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Discorder CITR-FM (Radio station : Vancouver, B.C.) Oct 1, 2007

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 Hftf**lo HOUR 20'
YEAR AHNWERSARY SHOW THURSaLOCT.'MS
W^>&y
SATURDAY,   OCT.   6th
DJ VADIM
mm ■.
mm.
Tickets $10- At B^tstf^JSv^^^Onderworid • Zulu ■ Dipt • Clubzone com
- SHINE (364 WATER St)
T^ftttfST
26 th.
BRAVO
$15 adv. at Clubzone.
■n, Livestock. Zulu, Dipt, Underworld & Beatstreet rjjr I  B'tiflj.
RICHARDS ON RICHARDS (1036 Richards St)
iSTTLlBBOTHIil
.J^ssafflSS^ak
3    October 2007 ROCKETS! HORSES! COLORING BOOKS!
OPERA! GOOD! BAD! EVIL! TRUTH! CHAOS!
uiscoraer 4    October 2007 FRIDAY NOVEMBER 16
RICHARD'S ON RICHARDS
NOVEMBER 6
THE MEDIA CLUB
FRIDAY
NOVEMBER 9 I
ST   THE MEDIA CLUB [
flllSj
als
and
Manchester Orchestra
SUNDAY
NOVEMBER 11
mfi&arsfm.
SHOUT OUT OUT OUT OUT
witt my!gay!husband!
Tyler Fedchuk, Tony X, and MC Curtis Santiago
FRIDAY DECEMBER 7 - RICHARD'S ON RICHARDS
/Wl/IM_%*
VHS
RBEIA
[SIS
■ RicHAftD-s st k&mk
iCELEDRdTION
i    _*^_W<&___T*l'Q_t WITH6UESTS
I "* '#^0feJi   KILL ME TOMORROW
I NOVEMBER 14 I
NOVEMBER 28
RICHARD'S ON RICHARDS
SOOT RECORDS
20th ANNIVERSARY
DESTROYER
VOTE ROBOT
PINK MOUNTAINTOPS
RIFF RANDELLS DUSTIN COLE
HILARITY! and special guests
SATURDAY NOVEMBER 10
RICHARD'S ON RICHARDS
CUFF THE DUKE I THE
WITHGU^TS
NOVEMBER 25
WTHGtflBSIS
§ifciNDOFTM&
POVEMBESfe
RICHARD'S ON RICHARDS
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WITH GUESTS
SATURDAY DECEMBER 8
RICHARD'S ON RICHARDS
™ntasy  joxtftti
«f9fi39tfOCTOBER 20 t£S9asBNta-8
TICKETS FOR ALL EVENTS ONSALE NOW AT ticketmaster.ca 604-280-4444 ZULU AND SCRATCH RECORDS IlYvie nnTionl
Now On Sale!
BLACK
UPS
iwpWcM«rphi|?
SATURDAY
NOVEMBER 1
MAXIMO PARK
FRIDAY DECEMBER 14 |
CROATIAN CULTURAL f
CENTRE
UNEARTH OCTOBER 15 f CROATIAN CULTURAL CENTRE • GALACTIC OCTOBER 18 I COMMODORE BALLROOM • IAMX OCTOBER 29 | THE PLAZA CLUB
nRTIOD.com
6    October 2007 tewHw
OCTOBER MOT
the Gentle j4rt of Editing
Art Director
Cole Johnston
Production Manager
P*|&J?RACrjLEA
Copy Editors
Mike Chilton
Brock Thiessen
c. TURIONS
Pyra Draculea
Ad Manager
Catherine Rana
Under Review Editor
Pyra Draculea
RLA Editor
Brock ThieSsen
Layout + Design
Cole Johnston
Mike Chilton
Contributors
Meg Bourne
Linda Bull
Amelia Butcher
Mike Chilton
Jullanne.Claire
Jason Colantonio
Pyra Draculea
Bryce Dunn
Steve edge
MikeFodor
Simon Foreman
Darren Gawle
Joelboy
Ben Johnstone
Marielle Kho
Arthur Krumins
Christian Martius
Maxwell Maxwell
Michelle Mayne
Robin McConnell
Steveston Mike
Nardwuar the Human
Serviette
Tyler Noble
Quinn Omori
Nick Pannu
PF
JoePooley   j^O.k'iri
Jack Prus
Peter Sickert
O.J. Simpkins
Emily Sobool
Jordie Sparkle
John Tanner
Brock Thiessen
Andrew Wilson
Lolei Yang
Photo & Illustration
Meg Bourne
Mitch Clem
Pyra Draculea
William Jans
Cole Johnston
Arthur Krumins
Maxwell Maxwell
Sean MacPherson.
Alicia Smith
Wilson Wong
Lolli Yang
Charts
Luke Meat
Distribution
JErank Rumbletone
US Distribution
Catherine Rana
CITR Station Manager
Lydia Masemola
Publisher
Student Radio Society
of UBC
Cover by Cole Johnston
Regulars
The Gentle Art of Editing
7
Riff Raff
12
Bryce Dunn
Inkstuds
fill
__&%Sl_\                                   'Robin McConnell
Textually Reviewed
z$i !i
Celluloid Exposed
14
Vancouver Special Duplex
15
lightning Dust + Mohawk Lodge
Calendar +Datebook
16
HeyDJ!
20
Under Review
22
Real Live Action
25
Zamo the Destroyer
28
CiTR Charts
29
The Dopest Hits of September 2007
Program Guide
30
Features
Army of Anime
1      The costumes may be weird, but who really
1      cares when you're having fun? Or maybe
1      not, if you ask our intrepid investigator... Mr
8
Nardwuar's 20th Anniversa
"7
The man who put the'guerilla'into
Vancouver music journalism, Nardwuar the
Human Serviette, celebrates 20 years on CiTR
with 20 hours of his best interviews!       BW 10
Gogol Bordello
Call it 'gypsy punk' if you must, but Gogol
1   s   Bordello is so much more than that. One thing
is for certain: this band does want to be known
for its propensity for partying down...      Mr
19
The Weakerthans
As they begin touring on their newest album.
Reunion Tour, Winnipeg's favourite musical sons
have established themselves not only as a touring
juggernaut, but as an activist force, too.   Mr 22
Wow, there's so much going on here at CiTR
over the next couple of months that it's time to
batten down the figurative hatches and stay
tuned to the station for further details-much
in the same way we've recently had to prepare
for those inevitable fall storms (it is still just fall,
right?) in my West End neighbourhood.
Not only is CiTR in the middle of celebrating
its 2 5th year on the FM airwaves, but it's doing so
by rolling out the banner on its biggest fundrais-
ing effort in its history. The second annual CiTR
Funding Drive will begin on Monday, Oct. 1, at
8 a.m. and go for an unprecedented two weeks,
ending at 11:55 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 14. The
goal is to raise $20,000 to do such things as buy
new broadcast equipment, add more production
training and editing studios, get a new high-powered server for hosting the popular podcasting
service, upgrade and renovate the production
facilities, buy remote equipment for the sports
department and, of course, repair and renovate
the main on-air studio. This all comes so CiTR can
continue to improve the quality and types of programming you have come to rely on the station
for. You can pledge during your favourite show, or
really any show, by calling 604-822-8648. Go to
citr.ca/donate.php for more details and help keep
CiTR on the air for another 25 years.
Also, every year at about this time, the
CiTR sports crew begin their slate of live UBC
Thunderbirds broadcasts. Check citr.ca/sports.php
for the full T-Birds on CiTR broadcast schedule.
On Tuesday, Oct. 2, head to UBC's Pit Pub to
check out another CiTR first: That DJ Competition
from CiTR. The station has taken entries from
some of Vancouver best amateur or undiscovered
turntablists, and narrowed it down to the eight
best, and will give them a quarter of an hour each
to prove their talent. There will be cheap cover, a
liquid-refreshment special (two bones each) and
over two hours of solid entertainment. Not to
mention the chance to possibly see Vancouver's
©DiSCORDER 2007 by the Student Radio Society of the
University of British Columbia^. All rights reserved. Circulation
8,000. Subscriptions, payable in advance, to Canadian residents
are $15 for one year, to residents of the USA are $15 US; $24
CDN elsewhere. Single copies are $2 (to cover postage). Please
make cheques or money orders payable to Discorder Magazine.
.DEADLINES: Copy deadline for the November issue is October
19th. Ad space is available until October 21st and can be
booked by calling 604.822.3017 ext 3 or emailing discorder.
advertising@gmail.com. Our rates are available upon request.
Discorder is not responsible for loss, damage, or any other injury
to unsolicited manuscripts, unsolicited artwork (including but
not limited to drawings, photographs, and transparencies), or
any other unsolicited material. Send words to editor.discorder@
gmail.com and art to art.discorder@gmail.com. Material can be
sumbitted on disc or hard copy or via mail. From UBC to Langley
and Squamish to Bellingham, CiTR can be heard at 101.9 FM as
well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland,
except Shaw in White Rock. Call the CiTR DJ fine at 822.2487, our
offlce at 822.3017, or our news and sports lines at 822.3017 ext. 2.
Fax us at 822.9364, e-mail us at: citrmgr@mail.ams.ubc.ca, visit
our web site at www.discorder.ca or just pick up a pen and write
#233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1, CANADA.
next hot live DJ. It's kind of like CiTRs Shindig! for
turntablists.
Speaking of CiTR's Shindig!, the station is
right in the thick of it. Action on Tuesday nights
at the Railway Club began on Sept. 11 and
continues for 13 weeks, until early December.
Congratulations goes to the SSRIs, Retrofire and
Stolen Bicycles Gang for winning Shindig! weeks
one through three, respectively. This month be
on the lookout for five weeks of real live Shindig!
action this month-are we blessed, or what? See
shindig.citr.ca for all the skinny.
There are also things going on here at
Discorder. Namely, we say goodbye to Cheyanne
Turions as our Under Review Editor and
Production Manager, I thank her for her dedication and service to this publication during her
time here. In turn, I extend a hearty welcome to
Pyra Draculea, the creator of our new monthly
comic, Zamo the Destroyer, as our new Production
Manager, Anyone interested in helping out with
production of Discorder may contact her at pro-
duction.discorder@gmail.com..
Finally, I end this off on a slightly sombre
note, as this will be my last issue of Discorder
Magazine in the role of Editor. My life has taken
a drastic change in direction, no longer allowing me to dedicate the time or attention that is
required to bring each issue of Discorder to fruition. I've always wanted to use the word 'fruition'
in a column. It is my hope that my replacement
wiH continue to bring you the best in CiTR-based
content you have become accustomed to, of late.
Anyone interested in going out for the Editor or
Under Review Editor position should email Lydia,
CiTR's station manager, at citrmgr@ams.ubc.ea
for further details.
It's been a slice, see you in the funny pages.
-Mike "Spike" Chilton
OfaCOfCtof HANGING WITH THE
ACMYs
OF        *■
V& PS ^>
m
WOQOS ANO
IMA&BS
BY
max we!5 max we!!
6 Ave Boll is something of a genius, in a slightly twisted
i m m way. He makes films out of popular video games which
Wt^t are then released to a wide audience and almost-
certain commercial and critical failure. If you've seen posters
for BloodRayne, Postal, Alone in the Dark, or House of the Dead,
you've probably got the general idea: Boll takes a mildly popular game (BloodRayne U, for instance), changes the plot around
until it can fill an hour and a half (turning BloodRayne II into
a vampire western, for instance), and then the movie almost
inevitably fails.
Why, then, is Uwe Boll able to make more films? After
so many of his movies have bombed so horribly, why would
people keep investing in them? The answer lies in a strange
loophole in the tax laws of Boll's native Germany. Investment
in German film production companies is rewarded with lavish
tax breaks by the government. Even better, corporations can
loan Boll's company money, invest it while it's borrowed, and
pay no taxes on anything but the film's profits. If the film is a
bomb, obviously, the companies need not pay taxes.
Boll's unique business model is taken, more or less, from The
Producers. As long as his movies bomb, his investors make money.
Seeing Boll in person, however, it becomes clear that the financial
aspect of his movies is not his main concern: the man is clearly
passionate about the films he makes to the point of obsession.
The audience here shares his passion, both for video games and
the films Boll makes from them. Then again, they're not exacdy
an average audience: I'm sitting in the middle of Anime Evolution 2007, one of British Columbia's biggest anime conventions.
The hundred or so people attending Boll's discussion panel
are, for the most part, dressed like they're at a Halloween party
instead. People are emulating their favorite video game or anime
character to varying degrees of success. Sometimes they're a little
cheap and silly-looking, and sometimes they seem to have spent
huge amounts of time and money to produce a disturbingly
high-quality costume, but they're all having a good time. Near
the front a group of boys are wearing matching black suits and
afros. I found out later they were from 4chan.org, a Web forum
responsible not only for the popular 'O RLY?' owl, but also for
the barrage of sensationalist television coverage which occurred
after members jokingly threatened to blow up several NFL stadiums. Fox News referred to them as an "internet hate machine".
They're pudgy, cheerful, and mostiy in their late teens.
Outside Boll's discussion panel, I find a boy sitting next to
a bizarre Japanese arcade game, wearing a huge red trench-
coat, bondage pants, and elaborate leather cuffs. He's playing
a Game Boy and ignoring the thousands of people wandering
the halls of SFU in equally outrageous costumes. I introduce
myself since he looks bored and most of the people with really
amazing costumes are too busy to interview. I've never heard of
the person he was supposed to be dressing as, and so can't make
an objective judgment as to the accuracy of his costume, but
I compliment him anyway. Making friends here will require
some stretching of the truth, as the only anime I've seen are
Hayao Miyazaki movies {Spirited Away, and so on). "Yes," I
tell him, "the similarity is amazing." I cannot remember what
the name of the character or the show was, but it seems best to
feign understanding and smile.
Moments later, his brother walks out of the panel with what
looks like his girlfriend. I'm surprised to see that the girl is not
only wearing an elaborate costume, she's also surprisingly pretty.
I strike up a conversation with her, and she's charming. I'd
expected the convention to be full of nerds and social outcasts (I
felt I'd fit in well—although I don't run Linux or have episodes
of Star Trek memorized, I do prefer reading books to getting
blasted at keggers), but a lot of the people I meet here seem
like they'd fit in fine at a sorority or a soccer team. I'm a little
weirded out and seek the safety of my own kind.
Past the screening rooms, gaming rooms, and vast array of
people selling Pocky, there's a stage outdoors. I have no idea
what's going on, but a Japanese woman starts singing and several
more behind her are shuffling to the rhythm and clapping their
hands. One of them isn't Japanese, or a woman at all: he's a white
guy, blonde and handsome, in a cheap-looking wig that is falling
off his head and a glittering schoolgirl outfit. He's a full head
taller than any of them, and not making much effort to pass as a
woman, but he's having an amazing time. So is everybody else: it
doesn't matter if they look ridiculous, they're happy.
Maybe they've got the right idea."*^",
8    October 2007 SATU319AY 27 OGTftlElfl
«isch auds ons mmmm
(PRE-PARTY  OCT   13  AT  CLUB  23  WEST)
'DJ Pandemonium Two-Time #2 DJ In Vancouver"
"Best Fetish Night In Vancouver"
"Best Place To Dance Topless" - Georgia Straight
"Most Radical Fetish Night In Vancouver"
"Most Modern Place To Get Some" - Terminal City
"One Of Those Rare Events Where Pretty Much
Anvthinq Goes" - Abort Maqazine
SEXIEST COSTUME CONTEST EVER
.   •HOSTED BY MR. DARK
YDJS PANDEMONIUM, R-LEX,
•STRICT FETISH DRESS CODE
• NO EFFORT = NO ENTRY
$15 ADVANCE TICKETS AT NEW WORLD DESIGNS,
ZULU, LITTLE SISTER'S AND CLUBVIBES.COM
MORE DRESS CODE INFO, PARTY PHOTOS AND
VIDEOS AT WWW.SINCITYFETISHNIGHT.CA
Discorder   9 preview by Nardwuar the Human Serviette, photos fey William Jans, comics by Mitch Clem
I, Nardwuar the Human Serviette, hate math, but I
love numbers! Especially the digits that come together
to create 1986, the year I entered the University of British Columbia. I guess to some, I only lasted in 'proper'
university for two days. Proper university? That, to me, is
like going to class, studying and doing nothing else. No,
I am not a dropout. I graduated from UBC in the fall of
1990 with a BA in Canadian History. What happened
to me? Well, let's lay the blame on the bands UB40 and
the Fine "Young Cannibals!	
On-my second day of university, they played UBC's
War Memorial Gymnasium. Before the gig, my buddies
and I wanted to get wasted. Being 18 and all, it wasn't
going to happen in the student pub; however, maybe it
would happen at the beer garden being hosted by CiTR
FM 101.9, UBC Radio. So, with the promise of fhe 'olde
ale,' we wandered into the Student Union Building's
'party room' for CiTR's 'Brews-cast.' Needless to say, I
was served, no problem. Except there was just one hitch:
I was pressured into joining the station. Well, not exactly
pressured, but encouraged to join possibly the greatest
radio station in the world! Me? A teenage zit loser? Yes!
All the training would be provided and I didn't just have
to be a DJ. I could do news, sports, arts, mobile sound
DJing, production, or write for the station's program
guide, Discorder. Or I could even do as little as eat my
lunch in the CiTR lounge. There were so many or's! The
fine folks at CiTR then gave me a membership form
and told me to bring it back the next day. And that day
was my third day of university! And that is when it all
changed: I joined CiTR!
I think it's the greatest thing I've ever done in my life!
Hell, it is my life!
I ate lunch in the CiTR Lounge for a year before I got
a radio show in 1987. But there was no rush. Little did T
know that through CiTR, I would be able to interview
everyone from Mikhail Gorbachev to Kurt Cobain, from
Dan Quayle to Courtney Love, from Timothy Leary
to Ron Jeremy, from Iggy Pop to Jean Chretien, from
Snoop Doggy Dogg to Mr. Plow and from James Brown
to Reveen. All this through a campus station—not some
top-40 lame-ass joint! Aside from the 'journalistic' part,
through CiTR I have also met the nicest, warmest, kindest people. Punks, poets, preachers, pornstars, yeah, yeah,
yeah! Now it is time for you to do the math, dear readers.
If a dweeb like me can still be hooked on some campus
club after 20 years, there must be something stupid going
on. Like you reading this! Baboom! Now go out and join
CiTR! Everyone is welcome.
the  im   .it Serviette
anniversary interview marathon
dJRS 9 P.TT1 IHURSOdH 7T0UETOBER X TO 5 ?m FHDdU T10USTTTBCT 2
Nardwuar will be celebrating the 20th Anniversary of his
radio show (1987-2007) on CiTR with a 20-hour live-on-
air Nardwuar interview marathon, starting at 9 p.m. on
Thursday, Nov. 1, and ending at 5 p.m. Friday, November 2.
Later on that evening, on Nov. 2, there will be a special all-
ages anniversary gig with Nardwuar's band, the Evaporators, along with the Pack and others at the Sub Ballroom.
Also, on N&fiikjbT, Nardwuar will be releasing a new 2-disc
DVD of interviews from his radio show and public access
specials called Welcome to My Castle. Plus, Nov. 6 also
marks the release date of the Evaporators' new CD/LP,
Gassy Jack and Other Tales.
More info at www.nardwHie^m    v
10    October 2007 Interviews to be aired during Nardwuar's 20-Hour Marathon include:
Ernest Angle?
Fugazi
GeraidForti
GWAR
Henry Rollins
Ice Cube
fe*T
fggyPaa
David CrasfJ'JJ?
Death Sentence
Begrassi Kids
Echo and the Bu
Elijah Wood
r
Jetto Biafra
Uk the Pole
Lydia Lunch
Maestro FresWes
Metal Groupie
Michael Moore
Mickey Dolenz
Mikhail Gorbachev
NegativLand
Nina Hagen
Nirvana
Oliver Stone
Paul Gallagher
Pierre Berton
Pointed Sticks
Rheostatics
Robert Anton Wilson
Mom Jeremy
Slayer iK-^t?
Stilt Toxic
Sloan
Swoop Doggy Dogg
Sonic Youth
Timothy Leary
Tom Vu
Tommy Chong
Tommy Lee
Vanilla lee
Wesley Willis
And many morel
Email,*
and tell Nardttmor what
you want to hear!
I
\
,^^r........MM
SSfl&ENDj^
&IHMCOUVER'S MIGHTIEST ANO LONGEST-RUNNING ALTERNATIVE NIGHT HAS MOVED TO THE WEEKEND!
ONOBOOY, BUT NOBODY, DELIVERS A HALLOWEEN PARTY LIKE SANCTUARY - COME GET YOUR FREAK ON!
TMSA
BY MR. DARK
PART HELLRAISER, PART NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD, PART CLASSIC HORROR, AND ONE HUNDRED
PERCENT EVIL, MR. DARK IS RESPONSIBLE YEAR AFTER YEAR FOR THE BEST DECORATIIONS IN THE CITY!
plS PANDERiC3Nli1^rVORTSXrR-IEX
I    sHviNG UP ONLY THE BEST INDUSTRIAL / ALTERNATIVE / ELECTRO / 80S / SYNTH / PUNK ALL NIGHT!
fstfOO CfiSHE^PRTZEFORBEOTCOSTOME
'   COME AS SEXY, SCARY, CREEPY, CLASSY, TRASHY, DRESSED UP OR DRESSED DOWN AS YOU WISH AND JOIN
Xl3K|THE PARTY!  TONS OF PR8jfSig£JKwoH INCLUDING THE JUDGES CHOICE THIS YEAR FOR MOST GORY!
Iniday,     )£Tch6e^alt^_\__0\\J_S
l ABBOT ST . 9PM-3AM. $10 ADV. TIX AT NEW WORLD DESIGNS, ZULU, UTTLE SISTERS, SCRAT~ Rl
BRYCE
DUNN
0*
■   __¥____ i T»T "W'li »■!"">
BLANK DOGS
1
Welcome everyone to yet another tale of epic vinyl
adventure, courtesy of yours truly. As the hours of
sunlight become increasingly short, the leaves begin to
fall and the air becomes crisp and the chance to tear up
the asphalt on your board becomes a precious commod-
. ity. But if you're the China Creeps, you find a way to
sidewalk surf and carve the most famed piece of concrete
in the Vancouver landscape any time and in any season.
This dedication to the popular skate spot of China Creek
inspired their moniker and the title to their fresh-as-
the-skinned-knees-from-a-bowl-bombing-session self-
titled EP, which made its way onto my desk. Intended as
j a vivid reminder of the spoils of such a workout, a ragged
piece of duct tape was glued to the cover to symbolically
christen the workout of musical muscle contained on the
six tracks within. Music this fast, uncompromising and
full of adrenalin makes for punk that both rocks and rolls
like the wheels of fire burning underneath these dudes.
For those who missed S.T.R.E.E.T.S and their brethren the first time around: check out this release. Bonus
points for tackling one of the best skating songs of all
time, Beyond Possession's "Skater's Life." (No address
given, only 300 pressed, so act fast.)
There's been a shift in the scene that has been bubbling
up as of late where a lot of bands seem to be conveniently
discovering No Wave (made somewhat famous in New
York during the late '70s and early '80s with bands like
Teenage Jesus and the Jerks, James Chance and the
Contortions and other like-minded outfits) to the effect
that it has become a bit too overwhelming for this writer
to handle. Not to say it's all bad—you just to wonder when
is it going to end? Better yet, how did it begin? Seemingly at the forefront of this 'movement' is the Mutators, three purveyors of pure musical mayhem that have
laid down 'songs,' which may be bereft of melody and
certain other qualities made available in popular music,
but which do contain admirable structures that resemble
tempo shifts, volume changes and 'singing.' Oh, what the
hell—enough of the shop talk, let's get to the real deal:
these guys and gal bring the noise and then some. Not
for the squeamish but definitely for the experimental
crowds. There's so much happening on these three tracks
that I couldn't even decide if it sounded better on 33 or
45 r.p.m. Live, I hear they are a clusterfuck of cacophony
(trademark that, Sam Sullivan!), but the kids, they dig it.
Kudos to a local label for plugging in and turning us on
to these crazy tunesmiths (the Broadway To Boundary
Records, myspace.com/thebroadwaytoboundary).
To end this edition, two meaty morsels from Sweet
Rot Records: a posthumous EP from Milwaukee,
Wisconsin, punks the Catholic Boys, and a current slab
for the unusually named Blank Dogs. The former are no
little angels and would rather piss in the Holy Grail than
drink from it. Plus, from the four tracks on their final
release, it sounds like their meds are running low, as the
vocals have been through a steady diet of bourbon and
barbed wire, the guitars are razor sharp and drums barely
keeping up with it all. Fans of Crime, Angry Samoans
and A.D.D. will like it. The latter band is a mysterious synth-post punk duo from points unknown who
conjure the spirits of Sparks and the Spits in tracks like
"Doorbell Fire" and "Outside Alarmer." Robotic without
sounding monotonous, quirky without sounding campy,
they've caught the ear of a few labels already, the most
noteworthy being heavyweights In the Red Records,
which plans to release an album's worth of Blank Dogs'
material in the coming months. For the now and the
curious, check this single out (Sweet Rot Records, P.O.
Box 78025 Vancouver BC Canada V5N 5W1).
Sayonara, sweethearts! To be continued... 0
www.ams.ubc.ca/events
ail Schedule
mm
at the Pit Pub
ct.12
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flMMERS
ct.20
, SEALED WITH A KISS
ON RICHARDS
Russian
Futurists
k at the Pit Pub
1St    October 2007 ■Textually
tRe^ewed
Tlitcii
Matthew Holmes
[Nightwoo*Editions]
Hitch is an appropriate title for Matthew Holmes's
debut collection of poetry, his words securely knotting
us to characters and the smallest moments. His ropes
connect five seemingly unrelated sections, each introduced by a Morse-code image of one of the five letters
in the word Hitch: "I. A Science Everyday," "II. Before
Others Are There," "III. Green Tomatoes,," "IV. Coal
Smoke Dreams" and " V. Hitch," which read like individual chapbooks tied together to form a book.
The bulk of "I. A Science Everyday" are prose poems
about various scientists who Holmes makes human
through a series of eccentric details. "II. Before Others
Are There" and "III. Green Tomatoes" read, at times, like
a well-edited poetry journal, with poems using simple
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experiences to portray a broader understanding of relationships and what it is to be human. It's in these sections
that Holmes masters the love poem with such lines as,
"How I find you in others how I want them/for you."
The book is dedicated to a woman named Beth, and the
third section contains simple yet moving love poems like
"To Beth, Sleeping" and "Beth Seeking Poems." In this
section, he also proves his flexibility by writing -about
appliances and using comedy to address dust bunnies,
as well as a man named Paul who stole his boots one
winter night. "IV. Coal Smoke Dreams" depicts observations of everything from birds to seasons, using often
overlooked details to reveal them anew. The final section,
"V. Hitch," is the most stylistically innovative, with short
poems prompted by images of knots. Here Holmes plays
with the rhythm and nuance of language, using backslash caesuras to create a tangled rope effect as in, "So we
go/together/untying/but tying/untying/a chain/loving
and drinking and loving/again."
Despite this being his first book, it's no surprise that
Holmes has an impressive resume. Hitch demonstrates
not only his ability to write in a range of tones and styles,
but also his talent for finding beauty in untying what it is
to love and be loved.
Tracy Ann Stefanucci
Delible 4gS9jj
Anne Stone
[independent]
When a person goes missing, there is always the question of how they went missing. A myriad of possibilities
suggest themselves as answers—the person got lost in an
avalanche, the person was kidnapped, the person went
on vacation without notifying anyone or the person ran
away Jfrom home—and the investigators must go to
loved ones to weed out the possibilities.
Fbfteen-year-old Lora's sister, Mel, has gone missing.
Police come to Lora and her mother, Karin, for answers.
They are sensitive to the situation, but still rely on
assumptions and stereotypes to solve the case. As they
discover Mel's past runaway attempts, and her one drug-
overdosing suicide attempt, they become convinced that
Mel has run away from home. Lora knows that there
was foul play involved—her sister was not abandoning
home this time. Still, the world does not gasp and react
with outrage when a missing girl printed on a poster has
a face of lost innocence and mischief.
This story belongs to a small family: Lora, her mother
Karin and her grandmother Celia. From each woman's
perspective we, the readers, get to experience the heartache of a lost family member. The author, Anne Stone,
reveals the hole that is left behind by Mel. The family's
grief is expressed with a sort of passive passion. Stone
never relies on gore or dramatic, tear-strewn scenes to
intrigue the reader. Instead, the reader is bound to the
book by its honesty.
The sensation of reading this is much like people-
watching. One can pick up or put down fhe book at
any point because it doesn't move forwards with an
introduction, rising action and climax. Rather, the story
moves back and forth in time without a sense of order.
I would not recommend Delible to those looking for
action, fantasy or the extraordinary, but for those look- .
ing for a thoughtful and sensitive book. A bonus is that
the author is a Vancouverite, like you and me.
Lillian Yang
Suburban Pornography
Matthew Firth
[Anvil Press] J
The ghosts of Charles Bukowski and Hubert Selby, Jr.
lurk in Matthew Firth's new short story collection. Even
the sparse prose-style of Raymond Carver materializes in passages of matter-of-fact description where the
seemingly minute incidents of existence become indelible. These influences may be common currency to an
author who casts an unflinching eye on the lurid margins
of life, the poverty stricken and the ever-widening gap
between expectation and reality, but the authenticity of
the content soon diminishes any prejudices based on the
familiarity of a writing style. There's more to Matthew
Firth than being a new version of Bukowski transposed
to the cold of a Canadian metropolis.
In Suburban Pornography, characters struggle to exist
in challenging social conditions, in ruined familial, social
and sexual relationships and often seek emancipation
through satiating their basest desires. "The Summer of
No Love" describes the cruelty of an abusive relationship
with a mentally disturbed woman, and "Smooth with the
Ladies" depicts an evening of sexual pursuits that ends
in humiliating violence. Throughout the novel, sex is
the realm of the cruel, the sordid and the disappointed,
which figuratively portrays a larger world that is just as
cruel, sordid and disappointing.
Despite an unwavering graphical depiction of degenerative and desperate situations, Firth frequently places
his characters at a dispassionate distance from the
world they survey. They are mostly impotent chroniclers, watching their own and other people's tawdry Uves
with a mustering of cold indifference. In this collection, men stare at naked women through their Uving
room windows, view copulating suburban neighbours in
their homes or catch bus drivers receiving the services
of a haggard prostitute. These voyeurs witness the not-
so-private Uves of others and the tragic circumstances
behind them. From the ten-year-old who observes an
occupied house burning down in "August, 1974" to the
homeless shelter worker who documents its assorted
patrons in "The Centre," most characters in Suburban
Pornography keep a cool physical or emotional distance.
The narrator in "Everybody Loses," who is affected by
an unfolding pubUc accident, puts it this way: "Someone
somewhere always strings us along, keeps us hanging on.
But I'm an interloper so I say nothing..."
Fortunately, Suburban Pornography is not a forum for
dry social criticism dressed up as fiction to be told from
a safe distance. For aU of Firth's character displacement,
these tales create a genuine world of despondency, where
people are burdened by their dumb jobs, aUenated by
their personal relationships and suffocated by their unre-
aUzed dreams. "SheUa Crawford Sucks Cocks" once again
details a voyeur, this time an adolescent, who notices the
local girls, not much older than him, offering backstreet
sexual services. Although the teenager is never involved
with what he sees, the first-person narration perfectly
transcribes fife child's feeUngs of alienation and longing
as he wrestles with his own unfulfilled sexual desire. In
"Giants," a long-distance driver illustrates his vulnerability by describing a group of giants that enter a hole in
his body. More often than not an impUcit inner territory
of anguish is revealed, even when what is described isn't
very real at aU. Firth reUably conveys a dejected voice,
not so much in conflict with a harsh and volatile milieu,
but one that is struggUng to accept the apparent frailty
of existence. These stories deUver an authentic reteU-
ing of Uved-in worlds full of wayward compulsions and
engulfing dead ends, whether inspected by a detached
and unflinching gaze or experienced through a character's internal but unacknowledged suffering. Suburban
Pornography surpasses a generic understanding of a
tell-it-like-it-is Uterary form, born from American 20th
century fiction, and deUvers a unique Canadian voice
offering a universal reflection of troubled humanity. 0
Christian Martius
Discorder   13 EXPO
hort F j{ms of Se^ii MacPhe
Lights, camera, action. Movie sets, flashing strobe Ughts and roadblocks have
become almost as permanent fixture in Vancouver as the mountains surrounding
the city. So much a part of the landscape have they become that Vancouver
is often labeled 'the HoUywood of the North.' Yet, if one is to venture outside the
context of corporate media and film, a new frontier can be discovered: the realm of
independent movies. In seeking out this entity one can find venues such as the Fifth
Avenue Cinemas, Pacific Cinematheque and VancityTheatre, which showcase mostly—
and sometimes exclusively—indie film. Around town, in cafes and post-secondary
campuses, small-budget indie entrepreneurs can also be spotted shooting scenes in
crooks and crannies. There is Uttle gUtz and glamour for these filmmakers. Recognition
and hopes of ultimate fame are not the major reasons behind their struggles. Indie film
makers have passion and a specific premise for what they are doing. According to local
indie writer/director Sean MacPherson, "Although it is the hardest road I decided to
take, there is no way to describe the feeling of giving birth to ideas for a film."
This past summer, on July 31, Sean MacPherson screened three short films:
Mannequin Romance Novel, Unicorn Ragazo and Marion Bigsby: Prince of Darkness at
Pacific Cinematheque. The films were only about 30 minutes each, but the process of
making the films took over a year. MacPherson wrote the first script for Mannequin-
Romance Novel over fhe course of a month, while working nights at a drop-in centre
in Calgary. He admits that preparing these films was one of the toughest undertakings
and chaUenges he ever dealt with. Getting the money for the project and then booking
the location took some time. MacPherson confessed the irony of disclosing to others
that you have a very small budget has its, perks: "When people realize that you don't
have a lot of money, they are willing to help out." Many businesses along Main Street
helped out with the pivotal scenes of his first film, Mannequin Romance Novel, where
various scenes were shot in cafes and clothing stores.
Moreover, having a tight budget often coerces filmmakers to bear the burden of
wearing many hats during production. MacPherson not only wrote, directed and
produced aU three films, but also starred in the first two. According to MacPherson,
multitasking for the many positions requires that you "have faith in every decision
you're making." Characters have to be found on the spot because of the time constraint.
Several approaches can be taken to find actors; for example, ads can be put in the
paper. Around the Lower Mainland, there are also several agencies to help find actors.
MacPherson was fortunate to find child actors for his film, Marion Bigsby, from a
talent agency in Surrey. Quite a few actors were found shortly before production
started, but everyone managed to get into character and perform.
In spite of the many challenges, MacPherson confesses the rewards are ultimately
reaped once the films are completed. "There is a sense of gratitude for family and friends
who supported each stage of production, and are finally able see the end product." Also,
being able to initiate the thought processes within audience members is rewarding.
MacPherson took an open-ended approach in his writing. Props, scenes and characters
constructed impUed themes that aflowed the audience to derive their own meanings.
Mannequin Romance Novel, Unicorn Ragazo and Marion Bigsby: Prince of Darkness
screened on July 31 and Aug. 14. For information on screenings contact Seari
Macpherson at winterpictures@gmail.com. There is also a webpage for Mannequin
Romance Novel at www.myspace.com/marmequinromance.     0       Of rjjjs
14    October 2007 Jmt-phK, VANCOUVER
mm- -* SpEC|AL
DUPLEX
SOMEWHERE IN THE WOODS, BY
POSSIBLY A CABIN:ARTHUR KRUMINS
THE ORIGINS OF LIGHTNING DUST
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"I think when we started the project, we just wanted to do
something that was sort of dreary, kinda dark. Sort of like the dark
side of our personalities. Or the dark side of our writing."—Amber
Webber on the Lightning Dust vision.
I'm out to a show by myself.1 haven't gone solo to one in a while,
but every so often, something like Lightning Dust comes along
that I can't resist. The narrative of the songs draw me in while I
marvel at the originality of the music being played. The interplay
between the keyboard and guitar, along with the harmonies, flies
and hangs in peaks and valleys. Thunderous applause, and I head
out to East Hastings to catch a bus home, feeling the wonderful
thing I feel when I've seen a truly great show.
A far more prosaic and day-to-day scene happens a few weeks
later when I get to interview lead singer Amber Webber, who
doubles as the second vocalist for Black Mountain and who has
a guest spot on the new Cave Singers LP due out on Matador.
As she remains humble about her musical beginnings,
Webber recalls listening to Van Morisson and Neil Diamond
growing up, and her mother's devotion to Janis Joplin: "Every
morning it was cranked to "Me and Bobby McGee."" Amber
"sang in a few choirs in high school and stuff like that," she
says and offers me a beer as we chat on the couch in her East
Van apartment. I look up at the shelves and shelves of old LPs
in her place. Musical stuff fills the room we're in. There's a
keyboard, and guitars on stands around the room.
"Josh and I obviously play in Black Mountain together and we
were writing songs that really weren't suiting Black Mountain.
We actually wrote five songs and put 'em on a CD for all of our
friends and some relatives and stufFfor Christmas in 2005. Then
we played a few art shows and we had a lot of fun doing that, so
we just kept on writing songs, and we had enough songs for an
album. Jagjaguwar had the Christmas CD and they were stoked
on it. When we said we were recording a full-length album, they
were interested in putting it out. Mostly Josh and I recorded that.
We just did it ourselves in our house and our practice spot and
mixed it at the Hive. We did the instrumentation by ourselves,
except for Cris Derkson, who did cello on it."
So far, Lightning Dust has played half a dozen local shows
and has gone on a two week tour with kindred spirits, the Cave
Singers. When asked about the Cave Singers, Webber says
she "loved them instantly" when she heard some songs they
had sent her. They are friends of mutual friends in Seattle, and
because they share a booking agent, scheduling a tour together
came about easily. Black Mountain is also taking the Cave
Singers with them to multiple dates on their current tour.
Webber is happy with how the Pat's Pub show went that
night, when they played with their full line-up, including her
sister, Ashley, and Peters from Ladyhawk. She explains the
virtue of having Ladyhawk's drummer: "He adds a lot 'cause it's
hard to play such mellow music live, you know, and get it across
without people just chit-chatting and all that kind of stuff."
Was it always called Lightning Dust?
"Josh and I took a vacation to Toronto to visit friends and
family and we were partying all night and we came up with
these ridiculous names. And it's two of the words I guess
that just stuck with us because I'm trying to work 'lightning'
into something and 'dust' into something, and so we just
collaborated the two."
So does Webber think their name describes the band's music very-well?
"Sure. I mean, fuck, names are hard, you know? Because you
just think people are going to think too much about it. We
just thought it was like a good memory: the name, coming up
with it and just laughing about it and just having a good time.
We thought that was more important: when you think of that
name, think of that time."
Since Black Mountain has become a touring machine, there
won't be too many Lightning Dust shows soon in Vancouver.
However, Webber and Wells already have four to five songs
together for their next record and plan to record it eventually
when they get the time; Webber vents her mixed feelings about
going on the road again: "My whole life for the next year is
seriously booked. It's cool to know what you're doing but
in a way, there's no room for anything else because of Black
Mountain. I totally prepared my mind for that kind of stuff
because it's really important and I have a lot of fun touring. But
at the same time, I wish there were just four months of the year
I could squeeze in some Lightning Dust stuff. It's good to give
it a fair shot: people can have your album, but there's nothing
like a live show."
Check out Amber and Josh live with Black Mountain on
November 3rd at Richards on Richards as part of Scratch Records'
20thAnniversary party. D
"Please state your name, instrument and favourite thing
about yourself.",Like any self-respecting group of free-spirited
people, the guys of the Mohawk Lodge did not answer in
the order of their seating arrangements, or according to my
expectations.
"Ryder, guitar and vocals...it would definitely be my feet,"
offered the lead singer.
"Arch, guitar, my muscular physique." The guys laughed
good-naturedly, acknowledging that Arch has an average build
but is by no means musclebound.
"Paul, bass, my iron stomach." Again, an explosion oflaughter
that was loud enough to disorient me.
"Rob, drums, I'm ambitious." I was caught off guard by his
earnest answer. There's also a third guitarist in the band, Corey
Price, but he wasn't there.
With that, I had a good idea of their group dynamic. Ryder
Havdale is the leader. He answers questions first and is the
founder of the band's record label, White Whale Records.
Sporting a mustache and a trucker hat is Arch, the funny
guy. He chooses to keep his last name a secret, even on their
MySpace page. Paul Goertzen is the quiet one, only uttering a
few words when prompted. Lastly, Rob Josephson is the calm
and attentive member, never losing his cool. Together, they form
an easygoing band of friends that laugh hard and rock harder.
The Mohawk Lodge guys were the closing act at UBC's
first-week concert event in September, also featuring the
youthful Copilot DJ and the electrifying In Medias Res. As
we spoke, Copilot DJ was on stage downstairs, so I asked how
they feel before going in front of a crowd. In his jovial manner,
Havdale quickly answered, "wasted," but retracted his answer
as a joke and admitted that he gets pre-show jitters. Josephson
added that he gets nervous and antisocial. Ever the joker, Arch
declared that he takes "a nervous poop." Well, sure, that would
calm anyone down.
The guys proudly label themselves rock musicians, so why
rock? Why not R&B, punk or, say, opera? As it turns out, the
band did have folky beginnings but moved naturally towards
rock with the addition of more members. %/$»• t "^
Havdale, Arch and Josephson all attended South Delta
Senior Secondary. Arch and Josephson jammed together, and
in Grade 9, Havdale first saw them play. Teenaged Havdale,
with the ambition of picking up girls, soon joined a Slayer
cover band and played the bass. As for Arch, it was known
from his elementary school days that he would be a musician.   .
The music of the Mohawk Lodge is soulful rock Great
attention is paid to the melody. When Havdale begins a new
song, he records his rough ideas onto his iPod to share with his
bandmates. Each member then contributes to the songwriting
process by adding his own ideas to the framework laid out by
Havdale. In this way, the songs have the depth of something
carefully crafted—something with a solid four-four beat and
lots of soul.
In October, the band heads out on a three week national tour
along with Octoberman. They have already purchased a Dodge
Pacifica van as transportation for their impending adventure.
The guys have no worries about getting sick of one another on
the road, which bodes well for such a long tour. It helps that
Arch promises he is "gonna bring tighty whities for everyone."
In the future, the Mohwak Lodge hopes to tour
internationally. At the present, they are very excited about their
new album, Wildfires. Visit their site http://mohawklodge.ca to
experience a piece of their rock O *_$*&'
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THU   REPUBLIC
958 Granville St // Open till 3am 111 nights a week // dhmbars.ca
18    October 2007 M#OU W^»TWANTTO SH3T JVfp^jBtOM CALLING IT'GyPSV
■P-wpunk,"' explains bass player Thomas Gobena of Gogol
-^ Bordello. "We are much rnoje than Gypsy punks-"
Hours later, as I watch Gogol Bordello play a two-
hour-long set at the Commodore Ballroom, I realize that
Thomas couldn't be more right. As 1 look around at tlie
sold-out crowd, some people dawning fake mustaches to
emulate lead singer Eugene Hiitz, others just staring in awe
(possibly because' Hutz's pants keep falling down), it's easy
fo* see ■that Gogol's stage presence and passion for music is
something that none of us can deny. An3 Ave love it.
With eight members, including t\yp dancing girls,
Gogofs.: live show is a chaotic circUs of energy and
eftfiSosiasm, mixed with the^nning and precision of a
weU-tfamed orchestra. If it seems, as though it's a party
on stage—"it is!" confirms Thomas. "We want it to be a
party every day, every minute, every second!"
Having just released their fifth album, Super Tarantal,
Gogol aire slowly emerging from their cult status.
Recently performing a duet w§h Madonna at ihe Live
Earth' concert in England in! playing almost every
festival you could imagine, they're just getting started.
They also have a lotto be proud of: they've just finished
■ a long U,S:/Canada tour, and they've already announced
a European tour starring in October and ending in
December; not to mention Hu£5 has been chosen, to
star jb Madonna's new film, JPiao and Wisdom, which is
scheduled to be released in 20QS.
:, When asked where he sees himself in ten' years,
■ Thomas said, T see myself having, like, a super-crazy
rocket-powered wheelchahv^Bteghed and began to
imagine the whole band still performing, even when, they
are in wheelchairs. And the thing is, it didn't even seem
that weiitfefThe strength and skill that Gogol shares is
too powerfiil to be stopped by age or fame or anything,.
In?' this world full of over-produced 'music/ Gogol
seems to smne through it approving that real talent will
always capture hearts and make a difference.
"With so much humour, .politics, energy and partying,
ghat's not to love about Gogol Bordello?    v Radio RcSfo
AsfiQsAshis
%Jh Maijelle Kho
My Upon to ylu this month is never judge a book by
SSs^vjf. Or morelspecifically, never judge a band by its
hsOTL gever. I receady learned this lesson from experience nui embarrassmg, but almost humorous, manner
this mcHSp. m
During^^l^^^^rst episodes of my show, just over
two years ago, I remember coming across a new local
band that, for very shallow and specific reasons, I learned
to hate pretty quickly. I was reading over the upcoming concert listings for the Lower Mainland area when
I came across a band called Fake Shark Real Zombie.
I had never heard any of their music, and when I read
their name out loUd, I immediately despised them. With
a name like that I got the feeling they were a group of
stupid, young, pretentious teenagers that thought they
were the shit. I even voiced this opinion on air. With an
over-the-top name like that, I thought they were trying
to make up for what I assumed would be very shitty
music. And every time I saw a listing for one of their
shows, I laughed and turned my nose up at them, like the
snobby asshole that I am.
Fast forward to two years later. I recendy started a new
job that I only got hired for because I knew the manager
well. As my first week there went by, I slowly became
acquainted with my co-workers. One day, the manager
introduced me to someone I would be working with and
said, "This is Malcolm. He's the drummer in Fake Shark."
I said "hi," but immediately thought, "Oh crap, one of
those guys." To my surprise, as the weeks went by he
actually came across as a pretty cool guy. He had talked
about his band a few times, but despite getting along
with him well, I still thought his band sucked. Keep in
mind I had not heard any of their music at this point.
One day, Malcolm announced that his band was playing a show at the end of the week and everyone at work
decided to attend, as most of us had never seen his band
play before. I convinced myself that the show would not
be a complete waste of my time and decided to go, if
only to support my friends. Turns out his band is fucking awesome. Their show left me feeling uncomfortable,
but in a good way. Their self-sacrificing, awe-inspiring
performance made my opinion of them do a full 180.
The next day I congratulated Malcolm on a great show
and admitted that I used to think that they were "a group
of stupid, young, pretentious teenagers that thought they
were the shit." I felt bad and apologized but he replied,
"We are a group of stujbid, young, pretentious teenagers
that still think we're the shit. And you can quote me on
that." So, it turns out I am a huge asshole and Fake Shark
Real Zombie is actually a great local band.T will play
their music on my show, and you too will come to know
their awesomeness.
Don't be a music snob, guys. It won't make you any
better, and the kids at Zulu won't think you're any cooler.
Marielle Kho hosts We All Fall Down Thursdays 1 p.m.
to2p.m. on CiTR 101.9FM.
20    October 2007
by John Tanner
Host Jolly John Tanner is a longtime (too long)
Vancouver broadcaster who spent commercial radio
purgatory in his chosen- profession back in Kelowna.
Always the music SJsJpMr.T. decided professional broadcasting would be his brilliant career move so he could
play all the music he loved (he thought).
Working the mid '60s at CKOV Kelowna, where he is
still held in high regard by the few still alive in the 'Big K'
to remember him, Jolly J. was brought to the Vancouver
radio wars by none other than Red Robinson, the "Dick
Clark" of local radio. JT saw action and inevitable inter- .
nal strife while residing at CFUN, CKLG AM & FM,
CJJC, CKVN, CFMI, CJOR, CHRX, and COAST 800
8c 1040.
Affable and arguably the friendliest and least affected
local radio personality, Mr. Tanner saw the advent of
the music video and can claim the mande of Canada's
first music VJ. Rogers Cable 10 in the late '70s 8c early
'80s, under Tanner and producer Mr. Tasty (Don Fraser),
launched Nite Dreems, airing Sunday nights at 11 p.m.,
which was to become the most-watched local program in
the history of Vancouver cable TV. It was innovative, self-
indulgent craziness that celebrated the new music video
before the advent of MTV. During the Nite Dreems era,
Tanner befriended the hapless—but celebrated—semi-
legendary J.B. Shayne: the first to introduce "alternative"
music to the CBC, among his other ventures in radio,
TV and films. Their team-up would continue throughout Tanner's colourful career.
Shayne took the moniker 'Raouel Casablanca' and
collaborated with Long John on Nite Dreems, taking the
cable show to new highs and lows. Shayne declined to
join Tanner on CiTR-FM, citing "no money," though he
is a fervent fan of the station. Instead, Mr. Shayne's son
from a previous marriage, Nimrod (real name Herbert)
was given the opportunity to assist—and hinder—Mr.
T.
Several listeners claim Nimrod posses his dad's gift
for bullshit cloaked in knowing cynicism and is a real
"hottie" (quoting CiTR's manager, Lydia). Radio Radio
has no set agenda other than to play an eclectic array of
the best of pop music from then to now.
With Nimrod's knowledge and enthusiasm for "what's
good" in most genres and Tanner's experience, love of
music and natural on-air abilities, this is a program that
sets no boundaries, takes no prisoners and is the perfect
accompaniment to nothing in particular.
John Tanner hosts Radio Radio alternating Mondays 6
p.m. to 7:30p.m. on CiTR 101.9 FM.
Breakfast with the Browns
by Peter Sickert
There are two events that changed my view of music
forever: seeing the Pointed Sticks perform a free concert
in Gastown (was it 1981?) and hearing Brian Eno one
late night on CBC. From then on, I was hunting for
anything that sounded new and different.
In late 1985, after hearing the Dead Kennedy's "Hobday in Cambodia" on my friend Ian's radio (it was tuned
to CiTR), I knew I had found what I was looking for.
He claimed that anyone could host a show and play cool
stuff. So he and I went out, paid up, got trained and made
demos. We actually never made it on the air—unless you
count the time we were asked by Jerome Broadway to
cheer loudly in the back ground as he destroyed some
"evil-mainstream vinyl." Anyway, we did promos and other
behind-the-scenes production stuff. My friend dropped
out. I met my future partner, the weather girl (they had
that back then), then I got busy with university.
Forward to the summer of 1988. I was bragging to
some of my classmates that I had been.involved in
CiTR. When asked whether I had been on the air, I
had to admit that I hadn't. I was double-dog dared to
go back and finish what I started. I triple dog dared
them into joining me. After some training, a demo tape,
being offered the unpopular Monday morning slot and
after a breakfast strategy meeting, a show concept was
born. Five of us—James, Judith, Julie, Vaughan and, of
course, I—would host a show featuring music, restaurant
reviews and short stories.
The show's name, Breakfast with the Browns, came
about naturally, as the generic Brown last name had a
certain bland, suburban feel to it, in contrast to the young
rebels we felt we were. So, in September 1988 BwtBsvras
on the air. The first tune played was David Bowie's "DJ."
The first year was marked by a crazy collage of unrelated music (punk, classical, ambient, jazz, new wave,
soundtracks, etc.), spoken word, interviews and reviews of
all types. Occasionally, we would do 'music specials'when
we< would use the show to feature different music styles
such as ska, African, covers, an all polka/klezmer show
and can't forget our annual Christmas Special, either.
Over the year, as school and eventually work got in the
way, only James and I were left as hosts. From then on,
our show started to focus more and more on the music.
Although our show is still pretty eclectic, we try to string
the disparate music pieces together into something
bigger than the parts—something that ebbs and flows
over the three hours and that creates a sustained mood
or atmosphere.
After all these years of doing the show it is still the
highlight of my week.
Old favourites:
Eno/Byrne "My Life in the Bush of Ghosts," Michael
Brook "Hybrid," Einsturzende Neubauten, Residents
8c Jon Hassel.
Odd favourites:
Der Plan, Spock, Al 8c George, Jolly Tambourine Man
8c EJ Brule
Current favourites:       sfe@C
Mathew Dear, Caribou, the Reid, Ulrich Schnauss,
Intermission  Audio   Lab,  Pete   Samples, Arclab,
Quadra, Dosh, the Arcade Fire, Budos Band
Many thanks to all the lovely listeners that take the
time to call in to the show or e-mail us breakfastwiththe-
browns@hotmail.com. It's easy to forget that people are
actually listening out there and appreciate what we do.
We were very flattered that during CiTR's last Funding
Drive so many listeners pledged money in our show's
name. IPiN^i lllfe^
Upcoming Highlights:
Oct. land 8,2007
The Best of the Browns: in support of the CiTR Funding Drive, we'll dig out some of our favourite tunes.
Peter Sickert hosts Breakfast with the Browns Monday
mornings 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. on CiTR 101.9FM.
Flex Your Head!
by Steveston Mike
I was reading one of the more popular hardcore
message boards this morning and the topic of violence
came up once again. The poster asked if it was okay to
react to a person who was moshing at the edge of the pit
and throwing punches and kicks into the crowd.
My first reaction was, when the hell did this become
accepted in the first place? I have been going to shows
for about 20 years now, and I've never seen this kind of
disregard for fellow punks and kids until recently.
It used to be that if you wanted to feel safe or just enjoy
the bands, you could stand off to the side and not feel
threatened by the dancing. Nowadays, some people think
that no one should be safe, no matter where they stand. They seem to go out of their way to slam into everyone,
even small kids and girls. Maybe they see this as a show
of their manhood. Maybe they think that people will be
impressed with how many people they can hurt during
their favourite band's set. They're wrong.
I am fed up with these new kids who feel it is their
right to act all tough and try to play the part. I have
s^een too many incidents where someone dances like a
jerk, hits people deliberately, and then, when someone
confronts him, he reacts with violence—knowing that
his so-called friends will help him out in the fight, no
matter who was in the wrong.
This needs to stop. These kids need to be called out and
shown how stupid their actions are. I have confronted
these kids in the past and some seem to Usten, if only for
a little while. It seems they need a constant reminder that
this scene is what they make it, and most of us don't want
a scene filled with violence and fear. This scene should
be a place where everyone can come and feel Hke they
are a part of something without worrying about violence
directed towards themselves or others around them.
Kids at shows need to be more aware of what they are
doing and realize that most people are there to have a
good time—and a good time likely means not getting
killed by someone else's dancing, no. matter how tough
and cool they may think they are. Please show some
respect for each other.
Top 10 for September
1. Soul Cqntrol - Involution (Rivalry)
2. Alternate Action -s/t 7" (Longshot)
3. 86 Mentality - Final Exit 7" (Deranged )
4. Antibodies - Concrete Rockers Go Uptown
(Choking Hazard)
5. Commitment Crew - Hisinger (Crucial Response)
6. Attitude - Turn Into Stone (1917)
7. One Voice - Break Free (Crucial Response)
8. Wolfbrigade - Prey To The World (Unrest)
9. Criminal Damage - No Solution (Feral Ward)
10. Limb From Limb - Death Famine Plague
(No Option)
Steveston Mike hosts Flex Your Head Tuesdays 6p.m. to
8 p. m: on CiTR 101.9 FM.
Shadow Jugglers
by Emily Sobool
We at Shadow Jugglers enjoy searching out the good
vibes in life and then sharing them. We've lucked into
Uving in a fine city with plenty of vibrant underground
cultures, and would Uke to give to you a sample of some
of our favourite finds.
Dubstep is a genre of music that emerged around the
turn of the mulennium, stemming from various influences, namely U.K. Garage, 2-Step, jungle, techno and
dub. The sound was cultivated from within a tight group
of people in the U.K. and was incubated at FWD» and
on the radio show Rinse FM. A. defining moment for
dubstep was on Mary Anne Hobb's Breezeblock show on
BBC Radio 1 in January of 2006. The show was called
Dubstep Warz and featured some of the sound's brightest pioneers: DMZ, Skream, Kode9 8c Space Ape, Vex'd,
Loefahj Hatcha and Distance.
Soon afterwards,-it was characterized memorably by Joe
Nice, one of dubstep's key North American ambassadors, as
consisting of elements of "bass, pace and space." And heavy
sub-bass is the key to dubstep's minimal and often dreamlike, reverb-drenched sound drenched. With a tempo
hovering around 140 bpjn., which doubles or halves itself
depending on the track, the music is well-suited to both
vibrant dance floors and contemplative headphone Ustening.
The ideal dubstep party takes place in a dark space stacked
with bassbins, and if you've been lucky to enough to attend
any of the parties put on by Lighta! Sound over the past year,
you'U know what I'm talking about
Part of the appeal of dubstep is its relative newness as a
genre: these are stiU the early years, so the sound is fresh
and regularly evolving. Music producers and DJs around
the world are certainly finding themselves inspired,
switching to dubstep from virtuaUy aU other genres of
computerized music. Some Canadians have also caught
the dubstep bug, including Taal Mala, Bias, Kuma, Max
UUs,AFL and DJ Cure.
If you're ready to learn more, the worldwide dubstep
community unites on dubstepforum.com. And if you're
ready to experience it, mark your calendars—Benga 8c
Hatcha are coming through town on Oct. 26. Another
unmissable is the Sound and Fury Tour, featuring R.A.W.
and General Malice mashing up dubstep, reggae, hip hop
and jungle on four decks. ^^^^S
Tune in to the Shadow Jugglers radio show on occasional
Saturdays from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. on CiTR 101.9FM. In the
meantime, check our show archives and blog on myspace.com/
One Year And Counting...
Shake a Tail Feather
by Jason Colantonio
Now that I've, metaphorically, blown out the candles
on Shake a Tail Feathers one-year birthday cake, there's
some fresh news On the horizon. First off, as promised,
the show now has a web presence. You can search for
Shake a Tail Feather on Facebook: just type in the name of
the show. Once there, you'U find many things, including
news about classic rhythm 8c blues and soul artists (their
whereabouts, upcoming tours and music releases), links
and discussion topics. Right now, you can vote for your
favourite YouTube soul music video (or 'promotional film'
in old school parlance). I promise you these are not the
standard oldies that have been Big ChiU-ed to death over
the past 25 years: these are some rarely seen gems.
Part three oi Shake a Tail Feather's "History ofRhythm 8c
Blues" series, which airs on Oct. 19, features soul pioneers
of the late-1950s. Partjene was a three-hour episode co-
hosted by Sweet N' Hot's Charles Burnham and yours
truly, which aired on Aug. 31 and spodighted the roots
and birth of rhythm 8c blues, from the pre-Second World
War-era to the mid-1950s. Part two aired on Sept. 7 and
featured the best of 1950s rhythm 8c blues and doo-wop,
the foundation upon which aU soul music rests. Listen to
podcasts of bothparts on www.citr.ca/podcast.php.
Also, Oct. 1 to 14 marks the second annual CiTR Funding Drive. Tune in for Shake a Tail Feather's special Funding Drive episodes on Fridays, Oct. 5 and 12. On Oct. 5,
I wiU be co-hosting with David "Love" Jones of African
Rhythms Radio on a show packed with special guests, give
away prizes and, as always, great classic soul music. These
episodes wiU be two out of many opportunities during the
Funding Drive for you to show your support for shows
Uke mine, as weU as CiTR as a whole. Pledge! Pledge!
Pledge!     " fg&|
Listen to Shake a TaU Feather, Fridays from 10:30p.m. to
Midnight. Podcasts can be heard at www.citr.ca/podcast.php.
Also, look up the show's Facebook page. Requests can be emailed
to moresoulmusic@yahoo.ca. Shake a Tail Feather!
Give 'Em The Boot!
by Linda Bull
As this is the first time I've written for Discorder, I
thought I should introduce myself and teU you a Uttle
about how an AustraUan woman ended up doing an Italian folk music show in Canada.
WeU, just over a year ago, I started this show after
thinking about getting into radio for a long time. I have
a good friend who is a host on AustraUa's national radio,
the .ABC. After many "what a great radio voice you
have" comments, it sort of gave me the idea that perhaps
I could try it out. I definitely had the interest and the
enthusiasm, but didn't reatty know where to start.
I moved to Canada in 2003 and got involved with the
Rogue Folk Club and met Steve Edge, host of CiTR's
long-running Saturday, morning folk music show, the
Saturday Edge. InitiaUy, I apprenticed under Steve and
filled in for him for a month when he went on hoUdays
last year. So, he introduced me to the world of CiTR:
using the console, finding CDs, getting into the station
on a weekend—which can. sometimes quite a chaUenge.
Getting up early to do the show was also hard, but I
loved it and couldn't wait to do more.
So, I asked Bryce if I could have a time slot for a show
of my own, and after an initial discussion about genres, I
said, "WeU, I speak ItaUan and am into traditional Italian music, so I could..." and before I could finish that
sentence, he said-yes. So Give Em the Boot! was born in
September 2006, and "it's been a great year of radio for
me since then.
Maybe I should teU you about what sort of music I
play, as it's pretty unusual. Hmmm... weU, I playja mix of
traditional ItaUan folk music—the hardcore stuff—from
aU different regions of the country. Then I also have quite
a soft spot for more contemporary folk music—usuafly
younger bands and singers who blend the traditional
music of their region (often singing in their own regional
dialects) with a more modern musical approach (pop/
rock and world influenced at times) that stiU often uses
traditional instruments. So, you should just tune in so
you can get a feel for whether you Uke it or not.
So, tune in, and if you want to get in touch, you can
caU me during the show in the studio at 604-822-2487
or emaU me at musicalboot@yahoo.ca.
Hope you enjoy the show!
Linda Bull.hosts Give 'Em the Boot! Tuesdays 1 p.m. to
2p.m. on CiTR 101.9FM.
Tratado de impaciencia No. 15
por Alex Tornillo
A mediados de los anos 70, me Uevaban a comer a
un lugar el cual en ese entonces no sabia donde qued-
aba. Cuando tienes menos de 10 primaveras vives en
un mundo que es totalmente diferente 10 anos despues.
No recuerdo como se Uamaba aquel lugar, pero a mi
me parecia sensaciorial: la comida era abundante y
buenisima, el ambiente invitaba a los comensales a
quedarse a una sobremesa de horas, era una especie de
cantina mezclada con pub, osmra con unas ventanas de
marco de madera que dejaban >. attar la luz perpendicular que con la humareda de la cocina se reflejaba como
imagen reUgiosa y para rematar habia un piano vertical
que era aporreado por un viejecito al cual no se le veia la
cara al tocar. Tocaba con tal pasion que quede marcado
para toda mi vida.
Este tipo de lugares existen por todos los rincones del
mundo, no son turisticos y tienes que ser considerado
como "local" para que sepas de su existencia y dependi-
endo de donde se encuentren es lo que sirven de comer.
En las ciudades viejas es mis entretenido encontrar un
lugar como estos y en aquel entonces la gente fumaba
en las mesas, los senores se emborrachaban frente los
nifios y las mujeres platicaban con risas desparpajadas
sin enterarse qu£ era lo que hacian sus tesoritos dentro
de un lugar como este. Yo corrfa entre las mesas, quiza
dando coces a las siUas y mesas y no dudo que alguien
algun dia me haya dado un jalon de rizos por haberle
tirado la bebida.
Despues de tantos anos entiendo que aquel lugar
al que me Uevaban cuando era niiio era lo que era no
porque el ambiente invitaba a los comensales a quedarse
a una sobremesa de horas, o era una especie de cantina
mezclada con pub, oscura con unas ventanas de marco
de madera que dejaban entrar la luz perpendicular que
con la humareda de la cocina se reflejaba como imagen
reUgiosa etc. sino que tenia magia porque la musica que
saUa de aquel piano era tocada con pasi6n.
Alex Tornillo esproductory locutor del programa de radio
Salario Minimo que se transmite los Maries de 8 a 10 de la
noche por medio del 101.9 FM. t)
DiscordeT  81 wi
rum
guitctrisTStepben Carroll
jrt^n. YTfUT   1%£___\"X* mnfr       '1     he new Weakerthans album, Reunion Tour,.
^Wt X ^^F ^^ I     - out On it, the group's ever-evolving
% L^A cellpbone intlrvieu) ooitb the X songwriting continues to mix punk-rock
energy and the spirit of protest music from the left
wing. It not only appeals to people across Canada
but also around the world. Their hometown of
Winnipeg has been the birthplace of a thriving'arts
ie, participants of which the band's members
have frequendy collaborated with. As they took off
to tour the world, Discorder got a chance to ask
their guitar player, Stephen Carroll, a few questions
in September while their tour bus travelled between
Chicago and Minneapolis for their first gig. In this
interview, Discorder got to discuss the political efforts
the band undertakes. The organizations discussed in
the interview can be found online:
■ftDords by eArtburKrumins
Tljoto by sAYicia Smitb
Resource Assistance for Youth (Winnipeg)
War Cluld (International)
%oww. warchild. org
Discorder: Hello? Is this Stephen?
Stephen Carroll: Yes, it is. Hi.
D: Oh, hi. This is Arthur in Vancouver. Your album's
coming out tomorrow.
SC:Itis.
D: Could you describe a little bit of what it was like
to record it this year?
SC: What it was like to record? Well, it was a
different experience from our last record That's for
D: Yeah, Reconstruction Site.
SC: We spent most of the recording in the Factory
mkWSKnipeg, which is just recording overnight.
And by the time we recorded the [songs], you
know, left at 6 a.m. to go home. We could almost
barely tell what we'd made. It probably wasn't until
we got it all assembled later on in Toronto that
we got to see what the songs were shaping up to.
be. That was an interesting process and fun. It was
beginning to feel like all we were doing was making
this record during that time. We lived and breathed
it. There was no time for anything else. There was
just enough time to go home. When you were back,
you'd be back driving out the commute of about
35-45 minutes to the Factory.
D: So, did you have any help on the record?
SC: You mean other musicians? We had some
musicians in Toronto come in and play flute and
trumpet and some other horns, and of course, the
help of our producer, Ian Blurton, and our artist
D: I lcnow in the past, you've recorded a song for
the War Child compilation. I was sort of interested
in that. And you've played Rock Against Racism
and stuff. Could you talk about your involvement
with activist projects?
SC: Well, I guess we're not heavily involved. We do
support about three or four organizations regularly
in Winnipeg. War Child asked us to contribute
a song. It was good. We were saving it for this
record, Reunion Tour, before we released it, and we
thought we'd do a version for that record. And for
this record we re-recorded it. Last year we started
working with this organization in Winnipeg called
Resource Assistance For Youth, a.lca. RAY They're
a really great organization, and we just did a show
for them and a T-shirt for them—a T-shirt that's
sold internationally—and a poster. It was really a
remarkable experience for us to work with them.
That's the people who are dealing with, I would
say, a series of problems that the world doesn't see
every day.
D: So is it a resource centre for people?
SCsResqurce Assistan&A^outh is basically an
assistance program run oUt of a couple locations
injsjfcaiaipeg, where [they bel|p with} whatever
any ^youth needs, be they homeless or temporarily
homeless or they are searching for something,
they're having trouble with a landlord who's
kicking them out or being cruel. It's just a fantastic
organization that helps: Bra realty broad way and
it focuses on street youth. And it's from laundry,
to Internet, to helping them with lawyers, and as
I said, to dealing with landlords, to finding them
food and shelter and health care.
D: I didn't lcnow about that, but that's good to hear.
Well, I'm excited'for the new record, and I wanted
22    October 2007
to ask you about artists tliat you feel have influenced
you. I know there's obviously the punk side to the
band, but I also hear a bit of country on songs like
"New Name for Everything."
SC: Yeah, we're interested in all aspects of music that
interest us. And, really, just follow the songs wherever
they lead us. Whatever they need. Whatever that
arrangement is. And whatever suits the subject of
the songs.
D: What can we expect to hear on the new album?
How would you describe it?
SC: Well, I think for me it just means an extension
of our previous work. I mean, these songs are kind
of tangled in my mind with older songs. Like, some
of them have been around for a while. I mean,
"Utilities" was written even maybe four years ago,
and it's been around for a while. And then "Night
Windows" as welL So, I kind of feel like I don't see
as much differentiation as maybe somebody who
purchases them would. I would sort of see them as
their histories entwined.
D: So, were they written on the road or in the
studio?
SC: No, no. There's not really writing on the road.
Everything has.to stop for any successful writing to
get done. itf^g'^H
D: And are there any things you do on the road to
make sure you stay sane and keep it together?
SC: I don't know. Humour. Laughter. Keep your sense
of humour and don't take anything too seriously.
D: I'm wondering if you grew up punk, or if it was a
radical thing to be into punk music when you were
growing up?
SC: Yeah, for sure it was, actually. We had a very
radicalized youth. I grew up in Winnipeg. For our
generation, it was pretty crazy. I mean, the idea was
everybody was engaging with their music. At the
time, it was very political. We were engaging with our
culture at all levels: about the way we were living our
personal lives, about the way we eat, about the way the
city we lived in was run. And we affiliated ourselves
with various organizations. We were walking into
the Premier's office and handing out controversial .
literature to him, right? Which is kind of funny. That
was just part of what we were doing. We were just
friends. And we had these political beliefs and we
just did this stuff. We had a fun time. I think our
band's history is really based on that, and we still use
the network of left wing punk rock to tour the world.
The people who come to see our shows are awesome,
and our songs have a philosophical centre and we
market that as left of centre, and I think when we
travel the world, people who come out often share
that opinion.
D: Why is the band called the Weakerthans?
S: It was named after a moment in a Margaret Duras
; rievel thwjvas. adapted for film. It was a film, and it
was a book. It's a line that's only in the movie, but
it's a good line. You have to watch the movie before
it makes sense.
D: What movie is it?
S: It's called The Lovers.
Check out the Weakerthans when they come to Vancouver
for an all ages show on Oct. 6th at the Commodore
Ballroom. S
JWDAYJIGHT
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DOOLIN'S
IRISH PUB Architecture in Helsinki  \ The Big Bad
Places Like This
Polyvinyl]
The first song on Architecture in Helsinki's third
album shouts the words, "You've got the wrong idea if
you're leaping off the edge of this world." In reference
to this and the following nine tracks that make up
Places Like This, such a sentiment describe the chaos of a
band trying too hard. Architecture in Helsinki have got
the wrong idea if they are, in a sense, jumping into the
unknown, for the band carry too many thrown-together
and hastily assembled musical aspects, which would
cause them to plummet off of the edge of the world.
Where a mix of strained vocals, bombastic brass,
electro-pop and Remain in Light-ish white-boy funk
would otherwise work, Places Like This delivers the
soundtrack for a headache in an over-crowded nursery,
but only because the songs have litde room to breathe.
Wrenching vocals crumble under the weight of barely
shouted syllables and layers of instrumentation, laser-
synth surges, omnipresent cowbells and acoustic guitars.
All these elements scream out against one another
-in desperate attempts to find spaces to be heard.
Unfortunately, it's an arrangement of sound that is both
jarring and forced.
rvTjjtespite Places Like This's laboured shambles, there
are some segments that work. The climatic last half of
i^afeae, Old Innocence," the bouncy intro of "Red Turned
White" and the building zenith of "Heart it Races," all let
the band's separate sounds coalesce. More often than not,
though, these harmonious arrangements are just fleeting
sections in a cluttered mess of songs. Maybe Architecture
in Helsinki could consolidate their wayward sound if they
looked before they leaped next time.
Christian Martius
The Fiery Furnaces
Widow City   %fp
[Thrill Jockey]
I was super stoked about reviewing this album
since I loved all the Furnaces' previous albums (even
Rehearsing My Choir).l )ust love the storytelling style of
the Ffiedburgers; it reminds me of the old 1950's radio
dramas that my parents and I would Usten to on road
trips. But this disc was actually a hard to review because,
I must admit, I was a more than a little disappointed.
Don't get me wrong, we are still talking about the Fiery
Furnaces, who are excellent, and there is still a lot to
enjoy in this album. My disappointment stems from
two things. First of all, this album follows a rapid-fire,
of excellent material: the epic concept album, Rehearsing
My Choir, the diverse double Matthew Friedburger solo
, .^alburn, Winter Women/Holy Ghost Language School, and
"^^ft|ncredibly catchy and poppy Bitter Tea. Second, for
theiirst time, I found myself being irritated by several
songs on the album: "Clear Signal from Cairo," "The
Old Hag Is Sleeping" and "Wicker Whatnots," to name
a few. Granted, every Fiery Furnaces album had one or
two songs that would grate on my nerves a little bit, but
this album was different. I found myself heartily disliking
$|£$Hee of the tracks and being only lukewarm
others. Once again, this album is not bad at
iQugh. I loved the flow of the first through fourth
i, and "My Egyptian Grammar," "Navy Nurse" and
"Restorative Beer" are excellent.
f§ The bottom line: for Furnaces fans, this album is still
Xmugt; but for people who are new to the Furnaces, I
wouldn't recommend this album as a starting point.
People looking to get into the Furnaces would do better
cheeking out either Bitter Tea or Blueberry Boat.
Ijjlplrew Wilson
Middle of the Night EP
[Independent]
It's alhursday morning and I am in my garage painting
something black. There is an obvious soundtrack for _
such an activity, but Vancouver's own the Big Bad are
providing the tunes. The first track off their five-song
Middle of the Night EP is "Better Way." Drums...guitar...
bass...vocals.
Really, by song three, the only thing getting through
to my paint-fume-addled brain is the vocals. Margitta
Ziercke growls, snarls and shouts her way through
15 minutes worth of formulaic punk rock. She could
probably kick your ass in three different octaves. So-so
lyrics, grinding guitars and repetitive songs don't make
the most of her talents, but there's enough there that,
with a Uttle more experimentation, Middle of the Night
could've been gi£at< \
AmeUa Butcher
Maritime
Heresy and the Hotel Choir
Pameshovel Records]
Like so many bands, Maritime has been a victim
of expectations. When the group started a few years
back, fans had such high hopes for this band of ex-
Promise Ring and Dismemberment Plan members
that disappointment seemed inevitable. And that's
exactly what Usteners got with Maritime's 2004 debut,
Glass Floor—an awkward record of pop songs that was
panned by critics and fans alike. Yet in a way, this shaky
beginning was a blessing; it seemed to let the pressure
off, to let the group shake out the cobwebs a bit. And
when Maritime released last year's foUow-up, We the
Vehicles, a new confidence and maturity had seeped into
the band, making comparisons to the group's emo-tinged
roots pointless. As a result, record No. 2 stood out as an
exceptional piece of sunny, low-key guitar pop and one
of last year's best.
Well, if Maritime found its footing with We the
Vehicles, then the band is now jogging at a nice, brisk
pace with its latest record, Heresy and the Hotel Choir.
Led by a more adult-like Davey von Bohlen, Maritime
packs a hefty load of pop hooks, catchy melodies and
clever guitar moves. And the newly expanded four-
piece (minus bass player Eric Axelson) does this with
precision and self-assurance, repeatedly hitting the mark
and making the phrase "no filler" an appropriate one. It's
this consistency that makes Heresy perhaps a stronger
album than Vehicles. The sound, direction and approach
of the new record aU seems to stem from the same place,
whereas Vehicles sometimes strayed off track and had a
more hodgepodge-type assembly.
Also, thanks to producer Stuart Sikes (the Walkmen,
Modest Mouse), the production of Heresy is leagues
above Maritime's previous efforts. He finaUy disposes of
the band's crisp, digital sheen and opts for much warmer,
. more analog one, which is more suiting for Maritime's
humble pop. Through a bigger, crunchier guitar sound,
Sikes also makes the record a bit more rock, a Uttle less
sugar—-a good move considering yon Bohlen's tendency
to give some Usteners a toothache. Ofej^-rg'
AU in aU, Maritime has one-upped itself with Heresy
and the Hotel Choir, and once again proved that first
impressions don't mean much.
Brock Thiessen
continued on page 24
WIDOW
CITY
Discorder   23 Hugh Masekela
Live at Market Theatre
[Time Square Records]
I witnessed a Hugh Masekela concert for the first
time this July at the Mission Folk Music Festival. The
legendary South African trumpet/flugelhorn player was
in stunning form that night, so I jumped at the chance
to review this double CD. It's very much along the
same Unes, stepping out to a danceable groove that Ues
between jazz, funk and African music.
Masekela was discovered by Archbishop Trevor
Huddlestone in the early 1960s. He came frorri a poor
black family background, and Huddlestone, who was
white, wanted to show the South African government
that even under Apartheid it was possible for young
Africans to make a name for themselves. Apparently,
Huddlestone bought Masekela his first trumpet. His
career blossomed immediately, and he recorded several
albums -with Miriam Makeba, becoming one of the
most powerful musical voices in the anti-Apa*the.isj_
movement. In the 1970s, he became the first African
artist to have a No. 1 hit in the U.S., knocking the
Rolling Stones'"Jumping Jack Flash" out of the top with
his classic groove, "Grazing in the Grass", included here
as a glorious 14-minute epic.
The coUection takes the form of a two-set concert,
complete with Masekela's trademark narratives and calls
to the audience to sing louder, cheer more and get up
and dance. At Mission, his song about the train taking
migrant workers to their unforgiving places ofworklasted I
about 30 minutes. It was compelling, covering African
poUtics fromJDarfur to Durban. Here, he deUvers several
monologues, including a wonderful moment where he
describes the difficulties faced by agricultural workers in
"incontinent weather."
The man is pushing 70, but has as much energy, joie
de vivre and mischievous sexual energy as anyone. His
mastery of the flugelhorn is total. He casts a speU over
his audience, and leads his superb backing band in
irrepressible fashion. That Mission festival performance
was amazing. The next best thing is to put this CD on
and surrender to the groove. Ik^^
Steve Edge
Moka Only & Def 3
Dog River
[Ship Records/Fontana North]
Dog River is a new coUaboration between Vancouver's
Moka Only and an up-and-coming MC from
Saskatchewan named Def 3. If you know a bit about hip
hop, you've likely heard of Moka Only, maybe from his
past days as a part of Swollen Members or from one of
his releases such as Lime Green and The Desired Effect.
Those in the know can teU you that those days are just the
tip of the iceberg of Moka's talent, with a 15-year-long
career and more than 30 self-produced solo albums. This
coUaboration, then, between Moka and Def 3 is one that
surprised me because of the widely different styles of these
two talented individuals. With Moka's laid-back, abstract
style of singing and rapping, and Def 3's poUshed deUvery,
the album shines with the contrast and talent these two
bring to the table and is one of my favourite hip-hop
albums to drop in quite a while.
The album starts with a heavy beat layered with samples
that appears to be both maniacal HaUoween-type laughter
and sped-up chipmunk vocals, firing up an album that's
diversity and contrast ties it together. Each track except the
fourth was produced by Moka and stays true to his typical
production style of intentionally unrefined raw, chunky
beats that could be compared to a J Dilla or a Madlib
style. The album is amazing front to back, flowing through
a diverse variety of amazing beats and weU-executed raps
34    October 2007
from both Moka and Def 3. However, Def 3 sometimes-
doesn't alter his precise flow enough throughout some of
the diverse beats, although his repetition ends up balancing
Moka's abstraction and helps tie the album together.
I played this album for a few people and had everyone,
including some non hip-hop fans, praised the heU out of it.
This album shows that Canadian hip hop is aUve and weU,
and hopefuUy wiU prove that Canada's music scene isn't all
trash like Avril Lavigne or Sum 41. From surfers to crack
dealers, this album wiU appeal to any music fan out there
and should definitely not be missed.
joelboy
Mutators
Mutators    jSS^
[Broadway to Boundry]
Setting the pace with an introductory scream that
reaches pitches matching those of the included sporatic
feedbackj-the. (reformed) Mutators' debut 7" rekindles an
energy I wasn't sure I would feel again until the teenage
years of my next life. As a recombinatieouof minimal punk
ideals, hardcore edge and tempo-change madnessTThis^
album is an at-home experience ofiSgjng in the midst of
a construction site and simultaneously feeling your mental
structures breaking.
While diving into to the three track record, I found
myself not knowing if I wanted to hack my hair offwith the
nearest sharp object, or drop everything and make violent
love to myself with the anticipated bursts of audio insanity.
With simple droning and drumming to pay attention to,
the (somewhat) newly acquired vocalist, Leif Ambrosia,
shrieks and screams his words so convincingly that I have
no idea what she is talking about, but I agree nonetheless.
The Mutators may be too unconventional for those who
view or Usten to punk rock for its nostalgic value, though
they're stiU reminiscent of historical, movements that
have brought music to this point (much Uke everything
happening). They are kind of Uke a banana: theydon't need
the shit on the outside, have a deUcious inner core and
remind perverts of a big yeUow dick. This album is one of
the most satisfying I could have around. I am convinced
that the Mutators are the type of band that wiU keep only
the most honest fans around and bring tears to those who
can see the importance but^a?t have the stomach for it.
Julianne Claire
The National Pares
Timber-vision (CD+DVD)
[Audiogram]
Newly formed trio, the National Pares (Ian Cameron,
ChimwemweMiBer and Montreal-scene veteran Vincent
"Freeworm" LetelUer), have crafted an ecological hip-hop
tour de force out of coUaged sounds coUected from nature.
The CD is good, but to get the whole experience, you
really have to watch the DVD - videos that show both
the creative process, as weU as being artistic extensions of
the songs themselves. They show the three making and
recording sounds using branches, logs and stones, a kick
drum against a canoe, water rushing through a beaver dam
and Miller rapping as he walks across a muddy bank
Opener "Border Patrol" is textured with chain-gang
chanting vocals; the warped lens and blue tuxedos of
"Powerline" add visual interest. Most intriguing^AbOgh^.
is "Down by the River," with gj|6phy, crackling beats and
smooth vocals and keyboards, a study in contrasts^eisveen^
fire and water that melded perfectly withjthe..video. Other
favourites are "CUckety-Clack" and "Twelve Word Song,"
especially the giant log xylophorite* '
Timbervision is smart, rich Canadian hip-hop for not
only die-hard fans, but also newcome||feo
AmeUa Butcher
Sunset Rubdown
Random Spirit Lover
[Jagjaguwar]
In the past couple of years, the indie music scene has
increasingly given the impression of a snake eating its
own tail. In a relatively short time, the genre, or whatever
you want to caU it, has grown from the domain of coUege
music geeks and Value Village Rivers Cuomos to its
glory of chart-topping bands from Montreal and teams of
screaming high-school girls. Now, I don't mean to knock
the entire thing - the "Indie" label has given us many
exceptional acts from the mega-stars Arcade Fire and
Broken Social Scene to the lesser-knowns Dufus and
Caribou. However it seems like for every genuinely good
act there are a score of the same uninspiring indie bands
that profit off the hipster aesthetic, or who think the more
*80s music references something has, the cooler it is. The
result is that an area of music that thrived off the hope of
something different and creative is now a "genre" that has
long since lost any semblance of freshness.
It is in dark times that Sunset Rubdown shines through
Hke a beacon of hope. Listening to Random Spirit Lover
is Uke entering a feverish musical kaleidoscope. Spencer
Krug of modern legends Wolf Parade and Frog Eyes
shines again/What started oOt^s a solo side-project has
by now evolved into a multi-faceted group that proves it's
more than ready to stand on its own two feet.
From the first track, the door is flung wide open with
an energetic romp that packs more style and variety into
one song than one is often lucky to find in an entire
album. As the album unfolds, one is taken on a journey
that gives stylistic nods here and there while remaining
independent and unique. It is quite simply an album that
defies categorization. Experimental but with an acute pop
sensibiUty, lyrics that run Uke poetry without the trappings
of conventional verse-chorus-verse arrangements. Feverish
in intensity but more of a playful fever than Carey Mercer's
"I'm about to lose it" fever.
I guess it's too much to expect for any genre to produce
great music, across the board, and the fact that Sunset
Rubdown is out there gives me hope that the indie bit stiU
has room to grow. Now if we could just do away with the
goddamn hipsters (we could lure them into a giant cage
with a vinyl of "ThriUer" and a vintage Devo shirt), we'd be
getting somewhere.
Jack Prus
The Russian Futurists
Me, Myself & Rye
[Memphis Industries]
Adam Matthew Hart's indie-pop project has put
out three albums that aU contain a few stand out tracks.
Unfortunately, the remainder of these albums tend to be
made up of filler-ish material that makes the actual albums
not reaUy worth owning. Few bands are in need of a "Best
of" as much as this band was. This compilation of the best
tracks from previous albums is not for the devoted fan who
already owns everything the Futurists have put out. There's
nothing new for you here.
However, if you held out on previousFuturists endeavours,
for aforementioned reasons or simply out of ignorance, this
album is an excellent purchase. Taking the high points of
previous albums, this compilation brings together the happy
good times of synth-dripping indie-pop choirs that make
Hart's music so notable. It cuts the fat of previous albums,
strips the song choices down to the essentials and delivers
pretty much everything you could want from the band.
This album is also an exceUent entry point for you if.
you're unfamiliar with the band and have been convinced
by favourable write-ups of their upbeat choral synth-pop.
In fact, it's the only Russian Futurists album you need.
Jordie Sparkle n
Octoberman
Run from Safety
[White Whale]
August hasn't felt Uke summer. It's been cold. It's been
rainy. But there is a soundtrack to this - Octoberman's
Run From Safety. It's meUow and laid back, with lapsteels
and trumpets. There's a soUd sound backing this album
that makes it feel like an album: put together and thought
out. It's the kind of music that pushes no boundaries and
no buttons, hovering just under the melodramatic radar.
It would make a good road album, driving through the
middle provinces with big sides and fields of yeUow.
PF
Joe Satriani
Surfing With the Alien
[Epic/Legacy]
This is the reissue of the Satriani's landmark 1987 disc.
Disc one is the album we guitar and metal geeks aU know
and love and probably have memorized note for note, so
I'll just skip over to commenting on Disc two, which is
a DVD featuring previously unreleased footage of a July
1988 concert at the Montreux Jazz Festival back in the
infancy of Satriani's career.
The first thing that comes to mind of course is a mix of
nostalgia and shock that I ever thought guitar grimaces
and spandex outfits Hke that were cool when I was 12. Oh
weU. The audio is fantastic, the video is as good as you can
expect 1980s video to be (which is to say don't watch it
fuU-screen if you have an iMac) and there are plenty of
great close-ups for figuring out Satriani's techniques. (Not
that it would do my stubby, clumsy fingers a damn bit of
good or anything.) In addition to Satriani's spectacular
playing, the DVD also includes a wonderful bass solo by
Stu Hamm exhibiting incredibly fluid and melodic chops,
every bit as outstanding as the big boss has.
The liner notes teU the tale of this show that almost
didn't happen because of airline delays and previous
bands jamming on without time limits. Slated to go on at
midnight, Satch and company didn't hit the stage until 4
a.m. And whether it be exhaustion or bad taste, much of
the crowd got up and walked out a few bars into the first
song. Idiots - they didn't know what they were missing.
I also quite enjoyed the cinematography on the DVD
and the angles used throughout as weU as the bonus
features' spoof interview with Nigel Tufnel of Spinal Tap.
HUarious.
Pyra Draculea
Dean's place was ground zero for two things: rap music and
ingesting things that you weren't supposed to. It was Dean
who introduced me to UGK via a mixtape entitled Deepest,
Downest South.
At the time, the biggest thing in my world was the
Wu-Tang Clan, but his compUation dropped the
tricked-out funk and slowed-up rhymes into my ears
for the first time. After Ustening to the tape at lunch,
I immediately pedaled over to Dean's house where we
turned on Riditi'Dirty (the duo's fourth fuU-length) and
made an iU-advised attempt to "sip on some syrup," not
realizing that over-the-counter cough suppressant was
not an adequate replacement for the codeine-based syrup
that's supposed to give the kick to "purple stuff."    '&&$.
It was the aforementioned memory that came flying
back when I popped UGK's latest into my stereo for the
first time. Tne beats and rhymes are stiU slow and thick,
and Pimp C and Bun B stiU come correct on nearly every
verse. WhUe Underground Kingz might stand as their
finest coUection to date, the formula hasn't changed aU
that rpuch. Despite aU my reminiscing, however, there's
nothing about the album that sounds stale. In fact,
despite taking more than half a decade off, UGK doesn't
have any catching up to do. Instead, in a rap world where
names Uke TI and Young Jeezy are tops, it seems Uke
the rest of the game has finaUy caught up to them.
Now, if you'U excuse me, I need to lace my work coffee
cup with some Buckley's, so I can get my drank on (to
get my lean on).
Quinn Omori
UGK
Underground Kingz
[Jive]
When I was in junior high, this was my shit. It's not
that I dislike hip hop now. In fact, I still love it. But weU
into my mid-20s, I recognize that I am not and never wiU
be a gangsta, hustla, playa, pimp, mack or straight thug.
I'U never Uve in Compton, the 10304 (a.k.a. ShaoUn),
or the Fifth Ward. And, I've long since abandoned my
aspirations to flossi^ja floored '64 Impala that roUs on
Daytons (in fact^T^dbn't even Uke driving). WhUe that
doesn't prevent me from celebrating the fact that UGK
is returning - after a six year hiatus - with one of a
handful of hip-hop double albums that actuaUy warrants
its two-disc length, it does make me long for days when
the release of Underground Kingz would have been an
event of epic proportions to me.
In the 10th grade, I was friends with a guy named Dean
whose parents, perhaps unwisely, let him Uve mostly alone
in the other half of their duplex. What this meant was that
Torngat
You Could Be
[alien8 rt
by virtue of being just a Uttle too sUck in their execution.
Bassist/vocalist John Idan deserves mention for pulling off
a spot-on Keith Relf, though.
Unfortunately, the concept unravels as the new Yardbirds
(which I guess can't officiaUy be caUed the New Yardbirds
courtesy of the embryonic Led Zeppelin's use of the
name in 1968) trot out material from the reunion album,
Birdland. Bearing in mind that most of the Yardbirds'best-
known original material was not self-penned, McCarty
does offer a glimpse of the old Yardbirds style with "Crying
out for Love" and "Please Don't TeU Me 'Bout the News,"
but as the set progresses, the new material sounds less and
less Uke the Yardbirds the fans came to see.
Ultimately, Live At BB King Blues Club, a CD packaging
of their 2006 satellite radio broadcast, adds nothing to the
Yardbirds' catalogue other than to prove that some of the
members put the band back together and made an alright
job of it. Not something I'd recommend spending your
money on - unless you're a Yardbirds completist. 0   &&&}
Darren Gawle
Along with the Arcade Fire, their cousins in instrument-
switching pop, Torngat proves that band nerds can make
it as indie rockers. Or that, in Quebec, musicianship is
alive and weU. With their full-length, You Could Be, these
three Montreal multi-taskers have fashioned a breezy
instrumental album that eschews the more theatrical
tendencies of their post-rock coterie. But the lack of
posturing refreshes: there's a purity and organic sounds
that shine through with analog synths, Hammond growls
and the acoustic hom echoes (and you can be sure that's
a part of their ethos). At times, one is certainly glad that
the soundscape is not tainted by vocals. Indeed, You Could
Be remedies the depersonalized, often aUenating, quaUty
of the instrumental-only albums with rich and engaging
arrangements. On the title track, the French horn dances
and sings whUe, later, the seemingly superfluous ambiance
of "Mouton Noir" gives way to a crack of body-moving
percussion that is primal in its affectivity - pre-language,
inarticulable. After aU, Torngat makes a safe bet they don't
want to come off as poetasters.
Joe Pooley
The Yardbirds
Live At BB King Blues Club
[Favoured Nations]
One has to question the point of the Yardbirds'reunion
when their original vocaUst is some 30 years deceased, and
there's no hope in heU that any of the three lead guitarists
(Clapton, Beck, and Page) who made the band legendary
would reunite for anything more than a one-off gig. But
Chris Dreja and Jim McCarty deserve some credit for
piecing together a new combo that comes close to recreating
the sound of the original lineup. A few of the old numbers,
such as "Train Kept A-RoUin" and "Shapes Of Things,"
compare favourably to the extant Uve Yardbirds recordings
of the '60s I've heard, and at worst, other numbers ff^Sfc1:
as "Heart FuU Of Soul" veer mttf'&Jref-band territory
Under Review Section Editor
1 he Under Review section editor is responsible for:
- maintaining and building contacts with labels and
bands in order to procure review material.
- organizing materials submitted for review
- recruiting and organizing reviewers and coordinating
section line-up for each issue of Discorder.
- primary edits of Under Review section copy to ensure
it is clean and ready for next phase of production.
This is a moderate volunteer position which requires
approximately a 10-20 hour commitment per issue.
Ideal for a UBC journalism student looking for practical
editorial experience.
Discorder Editor
1 he editor is responsible for:
- conceiving story ideas and assigning them to writers,
as well as accepting pitches from contributers.
- Collecting, organizing, editing and proofing all text
copy submitted by contributors.
- Working closely with other Discorder staff to organize
the production of every issue
- Recruit and organize volunteers.
- Communicate with record labels,' publishers, and other
industry contacts.
- Basic admin, and secretarial work.
This is a demanding volunteer position that requires
a serious commitment. The editor is creative head of *
the magazine as well as the main organizer. The role of
the editor is to fulfill the magazine's vision as well as
facilitate the ideas of volunteers. This position requires
about a 30-40 hour commitment per issue and includes
a modest honorarium. Ideal for a UBC journalism
student looking for practical experience and portfolio
If interested in either position, contact CiTR's station
ager, Lydia Masemola, at citrmgr@an
Discorder   25 REAie
1 Collective
llroom
fgmodor
Se^lbmber 1 i
WitK||n AnimaBCoUective show aU you can expect is
the unexpe%6e«Wwi stage, the group hardly foUows some
typical rock-show formula, where tours are simply used
as promotional tool for new releases. Instead, Animal
CoUective likes to stay a step ahead, most often using
the stage to explore new sounds and ideas for upcoming
material—not those recently recorded in the studio. If you
do hear familiar songs played Uve, the renditions are often.
so radicaUy different from the studio versions that they're
nearly unrecognizable. And whUe this journey into the
unknown can be a gamble, in Vancouver, it paid off
Animal CoUective was in top form at the Commodore BaUroom as it deUvered a tight and focused performance—one that proved the group has indeed moved up
in the rock'n'roU hierarchy. Minus Deakin (who, according to the merch guy, no longer tours), Panda Bear, Avery
Tare and the Geologist laid down a set of a very electronic nature, simUar to that heard on their latest album
Strawberry Jam and, in a sense, their first, Spirit They're
Gone, Spirit They've Vanished.
I As poles of bUnding Ughts flashed into concertgoers'
retinas, a clamour of sound came from chaotic consoles
of keys and wires. Groove-heavy rhythms beat out
steadily from bUnking high-tech machines. And vocals
were screamed, uttered and whispered by a jumping
and dancing Panda Bear. Despite the guitars remaining
almost entirely dormant, they weren't missed. Like on
Strawberry Jam, Uve, Animal CoUective's new sample-
based approach suited the band surprisingly weU, with
Jam songs such as "Unsolved Mysteries" and "Fireworks"
picking more emotional punch than much of the band's
older material. jiS^w if^ls!?**;
Compared to Animal CoUective's last two Vancouver
performances, this one was much more uplifting and, for
lack of a fancier word, fun. Unlike in the past, the band
never got bogged down in instrumental wank-offs and
taxing sonic experiments. Instead, it stuck to more song-
orientated structures, giving the night a sort of twisted
party vibe where movement was a natural reflex.
When the band left the stage, it was easy to feel that
you had experienced something significant, as weU as
satisfying. Animal CoUective has fuUy hit its stride and,
at this point, shows few signs of slowing down.     X-.£>k
Brock Thiessen W^Ms^-^v^*
26    October 2007
Magnolia Electric Co.
+ Joel RL Phelps & the Downer Trio
Richard's on Richards
August 31
MagnoUa Electric Co.'s latest coUection, Sojourner, is
one of the most aptly titled releases in recent memory.
Cutted from four different recording sessions, the four-
disc set of new and re-recorded material is a snapshot
of the unsettled world of Jason MoUna, whose prolificacy and dedication to craft must keep him very busy.
The intimate bedroom Americana of Molina's previous
incarnation Songs: Ohia has transitioned into bona fide
country-rock, a development that fittingly dovetaUs with
his adoption of the MEC moniker. Sojourner, then, is a
summation of that transition as weU as a gift to the fans
that have stuck by him through it. Similarly, a MEC tour
is less about reaching a new audience as it is playing for
the tried and true fans, which MoUna indeed did at his
recent Vancouver show.   y$T,P^
Also on the biU were Joel RL Phelps 8c the Downer
Trio. Phelps draws from the same weU of yearning
Americana as MoUna, but is a different animal—one
that is much more punk in spirit and execution. The best
pieces shifted between two extremes: pounding riffage,
and Phelps's unaccompanied voice, which is fragUe and
parched in nature. Tne set was passionate and had some
interesting dynamics, but it was quite short, feeUng
perfunctory because of the tight schedule of this early
show. Plus, by the brutal mix, the sound guy may have
been taking a siesta.
Not surprisingly, MagnoUa Electric Co. was dependably good, if a bit rigid. This is a band that has honed its
craft over countless gigs and it showed. They had synergy.
They could lean back, close their eyes and flesh out the
sound, and quite seamlessly at that. MoUna sang weU
and guitarist Jason Evans Groth was a virtuoso, naiUng
aU the Young/Allman/Collins inspired solos. "I've Been
Riding with the Ghost" roUicked, outdoing the studio
version. A cover of Warren Zevon's "Excitable Boy" was
gleefully deUvered with a smirk and juxtaposed with the
heavy-handed tone MoUna is known for.
During the encore, Ladyhawk's Darcy Hancock was
brought on stage for what was supposed to be a soulful
guitar duel with Groth in an extended version of "Texas
71." It wasn't. In fact, whatever did transpire was mind-
numbingly bad. Not a great ending, but it didn't mar
what had come before.
OveraU, other than the Ladyhawk mash-up, the performance was pretty good. If anything, the monotony of
Molina's material was responsible for the dull spots, not
any aspect of the performance. It was nice to see him in
the flesh, however, and for devout fans, it was a real treat.
MikeFodor
+ Black Joe Lewis
Commodore Ballroom
September 15
Allow me to admit this right from the get-go: It took
me a while to warm up to Spoon. For some reason, the
band has flown quietly near my radar for almost the
entirety of their 13-year existence, but I never took
much time to Usten or care. I always knew they were
there, buzzing around with the occasional catchy tune
Uke "The Way We Get By" or "I Turn My Camera On,"
but those highlights were never enough to maintain my
fickle interest. I just found them to be kind of duU: decent
songs but no real image or story to get behind. Kind of
Uke Wilco: you want to Uke them, but they're reaUy no
different from those indifferent uncles of yours. My attitude suddenly changed, however, with the release of this
year's Ga Ga Ga Ga Ga—an album that takes all those
previously pesky blah-blah's and swiftly turns them into
hearty rah-rah's. It's just too bad that the record's same
energy and thpughtfulness didn't go into Spoon's mediocre Uve show.
After an upbeat opening set from Austin's Black Joe
Lewis, Britt Daniel and company (including former Get
Up Kid Rob Pope) took the stage to a mid-sized roar
from the sold-out room. Issuing tracks from the old and
new, and peaking with the latest hit "The Underdog,"
Spoon played it pretty cool and detached for most of
their set. The songs offered were done note for note—
with the exception of a few pimped-out tracks from
Kill the Moonlight—whUe the chitchat and stage antics
were kept to a minimum. And with the exception of a
rather sweet exchange with a very recently newlywed
couple, the show went by without much notable incident. While there wasn't reaUy much to complain about,
there was reaUy no need for big cheers, either. Spoon is a
great band, without a doubt, but it's about time they step
things up to the next level. g^gS^]
O.J. Simpkins
Flaming Lips
Malkin Bowl
September 18
FoUowing a dismal afternoon of September rain, the
clouds parted on a chilled Malkin Bowl, nested deep
within the prehistoric trees of Stanley Park. Soon after,
Wayne Coyne roUed out and over a congested audience
in a giant hamster baU. Confetti flurried overhead, and
purple smoke bombs flared. The Flaming Lips had taken
the stage.
With globular baUoons bouncing lazUy offheadsnand
ribbons catching in mouths, it was hard not to feel like a
part of the refrain. More than almost any other band, the
Ranting Lips'performances come the closest to visuaUy
matching their sound. To attend a Flaming Lips show is
not just to see the band but to see the music. Between
spacey psych-rock and synthetic circus-pop, the sound
bounced around and never stayed in one place too long,
sometimes soft and cloudy, sometimes larger than life,
Uke the macro zoom of Coyne's face on a sparkly, pixeled
digital backdrop.
The Lips doled out most of the gems from their latter
work and dipped back into their catalog for one or two
oldies, such as Zaireeka's "Riding to Work in the Year
2025." This smoky visual and sonic assault was also met
with flanking armies of flashUght-waving Santas and
aUens, dancing tirelessly on either side of the stage. Various additional bouncy toys were added to the mix, which
all together had the senses working overtime.
By the time Coyne stood in the shivery cold asking
the crowd, "Do you reatize??" the stage was a giant baU
of poUution, enveloped in a-pufiy cloud of exhaust of the
night's events.
MicheUe Mayne ""f
Devenda Benhart
Commodore Ballroom
September 1
It's the first night of the tour, but
instead of making a grand entrance,
Devendra Banhart and his cohorts amble
on stage and slowly begin with a relaxed
set of gentle folk songs. Devendra sings
in his not-so-unique Bolanesque butter-
fly-in-the?throat technique, and an aura-
of-twiUght contemplation is created. But
no pulses are quickened—both out in the
audience and on the stage.
This hairy band does a good approximation of a 70s folk-rock sound, with
a democracy of shared vocal duties and
songs; but for aU the possibilities of seeing
a version of Santana/Free/T-Rex in the
21st century (without having to even close
your eyes), the CoUective's shamboUc lack
of focus is a constant letdown. Songs from
the new album, Smokey Rolls down Thunder Mountain, are often paused halfway
through with quips from Devendra, such
as "This is a good bit." The over-famitiar
. "Golden Brown" melody of "Seahorse"
is cut in half by an interrupting guitar
riff. And a bashful audience member is
puUed on stage to awkwardly sing his own
composition wltile the band happfly slinks
offstage.
Such a ramshackle performance may
be charming in its own special way, but
the band's start-stop inconsistency only
further disintegrates its graceless momen-.
turn. The setiist, with its endless block of
sedate down-tempo numbers and feeble
attempts at animation, reinforces the
notion that beyond the beards and the
hair, this reaUy is just a bunch of clumsy
laid-back hippies. The real shame here is
that Devendra has a lot more to him than
a waistcoat and velvety voice. And there
are hints of something greater locked
beneath his cumbersome and recycled 40-
year-old shtick, if it ever broke free from
its hackneyed self-imposed restrictions.
Christian Martius
Chad Van Gaalen
+ Fond of Tigers, fhe Doers
Richard's On Richards
September 13
Chad VanGaalen is never touring again—or at least that's what he
announced during his recent stop at
Richard's on Richards.
The show began with the Doers, a
Hiisker Du-like punk trio with a twist:
they play only acoustic guitars. Despite
their energy, they didn't do it for a
crowd awaiting the gentle tones of Mr.
VanGaalen. Next up were Fond of Tigers,
who played an eclectic set of mostly
improvised instrumentais. Though their
subtler moments were interesting, the
band—which featured guitar, bass, fiddle,
keyboards, trumpet and two drummers—
had so much going on that most of it was
uninteUigible.
After a lengthy intermission, a guitar-
wielding VanGaalen took the stage armed
with some drums, a bass and the harmonica around his neck. Consisting of largely
new material, his set shied away from his
electronic side and favoured his country-tinged rock tunes instead. Though
VanGaalen seemed to be enjoying himself,
he declared that touring was "miserable,"
and that he was "never going to go on tour
again." What troubled him, it seemed,
was the previous night's show, which was
deraUed after the band decided to open
with the theme from Ghostbusters.
Later, when a fan shouted that Alberta
missed him, VanGaalen, a native of
Calgary, said that he likes Alberta "except
for the nasty poUtics." VanGaalen then
caUed Stephen Harper "a douche bag"
who "looks Uke a pedophUe."
After a soUd set, the band was called
back by the smaU crowd. Triumphantly,
VanGaalen led his band through a rousing
rendition of "Ghostbusters," joyfuUy exorcising the previous night's faUures. "Let
me teU you something," he said. "Busting
makes me feel good." Having conquered
his difficulties, VanGaalen ended the show
with the Une, "I found you and I kiUed
you," which left an eerie fulfillment in the
air. Maybe he'U come back after aU.
Ben Johnstone
Winning
+ Ghost House, Karen Foster,
life Against Death
Pub 340
September 7
This night was to be my second encounter with Winning, my first taking place
when they opened for the venerable Blood
Brothers at Mesa Luna (RIP) back in '06.
I was greeted with two major changes
since last time: the replacement of Primes'
Jack Duckworth with The Red Light
Sting's Gregory Adams (joining other
RLS alumni Andy Dixon and Paul Patko)
and a move, however gradual, towards
more conventional songwriting. Many
songs stiU exude a harsh, corrosive jam-
session-gone-wrong feeUng. But "Weird
Wit" and a few other tunes had cracks in
their atonal sheUs that revealed melodies
and constructions smoldering like hot
embers underneath. I ask the members of
Winning to widen the cracks and let the
steam through. When they do, I'll be first
in line to warm my hands.
What stands out about the Ghost House
Uve experience is movement—not so much
physical as musical: the fervour in the
drums and bass, guitar parts that are always
climbing or flitting around Uke fruit flies,
and piano playing that alternately complements the other instruments and steers
songs into different territory. It aU brought
back fond memories of Cadeaux's tremendous and spunky energy. Both bands are
(or were, in Cadeaux's case) driven by a
standout drummer who lends each song a
special urgency. Exclaim! and the Straight
are eating this stuff up, and you should too..
As for Karen Foster, they played some
soUd, punky hard rock. But I decided to
retire my weary soul for the night midway
through their performance, opting to miss
Life Against Death for some weU-needed
shuteye. Until next time, Pub 340... tl
Simon Foreman
CiTR 101.9 FM presents... the longest miming music battle in Vancouver
2nd
OCTOBER LINEUP
Gunshae
The Petroleum By-Product
Wintermitts
9th
A Relative Distance
The Skedaddlers
 Treacherous Machete
16th JpNDRDS
Lownote
s Vonnegut Dollhouse*
23rd
Fanshaw
The Noble Firs
The Public Or The Press
30th   Adjective.
Taxes
Tuck
Plus Jokes For Beerl
Every Tuesday night, shews at 9 PM, $7
The Railway Club (Seymeur/Dunsmuir)
* Bands subject to change.
J»"lll     For the latest schedules and results, visit:
http://vpww.citr.ca
OUR GREAT SPONSORS:
Or
' IF^^ lllllll  JlHH
^^»MttssM jjpj||   i.'jSjJ
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backline:
RADIAN MUSIC WEEK
Discorder   27 http://members.shaw.ca/zamothedestroyer      http://www.mysface.com/zamothedestroyer
VANCOUVER NEW MUSIC FESTIVAL 2007
GUITARS! GUITARS!
PAOLO ANGELI - OREN AMBARCHI • SIR RICHARD BISHOP - NICOLAS BRAGG - BERNARD FALAISE - BILL FRISELL
GORD 6RDINA - HER JAZZ NOISE COLLECTIVE - ANNETTE KREBS - ROLF LISLEVAND - RENE LUSSIER
DONALD MILLER * JAMES PLOTKIN - KEITH ROWE s TONY WILSON - WALTER ZANETTI
vY 1 STAGE. 4 DAYS. 144 STRINGS.*
GIVE 08 TAKE ft DOZEN
17-20 0CT-8PM
TICKETS A
ZULU RECORDS *
WWW.TMETS10HIBHT.M
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HUB AT THE 8008
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677 DAVIE STREET
WWW.NEWMUSIC.ORG
604.633.0861
6P0MYMOUS
28    October 2007 mus
CiTR's charts reflect what has been spun on the air for the previous month. Artistes with stars
alongside their names (*) are from this great land o' ours. Most of these platters can be found at
finer (read: independent) music stores across Vancouver. If you can't find them there, give our Music
Director a shout at 604-822-8733. His name is Luke. If you ask nicely, he'U tell you how to get
them. To find other great campus! community radio charts check out www.earshot-online.com.
Strictly the dopest hits
of September 2007
#
Artist
Album
Label
1
New Pornographers*
\ Challengers
Last Gang/Matador
2
Caribou*
Andorra
Merge
3
Jason Zumpano*
In the' Company of Ghosts
Catbird
4
The Doers*
Gaiety
Reluctant
S
Animal Collective
Peacebone
Domino
6
Turbonegro
Retox
Cooking Vinyl           •
^
Bison*
Earthbound
Forest
8
Okkervil River
The Stage Names
Jagjaguwar
9
Liars
liars
Mute
10
Spoon
GaGaGaGaGa
Merge
11
Riff Randalls*
Doublecross
Dirtnap
12
Kinski
Down Below It's Chaos
SubPop
13
The Darkest of the Hillside
The Shadow Out of Tim
Divine Industries       <£&£&.
14
M.I.A.
Kala
Interscope
15
Wintermints*
The Cascadia Fault
Independent
16
Various
ImatWVFS
Independent
17
No Age
Weirdo flippers
Fat Cat
18
Oakley Hall
I'll Follow You
•      Merge
19
Get Him Eat Him
Arms Down
Absolutely Kosher
20
Black Moth Super Rainbow
Dandelion Gum
Graveface
21
The Luyas*
Faker Death
Independent
22
We Are Wolves*
Total Magique
Dare to Care
23
Torngat*
You Could Be
Alien 8
24
Architecture in Helsinki
Places Like This
Polyvinyl
25
1990s
Cookies         j
World's Fair
#
Artist
Album
Label
26
The Brunettes
Structure and Cosmetics
Sub Pop
27
Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings
100 Days, 100 Nights
Daptone
28
Square Root of Margaret*
Teragram Photeur
■ 331/3
.29
Various*       - r-J0%_t&£
CBC Radio 3: Breaking New Sound
Storyboard
30
Madlib
Beat Konducta 3 & 4: In India
• Stones Throw
31
Stereo Total
Paris-Berlin
Kill Rock Stars
32
Dirty Projectors
Rise Above
Kill Rock Stars
33
The Black Lips
Good Bad Not Evil
•   Vice
34
The Gol Team
Proof of Youth
Secret City
35
High On Fire
Death is the Communion
Relapse
36
Adrian Orange and Her Band
Adrian Orange and Her Band
$$$&$&
37
Pinback
Autumn of the Seraphs
Touch & Go
38
The Weakerthans*
Reunion Tour
, Anti-
39
Junior Senior
HeyHeyMyMyYoYo
Rykodisc
40
C.O.C.O.
Play Dwms and Bass
K
41
Mono
Gone: A Collection of EPs 2000-2007
Human Highway
42
Angels of Light
We Are Him
Young God
43
Devendra Banhart
Smokey Rolls Down Thunder Canyon
XL
44
Jason Anderson
Tonight
ECA
45
Bettye Lavette
The Scene of the Crime
Anti-
46
Interpol
Our Love to Admire
Capitol
47
ZolarX
X Marks the Spot
Alternative
Tentacles    .
48
The Cave Singers
invitation Songs
Matador
49
Scottie's Cut and Paste Project*
Unplugged from the Matrix
Independent
50
Dragons,      .;^Sj|;
BFI
Ninja Tune
THE BEST DEALS IN TOWN FOR A MEASLY IS SUCKS.
Anti-Social Skate Shop       The Bike Kitchen
Hitz Boutique
Puncture Haus
Scratcl Records
and Gallery                      UBC, AMS, 6138 Student Union
j   316 W.Cordova
2228 Broadway E.
726 Richard St.
2425 Main St.                        Blvd.
604-662-3334
604-708-8100
604487-6355
604-708-5678                        6Q4-822-BIKE
The Kiss Store
Red Cat Records
Slickity Jim's Chat and
Audiopile                         Buna's Angels
2512 Watson St.
4307 Main St.
Chew
2016 Commercial Dr.                 2535 Main St.
604-675-9972
604-708-9422    -
2513 Main St.
604-253-7453                        604-874-9773
604-873-6760
Lucky's Comics
Ike Regional Assembly
Beat Street Records          The Eatery
3972 Main St.
of Text
Spartacus Books
439 W.Hastings St.                   3431W. Broadway
604-875-9858
3934 Main St.           ?&M
319 W.Hastings
604-683-3344                        604-738-5298
Magpie Magazine
604-877-2247
604488-6138
yj    1319 Commercial Dr.
R/X Comics
Vinyl Records
w                             „„„: ; y                    """^
604-253-6666
2418 Main St.
319 Hastings St. West
ClonR
People's Co-op
Bookstore
604454-5099
604488-1234
____     ggpM_              fPMfJk
www.dtr.«/f riends
yisu
1391 Commercial Dr.
604-253-6442
'm i fmtt$ of cfltf -
ru   r _._._!   %*_Z_l_l_m
J     1
at   Vancouver's   finest   small   merchants   and
supports CiTR 101.9 FM. Show it when you shop!
Discorder   29 ffiunfto
You can listen to CiTR online at www.citr.ca or on the air at 101.9 FM
SHOOKSHOOKTA
SAINT TROPEZ
RHYTHMSINDA
MONDO TRASHO
TRANCENDANCE
DISASTERPIECE THEATRE
BREAKFAST
WITH
THE BROWNS
ALTERNATIVE RADIO
PARTS UNKNOWN
LETS GET BAKED
NATIVE SOLIDARITY NEWS
RADIO RADIO!
THEJAZZ SHOW
VENGEANCE IS MINE
PACIFIC PICKIN'
MORNING AFTER SHOW
GIVE'EM THE BOOT
CIRO RADIO OKANAGAN
REEL TO REAL
CAREER FAST TRACK
EN AVANT LA MUSIQUE
WENER'S BBQ
FLEXYOURHEAD
SALARIO MINIMO
CAUGHT IN THE RED
AURAL TENTACLES
Wednesday        Thursday
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
DEMOCRACY NOW
RACHEL'S SONG
AND
SOMETIMES
WHY
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
DEMOCRACY NOW
ALTERNATIVE RADIO
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
WE ALL FALL DOWN
' l$iii&& TREASONS'
EXCUISITE CORPSE
LAUGH TRACKS
CUTE BAND ALERT!
THESE ARE THE BREAKS
NARDWUAR PRESENTS
SWEET AND HOT
I UKE THE SCRIBBLES
Saturday
THE SATURDAY EDGE
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
POWERCHORD
LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
NASHAVOLNA
SHADOW JUGGLERS
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
PASSING BINARY
■■■■SUNDAY
TANA RADIO (World) 9-1 Oam
KOL NODEDI (Worid)
11 am-12pm
Beautiful arresting beats and
voices emanating from all continents, corners, and voids. Seldom-rattled pocketfuls of roots
and gems, recalling other times,
and other places, to vast crossroads en route to the unknown
and the unclaimable. East Asia.
South Asia. Africa. The Middle
East Europe. Latin America.
Gypsy. Fusion. Always rhythmic,
always captivating. Always crossing borders. Always transporting.
THE ROCKERS SHOW
(Reggae) 12-3pm
Reggae inna all styles and fashion.
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE
(Roots) 3-5pm
Real cowshit-caught-in-yer-boots
country.
CHIPS WITH EVERYTHING
(Pop) 5-6pm
British pop music from all decades. International pop (Japanese, French, Swedish, British,
US, etc.), 60s soundtracks and
lounge. Book your jet-set holiday
now!
Alternates with:
SAINTTROPEZ (Pop) 5-6pm
October 2007
QUEER FM (Talk) 6-8pm
Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transexual com-muni-
ties of Vancouver. Lots of human
interest features, background on
current issues, and great music.
RHYTHMSINDIA (V\forld)
8-9pm
Rhythmsindia features a wide
range of music from India, including popular music from the
1930s to the present, classical
music, semi-classical music such
as Ghazals and Bhajans, and also
Qawwalis, pop, and regional language numbers.
MONDO TRASHO (Eclectic)
9-1 Opm
TRANCENDANCE (Dance)
I Opm-12am
Join us in practicing the ancient
art  of  rising   above   common
thought and ideas as your host
DJ Smiley Mike lays down the latest trance cuts to propel us into
the domain of the mystical.
trancendance@hotmail.com
DISASTERPIECE THEATRE
(Talk)  l2-2am An odyssey into
time and space in audio.
___________M MONDAY
BREAKFAST WITH THE
BROWNS (Eclectic) 8-1 lam
Your    favourite     Brown-sters,
James and Peter, offer a savoury
blend of the familiar and exotic
in a blend of aural delights!
LIONS AND TIGERS AND
BEARS...(Eclectic) 11-12pm
A mix of indie pop, indie rock,
and pseudo underground hip hop,
with your host, Jordie Sparkle.
ALTERNATIVE   RADIO   (Talk)
12-lpm
Hosted by David Barsamian.
PARTS UNKNOWN (Pop)
Underground pop for the minuses with the occasional interview
with your host, Chris.
LETS GET BAKED w/matt &
dave (Eclectic) 3-4pm
Vegan baking with "rock stars"
like Laura Peek, The Food Jammers, Knock Knock Ginger, The
Superfantastics and more.
NATIVE SOLIDARITY NEWS
(Talk)4-5pm
A national radio service and part
of an international network of information and action in support
of indigenous peoples' survival
and dignity.We are all volunteers
committed  to   promoting Native   self-determination,   culturally, economically, spiritually and
otherwise. The show is self-sufficient,, without government or
corporate funding.
EUROQUEST
(Eclectic) 5-6pm
RADIO! RADIO!
(Eclectic) 6-7:30pm (alt)
KARUSU (World) 7:30-9pm
THE JAZZ SHOW (Jazz)
9pm-12am
Vancouver's longest running
prime-time Jazz program. Hosted
by the ever-suave Gavin Walker.
Features at I lpm.
Oct I: Tonight a live concert ■
from the Newport Jazz Festival
with the great Canadian pianist
Oscar Peterson and his Trio.
Then the Trio is joined by 'Papa
Joe' Jones (drums), Sonny Stitt
(alto and tenor saxophones) and
Roy 'Little Jazz* Eldridge (trumpet). Great cookin' sounds.
Oct 8: Some modern mainstream sounds with trumpeter
Art Farmer and tenor saxophonist Jimmy Heath and their band,
recorded live at the Museum of
Modern Art in New York. Great
music from this short-lived band.
Oct 15: The dynamic sounds of
one of the most swinging and
exciting big bands, led by the
great Canadian trumpet virtuoso
Maynard Ferguson. Recorded at
Birdland, that legendary New
York club, before a real jazz audience.
Oct 22:The very underrated and
underrecorded pianist/composer
Walter Davis Jr. from his one and
only album on Blue Note. Davis
performs with alto saxophone
master Jackie McLean, lyrical
trumpeter Donald Byrd, bassist Sam Jones, and hard-driving
drummer Arthur Taylor, in a program of Davis' compositions.
Oct 29: Tenor saxophonist Stan
Getz headlines tonight in an album aptly titled The Master. Mr.
Getz in rare form with a dynamic
-quartet with pianist Albert Dai-
ley, bassist Clint Houston, and
creative drummer Billy Hart
Only four tunes, but they allow
Getz to really 'stretch out'
■■■■TUESDAY
All the best the world of punk
has to offer, in the wee hours of
the morn.    .
PACIFIC PICKIN' (Roots)6-8am
Bluegrass, old-time music, and its
derivatives with Arthur and the
lovely Andrea Berman.
RACHEL'S SONG (Talk)
8-9:30am
(Rebroadcast from previous
Wednesday, 5-6:30pm) Currently airing Necessary Voices
lecture series.
THIRD TIME'S THE CHARM
(Rock) 9:30-11:30am
Open your ears and prepare for
a shock! A harmless note may
make you a fan! Hear the menacing scourge that is Rock and
Roll! Deadlier than the most
dangerous criminal!
borninsixtynine@hotmail.com
MORNING AFTER SHOW
(Eclectic) 11:30am-lpm
GIVE 'EM THE BOOT (World)
I-2pm
Sample the various flavours of
Italian folk music from north to
south, traditional and modern.
Un programma bilingue che es-
plora il mondo della musica folk
CIRO SYNDICATED (Talk)
2-2:30pm
Syndicated   programming  from
Okanagan's CIRO.
(Replaces Besneric Rhyme)
REEL TO REAL (Talk) 2:30-3pm
Movie reviews and criticism.
CAREER FASTTRACK
(Talk) 3-3:30pm
EN AVANT LA MUSIQUE
(French) 3:30-4:30pm
En Avant La Musique! se   concentre   sur   le   metissage   des
genres musicaux au sein d'une
francophonie ouverte a tous les
courants. This program focuses
on cross-cultural music and its
influence   on   mostly   Francophone musicians.
WENER'S BARBEQUE (Sports)
4:30*6pm
Join the sports department for
their coverage of theT-Birds. ,
FLEX YOUR HEAD (Hardcore)
Up the punx, down the emo!
Keepin' it real since 1989, yo.
Flexyourhead. SALARIO MINIMO (World)
8-1 Opm
Salario Minimo, the best rock in
Spanish show in Canada.
CAUGHT IN THE RED (Rock)
I Opm-12am
Trawling the trash heap of over
50 years' worth of rock n' roll
debris. Dig it!
It could be punk, ethno, global,
trance, spoken word, rock, the
unusual and the weird, or it could
be something different Hosted
by DJ Pierre.
^■WEDNESDAY
PLANET LOVETRON
(Electronic) 10-11:30am
With host Robert Robot One
part   classic   electronics.   One
part    plunderphonicmixnmatch.
Two parts new and experimental techno. One part progressive
hip-hop. Mix and add informative
banter and news for taste. Let
stand. Serve, and enjoy.
planetlovetron@gmail.com
ANOIZE (Noise) 11:30am-lpm
Luke Meat irritates and educates
through musical deconstruction.
Recommended for the strong.
DEMOCRACY NOW (Talk)
s2-3pm
Independent   news   hosted   by
award-winning   jounalists   Amy
Goodman and Juan Gonzalez.
RUMBLETONE RADIO (Rock)
3-Spm
Primitive, fuzzed-out garage may-
RACHEL'S SONG (Talk)
5-6:30pm
AND SOMETIMES WHY
(Pop/Eclectic) 6:30-8pm
First Wednesday of every month.
Alternates with:
SAMSQUANCH'S    HIDEAWAY
(Eclectic) 6:30-8pm
FOLK OASIS (Roots) 8-1 Opm
Two hours of eclectic roots mii-
sic. Don't own any Birkenstocks?
Allergic to patchouli? Cmon in!
A kumbaya-free zone since 1997.
JUICEBOX (Talk) 10-IIPM
Developing your relational and
individual sexual health, expressing diversity, celebrating queer-
ness, and encouraging pleasure
at all stages. Sexuality educators
Julia and Alix will quench your
search for responsible, progressive sexuality over your life span!
www.juiceboxradio.com
HANS KLOSS' MISERY HOUR
(Hans Kloss) I lpm-1 am
This is pretty much the best
thing on radio.
■■■THURSDAY
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
(Eclectic) 8-1 Oam
DEMOCRACY NOW
(Talk) 10-llam
ALTERNATIVE RADIO
(Eclectic) 11 am-12pm
DUNCAN'S DONUTS
(Eclectic) 12-lpm
Hosted by Duncan, sponsored by
donuts.
WE ALL FALL DOWN
(Eclectic) I-2pm
Punk rock, indie pop, and whatever else I deem worthy. Hosted
by a closet nerd.
INKSTUDS
(Talk) 2-3pm
CRIMES & TREASONS
(Hip Hop) 3-5pm
MY SCIENCE PROJECT (Talk)
Zoom a little zoom on the My Science Project rocket ship, piloted
by your host Julia, as we navigate
eccentric, underexposed, always
relevant and plainly cool scientific
research, technology, and poetry
. (submissions welcome), myscien-
ceprojectradio@yahoo.ca
Alternates with:
PEDAL REVOLUTION (Talk)
STEREOSCOPIC REDOUBT
(Rock) 6-7:30pm
Psychadelic, Garage,    Freakbeat
and Progressive music from 1965
to   today:   underground,  above
ground and homeground.
EXQUISITE CORPSE
(Experimental) 7:30-9pm
Experimental,   radio-art   sound
collage, field recordings, etc.
Recommended for the insane.
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD .
RADIO HELL (Uve Music)
9-1 lpm
Live From Thunderbird Radjo
Hell showcases local talent...
LIVE! Honestly, don't even ask
about the technical side of this.
■ FRIDAY
SKA-TS SCENIC DRIVE (Ska)
I Oam-12pm
Email requests to:
djska_t@hotmail.com
THESEARETHE BREAKS
(HipHop) l2-2pm
Top notch crate digger DJ Avi
Shack  mixes   underground   hip
hop, old school classics, and original breaks.
RADIO ZERO (Eclectic)
2-3:30pm
NARDWUAR THE HUMAN
SERVIETTE PRESENTS
(Nardwuar) 3:30-5pm
NEWS IOI
(Talk) 5-5:30pm
W.I.N.G.S.
(Eclectic) 5:30-6pm
THE CANADIAN WAY
(Eclectic) 6-7:30pm
All types of Canadian independent music from all across our
massive  and   talented   country,
with your host Spike.
wwwmyspace.com/canadianway
AFRICAN   RHYTHMS  (World)
7:30-9pm
David 'Love' Jones brings you the
best new and old jazz, soul, Latin,
samba, bossa and African music
from around the world.
www.africanrhythmsradio.com
WOMEN
VOLUNTEERS
needed for our 24 Hour
Rape Crisis Line and Transition
House for battered women
For an interview, please call
604-872-8212
Vancouver Rape Relief & Women's Shelter
www.rapereliefsheller.bc.ca
t
SWEET 'N' HOT (Jazz)
9-10:30pm
Sweet dance music and hot jazz
from the 1920s, 30s and 40s.
SHAKE ATAIL FEATHER
(Soul/R'n'B) 10:30pm-12am
The finest in classic soul and
rhythm & blues from the late '50s
to the early '70s, including lesser
known artists, regional hits, lost
sould gems and contemporary
artists recording in that classic
soul style.
I LIKE THE SCRIBBLES
(Eclectic) l2-2am
Beats mixed with audio from old
films and clips from the internet
10% discount for callers who are
certified insane. Hosted by Chris
D.
■■■SATURDAY
THE SATURDAY EDGE (Roots)
8am-12pm
Studio guests, new releases, British comedy sketches, folk music
calendar, and ticket giveaways.
GENERATION
ANNIHILATION (Punk)
12-lpm
A fine mix of streetpunk and old
school hardcore backed by band
interviews, guest speakers, and
social commentary.   ."'£gE%a&
www.streetpunkradio.com
crashnburnradio@yahoo.ca
POWERCHORD (Metal) I-3pm
Vancouver's   only   true   metal
show; local demo tapes, imports,
and other rarities. Gerald Rattle-
head, Geoff the Metal Pimp and
guests do the damage.
CODE BLUE (Roots) 3-5pm
From   backwoods   delta   low-
down slide to urban harp honks,
blues, and blues roots with your
hosts Jim, Andy and Paul.
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
(World) 5-6pm
The best of music, news, sports,
and commentary from around
the local and international Latin
American communities.
NASHAVOLNA
(World) 6-7pm
SHADOW JUGGLERS 7-9PM
(Dance/Electronic)
Shadow Jugglers works across
musical  genres   including  electronic and club-based music and
welcomes you to broaden your
musical knowledge with DJs MP,
Socool, Soo & their guests.Travel
through world sounds such as
dub/reggae, hip hop, funk, dub-
step/grime & jungle/drum  and
bass.Turie in and visit myspace/
shadowjugglers.
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH -
(Dance/Electronic/Eclectic)
9-1 lpm
BEATS FROM THE BASEMENT
(Hip Hop) I lpm-1 am
ra
that dj competition
oct 2 at the pit
email thatdjcompetition2007@gmail.com to enter WSiSS?*
u
are you that
*^ spin to win fabulous prizes.
40L M **************=**************
^QmCDfMIIMr
W$ arm O0KBQBBSO
1.1 IK   *Ui.T       Stu<j.nl SocMy     *****************************
9
•
D W!N PRIZES!
f TO www.citr.ca
604 822 1242
■■■■■■111
citr lOl.qftn
Discorder    31 ZULU BULLS UUWN THUNDER CANYDN
This and other nuggets!
AKRON/FAMILY
Love Is Simple
CD
Through seemingly constant
touring and regular work
with Michael Gira's Angels 01
light, the urban folkies in
Brooklyn's Akron/Family are a (mostly) bearded (always)
busy bunch. Which is why it's hard to believe the watch-
worthy quartet's forthcoming Love Is Simple is just their
second full-length release. No way that's possible... Let's
recount There's the self-titled debut, Gira backup band spot
on The Angels of Light Sing (Other People), and that
excellent split album with Angels — ail of that appeared in
2005. Then there's 2006s mini-album Meek Warrior. Okay,
all set... well, actually, they also lend one hell of a muster to
Angel's recent We Are Mm. The juice just doesn't let up,
though, as Love Is Simple may be their most fully-realized
effort to date, and certainly their folkiest, with heavy nods to
the Incredible String Band, The Holy Modal Rounders, and
even the Grateful Dead. Suffused with rootsy hippie utopi-
anism, the lads unleash hot-to-trot guitar solos and boogie
organ swells while howling good old American love n'
peace. Turn on, tune in, and buy this album.
JW__J-€k*^j_W*
DEVENDRA
BANHART
Smokey Rolls
Down Thunder
Canyon CD
" f a rolling stone gathers no
moss, how about a rolling smoke? On his fifth full-
length, The Bearded One rambles far and wide, but he
doesn't go it alone. He's already got a faithful band of fellow travelers nestled deep within the fragrant furrows of
his facial foliage, and he's opened his Topanga Canyon
hideaway to a picaresque variety of genres and guest
stars, including such diverse luminaries as Vashti
Bunyan, 8Mi Garcia Bernal, and The Black Crowes'
Chris Robinson. The result is an even fuller and more
classic-sounding album than Cripple Crow, redolent with
the perfumed breeze of South American sambas, the
JENSLEKMAN
Night Falls Over
KortedalaCD
CD $16.98
THE CAVE
SINGERS
Invitation Songs
CD
There are a lot of reasons to
love The Cave Singers.
Maybe it's that guitarist Derek Fudesco played in Pretty
Girls Make Graves and before that in the legendary Murder
City Devils. Maybe they touch your soft spot because
they're pals with local faves Black Mountain and Lightning
Bust, and they recorded this album (their debut) here in
Vancouver with Colin Stewart. More likely though, you'll
dig them because they play folk music in a way that few
artists (jndie, trad, or otherwise) do these days. Singer
Peter Quirk's spine-tinglingly high and nasal voice sounds
straight out of Harry Smith s Anthology of American Folk
Music, suffused with an Old Weird America that doesn't
have anything to do with shoelace headbands or heavy drug
consumption (though I wouldn't rule it out completely).
Their music isn't psych or soft, hokey or pretentious: it's
sparse, melodic, creepy, and alluring, like the widow
mourning graveside in Johnny Cash's long Black Veil".
d this darkness. You might not want to come back.
serious stabs at doo-wop and reggae that prove that
Devendra knows how to leaven the bread. Tis a feast, my
friends, conclusive proof that omnivorous rock-n-roll
excess is alive and well, and that Banhart is no mere flash'
the pan, but a worthy heir to the Tikes of Neil Young,
e, and Ci
CD $16.98
BEIRUT
The Flying Club
Cup CD
AVAuaiEocraw  w
After his debut album's flirtations with Balkan gypsy
folk made the youthful Zach
Condon a runaway star, one might tiave expected him to
. keeJNafking his way up the Neutral Milk Hotel tree —a
justifiable comparison considering that NMH's drummer
(and A Hawk and a Hacksaw main man) Jeremy Barnes
played on the album. Mucfiiff'our'a^ljted surprise, however, Condon is pulling a Sufjan and taking his iao1|l<}n
tour: for The Flying Cup Cluh, his inspiration is Jacques
Brel, Serge Gainsbourg, and the traditional cafe music of
Paris, if that wasn't tempting enough, Condon and his
posse struck a deal with Final Fantasy/Arcade Firer Owen
Pallet to record at the Fire's Masonic Church studio if they
played oh a forthcoming Pallet E.R, so expect nothing less
than massively beautiful string sections, scissoring accor-
dion, and a wine-sipping choir fit for tl e carnival, the circus,
or the lonely Montmarte garret. Is Condon still only 21?-^
CD $16.98
SUNSET
RUBDOWN
Random Spirit
Lover CD
Whether it's as the more
tortured and obtuse of
Wolf Parade's two heads, as the Son in Swan Lake's
Holy Trinity of Canadian indie rock (is it going out on a O
limb to proclaim Dan Bejar the Father and Carey Mercer
the Holy Ghost?), or constructing sets fc^an|astp§ffcf ■>
mas with his own group, Sunset Rubdown, Spencer Krug
has earned his place at the Last Supper of contemporary
songwriters. Darker than his breakout album, Random
Spirit Lover is a fever dream of silent-cinenn&smolteri|
mirrors, where beauties turn into beasts and take^g * -
through the pages of a mythological melodnSna/-^p6t 4
sturm, it's got drang, it's got hair-raising halped-Muse i
organs and a fog of crystallized guitars that sound like
nothing else going. It's a blood-soaked costume ball
where the host is as sincere as a suicide bomber with a
glowing coal clasped between his teeth. Listen now, or
you'll be gnashing your teeth later.
CD $16.98
SALE PRICES HI EFFECT UNTIL
OCTOBER 31,2007
CD $16.98
BAND OF
HORSES
Cease To Begin
iiifolP
Released in March of 2006,
Band of Horses'debut
Everything All the Time propelled the band from early
shows opening for friends Iron & Wine, to playing on The
fcate^^^^to^P|irid Letterman by July, and being nomi-
nated as one of ten finalists (along with Joanna Newsom,
Beirut, Tern Waits, and, the eventual winner, Cat Power)
for the"Shorttist Music Prize for that same year. Though
they worked with producer Phil He again for Cease To
Begin, as they did on Everything Ail the Time, much has
changed for Band of Horses between the fairly recent then
and now. Band members have come and gone, including
Mat Brooke, who left to pursue other interests and his
own band and, close friends and family have come and
gone-some far too early. Necessarify sj^flirough with
these experiences, the songs on Cease To Begin are strik-
";' tagy beaOT^JHtes elliptical and mcaSslpightforward,
dealing with the reconcjUttion'of attachment and detach-
ment, the strength that's found through suffering, and the
understanding that we are as'sJoJfficant as we are
insignificant It's also a great rock record.
Sweden's Magnetic Moz is
back, and more heartbroken jf^j N
than ever! With pitch-perfect
dry humour set to sampledelic
reinterpretations of doo-wop, A.M. radio, twee-pop, and
even tear-stained disco, Jens gives us twelve variations on
the timeless themes of kissing, memories, and remembering kisses past. Loosely themed as a farewell to the "suburban hell" of his neighborhood in Gothenberg, Sweden, Night
Falls Over Kortedala isn't so much a departure from his
past work as a fine-tuning. Lekman's deadpan style of
singing, sunny melodies, and wittily lovelorn lyrics are all
still intact and 100% Jens even as his vinyl-crackling
arrangements span the baroque pop of Scott Walker, the
upbeat rhythrhs and bricJffiafflSGrJies. of Northern soul, and
the beach-party disco of fellow Swetfisftj^ts^Afc France,
Studio, and the Tough Alliance. Along with wry, sometimes
melancholic observations worthy of Jonathan Richman,
these elements make for Lekman's best reeord. If you
weren't captivated already, you better brace yourself.
CD $16.98
IHE FIERY
FURNACES
Widow City CD
AVAUW£0CT9n<
ToHbauite honest, I'm at a bit
of a loss to explain to you
"IKBirincredibly awesome this
album is. It beggars description. I might as well just put oh
my coat and hat and go home to make some tea, because
there's nothingjjg3&8o to prepare you. You're going to put
Rjklioum on and, in mere moments, be reduced to a grimacing, air-drumming moron, trying to throw devil horns
and pull out your encyclopedia at the same time. I'll grant
llfe^ouin&ht be skeptical: this band often flies too close to
the sun. Keen as they are to never do things the normal
jvajsdhey occasionally sabotage perfectly good songs for no
>■ jeSMason. Rest assured, though, that Widow City is the
%erfe<$ajmalgam of everything they've ever tried to do.
Matthew plays every instrument except drums (handled by
the colossal, Bonham-esque talent of Robert D'Amico) and
Eleanor proves once again that she's the toughest, coolest
singer in rock music today as she narrates another set of
bizarre adventures. This snarling beast of an album is the
musical equivalent of a Russian novel, and future anthropologists could do worse than regard it as the pinnacle of
Western culture circa 2007.
jLJW?
w
SHARON
JONES&THE
DAP-KINGS
100 Days, 100
Nights CD
" n the new millennium,
soul has become big business again. But despite suc-
culent re-issues from labels like Astralwerks and Light in
the Attic, the resurgence of seasoned soul sisters like
Bettye LaVette, and the volcanic popularity of new-soul
crooners like Amy Winehouse, the champions of the
new generation's purist strain are Sharon Jones & the
Dap Kings. Jones has been turning in backup vocals for
gospel, soul, disco and blues artists, most of it uncredit-
ed, since the 70s. In the '80s, her vintage sound was
deemed unfashionable, so she returned to her roots in
church singing and took a job as a corrections officer at
Ryker's Island. In the late '90s, though, she was rediscovered-and since then she's been taking her lived-in,
sweat-blasted talent all over the.globe, proving her reputation as the Queen of Funk. 100 Days, 100 Nights is
her third full-length with the Dap Kings, and you can
start groovin' on it Oct. 2M.
CD $16.98
BELLA
No One Will
Know CD
Well, summer's pretty
much over now, but
don't let those shorter
days get you down. Bella's
coyly titled Mint debut No One Will Know will be in your
hands, extending the blissful season with its dreamy
girl-boy-girl vocals, synthy hooks and punchy rhythms.
It'll have you reliving those sweaty carefree weekends,
practicing your dance-moves in your living room and
wishing, hoping and bouncing around for more. While
recording No One WiH Know, Bella called in their
friends Roddy Bottum and Will Schwartz (Imperial
Teen) and Jason Martin (Starflyer SO) and joined
forces with producer/understated mastermind Ba»e
Carswell of JC/DC Studios (Tegan and Sara, The New
Pornographers). The result is a sparkling Mint Records
debut that channels its influences from a synthier time,
in a gorgeous, non-ironic kind of way.
CD $16.98
THE
WEAKERTHANS
Reunion Tour CD
By now, Them
bittersweet, slice-of-prairie
life vignettes are almost as
familiar a Canadian cultural
export as the Tragically Hip, though you're less likely to find
them in your dad's CD player. The curiously-titled Reunion
Tour (it's four years sincetftfejasftalbuna, bot"th# newdis-.'
banded) finds the band lirl6>form, 0 ice again crafting the
kind of lyrics that Ugye earned them comparisons to short
story masters like Grace Patey and Raymond Carver. Like
The Mountain Goats if tb^B&e songs about Olympic
curling, or Death Cab back in their early days, The
Weakerthans find ways to make the little things yield large
truths.5ecorded over the course of a winter week and a naif
in a Manitoba factory during its off hours, the album sounds
waim;Jtfsf5,afld'vjgorous. Give these songs time and they'll
flower WJj^M^eai, sprouting movies ease? on lines like
"where the raaiifresounds Jn4lig{^ri^aflje£ Itself inspired
by an Edward Hopper painting, but you ftori't need to know
any of that to dig it, of course.
CD $16.98
CD $16.98
CD $14.98
HU.YOURCANYQNS
mOURGOU)...
Taken By Trees - Open Field CD
Animal Collective - Strawberry Jam CO
Emma Pollock - Watch The Fireworks CD
Tim Gane & Sean O'Hagen - La Vie
D'ArtisteCD
Film School-Hideout CD
Federico Aubete - Panamerica CD
Damon & Naomi-Within these Walls CD
The Dead Kennedys- Milking The Sacred
Cow CD
Enon-Grass Geysers... Cariion Clouds CD
Robert Pollards-Standard Gargoyle
Decisions C05||||§
Oakley Hall - ril Follow You CD.  |
Cass McCombs- Dropping The Writ CD
Sir Ridiard Bishop- Polytheistic
Fragments CD
The Donnas- Bitchin' CD
Black Lips-Good Bad Not Evil CD
ZULU ART NEWS WSSNSSlI by
World[of mM%S0
Favorites
October 1-31

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