-JR GONE WILD
1        HAPPY MAN, and
#11ft Jtf   BRILLIANT ORANGE.
ijyflt1l2i1iF
Willi lb
"4 Stars!" -
Americana.UK
DAVE RAVE
IMWIIHWIttT YOU KNOW
"a collection of
power pop gems
by a true master
of the form."
Exclaim!
THE RAILWAY. FRI. AUG 27
INTERNATIONAL POP OVERTHROW
11:30pm - Graham Brown
12:00am - Dave Rave
WWW.B0NG0BEAT.COM
The Boots On Baby." They only fully
draw back on ±e throttle once, the
R&B swagger of "Petals of Petulance"
reminiscent of the Rolling Stones'
Exile on Main St. (a bold statement indeed). Ease Up is a poignant garage ,
rock manifesto written and vigorously/
delivered bjrjnjyA-star lineup ofVan/
couver musicians,
—MarkPantBm' •
THE TELEPATHIC BUTTERFLIES
WOW* FLUTTER
(Kfflxat Music)
Celebrating the release of their fourth
album, Wtw & f hr«*r, the Telepathic
Butterfliel^raH^rore than an ode to
'60s and '70s power pop. Their music is a nice mix of psychedelic rock
with influences steeped in American
new wave and early Brit pop, producing a sound that is retro yet modern,
detailed but loose. This is a formula
that has worked nicely for Sloan and
By Divine Right and it works nicely
here too. Wow & Flutter is chock-full
of tasty bits like "Circle Man," sounding a bit like a hippie's version of Foo
Fighters with an attention grabber if ever
there was one. "Elegy"
has shades of Teenage
Fanclub within its dated walls and "Aloha"
is a fun piano driven
rocker that is so Bowie
it hurts. While it is easy
to rehash sounds from
the old school it's not
nearly as easy to do so
as convincingly, but
the Telepathic Butterflies have. Well crafted
enough to make even
the most staunch music critic sway and pine
for days of groove, Wow
& Flutter is dressed in
quality garments hand
sewn with recycled
cloth, personally embroidered by the band
themselves.
—Nathaniel Bryce
THEWIHKS
WIU6HTS
(Oh! Records)   .
' You might best remember former Van-*
couver band the Winks lor their stage
set-up, wnfl^^^^ingly assembled
no matter the size of the show With!
bright boas wrapped around thef
mic stands, white lights strung up
with other colourful ephemera, not
to mention the queen bee herself,
singer/cellist Tyr Jami, who would
never disappoint in her handmade
concoctions of sequined velvet and
tulle. This description of the Winks'
visual aesthetic goes a long way toward describing their music, which
sounds like a magical dress-up game
in that last childhood moment when
one can still play. (Not to overstate the
point, but this is a band who used to
toss glitter confetti into the air during
the climax of their show).
The band's cross-country move to
Montreal hasn't much changed the
basic idea behind their music. Fans
will find here what they loved on
previous efforts, from the cello- and
ukelele-based arrangements to Jami's
child like voice and unrhymed, utterly
cryptic lyrics. In fact, she once likened
her method of songwriting—which
more is concealed than revealed—to
speaking in code in one's diary. Like
their earlier album, Birthday Party, the
production is downright lovely, taking
the rough off the edges while taking
care not to squish the exquisite, jewellike details.
At times, however, the childish
magic can feel a bit grating. On "Seasons," bandmate Todd MacDonald
sings "Tickles propel smiles most
beautiful" in a way that is a little too
whimsical for most, and "Bookface"
is entirely too high-pitched.
Nevertheless, there are just as
many indications that the Winks
are maturing. "It's Happening" is a
fascinating little pop song that resists its own catchiness by veering
between dramatic, sweeping strings
and Jami's teasing lyrics. "Telepathic
Rockets," meanwhile, is an edgier
track reminiscent of Do Make Say
Think's instrumental chaos. The
album closes with "Wakonda," a
stunner of a lullaby love song, subtle
and synthy and unlike anything else
they've done, *$$& ex^hometown band
is still worth watching. •
—luisa Fisher
WWTERSLiEP
NEW INHERITORS
(Labwork)
It is Inevitable thatWlritersleep's new
album wifl^^^mpared to the success
of their previous release Welcome to
the Niaht Sky with "Weighty Ghost"
receiving most of the attention, and
while New Inheritors will probably not
have throngs of people singing in unison or established Canadian bands
covering their songs on stage, the
new album is proving to be a musical graduation for the band. Keep in
mind, however, that the post-diploma
world is often anti-climactic and a
little more conservative.
The addition of strings, brass
and piano adds a textured and heavily layered sound. The end result is a
metamorphosis that is destined to
separate Wintersleep from Canadian
independent music.
"Experience the Jewel" sets the
tone of Wintersleep's new musical journey with orchestral opening and a build-up worthy of epic
proportions."Encyclopedia" follows
the maturation with a contagious chorus and a guitar section that sounds
like the Dandy Warhols complete with
accompanying organ. "Black Camera"
is by far the catchiest tune on the album with chorus sections that have a
curiously timeless feel. Simple chorus
lines permeate the record while the
layered guitar sounds migrate from
r track to track. A definite maturation
process is going on here as Winter-
sleep looks to shed their indie skin.
For many original fans, New Inheritors
might be filed under the 'may-grow-
on-you' category. The flip side is that
the album should garner more commercial success on a global scale.
—Slauko Bucifal
30 // REAL
LIVE ACTION
FROSElTES/SHMIITURIIEROVERORIVI/IIIIIIOttSm
TheBiltmore/MasaS
The audience at this show was on the more subdued side. Pockets of couples
and friends, all geeks with big hearts who like cool music had gathered under
the same roof in the name of cool music. There were many drinks imbibed
and surely some other unmentionables as well, leading to stumbling flirtations and friendly face-slap showdowns. There were cute young people
dancing awkwardly to the music, including a girl whose legs resembled long
fresh mints. And yes, there was cool music. Cool music like Shane Turner
Overdrive who started things offplaying some light-hearted folky power-pop
to a smattering of an audience, some who listened and a lot who didn't. But
he plugged on and came out looking good. In Medias Res stormed the stage
next and made my night as they laid into some heavy-handed walls of guitar
feedback, filling it up with rhythm and creating a monster that was dramatic,
forceful and intricately layered.
Now, I'm well aware of the chatter and buzz Carey Mercer and his wild Frog
Eyes have created over the years. I'm aware of the high regard in which this
man is held among some music loving circles, which is why I chose to take on
this show. I entered into it open-minded; secretly hoping the stories were true
and that I'd get swept away on the weird mythic wings and arcane ramblings
of a madman with a guitar. In the end I remained on earth and life was not
altered. But to be fair, Mercer was sick. He did his very best and judging by
the awkward jumping and dancing the kids like to do these days, Frog Eye's
certainly delivered. With songs ranging from all points in time they gave it
their all and largely impressed. I might not be entirely sold, but for getting up
and slogging through it, voice half shot and energy lowered, I pay my respect
to the madman with a guitar.
—Nathaniel Bryce
Venue /May 27
The music that we buy on iTunes or watch on television (if they show music
on television anymore) is often disingenuous advertising. It is design, image,
choreography and marketing. Some (most likely your parents) resent these
qualities in contemporary music and enjoy recalling "simpler times" when
songs were written with emotion, performed with passion, and could bring
you to tears.
Well, for those individuals all hope is not lost. Christopher Owens, lead
singer of Girls, is proof of that Owens' vocals are the poignant, heart-wrenching
stuff of Buddy Holly and Roy Orbison mixed with the charismatic performance
of Dwight Yoakam. He fronts a band with the charming innocence of early
Beach Boys. The music is sad, reflective, youthful and beautiful.
Sometimes surf rock, other times drunken country, the guys in Girls breezed
through hits from the 2009 release, Album. The backstory on Owens is important
in understanding his band's music. He grew up as a member of a cult called The
Children of God. His father left and his mother was forced into prostitution.
Owens eventually found himself in California after a brief time living in Texas
and it was there in San Francisco that he and Chet "J.R." White formed Girls
and put his lifetime of introspection to music. While years of living in a cult
increased Owens' insatiable appetite for rock 'n' roll and all its toxic temptations, there still lies an audible sense of purity and innocence in the music of
Girls that can be linked to the institution.
Songs like the prancing "Laura," the summery "Lust For Life" or the stark
and sad "Hellhole Ratrace" stood out on this evening as examples of the band's
wonderful synergy and of Owens' poetic lyricism. The highlight came with a
crescendo of distortion closing out "Ratrace" and leading into the joyously
psychedelic and bittersweet "Morning light." The quivering pained vocals
such as "Meet me in the morning light / We know it won't last forever / Wear
it out while it feels right / We know that it's now or never" speak to Owens'
talents as a performer and songwriter.
—Gavin Reid
31 {I   w
MASSIVE ATTACK / MARTINA TOPLEY-BIRD
May 29 / Malkin Bowl
After aimlessly traipsing through the back of muddy woodland Stanley Park for
just under two hours, one would surmise that standing in the rain for another
few hours listening to a band whose album, 100th Window, which contains
minimal loops and a dark delve into classical music, would be torturous. On
the contrary, Massive Attack, led by their ten-strong entourage including reggae legend Horace Andy, have been known to kick it up a notch live, and they
certainly did in this energetic, albeit brief, show.
Focusing on tracks from Heligoland and the '90s classic Mezzanine (only three
songs were performed from other albums; "Futureproof," "Safe from Harm"
and "Unfinished Sympathy"), Robert "3D" Del Naja and Grantley "Daddy G"
Marshall were the catalysts that allowed Martina Topley-Bird (who played
with them after she opened) and guest singer Deborah Miller to shine. The
collective effort resulted in a mysterious feel that played on Berthold Brecht's
Verfremdungseffekt, the distancing effect between the audience and the actors
on stage. This was done to engage them in the very real global dilemmas, in
this case the subliminal messages flashing across the stage that recounted
everything from the "War on Oil" in the Middle East to the alarming number of
pizzas consumed in the U.S. And while it was the band's mystique that created
almost hushed fan recognition, it was the progressive, enchanting bass and
appropriately used guitar riffs that jolted them out of their hypnotic trance.
Elements of trip-hop that served the band so well early on in their career
was scant, yet when it did arrive in the form of lyrical wordplay "Risingson" it
had most of the old school audience bouncing up and down uncontrollably.
That's not to say 3D and Daddy G weren't in their element performing the
more synth-oriented songs. Daddy G's dark, brooding voice was as haunting as 3D's renowned echoing whisper. This was evident with the hugely
popular "Inertia Creeps" and the politically charged "United Snakes" while
Topley-Bird, who had already performed the band's "Karmacoma" in her set,
rang out beautifully serene versions of "Teardrop" and Massive Attack alumni
Tricky's "Overcome."
Deborah Miller did a fantastic job living up to the standards Shara Nelson set
in the early '90s by belting out "Safe from Harm" and "Unfinished Sympathy" but
it was Horace Andy who stole the show with an astounding version of "Angel"
that seemed to stop time as all eyes centred on the motionless Rastafarian. The
show concluded with the mesmerising "Atlas Air" that seemed to last forever
but in reality was only a tenth of the entire gig. This didn't go down too well
with 3D, who said that the band's early curfew was because they "were to night
what garlic is to vampires." Judging by the mystique of this performance I'd
say they were more like angels!
—Sarshar Hosseinnia
LCD SOUNDSYSTEM / HOLY GHOST!
May 31 / Malkin Bowl
Malkin Bowl's great resurrecHonastnem?wsummertime venue is, two shows
in, beginning to show its cracks. As great as it is to have a new-ish midsized
place for these next few months, the majority of shows already booked start in-
September. The Flaming Lips will be a great show rain or shine, but Sept. 17
seems a little late by any estimates. The shows that happen in warmer weather,
meanwhile, can expect a late sunset and a tight 11 p.m. curfew to cause their
own problems. LCD Soundsystem can serve as a bit of a primer, then, for the
Bowl's drawbacks, and how to make an audience forget them.
Taking the stage at a little after 7 p.m. to a newly blue sky, Holy Ghost! found
themselves playing to a mix of fans that had arrived hours earlier, and fans
that were arriving halfway through their set; all of said fans were equally
soggy. HolyGhost!, with help from Tyler Pope and Nancy Huang for the first
few songs, tried hard to fight this general apathy, and probably would have
32  succeeded in a club or bar. The... "swooshiness" of their music, however, was
their worst enemy in front of this large a crowd; paired with a limp snare, most
songs sounded too muddy to really get into. They'll probably have more luck
opening for Chromeo, indoors, from August on.
Taking the stage to a crowd-exciting combo of "Us V Them" and "Drunk
Girls," LCD wrote themselves a blank cheque from the audience to do whatever
they wanted. Luckily, James Murphy didn't seem content delivering anything
but the best show possible, as evidenced by LCD's set list. Covering all albums
equally, die band somehow found time to surprise and delight in song selection. When they went from "Yr City's a Sucker" to "Pow Pow" back to "Daft
Punk is Playing at My House," for example, or playing "Movement" instead of
taking the easy route and jamming five extra minutes in "Tribulations." The
work done onstage by LCD's six other live members left Murphy in the role
of a singing front man, which worked out to be more fun than having him
hunched over a synth the whole time anyway. Song after song sounded tight,
and dense, and fun.
It was as the sun was setting, though, that the show's most lasting qualities
came out Everyone's favourite, "All My Friends," was more gentle than epic, and
gave the show a feeling of intimacy that recurred frequently. Save the set closing
and mind bogglingly fun "Yeah" (with lasers!), the more emotional songs won
out Even in the encore, "Losing My Edge" sounded good, but "Someone Great"
was better. Any debate about the feel of the show was silenced, at least, by the
show closing "New York I Love You, but You're Bringing Me Down." During
die pause after the end of the singing, but before the outro, the lights dimmed,
and as many LCDers as could sing joined together for an achingly beautiful go
at the chorus of Jay-Z's "Empire State of Mind." Between that, the lights, the
dancing and die songs... This show wasn't Vancouver's last-day-of-school; it
was our prom. We can all promise now things will be the same a year from
today, but we all know that isn't true; LCD Soundsystem won't be there.
—Jasper Walley
IWEWZZCOCKS
May 31/Venue
The thing about the Buzzcocks is that they're old. Their original fans are also
Old and their new fans are rowdy young punks. It was an odd mix and the
band knew it the fans knew it everyone knew it So we all just decided that
the Buzzcocks are awesome so let's get along and rock out. Everybody gave
each other their own space in which to do their thing while we all complained
about how much beer costs at Venue. It was honestly the most harmonious
punk show I've ever witnessed.
Before the Buzzcocks started their set & friend I was with remarked "This
is like a dream." The whole atmosphere was very surreal, like being in a video
of a live performance. It just seemed so unlikely that we were all at a Buzzcocks
concert One woman was draped over the balcony, sipping from a glass of
wine and looking better suited to an opera. But obviously it was true and we
all had convulsions of excitement when the band finally appeared on stage.
They immediately blasted in to a foot hopping set that was very light on banter.
The crowd immediately arranged itself in to its optimal listening positions.
A small contained mosh pit started up, surrounded by more subdued/less
large in stature fans, with a gaggle of gangly, generic punk band t-shirted
fans that stretched on as far as the eye could see (personally, I had busted out
my Ramones shirt). The older and collared shirt wearing set disappeared off
to the sidelines.
As for the band themselves, they delivered what we wanted to hear and
then some. They plainly didn't take themselves too seriously and their obvious good humour created exactly the right kind of atmosphere. Steve Diggle
enthusiastically played the rock star, bouncing around with an athleticism
that Pete Shelley, with his well established pot belly, couldn't manage. At one
point, Shelley even sat down to play a song, ("Have a sit down," called a guy
behind me) resulting in much good natured ribbing and head shaking from
Diggle. Tony Barber attracted a lot of female attention with his artful eyebrow
raises and Danny Farrant ended the set with a huge drum solo accompanied
by near-epileptic inducing lights.
To cap it off, they came back and delivered a whole other mini-set disguised
as an encore (Diggle holding a bottle of Moet champagne as he returned on to
the stage) that was comprised entirely of mega-hits. Before they left the stage,
they shook the hands of their enthusiastic fans. Diggle, who had already pretty
much won me over with his elegant British good-looks, gave me a big sweaty
kiss on the lips. Enchante\ Buzzcocks!
—Penny Clark
BOWL YOUR OWN WASTE
TWIN CRYSTALS/APOLLO GHOSTS/CAT ATTACK/
June 6 f Graniww Bowling Lanes
While Italian Day was getting soaked outside on Commercial Drive, Bowl Your
Own Waste was rocking the neon bowling at Grandview Lanes. Jarrett Evan
Samson had the rather ambitious idea of combining bowling with five bands
for part of the Music Waste Festival. Things were a little cramped in the black-lit
bowl area upstairs, but everyone seemed to get a chance to lob a ball down the
alley and you couldn't have asked for a better soundtrack.
Chris-a-Riffic begun with a torrent of verbosity. Part sermon, part diary
confessional, he was a one-man dictionary. Spewing forth an unstoppable
monologue, he had the modest sized audience eating out of his hand. Even
though he called everyone at Discorder "arseholes," he was still awesome, [ed.
No, he wasn't! He's a jerk! We hate him!]
Role Mach barely fit into the corner stage area and had a promising start.
The saxophone, trumpet and a great beat had the audience bobbing their
heads in satisfaction. Unfortunately, the majority of the set was continually
interrupted by an unruly base amp that refused to be controlled. For what they
did manage to play, they were impressive.
While the audience was split between watching the great bands and bowling (no strikes but I bowled a 112!), Cat Attack took to the stage. Playing a
shortened set, they rocked until the walls shook.
Local fan favourites Apollo Ghosts plunged into their set as the 4 p.m.
curfew ticked closer. Proving yet again that they are unbeatable live, they made
everyone quickly forget about the bowling. The ever talented singer/guitarist/
showman Adrian Teacher managed to play and bowl. Part way through the
set, Teacher ran from lane to lane, throwing a ball down each alley. He even
managed to get back to his microphone in time for the next verse. For those
of you who have not seen Apollo Ghosts live, you really should make the effort
to do so. One of the rare live acts that exceed their own hype.
Twin Crystals had the unenviable task of playing a much shortened set.
Another great live act, Twin Crystals didn't disappoint. Turning the black light
of the bowling alley a little blacker, they blasted though their shortened set.
Kudos to Jarrett Evan Samson for getting this event together. Hell of a fun
Sunday afternoon.
—Katherine Boothroyd
FIRST AID KIT/SAMANTHA CHAIN
June 6 / Media Club
American singer Samantha Crain kick started the night. She reminded me of
Eva Cassidy with her soft and breathy voice. Crain played for a little less than
an hour, leaving the crowd in a good, yet improvable, mood for the main act,
34 the Swedish sibling duo, First Aid Kit. Seeing those two young girls in their
bell bottoms with long hair and guitars you would expect them to be born in
the '6os rather than the '90s. The use of an autoharp, which I'd never heard of
before, made their appearance even more peculiar. On the Swedish count of
one, two, three—"En, tva, tre"—the show started. Both sisters impressed with
pure and strong voices, which they drew attention to when they performed a
song without microphones and their usual delay effect. Just being lower, their
clear voices still sounded close to perfect. It is live, not on record, where the
real beauty of their music comes into it's own. Their slightly unharmonious
vocals add a pinch of salt, which made the Swedish duo resemble old folk and
roots musicians. I gotgoosebumps while listening to "Hard Believer," hearing
them sing "And it's one life / And it's this life / And it's beautiful." Apart from
songs off their debut EP Drunken Trees and the Fleet Foxes cover "Tiger Mountain
Peasant" that made First Aid Kit popular on the Internet, they performed a rare
unpublished track on their playlist called "The Lion's Roar." For their final
song they brought Crain back on stage and performed together.
The stage's location allowed for an intimacy between performer and audience, and both acts made use of it that evening. A little less talk in between
the sisters' songs wouldn't have been amiss, though it would have made their
performance shorter than it already was;
—Susanne Detuein
]um g t Biltmore Cabaret
It was still light out when people started to arrive at the Biltmore on this
Wednesday evening. Both bands on the bill had recently returned to Canada
after selling out shows in L.A., San Francisco and Seattle on Born Ruffians'
album release tour. The early arrivals had time to enjoy a few pints before the
curtains cleared and openers Young Rival took the stage.
The Hamilton trio of Aron D'Alesio, Noah Fralick and John Smith also
released an album recently and were quick to show why it received so much
good press. Young Rival's laid-back, rock 'n' roll sound could just as easily
accompany a lazy day at the beach as get bodies moving on a warm summer
evening. They finished with "Authentic," a recent iTunes Single of the Week
and one of the catchier songs you'll hear this year.
Born Ruffians came on after a short intermission and immediately seemed
intent on bringing everyone in the venue to the stage. Luke LaLonde's whooping vocals accentuated Mitch Derosier and Steven Hamelin's jerky melodies
to get hands in the air and feet moving. While the songs from recent release
Say It didn't stick as well as their previous work, Born Ruffians' energy never
dwindled. In fact, the show seemed to pick up steam as it went on, driving the
crowd into a frenzy by the time the Toronto-based band was wrapping up with
foot-stomper "Badonkadonkey" and the cheerful "Foxes Mate For Life." By the
end of "I Need A Life," they were facing a mob chanting the chorus: "Oh, but
we go out at night!" Oh, do we ever.
—John Bartlett
Trie Biltmort Cabaret /June 19
Water, chains, a coffee cup and a conch were just a few of the "instruments"
played with virtuosic expertise during this evening's performance. To say this
concert was an exercise in musical totality would be a grand understatement.
Baltimore, Maryland duo Matmos brought pro collaborators and an arsenal
of instruments/objects to town, making good on their reputation as conceptual innovators, proficient in bringing the fringes of avant-garde electronica
to the fore of pop music. When Martin Schmidt of Matmos got the crowd to
rearrange the seating to the very middle of the room so the audience could
improve its positioning within the band's quadraphonic sound setup (read:
surround sound), it became apparent that maximizing sonic expression was
the priority for the evening.
Seated seance-style around a baby blue wooden box, the Lexie Mountain
Boys, a quartet of female vocal improvisers, set the tone with an opening
performance of cacophonic chants, polyphonic raps and tongue-in-cheek
Father's Day odes.
Then, after a brief intermission, the cactus appeared.
Positioned mid-stage before a glaring red stage light, the four members of
New York's So Percussion slowly approached the amplified plant, flicking and
plucking sounds out of it's spines while Matmos' Drew Daniels and Schmidt
sampled the experiment, generating a throbbing, organic rhythm structure
that would underpin the evening. The two groups shared the stage for the
night, playing an array of compositions from their respective albums, as well
as music from their new collaborative record Treasure State. The melodic whimsy
of "Treasure" and the synth-born wonder of "Rainbow Flag" showcased their
mutual affinity for complexity, but the sheer multitude of things brought to
make music with made their shared appreciation of the tactile obvious.
Amidst the squeaking of squeeze toys and the pouring of water (not to
mention conventional drum sets, vibraphones and guitars), Matmos proved
that even the most forward thinking electronic music needs a bit of booze and
love to make it live. The adoring crowd was treated to a beer can symphony
for an encore. As PBR cans were poked, mutilated and looped, Daniels and
Schmidt huddled close for a kiss under a sheet of tin foil, allowing the closest
microphone to parlay the sound of an unparalleled musical partnership.
—Justin Lanaille
COMMUNITY
DRIVEN
THE JOY
FORMIDABLE
CONCERT
CALENDAR
35  ■D A DTV DU nTn P D ^ JUV //
HMirIw
BY JORDIE YOW
i
x
K
iN
I
used to have a diary where I would put photos up just for myself and then
eventually some people found out about it and asked me to email them
photos, so I decided to make a website. That way, everyone can view it
and take whatever photos they like and it's also a good way to remember
things. It's a fun way to remember the night" Kathy Lo, founder of Kathy
Is Your Friend, wrote via email.
Those of you too young to remember Kathy Is Your Friend might not remember just how controversial party photography was when Lo imported it to
Vancouver. The seemingly simple process of taking pictures of people at parties
and putting them up on a website was a surprisingly polarizing issue. Some of
the biggest sites in this genre are Last Night's Party and the Cobrasnake, who
became popular in the early 2000s when the cheapness of digital photography
made it possibly for an enterprising photographer to quickly take hundreds of
pictures and document a party. The sites' popularity stemmed from a combination of human vanity, curiosity and the desire to document social gatherings.
Only Magazine called the sites running party photography in Vancouver out
in an uncredited 2007 editorial that declared the existence of these sites to be
"uncalled for and retarded," citing that the photographers running the sites
were talentless, unartistic fame seekers.
Lo has let her site disappear citing not enough time and too much competition as a reason, but she has used her experience to help herself launch a career
in New York (she was even profiled as an up-and-coming fashion photographer
by New York Magazine in 2009).
Lindsay's Diet was singled out in the comments section of that Only article.
Lindsay Ellis began her own site in a format similar to Lo's.
Though Ellis clearly enjoys doing it she is surprised how serious her
detractors make it out to be, "Ifs much less pretentious than people think it
is. Ifs just fun," she said.
Ellis doesn't see herself as hugely creative, but merely as someone who
who filling a need.
" [Party photography is] a really easy fun service to provide for people," said
Ellis in a coffee shop on Main.
id LINDSAY'S DIET
'S MUC
li J1|J
™IH|j|l» *
H&* \
"I discovered digital photography... when my parents got me this shit camera
and I'd bring it to the bar," Ellis said while sitting next to Nicola Hillbrandt,
who also shoots for Lindsay's Diet. Ellis started out just shooting her friends,
but worried that people would start creeping her Livejournal account, so she
got a friend to help create a site modelled after the Cobrasnake.
"Everyone loves a photo of themselves," said Ellis. Ifs a way they can say
to themselves and others, "Look I'm not boring. I'm out and having fun,"
Hillbrandt said. If you do happen to see them out, "Let us take your photo,"
Hillbrandt added.
Local promoter Jason "my!gay!husband!" Sulyma regularly hires party photographers for the primary reason that party photography is a valuable service
for an event promoter. He said it provides "history and documentation." The
sheer act of documentation adds a sense of permanence and importance to
an event. This legitimacy can be bought—most of the party photographers in
town are more than willing to work for money—but whether someone was
paid to take a photo of you at a party or not doesn't seem to stop partygoers
from being interested in seeing themselves and their friends having a good
time while they nurse their hangovers and use photos to jog their memories
of what took place.
Sulyma also pointed out that party photographers have a unique skill set
that many (including himself) don't have. "Who wants to see a big sweaty club
promoter take your picture?" he said over the phone.
Whether or not ifs art is a topic that the general public may still be debating,
but all the photographers I spoke to are of the opinion that it is.
"I treat it like it's art," said Jash Grafstein a.k.a. Swashbuckle, one of the
founders of party photography photo blog, the Futurists.
"I really like to capture the essence of what is going on," added his partner
Kheaven Lewandowski, a.k.a. Hartbraker. The two decided to start their own
website in 2008 after meeting in an Emily Carr photography class. Originally
their site was designed to be a street style blog, but they decided this was too
much work. They quickly turned to party photography due to its popularity.
"We covered a few parties and we saw our numbers skyrocket," said
Lewandowski. It wasn't that far from their goal of doing fashion photography, either.
"Parties are usually where people dress up [anyways]," added Grafstein.
They use the site as a way to launch their careers and have expanded their site
to work with nine photographers.
"We bring in people who are keen on using the site to get their work out
there," Lewandowski said.
Ifs worked so far. Lewandowski has used the connections he's developed
with the Futurists to start shooting music videos with Hot Hot Heat, and
Grafstein has recently been shooting bands such as Seattle indie-rock heavy-
weights Minus the Bear.
Despite detractors, it is hard to imagine that a busy club night would be
complete without a skinny hipster shoving his or her camera in drunk revelers
faces and whether or not party photography is "cool" or "arf' seems unimportant
as it is clearly something that there is a strong desire for. As Sulyma pointed
out, how else are we going to remember our young hedonistic days? And if the
photos happen to be tastefully selected by talented photographers like those
at Lindsay's Diet and the Futurists, then so much the better.
"I think there's losers doing it and there's really cool people doing it," said
Sulyma, and that statement seems to make it clear that just as with any craft or
art form, ifs up to its audience to separate the quality from the crap. ^
38 //CiTR 101.9 FM CHARTS
STRICTLY THE DOPEST HITZ OF JUNE
 #_
ARTIST
ALBUM
LABEL	
#
ARTIST
ALBUM
t LABEL
i
Shane Turner
Overdrive*
s/t
Independent
26
The SSRIs*
Effeminate Godzilla-
Sized Windchimes
Independent
2
Faux Amis*
s/t
Independent
27
Avi Buffalo
s/t
Sub Pop
3
The Telepathic
Butterflies
Wou)& Flutter
Rainbow Quartz
28
Bend Sinister*
Spring Romance
Distort
4
Hank III
Rebel Within
Sidewalk
29
The Brains*
Zombie Nation
Stomp
5
Caribou*
Swim
Merge
30
Jeremy Jay
Splash
K
6
Bonobo
Black Sands
Ninja Tune
31
Peggy Sue
Fossils &
Other Phantoms
Yep Roc
7
Hot Live Guys*
External Culture for
Internal Barbarians
Transistor 66
32
The Varsity Weirdos
Can't Go Home
Ifs Alive
8
The Sadies*
Darker Circles
Yep Roc
33
The Flaming Lips
Dark Side
of the Moon
Warner
9
Woods
At Echo Lake
Woodsist
34
Tobacco
Maniac Meat
Anticon
10
Deer Tick
The Black
Dirt Sessions
Partisan
35
Sonic Avenues*
Sonic Avenues
Going Gaga
11
Broken Social Scene*
Forgiveness
Rock Record
Arts & Crafts
36
The Vicious Cycles*
Momma
b/wNoGood
Teenage Rampage
12
Holy Fuck*
Latin
XL Recordings
37
Jandek
Camber
Sands Sunday
Corwood Industries
13
LCD Soundsystem
This Is Happening
DFA
38
David Cross
Bigger & Blackerer
Sub Pop
14
Joey Only
Outlaw Band*
Transgression Trail
High Art for
the Low Down
39
Jamie Udell
Compass
Warp
15
Harlem
Hippies
Matador
40
The Art Museums
Rough Frame
Woodsist
16
The Polymorphines*
Transistor Sister
Get Bent
41
Mark Sultan*
$
Last Gang
17
Kids On Fire*
s/t
Transistor 66
42
Natalie Merchant
Leave Your Sleep
Nonesuch
18
The Black Keys
Brothers
Nonesuch
43
Hot Chip
One Life Stand:
the Remixes
EMI
19
The Pack A.D.*
We Kill Computers
Mint
44
Bocce*
Disambiguation
Dadmobile
20
Tracy Thorn
Love and its Opposite
Merge
45
TheMolestics*
A Farewell
to Hokum
Independent
21
Old Man Luedecke*
My Hands Are on Fire
& Other Love Sonas
Black Hen
46
Defektors*
The Bottom
of the City
Nominal
22
Loscil*
Endless Falls
Kranky
47
Groove Armada
Black Light
Om
23
The Tallest
Man On Earth
The Wild Hunt
Dead Oceans
48
Drive-By Truckers
TheBigTb-Do
ATO
24
The Salteens*
Moths
Boompa
49
Fanshaw*
Dark Eyes
Mint
25
Silly Kissers*
Precious Necklace
Arbutus
50
Heiki*
Paper+Sound
Paper+Sound
CiTR's charts reflect what's been played on the air by CiTR's lovely DJs last month. Records with asterisks (*) are Canadian. Most of these
excellent albums can be found at fine independent music stores across Vancouver. If you can't find them, give CiTR's music coordinator a shout
at (604) 822-8733. His name is Luke Meat. If you ask nicely he'll tell you how to find them. Check out other great campus/community radio
charts at www.earshot-online.com.
39 Eidudesall already sale priced items,

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