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Full Text

 OORDER
from QTR 101.9 FM
Pietro Sammarco JoraJQC The Reatards Stitch n Bitch Nation The Weekend Sage Francis Scissor Sisters
Ali Shaheed Muhammad Holy Body Tattoo Totally Guitar The Kills P:anO Tegan and Sara SmOOsh
Hidden Cameras The Seams Duncan McHugh Black IMoUIltain Purple Wizard Say Nothing Bright
Eyes   jDOntempi  The   Frames   Steve   Vai   Hem   Keren  Ann   Cushion   Covers   Luna   Saint  Bushmills   Choir
March 2005 1       it-.."---..* t-i.ii:- «««isl
J      NOt.COM/2riMTU
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APRIL 27
IffiSALUfclA-MLMiS
«CHAfi£yS ON RICHARDS
PUiCHlfE TlcmTS iffllCfltl IT hefe*ca 01 ticketmaster «ea I^IOKIAuNmitf®
DiSCORDER - March 2005 Bmnwmi IRISH
';MM PQQLDSPS
mS   IRISHPUB
f|£pa£Ricp|
Manch'lJiiz
Doolin's 854 Nelson Street:: 604.605.4343:: www.doollns.ca
Tne trish Cellar 1008 Granville '£ 004.605.4350:: www.eeIlarvai.Gent
OGjlclf1 T^^^/T
v
Festival Guide for St.Paddy's Week
Date
Time   Venue Description
Official Venues
ceiticfestvancouve
Sunday
March 13
2pm      Roxy
2 & 6pm Cellar
8pm      Cellar
Halifax Wharf Rats
Robert Malcolm Memorial Pipe Band
Kings of Chill presents The Town Pants live
Monday
March 14
?pm
8pm
Cellar
Doolin's
McBlues Comedy Show
Rob Thompson, solo artist
Tuesday
March 15
6pm
8pm
9pm
Doolin's
Doolin's
Cellar
Sionnaine trish Dance Academy
Bob White, the Rock God playing anything
and everything   ;
Celtic Disco w/D J Chiclet originator of Discotronic
& host Slick Rick
Wednesday        6pm      Doolin's Guinness Perfect Pint Pour Off Competition
March 16 featuring bartenders from the lower Mainland
with guest judges including Sean Heather from
the Irish Heather
8pm      Doolin's St Paddy's Eve Industry Party with Brian Flannigan
playing your usual rock tunes with a Celtic flair
9pm      Cellar     Irish Luv featuring a Kilt Fashion show from Bear Kilts
Thursday 11am- Doolin's St. Paddy's Day
March 17 111    2am Live entertainment from 1pm-1 am
3pm Cellar Live entertainment from 3pm-2am
7pm Roxy Live entertainment with Dr.Strangelove
sr   ly^fi'i'W^NWgai'
Doolin's 654 Nelson St:: S04.60S.4343:: www.doolins.ca
The Irish Cellar 1006 Granville at Nelson:: 0O4.6O5.43SO:: www.ceKarvan.com
 The Roxy 932 Granville St:: 604.331.7999:: www.roxyvan.com
DiSCORDER
That magazine from CiTR 101.9fm. March 2005.
EDITRIX
Kat Siddle
AD AAANAGER
Jason Bennet
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Dory Kornfeld
ART DIRECTOR
Graeme Worthy
TA EDITOR
Vampyra Draculea
RLA EDITOR
Kimberley Day
REVIEWS EDITOR
Mairin Deery
LAYOUT & DESIGN
Graeme Worthy
Jason Bennet
Kimberley Day
Vampyra Draculea
Dory Kornfeld
PRODUCTION
Graeme Worthy
Kat Siddle
Kimberley Day
Vampyra Draculea
Jason Bennet
Dory Kornfeld
Saelan Twerdy
ON THE DIAL
Bryce Dunn
CHARTS
Luke Meat
DATEBOOK EDITOR
•   Saelen Twerdy
DISTRIBUTION
Lasse Lutick
US DISTRO
Frankie Rumbletone
PUBLISHER
Student Radio Society
of UBC
FEATURES
Bontempi
Jorane
Smoosh
Black Mountain
REGULARS
Program Guide
p.10
P-12
p. 17
p. 18
Mil
Perpetually Imminent Disaster
p.5
Riff Raff
p.6
Strut Fret & Flicker
P.*
o~Do It Your Damn Self
p.7
Textually Active -
P.*
Calendar
p. 14-15
Under Review
p. 20-21
Real Live Action
p. 22-23
Mix Tape (new section!)
p. 24
Charts
p. 25
Finding Joy
p. 25
p.'26-27
© DiSCORDER 2005 by the Student Radio Society of the University of British Columbia. All
rights reserved. Circulation 17,500. Subscriptions, payable in advance, to Canadian residents are
$15 for one year, to residents of the USA are $15 US; $24 CDN elsewhere. Single copies are $2
(to cover postage). Please make cheques or money orders payable to DiSCORDER Magazine.
Please note that my birthday is February 15. DEADUNES: Copy deadline for the April issue is March
15, 2005, not that any of you will care. Ad space is available until March 24 and can be booked
by calling Jason at 604.822.3017 ext. 3. Our rates are available upon request. DiSCORDER is not
responsible for loss, damage, or any other injury to unsolicited manuscripts, unsolicited artwork
(including but not limited to drawings, photographs, and transparencies), or any other unsolicited
material. Material can be submitted on disc or in type or via email. As always, English is preferred,
but we will accept French. Actually, we won't. Send email to DiSCORDER at cSscorder@dub.ams.
ubc.ca. From UBC to Langley and Squamfsh to Bellingham, CiTR can be heard at 101.9 fM as
well as through all major cable systems in the Lower Mainland, except Shaw in White Rock; Call
the CiTR DJ line at 8222487, our office at 822.3017, or our news and sports lines at 822.3017 ext.
2. Fax us at 822.9364, e-mail us at: citrmgr®mail.ams.ubc.ca, visit our web site at www.citr.ca or
just pick up a goddamn pen and write #233-6138 SUB Blvd., Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1, CANADA. BLACK MOUNTAIN MARCH!!!
BUCK MOUNTAIN     BLACK MOUNTAIN
Self Titled LP/CD (SCRATCH # 48)
Congratulations to Black Mountain for hitting number 1
nationwide in both Earshot and Chartattack radio charts. Old
and new rock and soul like you've never heard.
\—     —^"1 ALSO AVAILABLE:
BLACK MOUNTAIN
Druganaut/Buffalo Swan 12"
Jagjaguwar
BLACK MOUNTAIN/
DESTROYER
Quiet Weather
Singles Series 7"
Spirit Of Orr
ON TOUR!
THE PINK
MOUNTAINTOPS
Self Titled   LP/CD (SCRATCH #46)
Black mountain singer/songwriter Stephen McBean pulls
down his pants and we all dance. Tourist in Your Town
was the best song of 2004.
Black Mountain used to be
called Jerk With A Bomb, and
these two fantastic albums are   ^^XJfA/Vt^l^'
still available...
JERK WITH A BOMB -
Pyrokinesis  LP/CD
(SCRATCH # 40)
not by Black Mountain, but loved
by Black Mountain
JERK WITH A BOMB
The Old Noise LP/CD
(SCRATCH # 35)
BLACK MOUNTAIN and family fine releases are
available at these quality retailers: A & B Sound,
Audiopile, Ditch, Fascinating Rhythm, HMV, Noize,
Red Cat, Scratch, Virgin, Zulu.
CIRCLE
Guillotine CD
SCRATCH # 45
"sounding like an otherworldly      %
This Heat or a heavier, more
damaged Can. Mellow jazzy
moments and delicate melodies intersect with heavy,
Bonham-esque beats and crushing hypnotic force. Circle
wili mesmerize you. The only question is how quickly
and easily you can break the trance." fakejazz.com
03/11 Seattle, WA - Easy Street Records,
Queen Anne Location (In-store, 6pm)
03/12 Eugene, OR - Agate Hall, U of Oregon
03/13 Seattle, WA - Crocodile Cafe
03/14 Vancouver, BC - Richard's on
Richards with Oneida + Kinski
03/15 Portland, OR - Doug Fir Lounge
03/17 Oakland, CA - Lobot Gallery
03/18 San Francisco, CA -12 Galaxies
03/19 Los Angeles, CA - Spaceland
03/20 Long Beach, CA - Koo's
03/21 Tempe, AZ - Stinkweeds
03/23 Austin, TX - Emo's
03/24 Houston, TX - Mary Jane's Fat Cat
03/25 Denton, TX - Rubber Gloves
03/26 Oklahoma City, OK - The Conservatory
03/27 St. Louis, MO - Hi-Pointe
03/28 Bloomington, IN - Second Story
03/29 Cleveland, OH - Beachland Ballrom
03/30 New York; NY - Mercury Lounge
04/01 Harrisonburg, VA - PC Ballroom
04/03 Montreal, PQ - Casa Del Popolo
04/04 Ottawa, ON - Babylon
04/05 Toronto, ON - 360 Club
04/07 London, ON - Call the Office
04/08 Chicago, IL - Schubas
04/11 Denver, CO - Hi-Dive
04/15 Los Angeles, CA - The Echo
04/16 San Francisco, CA - Cafe du Nord
04/20 Portland, OR - Berbati's Pan
04/21 Seattle, WA - Neumos
04/22 Victoria, BC - Lucky Bar
with Frog Eyes
mm
726 Richards Street, Vancouver, BC Canada V6B 3A4  WWW.SOWI RECORDS.COM
Tel: (604) 687-0499 • Fax: (604) 687-0488 • Email: spooner@scratchrecords.com
STORES: Get in touch. EMAIL ORDER: commerce@scratchrecords.com
IN VANCOUVER? Drop by our store to sample the good times.
DiSCORDER - March 2005 SPMMUSIC PRESENTS
ERPETUALLY
11MM INENt
fo ISASTER
SHOWCASING
VANCOUVERS
BEST NEW BANDS!
RELOCATING IN APRIL I
TO THE BRICKYARD
315 CARROL STREET
If you're the kind of person who pays attention to these things, you're probably thinking, "Hey, shouldn't
this be some kind of Women's Issue?" After all, it is March. So what gives?
To be completely honest with you, gentle and possibly indignant reader, we weren't sure if we should do
a Women's Issue this year. Whilel'm the first to be irked by the music industry/media's abiding sexism (and the
first to gripe about it at length), I wasn't sure that a special "Girts Only" issue of DiSCORDER was the way to go.
' After all, it's the mainstream music media that's plagued most by overt and destructive misogyny, right?
But then I got an email. It was promotion piece for Danko Jones' new spoken word album. The Magical
World of Rock. According to this press release, "In The Magical World of Rock, your favourite album is holier
than a thousand bibles. "Professional Music Listener" is a full-time, tax-paying job. Monster Magnet's Dave
Wyndorf is your personal pot dealer. Solomon Burke is God. And girlfriends who own Elton John records must
be dumped immediately."
Does this sound like your magical world of rock? It sure as hell doesn't sound like mine (which would
probably involve more arts and crafts with Kathleen Hanna and less burnt offerings to Solomon Burke).
Although DiSCORDER tries not to perpetuate gender exclusionism, we still receive emails propagating it, under
the guise of celebrating rock music' "Male rock stars are gods. Girls who don't agree with your opinions must
be dumped. Rock on dude!" And in my personal email account no less. How fucking lame.
Sitting there, fuming at the computer, I decided it. We would do a Women's Issue. We would do do a
Women's Issue so good, it would take us months to plan and execute. (Look for our girly extravaganza in May
2005).
And so this is not that issue. But, looking at it now on its last day of production, it doesn't seem like much
of a man's issue either. Women and girls dominate our features this month: not one band featured is all-male.
Bontempi, P:ano, and Black Mountain all feature female musicians or songwriters. Jorane is a female solo artist,
and Smoosh...hey, if Smoosh aren't a symptom of a slowly-changing musical climate, I don't know what is.
The day that two preteen girls get parental support, a record deal, and national media attention for writing
their own very non-commercial songs is a great day for women in music, hands down. This issue ended up
being very female-focused completely by accident. All we were looking for was musical talent and interesting
bands. We ended up with a bunch of girls. Our May issue is going to be great, but honestly, the accidental
Women's Issue seems like the best kind of issue of all. It's pretty much what we've been wafting for all this
time. o
KATSIDDLE   jfe
"from melodic to minimalist, from deep gro<
to all out noise; this quartet inhabits the nei
regions of Vancouver's music unc
JP CARTER-trumpet
DAVE SIKULA - guitar.
SKYE BROOKS-drums
PETE SCHMITT-bass
cd release show
April 1st at the VCC King Edward Campu
Auditorium (1155 East Broadway)
■8PM SHARP!!
The Zubot/Fonda/Martin Trio RIHF* RAFF
I'm scaling things down considerably from last
month's barrage of garage, not because I want to,
but because I have to. When faced with the (colour
me sarcastic) enviable task of reviewing the latest
offering from Jimmy Eat Shit and others of their ilk,
I'll gladly take on The Reatards. In fact I think I'll let
The Reatards take on those bands for me 'cause I
don't want to waste any more ink on the subject.
Their contempt for "modern" rock music is probably
the first on a long list of things that Jay Reatard and
company would like to firebomb out of existence.
At least on this four song EP, he gets a chance to
spit venom and musically strangle tender topics like
being a "Monster Child" and the admission that he
has "No Soul No Mo." "I Will Die Alone" charges like
a bull through Devo's house and "TeH A Lie On Me"
by Bryce Dunn
ends with a bloodcurdling scream that would make
anyone leery of talking trash to a kid who's been at
this game long enough to know and who's still too
young to care. Those who want more verbal abuse in
the form of nasty, brutish, and short punk rock songs
should also check out their recent full-length Bedroom
Disasters, a collection of forgotten "gems" that were
unearthed from a dusty box of tapes underneath,
Ryan Reatard's bed no doubt, but among such
"classics" as "Lick On My Leather" and "Puke On
You" are inspired tributes to their influences including
The Ramones, The Saints, The Angry Samoans, and
Freestone. The Reatards are the real deal, folks: punk
for punks of all stripes. (Zaxxon Virile Action Records,
www.zaxxonvirileaction.com.)
To get all that teenage hate outta my system, I
took one look at Purple Wizard and figured two gals
bestowed with guitars has got to be the cure for
what ails me. Sho' nuff, I was floored the second the
needle made contact as the honeysweet harmonies
of these two ladies instantly reminded me of the* late
great Delmonas or even The Shangri-Las, but with the
musical chops of The Milkshakes or earty Kinks. Their
takes on two Everty Brothers songs—"I've Been Wrong
Before" and "I'm Not Angry"—are just too damn
catchy to be ignored, and you'll be wearing this
platter thin before you know it. A full-length album
is on" the way, so be warned, this may be ydur new
favourite band. (Show And Tell Recordings, www.
showandtellrecs.com.).
Lastly another duo making some sweet but
sticky blues is W and Hotel, otherwise-known as The
Kills. A teaser 7" out just in time for their new album
to drop later this month, this ball o' wax features an
album side "Good Ones" and an exclusive flip in
"Baby's Eyes." Those who caught the act back in
December when they graced Richard's On Richards
will probably recognize from their live set the album
cut as their slinky reworking of Nick Cave And The Bad
Seeds "Red Right Hand" only with PJ Harvey (that
would be W) crooning the question "Did you get the
real good ones, did you get the good ones?" To what
she is referring is anyone's guess; could be snow tires
for all I care, but whatever it is, damn if it don't sound
sexy. The flip is a little more subdued, showcasing
more of the nimble guitar work of Hotel. By the way
you know there's a drum machine, right? That was
a surprise to me too, and what other surprises they
may have in store can be witnessed proper-like when
The Kills make a return trip to Vancouver on March
26 at The Red Room. (Domino Record Co. www.
dominorecordco.com).
See you on the floor, rockers.   9
STUVT FRET AND
FI4ICKER
by Penelope Mulligan
Say Nothing
Ridiculusmus
Tuesday 18 January
Performance Works
"The Troubles," as the fallout from a fiercely
divided Ulster has been euphemistically known, got
a mind-bending airing from Ridiculusmus—here from
England as part of the PuSh international Performing
Arts Festival. Visually, Say Nothing was like a pop-up
Magritte painting. The whole thing took place in an
open suitcase filled with turf on which the two actors
either stood or assumed a mimed sitting posture.
This symbolic containment—of Northern Ireland,
of conflict, of failed communication—amplified
the play's pressure-cooker rhythms and relentless
absurdities.
Jon Hough and David Woods, who also wrote
and directed the piece, performed it with frightening
brilliance. Their work often slid so close to mayhem
that it felt like improvisation, yet you knew it wasn't.
Woods was an anxious knot of good intentions as
Ulster-born Kevin, who, after decades in England,
returns home with a PhD in Peace and Conflict
Studies and hopes of workshopping the populace
into some kind of harmony. Instead, he keeps
slamming into duplicity, ignorance, and passive
aggression in the form of several characters plcfyed
by Hough. A landlady, Sally, charges him for bed and
breakfast, but makes him sleep in his car because
her one guestroom is always occupied. She smothers
him with offers of food when he's not hungry and
generally engages him in the sort of conversations
designed to keep real contact at bay. (A looping
recitation of place-names and landmarks was an
excruciating parody of this common British pastime.)
DiSCORDER - March 2005
Her caretaker, Frank, is a beUowing Ulster Defense
Association man. The transitions were mercurial; and
so unexpected that they often felt like an assault.
Just when we'd been lulled into quiet hysteria by
Kevin and Sally's exchanges, Frank would go off with
Trainspotting intensity.
Kevin's failure to make any headway—the
local workshop he facilitates is a complete bust,
with participants either clamming up or attacking
him—said much about the futility of outside help in
conflicts with such deep religious and territorial roots.
And with its portrayal of a small-minded, socially
knee-capped populace, Say Nothing was even less
hopeful about Ulster's ability to sort itself out. This was
bleakness at its most theatrically satisfying.
THE PLUGHOLE
I await a new piece of dance from The Holy Body
Tattoo as I await a new album from a favourite band:
curiosity about where they'll go with it is mixed with
an assurance that I'll recognize their footprints. In the
case of company co-founders Noam Gagnon and
Dana Gingras, the visceral, strenuous choreography
is as unmistakable as their devastating production
aesthetic.
At the Dance Centre in late January, they
previewed an excerpt from their latest full-length
work, monumental. In several ways, it's a big
departure for them. Except for commissions, the
two choreographers have always performed what
they've created, but this time, as Gingras confirmed
to a wistful audience member, they "won't be
appearing." With a cast of nine, that's probably
wise.
It always gives me great pleasure to quote
the HBT's press material, since I couldn't possibly
improve on it. So here goes: "monumental is an
elegaic investigation into the physical anxiety of
urban culture." In an attempt to keep ourselves from
being obliterated by failure and overwork or from
dying of loneliness, we engage in small gestures and
everyday habits. As Gingras explained, these add up
to something quite huge, monumental celebrates
them. In the section I saw, each dancer was atop
a wooden box—isolated, agitated and throughly
stressed out. Movement was frenetic, repetitive and
percussive, occasionally giving way to something
looser and more seductive. According to the
choreographers, things get really interesting when
the dancers come off the boxes later in the piece.
As usual, the duo's work is given tremendous
texture by its collaborators. We had a taste of this in the
music of fly pan am's Roger Tellier-Craig, Godspeed
Youl Black Emperor, and Les Tambours du Bronx. The
complete production will also feature a cityscape
environment by lighting designer Marc Parent, film
montage by William Morrison and projected text by
Jenny Holzer. Consider this example: "Usually you
come away with stuff on you when you've been in
their thoughts or bodies.")
There was a large high school group at
January's open rehearsal and a couple of teenage
girls in the row ahead spent much of the time text
messaging. Afterwards, I overheard them talking in
fhe loo: "I really liked it when they were freaking out,
but when it was slower, I was like, 'whatever' ." Bless
their hearts. To quote HBT again, "In the disjunction
between immaculate facades and human frailty,
innocence is the first loss." In a few more years, they'll
probably know what that means.   8
monumental will be performed at the Vancouver
Playhouse on April IA 2 9 8pm. Tickets from 604-280-
3311 or from www.ticketmaster.ca SEAMRIIPERS
Removable
Cushion Covers
by Georgie
You will need:
Pillow: Can be bought for $5-15 at Dressew (or other sewing
stores) or you can make your own.
Fabric: Something breathable and soft, but not too thin. It
shouldn't be too stretchy or the pillow will be lumpy. The
material for the cover can be thicker than that of the pillow
itself. '     ..
Thread: Polyester (ifs stronger).
Needles or sewing machine: You gotta sew it somehow.
Scissors: Good and sharp.
Stuffing: Either synthetic fibre-fill or finely shredded rags (for a
denser heavier cushion).
Measuring device
Pins
Any decoration or fastening device that you see fit.
This removable cushion cover is simple and easy to make as it only uses one piece of fabric. Whether
they be ornamental or functional, cushions and pillows are an easyrto-accommodate household accessory.
They can make you feel like your crappy futon is actually the bed from The Princess and the Pea and they
i' can distract from the stains and the cigarette burns on your ugly couch. They are also an easy gift that
will offend no one. You can add a small pocket and the cushion will become useful in manyother
ways. A tooth for the Tooth Fairy can be left for your favourite six year old or your favourite brawler. Pockets
can also be used to keep items secretly on hand, like condoms, or if you don't need them, candy. Cushions
become a lot more appealing when you can make them yourself.
You may be wondering why the covers ought to be removable. This way you have the option of
recovering something you don't like, and let's just say that it seems ridiculous to make something functional
and then have no way to clean it. So if you want to skip a step and just make the cover a permanent part of
your pillow then go ahead...I hope that you exist somewhere with no pets, no sex life, and never get clumsy
when you have too much red wine. Of^5-'*- a
The Cushion:
This step is optional, as you may want to buy a preformed pillow recover something that you already
own. Choose a non-stretchy, breathable fabric like cotton twill—strong but not too thick. No one will see this
part, so you can use an old pillow cases or sheet. Make sure that the colour you choose will not be visible
through the final cover. You can make a cushion in almost any shape.„squares and circles are easiest, but
be creative.
Cut out the shape a half inch larger on each side than you want the finished product. This will leave
you an adequate seam allowance. Place right sides together and pin in place. Sew three of the sides and
2/3 of the fourth side. Turn the pillow right side out and stuff. Whatever stuffing you choose make sure that
you insert it in small pieces so the pillow is not too lumpy .The fullness of the cushion is up to personal
preference. If the cushion has comers, make sure fhe are all stuffed. Sew up the hole with small stitches.
You just saved yourself $5-15.
Cushion Cover: SeliM
For the sake of simplicity the cover that I'm going to describe is square. Please.feeJ free to make yours
any shape you want.
Measure the sides of the pillow from comer to comer. The longest side if not a square wfll be described
from here on in as 'B'. You will need a piece of fabric that is B x 2.25 plus 2 inches. The width of the fabric
will be the length of the shorter side plus 1 inch.
Mark the fabric size you need and cut it out. Finish both ends of the fabric by folding over the edge
and sewing (to contain the raw edge you may need to fold it over more than once). You may also finish
the edges with a serger if you have one. You have a generous seam allowance of 1 inch on each end; this
should be plenty. Make sure that at least one pf the edges is perfect. This opening will be visible down the
back of the cushion.
Lay the fabric out with the right side facing up. (Figure 1) Fold in edge A first (this should be theone with
the perfect edge). The fold should be 1 /2 the length of B. Pin the corners in place. Fold edge C overtop and
in place. If you measure all the folded areas on top of one another they should be that same length as your
pillow (or B). Set the cover in the sewing machine so that the opening faces you. This will stop the presser
foot from catching on the edge of it. Sew along 1 /2 an inch from the raw edge. You may want to finish these
edges with a serger or a zig-zag stitch. Turn cover right side in one side at a time and put it on the cushion.
The opening along the back should sit tight against the pillow. If it doesn't, it can be further secured
with a button, snap, or small piece of Velcro.
If you require further embellishments, they can often be added after the pillow is complete, if you find
all the folds complicate this then they can be added earlier. Just make sure that nothing+rard whtget in fhe
path of the sewing machine (eg. buttons, beads etc.). If you intend to sleep on the pillow, make sure that
the decoration is soft (embroidery or applique maybe).
Pockets
Small pockets can be added either under an applique or inside the cover opening. Finish the top
edge of the applique and sew in place except for that edge. To create a pocket inside the opening you
will need a small rectangle of fabric (figure 2). Finish both ends and fold in half so that one edge is 1 inch
longer than the other. Sew sides together and sew longer piece into the seam edge of side A. Secure the
corners of the pocket before assembling the cushion cover.
Springtime at Seamrippers:
The new Seamrippers workshop schedule is underway, and there will be another new-calendar
available in April. So if you are thinking of learning a new skill or perfecting an old one then now is the time.
We have a show opening on Friday March 4th called "Redrover" featuring paintings and beadwork by
Tiffany M. Monk. On Friday, March 18th we are hosting-fhe 'Church of Purr' fashion show and we'd love to
see you there. For details please check our website at www.seamrippers.ca. ||
CA&k'tw i»\&(x
l m r4U< DiSCORDER - March 2005 Totally Guitar: The Definitive Guide
Tony Beacon and Dave Hunter et al
Thunder Bay Press/Raincoast Books
Totally Guitar. The Definitive Guide redds like a thorough primer textbook on guitars, brought to yOu by
fhe same people who published Electric Guitars: The Illustrated Encyclopedia and its companion on acoustics,
it certainly lives up to my high expectations based on the previous two books, and in fact exceeds them in
terms of the sheer volume of good, practical information within a luscious photo-packed layout.     .
There are more than.a thousand playing tips covering the basics of chord voicings, typical licks from
several genres, set-up, and DIY maintenance as well as some less obvious, more advanced tricks. I'll be honest:
I haven't yet been able to put the majority of the tips here into use. My brain can only process so much guitar
information at once. That said, the ones I have absorbed thus far have been quite helpful to my development
and to the quest to de-buzz my bass.
There are really only two quibbles with this book that I can think of. Firstly, most of the manufacturers' bios
in the second half cover the same ground that Thunder Bay Press' previous two guitar encyclopedia offerings
cover in far greater detail, making me wonder if this was just a way to use up leftover pictures of Steve Vai and
company and to show all those great Washburn ads (not that there's anything wrong with that motivation—
the photos are really cool). Secondly, I may be selfish, but last week when I was setting up my dad's 40 year
old twelve-string, I looked here for information and was none too pleased to find the only real comment on '
twelve strings a note that they really aren't anything more than a novelty. This was the Definitive Guide's first
major failure to assist me, but this is a far more minor flaw than the redunancy issue. I'd have preferred that
space be dedicated to something else, maybe more tips or more anecdotal information on the makers and
their histories instead of the same overviews.
Drake
Stitch 'n Bitch Nation
Debbie Stoller
Workman Publishing
Everybody already knew how cool knitting was when, in 2003, Debbie Stoller, editor of the glossy third-
wave feminist BUST magazine, published Stitch 'n Bitch: The Knitter's Handbook. The book promised "everything
you need to know to get your knit on" and it came through, explaining not only how to knit, but also how to
form a stitch 'n bitch and how to make a knitted bikini or a hoodie or an iPod cozy or cat-ear-hat or a sweater
with skull and crossbones on the sleeves. This book became such an instant hit that it got its own thread on
Craftster.org, which is where Ms. Stoller originally put out the call for submissions to the sequel.
Stitch 'n Bitch Nation is bigger than the first book, it's glossy all the way through, and it has a lot more
patterns. Just as you'd expect, some of the patterns are totally rad, l-want-to-make-that-NOW kinda things,
(like felted messenger bags, cabled newsboy hats, wrap-around sweaters, and Joey Ramone and Joan
Jeft knitted dolls) and some are lame, boring, or too trendy for their own good (does the world really need
another poncho pattern?). What makes this book really worthwhile however, is the opening section, "I Knit
it My Way: How to Make any Knitting Pattern Work with Your Yarn, Your Gauge, Your Body, and Your Style."
This is information that really matters: how to decode a pattern, change certain elements of a knitted thing;
basically, how to be a knitting hacker. A good knitter is someone who understands what they're doing rather
than just following instructions blindly and having a sweater and the end, and Stitch 'n Btfch Nation gives us
all the tools to become good knitters. Knowing the stuff that Debbie is trying to teach is like reading a map
rather than following directions; you can visualize the outcome and work up to it, you can become master of
your knitting destiny.
Stitch 'n Bitch Nation is similar in form to 7he Garden of Vegan, the follow-up book to the seminal cookbook
How it all Vegan; the patterns/reclpes/tips are not entirely the work of the author, they are submitted by fans
and friends inspired by the first volume and collected by the writers-cum-editors to create volume 2. Though
the patterns in the first Stitch 'n Bitch were authored by all different women, the knitting instructions were all
Ucbbie's own. Stitch 'n Bitch Nation is full of little tips and tricks sent in by readers. There are little blue boxes
throughout the book with hand-me-down instructions to keep your yarn untangled, keep your stitches on the
needle, make your purls tighter, makes your seams smother, and organize your patterns, all followed with the
frame and hometown of the benevolent bestower of advice. There are also profiles of stitch 'n bitch groups
# across America (hence the 'Nation' in the title) and even a few in Canada and the UK. Truthfully, I don't
care very much about how the krtitters of Raleigh, North Carolina, came to form their knitting circle, or where
^ 'n B Pittsburgh likes to meet, but I think there' s something really neat about these write-ups being in the book.
When Debbie enlisted the help of Ihe krtltterati for her second book, she wanted to play up the new feminist
community that has grown Out of this knitting thing, so herinclusion of these tips and profiles of these knitting
groups seems less like she's trying to make a bigger book and more like she's showing that knitting is another
facet of the third-wave feminist version of the 1970's consciousness-raising circle; now women are meeting
not just because they're women, but because they're doing things that are really cool (and they're not, by
definition, excluding men).
The Sfifch 'n Bitch books are more than just knitting instructions and patterns, they embody the DIY-ness
that makes knitting so darn cool these days. Debbie Stoller wants you to modify the patterns to be what you
want, she wants you to recognize the power that knitting has to form community, and she wants you to help
her help others. And she sure isn't stopping there; the call for submissions for the third Stitch 'n Bitch book—a
volume dedicated to crocheting and aH its glory—has already been posted on Crgftster. There's no doubt
that the first Stitch 'n Bitch book is better than this follow-up; but if you're interested in knowing exactly just what
it is you*re doing when you turn a heel or make a v-neck or even if you just want to make a felted bag for your
iBook then Stitch *n Bifch Nation is a totally worthwhile purchase.
Dory Kornfeld
nn
The six books that Dory
Kornfeld read last week were
Louis Riel: A Comic Strip Biography by Chester Brown,
Sex Drugs and Cocoa Puffs by Chuck Ktosterrnan,
The Plot Against America by PhiKp Roth, The Death
and Life of Great American Cities by Jane Jacobs,
The Elements of Style by Strunk and While {this, she *
keeps in her back pocket at all times), and Down
and Out in the Magic Kingdom by Cory Doctrow.-aH
of which she heartily recommends. ^^H^R|^9^|
Ori^mfyikmn:HaWax but iJoarbated to' VancouvmBonhtm0rnigr04^ita/etaBvet^
unknown band right now, but I'm betting that they won't be for much longer. Just see
one of their shows and they will win you over with their Intricately crafted pop songs and
great musicianship. Just when I thought the local music scene was getting a bit stale,
here comes an act that is refreshingly distinct, and In an absolutely marvelous way.
Bontempi consists of Carlo Gillis (guitars, lead vocals), Lynette Gillis (drums,
backup vocals, percussion), and Geoff Miller (bass, keyboards). I had the pleasure of
having a cup of tea with the trio one Sunday afternoon to a cafe on Main Street.
DiSCORDER - March 2005
1#SCOft&£R: Let's start with history. Two of
Oyow. were tot a pretty successful band in
HaUfax caWI Plumtree.
?^^M^^ttfe and I have been in bands
^^^^WPWir, I don't know, since t was
thirteen and she was eleven. A really
long time. I don't want to do the math.
[Laughs] We did this sort of long-term
project called Plumtree that started in
1993 and ended in 2000.
Halifax was famous for its underground
rock scene back in fhe 90's. Plumtree was
one of Ihe bands from that scene.
Lynette: I g'uess we were considered
the second wave of the Halifax Pop
Explosion. The indie rock people helped
us out. Like Sloan, Thrush Hermit, Hardship
Post, Super Friendz.
Carta: Jale.
Lynette: And the Local Rabbits, who were
actually from Montreal.        fev?'-^
Carta: That was what we did for seven
years. [We were] pretty active. We
toured, made some videos and stuff like
that.
When did Bontempi start?
Lynette: The first public show we played
was the [Haliax] Pop Explosion [Music
Festival] in 2001.
Geoff: It was right after we started.
Carta: The show was in the basement—it
wasn't one of those big, promoted Pop ;
Explosion shows. But it was pretty good
and a lot of our friends got to see us.
We played a few more shows in Halifax,
and then Lynette went away to school
inBC.
Lynette: Jn the fall of 2002 I moved, to
Vancouver, so basically there was a
year or so where all of Bontempi was in
Halifax at the same time, playing shows.
It was really just on a small level. We
weren't trying to get videos and tour
or do all that bigger stuff Plumtree had
been doing. We were just writing and
playing.
Geoff: During the last few months of that
time we recorded most of the album
that we're putting out now.
Carta: We worked with Charles Austin
who is in The Super Friendz. He has
a really awesome studio in Halifax
that's affectionately called "The
Mullet." [Laughs] It's officially called
Electromagnetic Recordings, We spent
a few weeks in there recording, then
Lynette went away to Vancouver, and
the following January Geoff and I also
came out to BC. We finished those
recordings out in Langley on our friend's
farm, and then finally sent it off and got
it mixed. It was a really long process
just trying to get people interested
in releasing it, and we ended up just
releasing it ourselves just a few weeks
ago. So the songs are a little bit old now.
We have lots of new stuff that you'd
hear at shows, but the CD is still a good,
representation of what we're doing, I
think It's called What Keeps Us Awake.
How many of those songs do you still play
at shows?
GeoffcProbably about 75% of them. There
are three or four that we've cut from the
repertoire, or we're trying to rework.
Carta: We go through a long process of
reworking songs. We'll write a song, and
maybe it's just a straight ahead pop
song—we might play it like that for a
short time and decide it's not interesting
enough. We're kind of obsessed with
structure and trying to figure out what
we could take out or what we could add
to make a song more interesting and
unique. We haven't really established
the Bontempi sound yet, which I think is
good. We're always trying to experiment -
and find something we're all interested
And I was just about to ask you about
your sound.
Geoff:Well, now that I listen back to the
album, it sounds a lot more consistent
than I thought at the time we were
recording it.
Carta: That's true. There's [a difference
between] what we were going for and
what we actually sound like.
What were you going for?
Carta: Maybe it's a reaction to Plumtree,
which is really fast paced, high energy
pop—initially we wanted to really slow
things down and let the songs breathe,
let songs have quiet moments, and not
feel like we had to always rock. We have
some really slow songs on the album. But
more recently we've kind of been going
back to rock. It's just fun. I think we are
always straddling those two sides.
Lynette: We describe ourselves as dark
pop. That's the shortest description we
can put up with.
Carta: We were throwing around words.
We kind of like "spooky." There was a
time when we were all living together in
a flat in Halifax that was built in 1880's or
so. It was a little bit spooky and had a
creepy basement...there was this story
that a doctor had lived there during
the Halifax explosion [the munitions ship
explosion that wiped out half the city in
1917, not the pop music festival]. So this
doctor was living in this flat, and the story
goes that as a way of helping out, he
brought injured people in the house to
treat them, because the hospitals were
closed and chaotic. Supposedly a lot of
people died down in the basement.
Did you believe the story?
Lynette: We're paranoid people
anyways. It's always scary to go near
the basement. And in the meantime
we were starting Bontempi and trying to
think of what to write about. We were
interested in the mood.
You don't actually have a Bontempi right?
And what exactly is a Bontempi?
Carta: We used to. We originally had a
fourth member.
Geoff: Bontempi is an old brand of
keyboard, I don't know if it still exists.
They have a great sound; I don't know
how to'describe it.
Carta: They've got a bit of a...whine.
[Laughs] Our fourth member, Nicolas,
was the one who brought the bontempi
to the practices, and we really liked the
name and the font and everything. And
bontempi is Italian for "good times." Then
he left the band,.took the Bontempi and
we kept the name.
GeofhThe keyboard was untuneable. It
was really out of tune.
Carta: I still look for them whenever I'm
in Value Village. They often have them,
buf there are some really, really, really
bad Bontempis. And there are some
cool-sounding ones too. It seems like/
every one sounds completely different
Speaking   of   instruments,   you   were
surprised that bands don'i share drums in
Vancouver.
Lynette: There's a lot more sharing going
on in Halifax in general. Every show
that we played there, you bring one
drum set and then everyone shares it.
Most times it's the headlining band. In
Vancouver we've played a number of
shows where there have been three
bands with three drum kits, and you
have these long switchovers, and we
just think it's unnecessary—often you're
in the situation where you are all playing
the same four or five piece standard
rock kit.
Carta:' It's not that we don't want to take
our own. Often it was our kit that all that
bands used. We just want to make that
arrangement beforehand and people
seem unwilling to do that. [Laughs]
Lynette: It's just way more work for
everyone.
Carta: It's not really that a big a deal.
II makes sense though. But besides that,     I
any other differences between the Halifax     j
and Vancouver music scene?
Geoff: ,We're still gradually meetireg m
people. The longer we're here the less
intimidating it all seems. For a long time
we couldn't figure out if there was a |
scene of the type we're used to, with
a group of very close and connected
bands that are all helping each other
out.
Lynette: Yeah, it seemed quite
fragmented. In Halifax, it was all very
cohesive.
Carta: You can sort of jump right in and •
start playing. Here you have to go
through promoters and booking people.
So that was all new and challenged us
in new ways. But it's starting to come j
together for us now. 4
For more Information on Bontempi, you
can visit www.bontempl.ca. ZULU RECORDS
1972 WEST 4TH
604-738-3232
Mint Records Inc. PO Box 3613, Vancouver BC V6B 376 wwwjnintrecs.com by Kat Siddle-
PHOTO JIM COOK / Kl
I've seen Jorane play live just once, in New
Westminster in late 2002. Seated in the rapidly
dimming Massey Theatre, I wasn't sure what to
expect. I surveyed the audience and realized that I
was the youngest person in the crowd. It was me, sixty
middle-aged Francophones, and a smoke machine
set on "smog."
Three years ago, virtually no one in anglophone
Canada knew who Jorane was. Bom Joanne Peltier,
the young Quebecois musician was hardly the stuff
of frequent airplay. A longtime student of classical
guitar, she gave up the instrument at nineteen in
favour of the cello. Anxious to start writing her own
(non-classical) songs, she practiced for up to eight
hours a day, and recorded her first album only
two years later. Vent Fou, released in 1999, was an
unconventional affair of resonant cello and raw,
fierce vocals. The album was compared to early
Sinead O'Connor for its intensify, and to Tori Amos for
its'emotional scope, but didn't make a much of an
impression outside of Quebec.
Her second album, 2000's 16mm, defied these
previous comparisons. While Vent Fou was mostly
in French (two songs were written in English), on this
album Jorane sang in a made-up nonsense language.
Aiming for the kind of descriptive power found in
film, she explored pure sound with wordless vocals
as evocative as any lyrics. I6mm's asymmetrical
compositions used the rhythmic capabilities of the
cello, double-bass style, as well as the great, aching
chords that people more often associate with the
instrument. This album established Jorane a greater
fanbase in Europe and Quebec, but again, didn't
attract much attention in the rest of Canada. Which
is why I was possibly the only non-Francophone, and
the only person under forty, to catch Jorane's show
in New West that night.
I left that show that with the feeling that I knew
something no one else did, but I don't think I'm going
to feel that way much longer. With her new Engtish-
language album, and opening spot on Ontario
waifette Sarah Slean's cross-country tour, Jorane is in
a prime position to garner a little more recognition.
The You and the Now is more accessible and
introspective than 16mm or Vent Fou, though Jorane
continues to embrace her signature unfurlings of
sound that fade away as suddenly and beautifully
as they begin.
The album was conceived in a fury of creative
production. "When you're working in the studio,
it's like, the more you eat the more you're hungry,"
Jorane told me over the phone last summer. "Even
though I was working on a lot of songs in the studio,
often I'd get a new idea and say, stop, can you open
a new track for me? At the end of the project we
had way more ideas than we were supposed to work
on." Enough songs were recorded during the sessions
for the album that they were divided into a French-
language EP called Evapore that was released in
June and The You and the Now.
I asked Jorane why she chose to start singing
in English. A lot of it has to do with influence, she
explained. "Most of the music I listened to as a kid was
anglophone." Jorane also wanted to work with other
lyricists, most of whom wrote in English. "I have a lot of
friends who speak English, and friends who are good
writers in English and we wrote [songs] together. I had
a chance to share my stories with them."
Her most exciting collaborator was Lisa
Germano, maudlin violin player and writer of some of
the most depressing songs I've ever heard (and I am
a connoisseur of the downcast, let me tell you). She
wrote "Good Luck" with Jorane. Perhaps it's because
Jorane. has not worked with English lyrics since the
days of Vent Fou, but in this track the presence of
the other songwriter is palpable. The music is actually
credited to Jorane and Simon Wilcox, another
collaborator, but the vocal melody sounds distinctly
like Germano, with its low notes, narrow range, and
drawn-out, slightly muffled words.
I asked Jorane how she ended up choosing her
unusual musical path. "I learned the piano when I
was quite young," she told me, "and I didn't go too
far. It was just a way for me to express myself. It wasn't
really a technical thing. I cannot do everything
I want on the piano. After that came the guitar,
mostly classical guitar. I went to college for classical
music, and I had to pick another instrument. I always
dreamed of trying the cello, and when I did, it was a
revelation. It was much closer to me than the guitar
was. I think it was all the contrast...I had a lot more
chance to express myself with it. The fortissimo on
the cello is much louder than the fortissimo on the
classical guitar so it gave me more power in the
nuances. So I had more space, you know. If your
nuances are bigger you have more space to express
yourself in. And the texture, too, the sound of it. How
deep it can go, but also how it can be really light. It's
not always sad. People think that a cello is always
really sad. And if you use it in pizzicato it can be really
rhythmic. Whenever I touch the cello, it will inspire in
me a new melody, a new song. So it's my source, it's
my inspiration." I asked her if she ever listens to other
non-classical cellists. "I don't listen that much of cello
players. I like to listen to other instruments. It inspires
you with other ways to play yours."
So what does she listen to? On the day that I
called her, she'd been taking in a lot of folk music—
Jolie Holland, Ben Harper, and Gillian Welsh. Jorane
is a regular on the folk music circuit, and though I'd
never thought of her music as particularly folk. I told
her this. "If I start to sing with only voice and cello,
that can be really folk in a way," she says. "I was the
one who was bringing the guitar around the campfire
when I was in high school. I think that's really where
I come from in a way. Of course, I liked Led Zepplin.
I'm still a fan. But folk music really touched me. I can
really find myself in folk music. It's so simple and true
at the same time. And it's really touching."
When I tell her about being the only Anglophone
in New Westminster, she sighs. "It's hard. My music isn't
radio friendly—so far. I don't know about the new
album. I didn't do anything on purpose to get it on
the radio, but if it happens, I'll be happy...If singing in
English will help people hear my music, I'm happy."
A word pn the show...
After the release of Sarah Slean's Nightbugs in
2002,1 used to think to myself, if only Christine Fellows,
Jorane, and Sarah Slean would tour together. Well,
I'm getting two thirds of my wish on March 15, when
Jorane opens for Slean at Richards on Richards. (This
is more than I usually get, though Lady Sovereign,
M.I.A. and Bjork should happen any day, right?)
Jorane's booking agent couldn't have picked
a better gig to bring her new material to a receptive
audience. More accessible to singer-songwriter
fans than her previous work. The You and the Now
seems tailor-made for the Sarah Slean pixie league,
who've gotta fall for Jorane's gorgeous but startling
arrangements. Though they're appreciably different,
these two are complementary: like Jorane, Slean
likes to spike her songs with weird interludes, though
hers are more inclined to a staccato, cabaret feel
(contrast the choral parts in TYATK's "Stay" with
Slean's "When Another Midnight"). Both take their
music pretty seriously, but express a sense of humour
through backup vocals that mimic and mock the
lead vox (see "Mip Mo" from J6mm and Slean's
"Lucky Me"). Always-trustworthy internet rumours
indicate that the two may be writing a song to
perform together during this tour. Something tells me
it's going to be very pretty. J. T T f
ta
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VANCOUVER PLAYHOUSE THEATRE
APRIL 1-2, 2005 SHOWTIME 8 PM
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nckitet llcninaiter 604.280,3311  wmt.ficlBitmiiltr^*  Media Sweaters CSC Ttie*i»tea
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m rtt imi, y»# * mas* ind white phat* «mm m ft ds**tee«, ?h§ *N»tjr lady ftrttea'a tigM, fta*,
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SEALED WITH A KISS AND ZULU RECORDS PRESENT
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DiSCORDER - March 2005 Kid Rock:
SMOOSH!
by Chris-A-Riffic
PHOTO BY RYAN SCHUERLING
This was a long while ago, but does anybody remember
the band Old Skull? It was a ravenous punk-metal band
in the mid-80's comprised entirely of boys under the age
of twelve. A fine from one of their songs still rings true
today: "I HATE YOU RONALD REAGAN!" I loved that band,
and now I love Smoosh.
Smoosh are a Seattle twosome (and soon to
be threesome) of pre«teen sisters whose synth-ful pop
songs have earned them opening slots with Shoplifting,
Death Cab for Cutie and...OK, fine...Pearl Jam. Their first
full-length. She Like Electric, was released on Seattle's
Pattern 25 Records in late 2004. I chatted up 12-year
old songwriter, vocalist and keyboardist Asya on a drab
Saturday morning at her Seattle abode.
Discorder: I saw a photo of you and your sister, where
the both of you are jumping. Do you guys have a
trampoline?
Asya: Yeah we do.
Really! You're kidding) Is it one of the round ones, or is It
kind of rectangular?
It's a round one, and it's pretty big.
Can you double bounce your sister?
iiii&oo
That's fantastic! There's a lot that's been said about your
ksister's drum lessons. I believe Jason from Death Cab for.
Cutie is her drum teacher. I was wondering about you,
because I haven't heard much about piano lessons for
you. Have you ever taken piano lessons?
I've never taken piano lessons to learn piano....
Are you kidding!?!?
I play by ear. Sometimes I tried to read notes, but I quit
because I like to do it by myself better.
Fair enough. My Gosh! When did you start playing?
I've been playing since I was about one or two....
How can you remember playing the piano when you
were two?
My mom told me...
That's fantastic) Were there some songs you liked listening
to that you wanted to play on the keyboard?
Sometimes I liked playing Tori Amos songs	
When you were two?
No! Not when I was two.
Do you have any other piano influences? Do you like the
Vanessa Carlton's of the world?
I like Vanessa Carlton. I like a lot of indiefock and...
I noticed a bit of a hip hop Influence in some of your
songs.
A little bit. We did that when we were younger.
I see that you're opening for Mates of Slate. Have you
considered opening for Kanye West or something?
I don't know if he would want to play with us.
I'm sure he would. Your sister (Chloe) plays drums and
she's two years younger than you?
Yes.
My sister is two years younger than me. When I was
twelve, my sister and I hated each other. Absolute hate.
How does that work for you guys?
Sometimes we get into arguments, but mostly we work
it out.
You have played with crazy bands. Which band has given
you the best advice?
Probably Jason from Death Cab for Cutie. He's the one
we talk to a lot.
Are the two of you home schooled?
Last year we were, but now we go to regular school.
I had a bit of a conversation with your sister Maya. She was
alluding to the fact that she might be the new member of
Smoosh.
Yeah! I think she is.
That's great. Is she younger than you guys?
She's eight.
She's eight?! That's insane! Have there been any bands
that you've been freaked out by? I read that you played
with Shoplifting. They're pretty out there, aren't they?
Yeah, but they're pretty fun though. One time they gave
people tons of instruments and everyone in the crowd
was playing.
Did they give you something?
Yeah, I played bass guitar.
Which is your favorite instrument to play? Don't turn your
back on the keyboard!
Guitar is second best.
So keyboard is first in your heart forever?
Yeah. ^
How's it going?
It's going pretty good.
Which do you like better?
I don't know, because with home schooling, we get to do
whatever we want, but with regular school, we get to
hang with our friends.
The first song on your album, "Massive Cure," has the
greatest keyboard sound that I ever heard.
Oh, thanks.
You got a Roland? *&*
Yep.
You got no Moogs or Arps? You got your Roland and that's
good enoughTbr-yoirfO •
Yeah, because it has tons of sounds. It has any sound that
you want.
I had a bet going with my friend Parmida about the name
Smoosh. She said the name was actually a pet that you
guys had.
No. We used to like Smashmouth. Our name used to be
Smush, and everybody pronounced it as Smoosh.
That's a great story, but my friend Parmida owes me ten
dollars now. What was your first show?
At the I Spy, before it closed down. We paid for ourselves
to be in a Battle of the Bands.
How did you do?
We did okay. We were so nervous.
Did you win?
No. We didn't care. We just wanted to get started.
You can download "Massive Cure" at
www.pattern2S.com.
CAVE JUST NORTH C
Smoosh
She Like Electric
(Pattern 25)
This stuff is good—and I don't mean
"good for a twelve year old." I
mean "good for new weird band"
good. The sisters Smoosh yelp, shout,
rap, and sing their way through
their buoyant keyboardy pop like
the excited kids they are. Asya's
breathy vocals get a little repetitive
by the end of the album, but there's
a handful of standout tracks that
showcase her songwriting talents;
"About the Picture" and "It's Not Your
Day to Shine" have excellent hooks,
while the gleeful "Rad" actually
makes me want to play soccer (and I
loathe soccer). None of these top the
gloomish, mature "Make it Through,"
though. This song's enigmatic lyrics
remind us that the only people
who say that dhildhood is a simple
and untroubled time are adults.
Actually, my only major complaint
is that this album didn't come with
a lyric sheet... Asya's a bit hard to
understand, and I get the feeling
she's not singing about hopscotch or
bunny rabbits. Especially on "Pygmy
Motorcyle," where she chides, "Why
do you hide behind everyone's back,
I don't know why, you don't seem to
have any goals in your life."
All through the album you get the
sense that She Like Electric is music
made for the sheer fun of it. The last
track ends poignantly with Asya
repeating, "Now I'm here to stay..."
I'm not sure what she's talking about,
but if "here" is a place where Smoosh
can make music like this, I hope she ,
stays for a while too.
KafSiddte The Many Bedrooms of
Black Mountain
by Sasha Webb
So much has been written about
Vancouver's favourite artistic collective,
endearingly known as the Black Mountain Hi
Army, that I barely know where to begin. Let's
start simple: if you didn't already toiow, members
of Jerk with A Bomb, the Pink Mountaintops, Blood
Meridian, the Black Halos and Sinoia Caves, among
others, have convened for yet another delicious
project. This time we are treated to the psychedelic
rock and roll ensemble Black Mountain. Their self-
titled debut LP came out on January 18 on Scratch/
Jagjaguwar records and has leapt off the shelves
into the hearts and homes of old-school rockers and
art-loving hipsters alike. Local shows are packed. The
video for their first single "Druganaut," (broadcast
on CBC's www.zed.cbc.ca) has been watched
nearly 500 times. I was lucky enough to grab a few
minutes with three of the five—drummer Joshua
Wells, vocalist Amber Webber and guitarist/vocalist
Steve McBean—on a blustery February evening at
Pat's Pub.
Black Mountain's new album is a rock and roll
dreamscape: eight- swelling tracks in forty seven
minutes suffused with talent, depth, and dancability.
From start to finish, the record reeks of hard work and
solid production, but still maintains that signature
sense of Black Mountain whimsy. While each track is
ditjerent from the next, the record flows with exquisite
ease. Memorable tracks include "Modern Music,"
the clever pop-rock ballad that starts the album
off, the super-catchy "Druganaut," and the similarly
effervescent "No Hits." Amber Webber's inspired and
delicate vocals are put to intoxicating use in "Heart
of Snow," vacillating from vocal solo to hard rock
hymn.
Though clearly an artistic endeavour, lyrics
like "the war machine keeps on rolling/evil minds
and hearts of stone/have you done more/that you
can swallow?/lord, won't you set us free," and titles
like "Faulty Times" leave the listener in no doubt of
Black Mountain's political sensibility. Their stance isn't
precise, but is instead defined by how they live and
create. "[Politics] often enter the way we approach
music," says Joshua, "obviously, everyone has their
set of beliefs that they run into just by living." This is the
best kind of political music: not dogmatic or wh'iney,
just a set of beliefs that permeates in an unobtrusive
way and doesn't turn fhe music into a tirade.
Who is behind this work of wonders? You may
well be confused by the many bands and artistic
energies that have culminated in Black Mountain.
What's the difference between Jerk with a Bomb,
the Pink Mountaintops and Black Mountain? Though
each group sounds distinct, one facet remains
consistent; local legend Steve McBean is the creative
backbone of it all. And no, as I was duly corrected.
Black Mountain is not just another incarnation of
past projects, but a wholly separate creative entity.
While a "mountain" theme pervades the latest two
endeavours, Steve assured me of their separateness.
Though each band is related, the music expresses
different elements of this family's being and evolution:
"Some of the Black Mountain and the Pink stuff came
from roughly the same era. They didn't both exist at
the same time, but some of the Black Mountain stuff
was in its nascent stages while Pink Mountaintops had
already started. [The ideas] didn't have a home yet
then, but they came from the same home, but now
some have left home. There are kids that are creating
different stuff, but at least they have their own rooms,
as opposed to just a living room." Joshua felt those
kids are doing some distinct stuff on stage too. "There
SASHA WEBS IS A CHAMPIONSHIP BADMINTON  PLAYER,
are some of the same people, but they're doing
different things, playing different songs and with Pink
Mountain you sort of never really know exactly what
it's going to be like. It could just be Steve, or it could
be eight fools jumping around on stage."
So what kind of music is playing in the stereos
of said bedrooms? According to many reviews and
journalists. Black Mountain falls into the category
of "referential," meaning they consciously evoke
sounds of other bands or periods. I'm unsure if this
term is particularly apt; sure, while playing the album
at the UBC Food Co-op, I had two people assure
me it was a Black Sabbath cover band and another
declared that it must be Pink Floyd, but the album
has that unique Black Mountain Army feel that has
brought them such accolades. The band is unfazed
by the label. "People tend to always say Sabbath,
and I really can't see it. I mean it sounds more like
Sabbath than it sounds like Queen, which is good. I'd
want someone to smack us too if we started wearing
7" platforms or something like that. But I have nothing'
wrong with it. I like most of the bands that people
compare us too. I mean, most people like the Rolling
Stones. They're a fucking good band," says Steve.
Nor is there any hidden agenda in their use of familiar
styles. You're just supposed to enjoy the fluidity.
Jerk With a Bomb (JWAB), often seen as the
launch pad of the Black Mountain Army, has been
characterized as the closer cousin of Black Mountain,
in terms of style and content. Aurally, the difference
is clear. According to Steve, Black Mountain is "a
different space than Jerk With a Bomb so it's obvious
that people will react differently because it's a bit
more, I'd say it's slightly more extroverted, calls more
Son  participation  from  people rather
than slow brooding, to some degree less
is,   sad." Black Mountain has five members
in comparison to JWAB's three, more
flesh and blood on stage resulting in a fuller, perhaps
more uplifting tone.
Both bands share a common goal of music
and merry-making, and rely on friends for support
and creative momentum. How do they feel about
allegations that the Vancouver scene is harshed out?
Amber tentatively agreed, "I think it is hard. When I
first moved here I'd never seen anything like it. But
there are so many great people that hang out and
play music, that do so within the scene, and lOts.pM;
artists that are really amazing and friendly." Made
up of ex-bandmates, roommates and friends. Black
Mountain has obviously found equilibrium within a
scene that can be less than temperate. They have
found a perfect mix of personalities and talent, with
the explicit goal of having a good time.
With a five week North American tour on the
horizon and a potential European tour in the works,
the sun is smiling on Black Mountain. To close, I asked
if they had any final wishes for the band. Steve had
minimal but lofty goals "We're just starting really, this
. band is only a year old. I'd personally like to leave a
body of art that's listenable." Josh felt the same way,
just hoping for the "opportunity to do things differently
every time." Whatever good fortune befalls Black
Mountain is well deserved. I can only hope that more
bedroom doors open and close, and maybe some
new kids move in. J^
Check out their website at
www.thewaxmuseum.bc.ca/jwab
Next local gig: Monday March 14th w/ Oneida and
Kinski at the Red Room
I WOULD RECOMMEND.TO NORMAL
DiSCORDER - March 2005 P:ano
By Graeme Worthy
Art by Julian Gossen
See these drawings? They were done by
this eight year old kid that Nick Krgovich
knows. Nick called me and told me that
he had this wicked idea for the story art,
and I was so taken by his enthusiasm
that I had to agree. P:ano is mostly the
outcome of these flashes of brilliance and
serendipity. It's just that once Nick's got an
idea, he's got a way of making it happen.
This flightiness is part of what makes P:ano
what it is: a constantly shifting set of songs,
no two shows alike and a collection of
tunes so musically disparate, but still united
with their playful sound.
The grapevine delivered to me their
two upcoming albums, traded from hand
to hand and computer to computer
with warnings such as 'Now dont give
this to anyone! Promise?' Mine is a third
generation copy, each delivered with the
same warning.
The first of these, Brigadoon, is to
be released in April on Mint, the second.
Ghost Pirates Without Heads, in July or
August. The band is adamant that I not
confuse the two. Despite making their way
into my hands at the same time, these are
entirely different creations, each from a
different era.
When I meet with them, Nick is cold,
but refuses to wear the pink crocheted hat
that Julia Chirka, his cousin, tosses at him.
They're both a little uncomfortable about
being interviewed but they've got strong
opinions on certain points that make
them jump to attention and shake their
heads at my missaprehensions. There are
some things I'm not allowed to get wrong.
For example, Nick is unquestionably the
songwriter, and he is shocked that I would
assume he would allow anyone else to
share this role. But they all agree that it's
looser now, that they feel like more of a
band since Julia joined. Larissa Loyva has
been with the band since the beginning,
and Justin Keilam since he took photos for
the cover of When its Dark and its Summer.
The recording process used to feature a lot
of guests, now it has stabilized.
"We thought it would be awesome if
we could release two albums in one year,"
Nick explained. With this in mind, P:ano,
recorded Brigadoon last summer, paying
for it all themselves, and playing all the
instruments, something Nick says wasn't
true of the last two albums.
"We did [it] in a way that everything
was completely in our control, as four
people. There was no other- outside
influence in any way. We paid for
everything ourselves." When I raise an
eyebrow Julia offers a correction. Actually,
there are some handclaps by Black Rice,
who happened to be recording at the
same time; they giggle as they relate the
tale of how these 'dirty, punk-rock dudes'
whispered aside-to the recording engineer,
"They know how ironic this is, right?"
The album was finished in September,
but instead of last year being the year of
two albums, it's this year. P:ano is notorious
for not playing songs off their albums, at all.
A point which they are a little apologetic
about, but not completely. "We just feel
that once you do somthing, it dies." After
finishing the Den, the band had started
playing the much more lively, rockin'
cowbell songs that you wil! soon know as
Brigadoon, but at the time we just knew
them as 'the new P:ano songs,' a real
ubpeat set with plenty of drums and a loud
but petit bassist.
Their records end up reversing the
commercial recording dynamic. They're
archives rather than commodities. So
many bands tour "to promote their album"
1 it's a cliche, but here, it's just an indicator
of where the band has been, ground
covered, a map of conquered turf. "We're
searchers and discoverers...lt seems silly
to dwell. I'm a fan of trying to move on
to what feels relevant at any certain
moment, and not just rest on what you did
a year ago."
It was at the Railway, last September
when P:ano pulled a new trick on everyone,
including themselves. This time it was the
same. They had just finished recording
the songs they been playing all year, and
so, true to form, instead of playing songs
off the Den, or even what I had come to
know as their live show,-Nick wrote a whole
new set of songs, and everyone in the
band abandoned their instruments to try
something new.
"Knowing that in the past we stopped
playing things as soon as they were
recorded and done...l used Ghost Pirates
Without Heads as a distraction." It was
never intended to turn into an album, just
a break from the songs they'd recorded.
And from there it just grew because, well
it was fun.
He doesn't want you to think he's
cocky about it, but the truth is Nick is hugely
prolific, and the Ghost Pirates Without
Heads songs were mostly the product of
two days of writing. Tired of messing with
fickle equipment on the road, "I wanted a
set we could travel with... if we wanted we
could do the Gfiosf Pirates set right now,
without anything."
Nick is restless, rarely settling-on one
thing for any length of time. Talking about
the covers of the two albums, he throws
out a pi|e of ideas in just a few seconds,
tracking the path of his thoughts.
"I wanted albums that were
drastically different to look identical. I
also wanted it to look very shifty, crude, .
but not in a punk rock way, just with no
design going on whatsoever...Not boring,
just 'engaging with bad-looking.'" There's
something intentionally grotesqe about
P:ano. " I wanted it to be ugly," Nick says
of the cover of the new album. "I found
this pottery owl in one of my parents high
school yearbooks. It was so terrible." He
tried to convince the band to put it on
the cover, but this didn't work. Instead the
album art features a diorama by Ryan
Sluggett,-which does look a lot better. The
owl is now relegated to the back cover,
postage stamp sized. When I mention that
I have exactly that owl at my parent's
house, Julia and Larissa scold me, "Don't
tell him, we just got this one done."
Much like the title sequence of
Napoleon Dynamite—a series of comfort
foods, brightly coloured, against similarly
colourful carpets—it is an art to discover
those thing that make us yearn. The old
kind of gum wrapper, a cassette tape
of Michael Jackson songs, the smell of
bowling. When someone can deliver these
pointed moments of nostalgia, it's kind of
magic. g||
P:ano will be playing with Antony and the Jonsons @
the Red Room Sunday, and April 2nd @ The Western
Front.
Justin Kellam's other band Duplex will be releasing an
album to April. STNiKMITT
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Shaheedu^ttand Stereotypes
(Rykodfec)
Ahh, flashbacks—non-drug related I assure you! When listening to the
intro to this release I recalled watching such movies as Bladerunner
and The'Matrix. These two films and Ali She-heed's newish recording all
give me a fluorescent surreal sensation. (In the intro to Shaheedullah
and Stereotypes a slowed-down male voice cajoles you to "submit" to
"it" in a Morpheus-like tones). Anyway, my paraphrase of this album's
main message is "submit to what is true, only man has«a plan." Ahh!
i'm freakin' out already. Christian/religious echoes aside, the music
following the intro to this hip-hop album is some dope (aka good
or cool or awesome to you) stuff. The vocals are subdued and some
neato kitchen scissor sounds only add to the flavor of the beat. When
the rappers start, they mix seamlessly in to the overall flow of the song.
Ali Shaheed Muhamed has produced a whole lot of hip hop artists, the
most dear to this reviewer's heart being A Tribe Called Quest. This album
may appeal to fans (or former fans) of Wyclef Jean. The beats are a
similarly listenable blend. A group of vocalists put it down on what is
sort of a producer's album (Ali Shaheed behind the boards). Give the
disc a quick spin and if you like it you may also enjoy older albums by
Tribe, Mos Def, De La Soul, Bush Babees and Mike Ladd (the infesticons).
Stereotypes continues Muhammad's quality of "bringing it on" with hiphop beats that are fresh, tight, and innovative in subtle ways.
Arthur K
not a badM^fef^ack.fo-the familiar, the band introduces the newest of
ther typical sour#i^l|pbrt irregular "storytime session" at the beginning
li^pfifi.CD', leading into a similar-yet-wonderful-sounding album. If you
dislike the Bright Eyes that's come before, with the exception of Digital
Ash... I'm not gonoosSLyou may not be too thrilled with this one either.
That aside, the album departs from the sorrowful mood of Bright Eyes'
past and seems toJMSF«gn emotionally charged, but more outwardly
reflective mindset. Maybe Bright Eyes are maturing along with some of
ther fans?
Mairin
The Frames «^0O~"
Bum the Maps
(Anti-Record)
There's more to life'lSi U2. In the shadow of this "bigger than
:VJiN&3bt. other Irish bands are flying under the musical radar (excluding
Damien Rice and The Thrills). The Frames have been a household name
in Ireland for over 10 years but they've yet to make a mark over here.
Burn fhe Maps- may at least make a decent dent.
On first listen, this melancholy and pessimistic album doesn't
capture the band's charismatic presence like their live release Setlist
did. It sounds like someone did an assessment of their life and didn't
like the results. The Frames are flexing their musical muscles, delving into
Radiohead territory, and using more electronic sounds, drum beats and
samples, as well as eerie harmonies. Look no further than the opening
track, "Happy," as an example.
Despite the bleeps, there still remains the constant presence of the
fiddle (and additional strings) to keep The Frames' folk-like tendencies
in mind. The band hasn't abandoned their blend of sophisticated
lyrical rock either, showcasing some angry confessions in"Underglass"
and whispering thoughts in "Suffer in Silence". Other noteworthy tracks
include the radio-friendly "Fake" with lead singer Glen Hansard's bitter
ex-boyfriend persona saying, "You're telling me I should forget you."
Maps has a great album closer in "Locusts," a slow country-tinged
acoustic guitar number with stirring xylophone and string motifs woven in
for good measure. Hansard's delicate delivery of the chorus, "I'm moving
off, I'm packing up...I'm willing to be wrong" causes a gut reaction.
Of all the tracks on this record, this one is either the most hopeful or
hopeless. Listening to these songs is definitely a wake-up call. I'm hoping
the glass is half full.
Emily Khong
Bright Eyes
Digital Ash In a Digital Urn
I'm Wide Awake, It's Morning
(Saddle Creek)
Well, call me emo, but I love Digital Ash. Bright Eyes has come out with a
more "digitalized" version of their sound—and dare I say, a more happy
one? The band has taken their sound to a new level, incorporating
synthesized sounds and instruments to create something that, though
recognizably "Bright Eyes", is a much-needed change from what has
come to be seen as "old hat" In the world of emo-folk-indie-whatever
you kids are calling it these days. The album begins vocally bereft and
enigmatic, melancholy, yet "Time Code"-ed with beat and rhythm.
. The EP continues on to sunny-day music, upbeat, lyrics coupled with
driving beats layered over vibey melody," oozing liquid sunbeam through
oversized earphones. Bright Eyes has finpHy created music to make emo
kids skip. This CD isn't all fun and games, however. Their typically trite
timbre resurfaces, as we travel "Down the Rabbit Hole" with these rock
bottom "rockers". All in all,the CD is amazing. I couldn't have expected
anything more from something I loved, yet had become so very tired of
in subsequent weeks. All of you who haven't given Bright Eyes a chance,
or who have become tired of the incessant whining, give this one a
listen. IL j£ jw»
Now, that's not to say that I DON'T have a soft spot for the Bright
Eyes we all know and love. The second of two CDs released by this band
this month, I'm Wide Awake, It's Morning, definitely... put me to sleep. It's
Hem
Eveningland
(Waveland/Rounder)
There are many who believe that the rawer a band's sound is, the more
stripped-down it is, the better. That anything else is just sugar and syrup,
detracting from the "legitimacy" and "authenticity" of the music. Of
course, that's bullshit—a great many bands no doubt sound perfect
underproduced, but likewise, some warrant the extra production, which
can enhance the music. New York's Hem is such a group, and the
Eveningland, their latest offering 6f mostly country-tinged chamber pop,
fiontcdns some of the most affecting songs I've heard in the past year.
The record's first half starts us off nicely, with the pretty melody of
"Redwing", and the Daniel LanoU-style tribal country of "Hollow." The
second half is nearly flawless, thanks to songs such as the solemn, almost
prayer-like "Strays;" "Beautiful Sea," the shimmering centrepiece of
the. album, and an almost perfect bit of songwriting: the instrumental
title track almost veers into Disney territory, only to be saved in the end,
leading into "Pacific Street", a relatively sparse affair reminiscent of Joni
Mitchell.
There are three main parts that make the album work so welt: first is
the meticulously crafted songwriting of Dan Messe. This is what will bring me back for their next record, which I have no doubt
will be a step forward. Second is the production by
Messe and Gary Maurer, whose slightly echoey piano
sound and orchestral string swells strongly recalls '70s
era Randy Newman, but still sounds contemporary.
Then there is Sally Ellyson, with her absolutely stunning
voice. Both understated and commanding, she is as
good a vocalist as any currently out there.
I've mentioned some big names here as
reference points to their music. Make no mistake,
Hem have big ambitions, and Eveningland makes a
very good case for continuing to pursue them.
Robert Ferdman
maintains his tantalizing ability as a wordsmith, but
pushes upon us not only his socio-political outlook,
but his controversial religious outlook as well. Maybe
I'm just too easily offended, but announcing "God's
not a man, he's a bitch" certainly tests my patience
for outspoken anti-religion. Sage hails back to the
Personal Journal days on "Crumble", a track that,
if it ever climaxed, would probably be the standout
track on the album. "Lie Detector" is hands down
the best on the album and is what Sage should strive
for. Rather than babbling about the state-of-affairs,
he gives us a rest and lets his imagination guide us
through a sad tale of a man's melancholic aging.
Alas, we haverf't seen the crumbling of Sage Francis,
he's as sharp a mind as he's ever been, but he's
hung up on politics and it's dragging him down.
Tremendous potential shines through, but I think Bush
(and God) fucked this album up for us.
Michael Barrow    &m3iM
Keren Ann
Not Going Anywhere
(Blue Note)
Chanteuse is a label put on a many a female
singer hailing from France, telling tales of love and
heartache. Sure, Keren Ann is French, and sure, a
good deal of her songs deal with the affairs of the
heart, but the part-Russian-, part-Javanese-, part-
Israeli-, part-Dutch-, but-grew-up-in-France songstress
has a sound and style all her own. She writes, plays
various instruments, and produces on all the songs
in her first all-English album, Not Going Anywhere.
The record is pretty full of sweet melodies, with the
frequently  melancholy  arrangements  and  lyrical
content leaving the listener with a slightly sour taste
afterward. However, Keren Ann's voice, at once
delicate and seductive, is always front and centre, *
and very effective at making you feel that she
believes in what she sings. Standout songs include:
i    "Polly," where you can picture her singing next to a
!    window on a rainy day; "Road Bin," with its hand-
i    drum opening remeniscent of Harry Nilsson's playful
j    "Coconut," and the gentle verse-ending "doo doo -
j    doo's"; "Sailor & Widow", which starkly changes j
mood from the sad tale of a widow's lonely life to the
lightheaded chorus about her children playing, only
to find out that they are mere inventions of her mind; 1
and "Spanish Song Bird," a whimsical-sounding tune
contrasted by downhearted lyrics about lost love.
I    Even with all the bittersweet lyrics, however, the album
I    as a whole manages to be a warm and endearing
one. Chanteuse? Sure, I guess, but Keren Ann is quite
|    possibly on her way to becoming a cherished singer/
I    songwriter in her own right, convenient labels or not.
Robert Ferdman
Sage Francis
A Healthy Distrust
(Epitaph)
Sage Francis is everybody's favourite grown-up,
paternal rap figure. His much talked about deal
with Epitaph records certainly raised some eyebrows
and led some rap fans to look down their noses
upon an emcee.that, regardless of what you think
about him, continues to weave together impressive
rhymes. Sage's flirtations with the didactic have
bloomed into full blown intercourse, as the album's
name immediately connotes. Having grown weary
of the in-your-face politicizing of everything lately,
I assumed that Sage was going to cast aside his
nearly untouchable knack for word-play to shout his
socio-political views. I was only half-correct. Sage
Saint Busmffl's Choir
S/T
(Profane Existence)
"Saint Bushmill's Choir started in 1994 on a drunken
dare. Since then, the Choir has been responsible for
15 injuries." Thus is Saint Bushmill's Choir introduced
on their website. Injuries number 14 and 15 are
catalogued as a broken finger and a broken arm.
After hearing the band's latest and self-titled release,
nothing resonates more than the desire to somehow
make that list.
The Choir takes a musical nod from the Pogues
and adds Oi-influenced vocals in the vein of the
Dropkick Murphys. The album is mostly traditional
songs, but boasts two original tracks, "Goddamn
Shame" and "Miaeshaft". The end result is that breed
of Irish punk that makes you want to slam back a
Guinness and punch a skinhead. While many bands
that try and blend Oi and Irish folk end up sounding
kitsch and gimmicky, the Choir manage to pull it off.
Perhaps it's because of their connection with the early
'90s Seattle punk scene (the band is home to former
members of the Gits). And Jack Endino's production
can't hurt. All nit-picking aside, the album puts them
a step a head of more "Americanized" Irish punk
bands, like the Dropkick Murphys or the Mahones,
and places them among the ranks of Hogging Molly
and the Pogues. It makes you wish they played more
than tvvo or three shows a year. I, for one, can't wait
for the chance to be number 16.
Brie Aho
Pollination isan Opera
Pietro Sammarco
(Independent)
Pietro Sammarco is a musician/artist from Vancouver
who plays trombone in They Shoot Horses, Don't
They? He's also a graduate from Emily Carr, and
for a school project, he composed a short opera,
complete with libretto that doesn't make a whole hell
of a lotta sense to me. This album is seriously messed
up. If you are one of those twits that complain about
how samey today's music sounds, check this out.
This music makes me feel like ants are crawling all
over me. Pietrp's falsetto rockets up and down the
musical scale like a roller coaster. The Midi horns and
strings pop in and out at unpredictable times, buzzing
and droning in an unsettling manner. It's a wonderful
mess, absorbing and disturbing, and almost without
meter. The first time I heard this, it was right before
bedtime. I thought that it was an opera in the
classical sense and that it would ease me into
sleepiness. I lay awake until 6 in the morning, playing
it over and Over. It is a tough listen for some (most),
but Pollination is an Opera is a bold, creative musical
exploration that is quite inventive in its approach to
form and everything else.
fwww.geoc/f/es.com\piefrosammarcoJ jf,"C .Kf&&
Mairiiv M. Jordalters
/^mmSnmi-^<M>f^^:»'
The Seams
Castaway Motel
(Tractor Grease)
We were talking about cowboys the other night,
musing about how, with the collapse of small farms
and meat factories that resemble dude ranches
about as much as purple kool-aid tastes like real
grapes, cowboys haven't much to do other than
make music. Country-singers make better cowboys
anyway: their boots are shiny, their spurs aren't caked
with mud, and they sure smell better.
Add to this category The Seams. This 6-piece
from Sooke have recently released their debut
album, Castaway Motel, a pretty little piece of genre-
sprawling melodies about standard cowboy woes
like heartache and jailbreak. They're twangy and
bluesy with the pop-grdwl fake-cowpoke sincerity of
Luke Doucet, but they're folksy and jazzy as-well in-
the same manner as late-period Phish at times.
The District of Sooke's official website declares
that "Sooke's once resource dependent economy
has shifted focus to include many home-based
businesses, a commercial core, and a bustling
tourism sector which annually entertains thousands
of visitors from throughout the world." No doubt
that that entertainment often harkens back to the
resource-dependent days, and when the Seams sing
of putting on their "best blue pants" for a night out,
their cowboy posturing must be loved and adored.
However, on dn album that feels it necessary to
name a song "Slow Country Number," it becomes
clear that the Seams' ten-gallon hat are really just
part of the drag show.
There's something lacking about the posing
though; perhaps it's just not enough. The album is
sentimental and sweet, almost enough to feel like
the real thing, but it's not sad enough or surprising
enough to really stand out. If cowboys are really as
soft as the Seams make them seem, it's no wonder
that they couldn't keep the farm.      *
Dorique the Critique
Steve Vai
Real Illusions: Reflections
(Red Ink)
The latest offering from guitar wiz Steve Vai has
him exploring some familiar themes (searching,
relationships, spirituality) and doing the expected
guitar pyrotechnics, but in a new, twisted way.
Everything in this loosely twined narrative is related
somehow to family and viewed through a filter of
insanity (so it'll make good listening the next time
your crazy relatives come over). Lyrically, Vai explores
how a "truth-seeking madman" sees the world and
vice versa. Musically it's what you'd expect from Vai,
however, it's fresh and exciting, combining various
blues influences, metal shredding, and even the
strange, intense and seemingly insane (to Western
ears anyway) rhythms of Bulgarian wedding music
on "Freak Show Excess" (the title was taken from a
trashy review - sweet revenge). As one other reviewer
pointed out, only time will tell whether this disc is a
classic benchmark concept album or a self-indulgent
wank-fest, but I tend to lean towards the former.
It's reminiscent of some of the weirder things Vai
did under Frank Zappa's wing, while still holding the
same threads as his more recent works such as Fire
Garden. Weird, but wonderful—I can't stop listening
to this disc. I think I may need help, actually.
Drake
The Weekend
Beatbox My Heartbeat
(Teenage USA)
Polished and assured, Beatbox my Heartbeat
shows how far the Weekend have come since their
self-titled debut in 2000. They've intensified their pure,
girly pop assault by trimming away some of the fitfte
details that made the Teaser EP. The liberal garnishes
of synth are gone, as are former bassist Lorien Jone's
delicious back-up vocals (listen to Teaser's 'Perfect
World" and you'll know how backup vox can bring a
song from okay to pretty damn good). The results are
less interesting, but not bad either—Beatbox is radio-
friendly and well-produced. The lyrics aren't anything
special but Andrea Wasse knows her way around a
chorus. Check out "NYLA"—why this defiant ode to
California doesn't become the next "Complicated"
I'll never know. Still, there's always been something a
kittle more appealing about the Weekend that sets
them apart from the poprock crowd, and I'm pretty
sure I know what it is. There's a strange, famMfar-
sounding timbre to Wasse's voice, a sort of "everygirl"
element that I can't really explain. It's not the way
she sings, or the words, but the sound of her voice
itself: there's a yearning and vulnerability that doesn't
seem put on at all. It's a voice with less character
than, say, Chan Marshall or Donna C's but in good
way: it could be your best friend singing these songs
about love and confusion, or the girl making your
latte, or even you yourself
KatSiddle
page 21 REAif iLive action
Scissor Sisters at the Commodore
Photo by Kimberley Day
Scissor Sisters
Will Power
January 28
Commodore Ballroom
Isn't all glam a fusion of magnetic appeal,
flamboyancy, and a touch of the ridiculous? You
may dismiss the Scissor Sisters for their novelty, for .
their' cross-over mainstream success, or for their
Darkness-like magnitude of flashy showmdnship, but
once you see them live, you won't deny that they're
damn appealing. Particularly, their disco-feel seems
to offend the remnants of our punk sentiments, but
let it go. As Anna Matronic announced early in the
show in one of her characteristic fiery manifesto-like
speeches, the Scissor Sisters don't care who you are.
They are here to entertain. And that they do very,
very well.
I missed Will Power, the opening band, because
I missed my bus. From what I heard, it was one singer,
two dancers, and an iPod with the instrumentation.
I'll leave you to decide how you feel about that.
By the time I did wedge myself through the
multitudes of the sold-out show (impressive fact
considering that it's the third time they've been here
in six months), it was quite a bizarre scene indeed.
One of Ugg boots and mid-thirties Odyssey-goers.
Feed them beer, play some 2 Unlimited, and watch
them devolve into amusing Roxy dancing. Yes, the
kind of crowd that would make many a DiSCORDER
reader creep towards the door. Instead, I decided
to harness my nostalgia for the days of C&C Music
Factory, and I danced it up.
Eventually, the headliners entered the stage
one-by-one to the opening number "Laura,"
immaculately dressed and accessorized. The crowd
ate it up. They knew every word. They became a
heaving mass of bodies that reacted to every song
and every inciting scripted speech.
They played a solid hour and half of songs mostly
from their album, which is on its way to becoming
as huge in North America as it is in the UK. Personal
favourites of mine were the disco-esque cover of
DiSCORDER - March 2005
"Comfortably Numb" and the surprisingly political "Tits
on the Radio," a jab at former mayor Rudy Gulliani's
puritanical agenda for New York's downtown area.
The four-song encore was particularly entertaining,
with a "Scottish Folk Song" which was a piano-led
version of Franz Ferdinand's "Take me Out."
Though Luke Meat has announced that
watching them would be equivalent to getting his
"balls crushed in a vice," I must contradict him and
say that it was fun. "Way Cool," as he would say.
Parmida Zarinkamar
Tegan and Sara
Lindy
February 02
Commodore Ballroom
When Tegan and Sara played Vancouver at an
all-ages Mesa Luna show last fall, I left the concert
feeling a horrible combination of violation and shell
shock on account of the drunk underagers and the
incredibly hostile crowd. This time round, the concert
organizers get ten gold stars for choosing a venue
with both a good atmosphere, and the liquor license
to turn away hooligans.
Icelandic singer/songwriter Lindy kicked off
the show with songs from his fifth album, 2004' s
"Suspension of Disbelief." Drawing on folk and pop,
Lindy is definitely gifted technically as an acoustic
guitar player. His style is best described as gentle,
which, (pardon my superficiality), is incredibly
endearing considering his towering height. His songs
were about love: unrequieted, requieted, lost, found,
etc. etc.; sometimes painful but mostly sugary stuff,
that I regret to say got a little repetitive towards the
end of his set.
Onto the headliners! The sisters Quin delivered
a solid performance. Their strength these days lies
in their versatilftyr with 2004's So Jealous, they seem
to be building on 2003's If It Was You, staying on the
pop-rock course yet incorporating an impressively
diverse set of influences. It shows when they play live,
whether they're tackling the folksier older crowd-
pleasers such as "This is Everything" with a more
rock-focused edge, or delivering newer songs on
instruments previously absent from their performance
like the keyboard/synth.
Tegan and Sara in concert is less something to
dance to than something to experience. Live, they still
convey to me the kind of sincerity, emotional depth
and energy that drew meinto their music in the first
place. The audience responded well, too, the most
rousing responses by my gauge being songs from If
It Was You. such as "Living Room." Altogether, the
February 2nd Commodore show was a treat, Tegan
and Sara having proven themselves charismatic and
engaging performers once again. The duo is worth
catching live the next time they roll into Vancouver.
Alison Benjamin
Hidden Cameras
The Blow
February 03
Richards on Richards  *
Man! How did I ever pull this off? One of my favorite
bands of all time, and here I am, marching through the
crowd of a packed Richard's on Richards. I, Duncan
McHugh, for one wonderful moment of my life, am
an honorary member of the Hidden Cameras.
Wow, do I ever know a lot of people at this
show. Don't they wish they were me right now? I see
the jealously in their eyes, because they know where
I'm going. I'm going right to the top, right behind one
of Canada's great pop acts.
I got the lyrics down, and I've invented a whole
crapload of dance moves for this special night. I
think I'll do a little Mick Jagger shimmy during "Music
is my Boyfriend." Perhaps a dash of "hands up, baby,
hands up" in the middle of "Breathe On It." Who
knows? I think I'm a gonna play it by ear.
Man, the view is bloody amazing from up here.
All those little ants down in the nosebleed section look
like little ants. I'm going to remember this moment for
a long time. When I have boatlands of grandchildren,
I can see them all sitting cross-legged in front of me,
begging me to tell them the Hidden Cameras story
for the 70th time. But let's just live in the now. Oh, I
almost forgot my cue for "Ban Marriage." That was a
close one. Whew!
Chris-A-Riffic
Luna
Midnight Movies     * KW>
Richard's on Richards
February 12,2005
Opening for Luna was LA's Midnight Movies, whose
lead singer is also their drummer. It's not something
that gets pulled off very often, but this band did it well.
Gena Olivier has a unique voice and her drumming
style is strong and powerful, although a few mistakes
were audible as her concentration seemed to break
from time to time. Midnight Movies has a lot of talent,
but it is still raw, and this really showed through with
contrast to the vast experience of the headlining
band.
Let's start at the beginning, when we were little
and we watched cartoons on Saturday mornings.
Now some of us might be too young for this one—I'm
almost too young for it myself—but in the late '80s,
there was a cartoon show about a young woman
who fought for orphans by day and was the lead
singer of a successful rock group Jem & the Holograms
by night. The original Jem was on stage tonight in
the form of Britta Phillips, bass player for Luna. Sigh.
There is a distinct stylistic difference between Luna
and the, Holograms, though. There was no uplifting
'80s pop song about the power of friendship for me,
and the cherry pink bass that I thought Britta was
sporting turned out to be a trick of the light.
My initial disappointment was turned around,
due to Luna's technically flawless performance.
These people have been playing music for a long
time and on their final tour it really shows. They might
not have great stage presence, the band looked
pretty emotionless and bland the entire performance,
but if you just closed your eyes and listened, it was
beautiful.
Jordie Yow
Luna at Richard's on Richards
Photo by Kimberley Day March 14,
March 25.+ 24
ONEIDA
JOEL PLASKETT
Black Mountain
Peter Elkas
Wnski
Media Club
Richard's on Richards
378-GOGO • Rumbletone Radio A Go-Go • Alternating. Weds. 3pm - 5pm on GiTR A} IX TAPE |
Nick Krgovich made this cd for Ms cousin* s 23rd birthday.
He read the track list to DiSCORDER, and it made our heads spin.
Here it is. Now if you manage to find all these tracks, could you burn us one too.
Thanks.
o
"5
x
1
1*1       fi s 1 I
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ji§-J<
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SPM MUSIC AND MAGNETIZED PRODUCTIONS PRESI
WE HAVE SOME
QUESTIONS FOR YOU.
I Do you think we're a bunch of talentless hacks? Etitist snobs? Feces-flinging Bonobo monkeys?
If. you can do it better, email us. We need motivated illustrators, feature writers, reviewers,
photographers and designers.
Do you want to read back issues without getting your hands alt inky? Put down your gloves!
There's a better way!
Have we provoked your impotent rage or throbbing physical desire?
Write to airhead! Let us know what you think of us. Maybe we'll even print your letter.
discorder@club.ams.ubc.ca
http://discorder.citr.ca
DiSCORDER - March 2005 CHARTS
# Artist jfilsfe
01 BLACK MOUNTAIN
02 DESTROYER
03 ELEVATOR
04 YOU S**i$i&Y! WE SAY DIB s/t
05 V/A
06 PONY UPt
07 HEXSTATIC
08 DANDJ WIND
09 DSICO
^^^^SOSSlP/TRACY& THE PLASTICS
11 CANNED HAMM
'^j&BfflmGEMlE
13 STEREO TOTAL
UTHERAVONETTES
15 LCD!
16 BELL/
17THEC
IfLOW
19 BLOC PARTY
s/t
notorious IghijiMfc^].
august
Vancouver complication
Pony up!
Master View
Bait the Traps
You Fight Like a Girl
^SpBrV'
Erotic Thriller
Valenede
Do The Bambi
A Touch of Black
Secretly Canadian
15 LCD SOUNDSYSTEM
-    s/t
DFA
16 BELLA
Pretty Mess
Indie
17 THE CAPE MAY
Central City may Rise Again
Flemish Eye
The Great Destroyer
Tulips.
Sudden Death
Dim Mak
Ninja Tune
Bongo Beat
Spasticated
Dim Mak -
iu&Pop.
Kill Rock Stars
Columbia
DFA
ridie
Flemish Ey
SubPop
Dim Mak
20M83                         : '■';■■■'■"
Before fhe Dawn Heals Us
Mute
21 LOU BARLOW
Emoh
Merge
22 THE TOWER RECORDINGS
:«&* -
The Communion Labet
23 CONNECTICUT
Moss
Dehausset
24 VALUE VILLAGE PEOPLE
Blood Bath and Beyond
Worthy
25 DAMON AND NAOMI
The Earth is Blue
Sonic Unyon
26 THE CO^^^HIPS
Peanut Butter- and JeHy...
Narnack
27 LEMON JELLY
64-95
XL
28 FAT DAY
Unfi Unfl
Load
29 FINAL FANTASY Has a Good Home
Blocks
30 DIE MCNTiTOR 8ATSS
Girls of War
TroubJemar* LMmifed
31 LUNA
Rendezvous
JetSet
32 NEGATIVLAND
Helter Stupid {re-issue} Seetand
33 DOVES
Some Cities
Astralwerks
34 THE GO! TEAM
Thunder Lightning Strike
Memphis Industries
35 SAINT ETIENNE
Travel Edition
Sub Pop
# Artist
Title
Label
FliNDIiVG JOY
■P i rxa\ *g_j_py
ty> Lok-Z. RgflT\S-«?Lp   mjibjzmjz. PROGRAM GUIDE
For CiTR 101.9FM
LIST!
maawMBBK
PR
SUNDAY
ARE YOU SERIOUS? MUSIC
9:00AM-12:00PM
All of time is measured by rts art. This show presents the
most recent new music from around the world. Ears
open..
THE ROCKERS SHOW
12:00PM-3:00PM
Reggae inna all styles and fashion.
BLOOD ON THE SADDLE alt.
3:00PM-5:00PM
Real cowshitcaught-in-yer-boots country.
AFROBEAT
3:00PM-5:00PM
In two hours, I take the listener for a spin—musically—
around the world; my passion is African music and
- music from the Diaspora.
Afrobeat is where you can catch up on the latest in
the "World Music" scene and reminisce on the classic
collections. Don't miss it.
<uget_afrobeat@yahoo.com>
CHIPS WITH EVERYTHING alt.
5:00PM-6:00PM
British pop music from all decades.
SAINT TROPEZ alt.
5:O0PM-6:OOPM
International pop (Japanese, French, Swedish, British,
US, etc.), 60s soundtracks and lounge. Book your jet set
holiday now!
QUEER FM
6:OOPM-8:O0PM
. Dedicated to the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transsexual
communities of Vancouver. Lots of human interest
features, background on current issues, and great
music.       jJtoJv^
RHYTHMSINDIA
8:00PM-10:00PM
Rhythmslndia features a wide range of music from India,
including popular music from Indian movies from the
1930s to the present, classical music, semi-classical-
music such as Ghazals and Bhajans, and also Qawwalis,
pop, and regional language numbers.
TRANCENDANCE
10:00PM-12:00AM  '
Join us in practicing the ancient art of rising above
common thought and ideas as your host DJ Smiley
Mike lays down the latest trance cuts to propel us into
the domain of the mystic-al.
<trancendance@hotmail.com>
ELECTRONIC SPECTRUM
12:00AM-3:00AM
FILL-IN
3:00PM-6:00AM
MONDAY
FILL-IN
6:00AM- 8:00AM
BREAKFAST WITH THE BROWNS
8:00AM-11:00AM
Your favourite brown-sters, James and Peter, offer a
savoury blend of the familiar and exotic in a blend of
aural delights!
LIONS AND TIGERS AND BEARS...
11:00AM- 12:00PM
ALT. RADIO
12:00PM-1:00PM
Hosted by David B.
PARTS UNKNOWN
1:00PM-3:00PM
Underground pop for the minuses with the occasional
interview with your host, Chris.
SANDBOX THEATRE
3:00PM-4:00PM
A show of radio drama orchestrated and hosted by
UBC students,  featuring  independent, works from
local, national, and international theatre groups. We
DiSCORDER - March 2005
welcome your involvement.
<sandboxtheatre@hotmail.com>
ABSOLUTE BEGINNERS .
4:00PM-5:00PM
A chance for new CiTR DJs to flex their musical muscle.
Surprises galore.
THEFLIPSIDE
5:00PM-6:00PM
Join me - Dallas Brodie - for stimulating talk radio
about local, national and international issues.
SON OF NITE DREEMS alt.
6:00PM-7:30PM
SOLARIZATION alt.
6:00PM-6:30PM
MY ASS alt.
«:30PM-7:30PM
Phelps, Albini, 'n' me.
WIGFLUX RADIO
7:30PM-9:00PM
Listen to Selecta Krystabelle foryour reggae education.
THE JAZZ SHOW
9:O0PM-12:O0AM
Vancouver's longest running prime-time jazz program.
Hosted by the ever-suave, Gavin Walker. Features at
11:00, as listed
March 7: Now! is a socially significant album from master vibraphonist Bobby Hutcherson as it is a quintet recording with tenor saxophone giant Harold Land with
a difference: the quirttet is augmented by a choir of
female voices led by lead singer Gene McDaniels: it
works beautifully!
March 14: Tonight the Jazz Show commemorates the
60th anniversary of the death of one of the twentieth century's greatest musicians ... None other that
Charlie Parker. "Bird" actually died on March 12,1955
and we present the groundbreaking alto saxophonist
in two well-rounded quartet sessions with an all-star
rhythm section. "Rmeless sounds!
March 21: Tonight the Jazz Show commemorates the
60th anniversary of the death of one of the twentieth century's greatest musicians ... None other that
Charlie Parker. "Bird" actually died on March 12,1955
and we present the groundbreaking alto saxophonist
in two well-rounded quartet sessions with an all-star
rhythm section. Timeless sounds!
March 28: The Chicago Sound is a rare album by a
quintet of great players from the windy city. Bassist
Wilbur Ware is the leader and you'll also hear alto
saxophonist John Jenkins, drummer Wilbur Campbell
and two Jazz masters who are still with us... tenorist
Johnny Griffin and pianist Junior Mance. Windy city
jazz.
VENGEANCE IS MINE
12:O0AM-3:O0AM       fjfr*%Si?
All the best the world of punk rock has to offer, in the wee
hours of the morn. Hosted by Trevor.
FILL-IN
3:00AM - 6:30AM
TUESDAY
PACIFIC PICKIN'
6:30AM-8:00AM
Bluegrass, old-time music and its derivatives with Arthur
and "The Lovely Andrea" Berman.
HIGHBRED VOICES alt.
8:O0AM-9:3OAM
FILL-IN
8:O0AM-9:3OAM
THIRD TIME'S THE CHARM
9:30AM-11:30AM
Open your ears and prepare for a shock! A harmless
note may make" you a fanl Hearthe menacing scourge
that is Rock and Roll! Deadlier than the most dangerous
Criminall
<bominsixtyrine@hotmcii.com>
LIVE HERE, WORK EVERYWHERE, alt.
11:30AM- 12:00PM
CJLY - Kootenay Co-op Radio profiles 30 creative
enterprises   in   Nelson   with   markets   and   clients
worldwide.
MORNING AFTER SHOW alt.
11:30AM-12:30PM
REEL TO REAL alt.
12:30PM-1:00PM
Movie reviews and criticism.
ENGAGING THE WORD alt.
1:00PM-2:00PM
Canadian    authors,   fiction   writers   and    novellists
interviewed by James O'Hearn.
BEATUP RONIN
12:00PM-2:00PM
Where dead samurai can program music.
CIRCUIT TRACING
2:00PM-3:30PM
EN AVANT LA MUSIQUE alt.
3:30PM-4:30PM
«En Avant la musique!» se concentre sur le metissage
des genres musicaux au sein d'une francophonie
ouverte a tous les courants. This program focuses
on cross-cultural music and its influence on mostly
Francophone musicians.
TANSI KIYAW alt.
3:30PM-4:30PM
Tansi kiyaw? Is Michif-Cree (one of the Metis languages)
for "Hello, How are you?" and is a monthly Indigenous
music and spoken word show. Hosted b June Scudeler
(for those who know me from other shows-I'm Metis!),
the show will feature music and spoken word as well
as events and news from Indian country and special
guests. Contact me at jlscudel@ucalgary.ca with news,
even listings and ideas. Megwetch!
FILL-IN
4:30PM-5:00PM
WENER'S BARBEQUE
5:00PM-6:00PM
Join the sports dept. for their coverage of the T-Birds.
.FLEXYOURHEAD
6:00PM-8:00PM
Up the punx, down the emo! Keepin' it real since 1989,
yo. flexyourhead.vancouverhardcore.com
SALARIO MINIMO
8:00PM-10:00PM
THE LOVE DEN alt.
1O:O0PM-12:00AM
<loveden@hotmail.com>
ESCAPISM att.
10:00PM-12.00AM
es«cap»ism n: escape from the reality or routine of life by
absorbing the mind in entertainment or fantasy.
Host: DJ Satyricon.
<DJSatyricon@hotmail.com>
AURAL TENTACLES
12:O0AM-6:OOAM
It could be punk, ethno, global, trance, spoken word,
rock, the unusual and the weird, or it could be
something different. Hosted by DJ Pierre.
WEDNESDAY
FILL-IN
6:00AM- 7:00AM
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
7:00AM-9:00AM
CiTR NEWS AND ARTS
9:00AM-10:00AM
EXQUISITE CORPSE
10:00AM-11:30AM
Experimental, radio-art, sound collage, led recordings,
etc. Recommended for the insane.
ANOIZE
11:30AM-1:00PM
Luke Meat irritates and educates through musical
deconstruction. Recommended for the strong.
THE SHAKE ait.
1:00PM-2:00PM
FOR THE RECORD att.
1:00PM-2:00PM
DEMOCRACY NOW
2:00PM-3:00PM
Independent news hosted by award-winning journalists
Amy Goodman and Juan Gonzalez.
MOTORDADDY alt.
3:00PM-5:00PM
Cycle-riffle rawk and roll!
RUMBLETONE RADIO alt.
3:00PM-5:00PM
Primitive, fuzzed-out garage mayhem!
NECESSARY VOICES
5:O0PM-6:30PM
Socio-political, environmental activist news and spoken
word with some music, too. www.necessaryvoices.org
<necessaryvoices@teiws.net>
AND SOMETIMES WHY alt.
6:30PM-8:00PM
(First Wednesday of every month.)
BLUE MONDAY art.
6:30PM-8:00PM
Vancouver's only industrial-electronic-retro-goth
program. Music to schtomp to, hosted by Coreen.
FILL-IN
8:00PM-9:00PMalt
JUICEBOX
8:00PM-9:00PM alt.
Developing your relational and individual sexual health,
expressing diversity, celebrating queerness and encouraging pleasure at all stages. Sexuality educators
Julia and Alix wili quench your search for responsible,
progressive sexuality over your life span!
www.juiceboxradio.com
FOLK OASIS
9:00PM-11:00PM
Roots music for folkies and non-folkies... bluegrass, singer-
songwriters, worldbeat, alt country, and more. Not a
mirage! .     - v .  O
<folkoasis@canada.com>    "*<iw|§|
HANS KLOSS'MISERY HOUR      ^jsjl|
11:00PM-2:00AM
This is pretty much, the best thing on radio.
FIRST FLOOR SOUND SYSTEM
2:00AM-6:00AM
THURSDAY
FILL - IN
• 6:0OAM-8:O0AM
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
8:00AM-10:00AM
SWEET AND HOT
10:00AM-11:30AM
Sweet dance music and hot jazz from the 1920s 30s
and 40s.
FIRED UP
11:30AM-12:00PM
Ever told yourself "I can't even boil water, let alone
cook a chicken or stir-fry vegetables!" Let Chef Marat
show you the way to create easy meals prepared in
the comfort of your own kitchen/bechelor pad or
car. OK, maybe not the car. Wouldn't want to spill
anything on the upholstery.
UNPACK YOUR ADJECTIVES
12:00PM-1:00PM
WE ALL FALL DOWN
1:00PM-2:00PM    -
Punk rock, indie pop, and whatever else I "deem
worthy. Hosted by a closet nerd.
THE ONOMATOPOEIA SHOW
2:00PM-3:00PM
Comix comix comix. Oh yeah, and some music with
Robin.
RHYMES AND REASONS
3:00PM-5:00PM
DJ Knowone slaves over hot-multi-track to bring a
fresh continuous mix of fresh every week. Made
from scratch, samples and just a few drops of
fame. Our tables also have plethora of guest DJs,
performers, interviews, giveaways. Strong Bad and
the  occasional  public  service  announcements.
<eno_wonk@yahoo.ca>
LOCAL KIDS MAKE GOOD
5:00PM-6:00PM alt. CITR BROADCASTS AT 640 WATTS 24 HOURS A DAY. TUNE US IN AT 101.9FM, CA81E I01.9FM OR LISTEN TO US ONLINE AT WWW.CITR.CA-
Local Dave brings you local music of all sorts. The
program most likely to play your band!
PEDAL REVOLUTIONARY alt.
5:OOPM-6:0OPM folllMl
Viva la Velorution! DJ Helmet Hair and Chainbreaker
Jane  give  you   all  the   bike  news  and  views
You need and even cruise around while doing it!
www.bikesexual.org
NUTHOUSE RADIO THEATRE
6:00PM-7:30PM alt
Music inspired by Chocolate Thunder. Robert Robot
drops electro  past and  present,  hip hop and
intergalactic funkmanship. <rbotlove@yahoo.com>
NUTHOUSE RADIO THEATRE
6:00PM-7:30PM alt.
All-original Canadian radio drama and performance
art written and performed live-to-air by our very
own team of playwrights and voice-actors. We also
welcome you to get involved, whether you are a
professional or inexperienced...
ON AIR WITH GREASED HAIR
7:30PM-9:00PM
The best in roots, rock 'n' roll and rhythm and blues
from 1942-1962 with your snappily-attired host, Gary
Olsen.
<ripitup55@telus.net>
LIVE FROM THUNDERBIRD RADIO HELL
9:00PM-11:00PM
Live From Thunderbird Radio Hell showcases local talent... LIVE! Honestly, don't even ask about the technical side of this. This month will probably be the best
month ever.
WORLD HEAT
11:00PM- 1:00AM
An old punk rock heart considers the oneness of all
things and presents music of worlds near and far.
Your host, the great Daryl-ani, seeks reassurance via
<worldheat@hotmail.com>.
LAUGH TRACKS
1:00AM-2:00AM
BEATS FROM THE BASEMENT
2:0OAM-6:0OAM
FRIDAY
FILL-IN
6:00AM- 7:00AM
PLEASE ROCK THE DOOR
7:00AM- 8:00AM
CAUGHT IN THE RED
8:00AM-10:00AM
TrawSng the trash heap of over 50 years' worth of real
rock 'n' roll debris.
SKA-rS SCENE-IK DRIVE!
10:00AM-12:00PM
Email requests to: <djska_t@hotmail.com>
THESE ARE THE BREAKS
12:00PM-2:00PM    .
Top notch crate digger DJ Avi Shack mixes the.
underground hip hop, old school classics and
original breaks.
RADIO ZERO
2:00PM-3:30PM
NARDWUAR THE HUMAN SERVIETTE PRESENTS...
3:30PM-5:OOPM
CITR NEWS, SPORTS AND ARTS
5:O0PM-6:0OPM
A  volunteer-produced,   student   and   community
newscast featuring news, sports and arts. Reports by
people like you. "Become the Media."
THE NORTHERN WISH
6:00PM-7:30PM
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
7:30PM-?:OOPM
David "Love" Jones brings you the best new and old
jazz, soul, Latin, samba, bossa and African music
from around the world..
www.africanrhythmsradio.com
HOMEBASS
9:00PM- 12:00AM
Hosted by DJ Noah: techno but also some trance,
acid, tribal, etc. Guest DJs, interviews", retrospectives,
giveaways, and more.
I UKE THE SCRIBBLES art.
12:OOAM-2:0OAM
THE ANTIDOTE alt.
12:OOAM-2:0OAM
THE VAMPIRE'S BALL
2:OOAM-6:0OAM
Dark, sinister music to soothe and/or move the
Dragon's soul. Hosted by Drake.
<thevampiresball@yahoo.ca>
SATURDAY
FILL-IN
6:00AM-8:00PM
THE SATURDAY EDGE
8:00AM-12:00PM
Studio guests, new releases, British comedy sketches,
folk music calendar and ticket giveaways.
8AM-9AM: African/World roots. 9AM-12PM: Celtic
music and performances.
GENERATION ANNIHILATION
12:00PM- 1:00PM
A fine mix of streetpunk and old school hardcore
backed by band interviews, guest speakers, and
social commentary, www.sfreetpunkradio.com
<crashnburnradio@yahoo.ca>
POWERCHORD
1:00PM-3:00PM
Vancouver's only true metal show; local demo tapes,
imports,  and  other rarities.  Gerald   Rattlehead,
Dwain, and Metal Ron do the damage.
CODE BLUE
3:00PM-5:00PM
From backwoods delta low-down slide to urban harp
honks, blues, and blues roots with your hosts Jim,
Andy and Paul.
THE LEO RAMIREZ SHOW
5:00PM-6:00PM
The best mix of music, news, sports and commentary
from  around  the  local  and  international  Latin
I   American communities.
BATTLE ZONE
6:00PM-7:00PM
Each show will make you feel as though you're
listening in on conversations between political
insiders. As well, this guest and caller-driven programs
its guest from opposite ends of the corridor of public
argument against one another in ho-holds barred
debate that takes you behind today's headlines.
SHADOW JUGGLERS
7:00PM-9:00PM
An exciting chow of Drum n' Bass with Dj's MP & Bias
on the ones and twos, plus gusts. Listen for givawas
everyweek. Keep feelin da beatz.
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
9:00PM-1 1:00PM
PLUTONIAN NIGHTS
11:00PM-1:00AM
Cutting-edge, progressive organ music with resident
Haitchc and various guest performers/DJs. Bye-bye
civilisation, keep smiling blue, where's me bloody
anesthetic then? http://plutonia.org
EARWAX
1:00AM-4:30AM
"noiz terror mindfuck hardcore like punk/beatz drop
dem headz rock inna junglist mashup/distort da
source full force with needlz on wax/my chaos runs
rampant when I free da jazz..." Out.
REGGAE LINKUP
4:30AM-9:OOAM
Hardcore dancehall reggae. Hosted by Sister B.
7
8
9
10
11
12-
WB
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12-
1
2
3
4
5
6
SUNiDAY
MONDAY
TUESiDAY       WEDNESDAY      THURSiDAY
FRIDAY
SATURiDAY
REGGAE LINKUP
(RG)
ARE YOU SERIOUS?
MUSIC (EC)
ROCKERS
SHOW(RG)
BLOOD
ON THE
SADDLE (RT)
cups with
EflfflHH6(P0)
AFROBEAT
(WO).
QUEER FM
(TK)
RHYTHMSINDIA
(WO)
TRANCENDANCE
(DC)
ELECTRONIC
SPECTRUM
FILL-IN
BREAKFAST WITH
THE BROWNS
(EC)
UONS AND TIGERS AND BEARS
ALT. RADIO (PO)
PARTS
UNKNOWN (PO)
SANDBOX THEATRE (TK)
ABSOLUTE BEGINNERS (EC)
THEFUPStDEpK)
WIGFLUX RADIO (RG)
THE JAZZ
SHOW
(JZ)
VENGEANCE
IS MINE!
(PU)
FILL-IN
PACIFIC PICKIN'
(RT)
HIGHBRED        FILL -1
VOICES (WO)
THIRD TIMES
THE CHARM (RR]
BEATUP
RONIN
(EC)
CIRCUIT TRACING
(DC/EC)
FILL-IN
WENER'S BBQ (SP)
FLEX YOUR
HEAD(HC)
SALARIO MINIMO
(WO)
THE LOVE
DEN
(EC)
ESCAPISM
(K)
AURAL
TENTACLES
(EC)
FILL-IN
SUBURBAN JUNGLE
(EC)
CITR NEWS* ARTS (TK)
EXQUISITE CORPSE (EX)
ANOIZE (NO)
FOR THE RECORD
TO
DEMOCRACY NOW (TK)
RUMBLETONE
RADIO
OK)
MOTORDADDY
(RR)
NECESSARY VOICES (TK)
AND SOMETIMES
WHY (PO/EC)
BLUE MONDAY
(a)
JUICEBOX (TK)
FOLK OASIS (RT)
HANS KLOSS'
MISERY HOUR
(HK)
FIRST FLOOR
SOUNDSYSTEM
(EC)
END OF THE WORLD NEWS
(EC)
SWEET'N'HOT (EC)
UNPACK YOUR ADJECTIVES (PO/EC)
WE ALL FALL DOWN (EC)
THE ONOMATOPOEIA SHOW (IX)
RHYMES &
REASONS (HH)
PLANET LOVETRON
m
ON AIR WITH
GREASED HAIR (RR)
LIVE FROM...
THUNDERBIRD HELL (LM)
WORLD HEAT
(WO)
LAUGH TRACKS (TK)
BEATS FROM THE BASEMENT
FILL-IN
PLEASE ROCK THE DOOR (EC)
CAUGHT IN
THE RED (RR)
SKAT'S
SCENIC DRIVE (SK)
THESE ARE THE
BREAKS (HH)
RADIO ZERO (EC)
NARDWUAR
PRESENTS (NW)
CiTR NEWS AND ARTS (TK)
THE NORTHERN WISH
(EC)
AFRICAN RHYTHMS
(WO)      [•
HOMEBASS
-    (M)
ILIKETHE
SCRIBBLES (EC)
THE ANTIDOTE
m
THE VAMPIRE'S^
BALL (GI/MT)
FILL-IN
THE
SATURDAY
EDGE(RT)
GENERATION ANNIHILATION (PU)
POWERCHORD
(MT)
CODE BLUE
(RT)
LEO RAMIREZ SHOW (WO)
BATTLE ZONE (TK)
SHADOW JUGGLERS
(DC)
SYNAPTIC SANDWICH
(DC/TX)    .
PLUTONIAN
NIGHTS (DC)
EARWAX
(HH/DC)
REGGAE LINKUP (RG)
DOdance/electronic • EOeclectic • EX=experimental • FR=French language * GI=goth/industrial • HC=hardcore • HH=hiphop • HK=Hans Kloss • JZ=jazz
LMHive music • LOIounge • MT=metal • NOnoise • NW-Nardwuar • PO-pop • PU-punk • RG=reggae • RR-rock • RT=roots • SK=ska • SP-sports • TK-talk • WO-world
cVm
7
8
9
10
11
12™
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12-
1
2
3
4
5
6 SAIV1 PREKOP
■flW^Yowte*
Pressor COAP
^^ftnsistently goofft^iir^pkB
jpfwell-known to Zuto ^BRm.. |
jjor his work in Shrimp Bo^we*%
J Sea and Cake and his 19S0 se¥» "^
titled solo album, which rpcefved plenty of jMay.ni tfwf^fito,
even making it into some top picksi lists for that year ftfe?
-*e^Mfcpime since Ihis great debut and Who's Yom New
Professor ts an overdue but welcome return Prekop is^ -
gr^forrh,'but this is expected. No matter which prdfjsiJt he's
54rirT$rtg, he has an appealing breeziness, freerv mixing<seft «,
rootsy blues with dexterous jazzy pop. As with hispaintings,;
and photography, Prekop has always been concerned primarily with atmosphere. This recording continues this aesifietic,^
often eschewing clear-cut sono ste^rWfof^ftaoaBtelP
shapes that drift in and out of fcfcus Yet, backed by a'lf ace
band of celebrity pla.eis and a top production team Prekop
doesnat just dtTftjjelJr with the feather, Instead throwing a
little sand into tfie-air for g#pkWfiiir New Professor pro-
vides fes^^sj^^^^^^"1 %?____[
CD18.S8    LP 14.98 AVABABLfMARCHB"
IVWGWA1
Government
Commissions CD
Some have argued that Scotland's
Mogwai are a band truly and only
to behold live, that the record|r|flg» j
simile is no substitute for thereat
thing. A different opinion suggests that.the opposite^true,   *
that Mogwai need the time and space of the sj|^IP^^
realize their atmospheric rjynamicvtocap^^lorUhei^^fe.
ties. The latter view argues thatMogwa|^ deiiberateness and|:;,'*
subtleties might go unnoticed^p live sMB, which can be I I
messy and unpredictable, wifEa recordirtfegrants the opportunity for repeated, hermeneBjjil listeningj«iis new collect. :-
tion confounds both attitudes by presenting acareef-spannfhg •- j
collection of live recordings donrf^^BBC, mel^pr^fci *
Peei (RIP). Government Commissipi finds Mogwaf Areat J
and consistently muscular form, is&g waves of fat fl(K||||
squall amid slow burning structure^pjaracteristicai^^s
Government Commissions is a dem«ta#on op jfiW^^s "-
of tension and release and tension anrf^i^^^^yon and
release, which has always marked Mogwaremusic. A fine use
f taxpayers' money!
1.98
KiSOUNDSYSTqra
F^||generations young peofjfeliavejbiced because
Im need release. Be it trjjbe rripboJJEhris
. JP^Wtey, James Brown, Gang of Four, flerrick May's
Iwirert Techno, British House, or mofff recently Andre
*JBoO, the dance floor has always served as a public
t$fif» for the expression and alleviation of the social
'Sii^olitical tensions inherent ft, modern living. Today
flftjeitofas of Brooklyn, Manhattan and even
Vancouver, the youth are enthusiastically gathering to...
listen and move to the sounds of DFA"Re^onte^MHes
Murphy, a.k.a$$CD Soundsystem. Consistently filling
tiie floor, Murphy's eclectic and punchy deftgtjs^ |j
mandatory listening, the current edge of tlie, perpetual
cultural revohfkfji On the surface it collects tfie-ener-
' gy created by great artists such as Prince, Bfi» Eno,
Gee,, Sang of Four, P.I.L., Michael Jackson Ihe '""
ifiBi Soicide, New Order, The Jam Blondie, The
Velvets and of ct^MM^Penk. but'in tjs,syflihesis
it offers the BO^Kf^^^ftuch mjjra—the latest
thing in expressive de^^^naBonf Jl
2CD22.»ri
DEAD
WAWJWX
HPearttefQK
Oi^tr^prAatador
Seas#tlipit being
the stunnjng Shivering King
■usic of Maya Arahjtagasam, a twewty-seven-^ar-oW
LJ-ankan Tamil wko fjpved to England when she . wa£fiMj
and np/ performs under tjfe name M.I.A., has beeniBaJ»tup
If JlF^^1^ sirf^i°3 witn the sinnles |4^B
Sunshowet*." Af# nov^ttaaffy, lljyprfirst proper fultHAn^W
^n^B^^SMr^ar's rnf^fe co^RtratiorNvith Diplo titled^
^^^A^terorism *oTl^tt^^»8lu^e in North    J
Ame|HS^|ing most of her shatfrfeats on the Roland M§as|
rB^^ew^x and then adding to those demos with the|e|& fe
of various orglucers.JU.A.'s strengths are her knack tonsil!
inffftatoMNSjfi|^Bt^|tecks to play off her original vocal *"
style and%e^|JiMhp|B|fcpes political, lyrics. "From
J*qaqo to Coiih^qupa^t sforeotyr^mything yol" M.I.A.
■Jbte^nsgh bomtSlj^^r^l^nBhawoi's   'Blaze to
rtrtlftg^-alang-alang* "*
CDi|riS8   muaiuKBm^^
SAlEPfflSlS IM EFFECT UNTO. MARCH31,2003
me
find tnerHpei cloaked still in the eer<e bog of-':
Sabbath akttieyaaring grey of itawkwWi. Dense
sounds in exfcsffl&woods with gujpSawn like
swords held high^ JfWribute not iff bjlSe. There
^seems to be more aodrttfW^^lfet for this type
yf stoner-fr'iendly headlS*|<j^^ir as I'm con-
Ip-ned it's welcome respite. Feathers is the best pos-
Nble antidote to coffee-tabie rock and pleasant shop-
^rA^pgak, and the perfect soundtrack to being high
^^p^te^^pMotheting to take it anymore.
MONADE
A Few Steps
More CD
Stereolab co-founder
Laetitia Sadier returns
with a sophomore release
under the Monade (Mo-
■Jfaftd) moniker. With Stereolab freed from the
^bureaucratic tentacles of their former major label,
Laetftja has had f|§re private time on her hands'to
^N^ref%cinefliatic glories that graced her big- A
^y^^ftlli^a^dfeupohonieandi^ Pure.   .
^^exfellB^ifiwWi^ejj.showsonAFew
?^#sMore,wfftt^i^^»^^^^^|fo/
breezy iounge-prog exploratioj^irHi^riSirt melodic
tesi/umentaf interplay For example, as;its tjtle sug-
• psts, "Wash aad Obbsb," the opemrtg fra^k, grace^
fully lwlp-0»iitt^goftight bass and beats, awash
with shimmering tdl^^jiush hajtriAss. Add
Laetitia s angelic chil^^ vocBJ^ypjw mixture
and A Few Steps More%&me^^W delightful
release, app^^the curious.
CD 1|Mer^^fa|ftEMAIIGH8"
I
HELLOJUPREME AUTOMATIC DIRT
zulu news
Paperwork by Lee Hutzulak
HHlil,SUPl®r1EAIJT0MATICDWr
White Space Ghosts and Deadly Ink Blots
March 2005 Zulu Gallery
THIEVERY
CORPORATION
The Cosmic Game
Music cap cpnfotind;the
mind, overload ttje sensj
andor^y'anrJespbodyfftne -,
aarf Space In very pecdhar'WaVs Aware of this pliabiMy,
Eighteenth Street t^unge legends'Eric ffitforranriBob
Garza, a.k.a. Thievery Corporation have always^feaffiff*^
records to "trip out" wtfii. The Cosmic Game is Hilton and
Garza's mosl surreally expansive and r-ntically regarded
work so far. Pushing further into deep dub and eastern
ragas, their sonic production presents an extremely inviting
and wide vista, featuring subiimj arriSigemeete full o'fCattn
accents, bass heavy atrnospherics and^seosjtai'grg&ves
Ado fellow heady guest vocalists mciudinfl thp Framing
Lips' Kevin Coyne ami ffie ever-cool David Byrne, and you
have one far o^^fp^^^^aW^fc^^l^^^®
CD 16.98   7j||||
MWARD
Traii^oi'iptoo
Imagine a dinner party where
the likes of Jim Jame|L^|r^
MoinrnJaBlltl, Jenny Lewis
(fWaJStey), and Howe Gelb    . x
{Gieet Garni) show up. Their host, the highly tateAted,and
^gi%jjurfy^tred s wr"^9*w*ter.M w4 serves jr.-.
-Sumptuous Tuscan meal smartly accompanied by ast&tey
"of ml freasuraTcollectten of 78 rpm recordings of jffipPTj
gone old time soulful crooners. Afterwards, the flrGj§jkLp# '•
J^^yo the music parlour and bangs out some enchanted
^^^pgs that flirt with breezy Dylan-esque pop, skeletal
Amet^n Appalachian folk and of course jv&g&£iUM&9
Jcounby blues Sound good? It sure does This is the ncf>-
-^^^ttMnr^raMs latest dartng..egfMl>W)illtetl -?v,
| Radio; offers. Recorded m 8w BWwrt Johoaon tradttion, this
albumis raoltawtorie resonates with-a refined cool air fM"'
C016.98 wujsm
LACONNER
IWiABITANTS
ZUBOHA
Vanaiuvers t^zz circles
are not round, nor  .
oval'. rn'tarjlTthe new-arcs
our focal ™fe^ra^& ;
players txace seem to
change constantly as they
,*«flefe4h8^»HC«Tap in $
search of-paths cooven; ■„
* iional play^do notreao-
. ily recognce,T|3tts.'' *.«"
' demarcating their travel
the first three recordings ,'
for Jesse Zubot's Ate£§
Audio imprint si(^^^r
way forward SmartJcttSc-
-Sit¥j expert playing anrj .t
dedication majtes for    *
exptoratory, challenging f
andexcttingm^ic. Congratulations.
CD 18.fl»   ^
CROOKED
Dignity and
Shame CD
«
Eric B«il|jifwas last seej
sta^^ihisj^M|
d^|^'Clubj|t^M|tf
' extrerne^ribjjp^f of traderr^i^pR^jags soloIfRs-
tail bearded figure curled uptipjhtty ma ball received a
^berol^^^oi^^^TO^Wtes^rNrftrmW
passersby setif^world seemed alien, and somewhat sad.
-How could thesejustle and bustle people relate to a wily
songwriter, who ot) tlie#oadJtemQing his freshly crafted
songs before an eager audiefe^irvas not offered a floor to
i^afch" on^lpdeed, the Dig^ar%ie had partook in a few
l^^^^m^^^m rieedjng to sleep It off, decided
!#^(^(|&Jp>?8^^Sfcp*£-Bte inspiration guiding his
weff womjtf^|i«s|eJJt§ love, troubles, and unex-,,,
pected W^Sl^^^^telo the magnifioej|jl!#^
Dignity end Stante and yi^^^pstajt^ii^TOje^^g^
Bachmi»|rto your heart a|{^ttefKtefoftt||h||, -.
tunes iBst what your broiSl beartect m ierfms.
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DiSCORDER - March 2005

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